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Sample records for intestinal peptide receptor

  1. THE EXPRESSION OF RECEPTORS FOR VASOACTIVE INTESTINAL PEPTIDE AND SECRETIN IN COLON NEOPLASMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the expression of the receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and secretin in colon cancer. Methods: This study visualized and characterized the receptors for VIP and secretin in the sequence of human tumor-free colon, adenoma, carcinoma, liver metastasis using storage phosphor autoradiography. Results: Receptors for VIP and secretin were demonstrated in tumor-free colon and colon tumors. A decrease in affinity of VIP receptors was shown in the colonic liver metastasis (Kd = 3.30 nmol) when compared with tumor-free colon (Kd = 0.82 nmol). An up-regulation of receptors for secretin was found in colonic liver metastases. Conclusions: VIP and secretin were both expressed on normal colon tissues. Binding of VIP decreased while secretin increased in colonic liver metastasis. A down-regulation of receptors for VIP in colonic liver metastases may helpful to understand the migration of colon cancer.

  2. Autoradiographic visualization of CNS receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide

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    Shaffer, M.M.; Moody, T.W.

    1986-03-01

    Receptors for VIP were characterized in the rat CNS. /sup 125/I-VIP bound with high affinity to rat brain slices. Binding was time dependent and specific. Pharmacology studies indicated that specific /sup 125/I-VIP binding was inhibited with high affinity by VIP and low affinity by secretin and PHI. Using in vitro autoradiographic techniques high grain densities were present in the dentate gyrus, pineal gland, supraoptic and suprachiasmatic nuclei, superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus and the area postrema. Moderate grain densities were present in the olfactory bulb and tubercle, cerebral cortex, nucleus accumbens, caudate putamen, interstitial nucleus of the stria terminalis, paraventricular thalamic nucleus, medial amygdaloid nucleus, subiculum and the medial geniculate nucleus. Grains were absent in the corpus callosum and controls treated with 1 microM unlabeled VIP. The discrete regional distribution of VIP receptors suggest that it may function as an important modulator of neural activity in the CNS.

  3. [Role of antimicrobial peptides (AMP) and pattern recognition receptors (PRR) in the intestinal mucosa homeostasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapis, Károly

    2009-11-22

    Homeostasis and integrity of bowel mucosa is assured by well controlled mechanical, biochemical and immunological mechanisms. First line of defense is presented by the antimicrobial peptides (AMP), which form a continuous layer on the bowel surface, produced by intestinal specific (Paneth) and non-specific epithelial cells. AMPs have a significant antimicrobial, antifungal and antiviral, as well as immunomodulatory effects. Next line of defense is the pattern recognition receptors (PRR), which allows identifying conservative molecular patterns of different pathogens, and starts antimicrobial and inflammatory mechanisms through gene-expression induction. We review the most recent knowledge and studies concerning these mechanisms.

  4. Exenatide, a Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist, Acutely Inhibits Intestinal Lipoprotein Production in Healthy Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, Changting; Bandsma, Robert H. J.; Dash, Satya; Szeto, Linda; Lewis, Gary F.

    Objective-Incretin-based therapies for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus improve plasma lipid profiles and postprandial lipemia, but their exact mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we examined the acute effect of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, exenatide, on intestinal

  5. The glucagon-like peptide 2 receptor is expressed in enteric neurons and not in the epithelium of the intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens; B. Pedersen, Nis; Brix, Sophie W.

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) is a potent intestinotrophic growth factor with therapeutic potential in the treatment of intestinal deficiencies. It has recently been approved for the treatment of short bowel syndrome. The effects of GLP-2 are mediated by specific binding of the hormone to the GLP......-2 receptor (GLP-2R) which was cloned in 1999. However, consensus about the exact receptor localization in the intestine has never been established. By physical, chemical and enzymatic tissue fragmentation, we were able to divide rat jejunum into different compartments consisting of: (1) epithelium...... compartments rich in enteric neurons and, importantly they exclude significant expression in the epithelium of rat jejunal mucosa....

  6. Neuropeptide S receptor 1 expression in the intestine and skin--putative role in peptide hormone secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundman, L; Saarialho-Kere, U; Vendelin, J; Lindfors, K; Assadi, G; Kaukinen, K; Westerholm-Ormio, M; Savilahti, E; Mäki, M; Alenius, H; D'Amato, M; Pulkkinen, V; Kere, J; Saavalainen, P

    2010-01-01

    Neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) was recently found to be genetically associated with inflammatory bowel disease in addition to asthma and related traits. Epithelia of several organs express NPSR1 isoforms A and B, including the intestine and the skin, and NPSR1 appears to be upregulated in inflammation. In this study, we used cell lines and tissue samples to characterize the expression of NPSR1 and its ligand neuropeptide S (NPS) in inflammation. We used polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to investigate the expression of NPS and NPSR1 in intestinal diseases, such as celiac disease and food allergy, and in cutaneous inflammatory disorders. We found that NPSR1-A was expressed by the enteroendocrine cells of the gut. Overall, the expression pattern of NPS was similar to its receptor suggesting an autocrine mechanism. In an NPSR1-A overexpressing cell model, stimulation with NPS resulted in a dose-dependent upregulation of glycoprotein hormone, alpha polypeptide (CGA), tachykinin 1 (TAC1), neurotensin (NTS) and galanin (GAL) encoding peptide hormones secreted by enteroendocrine cells. Because NPSR1 was also expressed in macrophages, neutrophils, and intraepithelial lymphocytes, we demonstrated that stimulation with the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma increased NPSR1 expression in the THP-1 monocytic cells. In conclusion, similar to other neuropeptides and their receptors, NPSR1 signalling might play a dual role along the gut-brain axis. The NPS/NPSR1 pathway may participate in the regulation of the peptide hormone production in enteroendocrine cells of the small intestine.

  7. Overexpression of vasoactive intestinal peptide receptors and cyclooxygenase-2 in human prostate cancer. Analysis of potential prognostic relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Carmena, María J; Arenas, M Isabel; Bajo, Ana M; Prieto, Juan C; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel

    2012-08-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a potent inductor of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in human prostate cancer cell lines. There are conflicting data regarding the role of COX-2 in the progression of this disease. Here we examined the expression of VIP receptors (VPAC1 and VPAC2) and COX-2 in prostate cancer specimens. Correlations among protein levels and various clinicopathological factors and prognosis of patients were statistically analyzed. For these purposes, formaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded prostate tissue specimens from 63 patients with prostate cancer and 9 control samples were used. The expression of VPAC1 and VPAC2 receptors and COX-2 was analyzed at mRNA levels by quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR. The corresponding expression at protein level was studied by immunohistochemistry, scored as negative, weak, moderate, or strong, and correlated with different clinicopathological factors by means of multivariate analysis. 88% of prostate cancer tissues overexpressed VPAC1-receptor at mRNA level, 72% VPAC2-receptor and 77% COX-2. Simultaneous overexpression of the three genes was seen in 52% of patients. Similar overexpression patterns were observed at protein level. The correlation between VPAC1 and VPAC2 receptor protein levels was statistically significant. However, no significant correlations existed among protein levels of VPAC receptors and COX-2 with patient age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, tumor stage, Gleason score and survival time. The overexpression of VPAC1 and VPAC2 receptors and COX-2 in cancer tissue gives them a potential role as targets for diagnosis of prostate cancer but results do not support a clear value as biomarkers for the clinical prognosis of this disease.

  8. Genetic susceptibility to refractive error: association of vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2 (VIPR2 with high myopia in Chinese.

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    Wai Chi Yiu

    Full Text Available Myopia is the most common ocular disease worldwide. We investigated the association of high myopia with the common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of five candidate genes - early growth response 1 (EGR1, v-fos FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS, jun oncogene (JUN, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, and vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2 (VIPR2. We recruited 1200 unrelated Chinese subjects with 600 cases (spherical equivalent ≤-8.00 diopters and 600 controls (spherical equivalent within ±1.00 diopter. A discovery sample set was formed from 300 cases and 300 controls, and a replication sample set from the remaining samples. Tag SNPs were genotyped for the discovery sample set, and the most significant haplotypes and their constituent SNPs were followed up with the replication sample set. The allele and haplotype frequencies in cases and controls were compared by logistic regression adjusted for sex and age to give P a values, and multiple comparisons were corrected by permutation test to give P aemp values. Odd ratios (OR were calculated accordingly. In the discovery phase, EGR1, JUN and VIP did not show any significant association while FOS and VIPR2 demonstrated significant haplotype association with high myopia. In the replication phase, the haplotype association for VIPR2 was successfully replicated, but not FOS. In analysis combining both sample sets, the most significant association signals of VIPR2 were the single marker rs2071625 (P a = 0.0008, P aemp = 0.0046 and OR = 0.75 and the 4-SNP haplotype window rs2071623-rs2071625-rs2730220-rs885863 (omnibus test, P a = 9.10e-10 and P aemp = 0.0001 with one protective haplotype (GGGG: P aemp = 0.0002 and OR = 0.52 and one high-risk haplotype (GAGA: P aemp = 0.0027 and OR = 4.68. This 4-SNP haplotype window was the most significant in all sample sets examined. This is the first study to suggest a role of VIPR2 in the genetic

  9. Genetic susceptibility to refractive error: association of vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2 (VIPR2) with high myopia in Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Wai Chi; Yap, Maurice K H; Fung, Wai Yan; Ng, Po Wah; Yip, Shea Ping

    2013-01-01

    Myopia is the most common ocular disease worldwide. We investigated the association of high myopia with the common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of five candidate genes - early growth response 1 (EGR1), v-fos FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS), jun oncogene (JUN), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2 (VIPR2). We recruited 1200 unrelated Chinese subjects with 600 cases (spherical equivalent ≤-8.00 diopters) and 600 controls (spherical equivalent within ±1.00 diopter). A discovery sample set was formed from 300 cases and 300 controls, and a replication sample set from the remaining samples. Tag SNPs were genotyped for the discovery sample set, and the most significant haplotypes and their constituent SNPs were followed up with the replication sample set. The allele and haplotype frequencies in cases and controls were compared by logistic regression adjusted for sex and age to give P a values, and multiple comparisons were corrected by permutation test to give P aemp values. Odd ratios (OR) were calculated accordingly. In the discovery phase, EGR1, JUN and VIP did not show any significant association while FOS and VIPR2 demonstrated significant haplotype association with high myopia. In the replication phase, the haplotype association for VIPR2 was successfully replicated, but not FOS. In analysis combining both sample sets, the most significant association signals of VIPR2 were the single marker rs2071625 (P a = 0.0008, P aemp = 0.0046 and OR = 0.75) and the 4-SNP haplotype window rs2071623-rs2071625-rs2730220-rs885863 (omnibus test, P a = 9.10e-10 and P aemp = 0.0001) with one protective haplotype (GGGG: P aemp = 0.0002 and OR = 0.52) and one high-risk haplotype (GAGA: P aemp = 0.0027 and OR = 4.68). This 4-SNP haplotype window was the most significant in all sample sets examined. This is the first study to suggest a role of VIPR2 in the genetic

  10. Vasoactive intestinal peptide/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor relative expression in salivary glands as one endogenous modulator of acinar cell apoptosis in a murine model of Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauk, V; Calafat, M; Larocca, L; Fraccaroli, L; Grasso, E; Ramhorst, R; Leirós, C Pérez

    2011-12-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by a progressive oral and ocular dryness that correlates poorly with the autoimmune damage of the glands. It has been proposed that a loss of homeostatic equilibrium in the glands is partly responsible for salivary dysfunction with acinar cells involved actively in the pathogenesis of SS. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome develops secretory dysfunction and early loss of glandular homeostatic mechanisms, with mild infiltration of the glands. Based on the vasodilator, prosecretory and trophic effects of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on acini as well as its anti-inflammatory properties we hypothesized that the local expression of VIP/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor (VPAC) system in salivary glands could have a role in acinar cell apoptosis and macrophage function thus influencing gland homeostasis. Here we show a progressive decline of VIP expression in submandibular glands of NOD mice with no changes in VPAC receptor expression compared with normal mice. The deep loss of endogenous VIP was associated with a loss of acinar cells through apoptotic mechanisms that could be induced further by tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and reversed by VIP through a cyclic adenosine-5'-monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated pathway. The clearance of apoptotic acinar cells by macrophages was impaired for NOD macrophages but a shift from inflammatory to regulatory phenotype was induced in macrophages during phagocytosis of apoptotic acinar cells. These results support that the decline in endogenous VIP/VPAC local levels might influence the survival/apoptosis intracellular set point in NOD acinar cells and their clearance, thus contributing to gland homeostasis loss.

  11. The intestinotrophic peptide, glp-2, counteracts intestinal atrophy in mice induced by the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor, gefitinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristine Juul; Hartmann, Bolette; Kissow, Hannelouise;

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been introduced as antitumor agents in the treatment of cancers overexpressing the receptor. The treatment has gastrointestinal side effects which may decrease patient compliance and limit the efficacy. Glucagon...... and cross-sectional area were decreased. The same parameters were increased by GLP-2 treatment alone, and when GLP-2 was combined with the gefitinib treatment, the parameters remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor in mice results in small-intestinal growth...... inhibition that can be completely prevented by simultaneous treatment with GLP-2. This suggests that the gastrointestinal side effects elicited by treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors can be circumvented by GLP-2 treatment....

  12. Bile acid-regulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) activity underlies circadian expression of intestinal peptide absorption transporter PepT1/Slc15a1.

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    Okamura, Ayako; Koyanagi, Satoru; Dilxiat, Adila; Kusunose, Naoki; Chen, Jia Jun; Matsunaga, Naoya; Shibata, Shigenobu; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2014-09-05

    Digested proteins are mainly absorbed as small peptides composed of two or three amino acids. The intestinal absorption of small peptides is mediated via only one transport system: the proton-coupled peptide transporter-1 (PepT1) encoded from the soluble carrier protein Slc15a1. In mammals, intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 oscillates during the daily feeding cycle. Although the oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 is suggested to be controlled by molecular components of circadian clock, we demonstrated here that bile acids regulated the oscillation of PepT1/Slc15a1 expression through modulating the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Nocturnally active mice mainly consumed their food during the dark phase. PPARα activated the intestinal expression of Slc15a1 mRNA during the light period, and protein levels of PepT1 peaked before the start of the dark phase. After food intake, bile acids accumulated in intestinal epithelial cells. Intestinal accumulated bile acids interfered with recruitment of co-transcriptional activator CREB-binding protein/p300 on the promoter region of Slc15a1 gene, thereby suppressing PPARα-mediated transactivation of Slc15a1. The time-dependent suppression of PPARα-mediated transactivation by bile acids caused an oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 during the daily feeding cycle that led to circadian changes in the intestinal absorption of small peptides. These findings suggest a molecular clock-independent mechanism by which bile acid-regulated PPARα activity governs the circadian expression of intestinal peptide transporter.

  13. Specific efficacy of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with {sup 177}Lu-octreotate in advanced neuroendocrine tumours of the small intestine

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    Sabet, Amir; Dautzenberg, Kristina; Haslerud, Torjan; Aouf, Anas; Sabet, Amin; Biersack, Hans-Juergen [University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Simon, Birgit [University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Mayer, Karin [University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine and Oncology, Bonn (Germany); Ezziddin, Samer [University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Saarland University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Homburg (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Increasing evidence supports the value of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours (NET), but there are limited data on its specific efficacy in NET of small intestinal (midgut) origin. This study aims to define the benefit of PRRT with {sup 177}Lu-octreotate for this circumscribed entity derived by a uniformly treated patient cohort. A total of 61 consecutive patients with unresectable, advanced small intestinal NET G1-2 stage IV treated with {sup 177}Lu-octreotate (4 intended cycles at 3-month intervals, mean activity per cycle 7.9 GBq) were analysed. Sufficient tumour uptake on baseline receptor imaging and either documented tumour progression (n = 46) or uncontrolled symptoms (n = 15) were prerequisites for treatment. Response was evaluated according to modified Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) criteria and additionally with Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1. Assessment of survival was performed using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards model for uni- and multivariate analyses. Toxicity was assessed according to standardized follow-up laboratory work-up including blood counts, liver and renal function, supplemented with serial {sup 99m}Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) clearance measurements. The median follow-up period was 62 months. Reversible haematotoxicity (≥ grade 3) occurred in five patients (8.2 %). No significant nephrotoxicity (≥ grade 3) was observed. Treatment response according to modified SWOG criteria consisted of partial response in 8 (13.1 %), minor response in 19 (31.1 %), stable disease in 29 (47.5 %) and progressive disease in 5 (8.2 %) patients. The disease control rate was 91.8 %. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was 33 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 25-41] and 61 months (95 % CI NA), respectively. Objective response was associated with longer survival (p = 0.005). Independent predictors of shorter PFS were

  14. Clinical relevance of intestinal peptide uptake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh; James; Freeman

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine available information on an independent peptide transporter 1(Pep T1) and its potential relevance to treatment, this evaluation was completed.METHODS: Fully published English language literature articles sourced through Pub Med related to protein digestion and absorption, specifically human peptide and amino acid transport, were accessed and reviewed.Papers from 1970 to the present, with particular emphasis on the past decade, were examined. In addition,abstracted information translated to English in Pub Med was also included. Finally, studies and reviews relevant to nutrient or drug uptake, particularly in human intestine were included for evaluation. This work represents a summary of all of these studies with particular reference to peptide transporter mediated assimilation of nutrients and pharmacologically active medications.RESULTS: Assimilation of dietary protein in humans involves gastric and pancreatic enzyme hydrolysis to luminal oligopeptides and free amino acids. During the ensuing intestinal phase, these hydrolytic products are transported into the epithelial cell and, eventually, the portal vein. A critical component of this process is the uptake of intact di-peptides and tri-peptides by an independent Pep T1. A number of "peptide-mimetic" pharmaceutical agents may also be transported through this carrier, important for uptake of different antibiotics, antiviral agents and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. In addition, specific peptide products of intestinal bacteria may also be transported by Pep T1, with initiation and persistence of an immune response including increased cytokine production and associated intestinal inflammatory changes. Interestingly, these inflammatory changes may also be attenuated with orallyadministered anti-inflammatory tripeptides administered as site-specific nanoparticles and taken up by this Pep T1 transport protein. CONCLUSION: Further evaluation of the role of this transporter in treatment of

  15. Truncated glucagon-like peptide-1 (proglucagon 78-107 amide), an intestinal insulin-releasing peptide, has specific receptors on rat insulinoma cells (RIN 5AH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orskov, C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1988-01-01

    We studied binding of 125I-labelled truncated-glucagon-like peptide-1 (proglucagon 78-107 amide) to a cloned rat insulin-producing cell line, RIN 5AH, in monolayer culture. Interaction of the peptide with pancreatic insulinoma cells was saturable and time dependent. Half-maximal binding was obtai......We studied binding of 125I-labelled truncated-glucagon-like peptide-1 (proglucagon 78-107 amide) to a cloned rat insulin-producing cell line, RIN 5AH, in monolayer culture. Interaction of the peptide with pancreatic insulinoma cells was saturable and time dependent. Half-maximal binding...

  16. Vasoactive intestinal peptide stimulates tracheal submucosal gland secretion in ferret

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    Peatfield, A.C.; Barnes, P.J.; Bratcher, C.; Nadel, J.A.; Davis, B.

    1983-07-01

    We studied the effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on the output of 35S-labeled macromolecules from ferret tracheal explants either placed in beakers or suspended in modified Ussing chambers. In Ussing chamber experiments, the radiolabel precursor, sodium (35S)sulfate, and all drugs were placed on the submucosal side of the tissue. Washings were collected at 30-min intervals from the luminal side and were dialyzed to remove unbound 35S, leaving radiolabeled macromolecules. Vasoactive intestinal peptide at 3 X 10(-7) M stimulated bound 35S output by a mean of + 252.6% (n . 14). The VIP response was dose-dependent with a near maximal response and a half maximal response at approximately 10(-6) M and 10(-8), M, respectively. The VIP effect was not inhibited by a mixture of tetrodotoxin, atropine, I-propranolol, and phentolamine. Vasoactive intestinal peptide had no effect on the electrical properties of the of the tissues. We conclude that VIP stimulates output of sulfated-macromolecules from ferret tracheal submucosal glands without stimulating ion transport. Our studies also suggest that VIP acts on submucosal glands via specific VIP receptors. Vasoactive intestinal peptide has been shown to increase intracellular levels of cyclic AMP, and we suggest that this may be the mechanism for its effect on the output of macromolecules. This mechanism may be important in the neural regulation of submucosal gland secretion.

  17. Behavioural actions of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloet, E.R.; Cottrell, G.A.; Veldhuis, H.D.; Rostene, W.H.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was studied on fear-motivated behaviours, exploration of a novel environment and on novelty and ACTH-induced grooming. VIP was administered via a plastic cannula into the lateral ventricle. Retention of a step-through passive avoidance task was inhib

  18. Distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide, nitric oxide synthase, and their receptors in human and rat sphenopalatine ganglion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csati, A; Tajti, J; Kuris, A

    2012-01-01

    Cranial parasympathetic outflow is mediated through the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG). The present study was performed to examine the expression of the parasympathetic signaling transmitters and their receptors in human and rat SPG. Indirect immunofluorescence technique was used for the demonstra...

  19. Vasoactive intestinal peptide signaling axis in human leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Glenn; Paul; Dorsam; Keith; Benton; Jarrett; Failing; Sandeep; Batra

    2011-01-01

    The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) signaling axis constitutes a master "communication coordinator" between cells of the nervous and immune systems.To date,VIP and its two main receptors expressed in T lymphocytes,vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor (VPAC)1 and VPAC2,mediate critical cellular functions regulating adaptive immunity,including arresting CD4 T cells in G 1 of the cell cycle,protection from apoptosis and a potent chemotactic recruiter of T cells to the mucosa associated lymphoid compartment of the gastrointestinal tissues.Since the discovery of VIP in 1970,followed by the cloning of VPAC1 and VPAC2 in the early 1990s,this signaling axis has been associated with common human cancers,including leukemia.This review highlights the present day knowledge of the VIP ligand and its receptor expression profile in T cell leukemia and cell lines.Also,there will be a discussion describing how the anti-leukemic DNA binding transcription factor,Ikaros,regulates VIP receptor expression in primary human CD4 T lymphocytes and T cell lymphoblastic cell lines (e.g.Hut-78).Lastly,future goals will be mentioned that are expected to uncover the role of how the VIP signaling axis contributes to human leukemogenesis,and to establish whether the VIP receptor signature expressed by leukemic blasts can provide therapeutic and/or diagnostic information.

  20. Vasoactive intestinal peptide is a local mediator in a gut-brain neural axis activating intestinal gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vadder, F; Plessier, F; Gautier-Stein, A; Mithieux, G

    2015-03-01

    Intestinal gluconeogenesis (IGN) promotes metabolic benefits through activation of a gut-brain neural axis. However, the local mediator activating gluconeogenic genes in the enterocytes remains unknown. We show that (i) vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) signaling through VPAC1 receptor activates the intestinal glucose-6-phosphatase gene in vivo, (ii) the activation of IGN by propionate is counteracted by VPAC1 antagonism, and (iii) VIP-positive intrinsic neurons in the submucosal plexus are increased under the action of propionate. These data support the role of VIP as a local neuromodulator released by intrinsic enteric neurons and responsible for the induction of IGN through a VPAC1 receptor-dependent mechanism in enterocytes.

  1. The mechanism of gentisic acid-induced relaxation of the guinea pig isolated trachea: the role of potassium channels and vasoactive intestinal peptide receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.F. Cunha

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available We examined some of the mechanisms by which the aspirin metabolite and the naturally occurring metabolite gentisic acid induced relaxation of the guinea pig trachea in vitro. In preparations with or without epithelium and contracted by histamine, gentisic acid caused concentration-dependent and reproducible relaxation, with mean EC50 values of 18 µM and Emax of 100% (N = 10 or 20 µM and Emax of 92% (N = 10, respectively. The relaxation caused by gentisic acid was of slow onset in comparison to that caused by norepinephrine, theophylline or vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP. The relative rank order of potency was: salbutamol 7.9 > VIP 7.0 > gentisic acid 4.7 > theophylline 3.7. Gentisic acid-induced relaxation was markedly reduced (24 ± 7.0, 43 ± 3.9 and 78 ± 5.6% in preparations with elevated potassium concentration in the medium (20, 40 or 80 mM, respectively. Tetraethylammonium (100 µM, a nonselective blocker of the potassium channels, partially inhibited the relaxation response to gentisic acid, while 4-AP (10 µM, a blocker of the voltage potassium channel, inhibited gentisic acid-induced relaxation by 41 ± 12%. Glibenclamide (1 or 3 µM, at a concentration which markedly inhibited the relaxation induced by the opener of ATP-sensitive K+ channels, levcromakalim, had no effect on the relaxation induced by gentisic acid. Charybdotoxin (0.1 or 0.3 µM, a selective blocker of the large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, caused rightward shifts (6- and 7-fold of the gentisic acid concentration-relaxation curve. L-N G-nitroarginine (100 µM, a NO synthase inhibitor, had no effect on the relaxant effect of gentisic acid, and caused a slight displacement to the right in the relaxant effect of the gentisic acid curve at 300 µM, while methylene blue (10 or 30 µM or ODQ (1 µM, the inhibitors of soluble guanylate cyclase, all failed to affect gentisic acid-induced relaxation. D-P-Cl-Phe6,Leu17[VIP] (0.1 µM, a VIP receptor antagonist

  2. Intestinal antimicrobial peptides during homeostasis, infection and disease

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    Luciana R Muniz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, including defensins and cathelicidins, constitute an arsenal of innate regulators of paramount importance in the gut. The intestinal epithelium is exposed to myriad of enteric pathogens and these endogenous peptides are essential to fend off microbes and protect against infections. It is becoming increasingly evident that AMPs shape the composition of the commensal microbiota and help maintain intestinal homeostasis. They contribute to innate immunity, hence playing important functions in health and disease. AMP expression is tightly controlled by the engagement of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs and their impairment is linked to abnormal host responses to infection and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. In this review, we provide an overview of the mucosal immune barriers and the intricate crosstalk between the host and the microbiota during homeostasis. We focus on the AMPs and pay particular attention to how PRRs promote their secretion in the intestine. Furthermore, we discuss their production and main functions in three different scenarios, at steady state, throughout infection with enteric pathogens and IBD.

  3. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) inhibits human renal cell carcinoma proliferation.

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    Vacas, Eva; Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Bajo, Ana M; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Schally, Andrew V; Prieto, Juan C; Carmena, María J

    2012-10-01

    Clear renal cell carcinoma (cRCC) is an aggressive and fatal neoplasm. The present work was undertaken to investigate the antiproliferative potential of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) exposure on non-tumoral (HK2) and tumoral (A498, cRCC) human proximal tubular epithelial cell lines. Reverse transcription and semiquantitative PCR was used at the VIP mRNA level whereas enzyme immunoanalysis was performed at the protein level. Both renal cell lines expressed VIP as well as VIP/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (VPAC) receptors whereas only HK2 cells expressed formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL-1). Receptors were functional, as shown by VIP stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity. Treatment with 0.1μM VIP (24h) inhibited proliferation of A498 but not HK2 cells as based on a reduction in the incorporation of [(3)H]-thymidine and BrdU (5'-Br-2'-deoxyuridine), PCNA (proliferating-cell nuclear antigen) expression and STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) expression and activation. VPAC(1)-receptor participation was established using JV-1-53 antagonist and siRNA transfection. Growth-inhibitory response to VIP was related to the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC)/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K) signaling systems as shown by studies on adenylate cyclase stimulation, and using the EPAC-specific compound 8CPT-2Me-cAMP and specific kinase inhibitors such as H89, wortmannin and PD98059. The efficacy of VIP on the prevention of tumor progression was confirmed in vivo using xenografted athymic mouse. These actions support a potential role of this peptide and its agonists in new therapies for cRCC.

  4. Protective Effect of Wheat Peptides Against Small Intestinal Damage Induced by Non-Steroidal Anti-Inlfammatory Drugs in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Hong; PAN Xing-chang; WANG Shao-kang; YANG Li-gang; SUN Gui-ju

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inlfammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were able to produce tissue damage and oxidative stress in animal models of small intestinal damage. In this study, the putative protective effect of wheat peptides was evaluated in a NSAID-induced small intestinal damage model in rats, different doses of wheat peptides or distilled water were administered daily by intragastric administration for 30 d until small intestinal damage was caused. Before sacriifcing, NSAIDs (aspirin and indomethacin) or physiological saline were infused into the digestive tract twice. Wheat peptides administration reduced edema and small intestinal damage, and signiifcantly decreased the level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in mucous membrane of small intestine. Oxidative stress was signiifcantly increased after NSAID infusion and was reduced by wheat peptides. Wheat peptides increased glutathione peroxidase(GSH-Px) activity in mucous membrane of small intestine. µ-Opioid receptor mRNA expression decreased more signiifcantly in wheat peptides treated rats than in the model control group. Overall, the results suggest that non-steroidal anti-inlfammatory drugs induced small intestinal damage in rats and wheat peptides administration may be an effective tool for protecting small intestinal tissue against NSAID-induced small intestinal damage and oxidative stress.

  5. Advances on the imaging and therapy of vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor%血管活性肠肽受体显像及治疗研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐波; 郑磊; 李前伟

    2011-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide(VIP) is a peptide hormone containing 28 amino acid residues,and it belongs to glucagon-secretin family.VIP regulates the proliferation and differentiation of normal and cancer cell through the mediation of vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor (VIPR).Different types of cancer cell membrane express distinct density and affinity of VIPR,which provides the underlying molecular basis for labeling VIPR for radionuclide imaging and targeted therapy.The progress of VIPR radioligand research greatly promotes tumor VIPR imaging and therapy.The research will play an important part in the early diagnosis,staging,and targeted therapy of cancer.%血管活性肠肽(VIP)是由28个氨基酸组成的小分子多肽,属胰高血糖素-胰泌素家族,通过其受体( VIPR)介导,调节正常及肿瘤细胞的增殖与分化.多种类型的肿瘤细胞膜上表达高密度及高亲和力VIPR,为实现肿瘤放射性核素标记VIPR显像及靶向治疗提供了分子基础.新的VIPR放射性配体的研发极大地推动了肿瘤VIPR显像及治疗的研究,有望在肿瘤的早期诊断、分期及靶向治疗中发挥重要作用.

  6. Intracerebroventricular administration of vasoactive intestinal peptide inhibits food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghourab, Samar; Beale, Kylie E; Semjonous, Nina M; Simpson, Katherine A; Martin, Niamh M; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R; Smith, Kirsty L

    2011-12-10

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a 28 amino acid peptide expressed throughout the peripheral and central nervous systems. VIP and the VIP receptor VPAC(2)R are expressed in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis. VIP has been shown to be involved in the regulation of energy balance in a number of non-mammalian vertebrates. We therefore examined the effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of VIP on food intake, energy expenditure and activity in adult male Wistar rats. VIP administration caused a potent short lived decrease in food intake and an increase in activity and energy expenditure. The pathways potentially involved in the anorexigenic effects of VIP were investigated by measuring the release of neuropeptides involved in the regulation of food intake from hypothalamic explants treated with VIP. VIP significantly stimulated the release of the anorexigenic peptide alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (αMSH). These studies suggest that VIP may have an endogenous role in the hypothalamic control of energy homeostasis.

  7. Characterization of autoantibodies to vasoactive intestinal peptide in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S; Said, S I; Thompson, A B; Volle, D J; Agrawal, D K; Foda, H; de la Rocha, S

    1989-07-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a potent relaxant of the airway smooth muscle. In this study, VIP-binding autoantibodies were observed in the plasma of 18% asthma patients and 16% healthy subjects. Immunoprecipitation studies and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and immobilized protein G indicated that the plasma VIP-binding activity was largely due to IgG antibodies. Saturation analysis of VIP binding by the plasmas suggested the presence of one or two classes of autoantibodies, distinguished by their apparent equilibrium affinity constants (Ka). The autoantibodies from asthma patients exhibited a larger VIP-binding affinity compared to those from healthy subjects (Ka 7.8 x 10(9) M-1 and 0.13 x 10(9) M-1, respectively; P less than 0.005). The antibodies were specific for VIP, judged by their poor reaction with peptides bearing partial sequence homology with VIP (peptide histidine isoleucine, growth hormone releasing factor and secretin). IgG prepared from the plasma of an antibody-positive asthma patient inhibited the saturable binding of 125I-VIP by receptors in guinea pig lung membranes (by 39-59%; P less than 0.001). These observations are consistent with a role for the VIP autoantibodies in the airway hyperresponsiveness of asthma.

  8. Intestinal growth adaptation and glucagon-like peptide 2 in rats with ileal-jejunal transposition or small bowel resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, Jesper; Hartmann, B.; Kissow, H.;

    2001-01-01

    Anatomy, glucagon-like peptide 2, small intestine, short bowel, intestinal adaptation, growth factors, rat......Anatomy, glucagon-like peptide 2, small intestine, short bowel, intestinal adaptation, growth factors, rat...

  9. Glucagon-like peptides 1 and 2: intestinal hormones implicated in the pathophysiology of mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissow, Hannelouise

    2015-06-01

    Chemotherapy often causes adverse effects, including pain, bloating, diarrhea, and inflammation and ulceration of the mucous membranes lining the digestive tract, which are collectively referred to as mucositis. Unfortunately, no remedy has been found yet to manage these side-effects. The intestinal glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is secreted from the intestinal endocrine L cells after nutrient intake, but recent findings show that the peptide concentration in the plasma also rises after intestinal injury and that GLP-2 receptor activation is crucial for intestinal healing. The antidiabetic hormone GLP-1, cosecreted with GLP-2, diminished mucositis in an animal model of the condition. Therefore, both peptides could be involved in the pathophysiology of mucositis. The intestinal GLPs have shown beneficial effects in experimental trials and have potential for therapeutic use. In type 2 diabetic and obese patients, GLP secretion is impaired. Elucidating the role of these endogenous hormones could lead to the identification of mucositis risk factors and an alternative preventive therapy for these patients.

  10. Bile acids induce glucagon-like peptide 2 secretion with limited effects on intestinal adaptation in early weaned pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ipharraguerre, Ignacio R; Tedó, Gemma; Menoyo, David

    2013-01-01

    Early weaning is a stressful event characterized by a transient period of intestinal atrophy that may be mediated by reduced secretion of glucagon-like peptide (GLP) 2. We tested whether enterally fed bile acids or plant sterols could increase nutrient-dependent GLP-2 secretion and improve.......05) but did not affect plasma GLP-1 and feed intake. The intestinal expression of glucagon-like peptide 2 receptor, sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, farnesoid X receptor, and guanosine protein-coupled bile acid receptor genes were not affected by CDC treatment. The intragastric administration of CDC...... did not alter the weight and length of the intestine, yet increased the activation of caspase-3 in ileal villi (P affect any of the variables that were measured. Our results show that the enteral...

  11. Food Derived Bioactive Peptides and Intestinal Barrier Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Martínez-Augustin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of food-derived bioactive peptides have been shown to exert health-promoting actions and are therefore considered functional foods or nutraceuticals. Some of these actions are related to the maintenance, reinforcement or repairment of the intestinal barrier function (IBF whose role is to selectively allow the absorption of water, nutrients and ions while preventing the influx of microorganisms from the intestinal lumen. Alterations in the IBF have been related to many disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease or metabolic syndrome. Components of IBF are the intestinal epithelium, the mucus layer, secretory immunoglobulin A and cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Here we review the effects of food derived bioactive peptides on these IBF components. In vitro and in vivo effects, both in healthy and disease states, have been reviewed. Although limited, the available information indicates a potential for food-derived peptides to modify IBF and to contribute to disease treatment, but further research is needed to better isolate responsible peptides, and to help define their mode of action.

  12. cis-Peptide Bonds: A Key for Intestinal Permeability of Peptides? .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelli, Udaya Kiran; Ovadia, Oded; Frank, Andreas Oliver; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Gilon, Chaim; Hoffman, Amnon; Kessler, Horst

    2015-10-19

    Recent structural studies on libraries of cyclic hexapeptides led to the identification of common backbone conformations that may be instrumental to the oral availability of peptides. Furthermore, the observation of differential Caco-2 permeabilities of enantiomeric pairs of some of these peptides strongly supports the concept of conformational specificity driven uptake and also suggests a pivotal role of carrier-mediated pathways for peptide transport, especially for scaffolds of polar nature. This work presents investigations on the Caco-2 and PAMPA permeability profiles of 13 selected N-methylated cyclic pentaalanine peptides derived from the basic cyclo(-D-Ala-Ala4 -) template. These molecules generally showed moderate to low transport in intestinal epithelia with a few of them exhibiting a Caco-2 permeability equal to or slightly higher than that of mannitol, a marker for paracellular permeability. We identified that the majority of the permeable cyclic penta- and hexapeptides possess an N-methylated cis-peptide bond, a structural feature that is also present in the orally available peptides cyclosporine A and the tri-N-methylated analogue of the Veber-Hirschmann peptide. Based on these observations it appears that the presence of N-methylated cis-peptide bonds at certain locations may promote the intestinal permeability of peptides through a suitable conformational preorganization.

  13. Release of regulatory gut peptides somatostatin, neurotensin and vasoactive intestinal peptide by acid and hyperosmolal solutions in the intestine in conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudholm, T; Wallin, B; Theodorsson, E; Näslund, E; Hellström, P M

    2009-01-08

    The impact of exposure of the intestinal mucosa to acid and hyperosmolal solutions on the release of the inhibitory gut peptides somatostatin (SOM), neurotensin (NT) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was studied in conscious rats during pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion. The animals were equipped with a chronic gastric fistula to measure acid secretion and a jejunal Thiry-Vella loop for intestinal challenge with saline, hydrochloric acid (HCl, 200 mmol L(-1)) or hyperosmolal polyethylene glycol (PEG, 1200 mOsm kg(-1)). Gut peptide concentrations were measured in intestinal perfusates, and in plasma samples collected during stimulated acid secretion, and at the end of experiments with luminal challenge of the loops. After pentagastrin-stimulation acid secretion was dose-dependently inhibited by intravenous administration of the gastrin receptor antagonist gastrazole, as well as ranitidine and esomeprazole by maximally 73+/-10%; 95+/-3%; 90+/-10%, respectively. Acid perfusion of the Thiry-Vella loop caused a prominent release of SOM both to the lumen (from 7.2+/-5.0 to 1279+/-580 pmol L(-1)) and to the circulation (from 18+/-5.2 to 51+/-9.0 pmol L(-1)) simultaneously with an inhibition of gastric acid secretion. The release of NT and VIP was not affected to the same extent. PEG perfusion of the loop caused a release of SOM as well as NT and VIP, but less. Simultaneously acid secretion was slightly decreased. In conclusion, intestinal perfusion with acid or hyperosmolal solutions mainly releases SOM, which seems to exert a major inhibitory action in the gut, as shown by inhibition of acid secretion. The other peptides NT and VIP also participate in this action but to a much lesser degree. The operative pathways of these gut peptides hence involve both endocrine (SOM) and paracrine actions (SOM, NT, VIP) in order to exert inhibitory functions on the stomach. The inhibitory action of gastrazole, was in a similar range as that of SOM implying that

  14. Models to predict intestinal absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Filipa; Andrade, Fernanda; Ferreira, Domingos; Nielsen, Hanne Morck; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of human intestinal absorption is a major goal in the design, optimization, and selection of drugs intended for oral delivery, in particular proteins, which possess intrinsic poor transport across intestinal epithelium. There are various techniques currently employed to evaluate the extension of protein absorption in the different phases of drug discovery and development. Screening protocols to evaluate protein absorption include a range of preclinical methodologies like in silico, in vitro, in situ, ex vivo and in vivo. It is the careful and critical use of these techniques that can help to identify drug candidates, which most probably will be well absorbed from the human intestinal tract. It is well recognized that the human intestinal permeability cannot be accurately predicted based on a single preclinical method. However, the present social and scientific concerns about the animal well care as well as the pharmaceutical industries need for rapid, cheap and reliable models predicting bioavailability give reasons for using methods providing an appropriate correlation between results of in vivo and in vitro drug absorption. The aim of this review is to describe and compare in silico, in vitro, in situ, ex vivo and in vivo methods used to predict human intestinal absorption, giving a special attention to the intestinal absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins.

  15. Vasoactive intestinal peptide, a promising agent for myopia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Ayse Idil; Basmak, Hikmet; Gursoy, Huseyin; Ozkurt, Mete; Yildirim, Nilgun; Erkasap, Nilufer; Bilgec, Mustafa Deger; Tuncel, Nese; Colak, Ertugrul

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in form-deprivation myopia (FDM). METHODS FDM was created in three groups of eight chicks by placing a translucent diffuser on their right eyes. Intravitreal injections of saline and VIP were applied once a day into the occluded eyes of groups 2 and 3, respectively. Retinoscopy and axial length (AL) measurements were performed on the first and 8th days of diffuser wear. The retina mRNA levels of the VIP receptors and the ZENK protein in right eyes of the three groups and left eyes of the first group on day 8 were determined using real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RESULTS The median final refraction (D) in right eyes were -13.75 (-16.00, -12.00), -11.50 (-12.50, -7.50), and -1.50 (-4.75, -0.75) in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<0.001). The median AL (mm) in right eyes were 10.65 (10.00, 11.10), 9.90 (9.70, 10.00), and 9.20 (9.15, 9.25) in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<0.001). The median delta-delta cycle threshold (CT) values for the VIP2 receptors were 1.07 (0.82, 1.43), 1.22 (0.98, 1.65), 0.29 (0.22, 0.45) in right eyes of groups 1, 2, and 3, and 1.18 (0.90, 1.37) in left eyes of group 1, respectively (P=0.001). The median delta-delta CT values for the ZENK protein were 1.07 (0.63, 5.03), 3.55 (2.20, 5.55), undetectable in right eyes of groups 1, 2, and 3 and 1.89 (0.21, 4.73) in left eyes of group 1, respectively (P=0.001). CONCLUSION VIP has potential inhibitory effects in the development of FDM.

  16. Gastrin receptor-avid peptide conjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Timothy J.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Li, Ning; Sieckman, Gary; Higginbotham, Chrys-Ann

    2006-12-12

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  17. Gastrin Receptor-Avid Peptide Conjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Timothy J. (Columbia, MO); Volkert, Wynn A. (Columbia, MO); Li, Ning (Baltimore, MD); Sieckman, Gary (Ashland, MO); Higginbotham, Chrys-Ann (Columbia, MO)

    2005-07-26

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  18. Immunocytochemical detection of vasoactive intestinal peptide-like and peptide histidine isoleucine-like peptides in the nervous system and the excretory system of adult Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, N

    1998-05-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide-like and peptide histidine isoleucine-like immunoreactivities were detected in the excretory duct of adult male and female Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, thus indicating the source of these two physiologically active peptides previously isolated from the excretory/secretory products of adult N. brasiliensis. In the nervous system immunoreactivity to both these peptides was confined to females and was found in the neurons of the ovijector associated ganglion. This is consistent with co-synthesis of vasoactive intestinal peptide-like and peptide histidine isoleucine-like peptides which has also been shown to occur in all mammalian vasoactive intestinal peptid-ergic neurons studied to date. However, in addition to this, and in common to some previous studies on helminth vasoactive intestinal peptide and peptide histidine isoleucine immunoreactivities, co-synthesis of the peptides was not indicated in a pair of branched neurons which projected posteriorly and peripherally from the ganglion associated with the ovijector of females and which terminated in two pairs of ganglia also exhibiting vasoactive intestinal peptide-like immunoreactivity only. The position of these ganglia indicated that they innervate muscles close to the body wall and may be responsible for the muscular contractions required for expulsion of eggs from female Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. This is also the first study to successfully detect these peptides in the excretory system of gastrointestinal nematodes.

  19. Glucagon-like peptide-2 induces rapid digestive adaptation following intestinal resection in preterm neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a frequent complication after intestinal resection in infants suffering from intestinal disease. We tested whether treatment with the intestinotrophic hormone glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases intestinal volume and function in the period immediately following in...

  20. The role of vasoactive intestinal peptide in scavenging singlet oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, B.R.; Misra, H.P. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg (United States))

    1990-02-26

    The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a highly basic 28 amino acid peptide, has a widespread distribution in the body. The functional specificity of this peptide not only includes its potent vasodilatory activity, but also its role in protecting lungs against acute injury, in preventing T-lymphocyte proliferation and in modulating immune function. The purpose of this study was to examine the possible antioxidant properties of VIP. The authors found that VIP up to 50 {mu}g/ml had no inhibitory effect on its reduction of cytochrome C by xanthine and xanthine oxidase, indicating that the peptide does not have significant O{sub 2} scavenging ability. However, VIP was found to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, the {sup 1}O{sub 2} dependent 2, 2, 6, 6 tetramethyl piperidine oxide (TEMPO) formation. {sup 1}O{sub 2} was produced by rose benzal photosensitizing system and was detected as TEMP-{sup 1}O{sub 2} adduct (TEMPO) by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic technique. The formation of TEMPO signal was strongly inhibited by {beta}-carotene, histidine as well as azide, but not by superoxide dismutase (48 {mu}g/ml), catalase (20 {mu}g/ml) and mannitol (6mM), indicating that TEMPO signal was a TEMP-{sup 1}O{sub 2} adduct. These results indicate that VIP has potent antioxidant activity and may serve as a singlet O{sub 2} scavenger, thus it may modulate the oxidative tissue injury caused by this reactive oxygen species.

  1. Formyl peptide receptor chimeras define domains involved in ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, H D; Holmes, R; Vilander, L R; Adams, R R; Manzana, W; Jolley, D; Andrews, W H

    1993-02-05

    We have begun to study the structural requirements for the binding of formyl peptides to their specific receptors. As an initial approach, we constructed C5a-formyl peptide receptor chimeras. Unique (and identical) restriction sites were introduced within the transmembrane domains of these receptors that allowed for the exchange of specific areas. Four types of chimeric receptors were generated. 1) The C5a receptor was progressively substituted by the formyl peptide receptor. 2) The formyl peptide receptor was progressively substituted by the C5a receptor. 3) Specific domains of the C5a receptor were substituted by the corresponding domain of the formyl peptide receptor. 4) Specific domains of the formyl peptide receptor were replaced by the same corresponding domain of the C5a receptor. Wild type and chimeric receptors were transfected into COS 7 cells and their ability to bind formyl peptide determined, taking into account efficiency of transfection and expression of chimeric protein. Based on these results, a ligand binding model is presented in which the second, third, and fourth extracellular (and/or their transmembrane) domains together with the first transmembrane domain form a ligand binding pocket for formyl peptides. It is proposed that the amino-terminal domain plays a role by presumably providing a "lid" to the pocket. The carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic tail appears to modulate ligand binding by regulating receptor affinity.

  2. Clinical endocrinology and metabolism. Receptors for gut peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmar, Anthony J

    2004-12-01

    Most gut peptides exert their effects through G protein-coupled receptors, a family of about 700 membrane proteins, 87 of which are presently known to have peptide ligands. Three additional gut peptide receptors are not G protein-coupled receptors but regulate intracellular cyclic GMP accumulation. The aim of this review is to illustrate how the sequencing of the human genome and other recent advances in genomics has contributed to our understanding of the role of peptides and their receptors in gastrointestinal function. Recent discoveries include the identification of receptors for the peptides motilin and neuromedin U, and new physiological ligands for the PTH2 receptor, the CRF(2) receptor and the growth hormone secretagogue receptor. Knockout mice lacking specific peptide receptors or their ligands provide informative animal models in which to determine the functions of the numerous peptide-receptor systems in the gut and to predict which of them may be the most fruitful for drug development. Some peptide-receptor signalling systems may be more important in disease states than they are in normal physiology. For example, substance P, galanin, bradykinin and opioids play important roles in visceral pain and inflammation. Other peptides may have developmental roles: for example, disruption of endothelin-3 signalling prevents the normal development of the enteric nervous system and contributes to the pathogenesis of Hirschsprung disease.

  3. Glucagon-like peptide I receptors in the subfornical organ and the area postrema are accessible to circulating glucagon-like peptide I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orskov, C; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Møller, M

    1996-01-01

    The intestinal incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide I (GLP-I) inhibits gastric motility and secretion in normal, but not in vagotomized subjects, pointing to a centrally mediated effect. Therefore, our aim was to study the availability of rat brain GLP-I receptors to peripherally injected 125I-...

  4. Antioxidant activity of vasoactive intestinal peptide in HK2 human renal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacas, Eva; Bajo, Ana M; Schally, Andrew V; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Prieto, Juan C; Carmena, María J

    2012-12-01

    Oxidative stress is a major mediator of tissue and cell injuries. The injury in chronic nephrotic syndrome, acute renal failure, myeloma kidney injury and other kidney diseases is initiated by oxidative stress. We have previously demonstrated that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) acts as an antiproliferative agent in renal cancer cells. This study was designed to evaluate the renoprotective activity of VIP against H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative damage in a proximal tubule kidney cell line (human, non-tumor, HK2 cells) in order to investigate the potential usefulness of this peptide in the treatment of oxidative-stress related kidney diseases. HK2 cell viability was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. Propidium iodide was used to identify cells undergoing apoptosis. Western blotting was performed with anti-Bcl-2, anti-Bax and anti-formyl peptide receptor (low-affinity variant FPRL-1) monoclonal antibodies whereas 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate was used for measurement of levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). HK2 cells were injured with H(2)O(2) in order to induce apoptosis: the effect was time- and dose-dependent. VIP increased the levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and decreased those of the proapoptotic protein Bax. VIP decreased the intracellular ROS levels reached by H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress. VIP effect on ROS levels involved FPLR-1 but not VPAC(1,2) receptors as evidenced by the use of the respective antagonists WRW4 and JV-1-53. Thus, VIP protects HK2 cells from apoptosis by increasing Bcl-2 levels and this effect is initiated through FPLR1 receptor. In conclusion, VIP might exert a renoprotective effect by the suppression of oxidative stress.

  5. Efficiency of cell-penetrating peptides on the nasal and intestinal absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khafagy, El-Sayed; Morishita, Mariko; Kamei, Noriyasu; Eda, Yoshimi; Ikeno, Yohei; Takayama, Kozo

    2009-10-20

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the potential of cell-penetrating peptides; penetratin as novel delivery vector, on the systemic absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins across different mucosal administration sites. The absorption-enhancing feasibility of l- and d-penetratin (0.5mM) was used for glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and exendin-4 as novel antidiabetic therapy, in addition to interferon-beta (IFN-beta) as protein biotherapeutic model from nasal and intestinal route of administration was evaluated as first time in rats. Nasal route is the most feasible for the delivery of therapeutic peptides coadministered with penetratin whereas the intestinal route appears to be more restricted. The absolute bioavailability (BA (%)) values depend on the physichochemical characters of drugs, stereoisomer character of penetratin, and site of administration. Penetratin significantly increased the nasal more than intestinal absorption of GLP-1 and exendin-4, as the BA for nasal and intestinal administration of GLP-1 was 15.9% and 5%, and for exendin-4 were 7.7% and 1.8%, respectively. Moreover, the BA of IFN-beta coadministered with penetratin was 11.1% and 0.17% for nasal and intestinal administration, respectively. From these findings, penetratin is a promising carrier for transmucosal delivery of therapeutic peptides and macromolecules as an alternative to conventional parenteral routes.

  6. Glucagon-like peptide-2 induces rapid digestive adaptation following intestinal resection in preterm neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Andreas; Thymann, Thomas; Lund, Pernille;

    2013-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a frequent complication after intestinal resection in infants suffering from intestinal disease. We tested whether treatment with the intestinotrophic hormone glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases intestinal volume and function in the period immediately following...... and protein contents and increased total protein synthesis rate in SBS+GLP-2 vs. SBS pigs (+100%, P fluid and macronutrients. GLP-2 treatment may...... be a promising therapy to enhance intestinal adaptation and improve digestive function in preterm infants with jejunostomy following intestinal resection....

  7. Factors that restrict intestinal cell permeation of cyclic prodrugs of an opioid peptide (DADLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouyang, Hui; Chen, Weiqing; Andersen, Thomas E;

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relative importance of metabolism by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes versus efflux by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in restricting the intestinal mucosal permeation of cyclic prodrugs (AOA-DADLE, CA-DADLE, OMCA-DADLE) of the opioid peptide DADLE (H......-gp), not metabolic enzymes (e.g., CYP 3A, esterases), restrict the permeation of peptide prodrugs across the rat intestinal mucosa....

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-2 and mouse intestinal adaptation to a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassano, Sara; Amato, Antonella; Cappello, Francesco; Rappa, Francesca; Mulè, Flavia

    2013-04-01

    Endogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP2) is a key mediator of refeeding-induced and resection-induced intestinal adaptive growth. This study investigated the potential role of GLP2 in mediating the mucosal responses to a chronic high-fat diet (HFD). In this view, the murine small intestine adaptive response to a HFD was analyzed and a possible involvement of endogenous GLP2 was verified using GLP2 (3-33) as GLP2 receptor (GLP2R) antagonist. In comparison with animals fed a standard diet, mice fed a HFD for 14 weeks exhibited an increase in crypt-villus mean height (duodenum, 27.5±3.0%; jejunum, 36.5±2.9%; P<0.01), in the cell number per villus (duodenum, 28.4±2.2%; jejunum, 32.0±2.9%; P<0.01), and in Ki67-positive cell number per crypt. No change in the percent of caspase-3-positive cell in the villus-crypt was observed. The chronic exposure to a HFD also caused a significant increase in GLP2 plasma levels and in GLP2R intestinal expression. Daily administration of GLP2 (3-33) (30-60  ng) for 4 weeks did not modify the crypt-villus height in control mice. In HFD-fed mice, chronic treatment with GLP2 (3-33) reduced the increase in crypt-villus height and in the cell number per villus through reduction of cell proliferation and increase in apoptosis. This study provides the first experimental evidence for a role of endogenous GLP2 in the intestinal adaptation to HFD in obese mice and for a dysregulation of the GLP2/GLP2R system after a prolonged HFD.

  9. Diabetic intestinal growth adaptation and glucagon-like peptide 2 in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Hartmann, B; Nielsen, C;

    1999-01-01

    Dietary fibre influence growth and function of the upper gastrointestinal tract. This study investigates the importance of dietary fibre in intestinal growth in experimental diabetes, and correlates intestinal growth with plasma levels of the intestinotrophic factor, glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2)....

  10. Glucagon-like peptide-1 modulates neurally evoked mucosal chloride secretion in guinea pig small intestine in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassano, Sara; Wang, Guo-Du; Mulè, Flavia; Wood, Jackie D

    2012-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) acts at the G protein-coupled receptor, GLP-1R, to stimulate secretion of insulin and to inhibit secretion of glucagon and gastric acid. Involvement in mucosal secretory physiology has received negligible attention. We aimed to study involvement of GLP-1 in mucosal chloride secretion in the small intestine. Ussing chamber methods, in concert with transmural electrical field stimulation (EFS), were used to study actions on neurogenic chloride secretion. ELISA was used to study GLP-1R effects on neural release of acetylcholine (ACh). Intramural localization of GLP-1R was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Application of GLP-1 to serosal or mucosal sides of flat-sheet preparations in Ussing chambers did not change baseline short-circuit current (I(sc)), which served as a marker for chloride secretion. Transmural EFS evoked neurally mediated biphasic increases in I(sc) that had an initial spike-like rising phase followed by a sustained plateau-like phase. Blockade of the EFS-evoked responses by tetrodotoxin indicated that the responses were neurally mediated. Application of GLP-1 reduced the EFS-evoked biphasic responses in a concentration-dependent manner. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39) suppressed this action of GLP-1. The GLP-1 inhibitory action on EFS-evoked responses persisted in the presence of nicotinic or vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor antagonists but not in the presence of a muscarinic receptor antagonist. GLP-1 significantly reduced EFS-evoked ACh release. In the submucosal plexus, GLP-1R immunoreactivity (IR) was expressed by choline acetyltransferase-IR neurons, neuropeptide Y-IR neurons, somatostatin-IR neurons, and vasoactive intestinal peptide-IR neurons. Our results suggest that GLP-1R is expressed in guinea pig submucosal neurons and that its activation leads to a decrease in neurally evoked chloride secretion by suppressing release of ACh at neuroepithelial junctions in the enteric neural networks

  11. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabander, Tessa; Teunissen, Jaap J M; Van Eijck, Casper H J; Franssen, Gaston J H; Feelders, Richard A; de Herder, Wouter W; Kwekkeboom, Dik J

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, the number of neuroendocrine tumours that are detected is increasing. A relative new and promising therapy for patients with metastasised or inoperable disease is peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). This therapy involves an infusion of somatostatin analogues linked to radionuclides like Yttrium-90 or Lutetium-177. Objective response rates are reported in 15-35%. Response rates may vary between type of tumour and radionuclide. Besides the objective response rate, overall survival and progression free survival increase significantly. Also, the quality of life improves as well. Serious side-affects are rare. PRRT is usually well tolerated, also in patients with extensive metastasised disease. Recent studies combined PRRT with other types of therapies. Unfortunately no randomised trials comparing these strategies are available. In the future, more research is needed to evaluate the best therapy combinations or sequence of therapies.

  12. Intestinal scavenger receptors are involved in vitamin K1 absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Margier, Marielle; Roi, Stéphanie; Collet, Xavier; Niot, Isabelle; Goupy, Pascale; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2014-10-31

    Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) intestinal absorption is thought to be mediated by a carrier protein that still remains to be identified. Apical transport of vitamin K1 was examined using Caco-2 TC-7 cell monolayers as a model of human intestinal epithelium and in transfected HEK cells. Phylloquinone uptake was then measured ex vivo using mouse intestinal explants. Finally, vitamin K1 absorption was compared between wild-type mice and mice overexpressing scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in the intestine and mice deficient in cluster determinant 36 (CD36). Phylloquinone uptake by Caco-2 cells was saturable and was significantly impaired by co-incubation with α-tocopherol (and vice versa). Anti-human SR-BI antibodies and BLT1 (a chemical inhibitor of lipid transport via SR-BI) blocked up to 85% of vitamin K1 uptake. BLT1 also decreased phylloquinone apical efflux by ∼80%. Transfection of HEK cells with SR-BI and CD36 significantly enhanced vitamin K1 uptake, which was subsequently decreased by the addition of BLT1 or sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (CD36 inhibitor), respectively. Similar results were obtained in mouse intestinal explants. In vivo, the phylloquinone postprandial response was significantly higher, and the proximal intestine mucosa phylloquinone content 4 h after gavage was increased in mice overexpressing SR-BI compared with controls. Phylloquinone postprandial response was also significantly increased in CD36-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice, but their vitamin K1 intestinal content remained unchanged. Overall, the present data demonstrate for the first time that intestinal scavenger receptors participate in the absorption of dietary phylloquinone.

  13. Intestinal Scavenger Receptors Are Involved in Vitamin K1 Absorption*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Margier, Marielle; Roi, Stéphanie; Collet, Xavier; Niot, Isabelle; Goupy, Pascale; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) intestinal absorption is thought to be mediated by a carrier protein that still remains to be identified. Apical transport of vitamin K1 was examined using Caco-2 TC-7 cell monolayers as a model of human intestinal epithelium and in transfected HEK cells. Phylloquinone uptake was then measured ex vivo using mouse intestinal explants. Finally, vitamin K1 absorption was compared between wild-type mice and mice overexpressing scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in the intestine and mice deficient in cluster determinant 36 (CD36). Phylloquinone uptake by Caco-2 cells was saturable and was significantly impaired by co-incubation with α-tocopherol (and vice versa). Anti-human SR-BI antibodies and BLT1 (a chemical inhibitor of lipid transport via SR-BI) blocked up to 85% of vitamin K1 uptake. BLT1 also decreased phylloquinone apical efflux by ∼80%. Transfection of HEK cells with SR-BI and CD36 significantly enhanced vitamin K1 uptake, which was subsequently decreased by the addition of BLT1 or sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (CD36 inhibitor), respectively. Similar results were obtained in mouse intestinal explants. In vivo, the phylloquinone postprandial response was significantly higher, and the proximal intestine mucosa phylloquinone content 4 h after gavage was increased in mice overexpressing SR-BI compared with controls. Phylloquinone postprandial response was also significantly increased in CD36-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice, but their vitamin K1 intestinal content remained unchanged. Overall, the present data demonstrate for the first time that intestinal scavenger receptors participate in the absorption of dietary phylloquinone. PMID:25228690

  14. Distinct Signaling Cascades Elicited by Different Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 (FPR2 Agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Cattaneo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2 is a remarkably versatile transmembrane protein belonging to the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR family. FPR2 is activated by an array of ligands, which include structurally unrelated lipids and peptide/proteins agonists, resulting in different intracellular responses in a ligand-specific fashion. In addition to the anti-inflammatory lipid, lipoxin A4, several other endogenous agonists also bind FPR2, including serum amyloid A, glucocorticoid-induced annexin 1, urokinase and its receptor, suggesting that the activation of FPR2 may result in potent pro- or anti-inflammatory responses. Other endogenous ligands, also present in biological samples, include resolvins, amyloidogenic proteins, such as beta amyloid (Aβ-42 and prion protein (Prp106–126, the neuroprotective peptide, humanin, antibacterial peptides, annexin 1-derived peptides, chemokine variants, the neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP-27, and mitochondrial peptides. Upon activation, intracellular domains of FPR2 mediate signaling to G-proteins, which trigger several agonist-dependent signal transduction pathways, including activation of phospholipase C (PLC, protein kinase C (PKC isoforms, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt pathway, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway, p38MAPK, as well as the phosphorylation of cytosolic tyrosine kinases, tyrosine kinase receptor transactivation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of regulatory transcriptional factors, release of calcium and production of oxidants. FPR2 is an attractive therapeutic target, because of its involvement in a range of normal physiological processes and pathological diseases. Here, we review and discuss the most significant findings on the intracellular pathways and on the cross-communication between FPR2 and tyrosine kinase receptors triggered by different FPR2

  15. Distinct Signaling Cascades Elicited by Different Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 (FPR2) Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Fabio; Parisi, Melania; Ammendola, Rosario

    2013-01-01

    The formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) is a remarkably versatile transmembrane protein belonging to the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family. FPR2 is activated by an array of ligands, which include structurally unrelated lipids and peptide/proteins agonists, resulting in different intracellular responses in a ligand-specific fashion. In addition to the anti-inflammatory lipid, lipoxin A4, several other endogenous agonists also bind FPR2, including serum amyloid A, glucocorticoid-induced annexin 1, urokinase and its receptor, suggesting that the activation of FPR2 may result in potent pro- or anti-inflammatory responses. Other endogenous ligands, also present in biological samples, include resolvins, amyloidogenic proteins, such as beta amyloid (Aβ)-42 and prion protein (Prp)106–126, the neuroprotective peptide, humanin, antibacterial peptides, annexin 1-derived peptides, chemokine variants, the neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP)-27, and mitochondrial peptides. Upon activation, intracellular domains of FPR2 mediate signaling to G-proteins, which trigger several agonist-dependent signal transduction pathways, including activation of phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) pathway, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, p38MAPK, as well as the phosphorylation of cytosolic tyrosine kinases, tyrosine kinase receptor transactivation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of regulatory transcriptional factors, release of calcium and production of oxidants. FPR2 is an attractive therapeutic target, because of its involvement in a range of normal physiological processes and pathological diseases. Here, we review and discuss the most significant findings on the intracellular pathways and on the cross-communication between FPR2 and tyrosine kinase receptors triggered by different FPR2 agonists. PMID

  16. F-18 Labeled Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Analogue in the PET Imaging of Colon Carcinoma in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengfeng Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As large amount of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP receptors are expressed in various tumors and VIP-related diseases, radiolabeled VIP provides a potential PET imaging agent for VIP receptor. However, structural modification of VIP is required before being radiolabeled and used for VIP receptor imaging due to its poor in vivo stability. As a VIP analogue, [R8, 15, 21, L17]-VIP exhibited improved stability and receptor specificity in preliminary studies. In this study, F-18 labeled [R8,15,21, L17]-VIP was produced with the radiochemical yield being as high as 33.6%±3% (decay-for-corrected, n=5 achieved within 100 min, a specific activity of 255 GBq/μmol, and a radiochemical purity as high as 99% as characterized by radioactive HPLC, TLC, and SDS-Page radioautography. A biodistribution study in normal mice also demonstrated fast elimination of F-18 labeled [R8,15,21, L17]-VIP in the blood, liver, and gastrointestinal tracts. A further micro-PET imaging study in C26 colon carcinoma bearing mice confirmed the high tumor specificity, with the tumor/muscle radioactivity uptake ratio being as high as 3.03 at 60 min following injection, and no apparent radioactivity concentration in the intestinal tracts. In addition, blocking experiment and Western Blot test further confirmed its potential in PET imaging of VIP receptor-positive tumor.

  17. Exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) augments GLP-2 receptor mRNA and maintains proglucagon mRNA levels in resected rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopmann, Matthew C; Nelson, David W; Murali, Sangita G;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-dependent proglucagon-derived hormone that stimulates intestinal adaptive growth. Our aim was to determine whether exogenous GLP-2 increases resection-induced adaptation without diminishing endogenous proglucagon and GLP-2 receptor...... augments adaptive growth and digestive capacity of the residual small intestine in a rat model of mid-small bowel resection by increasing plasma GLP-2 concentrations and GLP-2 receptor expression without diminishing endogenous proglucagon expression....

  18. Toll-like receptors as modulators of intestinal barrier function

    OpenAIRE

    Estévez Medina, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Las patologías funcionales (síndrome del intestino irritable, IBS) e inflamatorias gastrointestinales (enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal, IBD) se caracterizan por alteraciones de la función barrera epitelial, con un aumento de la permeabilidad, y cambios en la microbiota intestinal. Los receptores de tipo Toll (TLRs) participan en el reconocimiento bacteriano en el intestino y en el control neuroinmune local, estando, por tanto, implicados en la regulación de la función barrera del epitelio ...

  19. Gut hormones, and short bowel syndrome: The enigmatic role of glucagon-like peptide-2 in the regulation of intestinal adaptation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GR Martin; PL Beck; DL Sigalet

    2006-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) refers to the malabsorption of nutrients, water, and essential vitamins as a result of disease or surgical removal of parts of the small intestine. The most common reasons for removing part of the small intestine are due to surgical intervention for the treatment of either Crohn's disease or necrotizing enterocolitis. Intestinal adaptation following resection may take weeks to months to be achieved, thus nutritional support requires a variety of therapeutic measures, which include parenteral nutrition. Improper nutrition management can leave the SBS patient malnourished and/or dehydrated, which can be life threatening. The development of therapeutic strategies that reduce both the complications and medical costs associated with SBS/long-term parenteral nutrition while enhancing the intestinal adaptive response would be valuable.Currently, therapeutic options available for the treatment of SBS are limited. There are many potential stimulators of intestinal adaptation including peptide hormones, growth factors, and neuronally-derived components. Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is one potential treatment for gastrointestinal disorders associated with insufficient mucosal function. A significant body of evidence demonstrates that GLP-2is atrophic hormone that plays an important role in controlling intestinal adaptation. Recent data from clinical trials demonstrate that GLP-2 is safe, well-tolerated, and promotes intestinal growth in SBS patients. However,the mechanism of action and the localization of the glucagon-like peptide-2 receptor (GLP-2R) remains an enigma. This review summarizes the role of a number of mucosal-derived factors that might be involved with intestinal adaptation processes; however, this discussion primarily examines the physiology, mechanism of action,and utility of GLP-2 in the regulation of intestinal mucosal growth.

  20. Synthetic Peptides as Receptors in Affinity Sensors: A Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, van den Dave J.; Kooyman, Rob P.H.; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; Welling, Gjalt W.

    1993-01-01

    A relatively simple method for immobilizing synthetic peptides as a receptor onto a gold surface using the self-assembling monolayer (SAM) technique has been investigated. A synthetic peptide with an amino acid sequence similar to the 9-21 gD sequence of herpes simplex virus type 1 was modified with

  1. Designing of peptides with desired half-life in intestine-like environment

    KAUST Repository

    Sharma, Arun

    2014-08-20

    Background: In past, a number of peptides have been reported to possess highly diverse properties ranging from cell penetrating, tumor homing, anticancer, anti-hypertensive, antiviral to antimicrobials. Owing to their excellent specificity, low-toxicity, rich chemical diversity and availability from natural sources, FDA has successfully approved a number of peptide-based drugs and several are in various stages of drug development. Though peptides are proven good drug candidates, their usage is still hindered mainly because of their high susceptibility towards proteases degradation. We have developed an in silico method to predict the half-life of peptides in intestine-like environment and to design better peptides having optimized physicochemical properties and half-life.Results: In this study, we have used 10mer (HL10) and 16mer (HL16) peptides dataset to develop prediction models for peptide half-life in intestine-like environment. First, SVM based models were developed on HL10 dataset which achieved maximum correlation R/R2 of 0.57/0.32, 0.68/0.46, and 0.69/0.47 using amino acid, dipeptide and tripeptide composition, respectively. Secondly, models developed on HL16 dataset showed maximum R/R2 of 0.91/0.82, 0.90/0.39, and 0.90/0.31 using amino acid, dipeptide and tripeptide composition, respectively. Furthermore, models that were developed on selected features, achieved a correlation (R) of 0.70 and 0.98 on HL10 and HL16 dataset, respectively. Preliminary analysis suggests the role of charged residue and amino acid size in peptide half-life/stability. Based on above models, we have developed a web server named HLP (Half Life Prediction), for predicting and designing peptides with desired half-life. The web server provides three facilities; i) half-life prediction, ii) physicochemical properties calculation and iii) designing mutant peptides.Conclusion: In summary, this study describes a web server \\'HLP\\' that has been developed for assisting scientific

  2. Transport of peptidomimetic drugs by the intestinal Di/tri-peptide transporter, PepT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodin, Birger; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Steffansen, Bente

    2002-01-01

    The apical membrane of small intestinal enterocytes possess an uptake system for di- and tripeptides. The physiological function of the system is to transport small peptides resulting from digestion of dietary protein. Moreover, due to the broad substrate specificity of the system, it is also cap...... an updated introduction to the transport system and discuss the substrate characteristics of the di/tri-peptide transporter system with special emphasis on chemically modified substrates and prodrugs....

  3. Recruitment of opioid peptide-containing neutrophils is independent of formyl peptide receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackel, D; Stolz, A; Mousa, S A; Brack, A; Rittner, H L

    2011-01-01

    In complete Freund's adjuvants (CFA) inflammation opioid containing neutrophils release opioid peptides upon stimulation and mediate peripheral analgesia. Neutrophil migration is regulated partially by chemokines, but other mediators e.g. formyl peptides could also contribute. In vitro, formyl peptides but not Mycobacterium butyricum (CFA component) induced migration of neutrophils. In contrast, local formyl peptide injection did not induce leukocyte recruitment in vivo due to insufficient up-regulation of adhesion molecule expression. Furthermore, leukocyte recruitment and peripheral opioid-mediated analgesia were unaffected by systemic formyl peptide receptor blockade in CFA inflammation. Thus, while formyl peptides do not regulate migration they directly stimulate opioid peptide release. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Immunomodulatory effects of endogenous and synthetic peptides activating opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorska, Dorota K; Gach, Katarzyna; Janecka, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The main role of endogenous opioid peptides is the modulation of pain. Opioid peptides exert their analgesic activity by binding to the opioid receptors distributed widely in the central nervous system (CNS). However, opioid receptors are also found on tissues and organs outside the CNS, including the cells of the immune system, indicating that opioids are capable of exerting additional effects in periphery. Morphine, which is a gold standard in the treatment of chronic pain, is well-known for its immunosuppressive effects. Much less is known about the immunomodulatory effects exerted by endogenous (enkephalins, endorphins, dynorphins and endomorphins) and synthetic peptides activating opioid receptors. In this review we tried to summarize opioid peptide-mediated modulation of immune cell functions which can be stimulatory as well as inhibitory.

  5. Intestinal Permeability and Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 in Children with Autism: A Controlled Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Marli A.; Sigalet, David L.; Holst, Jens J.; Meddings, Jon B.; Wood, Julie; Sharkey, Keith A.

    2008-01-01

    We measured small intestinal permeability using a lactulose:mannitol sugar permeability test in a group of children with autism, with current or previous gastrointestinal complaints. Secondly, we examined whether children with autism had an abnormal glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) response to feeding. Results were compared with sibling controls…

  6. Intestinal permeability and glucagon-like peptide-2 in children with autism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Marli A; Sigalet, David L; Holst, Jens Juul

    2008-01-01

    We measured small intestinal permeability using a lactulose:mannitol sugar permeability test in a group of children with autism, with current or previous gastrointestinal complaints. Secondly, we examined whether children with autism had an abnormal glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) response...

  7. Acylation of salmon calcitonin modulates in vitro intestinal peptide flux through membrane permeability enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Sofie; Linderoth, Lars; Bjerregaard, Simon;

    2015-01-01

    hypothesize that tailoring the acylation may be used to optimize intestinal translocation. This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of the therapeutic peptide salmon calcitonin (sCT), which lowers blood calcium, by systematically increasing acyl chain length at two positions, in order to elucidate...

  8. Effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide on pulmonary surfactants phospholipid synthesis in lung explants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian LI; Zi-qiang LUO; Fu-wen ZHOU; Dan-dan FENG; Cha-xiang GUAN; Chang-qing ZHANG; Xiu-hong SUN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on pulmonary surfactants (PS) phospholipid synthesis in cultured lung explants. METHODS: Lung explants were cultured with serum-free medium, [methyl-3H]choline incorporation, total phospholipid, phosphatidylcholine, activity of choline-phosphate cytidylyltransferase (CCT) and CCTα mRNA level in lung explants were determined. RESULTS: (1) VIP (10-10-10-7 mol/L) for 16 h promoted [methyl-3H]choline incorporation in dose dependence and VIP (10-8 mol/L) for 2 h-16 h promoted [methylz3H]choline incorporation in time dependence. (2) VIP (10-8 mol/L) enhanced the contents of total phospholipidsand phosphatidylcholine in lung explants. (3) VIP (10-10-10-7 mol/L) elevated microsomal CCT activity of lung explants in dose dependence. (4) VIP (10-8 mol/L) increased expression of CCTα mRNA in lung explants and alveolar type Ⅱ cells (ATII). (5) [D-P-Cl-Phe(6)-Leu(17)]-VIP (10-6 mol/L), a VIP receptors antagonist, abolished the increase of [3H]choline incorporation, microsomal CCT activity and CCTα mRNA level induced by VIP (10-8 mol/L) in lung explants. CONCLUSION: VIP could enhance synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, the major component of pulmonary surfactants by enhancing microsomal CCT activity and CCTα mRNA level via VIP receptormediated pathway.

  9. Mycobacteria attenuate nociceptive responses by formyl peptide receptor triggered opioid peptide release from neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike L Rittner

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In inflammation, pain is regulated by a balance of pro- and analgesic mediators. Analgesic mediators include opioid peptides which are secreted by neutrophils at the site of inflammation, leading to activation of opioid receptors on peripheral sensory neurons. In humans, local opioids and opioid peptides significantly downregulate postoperative as well as arthritic pain. In rats, inflammatory pain is induced by intraplantar injection of heat inactivated Mycobacterium butyricum, a component of complete Freund's adjuvant. We hypothesized that mycobacterially derived formyl peptide receptor (FPR and/or toll like receptor (TLR agonists could activate neutrophils, leading to opioid peptide release and inhibition of inflammatory pain. In complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammation, thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds of the paw were quantified (Hargreaves and Randall-Selitto methods, respectively. Withdrawal time to heat was decreased following systemic neutrophil depletion as well as local injection of opioid receptor antagonists or anti-opioid peptide (i.e. Met-enkephalin, beta-endorphin antibodies indicating an increase in pain. In vitro, opioid peptide release from human and rat neutrophils was measured by radioimmunoassay. Met-enkephalin release was triggered by Mycobacterium butyricum and formyl peptides but not by TLR-2 or TLR-4 agonists. Mycobacterium butyricum induced a rise in intracellular calcium as determined by FURA loading and calcium imaging. Opioid peptide release was blocked by intracellular calcium chelation as well as phosphoinositol-3-kinase inhibition. The FPR antagonists Boc-FLFLF and cyclosporine H reduced opioid peptide release in vitro and increased inflammatory pain in vivo while TLR 2/4 did not appear to be involved. In summary, mycobacteria activate FPR on neutrophils, resulting in tonic secretion of opioid peptides from neutrophils and in a decrease in inflammatory pain. Future therapeutic strategies may aim

  10. Enteroendocrine-derived glucagon-like peptide-2 controls intestinal amino acid transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer; Koehler, Jacqueline; Yusta, Bernardo; Bahrami, Jasmine; Matthews, Dianne; Rafii, Mahroukh; Pencharz, Paul B; Drucker, Daniel J

    2017-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is co-secreted with GLP-1 from gut endocrine cells, and both peptides act as growth factors to expand the surface area of the mucosal epithelium. Notably, GLP-2 also enhances glucose and lipid transport in enterocytes; however, its actions on control of amino acid (AA) transport remain unclear. Here we examined the mechanisms linking gain and loss of GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R) signaling to control of intestinal amino acid absorption in mice. Absorption, transport, and clearance of essential AAs, specifically lysine, were measured in vivo by Liquid Chromatography triple quadrupole Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and ex vivo with Ussing chambers using intestinal preparations from Glp2r(+/+) and Glp2r(-/-) mice. Immunoblotting determined jejunal levels of protein components of signaling pathways (PI3K-AKT, and mTORC1-pS6-p4E-BP1) following administration of GLP-2, protein gavage, and rapamycin to fasted Glp2r(+/+) and Glp2r(-/-) mice. Expression of AA transporters from full thickness jejunum and 4F2hc from brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) was measured by real-time PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. Acute administration of GLP-2 increased basal AA absorption in vivo and augmented basal lysine transport ex vivo. GLP-2-stimulated lysine transport was attenuated by co-incubation with wortmannin, rapamycin, or tetrodotoxin ex vivo. Phosphorylation of mTORC1 effector proteins S6 and 4E-BP1 was significantly increased in wild-type mice in response to GLP-2 alone, or when co-administered with protein gavage, and abolished following oral gavage of rapamycin. In contrast, activation of GLP-1R signaling did not enhance S6 phosphorylation. Disruption of GLP-2 action in Glp2r(-/-) mice reduced lysine transport ex vivo and attenuated the phosphorylation of S6 and 4E-BP1 in response to oral protein. Moreover, the expression of cationic AA transporter slc7a9 in response to refeeding, and the abundance of 4F2hc in BBMVs following protein gavage

  11. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and other preprovasoactive intestinal polypeptide-derived peptides in the female and male genital tract: localization, biosynthesis, and functional and clinical significance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, B; Fahrenkrug, J

    1995-01-01

    in the control of erection. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide has been suggested as a causative factor in some diseases of the genital organs (e.g., it may play a pathophysiologic role in male impotence and the peptide is currently used in the treatment of this condition). Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide may...

  12. The Role of Pattern Recognition Receptors in Intestinal Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukata, Masayuki; Arditi, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of microorganisms by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) is the primary component of innate immunity that is responsible for the maintenance of host-microbial interactions in intestinal mucosa. Disregulation in host-commensal interactions has been implicated as the central pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which predisposes to developing colorectal cancer. Recent animal studies have begun to outline some unique physiology and pathology involving each PRR signaling in the intestine. The major roles played by PRRs in the gut appear to be regulation of the number and the composition of commensal bacteria, epithelial proliferation and mucosal permiability in response to epithelial injury. In addition, PRR signaling in lamina propria immune cells may be involved in induction of inflammation in response to invasion of pathogens. Because some PRR-deficient mice have shown variable susceptibility to colitis, the outcome of intestinal inflammation may be modified depending on PRR signaling in epithelial cells, immune cells, and the composition of commensal flora. Through recent findings in animal models of IBD, this review will discuss how abnormal PRR signaling may contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammation and inflammation-associated tumorigenesis in the intestine. PMID:23515136

  13. Co-expressed peptide receptors in breast cancer as a molecular basis for in vivo multireceptor tumour targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reubi, Jean Claude; Gugger, Mathias; Waser, Beatrice [Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, University of Berne (Switzerland)

    2002-07-01

    Breast cancers can express different types of peptide receptors such as somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and NPY(Y{sub 1}) receptors. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate which is the most appropriate peptide receptor or peptide receptor combination for in vivo diagnostic and therapeutic targeting of breast cancers. Seventy-seven primary breast cancers and 15 breast cancer lymph node metastases were investigated in vitro for their expression of somatostatin, VPAC{sub 1}, GRP and NPY(Y{sub 1}) receptors using in vitro receptor autoradiography on successive tissue sections with {sup 125}I-[Tyr{sup 3}]-octreotide, {sup 125}I-VIP, {sup 125}I-[Tyr{sup 4}]-bombesin and {sup 125}I-[Leu{sup 31},Pro{sup 34}]-PYY respectively. This study identified two groups of tumours: a group of 68 tumours (88%) with at least one receptor expressed at high density (>2,000 dpm/mg tissue) that may provide a strong predictive value for successful in vivo targeting, and a group of nine tumours (12%) with no receptors or only a low density of them (<2,000 dpm/mg tissue). In the group with high receptor density, 50 of the 68 tumours (74%) expressed GRP receptors, 45 (66%) expressed NPY(Y{sub 1}) receptors, 25 (37%) expressed VPAC{sub 1} receptors and 14 (21%) expressed somatostatin receptors. Mean density was 9,819{+-}530 dpm/mg tissue for GRP receptors, 9,135{+-}579 dpm/mg for NPY(Y{sub 1}) receptors, 4,337{+-}528 dpm/mg for somatostatin receptors and 3,437{+-}306 dpm/mg for VPAC{sub 1} receptors. It is of note that tumours expressing NPY(Y{sub 1}) or GRP receptors, or both, were found in 63/68 (93%) cases. Lymph node metastases showed a similar receptor profile to the corresponding primary tumour. This in vitro study strongly suggests that the combination of radiolabelled GRP and Y{sub 1} analogues should allow targeting of breast carcinomas and their lymph node metastases for in vivo peptide receptor scintigraphy and radiotherapy

  14. cDNA Cloning, Sequence Analysis and Tissue Specific Expression of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Type 1 Receptor (VIPR-1)in Quails%鹌鹑VIPR-1的克隆、序列特征和组织表达分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周敏; 李莹; 沈栩; 徐海平; 张成广; 张细权

    2012-01-01

    [目的]对鹌鹑血管活性肠肽1型受体(vasoacitve intestinal peptide type 1 receptor,VIPR-1)cDNA全长基因进行克隆及分析,为鹌鹑的分子育种提供基础资料.[方法]通过比较基因组学,采用RT-PCR和RACE技术,获得鹌鹑了VIPR-1 cDNA全长序列;通过生物学软件对其核苷酸序列和氨基酸序列进行了比对;采用实时定量PCR方法检测了VIPR-1在8个组织中的表达.[结果]鹌鹑VIPR-1的cDNA全长2 427 bp,包含了1 341 bp的开放性阅读框,编码446个氨基酸;序列分析显示,克隆获得的鹌鹑VIPR-1编码区序列与鸡该编码区序列存在41个碱基的差异,造成4个氨基酸残基的不同;VIPR-1氨基酸序列与鸡、火鸡、斑胸草雀的氨基酸的一致性分别为99.1%、92.2%、88%,与其它物种的一致性在60%-78%;各物种VIPR-1蛋白进化树符合物种进化规律;VIPR-1理化性质表明该蛋白为一偏碱性蛋白,蛋白二级结构主要由α-螺旋、β-折叠和β-转角构成;在N-端存在一个由22个氨基酸残基(MKSARLRVLLPLLGCLLSAASS)组成的信号肽,7个α-螺旋构成的跨膜域和C-端结构域,在跨膜域有胆固醇结合位点;在所检测的8个组织中VIPR-1 mRNA均有表达,在小肠中表达量最高.[结论]成功地克隆了鹌鹑VIPR-1 cDNA全长序列,该基因在小肠组织的表达高于其它组织,在跨膜域存在胆固醇结合位点.%[Objective] Vasoactive intestinal peptide type 1 receptor (VIPR-1) plays an important role in poultry reproduction, but the gene and its analysis have not been reported in quail prior to this study. The objective of this study was to clone the cDNA of quail VIPR-1, analyze its sequence and tissue expression pattern. [Method] Based on comparative genomics, the cDNA sequence of quail VIPR-1 was obtained by RT-PCR and RACE PCR. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences were analyzed and compared with that of other species. The expression levels of VIPR-1 in eight quail tissues were detected by

  15. Acylation of salmon calcitonin modulates in vitro intestinal peptide flux through membrane permeability enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trier, Sofie; Linderoth, Lars; Bjerregaard, Simon; Strauss, Holger M; Rahbek, Ulrik L; Andresen, Thomas L

    2015-10-01

    Acylation of peptide drugs with fatty acid chains has proven beneficial for prolonging systemic circulation, as well as increasing enzymatic stability and interactions with lipid cell membranes. Thus, acylation offers several potential benefits for oral delivery of therapeutic peptides, and we hypothesize that tailoring the acylation may be used to optimize intestinal translocation. This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of the therapeutic peptide salmon calcitonin (sCT), which lowers blood calcium, by systematically increasing acyl chain length at two positions, in order to elucidate its influence on intestinal cell translocation and membrane interaction. We find that acylation drastically increases in vitro intestinal peptide flux and confers a transient permeability enhancing effect on the cell layer. The analogues permeabilize model lipid membranes, indicating that the effect is due to a solubilization of the cell membrane, similar to transcellular oral permeation enhancers. The effect is dependent on pH, with larger effect at lower pH, and is impacted by acylation chain length and position. Compared to the unacylated peptide backbone, N-terminal acylation with a short chain provides 6- or 9-fold increase in peptide translocation at pH 7.4 and 5.5, respectively. Prolonging the chain length appears to hamper translocation, possibly due to self-association or aggregation, although the long chain acylated analogues remain superior to the unacylated peptide. For K(18)-acylation a short chain provides a moderate improvement, whereas medium and long chain analogues are highly efficient, with a 12-fold increase in permeability compared to the unacylated peptide backbone, on par with currently employed oral permeation enhancers. For K(18)-acylation the medium chain acylation appears to be optimal, as elongating the chain causes greater binding to the cell membrane but similar permeability, and we speculate that increasing the chain length further may

  16. Intestinal absorption of amino acids and peptides in Hartnup disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J V; Marrs, T C; Addison, J M; Burston, D; Clegg, K M; Lloyd, J K; Matthews, D M; Seakins, J W

    1976-04-01

    Absorption of free and peptide-bound amino acids was investigated in a girl with Hartnup disorder aged 26 months. Plasma levels of amino acids were followed after oral administration of (1) an amino acid mixture simulating casein and (2) an equivalent dose of a partial enzymic hydrolysate of casein containing oligopeptides in addition to free amino acids. The results suggested that many neutral amino acids were poorly absorbed when given in the free form, but much more readily absorbed when given as peptides. Unexpectedly, the results also suggested that glutamic acid was poorly absorbed when given in the free form. The results obtained with threonine could not be interpreted. There was an increased renal clearance of many neutral amino acids, including glycine, but clearance of proline was not increased. Most amino acids with an increased renal clearance also appeared to be poorly absorbed when given by mouth in the free form.

  17. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: Past, present, and future

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay Kalra; Baruah, Manash P.; Rakesh K Sahay; Ambika Gopalakrishnan Unnikrishnan; Shweta Uppal; Omolara Adetunji

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)–based therapy improves glycaemic control through multiple mechanisms, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia and the additional benefit of clinically relevant weight loss. Since Starling and Bayliss first proposed the existence of intestinal secretions that stimulate the pancreas, tremendous progress has been made in the area of incretins. As a number of GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) continue to become available, physicians will soon face the challenge of selec...

  18. Effects of composite antimicrobial peptides in weanling piglets challenged with deoxynivalenol: II. Intestinal morphology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, H; Tan, B E; Wu, M M; Yin, Y L; Li, T J; Yuan, D X; Li, L

    2013-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) affects animal and human health and targets the gastrointestinal tract. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of composite antimicrobial peptides (CAP) to repair intestinal injury in piglets challenged with DON. A total of 28 piglets (Duroc × Landrace × Large Yorkshire) weaned at 28 d of age were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 treatments (7 pigs/treatment): negative control, basal diet (NC), basal diet + 0.4% composite antimicrobial peptide (CAP), basal diet + 4 mg/kg DON (DON), and basal diet + 4 mg/kg DON + 0.4% CAP (DON + CAP). After an adaptation period of 7 d, blood samples were collected on d 15 and 30 after the initiation of treatment for determinations of the concentrations of D-lactate and diamine oxidase. At the end of the study, all piglets were slaughtered to obtain small intestines for the determination of intestinal morphology, epithelial cell proliferation, and protein expression in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. The results showed that DON increased serum concentrations of D-lactate and diamine oxidase, and these values in the CAP and DON + CAP treatments were less than those in the NC and DON treatments, respectively (P morphology and promoted intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and protein synthesis, indicating that CAP may repair the intestinal injury induced by DON.

  19. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, reduces intimal thickening after vascular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hiromasa; Nomiyama, Takashi; Mita, Tomoya; Yasunari, Eisuke; Azuma, Kosuke; Komiya, Koji; Arakawa, Masayuki; Jin, Wen Long; Kanazawa, Akio; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Fujitani, Yoshio; Hirose, Takahisa; Watada, Hirotaka

    2011-02-04

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 is a hormone secreted by L cells of the small intestine and stimulates glucose-dependent insulin response. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists such as exendin-4 are currently used in type 2 diabetes, and considered to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. To further elucidate the effect of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on cardiovascular diseases, we investigated the effects of exendin-4 on intimal thickening after endothelial injury. Under continuous infusion of exendin-4 at 24 nmol/kg/day, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to endothelial denudation injury of the femoral artery. Treatment of mice with exendin-4 reduced neointimal formation at 4weeks after arterial injury without altering body weight or various metabolic parameters. In addition, in vitro studies of isolated murine, rat and human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells showed the expression of GLP-1 receptor. The addition of 10nM exendin-4 to cultured smooth muscle cells significantly reduced their proliferation induced by platelet-derived growth factor. Our results suggested that exendin-4 reduced intimal thickening after vascular injury at least in part by the suppression of platelet-derived growth factor-induced smooth muscle cells proliferation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of ferrous-chelating hairtail peptides on iron deficiency and intestinal flora in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Min; Deng, Shang-Gui; Huang, Sai-Bo; Li, Ying-Jie; Song, Ru

    2016-06-01

    Chelating agents, such as small peptides, can decrease free iron content and increase iron bioavailability. They may have promising therapeutic potential and may prevent the pro-oxidant effects of low molecular weight iron. Hairtail is a species of fish that is rich in easily digestible proteins. We extended this strategy for iron delivery by using an enzymatic hydrolysate of hairtail as the chelating agent and found that the ferrous-chelating hairtail peptides have anti-anaemic activity in Sprague-Dawley rats with anaemia. The anti-anaemic activity of ferrous-chelating hairtail peptides prepared by enzymatic hydrolysis of the hairtail and ferrous chelation was studied in rat models of iron deficiency anaemia. After the end of the 35 d experiment, we noted significant differences in haemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, haemoglobin distribution width, and ferritin concentrations between those animals supplemented with ferrous-chelating hairtail peptides and FeSO4 and healthy animals. There were no negative side effects on the animals' growth or behaviour. There was no obvious inflammation in the intestinal mucosa lamina propria and no unbalance of intestinal flora. The novel ferrous-chelating hairtail peptides may be a suitable fortificant for improving iron-deficiency status. Our findings demonstrated that this multi-tracer technique has many applications in nutritional research. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Receptor epitope usage by an interleukin-5 mimetic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishino, Tetsuya; Urbina, Cecilia; Bhattacharya, Madhushree; Panarello, Dominick; Chaiken, Irwin

    2005-06-17

    The cyclic peptide AF17121 is a library-derived antagonist for human interleukin-5 (IL5) receptor alpha (IL5Ralpha) and inhibits IL5 activity. Our previous results have demonstrated that the sixth arginine residue of the peptide is crucial for the inhibitory effect and that several acidic residues in the N- and C-terminal regions also make a contribution, although to a lesser extent (Ruchala, P., Varadi, G., Ishino, T., Scibek, J., Bhattacharya, M., Urbina, C., Van Ryk, D., Uings, I., and Chaiken, I. (2004) Biopolymers 73, 556-568). However, the recognition mechanism of the receptor has remained unresolved. In this study, AF17121 was fused to thioredoxin by recombinant DNA techniques and examined for IL5Ralpha interaction using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor method. Kinetic analysis revealed that the dissociation rate of the peptide.receptor complex is comparable with that of the cytokine.receptor complex. The fusion peptide competed with IL5 for both biological function and interaction with IL5Ralpha, indicating that the binding sites on the receptor are shared by AF17121 and IL5. To define the epitope residues for AF17121, we defined its binding footprint on IL5Ralpha by alanine substitution of Asp(55), Asp(56), Glu(58), Lys(186), Arg(188), and Arg(297) of the receptor. Marked effects on the interaction were observed in all three fibronectin type III domains of IL5Ralpha, in particular Asp(55), Arg(188), and Arg(297) in the D1, D2, and D3 domains, respectively. This footprint represents a significant subset of that for IL5 binding. The fact that AF17121 mimics the receptor binding capability of IL5 but antagonizes biological function evokes several models for how IL5 induces activation of the multisubunit receptor system.

  2. Expression of receptors for gut peptides in pancreata of BOP-treated and control hamsters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, C.; Biemond, I.; Appel, M.J.; Visser, C.J.T.; Woutersen, R.A.; Lamers, C.B.H.W.

    1996-01-01

    The growth of pancreatic cancers may be influenced by certain gut peptides. However, the alteration of gut peptide receptors in the progress of pancreatic carcinogenesis is largely unknown. With storage phosphor autoradiography, this study visualized and characterized receptors for cholecystokinin (

  3. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of a Water-in-Oil Microemulsion System for Enhanced Peptide Intestinal Delivery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Dongyun; Kobayashi, Taku; Russo, Steven; Li, Fengling; Plevy, Scott E; Gambling, Todd M; Carson, Johnny L; Mumper, Russell J

    .... The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate a water-in-oil (w/o) microemulsion system in vitro and in vivo for local intestinal delivery of water-soluble peptides after oral administration...

  4. Commensal-epithelial signaling mediated via formyl peptide receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, Christy C; Jones, Rheinallt M; Kwon, Young Man; Nusrat, Asma; Neish, Andrew S

    2010-12-01

    Commensal bacteria and/or their products engender beneficial effects to the mammalian gut, including stimulating physiological cellular turnover and enhancing wound healing, without activating overt inflammation. In the present study, we observed commensal bacteria-mediated activation of the noninflammatory extracellular signal-regulated kinase[ERK]/mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt signaling pathways in gut epithelial cells and delineated a mechanism for this bacterially activated signaling. All tested strains of commensal bacteria induced ERK phosphorylation without stimulating pro-inflammatory phospho-IκB or pro-apoptotic phospho-c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase, with Lactobacillus species being most potent. This pattern of signaling activation was recapitulated using the peptide N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, a bacterial product known to stimulate signaling events in mammalian phagocytes. Sensing of N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe by gut epithelial cells occurs via recently characterized formyl peptide receptors located in the plasma membrane. Both commensal bacteria and N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe application to the apical surface of polarized gut epithelial cells resulted in specific formyl peptide receptor activation. In addition, pretreatment of model epithelia and murine colon with Boc2 (a specific peptide antagonist) or pertussis toxin (a G(i)-protein inhibitor) abolished commensal-mediated ERK phosphorylation. Taken together, these data show that commensal bacteria specifically activate the ERK/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in an formyl peptide receptor-dependent manner, delineating a mechanism by which commensal bacteria contribute to cellular signaling in gut epithelia.

  5. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Inhibits Human Small-Cell Lung Cancer Proliferation in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruno, Kaname; Absood, Afaf; Said, Sami I.

    1998-11-01

    Small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) is an aggressive, rapidly growing and metastasizing, and highly fatal neoplasm. We report that vasoactive intestinal peptide inhibits the proliferation of SCLC cells in culture and dramatically suppresses the growth of SCLC tumor-cell implants in athymic nude mice. In both cases, the inhibition was mediated apparently by a cAMP-dependent mechanism, because the inhibition was enhanced by the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine in proportion to increases in intracellular cAMP levels, and the inhibition was abolished by selective inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. If confirmed in clinical trials, this antiproliferative action of vasoactive intestinal peptide may offer a new and promising means of suppressing SCLC in human subjects, without the toxic side effects of chemotherapeutic agents.

  6. Occurrence of substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and calcitonin gene-related peptide in dermographism and cold urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallengren, J; Möller, H; Ekman, R

    1987-01-01

    Substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) were assayed in lesions and normal skin of patients with dermographism and cold urticaria utilizing suction-induced blisters. There was no difference in SP and VIP concentrations between challenged and control skin of urticaria patients. On the whole, however, the concentration of both neuropeptides, and VIP in particular, was higher in the urticaria patients than in control subjects. CGRP levels were not increased. SP and VIP in blood samples from veins draining challenged skin areas were below the detection limit. It is concluded that SP and VIP may potentiate histamine in wheal formation and thus contribute to the increased reactivity of the skin to trauma and temperature changes in patients with physical urticaria.

  7. Melanocortin Receptors, Melanotropic Peptides and Penile Erection

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Stephen H.; Mayorov, Alexander V.; Balse-Srinivasan, Preeti; Hruby, Victor J.; Vanderah, Todd W.; Wessells, Hunter

    2009-01-01

    Penile erection is a complex physiologic event resulting from the interactions of the nervous system on a highly specialized vascular organ. Activation of central nervous system melanocortinergic (MC) receptors with either endogenous or synthetic melanotropic ligands may initiate and/or facilitate spontaneous penile erection. While the CNS contains principally the MC3 and MC4 receptor subtypes, there is conflicting data as to which receptor mediates erection. Although the MC4R is emerging as the principle effector of MC induced erection, the role of the MC3R is poorly understood. Manipulation of each receptor subtype with newly synthesized receptor specific agonists and antagonists, as well as knockout mice, has elucidated their individual contributions. Novel data from our laboratories suggests that antagonism of forebrain MC3R may enhance melanocortin-induced erections. Furthermore, melanocortin agents may interact with better-studied systems such as oxytocinergic pathways at the hypothalamic, brainstem or spinal level. Current therapies for erectile dysfunction target end organ vascular tissue. Manipulation of MC receptors may provide an alternative, centrally mediated therapeutic approach for erectile and other sexual dysfunctions. The non-specific “superpotent” MC agonist, PT-141, which is the carboxylate derivative of MT-II, has reached phase II human trials. Through their centrally mediated activity, melanocortin agonists have potential to treat erectile dysfunction as well as possible applications to the unmet medical needs of decreased sexual motivation and loss of libido. PMID:17584130

  8. The effect of glucagon-like Peptide-2 receptor agonists on colonic anastomotic wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redstone, Heather A; Buie, William D; Hart, David A;

    2010-01-01

    Background. Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) is an intestinal specific trophic hormone, with therapeutic potential; the effects on intestinal healing are unknown. We used a rat model of colonic healing, under normoxic, and stress (hypoxic) conditions to examine the effect of GLP-2 on intestinal he...

  9. Steric and interactive barrier properties of intestinal mucus elucidated by particle diffusion and peptide permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boegh, Marie; García-Díaz, María; Müllertz, Anette; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2015-09-01

    The mucus lining of the gastrointestinal tract epithelium is recognized as a barrier to efficient oral drug delivery. Recently, a new in vitro model for assessment of drug permeation across intestinal mucosa was established by applying a biosimilar mucus matrix to the surface of Caco-2 cell monolayers. The aim of the present study was to gain more insight into the steric and interactive barrier properties of intestinal mucus by studying the permeation of peptides and model compounds across the biosimilar mucus as well as across porcine intestinal mucus (PIM). As PIM disrupted the Caco-2 cell monolayers, a cell-free mucus barrier model was implemented in the studies. Both the biosimilar mucus and the PIM reduced the permeation of the selected peptide drugs to varying degrees illustrating the interactive properties of both mucus matrices. The reduction in peptide permeation was decreased depending on the cationicity and H-bonding capacity of the permeant clearly demonstrated by using the biosimilar mucus, whereas the larger inter sample variation of the PIM matrix obstructed similarly clear conclusions. Thus, for mechanistic studies of permeation across mucus and mucosa the biosimilar mucus offers a relevant and reproducible alternative to native mucus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Iodinated derivatives of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), PHI and PHM: purification, chemical characterization and biological activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMaster, D.; Suzuki, Y.; Rorstad, O.; Lederis, K.

    1987-07-01

    The iodination of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was studied, using a variety of enzymatic and chemical iodination methods. Reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to purify the reaction products. The lactoperoxidase-glucose oxidase method gave excellent results in terms of reproducibility, iodine incorporation, and yield of the non-oxidized products (Tyr(I)10)VIP and (Tyr(I)22)VIP, and was used to prepare both /sup 125/I and /sup 127/I labelled derivatives. In both cases, direct application to HPLC and a single column system were used. Although the oxidized peptides (Tyr(I)10,Met(O)17)VIP and (Tyr(I)22,Met(O)17)VIP could be generated to varying degrees directly by iodination of VIP, these were most conveniently prepared by iodination of (Met(O)17)VIP. Iodinated derivatives of the homologous peptides PHI and PHM were likewise prepared by rapid, one-step HPLC procedures. The site and degree of iodination were determined by HPLC peptide mapping of tryptic digests and amino acid analyses, and in the case of (Tyr(I)10)VIP also by sequencing. The vasorelaxant activities of the iodinated peptides in bovine cerebral artery preparations did not differ significantly from those of the corresponding noniodinated peptides, with the exception of (Tyr(I)10,Met(O)17)VIP and (Tyr(I)22,Met(O)17)VIP which, unlike (Met(O)17)VIP itself, had slightly lower potency than VIP.

  11. Pleiotropic effects of bombesin and neurotensin on intestinal mucosa: Not just trefoil peptides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stelios F Assimakopoulos; Chrisoula D Scopa; Vassiliki N Nikolopoulou; Constantine E Vagianos

    2008-01-01

    Bombesin and neurotensin are neuropeptides which exert a wide spectrum of biological actions on gastrointestinal tissues influencing intestinal growth and adaptation, intestinal motility, blood flow, secretion, nutrient absorption and immune response. Based mainly on their well-established potent enterotrophic effect, numerous experimental studies investigated their potential positive effect on the atrophic or injured intestinal mucosa. These peptides proved to be effective mucosa-healing factors, but the potential molecular and cellular mechanisms for this action remained unresolved. In a recently published study (World J Gastroenterol 2008; 14 (8): 1222-1230), it was shown that their protective effect on the intestine in experimentally induced inflammatory bowel disease was related to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiapoptotic actions. These results are in close agreement with our previous studies on jaundiced and hepatectomized rats that showed a regulatory effect of bombesin and neurotensin on critical cellular processes such as enterocyte' proliferation and death, oxidative stress and redox equilibrium, tight junctions' formation and function, and inflammatory response. The pleiotropic effects of bombesin and neurotensin on diverse types of intestinal injury may justify their consideration for clinical trials.

  12. Functional characterization of three mouse formyl peptide receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hui-Qiong; Liao, Dan; Wang, Zhen-Guo; Wang, Zhong-Li; Zhou, Hu-Chen; Wang, Ming-Wei; Ye, Richard D

    2013-02-01

    The evolutionary relationship and functional correlation between human formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) and their mouse counterparts remain incompletely understood. We examined three members of the mouse formyl peptide receptor subfamily (mFprs) and found that they differ in agonist preference and cellular distributions. When stably expressed in transfected rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells, mFpr1 was readily activated by N-formylated peptides derived from Listeria monocytogenes (fMIVTLF), Staphylococcus aureus (fMIFL), and mitochondria (fMMYALF). In contrast, the Escherichia coli-derived fMLF was 1000-fold less potent. The aforementioned peptides were much less efficacious at mFpr2, which responded better to the synthetic hexapeptide WKYMVm, the synthetic agonists Quin-C1 (a substituted quinazolinone), and compound 43 (a nitrosylated pyrazolone derivative). Saturation binding assays showed that mFpr1 and mFpr2 were expressed at similar levels on the cell surface, although their affinity for N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-Ile-Ile-Lys-fluorescein isothiocyanate varied by more than 1000-fold [dissociation constant (K(d)) values of 2.8 nM for mFpr1 and 4.8 μM for mFpr2]). Contrary to these receptors, mFpr-rs1 responded poorly to all the previously mentioned peptides that were tested. Fluorescent microscopy revealed an intracellular distribution pattern of mFpr-rs1. On the basis of these results, we conclude that mFpr1 is an ortholog of human FPR1 with certain pharmacologic properties of human FPR2/ALX, whereas mFpr2 has much lower affinity for formyl peptides. The intracellular distribution of mFpr-rs1 suggests an evolutionary correlation with human FPR3.

  13. Designer interface peptide grafts target estrogen receptor alpha dimerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, S. [Laboratory of Computational Biophysics & Bioengineering, Department of Physics, Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS 39174 (United States); Asare, B.K. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Biswas, P.K., E-mail: pbiswas@tougaloo.edu [Laboratory of Computational Biophysics & Bioengineering, Department of Physics, Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS 39174 (United States); Rajnarayanan, R.V., E-mail: rajendra@buffalo.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2016-09-09

    The nuclear transcription factor estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), triggered by its cognate ligand estrogen, regulates a variety of cellular signaling events. ERα is expressed in 70% of breast cancers and is a widely validated target for anti-breast cancer drug discovery. Administration of anti-estrogen to block estrogen receptor activation is still a viable anti-breast cancer treatment option but anti-estrogen resistance has been a significant bottle-neck. Dimerization of estrogen receptor is required for ER activation. Blocking ERα dimerization is therefore a complementary and alternative strategy to combat anti-estrogen resistance. Dimer interface peptide “I-box” derived from ER residues 503–518 specifically blocks ER dimerization. Recently using a comprehensive molecular simulation we studied the interaction dynamics of ERα LBDs in a homo-dimer. Based on this study, we identified three interface recognition peptide motifs LDKITDT (ERα residues 479–485), LQQQHQRLAQ (residues 497–506), and LSHIRHMSNK (residues 511–520) and reported the suitability of using LQQQHQRLAQ (ER 497–506) as a template to design inhibitors of ERα dimerization. Stability and self-aggregation of peptide based therapeutics poses a significant bottle-neck to proceed further. In this study utilizing peptide grafted to preserve their pharmacophoric recognition motif and assessed their stability and potential to block ERα mediated activity in silico and in vitro. The Grafted peptides blocked ERα mediated cell proliferation and viability of breast cancer cells but did not alter their apoptotic fate. We believe the structural clues identified in this study can be used to identify novel peptidometics and small molecules that specifically target ER dimer interface generating a new breed of anti-cancer agents. - Highlights: • Designer peptide grafts retain core molecular recognition motif during MD simulations. • Designer peptide grafts with Poly-ALA helix form stable

  14. Vaccination against Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis with T Cell Receptor Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Mark D.; Winters, Steven T.; Olee, Tsaiwei; Powell, Henry C.; Carlo, Dennis J.; Brostoff, Steven W.

    1989-11-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system mediated by CD4+ T cells reactive with myelin basic protein (MBP). Rats were rendered resistant to the induction of EAE by vaccination with synthetic peptides corresponding to idiotypic determinants of the β chain VDJ region and Jα regions of the T cell receptor (TCR) that are conserved among encephalitogenic T cells. These findings demonstrate the utility of TCR peptide vaccination for modulating the activity of autoreactive T cells and represent a general therapeutic approach for T cell--mediated pathogenesis.

  15. Intestinal growth adaptation and glucagon-like peptide 2 in rats with ileal--jejunal transposition or small bowel resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Hartmann, B; Kissow, Hannelouise;

    2001-01-01

    , and twofold in the distally resected group. Tissue GLP-2 levels were unchanged in resected rats. The data indicate that transposition of a distal part of the small intestine, and thereby exposure of L cells to a more nutrient-rich chyme, leads to intestinal growth. The adaptive intestinal growth is associated......Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2), produced by enteroendocrine L-cells, regulates intestinal growth. This study investigates circulating and intestinal GLP-2 levels in conditions with altered L-cell exposure to nutrients. Rats were allocated to the following experimental groups: ileal...... GLP-2 levels in the intestinal segments were unchanged. In resected rats with reduced intestinal capacity, adaptive small bowel growth was more pronounced following proximal resection than distal small bowel resection. Circulating GLP-2 levels increased threefold in proximally resected animals...

  16. Effect of Cordyceps sinensis mycelium on serum vasoactive intestinal peptide and substance P in mice with intestinal dysbacteriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-zhong DONG

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effect of Cordyceps sinensis mycelium on serum vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP and substance P (SP in mice with dysbacteriosis induced by antibiotics. Methods Forty-eight healthy SPF BALB/c mice were randomly divided into the normal control group (normal drink, the dysbacteriosis model group (induced by oral administration of 0.5 g/L ceftriaxone sodium, the natural recovery group (oral sterile water to replace antibiotic after reproduction of dysbacteriosis, and Cordyceps sinensis mycelium treatment group (treated by intragastric administration of Cordyceps sinensis mycelium. The feces were collected without contamination, and the change in intestinal bacterial number was observed with the plate dilution method. The volatile fatty acid was detected by chromatography. The serum VIP and SP contents were assayed with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results Compared with the normal control group, the numbers of probiotics, volatile fatty acids and serum VIP significantly decreased in the model group, while the serum SP markedly increased (P<0.01. Compared with the natural recovery group, the bacteria number, the quantities of volatile fatty acids and serum VIP significantly increased after the Cordyceps sinensis mycelium treatment, while the serum SP significantly decreased (P<0.01, P<0.05. Conclusion Cordyceps sinensis mycelium may effectively adjust the proportion of the probiotics in the mice with dysbacteriosis, and the mechanism is apparently related to alteration in the VIP and SP. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.11.06

  17. Non-peptide ligand binding to the formyl peptide receptor FPR2--A comparison to peptide ligand binding modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepniewski, Tomasz M; Filipek, Slawomir

    2015-07-15

    Ligands of the FPR2 receptor initiate many signaling pathways including activation of phospholipase C, protein kinase C, the mitogen-activated protein kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway. The possible actions include also calcium flux, superoxide generation, as well as migration and proliferation of monocytes. FPR2 activation may induce a pro- and anti-inflammatory effect depending on the ligand type. It is also found that this receptor is involved in tumor growth. Most of currently known FPR2 ligands are agonists since they were designed based on N-formyl peptides, which are natural agonists of formyl receptors. Since the non-peptide drugs are indispensable for effective treatment strategies, we performed a docking study of such ligands employing a generated dual template homology model of the FPR2 receptor. The study revealed different binding modes of particular classes of these drugs. Based on the obtained docking poses we proposed a detailed location of three hydrophobic pockets in orthosteric binding site of FPR2. Our model emphasizes the importance of aromatic stacking, especially with regard to residues His102(3.29) and Phe257(6.51), for binding of FPR2 ligands. We also identified other residues important for non-peptide ligand binding in the binding site of FPR2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Modulatory Effect of Gliadin Peptide 10-mer on Epithelial Intestinal CACO-2 Cell Inflammatory Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Capozzi

    Full Text Available Celiac Disease (CD is a chronic inflammatory enteropathy, triggered in genetically susceptible individuals by dietary gluten. Gluten is able to elicit proliferation of specific T cells and secretion of inflammatory cytokines in the small intestine. In this study we investigated the possibility that p10-mer, a decapeptide from durum wheat (QQPQDAVQPF, which was previously shown to prevent the activation of celiac peripheral lymphocytes, may exert an inhibitory effect on peptic-tryptic digested gliadin (PT-Gly-stimulated intestinal carcinoma CACO-2 cells. In these cells, incubated with PT-Gly or p31-43 α-gliadin derived peptide in the presence or in the absence of p10-mer, IRAK1 activation and NF-kB, ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation were measured by immunoblotting, Cyclooxigenase 2 (COX-2 activity by PGE-2 release assay, and production of cytokines in the cell supernatants by ELISA. Our results showed that pre-treatment of CACO-2 cells with p10-mer significantly inhibited IRAK1 activation and NF-kB, ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, as well as COX-2 activity (i.e. PGE-2 release and production of the IL-6 and IL-8 pro-inflammatory cytokines, induced by gliadin peptides. These findings demonstrate the inhibitory effect of the p10-mer peptide on inflammatory response in CACO-2 cells. The results of the present study show that this p10-mer peptide can modulate "in vitro" the inflammatory response induced by gliadin peptides, allowing to move towards new therapeutic strategies. Turning off the inflammatory response, may in fact represent a key target in the immunotherapy of celiac disease.

  19. Sweet taste receptor expression in ruminant intestine and its activation by artificial sweeteners to regulate glucose absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, A W; Al-Rammahi, M; Zhang, C; Bravo, D; Calsamiglia, S; Shirazi-Beechey, S P

    2014-01-01

    Absorption of glucose from the lumen of the intestine into enterocytes is accomplished by sodium-glucose co-transporter 1 (SGLT1). In the majority of mammalian species, expression (this includes activity) of SGLT1 is upregulated in response to increased dietary monosaccharides. This regulatory pathway is initiated by sensing of luminal sugar by the gut-expressed sweet taste receptor. The objectives of our studies were to determine (1) if the ruminant intestine expresses the sweet taste receptor, which consists of two subunits [taste 1 receptor 2 (T1R2) and 3 (T1R3)], and other key signaling molecules required for SGLT1 upregulation in nonruminant intestines, and (2) whether T1R2-T1R3 sensing of artificial sweeteners induces release of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) and enhances SGLT1 expression. We found that the small intestine of sheep and cattle express T1R2, T1R3, G-protein gustducin, and GLP-2 in enteroendocrine L-cells. Maintaining 110-d-old ruminating calves for 60d on a diet containing a starter concentrate and the artificial sweetener Sucram (consisting of saccharin and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone; Pancosma SA, Geneva, Switzerland) enhances (1) Na(+)-dependent d-glucose uptake by over 3-fold, (2) villus height and crypt depth by 1.4- and 1.2-fold, and (3) maltase- and alkaline phosphatase-specific activity by 1.5-fold compared to calves maintained on the same diet without Sucram. No statistically significant differences were observed for rates of intestinal glucose uptake, villus height, crypt depth, or enzyme activities between 50-d-old milk-fed calves and calves maintained on the same diet containing Sucram. When adult cows were kept on a diet containing 80:20 ryegrass hay-to-concentrate supplemented with Sucram, more than a 7-fold increase in SGLT1 protein abundance was noted. Collectively, the data indicate that inclusion of this artificial sweetener enhances SGLT1 expression and mucosal growth in ruminant animals. Exposure of ruminant sheep

  20. Structural Determinants for the Interaction of Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 with Peptide Ligands*

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hui-Qiong; Troksa, Erica L.; Caltabiano, Gianluigi; Pardo, Leonardo; Ye, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1), FPR2/ALX (FPR2) interacts with peptides of diverse sequences but has low affinity for the Escherichia coli-derived chemotactic peptide fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLF). Using computer modeling and site-directed mutagenesis, we investigated the structural requirements for FPR2 to interact with formyl peptides of different length and composition. In calcium flux assay, the N-formyl group of these peptides is necessary for activation of both FPR2 and FPR1, whereas the composition of the C-terminal amino acids appears more important for FPR2 than FPR1. FPR2 interacts better with pentapeptides (fMLFII, fMLFIK) than tetrapeptides (fMLFK, fMLFW) and tripeptide (fMLF) but only weakly with peptides carrying negative charges at the C terminus (e.g. fMLFE). In contrast, FPR1 is less sensitive to negative charges at the C terminus. A CXCR4-based homology model of FPR1 and FPR2 suggested that Asp-2817.32 is crucial for the interaction of FPR2 with certain formyl peptides as its negative charge may be repulsive with the terminal COO- group of fMLF and negatively charged Glu in fMLFE. Asp-2817.32 might also form a stable interaction with the positively charged Lys in fMLFK. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to remove the negative charge at position 281 in FPR2. The D2817.32G mutant showed improved affinity for fMLFE and fMLF and reduced affinity for fMLFK compared with wild type FPR2. These results indicate that different structural determinants are used by FPR1 and FPR2 to interact with formyl peptides. PMID:24285541

  1. Structural determinants for the interaction of formyl peptide receptor 2 with peptide ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hui-Qiong; Troksa, Erica L; Caltabiano, Gianluigi; Pardo, Leonardo; Ye, Richard D

    2014-01-24

    Unlike formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1), FPR2/ALX (FPR2) interacts with peptides of diverse sequences but has low affinity for the Escherichia coli-derived chemotactic peptide fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLF). Using computer modeling and site-directed mutagenesis, we investigated the structural requirements for FPR2 to interact with formyl peptides of different length and composition. In calcium flux assay, the N-formyl group of these peptides is necessary for activation of both FPR2 and FPR1, whereas the composition of the C-terminal amino acids appears more important for FPR2 than FPR1. FPR2 interacts better with pentapeptides (fMLFII, fMLFIK) than tetrapeptides (fMLFK, fMLFW) and tripeptide (fMLF) but only weakly with peptides carrying negative charges at the C terminus (e.g. fMLFE). In contrast, FPR1 is less sensitive to negative charges at the C terminus. A CXCR4-based homology model of FPR1 and FPR2 suggested that Asp-281(7.32) is crucial for the interaction of FPR2 with certain formyl peptides as its negative charge may be repulsive with the terminal COO- group of fMLF and negatively charged Glu in fMLFE. Asp-281(7.32) might also form a stable interaction with the positively charged Lys in fMLFK. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to remove the negative charge at position 281 in FPR2. The D281(7.32)G mutant showed improved affinity for fMLFE and fMLF and reduced affinity for fMLFK compared with wild type FPR2. These results indicate that different structural determinants are used by FPR1 and FPR2 to interact with formyl peptides.

  2. A synthetic peptide derivative that is a cholecystokinin receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignon, M F; Galas, M C; Rodriguez, M; Laur, J; Aumelas, A; Martinez, J

    1987-05-25

    So far, there are no known peptidic effective receptor antagonists of both peripheral and central effects of cholecystokinin (CCK). Here, we describe a synthetic peptide derivative of CCK, t-butyloxycarbonyl-Tyr(SO3-)-Met-Gly-D-Trp-Nle-Asp 2-phenylethyl ester 1 (where Nle is norleucine), which is a potent CCK receptor antagonist. In rat and guinea pig dispersed pancreatic acini, this peptide derivative did not alter amylase secretion, but was able to antagonize the stimulation caused by cholecystokinin-related agonists. It caused a parallel rightward shift in the dose-response curve for the stimulation of amylase secretion with half-maximal inhibition of CCK-8-stimulated amylase release at a concentration of about 0.1 microM. Compound 1 was able to inhibit the binding of labeled CCK-9 (the C-terminal nonapeptide of CCK) to rat and guinea pig pancreatic acini (IC50 = 5 X 10(-8) M) as well as to guinea pig cerebral cortical membranes (IC50 = 5 X 10(-7) M). These results indicate that Compound 1 is a potent competitive CCK receptor antagonist.

  3. A Safety and Dosing Study of Glucagon-Like Peptide 2 in Children With Intestinal Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigalet, David L; Brindle, Mary; Boctor, Dana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: A glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) analogue is approved for adults with intestinal failure, but no studies of GLP-2 have included children. This study examined the pharmacokinetics, safety, and nutritional effects of GLP-2 in children with intestinal failure. METHODS: Native...... human GLP-2(1-33) was synthesized following good manufacturing practices. In an open-label trial, with parental consent, 7 parenteral nutrition-dependent pediatric patients were treated with subcutaneous GLP-2 (20 µg/kg/d) for 3 days (phase 1) and, if tolerated, continued for 42 days (phase 2......). Nutritional treatment was directed by the primary caregivers. Patients were followed to 1 year. RESULTS: Seven patients were enrolled (age: 4.0 ± 0.8 years; bowel length, mean ± SEM: 24% ± 4% of predicted). All were parenteral nutrition dependent since birth, receiving 44% ± 5% of calories by parenteral...

  4. Salinity-Dependent Shift in the Localization of Three Peptide Transporters along the Intestine of the Mozambique Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Con, Pazit; Nitzan, Tali; Cnaani, Avner

    2017-01-01

    The peptide transporter (PepT) systems are well-known for their importance to protein absorption in all vertebrate species. These symporters use H+ gradient at the apical membrane of the intestinal epithelial cells to mediate the absorption of small peptides. In fish, the intestine is a multifunctional organ, involved in osmoregulation, acid-base regulation, and nutrient absorption. Therefore, we expected environmental stimuli to affect peptide absorption. We examined the effect of three environmental factors; salinity, pH and feeding, on the expression, activity and localization of three PepT transporters (PepT1a, PepT1b, PepT2) along the intestine of the Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) analysis demonstrated that the two PepT1 variants are typical to the proximal intestinal section while PepT2 is typical to the distal intestinal sections. Immunofluorescence analysis with custom-made antibodies supported the qPCR results, localized both transporters on the apical membrane of enterocytes and provided the first evidence for the participation of PepT2 in nutrient absorption. This first description of segment-specific expression and localization points to a complementary role of the different peptide transporters, corresponding to the changes in nutrient availability along the intestine. Both gene expression and absorption activity assays showed that an increase in water salinity shifted the localization of the PepT genes transcription and activity down along the intestinal tract. Additionally, an unexpected pH effect was found on the absorption of small peptides, with increased activity at higher pH levels. This work emphasizes the relationships between different functions of the fish intestine and how they are affected by environmental conditions. PMID:28167916

  5. Fundamental and clinical evaluation of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in pancreatitis by radioimmunoassay kit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, Soichiro; Nakamura, Takayuki; Ihara, Kenichi; Isogawa, Shin; Hirayama, Akio

    1987-07-01

    Plasma vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) concentrations of normal individuals and patients with pancreatitis were studied using a VIP RIA kit. The inter-assay and intra-assay variation of this kit were between 2.1 and 9.4 %. The VIP levels increased in the acute phase of acute pancreatitis and patients with chronic pancreatitis. The VIP concentration increased during the first 30 min of glucose tolerance test, but this increase was much smaller than that in insulin. These results suggest that this kit is useful for physiologic and pathologic changes in the VIP level.

  6. Glucagon-like peptide 2 treatment may improve intestinal adaptation during weaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thymann, Thomas; Le Huërou-Luron, I; Petersen, Y M;

    2014-01-01

    Transition from sow’s milk to solid feed is associated with intestinal atrophy and diarrhea. We hypothesized that the intestinotrophic hormone glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) would induce a dose- and health status-dependent effect on gut adaptation. In Exp. 1, weaned pigs (average BW at weaning 4......) were kept in a low-sanitary environment, leading to weaning diarrhea, and injected with saline or short-acting GLP-2 (200 µg/(kg BW·12 h); n = 11). Treatment with GLP-2 increased goblet cell density (P

  7. Peptide Receptor Targeting in Cancer: The Somatostatin Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Barbieri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptide receptors involved in pathophysiological processes represent promising therapeutic targets. Neuropeptide somatostatin (SST is produced by specialized cells in a large number of human organs and tissues. SST primarily acts as inhibitor of endocrine and exocrine secretion via the activation of five G-protein-coupled receptors, named sst1–5, while in central nervous system, SST acts as a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator, regulating locomotory and cognitive functions. Critical points of SST/SST receptor biology, such as signaling pathways of individual receptor subtypes, homo- and heterodimerization, trafficking, and cross-talk with growth factor receptors, have been extensively studied, although functions associated with several pathological conditions, including cancer, are still not completely unraveled. Importantly, SST exerts antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects on cancer cells in vitro, and on experimental tumors in vivo. Moreover, SST agonists are clinically effective as antitumor agents for pituitary adenomas and gastro-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, SST receptors being expressed by tumor cells of various tumor histotypes, their pharmacological use is potentially extendible to other cancer types, although to date no significant results have been obtained. In this paper the most recent findings on the expression and functional roles of SST and SST receptors in tumor cells are discussed.

  8. Small-molecule agonists for the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Kiel, Dan; Teng, Min

    2007-01-01

    The peptide hormone glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 has important actions resulting in glucose lowering along with weight loss in patients with type 2 diabetes. As a peptide hormone, GLP-1 has to be administered by injection. Only a few small-molecule agonists to peptide hormone receptors have been...

  9. Differential activation of polymorphisms of the formyl peptide receptor by formyl peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, John S.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the role of two polymorphic sites (R190W and N192K) on the binding and activation of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) by viral and formyl peptides. WEDWVGWI, a peptide with antiviral activity derived from the membrane proximal region of feline immunodeficiency virus, binds with high affinity to FPR. The three tryptophans in the peptide are all essential for FPR binding, just as they were essential for antiviral activity (Giannecchini, S. et al., J. Virol. 77 (2003) 3724). Formyl-NleWEDWVGWI behaved as a weak partial agonist with FPR W190/N192 but a stronger partial agonist with FPR R190/K192 and FPR R190/N192. Formyl-NleNleWEDWVGWI behaved as a full agonist toward all three FPRs but exhibited a much higher EC50 with W190/N192 FPR (300±45 nM) than for R190/K192 FPR (40±3 nM) or R190/N192 (60±8 nM). Formyl-MYKWPWYVWL preferentially activated R190/K192 and R190/N192 FPRs by >5 fold compared to W190/N192 FPR. Formyl-MFEDAVAWF, a peptide derived from a protein in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and formyl-MFTFEPFPTN, a peptide derived from the N-terminus of chemotaxis inhibitory protein of Staphylococcus aureus with an added N-terminal methionine exhibited the greatest selectivity for R190/K192 and R190/N192 FPRs with ~10 fold lower EC50S than that observed with FPR W190/N192. Thus, individuals with the W190 polymorphism may display a reduced ability to detect certain formyl peptides. PMID:17644322

  10. The effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide on development of form deprivation myopia in the chick: a pharmacological and immunocytochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltner, R L; Stell, W K

    1995-05-01

    The role of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the development of form deprivation myopia (FDM) was examined. Daily intravitreal injection of porcine VIP reduced, but did not eliminate FDM at a maximal daily dose of 1 x 10(-5) mol/injection. A VIP analogue reported to be relatively hydrolysis-resistant in vivo, had no effect on development of FDM at any dose tested. Two VIP antagonists completely abolished FDM. The one reported to be selective for central nervous system VIP receptors was 100 times more potent than one reported to be selective for peripheral nervous system receptors (ED50 = 2 x 10(-10) and 2 x 10(-8) mol/injection respectively). By immunofluorescence using antiserum to porcine VIP, VIP-like immunoreactivity was localized to a subset of amacrine cells (AC) and in three parallel layers in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) (10%, 40% and 70% of IPL thickness from the AC layer). Immunoreactive nerve fibres were also seen in the choroid, the ciliary body and the iris. These results suggest that VIP may play a role in both normal development of the refractive properties of the eye, and in the development of FDM.

  11. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, reduces intimal thickening after vascular injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Hiromasa [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Nomiyama, Takashi, E-mail: tnomiyama@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Mita, Tomoya; Yasunari, Eisuke; Azuma, Kosuke; Komiya, Koji; Arakawa, Masayuki; Jin, Wen Long; Kanazawa, Akio [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Kawamori, Ryuzo [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Sportology Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Center for Beta Cell Biology and Regeneration, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Fujitani, Yoshio; Hirose, Takahisa [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Watada, Hirotaka, E-mail: hwatada@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Sportology Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan)

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Exendin-4 reduces neointimal formation after vascular injury in a mouse model. {yields} Exendin-4 dose not alter metabolic parameters in non-diabetic, non-obese mouse model. {yields} Exendin-4 reduces PDGF-induced cell proliferation in cultured SMCs. {yields} Exendin-4 may reduces neointimal formation after vascular injury at least in part through its direct action on SMCs. -- Abstract: Glucagon-like peptide-1 is a hormone secreted by L cells of the small intestine and stimulates glucose-dependent insulin response. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists such as exendin-4 are currently used in type 2 diabetes, and considered to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. To further elucidate the effect of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on cardiovascular diseases, we investigated the effects of exendin-4 on intimal thickening after endothelial injury. Under continuous infusion of exendin-4 at 24 nmol/kg/day, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to endothelial denudation injury of the femoral artery. Treatment of mice with exendin-4 reduced neointimal formation at 4 weeks after arterial injury without altering body weight or various metabolic parameters. In addition, in vitro studies of isolated murine, rat and human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells showed the expression of GLP-1 receptor. The addition of 10 nM exendin-4 to cultured smooth muscle cells significantly reduced their proliferation induced by platelet-derived growth factor. Our results suggested that exendin-4 reduced intimal thickening after vascular injury at least in part by the suppression of platelet-derived growth factor-induced smooth muscle cells proliferation.

  12. cDNA Cloning of Vasoactice Intestinal Peptide Receptor-1 Gene (VIPR-1) and Its Expression Characteristics in Tissues of Black Muscovy Duck ( Cairina moschata)%黑番鸭血管活性肠肽受体-1基因(VIPR-1)的cDNA克隆及其组织表达特性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑嫩珠; 陈晓燕; 陈晖; 朱志明; 缪中纬; 辛清武; 王正朝; 卢立志

    2012-01-01

    最近的研究表明,血管活性肠肽(VIP)与家禽的就巢习性密切相关.本研究采用反转录PCR方法从黑番鸭(Cairina moschata)母鸭下丘脑组织中克隆了血管活性肠肽受体(VIPR-1)基因的cDNA序列,长度为1125bp,编码355个氨基酸(GenBank登录号:JN625215).序列比对结果表明,该序列与家禽(鸡、火鸡、鹌鹑)和哺乳动物(人、小鼠、猪、牛)的基因序列分别有93%~94%和69%~71%的同源性,而相应氨基酸序列的同源性分别为96%和70%~72%.荧光定量PCR结果发现,黑番鸭VIPR-1基因的表达量在产蛋期、就巢期和休产期差异显著(P<0.05)或极显著(P<0.01),就巢期表达量最高,休产期次之,产蛋期表达量最低,表明VIPR-1基因与繁殖阶段变化密切相关;对不同组织VIPR-1的表达量分析发现,VIPR-1在垂体、下丘脑和卵巢中均有表达,其中垂体最多,其次是下丘脑,卵巢中的表达量最低,差异极显著(P<0.01).研究结果提示,VIPR-1基因具有高度保守性,参与下丘脑-垂体-卵巢轴(特别是垂体)对黑番鸭就巢行为的调控.%Recent studies have already indicated that vasoactice intestinal peptide (VIP) is closely related to the habit of birds' nesting. In this study, we first cloned VIP receptor gene and analyzed its characteristics of expression in different tissues of muscovy duck. Reversed transcript PCR was used to clone vasoactice intestinal peptide receptor-1 (VIPR-1) gene from the hypothalamus of black muscovy ducks(Cairirna moschata), the cDNA sequence of this gene consisted of 1 125 nucleotides, which coded 335 amino acids (GenBank accession No. JN625215). The sequence of VIPR-1 was highly conserved in avian species. The muscovy duck VJPR-] shared 96% amino acid identity to that of chicken (Gallus gallus), turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), and quail (Coturnix japonica), while it shared only 70%~72% amino acid identing to that of some mammalians like human(Homo sapiens), mice

  13. Structure and expression of the gene encoding the vasoactive intestinal peptide precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linder, S.; Barkhem, T.; Norberg, A.; Persson, H.; Schalling, M.; Hoekfelt, T.; Magnusson, G.

    1987-01-01

    The gene encoding the human vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and the histidine-methionine amide (PHM-27) peptide hormone was isolated from lambda phage libraries. The human gene was found to be composed of seven exons spanning approx. = 9 kilobase pairs. The first exon codes for an untranslated leader sequence, and the second exon codes for a putative signal peptide. DNA sequences coding for the VIP and PHM-27 hormones are located in two different exons. Southern blot analysis with genomic DNA suggested that a single copy of the VIP/PHM-27 gene is present in the human haploid genome. The expression of VIP/PHM-27 precursor mRNA in various tissues in the rate was analyzed by RNA gel blot hybridization. In the organs examined, expression was only detected in the brain and duodenum. RNA isolated from various regions of the rat brain - including the cortex, hypothalamus, and hippocampus - hybridized to both VIP- and PHM-27-specific probes. The same pattern of hybridization was found when VIP- and PHM-27-specific probes were used, suggested that possible differences in the localization of VIP and PHM-27 peptides between different brain regions cannot be accounted for by differential RNA processing.

  14. Development of second generation peptides modulating cellular adiponectin receptor responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otvos, Laszlo; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Kovalszky, Ilona; Olah, Julia; Hewitson, Tim; Stawikowska, Roma; Stawikowski, Maciej; Cudic, Predrag; Lin, Feng; Wade, John; Surmacz, Eva; Lovas, Sandor

    2014-10-01

    The adipose tissue participates in the regulation of energy homeostasis as an important endocrine organ that secretes a number of biologically active adipokines, including adiponectin. Recently we developed and characterized a first-in-class peptide-based adiponectin receptor agonist by using in vitro and in vivo models of glioblastoma and breast cancer (BC). In the current study, we further explored the effects of peptide ADP355 in additional cellular models and found that ADP355 inhibited chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell proliferation and renal myofibroblast differentiation with mid-nanomolar IC50 values. According to molecular modeling calculations, ADP355 was remarkably flexible in the global minimum with a turn present in the middle of the peptide. Considering these structural features of ADP355 and the fact that adiponectin normally circulates as multimeric complexes, we developed and tested the activity of a linear branched dimer (ADP399). The dimer exhibited approximately 20-fold improved cellular activity inhibiting K562 CML and MCF-7 cell growth with high pM - low nM relative IC50 values. Biodistribution studies suggested superior tissue dissemination of both peptides after subcutaneous administration relative to intraperitoneal inoculation. After screening of a 397-member adiponectin active site library, a novel octapeptide (ADP400) was designed that counteracted 10-1000 nM ADP355- and ADP399-mediated effects on CML and BC cell growth at nanomolar concentrations. ADP400 induced mitogenic effects in MCF-7 BC cells perhaps due to antagonizing endogenous adiponectin actions or acting as an inverse agonist. While the linear dimer agonist ADP399 meets pharmacological criteria of a contemporary peptide drug lead, the peptide showing antagonist activity (ADP400) at similar concentrations will be an important target validation tool to study adiponectin functions.

  15. Development of second generation peptides modulating cellular adiponectin receptor responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laszlo eOtvos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The adipose tissue participates in the regulation of energy homeostasis as an important endocrine organ that secretes a number of biologically active adipokines, including adiponectin. Recently we developed and characterized a first-in-class peptide-based adiponectin receptor agonist by using in vitro and in vivo models of glioblastoma and breast cancer (BC. In the current study, we further explored the effects of peptide ADP355 in additional cellular models and found that ADP355 inhibited chronic myeloid leukemia (CML cell proliferation and renal myofibroblast differentiation with mid-nanomolar IC50 values. According to molecular modeling calculations, ADP355 was remarkably flexible in the global minimum with a turn present in the middle of the peptide. Considering these structural features of ADP355 and the fact that adiponectin normally circulates as multimeric complexes, we developed and tested the activity of a linear branched dimer (ADP399. The dimer exhibited approximately 20-fold improved cellular activity inhibiting K562 CML and MCF-7 cell growth with high pM - low nM relative IC50 values. Biodistribution studies suggested superior tissue dissemination of both peptides after subcutaneous administration relative to intraperitoneal inoculation. After screening of a 397-member adiponectin active site library, a novel octapeptide (ADP400 was designed that counteracted 10-1000 nM ADP355- and ADP399-mediated effects on CML and BC cell growth at nanomolar concentrations. ADP400 induced mitogenic effects in MCF-7 BC cells perhaps due to antagonizing endogenous adiponectin actions or acting as an inverse agonist. While the linear dimer agonist ADP399 meets pharmacological criteria of a contemporary peptide drug lead, the peptide showing antagonist activity (ADP400 at similar concentrations will be an important target validation tool to study adiponectin functions.

  16. Bifidobacteria inhibit the inflammatory response induced by gliadins in intestinal epithelial cells via modifications of toxic peptide generation during digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laparra, J M; Sanz, Y

    2010-03-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic enteropathy triggered by intake of gliadin, the toxic component of gluten. This study aims at evaluating the capacity of different Bifidobacterium strains to counteract the inflammatory effects of gliadin-derived peptides in intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells. A commercial extract of several gliadin (Gld) types (alpha, beta, gamma, [symbol: see text] ) was subjected to in vitro gastrointestinal digestion (pepsin at pH 3, pancreatin-bile at pH 6), inoculated or not with cell suspensions (10(8) colony forming units/ml) of either B. animalis IATA-A2, B. longum IATA-ES1, or B. bifidum IATA-ES2, in a bicameral system. The generated gliadin-derived peptides were identified by reverse phase-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Caco-2 cell cultures were exposed to the different gliadin peptide digestions (0.25 mg protein/ml), and the mRNA expression of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kappaB), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and chemokine CXCR3 receptor were analyzed by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in stimulated cells. The production of the pro-inflammatory markers NF-kappaB p50, TNF-alpha, and IL-1beta (interleukine 1beta) by Caco-2 cells was also determined by ELISA. The peptides from gliadin digestions inoculated with bifidobacteria did not exhibit the toxic amino acid sequences identified in those noninoculated (alpha/beta-Gld [158-164] and alpha/beta-Gld [122-141]). The RT-PCR analysis evidenced a down-regulation in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory biomarkers. Consistent with these results the production of NF-kappaB, TNF-alpha, and IL-1beta was reduced (18.2-22.4%, 28.0-64.8%, and abolished, respectively) in cell cultures exposed to gliadin digestions inoculated with bifidobacteria. Therefore, bifidobacteria change the gliadin-derived peptide pattern and, thereby, attenuate their pro-inflammatory effects on Caco-2 cells.

  17. Binding Mode of Insulin Receptor and Agonist Peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Insulin is a protein hormone secreted by pancreatic β cells. One of its main functions is to keep the balance of glucose inside the body by regulating the absorption and metabolism of glucose in the periphery tissue, as well as the production and storage of hepatic glycogen. The insulin receptor is a transmembrane glycoprotein in which two α subunits with a molecular weight of 135 kD and twoβ subunits with a molecular weight of 95 kD are joined by a disulfide bond to form a β-α-α-β structure. The extracellular α subunit, especially, its three domains near the N-terminal are partially responsible for signal transduction or ligand-binding, as indicated by the experiments. The extracellular α subunits are involved in binding the ligands. The experimental results indicate that the three domains of the N-terminal of the α subunits are the main determinative parts of the insulin receptor to bind the insulin or mimetic peptide.We employed the extracellular domain (PDBID: 1IGR) of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1 R ) as the template to simulate and optimize the spatial structures of the three domains in the extracellular domain of the insulin receptor, which includes 468 residues. The work was accomplished by making use of the homology program in the Insight Ⅱ package on an Origin3800 server. The docking calculations of the insulin receptor obtained by homology with hexapeptides were carried out by means of the program Affinity. The analysis indicated that there were hydrogen bonding, and electrostatic and hydrophobic effects in the docking complex of the insulin receptor with hexapeptides.Moreover, we described the spatial orientation of a mimetic peptide with agonist activity in the docking complex. We obtained a rough model of binding of DLAPSQ or STIVYS with the insulin receptor, which provides the powerful theoretical support for designing the minimal insulin mimetic peptide with agonist activity, making it possible to develop oral small

  18. Eicosanoid receptors: Targets for the treatment of disrupted intestinal epithelial homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Juan J

    2017-02-05

    The importance of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways and the consequent eicosanoid synthesis in the physiology and pathophysiology of the intestinal epithelium is currently being established. Each eicosanoid (prostanoid, leukotriene, hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid) preferentially recognizes one or more receptors coupled to one or more signal-transduction processes. This overview focuses on the role of eicosanoid receptors in the maintenance of intestinal epithelium physiology through the control of proliferation/differentiation/apoptosis processes. Furthermore, it is reported that the role of these receptors on the regulation of the barrier function of the intestinal epithelium have arisen through the regulation of absorption/secretion processes, tight-junction state and the control of the intestinal immune response. Also, this review considers the implication of AA cascade in the disruption of epithelial homeostasis during inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer as well as the therapeutic values and potential of the eicosanoid receptors as novel targets for the treatments of the pathologies above mentioned.

  19. Formyl Peptide Receptors in Cellular Differentiation and Inflammatory Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ha Young; Lee, Mingyu; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2017-06-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a family of classical chemoattractant receptors. Although FPRs are mainly expressed in phagocytic innate immune cells including monocytes/macrophages and neutrophils, recent reports demonstrated that additional different cell types such as T-lymphocytes and several non-immune cells also express functional FPRs. FPRs were first reported as a specific receptor to detect bacteria-derived N-formyl peptides. However, accumulating evidence has shown that FPRs can recognize various ligands derived from pathogens, mitochondria, and host. This review summarizes studies on some interesting endogenous agonists for FPRs. Here, we discuss functional roles of FPRs and their ligands concerning the regulation of cellular differentiation focusing on myeloid lineage cells. Accumulating evidence also suggests that FPRs may contribute to the control of inflammatory diseases. Here, we briefly review the current understanding of the functional role of FPRs and their ligands in inflammatory disorders in some animal disease models. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1300-1307, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Kidney protection during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with somatostatin analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolleman, Edgar J.; Melis, Marleen; Valkema, Roelf; Krenning, Eric P.; Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, V 220, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    This review focuses on the present status of kidney protection during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. This treatment modality for somatostatin receptor-positive tumours is limited by renal reabsorption and retention of radiolabelled peptides resulting in dose-limiting high kidney radiation doses. Radiation nephropathy has been described in several patients. Studies on the mechanism and localization demonstrate that renal uptake of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues largely depends on the megalin/cubulin system in the proximal tubule cells. Thus methods are needed that interfere with this reabsorption pathway to achieve kidney protection. Such methods include coadministration of basic amino acids, the bovine gelatin-containing solution Gelofusine or albumin fragments. Amino acids are already commonly used in the clinical setting during PRRT. Other compounds that interfere with renal reabsorption capacity (maleic acid and colchicine) are not suitable for clinical use because of potential toxicity. The safe limit for the renal radiation dose during PRRT is not exactly known. Dosimetry studies applying the principle of the biological equivalent dose (correcting for the effect of dose fractionation) suggest that a dose of about 37 Gy is the threshold for development of kidney toxicity. This threshold is lower when risk factors for development of renal damage exist: age over 60 years, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and previous chemotherapy. A still experimental pathway for kidney protection is mitigation of radiation effects, possibly achievable by cotreatment with amifostine (Ethylol), a radiation protector, or with blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Future perspectives on improving kidney protection during PRRT include combinations of agents to reduce renal retention of radiolabelled peptides, eventually together with mitigating medicines. Moreover, new somatostatin analogues with lower

  1. Honokiol suppresses formyl peptide-induced human neutrophil activation by blocking formyl peptide receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu-Chao; Yu, Huang-Ping; Syu, Yu-Ting; Fang, Jia-You; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Shih-Hsin; Lee, Yen-Tung; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2017-07-27

    Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) mediates bacterial and mitochondrial N-formyl peptides-induced neutrophil activation. Therefore, FPR1 is an important therapeutic target for drugs to treat septic or sterile inflammatory diseases. Honokiol, a major bioactive compound of Magnoliaceae plants, possesses several anti-inflammatory activities. Here, we show that honokiol exhibits an inhibitory effect on FPR1 binding in human neutrophils. Honokiol inhibited superoxide anion generation, reactive oxygen species formation, and elastase release in bacterial or mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (FPR1 agonists)-activated human neutrophils. Adhesion of FPR1-induced human neutrophils to cerebral endothelial cells was also reduced by honokiol. The receptor-binding results revealed that honokiol repressed FPR1-specific ligand N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein binding to FPR1 in human neutrophils, neutrophil-like THP-1 cells, and hFPR1-transfected HEK293 cells. However, honokiol did not inhibit FPR2-specific ligand binding to FPR2 in human neutrophils. Furthermore, honokiol inhibited FPR1 agonist-induced calcium mobilization as well as phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, and JNK in human neutrophils. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that honokiol may have therapeutic potential for treating FPR1-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  2. Transgenic Expression of Human Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor LPA2 in Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cells Induces Intestinal Dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Yoshida

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA acts on LPA2 receptor to mediate multiple pathological effects that are associated with tumorigenesis. The absence of LPA2 attenuates tumor progression in rodent models of colorectal cancer, but whether overexpression of LPA2 alone can lead to malignant transformation in the intestinal tract has not been studied. In this study, we expressed human LPA2 in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs under control of the villin promoter. Less than 4% of F1-generation mice had germline transmission of transgenic (TG human LPA2; as such only 3 F1 mice out of 72 genotyped had TG expression. These TG mice appeared anemic with hematochezia and died shortly after birth. TG mice were smaller in size compared with the wild type mouse of the same age and sex. Morphological analysis showed that TG LPA2 colon had hyper-proliferation of IECs resulting in increased colonic crypt depth. Surprisingly, TG small intestine had villus blunting and decreased IEC proliferation and dysplasia. In both intestine and colon, TG expression of LPA2 compromised the terminal epithelial differentiation, consistent with epithelial dysplasia. Furthermore, we showed that epithelial dysplasia was observed in founder mouse intestine, correlating LPA2 overexpression with epithelial dysplasia. The current study demonstrates that overexpression of LPA2 alone can lead to intestinal dysplasia.

  3. The regulation of K- and L-cell activity by GLUT2 and the calcium-sensing receptor CasR in rat small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Oliver J; Schindler, Marcus; Patel, Sonal

    2012-06-15

    Intestinal enteroendocrine cells (IECs) secrete gut peptides in response to both nutrients and non-nutrients. Glucose and amino acids both stimulate gut peptide secretion. Our hypothesis was that the facilitative glucose transporter, GLUT2, could act as a glucose sensor and the calcium-sensing receptor, CasR, could detect amino acids in the intestine to modify gut peptide secretion. We used isolated loops of rat small intestine to study the secretion of gluco-insulinotropic peptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) secretion stimulated by luminal perfusion of nutrients or bile acid. Inhibition of the sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) with phloridzin partially inhibited GIP, GLP-1 and PYY secretion by 45%, suggesting another glucose sensor might be involved in modulating peptide secretion. The response was completely abolished in the presence of the GLUT2 inhibitors phloretin or cytochalasin B. Given that GLUT2 modified gut peptide secretion stimulated by glucose, we investigated whether it was involved in the secretion of gut peptide by other gut peptide secretagogues. Phloretin completely abolished gut peptide secretion stimulated by artificial sweetener (sucralose), dipeptide (glycylsarcosine), lipid (oleoylethanolamine), short chain fatty acid (propionate) and major rat bile acid (taurocholate) indicating a fundamental position for GLUT2 in the gut peptide secretory mechanism. We investigated how GLUT2 was able to influence gut peptide secretion mediated by a diverse range of stimulators and discovered that GLUT2 affected membrane depolarisation through the closure of K+(ATP)-sensitive channels. In the absence of SGLT1 activity (or presence of phloridzin), the secretion of GIP, GLP-1 and PYY was sensitive to K+(ATP)-sensitive channel modulators tolbutamide and diazoxide. L-amino acids phenylalanine (Phe), tryptophan (Trp), asparagine (Asn), arginine (Arg) and glutamine (Gln) also stimulated GIP, GLP-1 and

  4. Small intestinal eosinophils regulate Th17 cells by producing IL-1 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Reiko; Lee, Eun-Jung; Jang, Min Seong; Jeun, Eun-Ji; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Park, Areum; Yun, Chang Ho; Hong, Sung-Wook; Kim, You-Me; Seoh, Ju-Young; Jung, YunJae; Surh, Charles D; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Yang, Bo-Gie; Jang, Myoung Ho

    2016-04-04

    Eosinophils play proinflammatory roles in helminth infections and allergic diseases. Under steady-state conditions, eosinophils are abundantly found in the small intestinal lamina propria, but their physiological function is largely unexplored. In this study, we found that small intestinal eosinophils down-regulate Th17 cells. Th17 cells in the small intestine were markedly increased in the ΔdblGATA-1 mice lacking eosinophils, and an inverse correlation was observed between the number of eosinophils and that of Th17 cells in the small intestine of wild-type mice. In addition, small intestinal eosinophils suppressed the in vitro differentiation of Th17 cells, as well as IL-17 production by small intestinal CD4(+)T cells. Unlike other small intestinal immune cells or circulating eosinophils, we found that small intestinal eosinophils have a unique ability to constitutively secrete high levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), a natural inhibitor of IL-1β. Moreover, small intestinal eosinophils isolated from IL-1Ra-deficient mice failed to suppress Th17 cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that small intestinal eosinophils play a pivotal role in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis by regulating Th17 cells via production of IL-1Ra.

  5. MIPs are ancestral ligands for the sex peptide receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Joon; Bartalska, Katarina; Audsley, Neil; Yamanaka, Naoki; Yapici, Nilay; Lee, Ju-Youn; Kim, Yong-Chul; Markovic, Milica; Isaac, Elwyn; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Dickson, Barry J

    2010-04-06

    Upon mating, females of many animal species undergo dramatic changes in their behavior. In Drosophila melanogaster, postmating behaviors are triggered by sex peptide (SP), which is produced in the male seminal fluid and transferred to female during copulation. SP modulates female behaviors via sex peptide receptor (SPR) located in a small subset of internal sensory neurons that innervate the female uterus and project to the CNS. Although required for postmating responses only in these female sensory neurons, SPR is expressed broadly in the CNS of both sexes. Moreover, SPR is also encoded in the genomes of insects that lack obvious SP orthologs. These observations suggest that SPR may have additional ligands and functions. Here, we identify myoinhibitory peptides (MIPs) as a second family of SPR ligands that is conserved across a wide range of invertebrate species. MIPs are potent agonists for Drosophila, Aedes, and Aplysia SPRs in vitro, yet are unable to trigger postmating responses in vivo. In contrast to SP, MIPs are not produced in male reproductive organs, and are not required for postmating behaviors in Drosophila females. We conclude that MIPs are evolutionarily conserved ligands for SPR, which are likely to mediate functions other than the regulation of female reproductive behaviors.

  6. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIII. Nomenclature for the Formyl Peptide Receptor (FPR) Family

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richard D. Ye; François Boulay; Ji Ming Wang; Claes Dahlgren; Craig Gerard; Marc Parmentier; Charles N. Serhan; Philip M. Murphy

    2009-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a small group of seven-transmembrane domain, G protein-coupled receptors that are expressed mainly by mammalian phagocytic leukocytes and are known to be important in host defense and inflammation...

  7. Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  8. Importance of Large Intestine in Regulating Bile Acids and Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 in Germ-Free Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwyn, Felcy Pavithra; Csanaky, Iván L; Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2015-10-01

    It is known that 1) elevated serum bile acids (BAs) are associated with decreased body weight, 2) elevated glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels can decrease body weight, and 3) germ-free (GF) mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a lack of intestinal microbiota results in more BAs in the body, resulting in increased BA-mediated transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) signaling and increased serum GLP-1 as a mechanism of resistance of GF mice to diet-induced obesity. GF mice had 2- to 4-fold increased total BAs in the serum, liver, bile, and ileum. Fecal excretion of BAs was 63% less in GF mice. GF mice had decreased secondary BAs and increased taurine-conjugated BAs, as anticipated. Surprisingly, there was an increase in non-12α-OH BAs, namely, β-muricholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and their taurine conjugates, in GF mice. Further, in vitro experiments confirmed that UDCA is a primary BA in mice. There were minimal changes in the mRNA of farnesoid X receptor target genes in the ileum (Fibroblast growth factor 15, small heterodimer protein, and ileal bile acid-binding protein), in the liver (small heterodimer protein, liver receptor homolog-1, and cytochrome P450 7a1), and BA transporters (apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter, organic solute transporter α, and organic solute transporter β) in the ileum of GF mice. Surprisingly, there were marked increases in BA transporters in the large intestine. Increased GLP-1 levels and gallbladder size were observed in GF mice, suggesting activation of TGR5 signaling. In summary, the GF condition results in increased expression of BA transporters in the colon, resulting in 1) an increase in total BA concentrations in tissues, 2) a change in BA composition to favor an increase in non-12α-OH BAs, and 3) activation of TGR5 signaling with increased gallbladder size and GLP-1.

  9. Combined treatment with dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitor sitagliptin and elemental diets reduced indomethacin-induced intestinal injury in rats via the increase of mucosal glucagon-like peptide-2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Kaori; Inoue, Takuya; Yorifuji, Naoki; Iguchi, Munetaka; Sakanaka, Taisuke; Narabayashi, Ken; Kakimoto, Kazuki; Nouda, Sadaharu; Okada, Toshihiko; Ishida, Kumi; Abe, Yosuke; Masuda, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Fukunishi, Shinya; Umegaki, Eiji; Akiba, Yasutada; Kaunitz, Jonathan D; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2015-03-01

    The gut incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and the intestinotropic hormone GLP-2 are released from enteroendocrine L cells in response to ingested nutrients. Treatment with an exogenous GLP-2 analogue increases intestinal villous mass and prevents intestinal injury. Since GLP-2 is rapidly degraded by dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), DPP4 inhibition may be an effective treatment for intestinal ulcers. We measured mRNA expression and DPP enzymatic activity in intestinal segments. Mucosal DPP activity and GLP concentrations were measured after administration of the DPP4 inhibitor sitagliptin (STG). Small intestinal ulcers were induced by indomethacin (IM) injection. STG was given before IM treatment, or orally administered after IM treatment with or without an elemental diet (ED). DPP4 mRNA expression and enzymatic activity were high in the jejunum and ileum. STG dose-dependently suppressed ileal mucosal enzyme activity. Treatment with STG prior to IM reduced small intestinal ulcer scores. Combined treatment with STG and ED accelerated intestinal ulcer healing, accompanied by increased mucosal GLP-2 concentrations. The reduction of ulcers by ED and STG was reversed by co-administration of the GLP-2 receptor antagonist. DPP4 inhibition combined with luminal nutrients, which up-regulate mucosal concentrations of GLP-2, may be an effective therapy for the treatment of small intestinal ulcers.

  10. Distinct regulation of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) expression at mRNA and peptide levels in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agoston, D V; Colburn, S; Krajniak, K G; Waschek, J A

    1992-05-25

    Neuronal differentiation was induced in cultures of the human neuroblastoma cell line subclone SH-SY5Y by 14-day treatment with dibutyryl cAMP (dBcAMP), retinoic acid, and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). An approximate 4-fold increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) mRNA concentration was observed after differentiation with retinoic acid, whereas no change in VIP mRNA concentration was observed after differentiation with dBcAMP or PMA. A short-term treatment of cells with PMA did however result in a 5-fold transient increase in VIP mRNA; prior differentiation with retinoic acid or dBcAMP diminished this effect. Observed increases in VIP mRNA were in all cases accompanied by increases in VIP immunoreactivity. Remarkably, however, long-term treatment of cells with dBcAMP, which caused no change in mRNA levels, resulted in a six-fold increase in VIP immunoreactivity. Acute (36-h) treatment with carbachol also caused an increase in VIP immunoreactivity (about 2-fold, and blocked by atropine) without an increase in VIP mRNA level. Thus, a quantitative change in gene transcription or mRNA stability appears not to be a prerequisite for increased VIP expression, indicating that regulation can occur at translational or post-translational steps.

  11. A safety and pharmacokinetic dosing study of glucagon-like peptide 2 in infants with intestinal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigalet, David L; Brindle, Mary E; Boctor, Dana

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) analogues are approved for adults with intestinal failure (IF), but no studies have included infants. This study examined the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety, and nutritional effects of GLP-2 in infants with IF. METHODS: With parental consent (Heal...

  12. Expression of an antimicrobial peptide, digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters in the intestine of E. praecox-infected chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccidiosis is a major intestinal disease of poultry, caused by several species of the protozoan Eimeria. The objective of this study was to examine changes in expression of digestive enzymes, nutrient transporters and an antimicrobial peptide following an Eimeria praecox challenge of chickens at d...

  13. Prodrugs of purine and pyrimidine analogues for the intestinal di/tri-peptide transporter PepT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Anne Engelbrecht; Friedrichsen, Gerda Marie; Sørensen, Arne Hagsten

    2003-01-01

    A general drug delivery approach for increasing oral bioavailability of purine and pyrimidine analogues such as acyclovir may be to link these compounds reversibly to stabilized dipeptide pro-moieties with affinity for the human intestinal di/tri-peptide transporter, hPepT1. In the present study...

  14. The intestinotrophic peptide, GLP-2, counteracts the gastrointestinal atrophy in mice induced by the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor, erlotinib, and cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Andreas Rosén; Viby, Niels-Erik; Hare, Kristine Juul;

    2010-01-01

    Erlotinib, an epidermal-growth-factor receptor inhibitor, belongs to a new generation of targeted cancer therapeutics. Gastrointestinal side-effects are common and have been markedly aggravated when erlotinib is combined with cytostatics. We examined the effects of erlotinib alone and combined wi...... with the cytostatic, cisplatin, on the gastrointestinal tract and examined whether glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), an intestinal hormone with potent intestinotrophic properties, might counteract the possible damaging effects of the treatments....

  15. Clostridium difficile suppresses colonic vasoactive intestinal peptide associated with altered motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nassif

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether Clostridium difficile toxin alters colonic tissue levels of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP at the expense of changes in colonic motility in the isolated perfused rabbit left colon. Colonic inflammation was induced by the intracolonic administration of 10−8 M C. difflcile toxin. Strain gauge transducers were sewn onto the serosal surface of the colon to evaluate colonic motility. C. difflcile administration produced histologic changes consistent with epithelial damage. This was associated with an increased production of prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane B2. Tissue levels of VIP but not substance P were significantly reduced. This was associated with an increased number of contractions per minute and an average force of each colonic contraction. These results suggest that tissue levels of VIP are suppressed by C. difflcile and may participate in colonic dysmotility during active inflammation.

  16. Role of chemokine receptors and intestinal epithelial cells in the mucosal inflammation and tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Neeraja; Pathak, Manisha; Lal, Girdhari

    2017-02-01

    The intestinal epithelial lining is a very dynamic interface, where multiple interactions occur with the external world. The intestinal epithelial barrier is continuously exposed to a huge load of commensal microorganisms, food-borne antigens, as well as invading enteropathogens. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and underlying immune cells are the main players in maintaining the delicate balance between gut tolerance and inflammation. IECs deferentially express the variety of chemokines and chemokine receptors, and these receptor-ligand interactions not only mediate the infiltration and activation of immune cells but also switch on the survival cascades in IECs. In this review, we discussed how chemokine-chemokine receptor-induced interactions play a central role to coordinate the interplay between IECs and gut immune cells to maintain homeostasis or elicit gut inflammation. Furthermore, we discussed how chemokines and chemokine receptors were used as a target for developing new drugs and therapies to control gut inflammation and autoimmunity. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  17. Activities of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and related peptides at the CGRP receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maton, P.N.; Pradhan, T.; Zhou, Z.C.; Gardner, J.D.; Jensen, R.T. (National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-05-01

    In guinea pig pancreatic acini rat calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) increased amylase release 2-fold, salmon calcitonin had an efficacy of only 44% of that of CGRP and (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37) and human calcitonin had no actions. (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37), but not human calcitonin, antagonized the actions of CGRP in pancreatic acini with an IC50 of 3 microM. (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37) produced a parallel rightward shift in the dose-response curve for CGRP-stimulated amylase secretion. The inhibition was specific for CGRP and was reversible. Studies with 125I-CGRP demonstrated that CGRP, salmon calcitonin and (Tyr0)CGRP, but not human calcitonin, interacted with CGRP receptors on pancreatic acini. These results indicate that various CGRP-related peptides demonstrate different relationships between their abilities to occupy the CGRP receptor and to affect biologic activity, with CGRP itself being a full agonist, salmon calcitonin a partial agonist, (Tyr0)CGRP(28-37) a competitive antagonist, and human calcitonin having no actions.

  18. Crystal Structure of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 in Complex with the Extracellular Domain of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underwood, Christina Rye; Garibay, P.; Knudsen, L.B.;

    2010-01-01

    GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) is an incretin released from intestinal L-cells in response to food intake. Activation of the GLP-1 receptor potentiates the synthesis and release of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells in a glucose-dependent manner. The GLP-1 receptor belongs to class B of the G......-protein-coupled receptors, a subfamily characterized by a large N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain. Exendin-4 and GLP-1 are 50% identical, and exendin-4 is a full agonist with similar affinity and potency for the GLP-1 receptor. We recently solved the crystal structure of the GLP-1 receptor extracellular domain...... in complex with the competitive antagonist exendin-4(9-39). Interestingly, the isolated extra-cellular domain binds exendin-4 with much higher affinity than the endogenous agonist GLP-1. Here, we have solved the crystal structure of the extracellular domain in complex with GLP-1 to 2.1 angstrom resolution...

  19. Intestinal protease-activated receptor-2 and fecal serine protease activity are increased in canine inflammatory bowel disease and may contribute to intestinal cytokine expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Shingo; Ohno, Koichi; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Igarashi, Hirotaka; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Fujino, Yasuhito; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2014-08-01

    Serine proteases elicit cellular responses via protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) which is known to regulate inflammation and the immune response. Although the gastrointestinal tract is exposed to large amounts of proteolytic enzymes, the role of PAR-2 in canine inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of PAR-2 activation on inflammatory cytokine/chemokine gene expression in canine intestine and the expression of intestinal PAR-2 and fecal serine protease activity in dogs with IBD. Duodenal biopsies from healthy dogs were cultured and treated ex vivo with trypsin or PAR-2 agonist peptide, and inflammatory cytokine/chemokine gene expression in the tissues was then quantified by real-time PCR. PAR-2 mRNA and protein expression levels in the duodenal mucosa were examined by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Fecal serine protease activity was determined by azocasein assay. In ex vivo-cultured duodenum, trypsin and PAR-2 agonist peptide induced significant up-regulation of mRNA expression levels of interleukin-1 β (IL-1β), IL-8, mucosae-associated epithelial chemokine (MEC) and fractalkine, and this up-regulation was inhibited by a serine protease inhibitor. Duodenal PAR-2 mRNA and protein expression levels were higher in dogs with IBD than in healthy control dogs. Fecal serine protease activity was significantly elevated in dogs with IBD, and the level of activity correlated positively with the clinical severity score. These results suggest that PAR-2 may contribute to the pathogenesis of canine IBD by inducing expression of inflammatory mediators in response to luminal serine proteases.

  20. Identification of putative CLE peptide receptors involved in determinate nodulation on soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, Virginie; Fenta, Berhanu Amsalu; Kunert, Karl; Holsters, Marcelle; Goormachtig, Sofie

    2011-07-01

    CLAVATA3/EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION (CLE) peptides tightly control the balance between stem cell proliferation and differentiation in several plant developmental processes. Transmission of the CLE peptide signal has been shown to be rather complex. Despite their recent identification, little is known about the receptors by which nodulation-specific CLE peptides, which were identified in soybean, are perceived. Genetic analysis has indicated that the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase NARK of soybean (Glycine max) and its orthologs in other legumes are possible candidates. However, more receptors need to be identified because CLE peptides are often detected by heteromultimeric complexes. Here, we identified two additional putative CLE peptide receptor pairs in the soybean genome with a nodulation-related expression pattern, GmRLK1-GmRLK2 and GmRLK3-GmRLK4, and discuss their role in CLE peptide perception during nodulation.

  1. Disrupted reproduction, estrous cycle, and circadian rhythms in female mice deficient in vasoactive intestinal peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, D H; Kuljis, D A; Azuma, L; Wu, Y; Truong, D; Wang, H B; Colwell, C S

    2014-10-01

    The female reproductive cycle is gated by the circadian timing system and may be vulnerable to disruptions in the circadian system. Prior work suggests that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-expressing neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are one pathway by which the circadian clock can influence the estrous cycle, but the impact of the loss of this peptide on reproduction has not been assessed. In the present study, we first examine the impact of the genetic loss of the neuropeptide VIP on the reproductive success of female mice. Significantly, mutant females produce about half the offspring of their wild-type sisters even when mated to the same males. We also find that VIP-deficient females exhibit a disrupted estrous cycle; that is, ovulation occurs less frequently and results in the release of fewer oocytes compared with controls. Circadian rhythms of wheel-running activity are disrupted in the female mutant mice, as is the spontaneous electrical activity of dorsal SCN neurons. On a molecular level, the VIP-deficient SCN tissue exhibits lower amplitude oscillations with altered phase relationships between the SCN and peripheral oscillators as measured by PER2-driven bioluminescence. The simplest explanation of our data is that the loss of VIP results in a weakened SCN oscillator, which reduces the synchronization of the female circadian system. These results clarify one of the mechanisms by which disruption of the circadian system reduces female reproductive success.

  2. Intestinal Farnesoid X Receptor Controls Transintestinal Cholesterol Excretion in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Jan Freark; Schonewille, Marleen; Boesjes, Marije; Wolters, Henk; Bloks, Vincent W; Bos, Trijnie; van Dijk, Theo H; Jurdzinski, Angelika; Boverhof, Renze; Wolters, Justina C; Kuivenhoven, Jan A; van Deursen, Jan M; Oude Elferink, Ronald P J; Moschetta, Antonio; Kremoser, Claus; Verkade, Henkjan J; Kuipers, Folkert; Groen, Albert K

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The role of the intestine in the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis is increasingly recognized. Fecal excretion of cholesterol is the last step in the atheroprotective reverse cholesterol transport pathway, to which biliary and transintestinal cholesterol excretion (TICE) cont

  3. Formylated MHC Class Ib Binding Peptides Activate Both Human and Mouse Neutrophils Primarily through Formyl Peptide Receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Malene; Holdfeldt, André; Gabl, Michael; Wang, Ji Ming; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes

    2016-01-01

    Two different immune recognition systems have evolved in parallel to recognize peptides starting with an N-formylated methionine, and recognition similarities/differences between these two systems have been investigated. A number of peptides earlier characterized in relation to the H2-M3 complex that presents N-formylated peptides to cytotoxic T cells, have been characterized in relation to the formyl peptide receptors expressed by phagocytic neutrophils in both men (FPRs) and mice (Fprs). FPR1/Fpr1 was identified as the preferred receptor for all fMet-containing peptides examined, but there was no direct correlation between H2-M3 binding and the neutrophil activation potencies. Similarly, there was no direct correlation between the activities induced by the different peptides in human and mouse neutrophils, respectively. The formyl group was important in both H2-M3 binding and FPR activation, but FPR2 was the preferred receptor for the non-formylated peptide. The structural requirements differed between the H2-M3 and FPR/Fpr recognition systems and these data suggest that the two recognition systems have different evolutionary traits.

  4. Effects of endotoxin on endothelin receptor in hepatic and intestinal tissues after endotoxemia in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Hua Liu; Hui Sun Chen; Ji Hong Zhou; Nan Xiao

    2000-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION Endothelins (ETs) has a potent and sustained vasoconstrictive effect on a variety of blood vessels.The vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) is the target for ETs. VSMC of the whole body contains endothelin receptor (ETR)[1]. A great number of experiments have shown that three distinct complementary DNAs of ETR have been identified i. e., endothelin A receptor (ETA receptor),endothelin B receptor ( ETB receptor ) and endothelin C receptor (ETc receptor). ETA receptor was expressed in VSMC responsible for the contraction[2]. The aim of this study is to confirm the effects of endotoxin on the activity of ETR, and the transcription and expression of ETA receptor mRNA in hepatic and intestinal tissues.

  5. Free fatty acid receptor GPR120 is highly expressed in enteroendocrine K cells of the upper small intestine and has a critical role in GIP secretion after fat ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Kanako; Harada, Norio; Sasaki, Kazuki; Yamane, Shunsuke; Iida, Keiko; Suzuki, Kazuyo; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Nasteska, Daniela; Shibue, Kimitaka; Joo, Erina; Harada, Takanari; Hashimoto, Toshihiro; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Hirasawa, Akira; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2015-03-01

    Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is an incretin secreted from enteroendocrine K cells in response to meal ingestion. Recently free fatty acid receptor G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 120 was identified as a lipid sensor involved in glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. However, Gpr 120 gene expression and its role in K cells remain unclear, partly due to difficulties in separation of K cells from other intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, we purified K cells using GIP-green fluorescent protein (GFP) knock-in mice, in which K cells can be visualized by GFP fluorescence. GFP-positive cells (K cells) were observed in the small intestine but not in the stomach and colon. K cell number and GIP content in K cells were significantly higher in the upper small intestine than those in the lower small intestine. We also examined the expression levels of several free fatty acid receptors in K cells. Among free fatty acid receptors, GPR120 was highly expressed in the K cells of the upper small intestine compared with the lower small intestine. To clarify the role of GPR120 on K cells in vivo, we used GPR120-deficient mice (GPR120(-/-)). GPR120(-/-) exhibited significantly lower GIP secretion (75% reduction, P secretion. In conclusion, GPR120 is expressed abundantly in K cells of the upper small intestine and plays a critical role in lipid-induced GIP secretion.

  6. Characterization of human 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor anti-peptide antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuohimaa, P; Bläuer, M; Jääskeläinen, T; Itkonen, A; Lindfors, M; Mahonen, A; Palvimo, J; Vilja, P; Mäenpää, P H

    1992-12-01

    Rabbit and chicken antibodies were raised against two peptides synthesized according to the structure of human 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor (hVDR): rabbit alpha hVDR-103 against the N-terminal amino acids 5-18 and alpha hVDR-104 against the amino acids 172-186 in the hinge region and chicken alpha hVDR-cab11 against the amino acids 172-186, respectively. The specificity of the antibodies was tested by peptide saturation, SDS-PAGE immunoblotting, gel shift assay and sucrose gradient centrifugation. Immunoblotting of a soluble extract (cytosol) from osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 showed a single band with an M(r) of about 48,000 and human intestine cytosol a broad band (50-63,000) for both antibodies. The antibodies recognized activated (3.2S) hVDR by shifting the centrifugation sedimentation profile to 5-6S. The antibodies showed nuclear immunostaining of unoccupied VDR in human osteosarcoma cells MG-63, U2-Os and SaOs-2. The immunoreaction could be saturated with the corresponding synthetic peptide. In immunoblot alpha hVDR-103 reacted with human and rat VDR, whereas alpha hVDR-104 recognized human VDR only. Similarly in immunohistochemistry, alpha hVDR-103 showed staining with hVDR and rVDR, whereas alpha hVDR-104 reacted only with hVDR. All antibodies recognized the native hVDR as verified with sucrose gradient centrifugation or immunoprecipitation but only alpha hVDR-103 and alpha hVDR-cab11 in gel shift assay of hVDR associated with the vitamin D-responsive element of human osteocalcin gene promoter.

  7. Chemotherapy-induced antitumor immunity requires formyl peptide receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchelli, Erika; Ma, Yuting; Baracco, Elisa E; Sistigu, Antonella; Enot, David P; Pietrocola, Federico; Yang, Heng; Adjemian, Sandy; Chaba, Kariman; Semeraro, Michaela; Signore, Michele; De Ninno, Adele; Lucarini, Valeria; Peschiaroli, Francesca; Businaro, Luca; Gerardino, Annamaria; Manic, Gwenola; Ulas, Thomas; Günther, Patrick; Schultze, Joachim L; Kepp, Oliver; Stoll, Gautier; Lefebvre, Céline; Mulot, Claire; Castoldi, Francesca; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Ladoire, Sylvain; Apetoh, Lionel; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Lucattelli, Monica; Delarasse, Cécile; Boige, Valérie; Ducreux, Michel; Delaloge, Suzette; Borg, Christophe; André, Fabrice; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Vitale, Ilio; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-11-20

    Antitumor immunity driven by intratumoral dendritic cells contributes to the efficacy of anthracycline-based chemotherapy in cancer. We identified a loss-of-function allele of the gene coding for formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) that was associated with poor metastasis-free and overall survival in breast and colorectal cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The therapeutic effects of anthracyclines were abrogated in tumor-bearing Fpr1(-/-) mice due to impaired antitumor immunity. Fpr1-deficient dendritic cells failed to approach dying cancer cells and, as a result, could not elicit antitumor T cell immunity. Experiments performed in a microfluidic device confirmed that FPR1 and its ligand, annexin-1, promoted stable interactions between dying cancer cells and human or murine leukocytes. Altogether, these results highlight the importance of FPR1 in chemotherapy-induced anticancer immune responses. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. The influence of restricted feeding on glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-containing cells in the chicken small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monir, M M; Hiramatsu, K; Yamasaki, A; Nishimura, K; Watanabe, T

    2014-04-01

    The influence of restricted feeding on the distribution of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-containing endocrine cells in the chicken small intestine was investigated using immunohistochemical and morphometrical techniques. This study demonstrated that the restricted feeding had an influence on the activity of GLP-1-immunoreactive cells in the chicken small intestine. There were differences in the localization and the frequency of occurrence of GLP-1-immunoreactive cells in the small intestine between control and restricted groups, especially 25% feed supply group provided with 25% of the intake during the adapting period. GLP-1-immunoreactive cells in the control chickens were mainly located in epithelium from crypts to the lower part of intestinal villi. Those in restricted groups, however, tended to be located from crypts to the middle part of intestinal villi. The frequency of occurrence of GLP-1-immunoreactive cells was lowest in the control group, medium in 50% feed supply group and highest in 25% feed supply group at each intestinal region examined in this study, that is, increased with the advancement of restricting the amount of feed supply. These data show that the quantity of food intake is one of signals that have an influence on the secretion of GLP-1 from L cells in the chicken small intestine.

  9. Porcine brain natriuretic peptide receptor in bovine adrenal cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, K.; Hashiguchi, T.; Ohashi, M.; Takayanagi, R.; Haji, M.; Matsuo, H.; Nawata, H.

    1989-01-01

    The action of porcine brain natriuretic peptide (pBNP) on the steroidogenesis was investigated in cultured bovine adrenocortical cells. Porcine BNP induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of both ACTH- and A II-stimulated aldosterone secretion. 10/sup /minus/8/M and 10/sup /minus/7/M pBNP also significantly inhibited ACTH-stimulated cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretions. Binding studies of (/sup 125/I)-pBNP to bovine adrenocortical membrane fractions showed that adrenal cortex had high-affinity and low-capacity pBNP binding sites, with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.70 x 10/sup /minus/10/M and a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 19.9 fmol/mg protein. Finally, the 135 Kd radioactive band was specially visualized in the affinity labeling of bovine adrenal cortex with disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS). These results suggest that pBNP may have receptor-mediated suppressive actions on bovine adrenal steroidogenesis, similar to that in atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP).

  10. Acceleration of intestinal polyposis through prostaglandin receptor EP2 in Apc(Delta 716) knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoshita, M; Takaku, K; Sasaki, N; Sugimoto, Y; Ushikubi, F; Narumiya, S; Oshima, M; Taketo, M M

    2001-09-01

    Arachidonic acid is metabolized to prostaglandin H(2) (PGH(2)) by cyclooxygenase (COX). COX-2, the inducible COX isozyme, has a key role in intestinal polyposis. Among the metabolites of PGH(2), PGE(2) is implicated in tumorigenesis because its level is markedly elevated in tissues of intestinal adenoma and colon cancer. Here we show that homozygous deletion of the gene encoding a cell-surface receptor of PGE(2), EP2, causes decreases in number and size of intestinal polyps in Apc(Delta 716) mice (a mouse model for human familial adenomatous polyposis). This effect is similar to that of COX-2 gene disruption. We also show that COX-2 expression is boosted by PGE(2) through the EP2 receptor via a positive feedback loop. Homozygous gene knockout for other PGE(2) receptors, EP1 or EP3, did not affect intestinal polyp formation in Apc(Delta 716) mice. We conclude that EP2 is the major receptor mediating the PGE2 signal generated by COX-2 upregulation in intestinal polyposis, and that increased cellular cAMP stimulates expression of more COX-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor in the polyp stroma.

  11. The Impact of Farnesoid X Receptor Activation on Intestinal Permeability in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Stojancevic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most important function of the intestinal mucosa is to form a barrier that separates luminal contents from the intestine. Defects in the intestinal epithelial barrier have been observed in several intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Recent studies have identified a number of factors that contribute to development of IBD including environmental triggers, genetic factors, immunoregulatory defects and microbial exposure. The current review focuses on the influence of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR on the inhibition of intestinal inflammation in patients with IBD. The development and investigation of FXR agonists provide strong support for the regulatory role of FXR in mucosal innate immunity. Activation of FXR in the intestinal tract decreases the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL 1-beta, IL-2, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, thus contributing to a reduction in inflammation and epithelial permeability. In addition, intestinal FXR activation induces the transcription of multiple genes involved in enteroprotection and the prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. These data suggest that FXR agonists are potential candidates for exploration as a novel therapeutic strategy for IBD in humans.

  12. Expression and function of the lipocalin-2 (24p3/NGAL receptor in rodent and human intestinal epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Langelueddecke

    Full Text Available The lipocalin 2//NGAL/24p3 receptor (NGAL-R/24p3-R is expressed in rodent distal nephron where it mediates protein endocytosis. The mechanisms of apical endocytosis and transcytosis of proteins and peptides in the intestine are poorly understood. In the present study, the expression and localization of rodent 24p3-R (r24p3-R and human NGAL-R (hNGAL-R was investigated in intestinal segments by immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. r24p3-R/hNGAL-R was also studied in human Caco-2 BBE cells and CHO cells transiently transfected with r24p3-R by immunofluorescence microscopy, RT-PCR and immunoblotting of plasma membrane enriched vesicles (PM. To assay function, endocytosis/transcytosis of putative ligands phytochelatin (PC₃, metallothionein (MT and transferrin (Tf was assayed by measuring internalization of fluorescence-labelled ligands in Caco-2 BBE cells grown on plastic or as monolayers on Transwell inserts. The binding affinity of Alexa 488-PC₃ to colon-like Caco-2 BBE PM was quantified by microscale thermophoresis (MST. r24p3-R/hNGAL-R expression was detected apically in all intestinal segments but showed the highest expression in ileum and colon. Colon-like, but not duodenum-like, Caco-2 BBE cells expressed hNGAL-R on their surface. Colon-like Caco-2 BBE cells or r24p3-R transfected CHO cells internalized fluorescence-labelled PC₃ or MT with half-maximal saturation at submicromolar concentrations. Uptake of PC₃ and MT (0.7 µM by Caco-2 BBE cells was partially blocked by hNGAL (500 pM and an EC₅₀ of 18.6 ± 12.2 nM was determined for binding of Alexa 488-PC₃ to PM vesicles by MST. Transwell experiments showed rapid (0.5-2 h apical uptake and basolateral delivery of fluorescent PC₃/MT/Tf (0.7 µM. Apical uptake of ligands was significantly blocked by 500 pM hNGAL. hNGAL-R dependent uptake was more prominent with MT but transcytosis efficiency was reduced compared to

  13. Epigenetic regulation of the formyl peptide receptor 2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simiele, Felice; Recchiuti, Antonio; Patruno, Sara; Plebani, Roberto; Pierdomenico, Anna Maria; Codagnone, Marilina; Romano, Mario

    2016-10-01

    Lipoxin (LX) A4, a main stop signal of inflammation, exerts potent bioactions by activating a specific G protein-coupled receptor, termed formyl peptide receptor 2 and recently renamed ALX/FPR2. Knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms that drive ALX/FPR2 gene expression is key for the development of innovative anti-inflammatory pharmacology. Here, we examined chromatin patterns of the ALX/FPR2 gene. We report that in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells, the ALX/FPR2 gene undergoes epigenetic silencing characterized by low acetylation at lysine 27 and trimethylation at lysine 4, associated with high methylation at lysine 27 of histone 3. This pattern, which is consistent with transcriptionally inaccessible chromatin leading to low ALX/FPR2 mRNA and protein expression, is reversed in polymorphonuclear leukocytes that express high ALX/FPR2 levels. Activation of p300 histone acetyltransferase and inhibition of DNA methyltransferase restored chromatin accessibility and significantly increased ALX/FPR2 mRNA transcription and protein levels in MDA-MB231 cells, as well as in pulmonary artery endothelial cells. In both cells types, changes in the histone acetylation/methylation status enhanced ALX/FPR2 signaling in response to LXA4. Collectively, these results uncover unappreciated epigenetic regulation of ALX/FPR2 expression that can be exploited for innovative approaches to inflammatory disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy: focus on bronchial neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Pusceddu, Sara; Prinzi, Natalie; Imbimbo, Martina; Proto, Claudia; Signorelli, Diego; Vitali, Milena; Ganzinelli, Monica; Maccauro, Marco; Buzzoni, Roberto; Seregni, Ettore; de Braud, Filippo; Garassino, Marina Chiara

    2016-10-01

    Well-differentiated bronchial neuroendocrine tumors (B-NETs) are rare. They represent 1-5 % of all lung cancers. The incidence of these neoplasms has risen over the past 30 years and, especially for advanced or metastatic disease, management is complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Treatment with somatostatin analogs (SSAs) is the most important first-line therapy, in particular in well-differentiated NETs with high somatostatin type receptor (SSTR) expression. In these tumors, the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR) inhibitors and the potential utility of other target therapies remain unclear while chemotherapy represents the gold standard treatment only for aggressive forms with low SSTR expression. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is an emerging treatment modality for advanced NETs. There are many cumulative evidences about the effectiveness and tolerability of this therapeutic approach, especially in gastro-entero-pancreatic (GEP)-NETs. For B-NETs, scientific research is moving more slowly. Here, we performed a review in order to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of PRRT with a focus on patients with inoperable or metastatic well-differentiated B-NETs.

  15. Functional expression of rat VPAC1 receptor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.K.; Tams, J.W.; Fahrenkrug, Jan;

    1999-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor; heterologous expression; membrane protein; Saccharomyces cerevisiae, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide; yeast mating factor-pre-pro *Ga-leader peptide......G protein-coupled receptor; heterologous expression; membrane protein; Saccharomyces cerevisiae, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide; yeast mating factor-pre-pro *Ga-leader peptide...

  16. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) regulate murine neural progenitor cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Eugene; May, Victor; Braas, Karen M; Shutz, Kristin C; Mao-Draayer, Yang

    2008-11-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NPC) have gained wide interest over the last decade from their therapeutic potential, either through transplantation or endogenous replacement, after central nervous system (CNS) disease and damage. Whereas several growth factors and cytokines have been shown to promote NPC survival, proliferation, or differentiation, the identification of other regulators will provide much needed options for NPC self-renewal or lineage development. Although previous studies have shown that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) can regulate stem/progenitor cells, the responses appeared variable. To examine the direct roles of these peptides in NPCs, postnatal mouse NPC cultures were withdrawn from epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblastic growth factor (FGF) and maintained under serum-free conditions in the presence or absence of PACAP27, PACAP38, or VIP. The NPCs expressed the PAC1(short)null receptor isoform, and the activation of these receptors decreased progenitor cell apoptosis more than 80% from TUNEL assays and facilitated proliferation more than fivefold from bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) analyses. To evaluate cellular differentiation, replicate control and peptide-treated cultures were examined for cell fate marker protein and transcript expression. In contrast with previous work, PACAP peptides downregulated NPC differentiation, which appeared consistent with the proliferation status of the treated cells. Accordingly, these results demonstrate that PACAP signaling is trophic and can maintain NPCs in a multipotent state. With these attributes, PACAP may be able to promote endogenous NPC self-renewal in the adult CNS, which may be important for endogenous self-repair in disease and ageing processes.

  17. Orexin and orexin receptor like peptides in the gastroenteric tract of Gallus domesticus: An immunohistochemical survey on presence and distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcamone, N; D'Angelo, L; de Girolamo, P; Lucini, C; Pelagalli, A; Castaldo, L

    2014-04-01

    This study reports the immunohistochemical localization and distribution of orexin A and B-like and their receptors-like peptides in the gastroenteric tract of chicken. The immunoreactivity is distributed in endocrine cells, nerve fibers and neurons, both in the stomach and intestine, and shows a discrete conformity with the data till now reported for Mammals. Our study suggests a possible participation of orexin-like peptides in the modulation of chicken gastroenteric activities and the preservation of their main distribution compared to Mammals. Western blot analysis has confirmed the presence of prepro-orexin and both receptors in the examined tissues. This survey represents the first evidence of the presence of orexin-like peptides in the gastroenteric tract of non mammalian species, and the results could help to better understand the alimentary control and body weight in domestic birds, which are of relevance to determine the productive factors in breeding animals. This study might also serve as a baseline for future experimental studies on the regulation of the gastroenteric functions in non mammalian Vertebrates.

  18. Biotechnological Fluorescent Ligands of the Bradykinin B1 Receptor: Protein Ligands for a Peptide Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Charest-Morin

    Full Text Available The bradykinin (BK B1 receptor (B1R is a peculiar G protein coupled receptor that is strongly regulated to the point of being inducible in immunopathology. Limited clinical evidence suggests that its expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is a biomarker of active inflammatory states. In an effort to develop a novel imaging/diagnostic tool, we report the rational design and testing of a fusion protein that is a ligand of the human B1R but not likely to label peptidases. This ligand is composed of a fluorescent protein (FP (enhanced green FP [EGFP] or mCherry prolonged at its N-terminus by a spacer peptide and a classical peptide agonist or antagonist (des-Arg9-BK, [Leu8]des-Arg9-BK, respectively. The design of the spacer-ligand joint peptide was validated by a competition assay for [3H]Lys-des-Arg9-BK binding to the human B1R applied to 4 synthetic peptides of 18 or 19 residues. The labeling of B1R-expressing cells with EGFP or mCherry fused with 7 of such peptides was performed in parallel (microscopy. Both assays indicated that the best design was FP-(Asn-Glyn-Lys-des-Arg9-BK; n = 15 was superior to n = 5, suggesting benefits from minimizing steric hindrance between the FP and the receptor. Cell labeling concerned mostly plasma membranes and was inhibited by a B1R antagonist. EGFP-(Asn-Gly15-Lys-des-Arg9-BK competed for the binding of [3H]Lys-des-Arg9-BK to human recombinant B1R, being only 10-fold less potent than the unlabeled form of Lys-des-Arg9-BK to do so. The fusion protein did not label HEK 293a cells expressing recombinant human BK B2 receptors or angiotensin converting enzyme. This study identifies a modular C-terminal sequence that can be adapted to protein cargoes, conferring high affinity for the BK B1R, with possible applications in diagnostic cytofluorometry, histology and drug delivery (e.g., in oncology.

  19. Common peptides shed light on evolution of Olfactory Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lancet Doron

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olfactory Receptors (ORs form the largest multigene family in vertebrates. Their evolution and their expansion in the vertebrate genomes was the subject of many studies. In this paper we apply a motif-based approach to this problem in order to uncover evolutionary characteristics. Results We extract deterministic motifs from ORs belonging to ten species using the MEX (Motif Extraction algorithm, thus defining Common Peptides (CPs characteristic to ORs. We identify species-specific CPs and show that their relative abundance is high only in fish and frog, suggesting relevance to water-soluble odorants. We estimate the origins of CPs according to the tree of life and track the gains and losses of CPs through evolution. We identify major CP gain in tetrapods and major losses in reptiles. Although the number of human ORs is less than half of the number of ORs in other mammals, the fraction of lost CPs is only 11%. By examining the positions of CPs along the OR sequence, we find two regions that expanded only in tetrapods. Using CPs we are able to establish remote homology relations between ORs and non-OR GPCRs. Selecting CPs according to their evolutionary age, we bicluster ORs and CPs for each species. Clean biclustering emerges when using relatively novel CPs. Evolutionary age is used to track the history of CP acquisition in the collection of mammalian OR families within HORDE (Human Olfactory Receptor Data Explorer. Conclusion The CP method provides a novel perspective that reveals interesting traits in the evolution of olfactory receptors. It is consistent with previous knowledge, and provides finer details. Using available phylogenetic trees, evolution can be rephrased in terms of CP origins. Supplementary information is also available at http://adios.tau.ac.il/ORPS

  20. The development of non-peptide glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ho-Sang; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Son, Moon-Ho

    2011-07-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is the main member of the incretin family and stimulates insulin secretion by binding with its specific receptor on pancreatic β-cells. In addition, GLP-1 exerts broad beneficial effects on the glucose regulation by suppressing food intake and delaying stomach emptying. Now, long acting GLP-1 analogs including exenatide and liraglutide have been approved for the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2, however long-term injection can limit their use for these chronic patients. In this report, the authors provide a review on the development of non-peptide GLP-1 receptor agonists and introduce a novel agonist DA-15864.

  1. The contribution of serotonin 5-HT2C and melanocortin-4 receptors to the satiety signaling of glucagon-like peptide 1 and liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist, in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Suzuki, Marina; Sanuki, Marin; Wakameda, Mamoru; Tamari, Tomohiro

    2011-07-29

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), an insulinotropic gastrointestinal peptide produced mainly from intestinal endocrine L-cells, and liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, induce satiety. The serotonin 5-HT2C receptor (5-HT2CR) and melanoroctin-4 receptor (MC4R) are involved in the regulation of food intake. Here we show that systemic administration of GLP-1 (50 and 200μg/kg)-induced anorexia was blunted in mice with a 5HT2CR null mutation, and was attenuated in mice with a heterozygous MC4R mutation. On the other hand, systemic administration of liraglutide (50 and 100μg/kg) suppressed food intake in mice lacking 5-HT2CR, mice with a heterozygous mutation of MC4R and wild-type mice matched for age. Moreover, once-daily consecutive intraperitoneal administration of liraglutide (100μg/kg) over 3days significantly suppressed daily food intake and body weight in mice with a heterozygous mutation of MC4R as well as wild-type mice. These findings suggest that GLP-1 and liraglutide induce anorexia via different central pathways.

  2. Glucagon-like peptides GLP-1 and GLP-2, predicted products of the glucagon gene, are secreted separately from pig small intestine but not pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, J J; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1986-01-01

    identified in glucagon-producing cells of the pancreatic islets, and in glicentin-producing cells of the small intestine. Immunoreactive GLP-1 and 2 in intestinal extracts corresponded in molecular size to peptides synthesized according to the predicted structure. By reverse phase HPLC, intestinal......We developed specific antibodies and RIAs for glucagon-like peptides 1 and 2 (GLP-1 and GLP-2), two predicted products of the glucagon gene, and studied the occurrence, nature, and secretion of immunoreactive GLP-1 and GLP-2 in pig pancreas and small intestine. Immunoreactive GLP-1 and GLP-2 were...... and synthetic GLP-1 behaved similarly, whereas synthetic and intestinal GLP-2 differed. Pancreatic extracts contained a large peptide with both GLP-1 and GLP-2 immunoreactivity. Secretion was studied using isolated perfused pig pancreas during arginine stimulation, and isolated perfused pig ileum during either...

  3. Radiolabeled CCK/gastrin peptides for imaging and therapy of CCK2 receptor-expressing tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosenburg, S.; Laverman, P.; Delft, F.L. van; Boerman, O.C.

    2011-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors are overexpressed in numerous human cancers, like medullary thyroid carcinomas, small cell lung cancers and stromal ovarian cancers. The specific receptor-binding property of the endogenous ligands for these receptors can be exploited by labeling peptides with a radio

  4. Down-regulation of the chemokine receptor CCR5 by activation of chemotactic formyl peptide receptor in human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, W; Li, B; Wetzel, M A; Rogers, T J; Henderson, E E; Su, S B; Gong, W; Le, Y; Sargeant, R; Dimitrov, D S; Oppenheim, J J; Wang, J M

    2000-10-15

    Interactions between cell surface receptors are important regulatory elements in the complex host responses to infections. In this study, it is shown that a classic chemotactic factor, the bacterial chemotactic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucylphenyl-alanine (fMLF), rapidly induced a protein-kinase-C-mediated serine phosphorylation and down-regulation of the chemokine receptor CCR5, which serves as a major human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 coreceptor. The fMLF binding to its receptor, formyl peptide receptor (FPR), resulted in significant attenuation of cell responses to CCR5 ligands and in inhibition of HIV-1-envelope-glycoprotein-mediated fusion and infection of cells expressing CD4, CCR5, and FPR. The finding that the expression and function of CCR5 can be regulated by peptides that use an unrelated receptor may provide a novel approach to the design of anti-inflamatory and antiretroviral agents. (Blood. 2000;96:2887-2894)

  5. Sex peptides and MIPs can activate the same G protein-coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Nachman, Ronald J; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2013-07-01

    In many animal species, copulation elicits a number of physiological and behavioral changes in the female partner. In Drosophila melanogaster, the main molecular effector of these physiological responses has been identified as sex peptide (SP). The sex peptide receptor (SPR) has been characterized and recently, its activation by Drosophila myoinhibiting peptides (MIPs)-in addition to SP-has been demonstrated. The myoinhibiting peptides are members of a conserved peptide family, also known as B-type allatostatins, which generally feature the C-terminal motif -WX6Wamide.

  6. The potential impacts of formyl peptide receptor 1 in inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shun-Chin; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. N-formyl peptides, which originate from bacterial peptides or mitochondrial proteins bind with a high binding affinity to formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). N-formyl peptide-FPR1 is involved in the pathogenesis of sterile and infectious inflammatory processes and causes phagocytosis of pathogens or injured cells by neutrophils. Excessive activation of neutrophils by binding of N-formyl peptides is associated with tissue injury requiring drugs that block FPR1-dependent signaling. Here, we review the roles of FPR1 as a critical regulator of inflammatory processes and its involvement in pathological conditions.

  7. Intestinal Serotonin Transporter Inhibition by Toll-Like Receptor 2 Activation. A Feedback Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layunta, Elena; Grasa, Laura; Castro, Marta; Pardo, Julián; Gomollón, Fernando; Mesonero, José E.

    2016-01-01

    TLR2 is a microbiota recognition receptor that has been described to contribute to intestinal homeostasis and to ameliorate inflammatory intestinal injury. In this context, serotonin (5-HT) has shown to be an essential intestinal physiological neuromodulator that is also involved in intestinal inflammatory diseases. Since the interaction between TLR2 activation and the intestinal serotoninergic system remains non-investigated, our main aim was to analyze the effect of TLR2 on intestinal serotonin transporter (SERT) activity and expression and the intracellular pathways involved. Caco-2/TC7 cells were used to analyze SERT and TLR2 molecular expression and SERT activity by measuring 5-HT uptake. The results showed that apical TLR2 activation inhibits SERT activity in Caco-2/TC7 cells mainly by reducing SERT protein level either in the plasma membrane, after short-term TLR2 activation or in both the plasma membrane and cell lysate, after long-term activation. cAMP/PKA pathway appears to mediate short-term inhibitory effect of TLR2 on SERT; however, p38 MAPK pathway has been shown to be involved in both short- and long-term TLR2 effect. Reciprocally, 5-HT long-term treatment yielded TLR2 down regulation in Caco-2/TC7 cells. Finally, results from in vivo showed an augmented intestinal SERT expression in mice Tlr2-/-, thus confirming our inhibitory effect of TLR2 on intestinal SERT in vitro. The present work infers that TLR2 may act in intestinal pathophysiology, not only by its inherent innate immune role, but also by regulating the intestinal serotoninergic system. PMID:28033388

  8. Dihydromorphine-peptide hybrids with delta receptor agonistic and mu receptor antagonistic actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.B.; Medzihradsky, F.; Woods, J.H.

    1986-03-05

    The actions of two morphine derivatives with short peptide side chains were evaluated upon the contraction of the isolated mouse vas deferens and upon displacement of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat brain membranes. NIH-9833 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl) was a potent agonist upon the vas deferens. Its EC50 for inhibition of the twitch was 1.2 +/- 0.1 nM. Both naltrexone (10/sup -7/ M) a relatively nonselective opioid antagonist, and ICI-174864 (10/sup -/' M) a highly selective delta receptor antagonist, blocked the actions of NIH-9833 which indicates that this drug is a delta receptor agonist. In contrast, NIH-9835 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-glycyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl), which differs from NIH-9835 by the presence of a single amino acid residue, was devoid of opioid agonistic activity but was a potent antagonist of the inhibitory actions on the vas deferens of morphine and sufentanil. NIH-9833 and NIH-9835 were potent displacers of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat cerebral membranes with EC50's of 0.58 nM and 1.7 nM, respectively. The observation that addition of a single glycyl group changes a dihydromorphine-peptide analog from a potent delta receptor agonist to an equally potent mu receptor antagonist suggests that the two receptor sites might be structurally quite similar.

  9. Production of a bioengineered G-protein coupled receptor of human formyl peptide receptor 3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiang Wang

    Full Text Available G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs participate in a wide range of vital regulations of our physiological actions. They are also of pharmaceutical importance and have become many therapeutic targets for a number of disorders and diseases. Purified GPCR-based approaches including structural study and novel biophysical and biochemical function analyses are increasingly being used in GPCR-directed drug discovery. Before these approaches become routine, however, several hurdles need to be overcome; they include overexpression, solubilization, and purification of large quantities of functional and stable receptors on a regular basis. Here we report milligram production of a human formyl peptide receptor 3 (FPR3. FPR3 comprises a functionally distinct GPCR subfamily that is involved in leukocyte chemotaxis and activation. The bioengineered FPR3 was overexpressed in stable tetracycline-inducible mammalian cell lines (HEK293S. After a systematic detergent screening, fos-choline-14 (FC-14 was selected for subsequent solubilization and purification processes. A two-step purification method, immunoaffinity using anti-rho-tag monoclonal antibody 1D4 and gel filtration, was used to purify the receptors to near homogeneity. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that expressed FPR3 was predominantly displayed on cellular membrane. Secondary structural analysis using circular dichroism showed that the purified FPR3 receptor was correctly folded with >50% α-helix, which is similar to other known GPCR secondary structures. Our method can readily produce milligram quantities of human FPR3, which would facilitate in developing human FPR as therapeutic drug targets.

  10. Effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide on prolactin secretion in three species of passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vleck, C M; Patrick, D J

    1999-01-01

    Previous work on domesticated species has indicated that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is an important prolactin-releasing factor in these birds, but no comparative work in passerine birds has been reported. This study showed that iv injections of VIP (50-100 microg/kg body mass) result in a dramatic, but transitory, rise in plasma prolactin in Mexican jays (Aphelocoma ultramarina). Significant increases in prolactin were also observed following VIP injection in blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) and zebra finches (Poephilla guttata). At the dosage we used, maximum levels of prolactin attained were slightly lower (Mexican jays) or very similar (blue jay and zebra finch) to the maximum prolactin levels observed in other, breeding birds of the same species. In zebra finches that initially had low prolactin, VIP injection resulted in a greater than 10-fold increase in prolactin within 10 min, but those individuals that already had elevated prolactin showed no further increase in response to VIP. Slow-release pellets of VIP implanted subcutaneously in Mexican jays and releasing 10 or 15 microg VIP/day (two or three pellets) produced a significant increase in plasma prolactin (78 and 92% rise, respectively) compared to birds with placebo pellets or with with one pellet releasing only 5 microg/day.

  11. Vasoactive intestinal peptide can promote the development of neonatal rat primordial follicles during in vitro culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Niannian; Li, Yu; Wang, Wenjun; Ma, Yun; Yang, Dongzi; Zhang, Qingxue

    2013-01-01

    Recruitment of primordial follicles is essential for female fertility. Some of the intraovarian growth factors involved in the initiation of primordial follicle growth have been identified, but the exact mechanisms regulating follicle activation are poorly understood. Strong evidence indicates that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a neuropeptide found in ovarian nerves, plays a role in the physiology of follicle development and function. The aim of the present study was to determine whether VIP might regulate the activation and growth of neonatal rat primordial follicles in an in vitro culture system. Ovaries from 4-day-old rats were cultured for 14 days in medium containing 10(-7) M VIP. At the end of the culture, the developmental stages and viability of the follicles were evaluated using histological sections. Immunohistochemistry studies for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were performed to assess the mitotic activity of granulosa cells. In addition, the expression level of kit ligand (KL) mRNA was examined after culture. Histology showed that primordial follicles could survive and start to grow in vitro. The proportion of primordial follicles was decreased and the proportion of early primary follicles increased after in vitro culture with VIP. Immunolocalization of PCNA showed that follicle growth was initiated after VIP treatment. The expression level of KL mRNA was increased in the VIP treatment group. Thus, VIP can promote primordial follicle development, possibly mediated in part through upregulating the expression of KL.

  12. Electroacupuncture Inhibits Inflammation Reaction by Upregulating Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide in Rats with Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Feng He

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is emerging as an alternative therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this beneficial effect of acupuncture has not been fully understood. Here, we demonstrated that electroacupuncture at acupoints Zusanli (ST36, Xuanzhong (GB39; and Shenshu (BL23 markedly decreased the paw swelling and the histologic scores of inflammation in the synovial tissue, and reduced the body weight loss in an adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model. However, the electrical stimulation at nonacupoint did not produce any beneficial effects against the experimental arthritis. Most interestingly, the electroacupuncture treatment resulted in an enhanced immunostaining for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, a potent anti-inflammatory neuropeptide, in the synovial tissue. Moreover, the VIP-immunostaining intensity was significantly negatively correlated with the scores of inflammation in the synovial tissue (r=−0.483, P=.0026. In conclusion, these findings suggest that electroacupuncture may offer therapeutic benefits for the treatment of RA, at least partially through the induction of VIP expression.

  13. Factors that restrict the intestinal cell permeation of cyclic prodrugs of an opioid peptide (DADLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouyang, Hui; Chen, Weiqing; Andersen, Thomas E;

    2009-01-01

    inactive or substantially less active than PSC-833 in increasing the P(B) values of these prodrugs. These data suggest that, while P-gp plays a role, other factors (e.g., substrate activity for other efflux transporters and/or for metabolic enzymes) may contribute to restricting the permeation of AOA......The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in restricting the intestinal mucosal permeation of cyclic prodrugs (AOA-DADLE, CA-DADLE, and OMCA-DADLE) of the opioid peptide DADLE (H-Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-Phe-D-Leu-OH). In the Caco-2 cell model, the high P......(app,BL-to-AP)/P(app,AP-to-BL) ratios of AOA-DADLE, CA-DADLE, and OMCA-DADLE (71-117) were significantly decreased by including known P-gp inhibitors, GF-12098, cyclosporine (CyA), or PSC-833, in the incubation media, suggesting that P-gp is restricting the AP-to-BL permeation of these cyclic prodrugs. In the in situ perfused rat...

  14. CCR6, the sole receptor for the chemokine CCL20, promotes spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisweswar Nandi

    Full Text Available Interactions between the inflammatory chemokine CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 have been associated with colorectal cancer growth and metastasis, however, a causal role for CCL20 signaling through CCR6 in promoting intestinal carcinogenesis has not been demonstrated in vivo. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of CCL20-CCR6 interactions in spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis. CCR6-deficient mice were crossed with mice heterozygous for a mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene (APCMIN/+ mice to generate APCMIN/+ mice with CCR6 knocked out (CCR6KO-APCMIN/+ mice. CCR6KO-APCMIN/+ mice had diminished spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis. CCR6KO-APCMIN/+ also had normal sized spleens as compared to the enlarged spleens found in APCMIN/+ mice. Decreased macrophage infiltration into intestinal adenomas and non-tumor epithelium was observed in CCR6KO-APCMIN/+ as compared to APCMIN/+ mice. CCL20 signaling through CCR6 caused increased production of CCL20 by colorectal cancer cell lines. Furthermore, CCL20 had a direct mitogenic effect on colorectal cancer cells. Thus, interactions between CCL20 and CCR6 promote intestinal carcinogenesis. Our results suggest that the intestinal tumorigenesis driven by CCL20-CCR6 interactions may be driven by macrophage recruitment into the intestine as well as proliferation of neoplastic epithelial cells. This interaction could be targeted for the treatment or prevention of malignancy.

  15. Acute ethanol administration inhibits Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway in rat intestinal epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao; Zhao, Ji; Li, Jing; Wang, Haiying; Tang, Chengwei

    2013-05-01

    Excess alcohol intake, as in binge drinking, increases susceptibility to microbial pathogens. Alcohol impairs macrophage function by suppression of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway. This study investigated the effects of acute ethanol intake on the TLR4 pathway in rat intestinal epithelia, which usually encounters luminal antigens at first and participates in the development of intestinal immunity. Twenty Wistar rats were randomly assigned to an ethanol group given ethanol as a 25% (v/v) solution in water at 7.5 g/kg, or a control group given saline, by oral gavage daily for 3 days. The epithelial histology and ultrastructure, the intestinal microflora, peripheral and portal venous plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels, and somatostatin (SST) levels in the peripheral plasma and small intestine were evaluated. Somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2), TLR4, TANK binding kinase-1 (TBK1), activated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the intestinal mucosa were assayed. LPS responsiveness with or without SST pretreatment was assayed in vitro by quantification of TLR4, TBK1, activated NF-κB, IFN-γ and TNF-α in isolated intestinal epithelia. Mucosal damage was observed in the ethanol group by light and electron microscopy. Escherichia coli cultures were unchanged in rat intestine of the ethanol group compared with controls, but lactobacilli cultures were reduced (p TNF-α were unchanged in the ethanol group. LPS treatment in vitro up-regulated the level of TLR4, TBK1 and nuclear NF-κB as well as the production of IFN-γ and TNF-α in isolated intestinal epithelia in the control (p inhibited by SST pretreatment (p < 0.05). The peripheral plasma and intestinal levels of SST and the mucosal expression of SSTR2 in the ethanol group were significantly higher than in the control group (p < 0.05). These findings suggest the hyposensitivity of intestinal epithelial TLR4 to LPS induced by acute alcohol abuse

  16. Synergistic effect of supplemental enteral nutrients and exogenous glucagon-like peptide 2 on intestinal adaptation in a rat model of short bowel syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaowen; Nelson, David W; Holst, Jens Juul

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Short bowel syndrome (SBS) can lead to intestinal failure and require total or supplemental parenteral nutrition (TPN or PN, respectively). Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-dependent, proglucagon-derived gut hormone that stimulates intestinal adaptation. OBJECTIVE: Our...... of GLP-2 (SEN x GLP-2 interaction, P cellularity and digestive capacity in parenterally fed rats with SBS...

  17. The cytomegalovirus-encoded chemokine receptor US28 promotes intestinal neoplasia in transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, G.; Maussang, D.; Muniz, L.R.; Noriega, V.M.; Fraile-Ramos, A.; Barker, N.; Marchesi, F.; Thirunarayanan, N.; Vischer, H.F.; Qin, L.; Mayer, L.; Harpaz, N.; Leurs, R.; Furtado, G.C.; Clevers, H.; Tortorella, D.; Smit, M.J.; Lira, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    US28 is a constitutively active chemokine receptor encoded by CMV (also referred to as human herpesvirus 5), a highly prevalent human virus that infects a broad spectrum of cells, including intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). To study the role of US28 in vivo, we created transgenic mice (VS28 mice)

  18. Vagus Nerve Activity Augments Intestinal Macrophage Phagocytosis via Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor alpha 4 beta 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zanden, Esmerij P.; Snoek, Susanne A.; Heinsbroek, Sigrid E.; Stanisor, Oana I.; Verseijden, Caroline; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Greaves, David R.; Gordon, Siamon; de Jonge, Wouter J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The vagus nerve negatively regulates macrophage cytokine production via the release of acetylcholine (ACh) and activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). In various models of intestinal inflammation, vagus nerve efferent stimulation ameliorates disease. Given the act

  19. Characterization of peptide QRFP (26RFa) and its receptor from amphioxus, Branchiostoma floridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bo; Bergqvist, Christina A; Sundström, Görel; Lundell, Ingrid; Vaudry, Hubert; Leprince, Jérôme; Larhammar, Dan

    2015-01-01

    A peptide ending with RFamide (Arg-Phe-amide) was discovered independently by three different laboratories in 2003 and named 26RFa or QRFP. In mammals, a longer version of the peptide, 43 amino acids, was identified and found to bind to the orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR103. We searched the genome database of Branchiostoma floridae (Bfl) for receptor sequences related to those that bind peptides ending with RFa or RYa (including receptors for NPFF, PRLH, GnIH, and NPY). One receptor clustered in phylogenetic analyses with mammalian QRFP receptors. The gene has 3 introns in Bfl and 5 in human, but all intron positions differ, implying that the introns were inserted independently. A QRFP-like peptide consisting of 25 amino acids and ending with RFa was identified in the amphioxus genome. Eight of the ten last amino acids are identical between Bfl and human. The prepro-QRFP gene in Bfl has one intron in the propeptide whereas the human gene lacks introns. The Bfl QRFP peptide was synthesized and the receptor was functionally expressed in human cells. The response was measured as inositol phosphate (IP) turnover. The Bfl QRFP peptide was found to potently stimulate the receptor's ability to induce IP turnover with an EC50 of 0.28nM. Also the human QRFP peptides with 26 and 43 amino acids were found to stimulate the receptor (1.9 and 5.1nM, respectively). Human QRFP with 26 amino acids without the carboxyterminal amide had dramatically lower potency at 1.3μM. Thus, we have identified an amphioxus QRFP-related peptide and a corresponding receptor and shown that they interact to give a functional response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Experimental Study on AT1-receptor-peptide-induced Myocardial Immune Damage in Rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO; Yusheng; LIAO; Yuhua; WANG; Min; WEI; Yumiao; DONG; Jihua; WANG; Jinping; LU; Yingping

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the immunological damage in rat immunized with AT1-receptor peptide, 18 male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: immunized-group (n= 12), each rat was immunized with 150 μg AT1-receptor petide coupled to bovine serum albumin, together with Freund's adjuvant. Control group (n= 6), sham-immunized, "immunized liquid" was same as immunized-group except AT1-receptor peptide. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured by using the tail-cuff technique, antibody against AT1-receptor peptide detected by using ELISA method, and left ventricular myocardium and renal cortex sections were observed under light and electron microscopy.There was no significant difference in SBP and light microscopic observation of the tissue sections between the immunized-group and control group. The O.D. value of anti-AT1-receptor peptide antiserum was significantly higher in the immunized-group than in the rats before immunization and control group (P<0.01). Positive rate in the immunized-group was 100 %, while 0 % in the control group. Ultramicroscopic morphology showed potential myocardial injury, including: increase in number of mitochondria, swelling of many mitochondria with reduction in number or absence of their cristae and cristolysis, disorder of the cardiac myofibrils, and myofibrillar disruption and myocytolysis. And lysosomes were increased in renal tubular epithelia. The AT1-receptor peptide could induce to generate the antibody against AT1-receptor peptide and lead to myocardial and renal damage in rats.

  1. Expression of Formyl-peptide Receptors in Human Lung Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Fabio; Guerra, Germano; Parisi, Melania; Lucariello, Angela; De Luca, Antonio; De Rosa, Nicolina; Mazzarella, Gennaro; Bianco, Andrea; Ammendola, Rosario

    2015-05-01

    Formyl-peptide receptors (FPRs) are expressed in several tissues and cell types. The identification of markers involved in cell growth may further allow for molecular profiling of lung cancer. We investigated the possible role of FPRs as molecular markers in several types of lung carcinomas which is the main cause of cancer death worldwide. Tumor tissue samples were collected from six patients affected by lung cancer. Biopsies were analyzed for expression of FPR isoforms both in tumoral and peritumoral tissue by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), western blot and immunofluorescence. Real-time PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence analyses showed that FPR expression is lower in types of human lung cancer tissues when compared to the surrounding peritumoral tissues. The study of the mechanistic basis for the control of FPR expression in normal peritumoral versus tumoral tissues could provide the basis for new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of atrial natriuretic peptide infusion on intestinal injury in septic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada F Elbaradey

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: In cases of septic shock, concomitant administration of ANP with noradrenaline may have a protective effect against intestinal injury through a decrease in the level of intestinal hypoperfusion owing to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effect.

  3. Gut peptide receptors in pancreata of azaserine-treated and normal control rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, C.; Biemond, I.; Appel, M.J.; Visser, C.J.T.; Woutersen, R.A.; Lamers, C.B.H.W.

    1995-01-01

    Gut peptides are involved in the growth and carcinogenesis of the exocrine pancreas of rats after treatment with azaserine. However, little is known about the influence of azaserine on expression of gut peptide receptors in the pancreas of the rat. Cholecystokinin, bombesin, somatostatin, secretin a

  4. On the binding mechanism of the peptide receptor of the oligopeptide transport system of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanfermeijer, Frank C.; Detmers, Frank J.M.; Konings, Wil N.; Poolman, Bert

    2000-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis degrades exogenous proteins such as β-casein to peptides of 4–30 amino acids, and uses these as nitrogen sources. The binding protein or receptor (OppALl) of the oligopeptide transport system (Opp) of L.lactis has the unique capacity to bind peptides from five up to at least 20

  5. Second extracellular loop of human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) has a critical role in GLP-1 peptide binding and receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koole, Cassandra; Wootten, Denise; Simms, John; Miller, Laurence J; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M

    2012-02-03

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a therapeutically important family B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is pleiotropically coupled to multiple signaling effectors and, with actions including regulation of insulin biosynthesis and secretion, is one of the key targets in the management of type II diabetes mellitus. However, there is limited understanding of the role of the receptor core in orthosteric ligand binding and biological activity. To assess involvement of the extracellular loop (ECL) 2 in ligand-receptor interactions and receptor activation, we performed alanine scanning mutagenesis of loop residues and assessed the impact on receptor expression and GLP-1(1-36)-NH(2) or GLP-1(7-36)-NH(2) binding and activation of three physiologically relevant signaling pathways as follows: cAMP formation, intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)(i)) mobilization, and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (pERK1/2). Although antagonist peptide binding was unaltered, almost all mutations affected GLP-1 peptide agonist binding and/or coupling efficacy, indicating an important role in receptor activation. However, mutation of several residues displayed distinct pathway responses with respect to wild type receptor, including Arg-299 and Tyr-305, where mutation significantly enhanced both GLP-1(1-36)-NH(2)- and GLP-1(7-36)-NH(2)-mediated signaling bias for pERK1/2. In addition, mutation of Cys-296, Trp-297, Asn-300, Asn-302, and Leu-307 significantly increased GLP-1(7-36)-NH(2)-mediated signaling bias toward pERK1/2. Of all mutants studied, only mutation of Trp-306 to alanine abolished all biological activity. These data suggest a critical role of ECL2 of the GLP-1R in the activation transition(s) of the receptor and the importance of this region in the determination of both GLP-1 peptide- and pathway-specific effects.

  6. Receptor binding peptides for target-selective delivery of nanoparticles encapsulated drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Accardo A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Antonella Accardo,1 Luigi Aloj,2 Michela Aurilio,2 Giancarlo Morelli,1 Diego Tesauro11Centro interuniversitario di Ricerca sui Peptidi Bioattivi (CIRPeB, Department of Pharmacy and Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IBB CNR, University of Naples “Federico II”, 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Fondazione “G. Pascale”, Napoli, ItalyAbstract: Active targeting by means of drug encapsulated nanoparticles decorated with targeting bioactive moieties represents the next frontier in drug delivery; it reduces drug side effects and increases the therapeutic index. Peptides, based on their chemical and biological properties, could have a prevalent role to direct drug encapsulated nanoparticles, such as liposomes, micelles, or hard nanoparticles, toward the tumor tissues. A considerable number of molecular targets for peptides are either exclusively expressed or overexpressed on both cancer vasculature and cancer cells. They can be classified into three wide categories: integrins; growth factor receptors (GFRs; and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. Therapeutic agents based on nanovectors decorated with peptides targeting membrane receptors belonging to the GPCR family overexpressed by cancer cells are reviewed in this article. The most studied targeting membrane receptors are considered: somatostatin receptors; cholecystokinin receptors; receptors associated with the Bombesin like peptides family; luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptors; and neurotensin receptors. Nanovectors of different sizes and shapes (micelles, liposomes, or hard nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin or other cytotoxic drugs and externally functionalized with natural or synthetic peptides are able to target the overexpressed receptors and are described based on their formulation and in vitro and in vivo behaviors.Keywords: receptors binding peptides, drug delivery

  7. Inflammation enhances mu-opioid receptor transcription and expression in mice intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, O; Alameda, F; Puig, M M

    2001-11-01

    Opioid receptors (ORs) and their mRNA are present in the central and peripheral nervous systems of mammals and in different peripheral tissues, including the gut. Using a model of croton oil-induced (CO) intestinal inflammation in mice, we have shown a 6-fold increase in the potency of the antitransit and antisecretory effects of mu-OR agonists, mediated by peripheral ORs. We postulate that the enhanced effects are mediated by an increase in the expression of intestinal OR. We used jejunum (stripped of the mucosal layer) from mice with CO-induced intestinal inflammation and, as control subjects, saline-treated animals (SS). We evaluated the quantity of mu-OR mRNA determined by a competitive reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction; the levels of mu-OR protein by Western blot immunoassay, and the localization and number of cells expressing mu-OR using immunohistochemistry. The results show a significant increase of mu-OR mRNA (7.7-fold) and receptor protein (3-fold) during intestinal inflammation. Inflammation also induced a 64.3% increase in the number of neurons expressing mu-OR immunoreactivity in the myenteric plexus but not in the submucosal plexus. Our results show that intestinal inflammation enhances the transcription and translation of mu-OR mRNA, thus explaining the increased potency of mu-opioids during inflammation.

  8. Serosal zinc attenuate serotonin and vasoactive intestinal peptide induced secretion in piglet small intestinal epithelium in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Dorthe; Sehested, Jakob; Feng, Z

    2008-01-01

    This study addressed the mechanisms by which dietary zinc affects diarrhoea and aimed to study possible interactions between zinc status and the presence of zinc in vitro on secretagogue-induced secretion from piglet intestinal epithelium in Ussing chambers....

  9. Xenobiotic Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Intestinal Barrier Function and Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmit S. Ranhotra

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The molecular basis for the regulation of the intestinal barrier is a very fertile research area. A growing body of knowledge supports the targeting of various components of intestinal barrier function as means to treat a variety of diseases, including the inflammatory bowel diseases. Herein, we will summarize the current state of knowledge of key xenobiotic receptor regulators of barrier function, highlighting recent advances, such that the field and its future are succinctly reviewed. We posit that these receptors confer an additional dimension of host-microbe interaction in the gut, by sensing and responding to metabolites released from the symbiotic microbiota, in innate immunity and also in host drug metabolism. The scientific evidence for involvement of the receptors and its molecular basis for the control of barrier function and innate immunity regulation would serve as a rationale towards development of non-toxic probes and ligands as drugs.

  10. Designer lipid-like peptides: a class of detergents for studying functional olfactory receptors using commercial cell-free systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Corin

    Full Text Available A crucial bottleneck in membrane protein studies, particularly G-protein coupled receptors, is the notorious difficulty of finding an optimal detergent that can solubilize them and maintain their stability and function. Here we report rapid production of 12 unique mammalian olfactory receptors using short designer lipid-like peptides as detergents. The peptides were able to solubilize and stabilize each receptor. Circular dichroism showed that the purified olfactory receptors had alpha-helical secondary structures. Microscale thermophoresis suggested that the receptors were functional and bound their odorants. Blot intensity measurements indicated that milligram quantities of each olfactory receptor could be produced with at least one peptide detergent. The peptide detergents' capability was comparable to that of the detergent Brij-35. The ability of 10 peptide detergents to functionally solubilize 12 olfactory receptors demonstrates their usefulness as a new class of detergents for olfactory receptors, and possibly other G-protein coupled receptors and membrane proteins.

  11. Orlistat inhibition of intestinal lipase acutely increases appetite and attenuates postprandial glucagon-like peptide-1-(7-36)-amide-1, cholecystokinin, and peptide YY concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellrichmann, Mark; Kapelle, Mario; Ritter, Peter R;

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Intestinal lipase inhibition using tetrahydrolipstatin (Orlistat) has been widely used in the pharmacotherapy of morbid obesity. However, the effects of Orlistat on the secretion of appetite regulating gastrointestinal hormones and appetite sensations are still debated. We addressed...... whether Orlistat alters the secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1-(7-36)-amide (GLP-1), cholecystokinin (CCK), peptide YY (PYY), and ghrelin as well as postprandial appetite sensations. METHODS: Twenty-five healthy human volunteers were examined with a solid-liquid test meal after the oral administration...... of Orlistat or placebo. Gastric emptying, gallbladder volume and the plasma levels of CCK, PYY, GLP-1, and ghrelin were determined and appetite sensations were measured using visual analogue scales. RESULTS: Gastric emptying was accelerated by Orlistat administration (P

  12. Ghrelin axis genes, peptides and receptors: recent findings and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Inge; Josh, Peter; Cunningham, Peter; Herington, Adrian; Chopin, Lisa

    2011-06-20

    The ghrelin axis consists of the gene products of the ghrelin gene (GHRL), and their receptors, including the classical ghrelin receptor GHSR. While it is well-known that the ghrelin gene encodes the 28 amino acid ghrelin peptide hormone, it is now also clear that the locus encodes a range of other bioactive molecules, including novel peptides and non-coding RNAs. For many of these molecules, the physiological functions and cognate receptor(s) remain to be determined. Emerging research techniques, including proteogenomics, are likely to reveal further ghrelin axis-derived molecules. Studies of the role of ghrelin axis genes, peptides and receptors, therefore, promises to be a fruitful area of basic and clinical research in years to come.

  13. G protein-coupled receptor120 (GPR120) transcription in intestinal epithelial cells is significantly affected by bacteria belonging to the Bacteroides, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes phyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredborg, M; Theil, P K; Jensen, B B; Purup, S

    2012-12-01

    Free fatty acids (FFA) are produced in the intestine by microbial fermentation. Recently, a family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPR) acting as FFA transporters has been reported including GPR120, which is expressed by intestinal epithelial cells. The GPR120 has been reported to affect the expression of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 as well as function as a control point for anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether 12 selected intestinal bacteria, representing the 4 major phyla present in the intestine, affect intestinal epithelial cell GPR120 and GLP-1 mRNA abundance. Supernatants of the 12 bacteria were added to differentiated Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells cultured on filter inserts in concentrations corresponding to a cell:bacteria ratio of 1:200. After 4 h of incubation, changes in cellular mRNA of GLP-1 and GPR120 by bacterial supernatant were examined using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The abundance of GLP-1 mRNA decreased when cells were exposed to 4 of the 12 supernatants (P ≤ 0.05) compared with cells without bacteria added. Supernatants from 8 of the 12 bacteria analyzed increased the mRNA level of GPR120 (P ≤ 0.05) compared with cells without bacteria added. The alteration in cellular GPR120 mRNA was observed with bacteria categorized as either probiotics or bacteria capable of inducing an anti-inflammatory effect. The beneficial effect of these bacteria may very well be mediated by regulation of GPR120. The regulation of GPR120 by intestinal microbiota represents a direct signaling pathway for gut bacteria to affect host health and metabolism.

  14. Guanylin peptides regulate electrolyte and fluid transport in the Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta) posterior intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhr, Ilan M; Bodinier, Charlotte; Mager, Edward M; Esbaugh, Andrew J; Williams, Cameron; Takei, Yoshio; Grosell, Martin

    2014-11-01

    The physiological effects of guanylin (GN) and uroguanylin (UGN) on fluid and electrolyte transport in the teleost fish intestine have yet to be thoroughly investigated. In the present study, the effects of GN, UGN, and renoguanylin (RGN; a GN and UGN homolog) on short-circuit current (Isc) and the transport of Cl-, Na+, bicarbonate (HCO3-), and fluid in the Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta) intestine were determined using Ussing chambers, pH-stat titration, and intestinal sac experiments. GN, UGN, and RGN reversed the Isc of the posterior intestine (absorptive-to-secretory), but not of the anterior intestine. RGN decreased baseline HCO3- secretion, but increased Cl- and fluid secretion in the posterior intestine. The secretory response of the posterior intestine coincides with the presence of basolateral NKCC1 and apical cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the latter of which is lacking in the anterior intestine and is not permeable to HCO3- in the posterior intestine. However, the response to RGN by the posterior intestine is counterintuitive given the known role of the marine teleost intestine as a salt- and water-absorbing organ. These data demonstrate that marine teleosts possess a tissue-specific secretory response, apparently associated with seawater adaptation, the exact role of which remains to be determined.

  15. Novel role for endogenous mitochondrial formylated peptide-driven formyl peptide receptor 1 signalling in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorward, David A; Lucas, Christopher D; Doherty, Mary K; Chapman, Gavin B; Scholefield, Emma J; Conway Morris, Andrew; Felton, Jennifer M; Kipari, Tiina; Humphries, Duncan C; Robb, Calum T; Simpson, A John; Whitfield, Phillip D; Haslett, Christopher; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Rossi, Adriano G

    2017-10-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an often fatal neutrophil-dominant lung disease. Although influenced by multiple proinflammatory mediators, identification of suitable therapeutic candidates remains elusive. We aimed to delineate the presence of mitochondrial formylated peptides in ARDS and characterise the functional importance of formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) signalling in sterile lung inflammation. Mitochondrial formylated peptides were identified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum of patients with ARDS by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In vitro, human neutrophils were stimulated with mitochondrial formylated peptides and their effects assessed by flow cytometry and chemotaxis assay. Mouse lung injury was induced by mitochondrial formylated peptides or hydrochloric acid. Bone marrow chimeras determined the contribution of myeloid and parenchymal FPR1 to sterile lung inflammation. Mitochondrial formylated peptides were elevated in BALF and serum from patients with ARDS. These peptides drove neutrophil activation and chemotaxis through FPR1-dependent mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. In mouse lung injury, inflammation was attenuated in Fpr1-/- mice, effects recapitulated by a pharmacological FPR1 antagonist even when administered after the onset of injury. FPR1 expression was present in alveolar epithelium and chimeric mice demonstrated that both myeloid and parenchymal FPR1 contributed to lung inflammation. We provide the first definitive evidence of mitochondrial formylated peptides in human disease and demonstrate them to be elevated in ARDS and important in a mouse model of lung injury. This work reveals mitochondrial formylated peptide FPR1 signalling as a key driver of sterile acute lung injury and a potential therapeutic target in ARDS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Modulation of Corpus Striatal Neurochemistry by Astrocytes and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) in Parkinsonian Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelkenli, İbrahim Halil; Ulupinar, Emel; Korkmaz, Orhan Tansel; Şener, Erol; Kuş, Gökhan; Filiz, Zeynep; Tunçel, Neşe

    2016-06-01

    The neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is widely used in animal models of Parkinson's disease. In various neurodegenerative diseases, astrocytes play direct, active, and critical roles in mediating neuronal survival and functions. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has neurotrophic actions and modulates a number of astrocytic activities. In this study, the effects of VIP on the striatal neurochemistry were investigated in parkinsonian rats. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into sham-operated, unilaterally 6-OHDA-lesioned, and lesioned + VIP-administered (25 ng/kg i.p.) groups. VIP was first injected 1 h after the intrastriatal 6-OHDA microinjection and then every 2 days throughout 15 days. Extracellular striatal concentration of glutathione (GSH), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (GLU), and lactate were measured in microdialysates by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Quantification of GABA and activity dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP)-expressing cells were determined by glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)/ADNP + glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) double immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrated that a 6-OHDA lesion significantly increased the density of astrocytes in the striatum and VIP treatment slightly reduced the gliosis. Extracellular concentration of GABA, GLU, and lactate levels did not change, but GSH level significantly increased in the striatum of parkinsonian rats. VIP treatment reduced GSH level comparable to sham-operated groups, but enhanced GABA and GLU levels. Our double labeling results showed that VIP primarily acts on neurons to increase ADNP and GAD expression for protection. These results suggest that, in the 6-OHDA-induced neurodegeneration model, astrocytes were possibly activated for forefront defensiveness by modulating striatal neurochemistry.

  17. Insights into the evolution of proglucagon-derived peptides and receptors in fish and amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Stephanie Y L; Lee, Leo T O; Chow, Billy K C

    2010-07-01

    Glucagon and the glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1 and GLP-2) share a common evolutionary origin and are triplication products of an ancestral glucagon exon. In mammals, a standard scenario is found where only a single proglucagon-derived peptide set exists. However, fish and amphibians have either multiple proglucagon genes or exons that are likely resultant of duplication events. Through phylogenetic analysis and examination of their respective functions, the proglucagon ligand-receptor pairs are believed to have evolved independently before acquiring specificity for one another. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of current knowledge of proglucagon-derived peptides and receptors, with particular focus on fish and amphibian species.

  18. CLE Peptides in Plants: Proteolytic Processing,Structure-Activity Relationship, and Ligand-Receptor Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoming Gao; Yongfeng Guo

    2012-01-01

    Ligand-receptor signaling initiated by the CLAVATA3/ENDOSPERM SURROUNDING REGION (CLE) family peptides is critical in regulating cell division and differentiation in meristematic tissues in plants.Biologically active CLE peptides are released from precursor proteins via proteolytic processing.The mature form of CLE ligands consists of 12-13 amino acids with several post-translational modifications.This review summarizes recent progress toward understanding the proteolytic activities that cleave precursor proteins to release CLE peptides,the molecular structure and function of mature CLE ligands,and interactions between CLE ligands and corresponding leucine-rich repeat (LRR) receptor-like kinases (RLKs).

  19. Differential localization and characterization of functional calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors in human subcutaneous arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, L; Ahnstedt, H; Larsen, R;

    2014-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and its receptor are widely distributed within the circulation and the mechanism behind its vasodilation not only differs from one animal species to another but is also dependent on the type and size of vessel. The present study examines the nature of CGRP......-induced vasodilation, characteristics of the CGRP receptor antagonist telcagepant and localization of the key components calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity modifying protein 1 (RAMP1) of the CGRP receptor in human subcutaneous arteries....

  20. Transport of peptidomimetic drugs by the intestinal Di/tri-peptide transporter, PepT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodin, Birger; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Steffansen, Bente;

    2002-01-01

    peptide transport mechanism and enter the systemic circulation. As the number of new peptide and peptidomimetic drugs are rapidly increasing, the peptide transport system has gained increasing attention as a possible drug delivery system for small peptides and peptide-like compounds. In this paper we give...... capable of transporting a number of orally administered peptidomimetic drugs. Absorbed peptides may be hydrolysed in the cells due to the high peptidase activity present in the cytosol. Peptidomimetic drugs may, if resistant to the cellular enzyme activity, pass the basolateral membrane via a basolateral...

  1. Isolation and characterisation of a novel antibacterial peptide from a native swine intestinal tract-derived bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Haiyun; Ji, Shengyue; Peng, Jiayin; Han, Peng; An, Xiaopeng; Wang, Shan; Cao, Binyun

    2017-02-27

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are highly associated with antipathogenic activity, without generating drug resistance in targeted bacteria. In this study, the existence of AMPs in the Tibetan swine, a China-native, cold-resistant and seldom-sick breed of pig, was investigated. A peptide secreted by a Tibetan swine intestinal tract-derived Bacillus strain was isolated using reversed-phase chromatography (RPC), ultrafiltration and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The peptide was identified by mass spectrometry and was characterised for activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The 16-amino acid peptide (ASVVNKLTGGVAGLLK), named TP, had a molecular mass of 1568.919 Da and exhibited inhibitory activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria [minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 2.5-5 µM and 10-20 µM for E. coli and S. aureus, respectively] as well as human MKN-45 and NB4 tumour cell lines [50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) = 4.686 µM and 11.479 µM, respectively]. TP also exhibited weak haemolytic activity. Furthermore, TP enhanced cell membrane permeability and K(+) outflow, bound with E. coli genomic DNA in vitro and inhibited E. coli growth. Thus, TP represents a strong candidate as an antibacterial peptide.

  2. Reversible Opening of Intercellular Junctions of Intestinal Epithelial and Brain Endothelial Cells With Tight Junction Modulator Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocsik, Alexandra; Walter, Fruzsina R; Gyebrovszki, Andrea; Fülöp, Lívia; Blasig, Ingolf; Dabrowski, Sebastian; Ötvös, Ferenc; Tóth, András; Rákhely, Gábor; Veszelka, Szilvia; Vastag, Monika; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Deli, Mária A

    2016-02-01

    The intercellular junctions restrict the free passage of hydrophilic compounds through the paracellular clefts. Reversible opening of the tight junctions of biological barriers is investigated as one of the ways to increase drug delivery to the systemic circulation or the central nervous system. Six peptides, ADT-6, HAV-6, C-CPE, 7-mer (FDFWITP, PN-78), AT-1002, and PN-159, acting on different integral membrane and linker junctional proteins were tested on Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell line and a coculture model of the blood-brain barrier. All peptides tested in nontoxic concentrations showed a reversible tight junctions modulating effect and were effective to open the paracellular pathway for the marker molecules fluorescein and albumin. The change in the structure of cell-cell junctions was verified by immunostaining for occludin, claudin-4,-5, ZO-1, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Expression levels of occludin and claudins were measured in both models. We could demonstrate a selectivity of C-CPE, ADT-6, and HAV-6 peptides for epithelial cells and 7-mer and AT-1002 peptides for brain endothelial cells. PN-159 was the most effective modulator of junctional permeability in both models possibly acting via claudin-1 and -5. Our results indicate that these peptides can be effectively and selectively used as potential pharmaceutical excipients to improve drug delivery across biological barriers.

  3. Gliadin Peptides as Triggers of the Proliferative and Stress/Innate Immune Response of the Celiac Small Intestinal Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vittoria Barone

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a frequent inflammatory intestinal disease, with a genetic background, caused by gliadin-containing food. Undigested gliadin peptides induce innate and adaptive T cell-mediated immune responses. The major mediator of the stress and innate immune response to gliadin peptides (i.e., peptide 31–43, P31–43 is the cytokine interleukin-15 (IL-15. The role of epithelial growth factor (EGF as a mediator of enterocyte proliferation and the innate immune response has been described. In this paper, we review the most recent literature on the mechanisms responsible for triggering the up-regulation of these mediators in CD by gliadin peptides. We will discuss the role of P31–43 in enterocyte proliferation, structural changes and the innate immune response in CD mucosa in cooperation with EGF and IL-15, and the mechanism of up-regulation of these mediators related to vesicular trafficking. We will also review the literature that focuses on constitutive alterations of the structure, signalling/proliferation and stress/innate immunity pathways of CD cells. Finally, we will discuss how these pathways can be triggered by gliadin peptide P31–43 in controls, mimicking the celiac cellular phenotype.

  4. Screening and identification of receptor antagonist for shiga toxin from random peptides displayed on filamentous bacteriophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩照中; 苏国富; 黄翠芬

    1999-01-01

    The bacteriophage clones which can bind with shiga toxin B subunit (StxB) and inhibit cytotoxicity of shiga toxin were obtained by using antibody capturing method from a 15-mer random peptide library displayed on the surface of bacteriophage fd. Among them, one peptide encoded by the random DNA region of a selected bacteriophage (A12) was synthesized and tested in vitro and in vivo, where the peptide competed with the receptor of shiga toxin to bind StxB, and inhibited the cytotoxicity and enterotoxicity of shiga toxin. The peptide can also block other apparently unrelated StxB binding bacteriophage (A3), which suggests that there are overlapping StxB interaction sites for those ligands with different sequences. The results provide a demonstration of bacteriophage display to screen peptide ligands for a small and/or unable biotinylated molecule by antibodies-capturing strategy, and take the lead for the development of receptor antagonists for shiga toxin.

  5. Intestinal cell targeting of a stable recombinant Cu-Zn SOD from Cucumis melo fused to a gliadin peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intes, Laurent; Bahut, Muriel; Nicole, Pascal; Couvineau, Alain; Guette, Catherine; Calenda, Alphonse

    2012-05-31

    The mRNA encoding full length chloroplastic Cu-Zn SOD (superoxide dismutase) of Cucumis melo (Cantaloupe melon) was cloned. This sequence was then used to generate a mature recombinant SOD by deleting the first 64 codons expected to encode a chloroplastic peptide signal. A second hybrid SOD was created by inserting ten codons to encode a gliadin peptide at the N-terminal end of the mature SOD. Taking account of codon bias, both recombinant proteins were successfully expressed and produced in Escherichia coli. Both recombinant SODs display an enzymatic activity of ~5000U mg(-1) and were shown to be stable for at least 4h at 37°C in biological fluids mimicking the conditions of intestinal transit. These recombinant proteins were capable in vitro, albeit at different levels, of reducing ROS-induced-apoptosis of human epithelial cells. They also stimulated production and release in a time-dependent manner of an autologous SOD activity from cells located into jejunum biopsies. Nevertheless, the fused gliadin peptide enable the recombinant Cu-Zn SOD to maintain a sufficiently sustained interaction with the intestinal cells membrane in vivo rather than being eliminated with the flow. According to these observations, the new hybrid Cu-Zn SOD should show promise in applications for managing inflammatory bowel diseases.

  6. Identification of potent, selective, and metabolically stable peptide antagonists to the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Les P; Holder, Jerry Ryan; Shi, Licheng; Bennett, Brian; Aral, Jennifer; Gegg, Colin V; Wright, Marie; Walker, Kenneth; Doellgast, George; Rogers, Rick; Li, Hongyan; Valladares, Violeta; Salyers, Kevin; Johnson, Eileen; Wild, Kenneth

    2008-12-25

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-residue neuropeptide that can be converted to a CGRP(1) receptor antagonist by the truncation of its first seven residues. CGRP(8-37), 1, has a CGRP(1) receptor K(i) = 3.2 nM but is rapidly degraded in human plasma (t(1/2) = 20 min). As part of an effort to identify a prolonged in vivo circulating CGRP peptide antagonist, we found that the substitution of multiple residues in the CGRP peptide increased CGRP(1) receptor affinity >50-fold. Ac-Trp-[Arg(24),Lys(25),Asp(31),Pro(34),Phe(35)]CGRP(8-37)-NH(2), 5 (K(i) = 0.06 nM) had the highest CGRP(1) receptor affinity. Using complimentary in vitro and in vivo metabolic studies, we iteratively identified degradation sites and prepared high affinity analogues with significantly improved plasma stability. Ac-Trp-[Cit(11,18),hArg(24),Lys(25),2-Nal(27,37),Asp(31),Oic(29,34),Phe(35)]CGRP(8-37)-NH(2), 32 (K(i) = 3.3 nM), had significantly increased (>100-fold) stability over 1 or 5, with a cynomolgus monkey and human in vitro plasma half-life of 38 and 68 h, respectively.

  7. Decreased Hypothalamic Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Expression in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Kulve, Jennifer S; van Bloemendaal, Liselotte; Balesar, Rawien; IJzerman, Richard G; Swaab, Dick F; Diamant, Michaela; la Fleur, Susanne E; Alkemade, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and GLP-1 receptor agonist treatment in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) reduce blood glucose and food intake. It has been suggested that these effects are partly mediated through central GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs). The rodent and nonhuman primate hypothalamus show clea

  8. Functional phylogenetics reveals contributions of pleiotropic peptide action to ligand-receptor coevolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    The evolution of peptidergic signaling has been accompanied by a significant degree of ligand-receptor coevolution. Closely related clusters of peptide signaling molecules are observed to activate related groups of receptors, implying that genes encoding these ligands may orchestrate an array of fu...

  9. CCR6 Deficiency Impairs IgA Production and Dysregulates Antimicrobial Peptide Production, Altering the Intestinal Flora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ya-Lin; Ip, Peng-Peng; Liao, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal immunity exists as a complex relationship among immune cells, epithelial cells, and microbiota. CCR6 and its ligand–CCL20 are highly expressed in intestinal mucosal tissues, such as Peyer’s patches (PPs) and isolated lymphoid follicles (ILFs). In this study, we investigated the role of the CCR6–CCL20 axis in intestinal immunity under homeostatic conditions. CCR6 deficiency intrinsically affects germinal center reactions in PPs, leading to impairments in IgA class switching, IgA affinity, and IgA memory B cell production and positioning in PPs, suggesting an important role for CCR6 in T-cell-dependent IgA generation. CCR6 deficiency impairs the maturation of ILFs. In these follicles, group 3 innate lymphoid cells are important components and a major source of IL-22, which stimulates intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) to produce antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). We found that CCR6 deficiency reduces IL-22 production, likely due to diminished numbers of group 3 innate lymphoid cells within small-sized ILFs. The reduced IL-22 levels subsequently decrease the production of AMPs, suggesting a critical role for CCR6 in innate intestinal immunity. Finally, we found that CCR6 deficiency impairs the production of IgA and AMPs, leading to increased levels of Alcaligenes in PPs, and segmented filamentous bacteria in IECs. Thus, the CCR6–CCL20 axis plays a crucial role in maintaining intestinal symbiosis by limiting the overgrowth of mucosa-associated commensal bacteria. PMID:28744287

  10. Region-Dependent Role of Cell-Penetrating Peptides in Insulin Absorption Across the Rat Small Intestinal Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khafagy, El-Sayed; Iwamae, Ruisha; Kamei, Noriyasu; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2015-11-01

    We have reported that the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin acts as a potential absorption enhancer in oral insulin delivery systems and that this action occurs through noncovalent intermolecular interactions. However, the region-dependent role of CPPs in intestinal insulin absorption has not been clarified. To identify the intestinal region where CPPs have the most effect in increasing insulin absorption, the region-dependent action of penetratin was investigated using in situ closed intestinal loops in rats. The order of the insulin area under the insulin concentration-time curve (AUC) increase effect by L-penetratin was ileum > jejunum > duodenum > colon. By contrast, the AUC order after coadministration of insulin with D-penetratin was colon > duodenum ≥ jejunum and ileum. We also compared the effects of the L- and D-forms of penetratin, R8, and PenetraMax on ileal insulin absorption. Along with the CPPs used in this study, L- and D-PenetraMax produced the largest insulin AUCs. An absorption study using ilea pretreated with CPPs showed that PenetraMax had no irreversible effect on the intestinal epithelial membrane. The degradation of insulin in the presence of CPPs was assessed in rat intestinal enzymatic fluid. The half-life (t 1/2) of insulin increased from 14.5 to 23.7 and 184.7 min in the presence of L- and D-PenetraMax, respectively. These enzymatic degradation-resistant effects might contribute partly to the increased ileal absorption of insulin induced by D-PenetraMax. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the ability of the L- and D-forms of penetratin to increase intestinal insulin absorption was maximal in the ileum and the colon, respectively, and that D-PenetraMax is a powerful but transient enhancer of oral insulin absorption.

  11. Neuropeptides and neuropeptide receptors: drug targets, and peptide and non-peptide ligands: a tribute to Prof. Dieter Seebach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Daniel; Bartfai, Tamas

    2012-11-01

    The number of neuropeptides and their corresponding receptors has increased steadily over the last fourty years: initially, peptides were isolated from gut or brain (e.g., Substance P, somatostatin), then by targeted mining in specific regions (e.g., cortistatin, orexin in the brain), or by deorphanization of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; orexin, ghrelin receptors) and through the completion the Human Genome Project. Neuropeptides (and their receptors) have regionally restricted distributions in the central and peripheral nervous system. The neuropeptide signaling is somewhat more distinct spatially than signaling with classical, low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters that are more widely expressed, and, therefore, one assumes that drugs acting at neuropeptide receptors may have more selective pharmacological actions with possibly fewer side effects than drugs acting on glutamatergic, GABAergic, monoaminergic, or cholinergic systems. Neuropeptide receptors, which may have a few or multiple subtypes and splice variants, belong almost exclusively to the GPCR family also known as seven-transmembrane receptors (7TM), a favorite class of drug targets in the pharmaceutical industry. Most neuropeptides are co-stored and co-released with classic neurotransmitters, albeit often only at higher frequencies of stimulation or at bursting activity, thus restricting the neuropeptide signaling to specific circumstances, another reason to assume that neuropeptide drug mimics may have less side effects. Neuropeptides possess a wide spectrum of functions from neurohormone, neurotransmitter to growth factor, but also as key inflammatory mediators. Neuropeptides become 'active' when the nervous system is challenged, e.g., by stress, injury, drug abuse, or neuropsychiatric disorders with genetic, epigenetic, and/or environmental components. The unsuspected number of true neuropeptides and their cognate receptors provides opportunities to identify novel targets for the treatment of

  12. Transitions in Oral and Intestinal Microflora Composition and Innate Immune Receptor-Dependent Stimulation during Mouse Development▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Hasegawa, Mizuho; Osaka, Toshifumi; Tawaratsumida, Kazuki; Yamazaki, Takashi; Tada, Hiroyuki; Chen, Grace Y; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Núñez, Gabriel; Inohara, Naohiro

    2009-01-01

    Commensal bacteria possess immunostimulatory activities that can modulate host responses to affect development and homeostasis in the intestine. However, how different populations of resident bacteria stimulate the immune system remains largely unknown. We characterized here the ability of intestinal and oral microflora to stimulate individual pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in bone marrow-derived macrophages and mesothelial cells. The intestinal but not oral microflora elicited age- and...

  13. New development in studies of formyl-peptide receptors: critical roles in host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liangzhu; Chen, Keqiang; Xiang, Yi; Yoshimura, Teizo; Su, Shaobo; Zhu, Jianwei; Bian, Xiu-wu; Wang, Ji Ming

    2016-03-01

    Formyl-peptide receptors are a family of 7 transmembrane domain, Gi-protein-coupled receptors that possess multiple functions in many pathophysiologic processes because of their expression in a variety of cell types and their capacity to interact with a variety of structurally diverse, chemotactic ligands. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that formyl-peptide receptors are critical mediators of myeloid cell trafficking in the sequential chemotaxis signal relays in microbial infection, inflammation, and immune responses. Formyl-peptide receptors are also involved in the development and progression of cancer. In addition, one of the formyl-peptide receptor family members, Fpr2, is expressed by normal mouse-colon epithelial cells, mediates cell responses to microbial chemotactic agonists, participates in mucosal development and repair, and protects against inflammation-associated tumorigenesis. These novel discoveries greatly expanded the current understanding of the role of formyl-peptide receptors in host defense and as potential molecular targets for the development of therapeutics. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  14. Model prodrugs designed for the intestinal peptide transporter. A synthetic approach for coupling of hydroxy-containing compounds to dipeptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, G M; Nielsen, C U; Steffansen, B

    2001-01-01

    The human peptide transporter, hPepT1, situated in the small intestine, may be exploited to increase absorption of drugs or model drugs by attaching them to a dipeptide, which is recognised by hPepT1. A synthetic protocol for this kind of model prodrugs was developed, in which model drugs...... intestine and be converted to the parent drug during or after transport into the blood circulation. Therefore, we investigated the influence of the electronegativity of the substituent in the 4-position of the phenyl ring on stability in aqueous solution at pH 6.0 and 7.4, corresponding to pH in jejunum...... and blood, respectively. In addition, the influence of the electronegativity of the substituent on stability upon storage was examined. Model prodrugs containing electron donating substituents in the 4-position of the phenyl ring decomposed upon storage, while model prodrugs containing no substituents...

  15. Small Molecule Drug Discovery at the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis S. Willard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic success of peptide glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptor agonists for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus has inspired discovery efforts aimed at developing orally available small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonists. Although the GLP-1 receptor is a member of the structurally complex class B1 family of GPCRs, in recent years, a diverse array of orthosteric and allosteric nonpeptide ligands has been reported. These compounds include antagonists, agonists, and positive allosteric modulators with intrinsic efficacy. In this paper, a comprehensive review of currently disclosed small molecule GLP-1 receptor ligands is presented. In addition, examples of “ligand bias” and “probe dependency” for the GLP-1 receptor are discussed; these emerging concepts may influence further optimization of known molecules or persuade designs of expanded screening strategies to identify novel chemical starting points for GLP-1 receptor drug discovery.

  16. Thyrotropin modulates receptor-mediated processing of the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in cultured thyroid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Y.L.; Burman, K.D.; Lahiri, S.; Abdelrahim, M.M.; D' Avis, J.C.; Wartofsky, L. (Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC (USA))

    1991-03-01

    In a prior study of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding to cultured thyroid cells, we reported that at 4 C, more than 95% of bound ANP is recovered on cell membranes, with negligible ANP internalization observed. Since ANP binding was inhibited by TSH, we have further studied TSH effects on postbinding ANP processing to determine whether this phenomenon reflects enhanced endocytosis of the ANP-receptor complex. An ANP chase study was initiated by binding (125I) ANP to thyroid cells at 4 C for 2 h, followed by incubation at 37 C. ANP processing was then traced by following 125I activity at various time intervals in three fractions: cell surface membranes, incubation medium, and inside the cells. Radioactivity released into medium represented processed ANP rather than ANP dissociated from surface membranes, since prebound (125I)ANP could not be competitively dissociated by a high concentration of ANP (1 mumol/L) at 37 C. Chase study results showed that prebound ANP quickly disappeared from cell membranes down to 34% by 30 min. Internalized ANP peaked at 10 min, with 21% of initial prebound ANP found inside the cells. At the same time, radioactivity recovered in incubation medium sharply increased between 10-30 min from 8% to 52%. Preincubation of cells with chloroquine (which blocks degradation of the ANP-receptor complex by inhibiting lysosomal hydrolase) caused a 146% increase in internalized (125I)ANP by 30 min (39% compared to 15% control), while medium radioactivity decreased from 52% to 16%, suggesting that processing of the receptor complex is mediated via lysosomal enzymes. In chase studies employing cells pretreated with chloroquine, TSH stimulated the internalization rate of ANP-receptor complex. By 30 min, TSH significantly reduced the membrane-bound ANP, and the decrease was inversely correlated to the increase in internalized radioactivity.

  17. Fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 is expressed in undifferentiated intestinal epithelial cells during murine crypt morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrich, Alda; Buzan, Jenny M; Ilo, Chibuzo; Bradley, Leigh; Skaar, Kirstin; Cohn, Steven M

    2004-05-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated that fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (FGFR-3) regulates proliferation of undifferentiated intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. However, the function(s) of FGFR-3-mediated signaling during intestinal development and epithelial differentiation in vivo remain unknown. The goal of this study was to define the temporal, regional, and cell-specific patterns of FGFR-3 expression and its ligands during normal intestinal ontogeny and epithelial regeneration. Both the IIIb and IIIc isoforms of FGFR-3 mRNA, which result from differential splicing of the FGFR-3 primary transcript, were detected in mouse small intestine as early as embryonic day 16. FGFR-3 levels peaked in the small intestine from 7 to 21 days after birth and decreased thereafter to reach the low levels observed in adult mice. FGFR-3 IIIb and IIIc mRNA levels were highest in the duodenum and proximal jejunum with lower levels of both seen in the distal jejunum, ileum, and colon. FGFR-3 was expressed in a subset of proliferating undifferentiated crypt epithelial cells located in the intervillous epithelium and in the lower half of nascently forming crypts but not in differentiated epithelial cell types. FGFR-3 IIIb was the dominant isoform expressed in both small intestinal and colonic crypts. Expression of FGF1, FGF2, and FGF9, known ligands of FGFR-3, paralleled patterns of FGFR-3 expression during gut development. These data suggest that signaling through FGFR-3 plays a role in regulating morphogenic events involved in formation of intestinal crypts and/or the fate of epithelial stem cells.

  18. Molecular identification of a Drosophila G protein-coupled receptor specific for crustacean cardioactive peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Hauser, Frank; Kobberup, Sune

    2003-01-01

    The Drosophila Genome Project website (www.flybase.org) contains the sequence of an annotated gene (CG6111) expected to code for a G protein-coupled receptor. We have cloned this receptor and found that its gene was not correctly predicted, because an annotated neighbouring gene (CG14547) was als....... Furthermore, we identified a gene sequence in the genomic database from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae that very likely codes for a crustacean cardioactive peptide receptor....

  19. Mast cell expression of the serotonin1A receptor in guinea pig and human intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Zou, Fei; Qu, Meihua; Liu, Sumei; Fei, Guijun; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2013-05-15

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] is released from enterochromaffin cells in the mucosa of the small intestine. We tested a hypothesis that elevation of 5-HT in the environment of enteric mast cells might degranulate the mast cells and release mediators that become paracrine signals to the enteric nervous system, spinal afferents, and secretory glands. Western blotting, immunofluorescence, ELISA, and pharmacological analysis were used to study expression of 5-HT receptors by mast cells in the small intestine and action of 5-HT to degranulate the mast cells and release histamine in guinea pig small intestine and segments of human jejunum discarded during Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgeries. Mast cells in human and guinea pig preparations expressed the 5-HT1A receptor. ELISA detected spontaneous release of histamine in guinea pig and human preparations. The selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-PIPAT evoked release of histamine. A selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY-100135, suppressed stimulation of histamine release by 5-HT or 8-hydroxy-PIPAT. Mast cell-stabilizing drugs, doxantrazole and cromolyn sodium, suppressed the release of histamine evoked by 5-HT or 8-hydroxy-PIPAT in guinea pig and human preparations. Our results support the hypothesis that serotonergic degranulation of enteric mast cells and release of preformed mediators, including histamine, are mediated by the 5-HT1A serotonergic receptor. Association of 5-HT with the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders (e.g., irritable bowel syndrome) underlies a question of whether selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonists might have therapeutic application in disorders of this nature.

  20. Signature motif-guided identification of receptors for peptide hormones essential for root meristem growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wen; Liu, Li; Wang, Jizong; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Heqiao; Tang, Jiao; Lin, Guangzhong; Wang, Yichuan; Wen, Xing; Li, Wenyang; Han, Zhifu; Guo, Hongwei; Chai, Jijie

    2016-06-01

    Peptide-mediated cell-to-cell signaling has crucial roles in coordination and definition of cellular functions in plants. Peptide-receptor matching is important for understanding the mechanisms underlying peptide-mediated signaling. Here we report the structure-guided identification of root meristem growth factor (RGF) receptors important for plant development. An assay based on a signature ligand recognition motif (Arg-x-Arg) conserved in a subfamily of leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases (LRR-RKs) identified the functionally uncharacterized LRR-RK At4g26540 as a receptor of RGF1 (RGFR1). We further solved the crystal structure of RGF1 in complex with the LRR domain of RGFR1 at a resolution of 2.6 Å, which reveals that the Arg-x-Gly-Gly (RxGG) motif is responsible for specific recognition of the sulfate group of RGF1 by RGFR1. Based on the RxGG motif, we identified additional four RGFRs. Participation of the five RGFRs in RGF-induced signaling is supported by biochemical and genetic data. We also offer evidence showing that SERKs function as co-receptors for RGFs. Taken together, our study identifies RGF receptors and co-receptors that can link RGF signals with their downstream components and provides a proof of principle for structure-based matching of LRR-RKs with their peptide ligands.

  1. Effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 and distal bowel resection on intestinal and systemic adaptive responses in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Sarah W; de Heuvel, Elaine; Wallace, Laurie E

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), with or without massive distal bowel resection, on adaptation of jejunal mucosa, enteric neurons, gut hormones and tissue reserves in rats. BACKGROUND: GLP-2 is a gut hormone known to be trophic for small bowel mucosa......-2 attenuated resection-induced increases in blood glucose and body fat loss. CONCLUSIONS: Exogenous GLP-2 stimulates jejunal adaptation independent of enteric neuronal VIP or nNOS changes, and has divergent effects on plasma amylin and peptide YY concentrations. The novel ability of exogenous GLP-2......, and to mimic intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome (SBS). However, the effects of exogenous GLP-2 and SBS on enteric neurons are unclear. METHODS: Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to four treatments: Transected Bowel (TB) (n = 8), TB + GLP-2 (2.5 nmol/kg/h, n = 8), SBS (n = 5), or SBS + GLP-2 (2...

  2. Concomitant duplications of opioid peptide and receptor genes before the origin of jawed vertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Görel Sundström

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The opioid system is involved in reward and pain mechanisms and consists in mammals of four receptors and several peptides. The peptides are derived from four prepropeptide genes, PENK, PDYN, PNOC and POMC, encoding enkephalins, dynorphins, orphanin/nociceptin and beta-endorphin, respectively. Previously we have described how two rounds of genome doubling (2R before the origin of jawed vertebrates formed the receptor family. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Opioid peptide gene family members were investigated using a combination of sequence-based phylogeny and chromosomal locations of the peptide genes in various vertebrates. Several adjacent gene families were investigated similarly. The results show that the ancestral peptide gene gave rise to two additional copies in the genome doublings. The fourth member was generated by a local gene duplication, as the genes encoding POMC and PNOC are located on the same chromosome in the chicken genome and all three teleost genomes that we have studied. A translocation has disrupted this synteny in mammals. The PDYN gene seems to have been lost in chicken, but not in zebra finch. Duplicates of some peptide genes have arisen in the teleost fishes. Within the prepropeptide precursors, peptides have been lost or gained in different lineages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The ancestral peptide and receptor genes were located on the same chromosome and were thus duplicated concomitantly. However, subsequently genetic linkage has been lost. In conclusion, the system of opioid peptides and receptors was largely formed by the genome doublings that took place early in vertebrate evolution.

  3. Phorbol ester and atrial natriuretic peptide receptor response on vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Murakawa, K; Yokokawa, K; Horio, T; Takeda, T

    1992-04-01

    At least two types of receptors for natriuretic peptides have been reported: biologically active receptors coupled with guanylate cyclase (atrial natriuretic peptide [ANP]-B receptors) and clearance receptors (ANP-C receptors). To elucidate the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the regulation of ANP-B receptors, vascular smooth muscle cells in culture were treated with phorbol ester. Incubation with receptor agonists and phorbol ester led to the desensitization of receptor-mediated cyclic guanosine monophosphate (ANP-B receptor response) in rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Although a PKC inhibitor and downregulation of PKC by long-term incubation of cells with phorbol esters blocked the phorbol ester-induced desensitization of the ANP-B receptor response, they did not block the ANP-induced desensitization of the ANP-B receptor response. In addition, when desensitization by phorbol esters was observed, ANP was still capable of desensitization. These observations suggest that the mechanism for regulating ANP-B receptor sensitivity may be both PKC-dependent and PKC-independent and mediated by phorbol esters and ANP, respectively.

  4. Allosteric Modulation of the Activity of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Metabolite GLP-1 9–36 Amide at the GLP-1 Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Naichang Li; Jing Lu; Willars, Gary B

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) released from intestinal L cells in response to nutrients has many physiological effects but particularly enhances glucose-dependent insulin release through the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). GLP-1 7-36 amide, the predominant circulating active form of GLP-1, is rapidly truncated by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 to GLP-1 9-36 amide, which is generally considered inactive. Given its physiological roles, the GLP-1R is targeted for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Recently 'compo...

  5. Lymphocyte Cc Chemokine Receptor 9 and Epithelial Thymus-Expressed Chemokine (Teck) Expression Distinguish the Small Intestinal Immune Compartment

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The immune system has evolved specialized cellular and molecular mechanisms for targeting and regulating immune responses at epithelial surfaces. Here we show that small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and lamina propria lymphocytes migrate to thymus-expressed chemokine (TECK). This attraction is mediated by CC chemokine receptor (CCR)9, a chemoattractant receptor expressed at high levels by essentially all CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the small intestine. Only a small subset of lymp...

  6. Effects of the mucoadhesive polymer polycarbophil on the intestinal absorption of a peptide drug in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, C M; Bouwstra, J A; Kok, W; De Boer, A G; Tukker, J J; Verhoef, J C; Breimer, D D; Junginger, H E

    1992-05-01

    The absorption across rat intestinal tissue of the model peptide drug 9-desglycinamide, 8-arginine vasopressin from bioadhesive formulations was studied in-vitro, in a chronically isolated internal loop in-situ and after intraduodenal administration in-vivo. A controlled-release bioadhesive drug delivery system was tested, consisting of microspheres of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) with a mucoadhesive Polycarbophil-coating, as well as fast-release formulation consisting of an aqueous solution of the peptide in a suspension of Polycarbophil particles. Using the controlled-release system, a slight improvement of peptide absorption was found in-vitro in comparison with a non-adhesive control system, but not in-situ or in-vivo. In contrast, bioavailability was significantly increased in all three models from the Polycarbophil suspension in comparison with a solution of the drug in saline. The effect appeared to be dose-dependent, indicative of intrinsic penetration-enhancing properties of the mucoadhesive polymer. A prolongation of the absorption phase in-vitro and in the chronically isolated loop in-situ suggested that the polymer was able to protect the peptide from proteolytic degradation. This could be confirmed by degradation studies in-vitro. The duration of the penetration enhancing/enzyme inhibiting effect was diminished with increasing complexity of the test model, in the same way as was previously found for the bioadhesive effect. This interrelationship suggests that the observed improvement in peptide absorption and the mucoadhesive properties of this polymer are associated. The development of a fast-release oral dosage form for peptide drugs on the basis of Polycarbophil appears to be possible.

  7. The effect of gastric inhibitory polypeptide on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Eiichi [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Hosokawa, Masaya [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Faculty of Human Sciences, Tezukayama Gakuin University, Osaka (Japan); Harada, Norio; Yamane, Shunsuke; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Toyoda, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Fujita, Yoshihito; Fukuda, Kazuhito [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Tsukiyama, Katsushi; Yamada, Yuichiro [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Geriatric Medicine, Akita University School of Medicine, Akita (Japan); Seino, Yutaka [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Kansai Electric Power Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Inagaki, Nobuya, E-mail: inagaki@metab.kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); CREST of Japan Science and Technology Cooperation (JST), Kyoto (Japan)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal motility through a somatostatin-mediated pathway. {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility. {yields} The GIP-receptor-mediated action in intestine does not involve in GLP-1-mediated pathway. -- Abstract: Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is released from the small intestine upon meal ingestion and increases insulin secretion from pancreatic {beta} cells. Although the GIP receptor is known to be expressed in small intestine, the effects of GIP in small intestine are not fully understood. This study was designed to clarify the effect of GIP on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility. Intestinal glucose absorption in vivo was measured by single-pass perfusion method. Incorporation of [{sup 14}C]-glucose into everted jejunal rings in vitro was used to evaluate the effect of GIP on sodium-glucose co-transporter (SGLT). Motility of small intestine was measured by intestinal transit after oral administration of a non-absorbed marker. Intraperitoneal administration of GIP inhibited glucose absorption in wild-type mice in a concentration-dependent manner, showing maximum decrease at the dosage of 50 nmol/kg body weight. In glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor-deficient mice, GIP inhibited glucose absorption as in wild-type mice. In vitro examination of [{sup 14}C]-glucose uptake revealed that 100 nM GIP did not change SGLT-dependent glucose uptake in wild-type mice. After intraperitoneal administration of GIP (50 nmol/kg body weight), small intestinal transit was inhibited to 40% in both wild-type and GLP-1 receptor-deficient mice. Furthermore, a somatostatin receptor antagonist, cyclosomatostatin, reduced the inhibitory effect of GIP on both intestinal transit and glucose absorption in wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility through a somatostatin

  8. Opiate-induced constipation related to activation of small intestine opioid μ2-receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wency Chen; Hsien-Hui Chung; Juei-Tang Cheng

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the role of opioid μ-receptor subtype in opiate-induced constipation (OIC).METHODS:The effect of loperamide on intestinal transit was investigated in mice.Ileum strips were isolated from 12-wk-old male BALB/c mice for identification of isometric tension.The ileum strips were precontracted with 1 μmol/L acetylcholine (ACh).Then,decrease in muscle tone (relaxation) was characterized after cumulative administration of 0.1-10 μmol/k loperamide into the organ bath,for a concentration-dependent study.Specific blockers or antagonists were used for pretreatment to compare the changes in loperamide-induced relaxation.RESULTS:In addition to the delay in intestinal transit,loperamide produced a marked relaxation in isolated ileum precontracted with ACh,in a dose-dependent manner.This relaxation was abolished by cyprodime,a selective opioid μ-receptor antagonist,but not modified by naloxonazine at a dose sufficient to block opioid μ-1 receptors.Also,treatment with opioid μ-1 receptor agonist failed to modify the muscle tone.Moreover,the relaxation by loperamide was attenuated by glibenclamide at a dose sufficient to block ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels,and by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor,but was enhanced by an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase for cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP).CONCLUSION:Loperamide induces intestinal relaxation by activation of opioid μ-2 receptors via the cAMPPKA pathway to open KATP channels,relates to OIC.

  9. Inhibition of Protease-activated Receptor 1 Ameliorates Intestinal Radiation Mucositis in a Preclinical Rat Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Junru; Kulkarni, Ashwini [Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Chintala, Madhu [Schering-Plough Research Institute, Kenilworth, New Jersey (United States); Fink, Louis M. [Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Hauer-Jensen, Martin, E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu [Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Surgery Service, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, using a specific small-molecule inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) signaling, whether the beneficial effect of thrombin inhibition on radiation enteropathy development is due to inhibition of blood clotting or to cellular (PAR1-mediated) thrombin effects. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent fractionated X-irradiation (5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 9) of a 4-cm small-bowel segment. Early radiation toxicity was evaluated in rats receiving PAR1 inhibitor (SCH602539, 0, 10, or 15 mg/kg/d) from 1 day before to 2 weeks after the end of irradiation. The effect of PAR1 inhibition on development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis was evaluated in animals receiving SCH602539 (0, 15, or 30 mg/kg/d) until 2 weeks after irradiation, or continuously until termination of the experiment 26 weeks after irradiation. Results: Blockade of PAR1 ameliorated early intestinal toxicity, with reduced overall intestinal radiation injury (P=.002), number of myeloperoxidase-positive (P=.03) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive (P=.04) cells, and collagen III accumulation (P=.005). In contrast, there was no difference in delayed radiation enteropathy in either the 2- or 26-week administration groups. Conclusion: Pharmacological blockade of PAR1 seems to reduce early radiation mucositis but does not affect the level of delayed intestinal radiation fibrosis. Early radiation enteropathy is related to activation of cellular thrombin receptors, whereas platelet activation or fibrin formation may play a greater role in the development of delayed toxicity. Because of the favorable side-effect profile, PAR1 blockade should be further explored as a method to ameliorate acute intestinal radiation toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer and to protect first responders and rescue personnel in radiologic/nuclear emergencies.

  10. Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues in patients with somatostatin receptor positive tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essen, Martijn van; Krenning, Eric P.; Jong, Marion De; Valkema, Roelf; Kwekkeboom, Dik J. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Erasmus MC, ' s Gravendijkwal 230, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-08-15

    Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT) with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues is a promising treatment option for patients with inoperable or metastasised neuroendocrine tumours. Symptomatic improvement may occur with all of the various {sup 111}In, {sup 90}Y, or {sup 177}Lu-labelled somatostatin analogues that have been used. Since tumour size reduction was seldom achieved with {sup 111}Indium labelled somatostatin analogues, radiolabelled somatostatin analogues with beta-emitting isotopes like {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu were developed. Reported anti-tumour effects of [{sup 90}Y-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotide vary considerably between various studies: Tumour regression of 50% or more was achieved in 9 to 33% (mean 22%). With [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotate treatments, tumour regression of 50% or more was achieved in 28% of patients and tumour regression of 25 to 50% in 19% of patients, stable disease was demonstrated in 35% and progressive disease in 18%. Predictive factors for tumour remission were high tumour uptake on somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and limited amount of liver metastases. The side-effects of PRRT are few and mostly mild, certainly when using renal protective agents: Serious side-effects like myelodysplastic syndrome or renal failure are rare. The median duration of the therapy response for [{sup 90}Y-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotide and [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotate is 30 months and more than 36 months respectively. Lastly, quality of life improves significantly after treatment with [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotate. These data compare favourably with the limited number of alternative treatment approaches, like chemotherapy. If more widespread use of PRRT is possible, such therapy might become the therapy of first choice in patients with metastasised or inoperable gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. Also the role in somatostatin receptor expressing non-GEP tumours, like metastasised paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma and non

  11. Optimization of combined temozolomide and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in mice after multimodality molecular imaging studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Bison (Sander); J.C. Haeck (Joost); K. Bol (Karin); S. Koelewijn (Stuart); H.C. Groen (Harald); M.L. Melis (Marleen); J.F. Veenland (Jifke); M.R. Bernsen (Monique); M. de Jong (Marion)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Successful treatments of patients with somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-overexpressing neuroendocrine tumours (NET) comprise somatostatin-analogue lutetium-177-labelled octreotate (177Lu-TATE) treatment, also referred to as peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), and temozo

  12. Optimization of combined temozolomide and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in mice after multimodality molecular imaging studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Bison (Sander); J.C. Haeck (Joost); K. Bol (Karin); S. Koelewijn (Stuart); H.C. Groen (Harald); M.L. Melis (Marleen); J.F. Veenland (Jifke); M.R. Bernsen (Monique); M. de Jong (Marion)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Successful treatments of patients with somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-overexpressing neuroendocrine tumours (NET) comprise somatostatin-analogue lutetium-177-labelled octreotate (177Lu-TATE) treatment, also referred to as peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), and

  13. Intestinal microbiota diversity and expression of pattern recognition receptors in newly weaned piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xin; Xu, Ziwei; Wan, Jing

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the gastrointestinal microbial diversity and the expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) of the small intestine during the first week post-weaning in newly weaned piglets. Sixteen piglets were sacrificed on days 0, 1, 4, and 7 post-weaning. Luminal contents from the stomach, ileum, and colon were collected to determine the microbiota diversity; intestinal mucosa from the ileum was collected to assess mRNA expression of PRRs, including toll-like receptors (TLRs) and NOD-like receptors (NLRs); sections of ileum were examined immunohistochemically to assess the immunoglobulin-secreting cells. The results showed that the number of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) bands from the ileum and colon contents were significantly reduced in the d 4 post-weaning group. Biodiversity indexes (Shannon-Wiener index, richness index, and evenness index) were significantly decreased in the ileum of weaning groups. These indexes decreased in the colon of the d 4 post-weaning group. No significant differences were obtained in the stomach. With the exception of TLR5, the mRNA expressions of TLR2, TLR4, and TLR7 increased post-weaning. The mRNA expressions of NOD1 and NOD2 were significantly affected in the d 4 post-weaning group, and there were no significant differences in the d 1 or d 7 post-weaning groups. Analysis of the immunoglobulin-secreting (IgA, IgG, and IgM) cells showed that the ratio of each immunoglobulin was significantly higher on d 7 than d 0. The results revealed that microbial diversity was lower in the ileum and on d 4 post-weaning. Weaning significantly affected the expression of intestinal PRRs mainly on d 1 and d 4 post-weaning. The expression of specific PRRs was triggered by weaning to recognize distinctive microbiota and promote the development and maturation of the intestinal mucosal immunity.

  14. Dab2, megalin, cubilin and amnionless receptor complex might mediate intestinal endocytosis in the suckling rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Carretero, María D; Palomo, Marta; García-Miranda, Pablo; Sánchez-Aguayo, Inmaculada; Peral, María J; Calonge, María L; Ilundain, Anunciación A

    2014-03-01

    We previously proposed that Dab2 participates in the endocytosis of milk macromolecules in rat small intestine. Here we investigate the receptors that may mediate this endocytosis by studying the effects of age and diet on megalin, VLDLR, and ApoER2 expression, and that of age on the expression of cubilin and amnionless. Of megalin, VLDLR and ApoER2, only the megalin expression pattern resembles that of Dab2 previously reported. Thus the mRNA and protein levels of megalin and Dab2 are high in the intestine of the suckling rat, down-regulated by age and up-regulated by milk diet, mainly in the ileum. Neither age nor diet affect ApoER2 mRNA levels. The effect of age on VLDLR mRNA levels depends on the epithelial cell tested but they are down-regulated by milk diet. In the suckling rat, the intestinal expressions of both cubilin and amnionless are similar to that of megalin and megalin, cubilin, amnionless and Dab2 co-localize at the microvilli and in the apical endocytic apparatus. Co-localization of Dab2 with ApoER2 and VLDLR at the microvilli and in the apical endocytic apparatus is also observed. This is the first report showing intestinal co-localization of: megalin/cubilin/amnionless/Dab2, VLDLR/Dab2 and ApoER2/Dab2. We conclude that the megalin/cubilin/amnionless/Dab2 complex/es participate in intestinal processes, mainly during the lactation period and that Dab2 may act as an adaptor in intestinal processes mediated by ApoER2 and VLDLR.

  15. A novel phage-library-selected peptide inhibits human TNF-α binding to its receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Jlenia; Lelli, Barbara; Scali, Silvia; Falciani, Chiara; Bracci, Luisa; Pini, Alessandro

    2014-06-03

    We report the identification of a new human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) specific peptide selected by competitive panning of a phage library. Competitive elution of phages was obtained using the monoclonal antibody adalimumab, which neutralizes pro-inflammatory processes caused by over-production of TNF-α in vivo, and is used to treat severe symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. The selected peptide was synthesized in monomeric and branched form and analyzed for binding to TNF-α and competition with adalimumab and TNF-α receptors. Results of competition with TNF-α receptors in surface plasmon resonance and melanoma cells expressing both TNF receptors make the peptide a candidate compound for the development of a novel anti-TNF-α drug.

  16. Targeting of liposomes to HIV-1-infected cells by peptides derived from the CD4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepushkin, V A; Salem, I I; Andreev, S M; Dazin, P; Düzgüneş, N

    1996-10-23

    Liposomes can be targeted to HIV-infected cells by either reconstituting transmembrane CD4 in the membrane or covalently coupling soluble CD4 to modified lipids. We investigated whether synthetic peptides could be used as ligands for targeting liposomes. A synthetic peptide from the complementarity determining region 2 (CDR-2)-like domain of CD4 could bind specifically to HIV-infected cells and mediate the binding of peptide-coupled liposomes to these cells. A peptide from the CDR-3-like domain of CD4 inhibited HIV-induced syncytia formation, but failed to target liposomes to infected cells. This apparent discrepancy may be due to the requirement for a conformational change in the CD4 receptor for the CDR-3 region to interact with the HIV envelope protein. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using synthetic peptides to target liposomes containing antiviral drugs to HIV-infected cells.

  17. Enhanced visualization of small peptides absorbed in rat small intestine by phytic-acid-aided matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong-Min; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Yoshii, Saori; Mine, Yoshinori; Matsui, Toshiro

    2013-11-05

    Enhanced visualization of small peptides absorbed through a rat intestinal membrane was achieved by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) with the aid of phytic acid as a matrix additive. Penetrants through intestinal peptide transporter 1, i.e., glycyl-sarcosine (Gly-Sar, 147.1 m/z) and antihypertensive dipeptide, Val-Tyr (281.2 m/z), were chosen for MALDI-IMS. The signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of dipeptides Gly-Sar and Val-Tyr were seen to increase by 2.4- and 8.0-fold, respectively, when using a 2',4',6'-trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP) matrix containing 5.0 mM phytic acid, instead of the THAP matrix alone. Owing to the phytic-acid-aided MALDI-IMS method, Gly-Sar and Val-Tyr absorbed in the rat intestinal membrane were successfully visualized. The proposed imaging method also provided useful information on intestinal peptide absorption; to some extent, Val-Tyr was rapidly hydrolyzed to Tyr by peptidases located at the intestinal microvillus during the absorption process. In conclusion, the strongly acidic additive, phytic acid, is beneficial for enhancing the visualization of small peptides using MALDI-IMS, owing to the suppression of ionization-interfering salts in the tissue.

  18. Structural changes of the ligand and of the receptor alters the receptor preference for neutrophil activating peptides starting with a 3 formylmethionyl group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsman, Huamei; Winther, Malene; Gabl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus strains produce N-formylmethionyl containing peptides, of which the tetrapeptide fMIFL is a potent activator of the neutrophil formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) and the PSMα2 peptide is a potent activator of the closely related FPR2. Variants derived from these two...

  19. Effects of FGF receptor peptide agonists on animal behavior under normal and pathological conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudenko, Olga; Tkach, Vadym; Berezin, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Hexafins are recently identified low-molecular-weight peptide agonists of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), derived from the ß6–ß7 loop region of various FGFs. Synthetic hexafin peptides have been shown to bind to and induce tyrosine phosphorylation of FGFR1, stimulate neurite outgrowth......, and promote neuronal survival in vitro. Thus, the pronounced biological activities of hexafins in vitro make them attractive compounds for pharmacological studies in vivo. The present study investigated the effects of subcutaneous administration of hexafin1 and hexafin2 (peptides derived from FGF1 and FGF2...

  20. Antioxidative, DPP-IV and ACE inhibiting peptides from fish protein hydrolysed with intestinal proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, Susan Skanderup; Stagsted, Jan; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch

    of secondary marine products. The approach in this study is to hydrolyse skin and belly flap tissue from Salmon with the use of mammalian digestive proteases from pancreas and intestinal mucosa and test hydrolysates for antioxidative capacity, intestinal DPP-IV and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE...... amino groups, antioxidative capacity by ABTS (2,2-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonicacid)), DPP-IV and ACE inhibiting activity. Degree of hydrolysis (DH) of hydrolysates was approximately 13% and 10% for belly flap and skin respectively. No clear difference was observed in DH between pancreatin...... and pancreatin + mucosa hydrolysates. No DH was obtained for tissues hydrolysed with only intestinal mucosa extract. Preliminary results showed antioxidant activity and intestinal DPP-IV and ACE inhibiting activity in 10 kDa fraction from both belly flap and skin hydrolysates but with a higher antioxidative...

  1. The Formyl Peptide Receptors: Diversity of Ligands and Mechanism for Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Qiong He

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The formyl peptide receptors (FPRs are G protein-coupled receptors that transduce chemotactic signals in phagocytes and mediate host-defense as well as inflammatory responses including cell adhesion, directed migration, granule release and superoxide production. In recent years, the cellular distribution and biological functions of FPRs have expanded to include additional roles in homeostasis of organ functions and modulation of inflammation. In a prototype, FPRs recognize peptides containing N-formylated methionine such as those produced in bacteria and mitochondria, thereby serving as pattern recognition receptors. The repertoire of FPR ligands, however, has expanded rapidly to include not only N-formyl peptides from microbes but also non-formyl peptides of microbial and host origins, synthetic small molecules and an eicosanoid. How these chemically diverse ligands are recognized by the three human FPRs (FPR1, FPR2 and FPR3 and their murine equivalents is largely unclear. In the absence of crystal structures for the FPRs, site-directed mutagenesis, computer-aided ligand docking and structural simulation have led to the identification of amino acids within FPR1 and FPR2 that interact with several formyl peptides. This review article summarizes the progress made in the understanding of FPR ligand diversity as well as ligand recognition mechanisms used by these receptors.

  2. Model of the complex of Parathyroid hormone-2 receptor and Tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persson Bengt

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aim to propose interactions between the parathyroid hormone-2 receptor (PTH2R and its ligand the tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39 by constructing a homology model of their complex. The two related peptides parathyroid hormone (PTH and parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP are compared with the complex to examine their interactions. Findings In the model, the hydrophobic N-terminus of TIP39 is buried in a hydrophobic part of the central cavity between helices 3 and 7. Comparison of the peptide sequences indicates that the main discriminator between the agonistic peptides TIP39 and PTH and the inactive PTHrP is a tryptophan-phenylalanine replacement. The model indicates that the smaller phenylalanine in PTHrP does not completely occupy the binding site of the larger tryptophan residue in the other peptides. As only TIP39 causes internalisation of the receptor and the primary difference being an aspartic acid in position 7 of TIP39 that interacts with histidine 396 in the receptor, versus isoleucine/histidine residues in the related hormones, this might be a trigger interaction for the events that cause internalisation. Conclusions A model is constructed for the complex and a trigger interaction for full agonistic activation between aspartic acid 7 of TIP39 and histidine 396 in the receptor is proposed.

  3. The Formyl Peptide Receptors: Diversity of Ligands and Mechanism for Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hui-Qiong; Ye, Richard D

    2017-03-13

    The formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G protein-coupled receptors that transduce chemotactic signals in phagocytes and mediate host-defense as well as inflammatory responses including cell adhesion, directed migration, granule release and superoxide production. In recent years, the cellular distribution and biological functions of FPRs have expanded to include additional roles in homeostasis of organ functions and modulation of inflammation. In a prototype, FPRs recognize peptides containing N-formylated methionine such as those produced in bacteria and mitochondria, thereby serving as pattern recognition receptors. The repertoire of FPR ligands, however, has expanded rapidly to include not only N-formyl peptides from microbes but also non-formyl peptides of microbial and host origins, synthetic small molecules and an eicosanoid. How these chemically diverse ligands are recognized by the three human FPRs (FPR1, FPR2 and FPR3) and their murine equivalents is largely unclear. In the absence of crystal structures for the FPRs, site-directed mutagenesis, computer-aided ligand docking and structural simulation have led to the identification of amino acids within FPR1 and FPR2 that interact with several formyl peptides. This review article summarizes the progress made in the understanding of FPR ligand diversity as well as ligand recognition mechanisms used by these receptors.

  4. Porcine lactoferrin-derived peptide LFP-20 protects intestinal barrier by maintaining tight junction complex and modulating inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Xin; Hu, Wangyang; Song, Deguang; Li, Zhi; Du, Huahua; Lu, Zeqing; Wang, Yizhen

    2016-03-15

    LFP-20, a 20-amino acid antimicrobial peptide in the N terminus of porcine lactoferrin, has antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. This study assessed the protective effects of LFP-20 on LPS-induced intestinal damage in a LPS-induced mouse model and in vitro, using intestinal porcine epithelial cell line 1 (IPEC-1) cells. LFP-20 prevented LPS-induced impairment in colon epithelium tissues, infiltration of macrophages or leukocytes, histological evidence of inflammation and increased levels of TNF-a, IL-6 and IFN-γ. LFP-20 increased the expression of zonula occludens-1, occludin and claudin-1 and reduced permeability as well as apoptosis of the colon in LPS-treated mice. In IPEC-1 cells, LFP-20 increased transepithelial electrical resistance and tight junction expression. Moreover, we found LFP-20 decreased the MyD88 and AKT levels to affect the NF-κB signaling pathway, to modulate inflammation response and tight junction networks in the processing of LPS stimulation. In summary, LFP-20 prevents the inflammatory response and disruption of tight junction structure induced by LPS, suggesting the potential use of LFP-20 as a prophylactic agent to protect intestinal barrier function.

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of a technetium-99m labeled cytotoxic bombesin peptide conjugate for targeting bombesin receptor-expressing tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okarvi, Subhani M. [Cyclotron and Radiopharmaceuticals Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, MBC-03, PO Box 3354, Riyadh 11211 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: sokarvi@kfshrc.edu.sa; Al Jammaz, Ibrahim [Cyclotron and Radiopharmaceuticals Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, MBC-03, PO Box 3354, Riyadh 11211 (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-04-15

    Conjugation of the cytotoxic drugs to receptor-binding peptides is an attractive approach for the targeted delivery of cytotoxic peptide conjugates to tumor cells. In an attempt to develop an efficient peptide-based radiopharmaceutical for targeting bombesin (BN) receptor-expressing tumors (i.e., breast and prostate), we have prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis, a novel BN analog derived from the universal sequence of BN and conjugated to a widely characterized antineoplastic agent, methotrexate (MTX). MTX-BN, after radiolabeling with {sup 99m}Tc via stannous-tartrate exchange, showed a good stability against cysteine and histidine transchelation as well as a high in vitro metabolic stability in human plasma. In vitro cell-binding and internalization on MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, T47-D breast cancer and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines demonstrated high affinity and specificity of {sup 99m}Tc-MTX-BN towards both human breast and prostate cancer cells (binding affinities in nanomolar range). In addition, the radioconjugate displayed a significant internalization (values ranged between 19-35%) into the tumor cells. In vivo biodistribution and clearance kinetics in Balb/c mice are characterized by an efficient clearance from the blood and excretion mainly through the renal-urinary pathway with some elimination via the hepatobiliary system. In vivo tumor uptake in nude mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cells was 2.70{+-}0.44% ID/g at 1 h, whereas in nude mice with human epidermoid KB cells the accumulation in the tumor was found to be 1.48{+-}0.31% ID/g at 1 h post injection. The tumor uptake was always higher than in the blood and muscle, with good tumor retention and good tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-muscle ratios. The accumulation/retention in the major organs (i.e., lungs, stomach, liver, intestines, etc.) was low to moderate (<6% ID/g) in both healthy and tumor-bearing mice. However, the uptake/retention in the kidneys was rather high (up to 11.05{+-}1.80% ID/g), which is of a

  6. Shared fine specificity between T-cell receptors and an antibody recognizing a peptide/major histocompatibility class I complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Andersen, P S; Pedersen, L O

    1996-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cells recognize mosaic structures consisting of target peptides embedded within self-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. This structure has been described in great detail for several peptide-MHC complexes. In contrast, how T-cell receptors recognize peptide-MHC c...

  7. Structure of the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor in complex with a peptide mimetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Aaron A.; Liu, Wei; Chun, Eugene; Katritch, Vsevolod; Wu, Huixian; Vardy, Eyal; Huang, Xi-Ping; Trapella, Claudio; Guerrini, Remo; Calo, Girolamo; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (Ferrara); (Scripps); (UNC)

    2012-07-11

    Members of the opioid receptor family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are found throughout the peripheral and central nervous system, where they have key roles in nociception and analgesia. Unlike the 'classical' opioid receptors, {delta}, {kappa} and {mu} ({delta}-OR, {kappa}-OR and {mu}-OR), which were delineated by pharmacological criteria in the 1970s and 1980s, the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide receptor (NOP, also known as ORL-1) was discovered relatively recently by molecular cloning and characterization of an orphan GPCR. Although it shares high sequence similarity with classical opioid GPCR subtypes ({approx}60%), NOP has a markedly distinct pharmacology, featuring activation by the endogenous peptide N/OFQ, and unique selectivity for exogenous ligands. Here we report the crystal structure of human NOP, solved in complex with the peptide mimetic antagonist compound-24 (C-24) (ref. 4), revealing atomic details of ligand-receptor recognition and selectivity. Compound-24 mimics the first four amino-terminal residues of the NOP-selective peptide antagonist UFP-101, a close derivative of N/OFQ, and provides important clues to the binding of these peptides. The X-ray structure also shows substantial conformational differences in the pocket regions between NOP and the classical opioid receptors {kappa} (ref. 5) and {mu} (ref. 6), and these are probably due to a small number of residues that vary between these receptors. The NOP-compound-24 structure explains the divergent selectivity profile of NOP and provides a new structural template for the design of NOP ligands.

  8. The prenatal developmental profile of expression of opioid peptides and receptors in the mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, R. Adrian; Barg, Jacob; Bem, Wojciech T.; Coscia, Carmine J.; Loh, Y. Peng

    2008-01-01

    Although the postnatal development of opioid systems of mammalian brain has been well studied, little is known about the ontogeny of and relationship between embryonic (E) opioid peptides and their receptors. Moreover, a simultaneous assessment of levels of the 3 classes of opioid peptides and their putative receptors during embryonal development has not been made. To this end, the ontogeny of opioid peptides and receptors in mouse brain were examined during the period E11.5 to postnatal day 1 (P1). Met-enkephalin, dynorphin and β-endorphin immunoreactivity were detected before their putative opioid receptors. β-Endorphin can be discerned as early as E11.5, whereas μ binding was first observed at E12.5. Although dynorphin and Met-enkephalin were measurable at the same time as β-endorphin, κ-receptors were not detected until E14.5 and δ sites were not found at all prenatally. Differences in immunoreactivity levels of the 3 peptides occur with dynorphin being lower than Met-enkephalin and β-endorphin, consistent with a low Bmax for κ binding. Expression of the 3 opioid peptides as well as μ and κ opioid receptors rapidly increase in parallel from E14.5 to E18.5, Interestingly, levels of β-endorphin diminish by P1, the stage at which a sharp rise of μ receptors occurs. In a comparative study of the binding of β-endorphin1–31, its truncated form (1–27) and their N-acetyl derivatives to E14.5 brain membranes, β-endorphin1–31 exhibited the highest affinity. PMID:1674235

  9. Lupin Peptides Modulate the Protein-Protein Interaction of PCSK9 with the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor in HepG2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammi, Carmen; Zanoni, Chiara; Aiello, Gilda; Arnoldi, Anna; Grazioso, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) has been recently identified as a new useful target for hypercholesterolemia treatment. This work demonstrates that natural peptides, deriving from the hydrolysis of lupin protein and absorbable at intestinal level, are able to inhibit the protein-protein interaction between PCSK9 and the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). In order to sort out the best potential inhibitors among these peptides, a refined in silico model of the PCSK9/LDLR interaction was developed. Docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and peptide binding energy estimations, by MM-GBSA approach, permitted to select the two best candidates among tested peptides that were synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory activity. The most active was P5 that induced a concentration dependent inhibition of the PCSK9-LDLR binding, with an IC50 value equal to 1.6 ± 0.33 μM. Tested at a 10 μM concentration, this peptide increased by 66 ± 21.4% the ability of HepG2 cells to take up LDL from the extracellular environment.

  10. Pregnane X receptor agonists enhance intestinal epithelial wound healing and repair of the intestinal barrier following the induction of experimental colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terc, Joshua; Hansen, Ashleigh; Alston, Laurie; Hirota, Simon A

    2014-05-13

    The intestinal epithelial barrier plays a key role in the maintenance of homeostasis within the gastrointestinal tract. Barrier dysfunction leading to increased epithelial permeability is associated with a number of gastrointestinal disorders including the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) - Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. It is thought that the increased permeability in patients with IBD may be driven by alterations in the epithelial wound healing response. To this end considerable study has been undertaken to identify signaling pathways that may accelerate intestinal epithelial wound healing and normalize the barrier dysfunction observed in IBD. In the current study we examined the role of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) in modulating the intestinal epithelial wound healing response. Mutations and reduced mucosal expression of the PXR are associated with IBD, and others have reported that PXR agonists can dampen intestinal inflammation. Furthermore, stimulation of the PXR has been associated with increased cell migration and proliferation, two of the key processes involved in wound healing. We hypothesized that PXR agonists would enhance intestinal epithelial repair. Stimulation of Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells with rifaximin, rifampicin and SR12813, all potent agonists of the PXR, significantly increased wound closure. This effect was driven by p38 MAP kinase-dependent cell migration, and occurred in the absence of cell proliferation. Treating mice with a rodent specific PXR agonist, pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN), attenuated the intestinal barrier dysfunction observed in the dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) model of experimental colitis, an effect that occurred independent of the known anti-inflammatory effects of PCN. Taken together our data indicate that the activation of the PXR can enhance intestinal epithelial repair and suggest that targeting the PXR may help to normalize intestinal barrier dysfunction observed in patients with IBD

  11. The relaxin family peptide receptors and their ligands : new developments and paradigms in the evolution from jawless fish to mammals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yegorov, Sergey; Bogerd, Jan; Good, Sara V

    2014-01-01

    Relaxin family peptide receptors (Rxfps) and their ligands, relaxin (Rln) and insulin-like (Insl) peptides, are broadly implicated in the regulation of reproductive and neuroendocrine processes in mammals. Most placental mammals harbour genes for four receptors, namely rxfp1, rxfp2, rxfp3 and rxfp4.

  12. 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 triggered vitamin D receptor and Farnesoid X Receptor-like effects in rat intestine, liver, and kidney in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chow, Edwin C. Y.; Maeng, Han-Joo; Khan, Ansar; Groothuis, Genoveva; Pang, K. Sandy

    2009-01-01

    1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Triggered Vitamin D Receptor and Farnesoid X Receptor-like Effects in Rat Intestine, Liver, and Kidney In Vivo E. C. Chow 1, H-J. Maeng 1, A. A. Khan 2, G. M. Groothuis 2, K. S. Pang 1 1 Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of To

  13. Peptides derived from HIV-1, HIV-2, Ebola virus, SARS coronavirus and coronavirus 229E exhibit high affinity binding to the formyl peptide receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, John S.

    2007-01-01

    Peptides derived from the membrane proximal region of fusion proteins of human immunodeficiency viruses 1 and 2, Coronavirus 229 E, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and Ebola virus were all potent antagonists of the formyl peptide receptor expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Binding of viral peptides was affected by the naturally occurring polymorphisms at residues 190 and 192, which are located at second extracellular loop-transmembrane helix 5 interface. Substitution of R190 with W190 enhanced the affinity for a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus peptide 6 fold but reduced the affinity for N-formyl-Nle–Leu-Phe by 2.5 fold. A 12 mer peptide derived from coronavirus 229E (ETYIKPWWVWL) was the most potent antagonist of the formyl peptide receptor W190 with a Ki of 230 nM. Fluorescently labeled ETYIKPWWVWL was effectively internalized by all three variants with EC50 of ~25 nM. An HKU-1 coronavirus peptide, MYVKWPWYVWL, was a potent antagonist but N-formyl-MYVKWPWYVWL was a potent agonist. ETYIKPWWVWL did not stimulate GTPγS binding but inhibited the stimulation by formyl-NleLeuPhe. It also blocked β arrestin translocation and receptor downregulation induced by formyl-Nle–Leu–Phe. This indicates that formyl peptide receptor may be important in viral infections and that variations in its sequence among individuals may affect their likelihood of viral and bacterial infections. PMID:16842982

  14. Analysis of gastrin-releasing peptide gene and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor gene in patients with agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Katrin; Görgens, Heike; Bräuer, David; Einsle, Franziska; Noack, Barbara; von Kannen, Stephanie; Grossmann, Maria; Hoyer, Jürgen; Strobel, Alexander; Köllner, Volker; Weidner, Kerstin; Ziegler, Andreas; Hemmelmann, Claudia; Schackert, Hans K

    2014-10-01

    A gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) knock-out mouse model provided evidence that the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and its neural circuitry operate as a negative feedback-loop regulating fear, suggesting a novel candidate mechanism contributing to individual differences in fear-conditioning and associated psychiatric disorders such as agoraphobia with/without panic disorder. Studies in humans, however, provided inconclusive evidence on the association of GRP and GRPR variations in agoraphobia with/without panic disorder. Based on these findings, we investigated whether GRP and GRPR variants are associated with agoraphobia. Mental disorders were assessed via the Munich-Composite International Diagnostic Interview (M-CIDI) in 95 patients with agoraphobia with/without panic disorder and 119 controls without any mental disorders. A complete sequence analysis of GRP and GRPR was performed in all participants. We found no association of 16 GRP and 7 GRPR variants with agoraphobia with/without panic disorder.

  15. Deficiency of the intestinal growth factor, glucagon-like peptide 2, in the colon of SCID mice with inflammatory bowel disease induced by transplantation of CD4+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, P T; Hartmann, B; Bregenholt, S;

    2000-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) is produced in endocrine L-cells of the intestinal mucosa. Recently, GLP-2 was found to stimulate intestinal mucosal growth. Our objective was to study the content of GLP-2 in the large intestine in a murine model of T-cell-induced inflammatory bowel disease....

  16. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonism or DPP-4 inhibition does not accelerate neoplasia in carcinogen treated mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kissow, Hannelouise; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens Juul

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) are secreted in parallel from the intestinal endocrine cells after nutrient intake. GLP-1 is an incretin hormone and analogues are available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). GLP-2 is an intestinal growth horm...

  17. Changes in vasoactive intestinal peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide and neuropeptide Y-ergic structures of the enteric nervous system in the carcinoma of the human large intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ireneusz Mirosław Łakomy

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was aimed at immunohistochemical analysis of potential changes in the enteric nervous system caused by cancer of the large intestine. In this purpose, neurons and nerve fibers of intestinal plexuses containing neuropeptides: vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and neuropeptide Y (NPY, in pathologically changed part of the large intestine were microscpically observed and compared. Samples were taken from patients operated due to cancer of the sigmoid colon and rectum. The number of neurons and density of nerve fibres containing neuropeptides found in sections with cancer tissues were compared to those observed in sections from the uninvolved intestinal wall. Changes relating to reductions in the number of NPY-ergic neurons and density of nerve fibres in submucous and myenteric plexuses in the sections with cancer tissues (pathological sections were statistically significant. A statistically similar presence of VIP-ergic and PACAP-ergic neurons in the submucosal and myenteric plexuses was observed in both the pathological and control sections. On the other hand, in the pathological sections, VIP-ergic nerve fibres in the myenteric plexuses and PACAP-ergic nerve fibres in the submucosal and myenteric plexuses were found to be less dense. Analysis revealed changes in pathologically affected part of the large intestine may caused disruption of proper intestinal function. Observed changes in the neural elements which are responsible for relaxation of the intestine may suggest dysfunction in the innervation of this part of the colon.

  18. EP receptor expression in human intestinal epithelium and localization relative to the stem cell zone of the crypts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen Hult, Lene Th; Kleiveland, Charlotte R; Fosnes, Kjetil; Jacobsen, Morten; Lea, Tor

    2011-01-01

    There is substantial evidence for PGE2 affecting intestinal epithelial proliferation. PGE2 is also reported to be involved in the regulation of growth and differentiation in adult stem cells, both effects mediated by binding to EP-receptors. We have used the Lgr5 as a marker to scrutinize EP-receptor and COX expression in human intestinal epithelial cells with focus on the stem cell area of the crypts. Normal tissue from ileum and colon, but also duodenal biopsies from patients with untreated celiac disease, were investigated by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. The combination of fresh flash-frozen tissue and laser microdissection made it possible to isolate RNA from the epithelial cell layer, only. In the small intestine, Lgr5 labels cells are in the +4 position, while in the colon, Lgr5 positive cells are localized to the crypt bottoms. Epithelial crypt cells of normal small intestine expressed neither EP-receptor mRNA nor COX1/2. However, crypt cells in tissue from patients with untreated celiac disease expressed EP2/4 receptor and COX1 mRNA. In the colon, the situation was different. Epithelial crypt cells from normal colon were found to express EP2/4 receptor and COX1/2 transcripts. Thus, there are distinct differences between normal human small intestine and colon with regard to expression of EP2/4 receptors and COX1/2. In normal colon tissue, PGE2-mediated signaling through EP-receptors 2/4 could be involved in regulation of growth and differentiation of the epithelium, while the lack of EP-receptor expression in the small intestinal tissue exclude the possibility of a direct effect of PGE2 on the crypt epithelial cells.

  19. EP receptor expression in human intestinal epithelium and localization relative to the stem cell zone of the crypts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Th Olsen Hult

    Full Text Available There is substantial evidence for PGE2 affecting intestinal epithelial proliferation. PGE2 is also reported to be involved in the regulation of growth and differentiation in adult stem cells, both effects mediated by binding to EP-receptors. We have used the Lgr5 as a marker to scrutinize EP-receptor and COX expression in human intestinal epithelial cells with focus on the stem cell area of the crypts. Normal tissue from ileum and colon, but also duodenal biopsies from patients with untreated celiac disease, were investigated by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. The combination of fresh flash-frozen tissue and laser microdissection made it possible to isolate RNA from the epithelial cell layer, only. In the small intestine, Lgr5 labels cells are in the +4 position, while in the colon, Lgr5 positive cells are localized to the crypt bottoms. Epithelial crypt cells of normal small intestine expressed neither EP-receptor mRNA nor COX1/2. However, crypt cells in tissue from patients with untreated celiac disease expressed EP2/4 receptor and COX1 mRNA. In the colon, the situation was different. Epithelial crypt cells from normal colon were found to express EP2/4 receptor and COX1/2 transcripts. Thus, there are distinct differences between normal human small intestine and colon with regard to expression of EP2/4 receptors and COX1/2. In normal colon tissue, PGE2-mediated signaling through EP-receptors 2/4 could be involved in regulation of growth and differentiation of the epithelium, while the lack of EP-receptor expression in the small intestinal tissue exclude the possibility of a direct effect of PGE2 on the crypt epithelial cells.

  20. Development of a Single-Chain Peptide Agonist of the Relaxin-3 Receptor Using Hydrocarbon Stapling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, Keiko; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Tailhades, Julien; Shabanpoor, Fazel; Wong, Lilian L L; Ong-Pålsson, Emma E K; Kastman, Hanna E; Ma, Sherie; Gundlach, Andrew L; Rosengren, K Johan; Wade, John D; Bathgate, Ross A D

    2016-08-25

    Structure-activity studies of the insulin superfamily member, relaxin-3, have shown that its G protein-coupled receptor (RXFP3) binding site is contained within its central B-chain α-helix and this helical structure is essential for receptor activation. We sought to develop a single B-chain mimetic that retained agonist activity. This was achieved by use of solid phase peptide synthesis together with on-resin ruthenium-catalyzed ring closure metathesis of a pair of judiciously placed i,i+4 α-methyl, α-alkenyl amino acids. The resulting hydrocarbon stapled peptide was shown by solution NMR spectroscopy to mimic the native helical conformation of relaxin-3 and to possess potent RXFP3 receptor binding and activation. Alternative stapling procedures were unsuccessful, highlighting the critical need to carefully consider both the peptide sequence and stapling methodology for optimal outcomes. Our result is the first successful minimization of an insulin-like peptide to a single-chain α-helical peptide agonist which will facilitate study of the function of relaxin-3.

  1. Utilizing reversible copper(II) peptide coordination in a sequence-selective luminescent receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadlbauer, Stefan; Riechers, Alexander; Späth, Andreas; König, Burkhard

    2008-01-01

    Although vast information about the coordination ability of amino acids and peptides to metal ions is available, little use of this has been made in the rational design of selective peptide receptors. We have combined a copper(II) nitrilotriacetato (NTA) complex with an ammonium-ion-sensitive and luminescent benzocrown ether. This compound revealed micromolar affinities and selectivities for glycine- and histidine-containing sequences, which closely resembles those of copper(II) ion peptide binding: the two free coordination sites of the copper(II) NTA complex bind to imidazole and amido nitrogen atoms, replicating the initial coordination steps of non-complexed copper(II) ions. The benzocrown ether recognizes the N-terminal amino moiety intramolecularly, and the significantly increased emission intensity signals the binding event, because only if prior coordination of the peptide has taken place is the intramolecular ammonium ion-benzocrown ether interaction of sufficient strength in water to trigger an emission signal. Intermolecular ammonium ion-benzocrown ether binding is not observed. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirmed the binding constants derived from emission titrations. Thus, as deduced from peptide coordination studies, the combination of a truncated copper(II) coordination sphere and a luminescent benzocrown ether allows for the more rational design of sequence-selective peptide receptors.

  2. The Role of Formylated Peptides and Formyl Peptide Receptor 1 in Governing Neutrophil Function during Acute Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorward, David A.; Lucas, Christopher D.; Chapman, Gavin B.; Haslett, Christopher; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Rossi, Adriano G.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil migration to sites of inflammation and the subsequent execution of multiple functions are designed to contain and kill invading pathogens. These highly regulated and orchestrated processes are controlled by interactions between numerous receptors and their cognate ligands. Unraveling and identifying those that are central to inflammatory processes may represent novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of neutrophil-dominant inflammatory disorders in which dysregulated neutrophil recruitment, function, and elimination serve to potentiate rather than resolve an initial inflammatory insult. The first G protein–coupled receptor to be described on human neutrophils, formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1), is one such receptor that plays a significant role in the execution of these functions through multiple intracellular signaling pathways. Recent work has highlighted important observations with regard to both receptor function and the importance and functional relevance of FPR1 in the pathogenesis of a range of both sterile and infective inflammatory conditions. In this review, we explore the multiple components of neutrophil migration and function in both health and disease, with a focus on the role of FPR1 in these processes. The current understanding of FPR1 structure, function, and signaling is examined, alongside discussion of the potential importance of FPR1 in inflammatory diseases suggesting that FPR1 is a key regulator of the inflammatory environment. PMID:25791526

  3. Differential expression of pancreatic protein andchemosensing receptor mRNAs in NKCC1-null intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the intestinal functions of the NKCC1Na+-K+-2Cl cotransporter (SLC12a2 gene), differentialmRNA expression changes in NKCC1-null intestine wereanalyzed.METHODS: Microarray analysis of mRNA from intestinesof adult wild-type mice and gene-targeted NKCC1-null mice (n = 6 of each genotype) was performed toidentify patterns of differential gene expression changes.Differential expression patterns were further examinedby Gene Ontology analysis using the online Gorillaprogram, and expression changes of selected genes wereverified using northern blot analysis and quantitativereal time-polymerase chain reaction. Histological stainingand immunofluorescence were performed to identify celltypes in which upregulated pancreatic digestive enzymeswere expressed.RESULTS: Genes typically associated with pancreaticfunction were upregulated. These included lipase,amylase, elastase, and serine proteases indicative ofpancreatic exocrine function, as well as insulin andregenerating islet genes, representative of endocrinefunction. Northern blot analysis and immunohistochemistryshowed that differential expression of exocrinepancreas mRNAs was specific to the duodenum andlocalized to a subset of goblet cells. In addition, a majorpattern of changes involving differential expression ofolfactory receptors that function in chemical sensing, aswell as other chemosensing G-protein coupled receptors,was observed. These changes in chemosensory receptorexpression may be related to the failure of intestinalfunction and dependency on parenteral nutritionobserved in humans with SLC12a2 mutations.CONCLUSION: The results suggest that loss of NKCC1affects not only secretion, but also goblet cell functionand chemosensing of intestinal contents via G-proteincoupled chemosensory receptors.

  4. Distribution patterns of influenza virus receptors and viral attachment patterns in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of seven avian species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Taiana

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study assessed the presence of sialic acid α-2,3 and α-2,6 linked glycan receptors in seven avian species. The respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, golden pheasant, ostrich, and mallard were tested by means of lectin histochemistry, using the lectins Maackia amurensis agglutinin II and Sambucus nigra agglutinin, which show affinity for α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors, respectively. Additionally, the pattern of virus attachment (PVA was evaluated with virus histochemistry, using an avian-origin H4N5 virus and a human-origin seasonal H1N1 virus. There was a great variation of receptor distribution among the tissues and avian species studied. Both α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors were present in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, and golden pheasant. In ostriches, the expression of the receptor was basically restricted to α-2,3 in both the respiratory and intestinal tracts and in mallards the α-2,6 receptors were absent from the intestinal tract. The results obtained with the lectin histochemistry were, in general, in agreement with the PVA. The differential expression and distribution of α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors among various avian species might reflect a potentially decisive factor in the emergence of new viral strains.

  5. Combining Elements from Two Antagonists of Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 Generates More Potent Peptidomimetic Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Holdfeldt, André; Nielsen, Christina; Hansen, Anna Mette; Perez-Gassol, Iris; Dahlgren, Claes; Forsman, Huamei; Franzyk, Henrik

    2017-08-24

    Structural optimization of a peptidomimetic antagonist of formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) was explored by an approach involving combination of elements from the two most potent FPR2 antagonists described: a Rhodamine B-conjugated 10-residue gelsonin-derived peptide (i.e., PBP10, RhB-QRLFQVKGRR-OH) and the palmitoylated α-peptide/β-peptoid hybrid Pam-(Lys-βNspe)6-NH2. This generated an array of hybrid compounds from which a new subclass of receptor-selective antagonists was identified. The most potent representatives displayed activity in the low nanomolar range. The resulting stable and potent FPR2-selective antagonists (i.e., RhB-(Lys-βNphe)n-NH2; n = 4-6) are expected to become valuable tools in further elucidation of the physiological role of FPR2 in health and disease.

  6. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist treatment reduces beta cell mass in normoglycaemic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellenbroek, J.H.; Tons, H.A.; Westerouen van Meeteren, M.J.; de Graaf, N.; Hanegraaf, M.A.; Rabelink, T.J.; Carlotti, F.; de Koning, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Incretin-based therapies improve glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. In animal models of diabetes, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) increase beta cell mass. GLP-1RAs are also evaluated in non-diabetic individuals with obesity and cardiovascular di

  7. Interaction of a non-peptide agonist with angiotensin II AT1 receptor mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa-Neto, Claudio M; Miyakawa, Ayumi A; Pesquero, João B;

    2002-01-01

    To identify residues of the rat AT1A angiotensin II receptor involved with signal transduction and binding of the non-peptide agonist L-162,313 (5,7-dimethyl-2-ethyl-3-[[4-[2(n-butyloxycarbonylsulfonamido)-5-isobutyl-3-thienyl]phenyl]methyl]imidazol[4,5,6]-pyridine) we have performed ligand bindi...

  8. Effect of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist telcagepant in human cranial arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Edvinsson (Lars); K.Y. Chan (Kayi); S. Eftekhari; E. Nilsson (Elisabeth); R. de Vries (René); H. Säveland (Hans); C.M.F. Dirven (Clemens); A.H.J. Danser (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuronal messenger in intracranial sensory nerves and is considered to play a significant role in migraine pathophysiology. Materials and methods: We investigated the effect of the CGRP receptor antagonist, telcagepant, on CGRP-in

  9. Whole Body Activity Retentions in the Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with Lu-177

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, B.

    2013-01-01

    The patients with the neuroendocrine tumours (liver, spleen, etc.) often need treatment by the Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with 177Lu. The amount of 177Lu activity in the body of patients has to be known accurately for assessment of the dosimetry and for evaluation of the effectiveness of

  10. Elevated glucose concentration and natriuretic peptides receptor response on vascular smooth muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Kano, H; Hanehira, T; Minami, M; Ikeda, M; Horio, T; Yokokawa, K; Takeda, T

    1995-12-01

    1. Hyperglycaemia is believed to be a major cause of diabetic vascular complications such as accelerated atherosclerosis. In order to elucidate the effect of hyperglycaemia on vascular response in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), the natriuretic peptides receptor responses to vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) which are thought to suppress atherosclerosis were studied under high glucose (HG:22.2 mmol/L) conditions. 2. The total number of cells in SHR is higher and natriuretic peptides receptor response is smaller than that of cells in the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat. Membrane bound protein kinase C (PKC) activity in HG or SHR is higher compared to that of cells in normal glucose (NG:5.6 mmol/L) or WKY. Cells cultured in HG for at least 2 passages had higher total cell number and receptor mediated cGMP formation were suppressed compared to cells cultured in NG both in SHR and WKY. Specific PKC inhibitor PKC (19-36) 1 mu mol/L prevented HG induced suppression of natriuretic peptides response. 3. These results show that hyperglycaemia may be linked to suppressed natriuretic peptides receptor response which is caused by increased PKC activity both in WKY and SHR. This suppressed response may cause the accelerated atherosclerosis by hyperglycaemia.

  11. The effect of parachlorophenylalanine and active immunization against vasoactive intestinal peptide on reproductive activities of broiler breeder hens photostimulated with green light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarkey, Nader; Avital, Natalie; Heiblum, Rachel; Rozenboim, Israel

    2013-04-01

    Photostimulation of retinal photoreceptors appears to inhibit reproductive activity in birds. In the present study, the involvement of serotonin and vasoactive intestinal peptide was investigated in relation to reproductive failure associated with retinal photostimulation. Hens at 23 wk of age were divided into six rooms equipped with individual cages. At 24 wk of age, three rooms were photostimulated (14L:10D) with white light (control). Three rooms had two parallel lighting systems, red (660 nm) and green (560 nm), which were both on during 6 h of the 14-h light period. Upon photostimulation, the red light was turned off after 6 h, and the green light was left on for a total of 14 h (Green). Five hens from each room served as controls, five hens were immunized against vasoactive intestinal peptide, and five hens received parachlorophenylalanine, an inhibitor of serotonin biosynthesis. Parachlorophenylalanine treatment increased reproductive performance and mRNA expression of GnRH-I, LH-beta and FSH-beta (P Green group to levels which did not differ from those of the White (control) group. Immunization against vasoactive intestinal peptide reduced plasma concentration and pituitary mRNA expression of prolactin but did not affect expression of gonadal axis genes. Collectively, the results suggest that retinal photostimulation inhibits the reproductive axis through serotonin and not through vasoactive intestinal peptide.

  12. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and peptide histidine methionine. Presence in human follicular fluid and effects on DNA synthesis and steroid secretion in cultured human granulosa/lutein cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gräs, S; Ovesen, P; Andersen, A N;

    1994-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and peptide histidine methionine (PHM) originate from the same precursor molecule, prepro VIP. In the present study we examined the concentrations of VIP and PHM in human follicular fluid and their effects on cultured human granulosa/lutein cells. Follicular...

  13. Vasoactive intestinal peptide induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression through nuclear factor-κB in human prostate cell lines. Differential time-dependent responses in cancer progression

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Martínez, Ana B.; Collado, Beatriz; Bajo, Ana M.; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Prieto,Juan C.; Carmena, María J.

    2007-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression through nuclear factor-?B in human prostate cell lines. Differential time-dependent responses in cancer progression SPAIN (Fernandez-Martinez, Ana B.) SPAIN Received: 2006-09-11 Revised: 2007-01-11 Accepted: 2007-01-11

  14. Teduglutide (ALX-0600), a dipeptidyl peptidase IV resistant glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue, improves intestinal function in short bowel syndrome patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jeppesen, P B; Sanguinetti, E L; A. Buchman; Howard, L; Scolapio, J S; Ziegler, T R; Gregory, J; Tappenden, K A; Holst, J; Mortensen, P. B.

    2005-01-01

    Background and aims: Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) may improve intestinal absorption in short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients with an end jejunostomy. Teduglutide (ALX-0600), a dipeptidyl peptidase IV resistant GLP-2 analogue, prolongs the intestinotrophic properties of GLP-2 in animal models. The safety and effect of teduglutide were investigated in SBS patients with and without a colon in continuity.

  15. Carboxypeptidase-B-like processing of the C-terminus of glucagon-like peptide-2 in pig and human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orskov, C; Buhl, T; Rabenhøj, L

    1989-01-01

    no mutual cross-reactivity. By gel filtration of extracts of pig and human small intestine, the immunoreactivity eluting at the position of GLP-2 was identified by the radioimmunoassays for glucagon-like peptide-2 (PG 126-159) and for PG 151-158, whereas the assay for PG 151-160 was completely negative. We...

  16. The sensing of bacteria: emerging principles for the detection of signal sequences by formyl peptide receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufe, Bernd; Zufall, Frank

    2016-06-01

    The ability to detect specific chemical signatures released by bacteria and other microorganisms is a fundamental feature of immune defense against pathogens. There is increasing evidence that chemodetection of such microorganism-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) occurs at many places in the body including specific sets of chemosensory neurons in the mammalian nose. Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a unique family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that can detect the presence of bacteria and function as chemotactic receptors. Here, we highlight the recent discovery of a vast family of natural FPR agonists, the bacterial signal peptides (or signal sequences), thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms of bacterial sensing by human and mouse FPRs. Signal peptides in bacteria are formylated, N-terminal protein signatures required for directing the transfer of proteins through the plasma membrane. After their cleavage and release, signal peptides are available for FPR detection and thus provide a previously unrecognized MAMP. With over 170 000 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent one of the largest families of GPCR ligands and one of the most complex classes of natural activators of the innate immune system. By recognizing a conserved three-dimensional peptide motif, FPRs employ an unusual detection mechanism that combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and sensitivity, thus solving the problem of detecting thousands of distinct sequences yet maintaining selectivity. How signal peptides are released by bacteria and sensed by GPCRs and how these processes shape the responses of other cells and whole organisms represents an important topic for future research.

  17. Activation of Adhesion G Protein-coupled Receptors: AGONIST SPECIFICITY OF STACHEL SEQUENCE-DERIVED PEPTIDES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demberg, Lilian M; Winkler, Jana; Wilde, Caroline; Simon, Kay-Uwe; Schön, Julia; Rothemund, Sven; Schöneberg, Torsten; Prömel, Simone; Liebscher, Ines

    2017-03-17

    Members of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (aGPCR) family carry an agonistic sequence within their large ectodomains. Peptides derived from this region, called the Stachel sequence, can activate the respective receptor. As the conserved core region of the Stachel sequence is highly similar between aGPCRs, the agonist specificity of Stachel sequence-derived peptides was tested between family members using cell culture-based second messenger assays. Stachel peptides derived from aGPCRs of subfamily VI (GPR110/ADGRF1, GPR116/ADGRF5) and subfamily VIII (GPR64/ADGRG2, GPR126/ADGRG6) are able to activate more than one member of the respective subfamily supporting their evolutionary relationship and defining them as pharmacological receptor subtypes. Extended functional analyses of the Stachel sequences and derived peptides revealed agonist promiscuity, not only within, but also between aGPCR subfamilies. For example, the Stachel-derived peptide of GPR110 (subfamily VI) can activate GPR64 and GPR126 (both subfamily VIII). Our results indicate that key residues in the Stachel sequence are very similar between aGPCRs allowing for agonist promiscuity of several Stachel-derived peptides. Therefore, aGPCRs appear to be pharmacologically more closely related than previously thought. Our findings have direct implications for many aGPCR studies, as potential functional overlap has to be considered for in vitro and in vivo studies. However, it also offers the possibility of a broader use of more potent peptides when the original Stachel sequence is less effective. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Monocyte Activation by Necrotic Cells Is Promoted by Mitochondrial Proteins and Formyl Peptide Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouser, Elliott D.; Shao, Guohong; Julian, Mark W.; Macre, Jennifer E.; Shadel, Gerald S.; Tridandapani, Susheela; Huang, Qin; Wewers, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Necrotic cells evoke potent innate immune responses through unclear mechanisms. The mitochondrial fraction of the cell retains constituents of its bacterial ancestors, including N-formyl peptides, which are potentially immunogenic. Thus, we hypothesized that the mitochondrial fraction of the cell, particularly N-formyl peptides, contributes significantly to the activation of monocytes by necrotic cells. Design Human peripheral blood monocytes were incubated with necrotic cell fractions and mitochondrial proteins in order to investigate their potential for immune cell activation. Setting University medical center research laboratory. Subjects Healthy human adults served as blood donors. Measurements and Main Results Human blood monocyte activation was measured after treatment with cytosolic, nuclear and mitochondrial fractions of necrotic HepG2 cells or necrotic HepG2 cells depleted of N-formyl peptides [Rho(0) cells]. The specific role of the high affinity formyl peptide receptor (FPR) was then tested using specific pharmacological inhibitors and RNA-silencing. The capacity of mitochondrial N-formyl peptides to activate monocytes was confirmed using a synthetic peptide conforming to the N-terminus of mitochondrial NADH subunit 6. The results demonstrated that mitochondrial cell fractions most potently activated monocytes, and IL-8 was selectively released at low protein concentrations. Mitochondria from Rho(0) cells induced minimal monocyte IL-8 release, and specific pharmacological inhibitors and RNA-silencing confirmed that FPR contributes significantly to monocyte IL-8 responses to both necrotic cells and mitochondrial proteins. N-formyl peptides alone did not induce monocyte IL-8 release; whereas, the combination of mitochondrial N-formyl peptides and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) dramatically increased IL-8 release from monocytes. Likewise, HMGB1, the nuclear homologue of TFAM, did not induce monocyte IL-8 release unless combined with

  19. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIII. Nomenclature for the Formyl Peptide Receptor (FPR) Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    YE, RICHARD D.; BOULAY, FRANÇOIS; WANG, JI MING; DAHLGREN, CLAES; GERARD, CRAIG; PARMENTIER, MARC; SERHAN, CHARLES N.; MURPHY, PHILIP M.

    2009-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a small group of seven-transmembrane domain, G protein-coupled receptors that are expressed mainly by mammalian phagocytic leukocytes and are known to be important in host defense and inflammation. The three human FPRs (FPR1, FPR2/ALX, and FPR3) share significant sequence homology and are encoded by clustered genes. Collectively, these receptors bind an extraordinarily numerous and structurally diverse group of agonistic ligands, including N-formyl and nonformyl peptides of different composition, that chemoattract and activate phagocytes. N-formyl peptides, which are encoded in nature only by bacterial and mitochondrial genes and result from obligatory initiation of bacterial and mitochondrial protein synthesis with N-formylmethionine, is the only ligand class common to all three human receptors. Surprisingly, the endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide annexin 1 and its N-terminal fragments also bind human FPR1 and FPR2/ALX, and the anti-inflammatory eicosanoid lipoxin A4 is an agonist at FPR2/ALX. In comparison, fewer agonists have been identified for FPR3, the third member in this receptor family. Structural and functional studies of the FPRs have produced important information for understanding the general pharmacological principles governing all leukocyte chemoattractant receptors. This article aims to provide an overview of the discovery and pharmacological characterization of FPRs, to introduce an International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR)-recommended nomenclature, and to discuss unmet challenges, including the mechanisms used by these receptors to bind diverse ligands and mediate different biological functions. PMID:19498085

  20. Stapled Peptides with γ-Methylated Hydrocarbon Chains for the Estrogen Receptor/Coactivator Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speltz, Thomas E; Fanning, Sean W; Mayne, Christopher G; Fowler, Colin; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Greene, Geoffrey L; Moore, Terry W

    2016-03-18

    "Stapled" peptides are typically designed to replace two non-interacting residues with a constraining, olefinic staple. To mimic interacting leucine and isoleucine residues, we have created new amino acids that incorporate a methyl group in the γ-position of the stapling amino acid S5. We have incorporated them into a sequence derived from steroid receptor coactivator 2, which interacts with estrogen receptor α. The best peptide (IC50 =89 nm) replaces isoleucine 689 with an S-γ-methyl stapled amino acid, and has significantly higher affinity than unsubstituted peptides (390 and 760 nm). Through X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics studies, we show that the conformation taken up by the S-γ-methyl peptide minimizes the syn-pentane interactions between the α- and γ-methyl groups.

  1. The orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR139 is activated by the peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Cathrine Nøhr; Shehata, Mohamed A; Hauser, Alexander S;

    2017-01-01

    peptides, as well as their conserved core motif HFRW, were found to activate GPR139 in the low μM range. Moreover, we found that peptides consisting of nine or ten N-terminal residues of α-MSH activate GPR139 in the submicromolar range. α-MSH1-9 was found to correspond to the product of a predicted...... cleavage site in the pre-pro-protein pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC). Our results demonstrate that GPR139 is a peptide receptor, activated by ACTH, α-MSH, β-MSH, the conserved core motif HFRW as well as a potential endogenous peptide α-MSH1-9. Further studies are needed to determine the functional relevance...

  2. An antimicrobial peptide-A3: effects on growth performance, nutrient retention, intestinal and faecal microflora and intestinal morphology of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S C; Ingale, S L; Kim, J S; Park, Y K; Kwon, I K; Chae, B J

    2013-01-01

    1. The present study investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with an antimicrobial peptide-A3 (AMP-A3) on growth performance, nutrient retention, intestinal microflora and intestinal morphology of broilers. 2. A total of 320-d-old chicks (Ross 308, average BW 44.0 ± 3.4 g) were randomly allotted to 4 dietary treatments on the basis of initial body weight (BW). The dietary treatments were negative control (NC; basal diet), positive control (PC; basal diet + 15 mg avilamycin/kg diet) and AMP-A3 (basal diet supplemented with 60 or 90 mg/kg AMP-A3). The NC diet was considered as 0 mg/kg AMP-A3 treatment. Experimental diets were given in two phases: starter phase (d 0-21) and finisher phase (d 22-35). 3. The overall BW gain and retention of dry matter (DM), gross energy (GE; d 19-21) and crude protein (CP; d 19-21 and d 33-35) were greater in birds fed on the PC and 90 mg/kg AMP-A3 diets than in birds fed on the NC diet. Also, an increase in dietary AMP-A3 linearly improved BW gain and retention of DM, GE (d 19-21) and CP (d 19-21 and d 33-35). 4. Birds fed on the PC and 90 mg/kg AMP-A3 diets had fewer excreta coliforms (d 21 and d 35), total anaerobic bacteria (TAB) and Clostridium spp. (d 35) and ileum and caecum coliforms (d 35) than birds fed on the NC diet. In addition, birds fed on the diet supplemented with increasing levels of AMP-A3 had linearly reduced excreta TAB (d 35), Clostridium spp. and coliforms (d 21 and d 35) and ileum and caecum coliforms (d 35). 5. Birds fed on the PC and 90 mg/kg AMP-A3 diets had greater villus height of the duodenum, jejunum and ileum than birds fed on the NC diet. Moreover, birds fed on increasing levels of AMP-A3 diet had increased (linear) villus height of the duodenum, jejunum and ileum. 6. These results indicate that 90 mg/kg AMP-A3 has the potential to improve growth performance, nutrient retention and intestinal morphology and to reduce harmful microorganisms in broilers and can be used as a potential

  3. 肠道小肽吸收利用机制及其营养功能%Peptide Absorption and Utilization and Its Nutritional Functions in Intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺光祖; 谭碧娥; 肖昊; 印遇龙; 方俊

    2015-01-01

    Small peptides are the degradation products from protein, consisting of 2 or more amino acids joined by peptide bond( s) . Peptides uptake play a more important part in dietary protein absorption. This review sum⁃marized the mechanisms of peptide absorption and utilization in the intestine, peptide sensing involved in gas⁃trointestinal hormone secretion and feed intake regulation, the regulation of peptide utilization on intestinal health, as well as the application of small peptides in animal nutrition.%小肽是动物降解蛋白质过程中的中间产物,是由2个或2个以上的氨基酸以肽键相连的化合物,其吸收在总饲粮蛋白质的吸收中有重要作用。本文综述肠道对小肽的吸收利用及其调控机制,肠道小肽感应与胃肠激素分泌和摄食调控,肠道小肽利用对肠道健康的调控,以及小肽在动物营养中的应用。

  4. Neural regulation of intestinal nutrient absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Fadi H; Saadé, Nayef E

    2011-10-01

    The nervous system and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract share several common features including reciprocal interconnections and several neurotransmitters and peptides known as gut peptides, neuropeptides or hormones. The processes of digestion, secretion of digestive enzymes and then absorption are regulated by the neuro-endocrine system. Luminal glucose enhances its own absorption through a neuronal reflex that involves capsaicin sensitive primary afferent (CSPA) fibres. Absorbed glucose stimulates insulin release that activates hepatoenteric neural pathways leading to an increase in the expression of glucose transporters. Adrenergic innervation increases glucose absorption through α1 and β receptors and decreases absorption through activation of α2 receptors. The vagus nerve plays an important role in the regulation of diurnal variation in transporter expression and in anticipation to food intake. Vagal CSPAs exert tonic inhibitory effects on amino acid absorption. It also plays an important role in the mediation of the inhibitory effect of intestinal amino acids on their own absorption at the level of proximal or distal segment. However, chronic extrinsic denervation leads to a decrease in intestinal amino acid absorption. Conversely, adrenergic agonists as well as activation of CSPA fibres enhance peptides uptake through the peptide transporter PEPT1. Finally, intestinal innervation plays a minimal role in the absorption of fat digestion products. Intestinal absorption of nutrients is a basic vital mechanism that depends essentially on the function of intestinal mucosa. However, intrinsic and extrinsic neural mechanisms that rely on several redundant loops are involved in immediate and long-term control of the outcome of intestinal function.

  5. Human Leukocyte Antigen F Presents Peptides and Regulates Immunity through Interactions with NK Cell Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulberger, Charles L; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Hölzemer, Angelique; Neu, Karlynn E; Liu, Victor; Steinbach, Adriana M; Garcia-Beltran, Wilfredo F; Sulak, Michael; Jabri, Bana; Lynch, Vincent J; Altfeld, Marcus; Hildebrand, William H; Adams, Erin J

    2017-06-20

    Evidence is mounting that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule HLA-F (human leukocyte antigen F) regulates the immune system in pregnancy, infection, and autoimmunity by signaling through NK cell receptors (NKRs). We present structural, biochemical, and evolutionary analyses demonstrating that HLA-F presents peptides of unconventional length dictated by a newly arisen mutation (R62W) that has produced an open-ended groove accommodating particularly long peptides. Compared to empty HLA-F open conformers (OCs), HLA-F tetramers bound with human-derived peptides differentially stained leukocytes, suggesting peptide-dependent engagement. Our in vitro studies confirm that NKRs differentiate between peptide-bound and peptide-free HLA-F. The complex structure of peptide-loaded β2m-HLA-F bound to the inhibitory LIR1 revealed similarities to high-affinity recognition of the viral MHC-I mimic UL18 and a docking strategy that relies on contacts with HLA-F as well as β2m, thus precluding binding to HLA-F OCs. These findings provide a biochemical framework to understand how HLA-F could regulate immunity via interactions with NKRs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibitory effect of oatmeal extract oligomer on vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced inflammation in surviving human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisnic, S; Branchet-Gumila, M C; Coutanceau, C

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiinflammatory effect of oatmeal extract oligomer on skin fragments stimulated by a neuromediator, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Skin fragments (from plastic surgery) were maintained in survival conditions for 6 h. To induce inflammation, VIP was placed in contact with dermis by culture medium. Histological analysis was then performed on hematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides. Edema was evaluated with semiquantitative scores. Vasodilation was studied by quantifying the percentage of dilated vessels according to scores and by measuring their surface by morphometrical image analysis. TNF-alpha dosage was made on culture supernatants. Vasodilation was significantly increased after application of VIP. After treatment with oatmeal extract oligomer, the mean surface of dilated vessels and edema were significantly decreased compared with VIP-treated skin. Moreover, treatment with this extract decreased TNF-alpha.

  7. Absorption-enhancing effects of gemini surfactant on the intestinal absorption of poorly absorbed hydrophilic drugs including peptide and protein drugs in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alama, Tammam; Kusamori, Kosuke; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2016-02-29

    In general, the intestinal absorption of small hydrophilic molecules and macromolecules like peptides, after oral administration is very poor. Absorption enhancers are considered to be one of the most promising agents to enhance the intestinal absorption of drugs. In this research, we focused on a gemini surfactant, a new type of absorption enhancer. The intestinal absorption of drugs, with or without sodium dilauramidoglutamide lysine (SLG-30), a gemini surfactant, was examined by an in situ closed-loop method in rats. The intestinal absorption of 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextrans (FDs) was significantly enhanced in the presence of SLG-30, such effect being reversible. Furthermore, the calcium levels in the plasma significantly decreased when calcitonin was co-administered with SLG-30, suggestive of the increased intestinal absorption of calcitonin. In addition, no significant increase in the of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity or in protein release from the intestinal epithelium was observed in the presence of SLG-30, suggestive of the safety of this compound. These findings indicate that SLG-30 is an effective absorption-enhancer for improving the intestinal absorption of poorly absorbed drugs, without causing serious damage to the intestinal epithelium.

  8. Cell-collagen interactions: the use of peptide Toolkits to investigate collagen-receptor interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farndale, Richard W; Lisman, Ton; Bihan, Dominique; Hamaia, Samir; Smerling, Christiane S; Pugh, Nicholas; Konitsiotis, Antonios; Leitinger, Birgit; de Groot, Philip G; Jarvis, Gavin E; Raynal, Nicolas

    2008-04-01

    Fibrillar collagens provide the most fundamental platform in the vertebrate organism for the attachment of cells and matrix molecules. We have identified specific sites in collagens to which cells can attach, either directly or through protein intermediaries. Using Toolkits of triple-helical peptides, each peptide comprising 27 residues of collagen primary sequence and overlapping with its neighbours by nine amino acids, we have mapped the binding of receptors and other proteins on to collagens II or III. Integrin alpha2beta1 binds to several GXX'GER motifs within the collagens, the affinities of which differ sufficiently to control cell adhesion and migration independently of the cellular regulation of the integrin. The platelet receptor, Gp (glycoprotein) VI binds well to GPO (where O is hydroxyproline)-containing model peptides, but to very few Toolkit peptides, suggesting that sequence in addition to GPO triplets is important in defining GpVI binding. The Toolkits have been applied to the plasma protein vWF (von Willebrand factor), which binds to only a single sequence, identified by truncation and amino acid substitution within Toolkit peptides, as GXRGQOGVMGFO in collagens II and III. Intriguingly, the receptor tyrosine kinase, DDR2 (discoidin domain receptor 2) recognizes three sites in collagen II, including its vWF-binding site, although the amino acids that support the interaction differ slightly within this motif. Furthermore, the secreted protein BM-40 (basement membrane protein 40) also binds well to this same region. Thus the availability of extracellular collagen-binding proteins may be important in regulating and facilitating direct collagen-receptor interaction.

  9. Activation of Intestinal Human Pregnane X Receptor Protects against Azoxymethane/Dextran Sulfate Sodium–Induced Colon Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Jie; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Nagaoka, Kenjiro; Okamoto, Minoru; Qu, Aijuan; Tanaka, Naoki; Kimura, Shioko; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    The role of intestinal human pregnane X receptor (PXR) in colon cancer was determined through investigation of the chemopreventive role of rifaximin, a specific agonist of intestinal human PXR, toward azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)–induced colon cancer. Rifaximin treatment significantly decreased the number of colon tumors induced by AOM/DSS treatment in PXR-humanized mice, but not wild-type or Pxr-null mice. Additionally, rifaximin treatment markedly increased the survival r...

  10. Pregnane-X-Receptor Mediates The Anti-inflammatory Activities of Rifaximin on Detoxification Pathways in Intestinal Epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Migliorati, Marco; Barbanti, Miriam; Cipriani, Sabrina; Palladino, Giuseppe; Distrutti, Eleonora; Renga, Barbara; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The pregnane-X-receptor (PXR) is master gene overseeing detoxification of wide number of xenobiotics and is critical for maintenance of intestinal integrity. The intestinal expression of genes involved in cellular detoxification is down-regulated in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Rifaximin, is a non absorbable antibiotic endowed with a PXR agonistic activity. In the present study we have investigated whether rifaximin activates PXR in primary human colon ...

  11. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating-peptide and its receptor antagonists in development of acute pancreatitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Dai Chen; Zong-Guang Zhou; Zhao Wang; Hong-Kai Gao; Wen-Wei Yan; Cun Wang; Gao-Ping Zhao; Xiao-Hui Peng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating-peptide (PACAP) is a late member of the secretin/glucagon/vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) family of brain-gut peptides. It is unknown whether PACAP takes part in the development of acute pancreatitis and whether PACAP or its antagonists can be used to suppress the progression of acute pancreatitis.We investigated the actions of PACAP and its receptor antagonists in acute pancreatitis on rats.METHODS: Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats with caerulein or 3.5% sodium taurocholate. The rats were continuously infused with 5-30 μg/kg PACAP via jugular vein within the first 90 min, while 10-100 μg/kg PACAP6-27 and (4-Cl-D-Phe6, Leu17) VIP (PACAP receptor antagonists) were intravenously infused for 1 h. Biochemical and histopathological assessments were made at 4 h after infusion. Pancreatic and duodenal PACAP concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Chinese ink-perfused pancreas was fixed, sectioned and cleared for counting the functional capillary density.RESULTS: PACAP augmented caerulein-induced pancreatitis and failed to ameliorate sodium taurocholate-induced pancreatitis. ELISA revealed that relative concentrations of PACAP in pancreas and duodenum were significantly increased in both sodium taurocholate- and caeruleininduced pancreatitis compared with those in normal controls.Unexpectedly, PACAP6-27 and (4-Cl-DPhe6, Leu17) VIP could induce mild acute pancreatitis and aggravate caeruleininduced pancreatitis with characteristic manifestations of acute hemorrhagic/necrotizing pancreatitis. Functional capillary density of pancreas was interpreted in the context of pancreatic edema, and calibrated functional capillary density (calibrated FCD), which combined measurement of functional capillary density with dry weight/wet weight ratio, was introduced. Hyperemia or congestion, rather than ischemia, characterized pancreatic microcirculatory changes in acute pancreatitis

  12. Bile acid signaling through farnesoid X and TGR5 receptors in hepatobiliary and intestinal diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bojan Stanimirov; Karmen Stankovand Momir Mikov

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The well-known functions of bile acids (BAs) are the emulsification and absorption of lipophilic xenobiotics. However, the emerging evidences in the past decade showed that BAs act as signaling molecules that not only autoregulate their own metabolism and enterohepatic recirculation, but also as important regulators of integrative metabolism by ac-tivating nuclear and membrane-bound G protein-coupled re-ceptors. The present review was to get insight into the role of maintenance of BA homeostasis and BA signaling pathways in development and management of hepatobiliary and intestinal diseases. DATA SOURCES: Detailed and comprehensive search of PubMed and Scopus databases was carried out for original and review articles. RESULTS: Disturbances in BA homeostasis contribute to the development of several hepatobiliary and intestinal disorders, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, liver cirrhosis, choles-terol gallstone disease, intestinal diseases and both hepatocel-lular and colorectal carcinoma. CONCLUSION: Further efforts made in order to advance the understanding of sophisticated BA signaling network may be promising in developing novel therapeutic strategies related not only to hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal but also sys-temic diseases.

  13. Mitochondrial N-formyl peptides cause airway contraction and lung neutrophil infiltration via formyl peptide receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenceslau, Camilla Ferreira; Szasz, Theodora; McCarthy, Cameron G; Baban, Babak; NeSmith, Elizabeth; Webb, R Clinton

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory failure is a common characteristic of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis. Trauma and severe blood loss cause the release of endogenous molecules known as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (F-MITs) are DAMPs that share similarities with bacterial N-formylated peptides, and are potent immune system activators. Recently, we observed that hemorrhagic shock-induced increases in plasma levels of F-MITs associated with lung damage, and that antagonism of formyl peptide receptors (FPR) ameliorated hemorrhagic shock-induced lung injury in rats. Corroborating these data, in the present study, it was observed that F-MITs expression is higher in plasma samples from trauma patients with SIRS or sepsis when compared to control trauma group. Therefore, to better understand the role of F-MITs in the regulation of lung and airway function, we studied the hypothesis that F-MITs lead to airway contraction and lung inflammation. We observed that F-MITs induced concentration-dependent contraction in trachea, bronchi and bronchioles. However, pre-treatment with mast cells degranulator or FPR antagonist decreased this response. Finally, intratracheal challenge with F-MITs increased neutrophil elastase expression in lung and inducible nitric oxide synthase and cell division control protein 42 expression in all airway segments. These data suggest that F-MITs could be a putative target to treat respiratory failure in trauma patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Miniaturizing VEGF: Peptides mimicking the discontinuous VEGF receptor-binding site modulate the angiogenic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Lucia; Finetti, Federica; Diana, Donatella; Di Stasi, Rossella; Auriemma, Sara; Romanelli, Alessandra; Fattorusso, Roberto; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D'Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2016-08-08

    The angiogenic properties of VEGF are mediated through the binding of VEGF to its receptor VEGFR2. The VEGF/VEGFR interface is constituted by a discontinuous binding region distributed on both VEGF monomers. We attempted to reproduce this discontinuous binding site by covalently linking into a single molecular entity two VEGF segments involved in receptor recognition. We designed and synthesized by chemical ligation a set of peptides differing in length and flexibility of the molecular linker joining the two VEGF segments. The biological activity of the peptides was characterized in vitro and in vivo showing a VEGF-like activity. The most biologically active mini-VEGF was further analyzed by NMR to determine the atomic details of its interaction with the receptor.

  15. Targeting of peptide conjugated magnetic nanoparticles to urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expressing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Line; Unmack Larsen, Esben Kjær; Nielsen, Erik Holm

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are currently being used as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in vivo, mainly by their passive accumulation in tissues of interest. However, a higher specificity can ideally be achieved when the nanoparticles are targeted...... towards cell specific receptors and this may also facilitate specific drug delivery by an enhanced target-mediated endocytosis. We report efficient peptide-mediated targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to cells expressing the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), a surface biomarker for poor...... to nanoparticles carrying a non-binding control peptide. In accordance with specific receptor-mediated recognition, a low uptake was observed in the presence of an excess of ATF, a natural ligand for uPAR. The uPAR specific magnetic nanoparticles can potentially provide a useful supplement for tumor patient...

  16. Transitions in oral and intestinal microflora composition and innate immune receptor-dependent stimulation during mouse development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Mizuho; Osaka, Toshifumi; Tawaratsumida, Kazuki; Yamazaki, Takashi; Tada, Hiroyuki; Chen, Grace Y; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Núñez, Gabriel; Inohara, Naohiro

    2010-02-01

    Commensal bacteria possess immunostimulatory activities that can modulate host responses to affect development and homeostasis in the intestine. However, how different populations of resident bacteria stimulate the immune system remains largely unknown. We characterized here the ability of intestinal and oral microflora to stimulate individual pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in bone marrow-derived macrophages and mesothelial cells. The intestinal but not oral microflora elicited age- and cell type-specific immunostimulation. The immunostimulatory activity of the intestinal microflora varied among individual mice but was largely mediated via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) during breast-feeding, whereas it became TLR4 independent after weaning. This transition was associated with a change from a microflora rich in TLR4-stimulatory proteobacteria to one dominated by Bacteroidales and/or Clostridiales that poorly stimulate TLR4. The major stimulatory activity of the intestinal microflora was still intact in NOD1-, NOD2-, TLR2-, TLR4-, TLR5-, TLR9-, TLR11-, ASC-, or RICK-deficient cells but still relied on the adaptor MyD88. These studies demonstrate a transition in the intestinal microflora accompanied by a dynamic change of its ability to stimulate different PRRs which control intestinal homeostasis.

  17. Acute effects of the glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue, teduglutide, on intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thymann, Thomas; Stoll, Barbara; Mecklenburg, Lars; Burrin, Douglas G; Vegge, Andreas; Qvist, Niels; Eriksen, Thomas; Jeppesen, Palle B; Sangild, Per T

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal short bowel syndrome following massive gut resection is associated with malabsorption of nutrients. The intestinotrophic factor glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) improves gut function in adult patients with short bowel syndrome, but its effect in pediatric patients remains unknown. Our objective was to test the efficacy of the long-acting synthetic human GLP-2 analogue, teduglutide (ALX-0600), in a neonatal piglet jejunostomy model. Two-day-old pigs were subjected to resection of 50% of the small intestine (distal part), and the remnant intestine was exteriorized on the abdominal wall as a jejunostomy. All pigs were given total parenteral nutrition for 7 days and a single daily injection of the following doses of teduglutide: 0.01 (n = 6), 0.02 (n = 6), 0.1 (n = 5), or 0.2 mg · kg · day (n = 6), and compared with placebo (n = 9). Body weight increment was similar for all 4 teduglutide groups but higher than placebo (P short bowel syndrome.

  18. Intestinal Sodium Glucose Cotransporter 1 Inhibition Enhances Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion in Normal and Diabetic Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguma, Takahiro; Nakayama, Keiko; Kuriyama, Chiaki; Matsushita, Yasuaki; Yoshida, Kumiko; Hikida, Kumiko; Obokata, Naoyuki; Tsuda-Tsukimoto, Minoru; Saito, Akira; Arakawa, Kenji; Ueta, Kiichiro; Shiotani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    The sodium glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 1 plays a major role in glucose absorption and incretin hormone release in the gastrointestinal tract; however, the impact of SGLT1 inhibition on plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels in vivo is controversial. We analyzed the effects of SGLT1 inhibitors on GLP-1 secretion in normoglycemic and hyperglycemic rodents using phloridzin, CGMI [3-(4-cyclopropylphenylmethyl)-1-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)-4-methylindole], and canagliflozin. These compounds are SGLT2 inhibitors with moderate SGLT1 inhibitory activity, and their IC50 values against rat SGLT1 and mouse SGLT1 were 609 and 760 nM for phloridzin, 39.4 and 41.5 nM for CGMI, and 555 and 613 nM for canagliflozin, respectively. Oral administration of these inhibitors markedly enhanced and prolonged the glucose-induced plasma active GLP-1 (aGLP-1) increase in combination treatment with sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitor, in normoglycemic mice and rats. CGMI, the most potent SGLT1 inhibitor among them, enhanced glucose-induced, but not fat-induced, plasma aGLP-1 increase at a lower dose compared with canagliflozin. Both CGMI and canagliflozin delayed intestinal glucose absorption after oral administration in normoglycemic rats. The combined treatment of canagliflozin and a DPP4 inhibitor increased plasma aGLP-1 levels and improved glucose tolerance compared with single treatment in both 8- and 13-week-old Zucker diabetic fatty rats. These results suggest that transient inhibition of intestinal SGLT1 promotes GLP-1 secretion by delaying glucose absorption and that concomitant inhibition of intestinal SGLT1 and DPP4 is a novel therapeutic option for glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  19. Pretreatment with adenosine and adenosine A1 receptor agonist protects against intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V Haktan Ozacmak; Hale Sayan

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of adenosine and A1 receptor activation on reperfusion-induced small intestinal injury.METHODS: Rats were randomized into groups with sham operation, ischemia and reperfusion, and systemic treatments with either adenosine or 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine, A1 receptor agonist or 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, A1 receptor antagonist, plus adenosine before ischemia. Following reperfusion, contractions of ileum segments in response to KCl, carbachol and substance P were recorded. Tissue myeloperoxidase,malondialdehyde, and reduced glutathione levels were measured.RESULTS: Ischemia significantly decreased both contraction and reduced glutathione level which were ameliorated by adenosine and agonist administration. Treatment also decreased neutrophil infiltration and membrane lipid peroxidation. Beneficial effects of adenosine were abolished by pretreatment with A1 receptor antagonist.CONCLUSION: The data suggest that adenosine and A1 receptor stimulation attenuate ischemic intestinal injury via decreasing oxidative stress, lowering neutrophil infiltration, and increasing reduced glutathione content.

  20. Generation of recombinant antibodies to rat GABAA receptor subunits by affinity selection on synthetic peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha P Koduvayur

    Full Text Available The abundance and physiological importance of GABAA receptors in the central nervous system make this neurotransmitter receptor an attractive target for localizing diagnostic and therapeutic biomolecules. GABAA receptors are expressed within the retina and mediate synaptic signaling at multiple stages of the visual process. To generate monoclonal affinity reagents that can specifically recognize GABAA receptor subunits, we screened two bacteriophage M13 libraries, which displayed human scFvs, by affinity selection with synthetic peptides predicted to correspond to extracellular regions of the rat α1 and β2 GABAA subunits. We isolated three anti-β2 and one anti-α1 subunit specific scFvs. Fluorescence polarization measurements revealed all four scFvs to have low micromolar affinities with their cognate peptide targets. The scFvs were capable of detecting fully folded GABAA receptors heterologously expressed by Xenopus laevis oocytes, while preserving ligand-gated channel activity. Moreover, A10, the anti-α1 subunit-specific scFv, was capable of detecting native GABAA receptors in the mouse retina, as observed by immunofluorescence staining. In order to improve their apparent affinity via avidity, we dimerized the A10 scFv by fusing it to the Fc portion of the IgG. The resulting scFv-Fc construct had a Kd of ∼26 nM, which corresponds to an approximately 135-fold improvement in binding, and a lower detection limit in dot blots, compared to the monomeric scFv. These results strongly support the use of peptides as targets for generating affinity reagents to membrane proteins and encourage investigation of molecular conjugates that use scFvs as anchoring components to localize reagents of interest at GABAA receptors of retina and other neural tissues, for studies of receptor activation and subunit structure.

  1. The role of Ly49E receptor expression on murine intraepithelial lymphocytes in intestinal cancer development and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Acker, Aline; Louagie, Els; Filtjens, Jessica; Taveirne, Sylvie; Van Ammel, Els; Kerre, Tessa; Elewaut, Dirk; Taghon, Tom; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Plum, Jean; Leclercq, Georges

    2016-11-01

    Ly49E is a member of the Ly49 family of NK receptors and is distinct from other members of this family on the basis of its structural properties, expression pattern and ligand recognition. Importantly, Ly49E receptor expression is high on small intestinal and colonic intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs). Intestinal IELs are regulators of the mucosal immune system and contribute to front-line defense at the mucosal barrier, including anti-tumor immune response. Whereas most Ly49 receptors have MHC class-I ligands, we showed that Ly49E is instead triggered by urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). uPA has been extensively implicated in tumor development, where increased uPA expression correlates with poor prognosis. As such, we investigated the role of Ly49E receptor expression on intestinal IELs in the anti-tumor immune response. For this purpose, we compared Ly49E wild-type mice to Ly49E knockout mice in two established tumor models: Apc(Min/+)-mediated and azoxymethane-induced intestinal cancer. Our results indicate that Ly49E expression on IELs does not influence the development or progression of intestinal cancer.

  2. Atypical signaling and functional desensitization response of MAS receptor to peptide ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirupula, Kalyan C; Desnoyer, Russell; Speth, Robert C; Karnik, Sadashiva S

    2014-01-01

    MAS is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) implicated in multiple physiological processes. Several physiological peptide ligands such as angiotensin-(1-7), angiotensin fragments and neuropeptide FF (NPFF) are reported to act on MAS. Studies of conventional G protein signaling and receptor desensitization upon stimulation of MAS with the peptide ligands are limited so far. Therefore, we systematically analyzed G protein signals activated by the peptide ligands. MAS-selective non-peptide ligands that were previously shown to activate G proteins were used as controls for comparison on a common cell based assay platform. Activation of MAS by the non-peptide agonist (1) increased intracellular calcium and D-myo-inositol-1-phosphate (IP1) levels which are indicative of the activation of classical Gαq-phospholipase C signaling pathways, (2) decreased Gαi mediated cAMP levels and (3) stimulated Gα12-dependent expression of luciferase reporter. In all these assays, MAS exhibited strong constitutive activity that was inhibited by the non-peptide inverse agonist. Further, in the calcium response assay, MAS was resistant to stimulation by a second dose of the non-peptide agonist after the first activation has waned suggesting functional desensitization. In contrast, activation of MAS by the peptide ligand NPFF initiated a rapid rise in intracellular calcium with very weak IP1 accumulation which is unlike classical Gαq-phospholipase C signaling pathway. NPFF only weakly stimulated MAS-mediated activation of Gα12 and Gαi signaling pathways. Furthermore, unlike non-peptide agonist-activated MAS, NPFF-activated MAS could be readily re-stimulated the second time by the agonists. Functional assays with key ligand binding MAS mutants suggest that NPFF and non-peptide ligands bind to overlapping regions. Angiotensin-(1-7) and other angiotensin fragments weakly potentiated an NPFF-like calcium response at non-physiological concentrations (≥100 µM). Overall, our data suggest

  3. Influence of renovascular hypertension on the distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide in the stomach and heart of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasacka, Irena; Piotrowska, Żaneta; Janiuk, Izabela

    2015-11-01

    Arterial hypertension is associated with serious dysfunction of the cardiovascular system and digestive system. Given the relevant role of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the regulation of digestion process, control of blood pressure and heart rate as well as cardio- and gastro-protective character of the peptide, it appeared worthwhile to undertake the research aimed at immunohistochemical identification and evaluation of VIP-positive structures in the pylorus and heart of hypertensive rats. Up to now, this issue has not been investigated. The experimental model of hypertension in rats according to Goldblatt (two-kidney one clip model of hypertension) was used in the study. The experimental material (pylorus and heart) was collected in the sixth week of the study. VIP-containing structures were evaluated using immunohistochemical and morphometric methods. The analysis of the results showed a significant increase in the number of immunoreactive VIP structures and in the intensity of immunohistochemical staining in the stomach and in the heart of hypertensive rats. Our findings indicate that VIP is an important regulator of cardiovascular and digestive system in physiological and pathological conditions. However, to better understand the exact role of VIP in hypertension further studies need to be carried out.

  4. Formyl Peptide Receptors from Immune and Vomeronasal System Exhibit Distinct Agonist Properties*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Zufall, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The formyl peptide receptor (Fpr) family is well known for its contribution to immune defense against pathogens in human and rodent leukocytes. Recently, several structurally related members of these receptors were discovered in sensory neurons of the mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO), key detectors of pheromones and related semiochemicals. Although the biological role of vomeronasal Fprs is not yet clear, the known contribution of other Fprs to host immune defense suggested that they could contribute to vomeronasal pathogen sensing. Precise knowledge about the agonist properties of mouse Fprs is required to determine their function. We expressed all seven mouse and three human Fprs using an in vitro system and tested their activation with 32 selected compounds by conducting high throughput calcium measurements. We found an intriguing functional conservation between human and mouse immune Fprs that is most likely a consequence of closely similar biological constraints. By contrast, our data suggest a neofunctionalization of the vomeronasal Fprs. We show that the vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 can be activated robustly by W-peptide and structural derivatives but not by other typical ligands of immune Fprs. mFpr-rs1 exhibits a stereo-selective preference for peptides containing d-amino acids. The same peptide motifs are contained in pathogenic microorganisms. Thus, the ligand profile of mFpr-rs1 is consistent with a role in vomeronasal pathogen sensing. PMID:22859307

  5. The Toxicity of a Chemically Synthesized Peptide Derived from Non-Integrin Platelet Collagen Receptors

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    Thomas M. Chiang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A chemically synthesized peptide derived from platelet non-integrin collagen receptor has been shown to be an effective agent for inhibiting collagen-induced platelet aggregation and adhesion of washed radiolabeled platelets onto natural matrices and collagen coated microtiter plates. In order to be a therapeutic agent, we have used a cell culturing system and an animal model to test its cytotoxicities. In cell culture experiments, the peptide is not toxic to MEG-01, a megakaryoblastic cell line. Prior to performing experiments in rats, the existence of both platelet type I and type III collagen receptors and its functional roles in rat platelets had to be established. In this investigation, we report that rat platelets contain both receptors and the cHyB peptide inhibits both type I and type III collagen-induced rat platelet aggregation. In addition, analysis of the rat sera collected at various time intervals following an injection of cHyB into the rat-tail vein, did not show an increase in the activity of key enzymes which indicate tissue and/or organ damage. These results suggest that the cHyB peptide is safe and its development into a potential therapeutic agent for inhibiting thrombi formation is possible.

  6. The Toxicity of a Chemically Synthesized Peptide Derived from Non-Integrin Platelet Collagen Receptors

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    Thomas M. Chiang

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A chemically synthesized peptide derived from platelet non-integrin collagen receptor has been shown to be an effective agent for inhibiting collagen-induced platelet aggregation and adhesion of washed radiolabeled platelets onto natural matrices and collagen coated microtiter plates. In order to be a therapeutic agent, we have used a cell culturing system and an animal model to test its cytotoxicities. In cell culture experiments, the peptide is not toxic to MEG-01, a megakaryoblastic cell line. Prior to performing experiments in rats, the existence of both platelet type I and type III collagen receptors and its functional roles in rat platelets had to be established. In this investigation, we report that rat platelets contain both receptors and the cHyB peptide inhibits both type I and type III collagen-induced rat platelet aggregation. In addition, analysis of the rat sera collected at various time intervals following an injection of cHyB into the rat-tail vein, did not show an increase in the activity of key enzymes which indicate tissue and/or organ damage. These results suggest that the cHyB peptide is safe and its development into a potential therapeutic agent for inhibiting thrombi formation is possible.

  7. Steviol glycoside rebaudioside A induces glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY release in a porcine ex vivo intestinal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripken, Dina; van der Wielen, Nikkie; Wortelboer, Heleen M; Meijerink, Jocelijn; Witkamp, Renger F; Hendriks, Henk F J

    2014-08-20

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) are hormones important for satiation and are involved in the process called "ileal brake". The aim of this study was to investigate the GLP-1- and PYY-stimulating efficacy of rebaudioside A, casein, and sucrose. This was studied using tissue segments collected from various regions of the pig small intestine. GLP-1 release was strongest from the distal ileum. There, control release was 0.06 ± 0.01 (GLP-1) and 0.07 ± 0.01 (PYY) pmol/cm(2) of tissue. Rebaudioside A (2.5, 12.5, and 25 mM) stimulated GLP-1 release (0.14 ± 0.02, 0.16 ± 0.02, and 0.13 ± 0.02 pmol/cm(2) of tissue, p < 0.001) and PYY release (0.19 ± 0.02, 0.42 ± 0.06, and 0.27 ± 0.03 pmol/cm(2) of tissue, p < 0.001). Sucrose stimulated GLP-1 release (0.08 ± 0.01 pmol/cm(2) of tissue, p < 0.05) only at 10 mM. Casein (0.5%, 1%, and 2.5%, w/v) stimulated GLP-1 release (0.15 ± 0.03, 0.13 ± 0.02, and 0.14 ± 0.01 pmol/cm(2) of tissue, p < 0.001) and PYY release (0.13 ± 0.02, 0.20 ± 0.03, and 0.27 ± 0.03 pmol/cm(2) of tissue, p < 0.01). These findings may help in developing dietary approaches for weight management.

  8. Neuritogenic and neuroprotective properties of peptide agonists of the fibroblast growth factor receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shizhong; Bock, Elisabeth Marianne; Berezin, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) interact with their cognate ligands, FGFs, and with a number of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), such as the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), mediating a wide range of events during the development and maintenance of the nervous system. Determination...... of protein structure, in silico modeling and biological studies have recently resulted in the identification of FGFR binding peptides derived from various FGFs and NCAM mimicking the effects of these molecules with regard to their neuritogenic and neuroprotective properties. This review focuses on recently...... developed functional peptide agonists of FGFR with possible therapeutic potential....

  9. Neuritogenic and Neuroprotective Properties of Peptide Agonists of the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shizhong Li

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs interact with their cognate ligands, FGFs, and with a number of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs, such as the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM, mediating a wide range of events during the development and maintenance of the nervous system. Determination of protein structure, in silico modeling and biological studies have recently resulted in the identification of FGFR binding peptides derived from various FGFs and NCAM mimicking the effects of these molecules with regard to their neuritogenic and neuroprotective properties. This review focuses on recently developed functional peptide agonists of FGFR with possible therapeutic potential.

  10. The formyl peptide receptor like-1 and scavenger receptor MARCO are involved in glial cell activation in bacterial meningitis

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    Jansen Sandra

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have suggested that the scavenger receptor MARCO (macrophage receptor with collagenous structure mediates activation of the immune response in bacterial infection of the central nervous system (CNS. The chemotactic G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR formyl-peptide-receptor like-1 (FPRL1 plays an essential role in the inflammatory responses of host defence mechanisms and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD. Expression of the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin CRAMP/LL-37 is up-regulated in bacterial meningitis, but the mechanisms underlying CRAMP expression are far from clear. Methods Using a rat meningitis model, we investigated the influence of MARCO and FPRL1 on rCRAMP (rat cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide expression after infection with bacterial supernatants of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP and Neisseria meningitides (NM. Expression of FPRL1 and MARCO was analyzed by immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR in a rat meningitis model. Furthermore, we examined the receptor involvement by real-time RT-PCR, extracellular-signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement in glial cells (astrocytes and microglia and transfected HEK293 cells using receptor deactivation by antagonists. Receptors were inhibited by small interference RNA and the consequences in NM- and SP-induced Camp (rCRAMP gene expression and signal transduction were determined. Results We show an NM-induced increase of MARCO expression by immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR in glial and meningeal cells. Receptor deactivation by antagonists and small interfering RNA (siRNA verified the importance of FPRL1 and MARCO for NM- and SP-induced Camp and interleukin-1β expression in glial cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated a functional interaction between FPRL1 and MARCO in NM-induced signalling by real-time RT-PCR, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement and show differences between

  11. CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript) peptide specific binding sites in PC12 cells have characteristics of CART peptide receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelová, Veronika; Pirník, Zdeno; Železná, Blanka; Maletínská, Lenka

    2014-02-14

    CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript) peptide is a neuropeptide with a powerful central anorexigenic effect. Specific CART peptide binding sites, most likely CART peptide receptors, have been found in PC12 cells. This study further characterizes the CART peptide binding sites in PC12 cells. After differentiation to a neuronal phenotype with nerve growth factor, the number of CART peptide binding sites in PC12 cells tripled. Following dexamethasone treatment, which transforms PC12 cells into chromaffin-like cells, the number of CART peptide binding sites substantially decreased. CART peptide did not affect the differentiation or acetylcholinesterase activity of PC12 cells, indicating that CART peptide does not participate in differentiation or neuronal activity. CART peptide increased the phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK (stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun-amino-terminal kinase) and subsequent c-Jun protein expression. These effects were reversed by SP600125, a specific JNK-kinase inhibitor. CART peptide did not significantly affect ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase), CREB (cAMP responsive element binding protein), or p38 phosphorylation and c-Fos protein expression. Central administration of CART peptide into mice also resulted in increased c-Jun positive cells in dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus and nucleus of the solitary tract, areas involved in food intake regulation. Activation of c-Jun by CART peptide might indicate a possible role of CART peptide in managing stress conditions rather than a role in cell proliferation or differentiation as well as the more complex and/or specific regulation ways by transcription factors in some nuclei involved in food intake regulation. The characteristics of stress that CART peptide potentially mediates should be further studied.

  12. A structural feature of the non-peptide ligand interactions with mice mu-opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Hamid R; Mucksch, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2014-01-01

    By binding to and activating the G-protein coupled μ-, κ- and δ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system, opiates are known to induce analgesic and sedative effects. In particular, non-peptide opioid ligands are often used in clinical applications to induce these therapeutically beneficial effects, due to their superior pharmacokinetics and bioavailability in comparison to endogenous neuropeptides. However, since opioid alkaloids are highly addictive substances, it is necessary to understand the exact mechanisms of their actions, specifically the ligand-binding properties of the target receptors, in order to safely apply opiates for therapeutic purposes. Using an in silico molecular docking approach (AutoDock Vina) combined with two-step cluster analysis, we have computationally obtained the docking scores and the ligand-binding pockets of twelve representative non-peptide nonendogenous agonists and antagonists at the crystallographically identified μ-opioid receptor. Our study predicts the existence of two main binding sites that are congruently present in all opioid receptor types. Interestingly, in terms of the agonist or antagonist properties of the substances on the receptors, the clustering analysis suggests a relationship with the position of the ligand-binding pockets, particularly its depth within the receptor structure. Furthermore, the binding affinity of the substances is directly correlated to the proximity of the binding pockets to the extracellular space. In conclusion, the results provide further insights into the structural features of the functional pharmacology of opioid receptors, suggesting the importance of the binding position of non-peptide agonists and antagonists- specifically the distance and the level of exposure to the extracellular space- to their dissociation kinetics and subsequent potency.

  13. T4-lysozyme fusion for the production of human formyl peptide receptors for structural determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; Cui, Ying; Wang, Jiqian

    2014-03-01

    T4-lysozyme (T4L) fusion was introduced in the intracellular loop of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) of human formyl peptide receptor 3 (FPR3), and the ability of T4L fusion to be used in the production of human FPR3 for structural determination was evaluated in this work. The T4L variant of human FPR3 termed FPR3-T4L was expressed in stable tetracycline-inducible HEK293 cells. A systematic detergent screening showed that fos-choline-14 was the optimal detergent to solubilize and subsequently purify FPR3-T4L from HEK293 cells. Immunoaffinity purification in combination with gel filtration was employed to purify the T4L-fused receptor to high homogeneity. The final yield of the human FPR3-T4L monomer from 2 g of cells was 0.2 mg. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the receptor adopted a correct secondary structure after purification, while ligand binding measurement indicated that the receptor was functional. Thus, the presence of T4L fusion did not evidently disturb the expression in HEK293 cells, proper folding, and functionality of human FPR3. Our study of evaluating T4L fusion for the recombinant production of human formyl peptide receptor would facilitate ongoing efforts in the structural characterization of GPCRs.

  14. Formyl Peptide Receptor Polymorphisms: 27 Most Possible Ways for Phagocyte Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsov, S S; Gabdoulkhakova, A G

    2017-04-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) expressed by mammalian myeloid cells are the important part of innate immunity. They belong to the seven-transmembrane domain class of receptors coupled to heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins. Binding of the receptor with a wide spectrum of exogenous and endogenous ligands triggers such defensive phagocyte reactions as chemotaxis, secretory degranulation, and respiratory burst, keeping a balance of inflammatory and antiinflammatory processes in the organism. The association between single nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene of FPR1 receptor resulting in disruption of the receptor structure and the development of certain pathologies accompanied with inflammation, such as aggressive periodontitis, macular degeneration, and even gastric cancer (Maney, P., and Walters, J. D. (2009) J. Periodontol., 80, 1498-1505; Liang, X. Y., et al. (2014) Eye, 28, 1502-1510; Otani, T., et al. (2011) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 405, 356-361) has been shown. In this review, we matched the missense mutation of formyl-peptide receptors with their known functional domains and classified them according to their potential significance in pathology.

  15. Neural effects of gut- and brain-derived glucagon-like peptide-1 and its receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsurada, Kenichi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is derived from both the enteroendocrine L cells and preproglucagon-expressing neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the brain stem. As GLP-1 is cleaved by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 yielding a half-life of less than 2 min, it is plausible that the gut-derived GLP-1, released postprandially, exerts its effects on the brain mainly by interacting with vagal afferent neurons located at the intestinal or hepatic portal area. GLP-1 neurons in the NTS widely project in the central nervous system and act as a neurotransmitter. One of the physiological roles of brain-derived GLP-1 is restriction of feeding. GLP-1 receptor agonists have recently been used to treat type 2 diabetic patients, and have been shown to exhibit pleiotropic effects beyond incretin action, which involve brain functions. GLP-1 receptor agonist administered in the periphery is stable because of its resistance to dipeptidyl peptidase-4, and is highly likely to act on the brain by passing through the blood-brain barrier (BBB), as well as interacting with vagal afferent nerves. Central actions of GLP-1 have various roles including regulation of feeding, weight, glucose and lipid metabolism, cardiovascular functions, cognitive functions, and stress and emotional responses. In the present review, we focus on the source of GLP-1 and the pathway by which peripheral GLP-1 informs the brain, and then discuss recent findings on the central effects of GLP-1 and GLP-1 receptor agonists.

  16. Targeting of peptide conjugated magnetic nanoparticles to urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expressing cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Line; Unmack Larsen, Esben Kjær; Nielsen, Erik Holm; Iversen, Frank; Liu, Zhuo; Thomsen, Karen; Pedersen, Michael; Skrydstrup, Troels; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Ploug, Michael; Kjems, Jørgen

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are currently being used as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in vivo, mainly by their passive accumulation in tissues of interest. However, a higher specificity can ideally be achieved when the nanoparticles are targeted towards cell specific receptors and this may also facilitate specific drug delivery by an enhanced target-mediated endocytosis. We report efficient peptide-mediated targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to cells expressing the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), a surface biomarker for poor patient prognosis shared by several cancers including breast, colorectal, and gastric cancers. Conjugation of a uPAR specific targeting peptide onto polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated USPIO nanoparticles by click chemistry resulted in a five times higher uptake in vitro in a uPAR positive cell line compared to nanoparticles carrying a non-binding control peptide. In accordance with specific receptor-mediated recognition, a low uptake was observed in the presence of an excess of ATF, a natural ligand for uPAR. The uPAR specific magnetic nanoparticles can potentially provide a useful supplement for tumor patient management when combined with MRI and drug delivery.Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are currently being used as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in vivo, mainly by their passive accumulation in tissues of interest. However, a higher specificity can ideally be achieved when the nanoparticles are targeted towards cell specific receptors and this may also facilitate specific drug delivery by an enhanced target-mediated endocytosis. We report efficient peptide-mediated targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to cells expressing the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), a surface biomarker for poor patient prognosis shared by several cancers including breast, colorectal, and gastric cancers. Conjugation of a uPAR specific

  17. Involvement of mammalian RF-amide peptides and their receptors in the modulation of nociception in rodents

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    Safia eAyachi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian RF-amide peptides, which all share a conserved carboxyl-terminal Arg-Phe-NH2 sequence, constitute a family of five groups of neuropeptides that are encoded by five different genes. They act through five G protein-coupled receptors and each group of peptide binds to and activates mostly one receptor: RF-amide related peptide (RFRP group binds to NPFFR1, neuropeptide FF (NPFF group to NPFFR2, pyroglutamylated RF-amide peptide (QRFP group to QRFPR, prolactin releasing peptide (PrRP group to PrRPR, and kisspeptin group to Kiss1R. These peptides and their receptors have been involved in the modulation of several functions including reproduction, feeding and cardiovascular regulation. Data from the literature now provide emerging evidence that all RF-amide peptides and their receptors are also involved in the modulation of nociception. This review will present the current knowledge on the involvement in rodents of the different mammalian RF-amide peptides and their receptors in the modulation of nociception in basal and chronic pain conditions as well as their modulatory effects on the analgesic effects of opiates.

  18. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

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    Xiaopeng Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor (EGF is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health.

  19. A novel small peptide as an epidermal growth factor receptor targeting ligand for nanodelivery in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han CY

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cui-yan Han,1,2 Li-ling Yue,2 Ling-yu Tai,1 Li Zhou,2 Xue-yan Li,2 Gui-hua Xing,2 Xing-gang Yang,1 Ming-shuang Sun,1 Wei-san Pan1 1School of Pharmacy, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China; 2Qiqihar Medical University, Qiqihar, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR serves an important function in the proliferation of tumors in humans and is an effective target for the treatment of cancer. In this paper, we studied the targeting characteristics of small peptides (AEYLR, EYINQ, and PDYQQD that were derived from three major autophosphorylation sites of the EGFR C-terminus domain in vitro. These small peptides were labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC and used the peptide LARLLT as a positive control, which bound to putative EGFR selected from a virtual peptide library by computer-aided design, and the independent peptide RALEL as a negative control. Analyses with flow cytometry and an internalization assay using NCI-H1299 and K562 with high EGFR and no EGFR expression, respectively, indicated that FITC-AEYLR had high EGFR targeting activity. Biotin-AEYLR that was specifically bound to human EGFR proteins demonstrated a high affinity for human non-small-cell lung tumors. We found that AEYLR peptide-conjugated, nanostructured lipid carriers enhanced specific cellular uptake in vitro during a process that was apparently mediated by tumor cells with high-expression EGFR. Analysis of the MTT assay indicated that the AEYLR peptide did not significantly stimulate or inhibit the growth activity of the cells. These findings suggest that, when mediated by EGFR, AEYLR may be a potentially safe and efficient delivery ligand for targeted chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and gene therapy. Keywords: EGFR, small peptide, tumor targeting, lung cancer, NLC

  20. Novel GM1 ganglioside-like peptide mimics prevent the association of cholera toxin to human intestinal epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Robert K; Usuki, Seigo; Itokazu, Yutaka; Wu, Han-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Cholera is an acute diarrheal disease caused by infection in the gastrointestinal tract by the gram-negative bacterium, Vibrio cholerae, and is a serious public health threat worldwide. There has not been any effective treatment for this infectious disease. Cholera toxin (CT), which is secreted by V. cholerae, can enter host cells by binding to GM1, a monosialoganglioside widely distributed on the plasma membrane surface of various animal epithelial cells. The present study was undertaken to generate peptides that are conformationally similar to the carbohydrate epitope of GM1 for use in the treatment of cholera and related bacterial infection. For this purpose, we used cholera toxin B (CTB) subunit to select CTB-binding peptides that structurally mimic GM1 from a dodecamer phage-display library. Six GM1-replica peptides were selected by biopanning based on CTB recognition. Five of the six peptides showed inhibitory activity for GM1 binding to CTB. To test the potential of employing the peptide mimics for intervening with the bacterial infection, those peptides were examined for their binding capacity, functional inhibitory activity and in vitro effects using a human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2 cells. One of the peptides, P3 (IPQVWRDWFKLP), was most effective in inhibiting cellular uptake of CTB and suppressing CT-stimulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate production in the cells. Our results thus provide convincing evidence that GM1-replica peptides could serve as novel agents to block CTB binding on epithelial cells and prevent the ensuing physiological effects of CT.

  1. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG increases Toll-like receptor 3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki-Yoshida, A; Saito, S; Fukiya, S; Aoki, R; Takayama, Y; Suzuki, C; Sonoyama, K

    2016-06-01

    Administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been reported to be therapeutically effective against acute secretory diarrhoea resulting from the structural and functional intestinal mucosal lesions induced by rotavirus infection; however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be completely elucidated. Because Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) plays a key role in the innate immune responses following the recognition of rotavirus, the present study examined whether LGG influences TLR3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo. We employed cultured intestinal organoids derived from small intestinal crypts as an ex vivo tissue model. LGG supplementation increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the intestinal organoids, as estimated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Likewise, single and 7-day consecutive daily administrations of LGG increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the small intestine of C57BL/6N mice. The mRNA levels of other TLRs were not substantially altered both ex vivo and in vivo. In addition, LGG supplementation increased the mRNA levels of an antiviral type 1 interferon, interferon-α (IFN-α), and a neutrophil chemokine, CXCL1, upon stimulation with a synthetic TLR3 ligand, poly(I:C) in the intestinal organoids. LGG administration did not alter IFN-α and CXCL1 mRNA levels in the small intestine in vivo. Supplementation of other bacterial strains, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Lactobacillus paracasei, failed to increase TLR3 and poly(I:C)-stimulated CXCL1 mRNA levels ex vivo. We propose that upregulation of TLR3 gene expression may play a pivotal role in the therapeutic efficacy of LGG against rotavirus-associated diarrhoea. In addition, we demonstrated that intestinal organoids may be a promising ex vivo tissue model for investigating host-pathogen interactions and the antiviral action of probiotics in the intestinal epithelium.

  2. Construction and application of elastin like polypeptide containing IL-4 receptor targeting peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Sarangthem

    Full Text Available Various human solid tumors highly express IL-4 receptors which amplify the expression of some of anti-apoptotic proteins, preventing drug-induced cancer cell death. Thus, IL-4 receptor targeted drug delivery can possibly increase the therapeutic efficacy in cancer treatment. Macromolecular carriers with multivalent targeting moieties offered great advantages in cancer therapy as they not only increase the plasma half-life of the drug but also allow delivery of therapeutic drugs to the cancer cells with higher specificity, minimizing the deleterious effects of the drug on normal cells. In this study we designed a library of elastin like polypeptide (ELP polymers containing tumor targeting AP1 peptide using recursive directional ligation method. AP1 was previously discovered as an atherosclerotic plaque and breast tumor tissue homing peptide using phage display screening method, and it can selectively bind to the interleukin 4 receptor (IL-4R. The fluorescently labeled [AP1-V12]6, an ELP polymer containing six AP1 enhanced tumor-specific targeting ability and uptake efficiency in H226 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cell lines in vitro. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that multivalent presentation of the targeting ligand in the ELP polymer increased the binding affinity towards IL-4 receptor compared to free peptide. The binding of [AP1-V12]6 to cancer cells was remarkably reduced when IL-4 receptors were blocked by antibody against IL-4 receptor further confirmed its binding. Importantly, the Cy5.5-labeled [AP1-V12]6 demonstrated excellent homing and longer retention in tumor tissues in MDA-MB-231 xenograft mouse model. Immunohistological studies of tumor tissues further validated the targeting efficiency of [AP1-V12]6 to tumor tissue. These results indicate that designed [AP1-V12]6 can serve as a novel carrier for selective delivery of therapeutic drugs to tumors.

  3. Diurnal gene expression of lipolytic natriuretic peptide receptors in white adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Julie; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Jørgensen, Henrik L

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of the circadian rhythm can lead to obesity and cardiovascular disease. In white adipose tissue, activation of the natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) stimulates lipolysis. We have previously shown that natriuretic peptides are expressed in a circadian manner in the heart......, but the temporal expression profile of their cognate receptors has not been examined in white adipose tissue. We therefore collected peri-renal white adipose tissue and serum from WT mice. Tissue mRNA contents of NPRs - NPR-A and NPR-C, the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1, and transcripts involved in lipid metabolism...... in serum peaked in the active dark period (P=0.003). In conclusion, NPR-A and NPR-C gene expression is associated with the expression of clock genes in white adipose tissue. The reciprocal expression may thus contribute to regulate lipolysis and energy homeostasis in a diurnal manner....

  4. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Modulates Small Intestine Neuromuscular Function through Nitrergic and Purinergic Pathways

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    Valentina Caputi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Toll-like receptors (TLRs play a pivotal role in the homeostatic microflora-host crosstalk. TLR4-mediated modulation of both motility and enteric neuronal survival has been reported mainly for colon with limited information on the role of TLR4 in tuning structural and functional integrity of enteric nervous system (ENS and in controlling small bowel motility.Methods: Male TLR4 knockout (TLR4-/-, 9 ± 1 weeks old and sex- and age-matched wild-type (WT C57BL/6J mice were used for the experiments. Alterations in ENS morphology and neurochemical code were assessed by immunohistochemistry whereas neuromuscular function was evaluated by isometric mechanical activity of ileal preparations following receptor and non-receptor-mediated stimuli and by gastrointestinal transit.Results: The absence of TLR4 induced gliosis and reduced the total number of neurons, mainly nNOS+ neurons, in ileal myenteric plexus. Furthermore, a lower cholinergic excitatory response with an increased inhibitory neurotransmission was found together with a delayed gastrointestinal transit. These changes were dependent on increased ileal non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC relaxations mediated by a complex neuronal-glia signaling constituted by P2X7 and P2Y1 receptors, and NO produced by nNOS and iNOS.Conclusion: We provide novel evidence that TLR4 signaling is involved in the fine-tuning of P2 receptors controlling ileal contractility, ENS cell distribution, and inhibitory NANC neurotransmission via the combined action of NO and adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP. For the first time, this study implicates TLR4 at regulating the crosstalk between glia and neurons in small intestine and helps to define its role in gastrointestinal motor abnormalities during dysbiosis.

  5. CGRP receptors mediating CGRP-, adrenomedullin- and amylin-induced relaxation in porcine coronary arteries. Characterization with 'Compound 1' (WO98/11128), a non-peptide antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasbak, P; Sams, A; Schifter, S

    2001-01-01

    1. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), amylin and adrenomedullin (AM) belong to the same family of peptides. Accumulating evidence indicate that the calcitonin (CT) receptor, the CT receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor-activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) form the basis of all the recept......1. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), amylin and adrenomedullin (AM) belong to the same family of peptides. Accumulating evidence indicate that the calcitonin (CT) receptor, the CT receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor-activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) form the basis of all....... The partial porcine mRNA sequences shared 82 - 92% nucleotide identity with human sequences. 3. The human peptides alphaCGRP, betaCGRP, AM and amylin induced relaxation with pEC(50) values of 8.1, 8.1, 6.7 and 6.1 M respectively. 4. The antagonistic properties of a novel non-peptide CGRP antagonist 'Compound...

  6. Peptides from puff adder Bitis arietans venom, novel inhibitors of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfius, Catherine A; Spirova, Ekaterina N; Serebryakova, Marina V; Shelukhina, Irina V; Kudryavtsev, Denis S; Kryukova, Elena V; Starkov, Vladislav G; Kopylova, Nina V; Zhmak, Maxim N; Ivanov, Igor A; Kudryashova, Ksenia S; Andreeva, Tatyana V; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2016-10-01

    Phospholipase A2 (named bitanarin) possessing capability to block nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) was isolated earlier (Vulfius et al., 2011) from puff adder Bitis arietans venom. Further studies indicated that low molecular weight fractions of puff adder venom inhibit nAChRs as well. In this paper, we report on isolation from this venom and characterization of three novel peptides called baptides 1, 2 and 3 that reversibly block nAChRs. To isolate the peptides, the venom of B. arietans was fractionated by gel-filtration and reversed phase chromatography. The amino acid sequences of peptides were established by de novo sequencing using MALDI mass spectrometry. Baptide 1 comprised 7, baptides 2 and 3-10 amino acid residues, the latter being acetylated at the N-terminus. This is the first indication for the presence of such post-translational modification in snake venom proteins. None of the peptides contain cysteine residues. For biological activity studies the peptides were prepared by solid phase peptide synthesis. Baptide 3 and 2 blocked acetylcholine-elicited currents in isolated Lymnaea stagnalis neurons with IC50 of about 50 μM and 250 μM, respectively. In addition baptide 2 blocked acetylcholine-induced currents in muscle nAChR heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes with IC50 of about 3 μM. The peptides did not compete with radioactive α-bungarotoxin for binding to Torpedo and α7 nAChRs at concentration up to 200 μM that suggests non-competitive mode of inhibition. Calcium imaging studies on α7 and muscle nAChRs heterologously expressed in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a cells showed that on α7 receptor baptide 2 inhibited acetylcholine-induced increasing intracellular calcium concentration with IC50 of 20.6 ± 3.93 μM. On both α7 and muscle nAChRs the suppression of maximal response to acetylcholine by about 50% was observed at baptide 2 concentration of 25 μM, the value being close to IC50 on α7 nAChR. These data are in

  7. Peptide Phage Display as a Tool for Drug Discovery: Targeting Membrane Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaz Bratkovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ligands selected from phage-displayed random peptide libraries tend to be directed to biologically relevant sites on the surface of the target protein. Consequently, peptides derived from library screenings often modulate the target protein’s activity in vitro and in vivo and can be used as lead compounds in drug design and as alternatives to antibodies for target validation in both genomics and drug discovery. This review discusses the use of phage display to identify membrane receptor modulators with agonistic or antagonistic activities. Because isolating or producing recombinant membrane proteins for use as target molecules in library screening is often impossible, innovative selection strategies such as panning against whole cells or tissues, recombinant receptor ectodomains, or neutralizing antibodies to endogenous binding partners were devised. Prominent examples from a two-decade history of peptide phage display will be presented, focusing on the design of affinity selection experiments, methods for improving the initial hits, and applications of the identified peptides.

  8. Novel mutations in natriuretic peptide receptor-2 gene underlie acromesomelic dysplasia, type maroteaux

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    Khan Saadullah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natriuretic peptides (NPs are peptide hormones that exert their biological actions by binding to three types of cell surface natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs. The receptor NPR-B binding C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP acts locally as a paracrine and/or autocrine regulator in a wide variety of tissues. Mutations in the gene NPR2 have been shown to cause acromesomelic dysplasia-type Maroteaux (AMDM, an autosomal recessive skeletal disproportionate dwarfism disorder in humans. Methods In the study, presented here, genotyping of six consanguineous families of Pakistani origin with AMDM was carried out using polymorphic microsatellite markers, which are closely linked to the gene NPR2 on chromosome 9p21-p12. To screen for mutations in the gene NPR2, all of its coding exons and splice junction sites were PCR amplified from genomic DNA of affected and unaffected individuals of the families and sequenced. Results Sequence analysis of the gene NPR2 identified a novel missence mutation (p.T907M in five families, and a splice donor site mutation c.2986 + 2 T > G in the other family. Conclusion We have described two novel mutations in the gene NPR2. The presence of the same mutation (p.T907M and haplotype in five families (A, B, C, D, E is suggestive of a founder effect.

  9. Effects of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists on Body Weight: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Matteo Monami; Ilaria Dicembrini; Niccolò Marchionni; Rotella, Carlo M.; Edoardo Mannucci

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs), approved as glucose-lowering drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, have also been shown to reduce body weight. An extensive Medline, Cochrane database, and Embase search for “exenatide,” “liraglutide,” “albiglutide,” “semaglutide,” and “lixisenatide” was performed, collecting all randomized clinical trials on humans up to December 15, 2011, with a duration of at least 24 weeks, comparing GLP-1 receptor agonists with either placebo or...

  10. Pachymodulin, a new functional formyl peptide receptor 2 peptidic ligand isolated from frog skin has Janus-like immunomodulatory capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Claire; Piesse, Christophe; Sagan, Sandrine; Combadière, Christophe; Rosenstein, Yvonne; Auvynet, Constance

    2015-02-12

    Recruitment of leukocytes is essential to fight infections or to heal injuries; however, excessive and/or prolonged responses favor the development of major inflammatory pathologies, such as cardiovascular or neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, it is of great interest to seek novel compounds that can regulate leukocyte recruitment depending on the degree of inflammation. We have isolated and characterized, by different chromatographic techniques, mass spectrometry, and Edman sequencing, a new hexapeptide (SSLSKL) from the Mexican frog Pachymedusa dacnicolor, which we named pachymodulin. In vitro, pachymodulin promotes the migration of leukocytes through the binding and activation of the human and mouse N-formyl peptide receptor 2 (huFPR2). In vivo, it exhibits opposite biological activities: under homeostatic conditions, pachymodulin induces the recruitment of leukocytes, whereas under inflammatory conditions, it inhibits this process. Therefore, pachymodulin represents an interesting template in the quest to design new immunomodulatory drugs in the therapy of immune-related diseases.

  11. Synthetic. cap alpha. subunit peptide 125-147 of human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor induces antibodies to native receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, D.J.; Griesmann, G.E.; Huang, Z.; Lennon, V.A.

    1986-03-05

    A synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 125-147 of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor (AChR) ..cap alpha.. subunit proved to be a major antigenic region of the AChR. Rats inoculated with 50 ..mu..g of peptide (T ..cap alpha.. 125-147) developed T cell immunity and antibodies to native AChR and signs of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. They report the synthesis and preliminary testing of a disulfide-looped peptide comprising residues 125-147 of the human AChR ..cap alpha.. subunit. Peptide H ..cap alpha.. 125-147 differs from T ..cap alpha.. 125-147 at residues 139 (Glu for Gln) and 143 (Ser for Thr). In immunoprecipitation assays, antibodies to Torpedo AChR bound /sup 125/I-labelled H..cap alpha.. 125-147 antibody bound H..cap alpha.. 125-147, but monoclonal antibodies to an immunodominant region of native AChR bound neither H..cap alpha.. 125-147 nor T ..cap alpha.. 125-147. Rats immunized with H ..cap alpha.. 125-147 produced anti-mammalian muscle AChR antibodies that induced modulation of AChRs from cultured human myotubes. Thus, region 125-147 of the human AChR ..cap alpha.. subunit is extracellular in muscle, and is both antigenic and immunogenic. It remains to be determined whether or not autoantibodies to this region may in part cause the weakness or myasthenia gravis in man.

  12. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: Past, present, and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1–based therapy improves glycaemic control through multiple mechanisms, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia and the additional benefit of clinically relevant weight loss. Since Starling and Bayliss first proposed the existence of intestinal secretions that stimulate the pancreas, tremendous progress has been made in the area of incretins. As a number of GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs continue to become available, physicians will soon face the challenge of selecting the right option customized to their patient's needs. The following discussion, derived from an extensive literature search using the PubMed database, applying the terms incretin, GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, and taspoglutide, provides a comprehensive review of existing and upcoming molecules in the GLP-1 RA class in terms of their structure, pharmacological profiles, efficacy, safety, and convenience. Search Methodology: A literature search was conducted using the PubMed database, applying the terms incretin, GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, and taspoglutide. Relevant articles were those that discussed structural, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences, classification, long-acting and short-acting GLP-1 RAs, phase 3 trials, and expert opinions. Additional targeted searches were conducted on diabetes treatment guidelines and reviews on safety, as well as the American Diabetes Association/European Society for Study of Diabetes (ADA/EASD statement on pancreatic safety.

  13. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: Past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sanjay; Baruah, Manash P; Sahay, Rakesh K; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Uppal, Shweta; Adetunji, Omolara

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy improves glycaemic control through multiple mechanisms, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia and the additional benefit of clinically relevant weight loss. Since Starling and Bayliss first proposed the existence of intestinal secretions that stimulate the pancreas, tremendous progress has been made in the area of incretins. As a number of GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) continue to become available, physicians will soon face the challenge of selecting the right option customized to their patient's needs. The following discussion, derived from an extensive literature search using the PubMed database, applying the terms incretin, GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, and taspoglutide, provides a comprehensive review of existing and upcoming molecules in the GLP-1 RA class in terms of their structure, pharmacological profiles, efficacy, safety, and convenience. Search Methodology: A literature search was conducted using the PubMed database, applying the terms incretin, GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, and taspoglutide. Relevant articles were those that discussed structural, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences, classification, long-acting and short-acting GLP-1 RAs, phase 3 trials, and expert opinions. Additional targeted searches were conducted on diabetes treatment guidelines and reviews on safety, as well as the American Diabetes Association/European Society for Study of Diabetes (ADA/EASD) statement on pancreatic safety.

  14. Identification and biological activity of ovine and caprine calcitonin receptor-stimulating peptides 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Christopher J; Katafuchi, Takeshi; Yandle, Timothy G; Minamino, Naoto

    2008-08-01

    We have recently reported the isolation of three new members of the calcitonin (CT) gene-related peptide family of peptides, the CT receptor (CT-R)-stimulating peptides (CRSPs). We now report the sequencing and characterization of ovine/caprine CRSP-1 and caprine CRSP-2. Mature ovine and caprine CRSP-1 are identical and have strong structural homology to CRSP-1s identified to date from other species. As with other CRSP-1s, ovine/caprine CRSP-1 binds to and activates the CT-R but not the CT-like receptor (CL-R) in combination with the receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). By contrast, caprine CRSP-2 does not activate any of these receptor-RAMP complexes. Intravenous infusions of ovine CRSP-1 to normal conscious sheep induced dose-dependent reduction in plasma total Ca levels (P=0.02) and corrected Ca levels (P=0.017) associated with increases in plasma cAMP (P=0.002). CRSP-1 reduced both plasma amino-terminal pro-C-type natriuretic peptide levels (P=0.006) and plasma renin activity (P=0.028). There were no significant effects observed on hemodynamic or renal indices measured. In conclusion, we have sequenced ovine/caprine CRSP-1 and caprine CRSP-2 precursors. This newly identified CRSP-1 has been shown to share the structural and biological features of CRSP-1s known to date. In vivo studies confirm that ovine CRSP-1 reduces plasma Ca levels in sheep, presumably via a cAMP-mediated mechanism. By contrast, caprine CRSP-2 did not stimulate any combination of CT-R, CL-R, and RAMPs. Accession numbers of cDNA determined in this study are caprine CRSP-1, AB364646; caprine CRSP-2, AB364647; and ovine CRSP-1, AB364648.

  15. Promotion of formyl peptide receptor 1-mediated neutrophil chemotactic migration by antimicrobial peptides isolated from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Sung Kyun; Jung, Young Su; Lee, Mingyu; Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Park, Joon Seong; Koo, JaeHyung; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the effects of two antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) isolated from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans on neutrophil activity. Stimulation of mouse neutrophils with the two AMPs elicited chemotactic migration of the cells in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. The two AMPs also stimulated activation of ERK and Akt, which contribute to chemotactic migration of neutrophils. We found that AMP-stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis was blocked by a formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 1 antagonist (cyclosporin H); moreover the two AMPs stimulated the chemotactic migration of FPR1-expressing RBL-2H3 cells but not of vector-expressing RBL-2H3 cells. We also found that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophil migration in vivo, and that this effect is blocked in FPR1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophils, leading to chemotactic migration through FPR1, and the two AMPs will be useful for the study of FPR1 signaling and neutrophil activation. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 520-525].

  16. Cannabinoids alleviate experimentally induced intestinal inflammation by acting at central and peripheral receptors.

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    Jakub Fichna

    Full Text Available In an attempt to further investigate the role of cannabinoid (CB system in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases, we employed two recently developed ligands, AM841 (a covalently acting CB agonist and CB13 (a peripherally-restricted CB agonist to establish whether central and peripheral CB sites are involved in the anti-inflammatory action in the intestine.AM841 (0.01, 0.1 and 1 mg/kg, i.p. significantly decreased inflammation scores in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS- and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS-treated mice when administered before induction of colitis or as a treatment of existing intestinal inflammation. The effect was absent in CB1, CB2 and CB(1/2-deficient mice. A peripherally-restricted agonist CB13 did not alleviate colitis when given i.p. (0.1 mg/kg, but significantly decreased inflammation score after central administration (0.1 µg/animal.This is the first evidence that central and peripheral CB receptors are responsible for the protective and therapeutic action of cannabinoids in mouse models of colitis. Our observations provide new insight to CB pharmacology and validate the use of novel ligands AM841 and CB13 as potent tools in CB-related research.

  17. Immunohistochemical evidence for the presence of a Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide, Neuropeptide Y, and Substance P, in rat adrenal cortex after acute heat stress

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    Petrović-Kosanović Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP, Neuropeptide Y (NPY, and the absence of Substance P (SP immunoreactivity in the rat adrenal cortex. VIP- and NPY-immunoreactivity were detected in nerve fibers around the small blood vessels projecting into the capsule and cortical zones surrounding blood vessels and cortical cells. After acute heat stress, VIP- and NPY-immunoreactivities in the nerve fibers were reduced, probably as a result of the release of these peptides. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173023

  18. α-RgIB: A Novel Antagonist Peptide of Neuronal Acetylcholine Receptor Isolated from Conus regius Venom

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    Maria Cristina Vianna Braga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Conus venoms are rich sources of biologically active peptides that act specifically on ionic channels and metabotropic receptors present at the neuromuscular junction, efficiently paralyzing the prey. Each species of Conus may have 50 to 200 uncharacterized bioactive peptides with pharmacological interest. Conus regius is a vermivorous species that inhabits Northeastern Brazilian tropical waters. In this work, we characterized one peptide with activity on neuronal acetylcholine receptor (nAChR. Crude venom was purified by reverse-phase HPLC and selected fractions were screened and sequenced by mass spectrometry, MALDI-ToF, and ESI-Q-ToF, respectively. A new peptide was identified, bearing two disulfide bridges. The novel 2,701 Da peptide belongs to the cysteine framework I, corresponding to the cysteine pattern CC-C-C. The biological activity of the purified peptide was tested by intracranial injection in mice, and it was observed that high concentrations induced hyperactivity in the animals, whereas lower doses caused breathing difficulty. The activity of this peptide was assayed in patch-clamp experiments, on nAChR-rich cells, in whole-cell configuration. The peptide blocked slow rise-time neuronal receptors, probably α3β4 and/or α3β4α5 subtype. According to the nomenclature, the new peptide was designated as α-RgIB.

  19. Identification of potent 11mer glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist peptides with novel C-terminal amino acids: Homohomophenylalanine analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Tasir S; Lee, Ving G; Riexinger, Douglas; Lei, Ming; Malmstrom, Sarah; Xin, Li; Han, Songping; Mapelli, Claudio; Cooper, Christopher B; Zhang, Ge; Ewing, William R; Krupinski, John

    2010-05-01

    We report the identification of potent agonists of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R). These compounds are short, 11 amino acid peptides containing several unnatural amino acids, including (in particular) analogs of homohomophenylalanine (hhPhe) at the C-terminal position. Typically the functional activity of the more potent peptides in this class is in the low picomolar range in an in vitro cAMP assay, with one example demonstrating excellent in vivo activity in an ob/ob mouse model of diabetes.

  20. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dods, Rachel L; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-11-23

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide-receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design.

  1. Synthetic Toll like receptor-4 (TLR-4 agonist peptides as a novel class of adjuvants.

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    Arulkumaran Shanmugam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adjuvants serve as catalysts of the innate immune response by initiating a localized site of inflammation that is mitigated by the interactions between antigens and toll like receptor (TLR proteins. Currently, the majority of vaccines are formulated with aluminum based adjuvants, which are associated with various side effects. In an effort to develop a new class of adjuvants, agonists of TLR proteins, such as bacterial products, would be natural candidates. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a major structural component of gram negative bacteria cell walls, induces the systemic inflammation observed in septic shock by interacting with TLR-4. The use of synthetic peptides of LPS or TLR-4 agonists, which mimic the interaction between TLR-4 and LPS, can potentially regulate cellular signal transduction pathways such that a localized inflammatory response is achieved similar to that generated by adjuvants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the identification and activity of several peptides isolated using phage display combinatorial peptide technology, which functionally mimicked LPS. The activity of the LPS-TLR-4 interaction was assessed by NF-κB nuclear translocation analyses in HEK-BLUE™-4 cells, a cell culture model that expresses only TLR-4, and the murine macrophage cell line, RAW264.7. Furthermore, the LPS peptide mimics were capable of inducing inflammatory cytokine secretion from RAW264.7 cells. Lastly, ELISA analysis of serum from vaccinated BALB/c mice revealed that the LPS peptide mimics act as a functional adjuvant. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate the identification of synthetic peptides that mimic LPS by interacting with TLR-4. This LPS mimotope-TLR-4 interaction will allow for the development and use of these peptides as a new class of adjuvants, namely TLR-4 agonists.

  2. Cell wall trapping of autocrine peptides for human G-protein-coupled receptors on the yeast cell surface.

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    Jun Ishii

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs regulate a wide variety of physiological processes and are important pharmaceutical targets for drug discovery. Here, we describe a unique concept based on yeast cell-surface display technology to selectively track eligible peptides with agonistic activity for human GPCRs (Cell Wall Trapping of Autocrine Peptides (CWTrAP strategy. In our strategy, individual recombinant yeast cells are able to report autocrine-positive activity for human GPCRs by expressing a candidate peptide fused to an anchoring motif. Following expression and activation, yeast cells trap autocrine peptides onto their cell walls. Because captured peptides are incapable of diffusion, they have no impact on surrounding yeast cells that express the target human GPCR and non-signaling peptides. Therefore, individual yeast cells can assemble the autonomous signaling complex and allow single-cell screening of a yeast population. Our strategy may be applied to identify eligible peptides with agonistic activity for target human GPCRs.

  3. Small intestinal cannabinoid receptor changes following a single colonic insult with oil of mustard in mice

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    Edward S Kimball

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids are known to be clinically beneficial for control of appetite disorders and nausea/vomiting, with emerging data that they can impact other GI disorders, such as inflammation. Post-inflammatory irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS is a condition of perturbed intestinal function that occurs subsequent to earlier periods of intestinal inflammation. Cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R and CB2R alterations in GI inflammation have been demonstrated in both animal models and clinically, but their continuing role in the post-inflammatory period has only been implicated to date. Therefore, to provide direct evidence for CBR involvement in altered GI functions in the absence of overt inflammation, we used a model of enhanced upper GI transit that persists for up to 4 weeks after a single insult by intracolonic 0.5% oil of mustard (OM in mice. In mice administered OM, CB1R immunostaining in the myenteric plexus was reduced at day 7, when colonic inflammation is subsiding, and then increased at 28 days, compared to tissue from age-matched vehicle-treated mice. In the lamina propria CB2R immunostaining density was also increased at day 28. In mice tested 28 day after OM, either a CB1R-selective agonist, ACEA (1 and 3 mg/kg, s.c. or a CB2R-selective agonist, JWH-133 (3 and 10 mg/kg, s.c. reduced the enhanced small intestinal transit in a dose-related manner. Doses of ACEA and JWH-133 (1 mg/kg, alone or combined, reduced small intestinal transit of OM-treated mice to a greater extent than control mice. Thus, in this post-colonic inflammation model, both CBR subtypes are up-regulated and there is increased efficacy of both CB1R and CB2R agonists. We conclude that CBR remodeling occurs not only during GI inflammation but continues during the recovery phase. Thus, either CB1R- or CB2-selective agonists could be efficacious for modulating GI motility in individuals experiencing diarrhea-predominant PI-IBS.

  4. Targeting of Peptide Cytotoxins to LHRH Receptors For Treatment of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Jorg B; Tinneberg, Hans-Rudolf; Rick, Ferenc G; Berkes, Enniko; Schally, Andrew V

    2016-01-01

    Receptors for LHRH (luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone) are expressed in about 80% of human endometrial, ovarian and prostate cancers and are also found in more than 50% of breast cancers including triple negative breast cancers. In the human body, LHRH receptors are found at significant levels in the pituitary and reproductive organs. Other benign tissues or hematopoietic stem cells express only low levels of receptors for LHRH or no receptors. Thus LHRH receptors are promising targets for a receptor- mediated chemotherapy with cytotoxic hybrid molecules. Cytotoxic analogs of LHRH consist of a LHRH agonist, which is used as a carrier peptide and DOX or its derivatives. Cytotoxic analogs of LHRH, AEZS-108 (formerly known as AN-152) and AN-207, exhibit anti-cancer activity in various in vitro and in vivo models of LHRH-receptor positive cancers. In AEZS-108 (zoptarelin DOX) DOX is covalently linked to the LHRH agonist [D-Lys(6)]LHRH. Results of phase I and II clinical studies in patients with breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers demonstrated good anticancer activity with moderate toxic side effects and without any sign of cardiotoxicity so far. AEZS-108 is also being evaluated in phase I/II studies in castration resistant prostate cancer and metastatic bladder cancer. Because of the very promising phase II results in endometrial cancer, a multinational, multicenter phase III study of this malignancy has been initiated and is currently recruiting patients.

  5. Biased signaling by peptide agonists of protease activated receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuhong; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Kok, W Mei; Lim, Junxian; Wu, Kai-Chen; Liu, Ligong; Hill, Timothy A; Suen, Jacky Y; Fairlie, David P

    2017-02-07

    Protease activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is associated with metabolism, obesity, inflammatory, respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders, pain, cancer and other diseases. The extracellular N-terminus of PAR2 is a common target for multiple proteases, which cleave it at different sites to generate different N-termini that activate different PAR2-mediated intracellular signaling pathways. There are no synthetic PAR2 ligands that reproduce the same signaling profiles and potencies as proteases. Structure-activity relationships here for 26 compounds spanned a signaling bias over 3 log units, culminating in three small ligands as biased agonist tools for interrogating PAR2 functions. DF253 (2f-LAAAAI-NH2) triggered PAR2-mediated calcium release (EC50 2 μM) but not ERK1/2 phosphorylation (EC50 > 100 μM) in CHO cells transfected with hPAR2. AY77 (Isox-Cha-Chg-NH2) was a more potent calcium-biased agonist (EC50 40 nM, Ca2+; EC50 2 μM, ERK1/2), while its analogue AY254 (Isox-Cha-Chg-A-R-NH2) was an ERK-biased agonist (EC50 2 nM, ERK1/2; EC50 80 nM, Ca2+). Signaling bias led to different functional responses in human colorectal carcinoma cells (HT29). AY254, but not AY77 or DF253, attenuated cytokine-induced caspase 3/8 activation, promoted scratch-wound healing and induced IL-8 secretion, all via PAR2-ERK1/2 signaling. Different ligand components were responsible for different PAR2 signaling and functions, clues that can potentially lead to drugs that modulate different pathway-selective cellular and physiological responses.

  6. A peptide from Porphyra yezoensis stimulates the proliferation of IEC-6 cells by activating the insulin-like growth factor I receptor signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Kyeong; Kim, In-Hye; Choi, Youn-Hee; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2015-02-01

    Porphyra yezoensis (P. yezoensis) is the most noteworthy red alga and is mainly consumed in China, Japan and Korea. In the present study, the effects of a P. yezoensis peptide (PY‑PE) on cell proliferation and the associated signaling pathways were examined in IEC‑6 rat intestinal epithelial cells. First, the MTS assay showed that PY‑PE induced cell proliferation in a dose‑dependent manner. Subsequently, the mechanism behind the proliferative activity induced by PY‑PE was determined. The insulin‑like growth factor‑I receptor (IGF‑IR) signaling pathway was the main focus as it plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and proliferation. PY‑PE increased the protein and mRNA expression of IGF‑IR, insulin receptor substrate‑1, Shc and PY‑99. In addition, PY‑PE stimulated extracellular signal‑regulated kinase phosphorylation and phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase/Akt activation but inhibited p38 and c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase phosphorylation. Furthermore, PY‑PE treatment increased protein and mRNA expression levels of activator protein‑1, which regulates cell proliferation and survival, in the nuclear fraction. These results have significant implications for understanding the role of cell proliferation signaling pathways in intestinal epithelial cells.

  7. PI3K p110α/Akt signaling negatively regulates secretion of the intestinal peptide neurotensin through interference of granule transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Song, Jun; Cassidy, Margaret G; Rychahou, Piotr; Starr, Marlene E; Liu, Jianyu; Li, Xin; Epperly, Garretson; Weiss, Heidi L; Townsend, Courtney M; Gao, Tianyan; Evers, B Mark

    2012-08-01

    Neurotensin (NT), an intestinal peptide secreted from N cells in the small bowel, regulates a variety of physiological functions of the gastrointestinal tract, including secretion, gut motility, and intestinal growth. The class IA phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) family, which comprised of p110 catalytic (α, β and δ) and p85 regulatory subunits, has been implicated in the regulation of hormone secretion from endocrine cells. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In particular, the role of PI3K in intestinal peptide secretion is not known. Here, we show that PI3K catalytic subunit, p110α, negatively regulates NT secretion in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that inhibition of p110α, but not p110β, induces NT release in BON, a human endocrine cell line, which expresses NT mRNA and produces NT peptide in a manner analogous to N cells, and QGP-1, a pancreatic endocrine cell line that produces NT peptide. In contrast, overexpression of p110α decreases NT secretion. Consistently, p110α-inhibition increases plasma NT levels in mice. To further delineate the mechanisms contributing to this effect, we demonstrate that inhibition of p110α increases NT granule trafficking by up-regulating α-tubulin acetylation; NT secretion is prevented by overexpression of HDAC6, an α-tubulin deacetylase. Moreover, ras-related protein Rab27A (a small G protein) and kinase D-interacting substrate of 220 kDa (Kidins220), which are associated with NT granules, play a negative and positive role, respectively, in p110α-inhibition-induced NT secretion. Our findings identify the critical role and novel mechanisms for the PI3K signaling pathway in the control of intestinal hormone granule transport and release.

  8. THE AUTOCRINE REGULATORY EFFECT OF VASOACTIVE INTESTINAL PEPTIDE ON THE GROWTH OF HUMAN PANCREATIC CARCINOMA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈元方; 陈潜; 陆国钧; 范振符; 钟守先

    1994-01-01

    In the present study, the effets of VIP on the growth of two human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines PU-PAH-1 and PANC-1 were determined using tritiated thymidine incorporation, VIP receptors, intracellular cAMP and polyamings were investlsa.ted, The results indicated that VIP at a concentcation of 10-8mol/L to 10-7 mol/L can significantly Stimulate the growth of PU-PAN-1 cells but not PANC-1 cells, This effect is dose-dependent and abolished by VIP receptor antagonist, [4-CI-Phe6 , Leu7] VIP, suggesting VIP receptors in PU-PAN-1 cells maymediate this effect. VIP can markedly elevate the levels of intracellular cAMP and polyammes in PU-PAN-1 cells,indicating that the growth-promoting effect stimulated by VIP may be via a rapid increase in the biosynth~es of cAMP and polyamines. In addition, the VIP-antibody ir2Libited the growth of PU-PAN-1 cells in serum-free culture medium. The results above suggested that VIP has an autoctine regulatory effect on this pancreatic carcinoma cell line(PU-PAN-1).

  9. A pilot study examining the relationship among Crohn disease activity, glucagon-like peptide-2 signalling and intestinal function in pediatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigalet, David L; Kravarusic, Dragan; Butzner, Decker

    2013-01-01

      BACKGROUND⁄/OBJECTIVES: The relationship between the enteroendocrine hormone glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) and intestinal inflammation is unclear. GLP-2 promotes mucosal growth, decreases permeability and reduces inflammation in the intestine; physiological stimulation of GLP-2 release...... of the small intestine) with a disease activity index >150. Fasting and postprandial GLP-2 levels and quantitative urinary recovery of orally administered 3-O-methyl-glucose (active transport) and lactulose⁄mannitol (passive) were quantified during the acute and remission phases. RESULTS: Seven patients (mean...... normalized with disease remission. The change in the lactulose⁄mannitol ratio was due to both reduced lactulose and increased mannitol absorption. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that pediatric patients with acute ileal CD have decreased postprandial GLP-2 release, reduced glucose absorption...

  10. Structural insight into antibody-mediated antagonism of the Glucagon-like peptide-1 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennen, Stephanie; Kodra, János T; Soroka, Vladyslav; Krogh, Berit O; Wu, Xiaoai; Kaastrup, Peter; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rønn, Sif G; Schluckebier, Gerd; Barbateskovic, Silvia; Gandhi, Prafull S; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-05-19

    The Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and a well-established target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of GLP-1R is important for GLP-1 binding and the crystal structure of the GLP-1/ECD complex was reported previously. The first structure of a class B GPCR transmembrane (TM) domain was solved recently, but the full length receptor structure is still not well understood. Here we describe the molecular details of antibody-mediated antagonism of the GLP-1R using both in vitro pharmacology and x-ray crystallography. We showed that the antibody Fab fragment (Fab 3F52) blocked the GLP-1 binding site of the ECD directly and thereby acts as a competitive antagonist of native GLP-1. Interestingly, Fab 3F52 also blocked a short peptide agonist believed to engage primarily the transmembrane and extracellular loop region of GLP-1R, whereas functionality of an allosteric small-molecule agonist was not inhibited. This study has implications for the structural understanding of the GLP-1R and related class B GPCRs, which is important for the development of new and improved therapeutics targeting these receptors.

  11. Role of G protein-coupled orphan receptors in intestinal inflammation: novel targets in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Andrzej; Storr, Martin; Zielińska, Marta; Fichna, Jakub

    2015-03-01

    A large number of proteins were classified into the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Based on their characteristic serpentine domain, they are called 7 TM receptors. Presently, their ligands and physiological functions remain unknown. In this review, we summarize what is known on these receptors and discuss the potential use of these orphan GPCRs (GPRs) in the induction or maintenance of remission in inflammatory bowel diseases. We focus on GPRs 30, 41, 43, 55, 119, and 120, where scientific evidence supports a potential role in intestinal inflammation.

  12. The Secreted Peptide PIP1 Amplifies Immunity through Receptor-Like Kinase 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shuguo; Wang, Xin; Chen, Donghua; Yang, Xue; Wang, Mei; Turrà, David; Di Pietro, Antonio; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    In plants, innate immune responses are initiated by plasma membrane-located pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) upon recognition of elicitors, including exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Arabidopsis thaliana produces more than 1000 secreted peptide candidates, but it has yet to be established whether any of these act as elicitors. Here we identified an A. thaliana gene family encoding precursors of PAMP-induced secreted peptides (prePIPs) through an in-silico approach. The expression of some members of the family, including prePIP1 and prePIP2, is induced by a variety of pathogens and elicitors. Subcellular localization and proteolytic processing analyses demonstrated that the prePIP1 product is secreted into extracellular spaces where it is cleaved at the C-terminus. Overexpression of prePIP1 and prePIP2, or exogenous application of PIP1 and PIP2 synthetic peptides corresponding to the C-terminal conserved regions in prePIP1 and prePIP2, enhanced immune responses and pathogen resistance in A. thaliana. Genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that the receptor-like kinase 7 (RLK7) functions as a receptor of PIP1. Once perceived by RLK7, PIP1 initiates overlapping and distinct immune signaling responses together with the DAMP PEP1. PIP1 and PEP1 cooperate in amplifying the immune responses triggered by the PAMP flagellin. Collectively, these studies provide significant insights into immune modulation by Arabidopsis endogenous secreted peptides. PMID:25188390

  13. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylate cyclase.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misono, K. S.; Philo, J. S.; Arakawa, T.; Ogata, C. M.; Qiu, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Young, H. S. (Biosciences Division); (Univ. of Nevada); (Alliance Protein Labs.)

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the homologous B-type natriuretic peptide are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and B-type natriuretic peptide counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylyl cyclase (GC)-linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here, we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation and signaling mechanism of NPRA and other receptor GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacterium GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylyl cyclase catalytic domain, consisting of a C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. Adenylyl cyclase is activated by binding of G{sub s}{alpha} to C2 and the ensuing 7{sup o} rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer to adopt a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity.

  14. The secreted peptide PIP1 amplifies immunity through receptor-like kinase 7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuguo Hou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In plants, innate immune responses are initiated by plasma membrane-located pattern recognition receptors (PRRs upon recognition of elicitors, including exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs. Arabidopsis thaliana produces more than 1000 secreted peptide candidates, but it has yet to be established whether any of these act as elicitors. Here we identified an A. thaliana gene family encoding precursors of PAMP-induced secreted peptides (prePIPs through an in-silico approach. The expression of some members of the family, including prePIP1 and prePIP2, is induced by a variety of pathogens and elicitors. Subcellular localization and proteolytic processing analyses demonstrated that the prePIP1 product is secreted into extracellular spaces where it is cleaved at the C-terminus. Overexpression of prePIP1 and prePIP2, or exogenous application of PIP1 and PIP2 synthetic peptides corresponding to the C-terminal conserved regions in prePIP1 and prePIP2, enhanced immune responses and pathogen resistance in A. thaliana. Genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that the receptor-like kinase 7 (RLK7 functions as a receptor of PIP1. Once perceived by RLK7, PIP1 initiates overlapping and distinct immune signaling responses together with the DAMP PEP1. PIP1 and PEP1 cooperate in amplifying the immune responses triggered by the PAMP flagellin. Collectively, these studies provide significant insights into immune modulation by Arabidopsis endogenous secreted peptides.

  15. Comparative biodistribution of 12 {sup 111}In-labelled gastrin/CCK2 receptor-targeting peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverman, Peter; Joosten, Lieke; Eek, Annemarie; Roosenburg, Susan; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Peitl, Petra Kolenc [University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Maina, Theodosia [National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Molecular Radiopharmacy, Institute of Radioisotopes-Radiodiagnostic Products, Athens (Greece); Maecke, Helmut [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Aloj, Luigi [Fondazione ' ' G. Pascale' ' , Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istituto Nazionale Tumouri, Naples (Italy); Guggenberg, Elisabeth von [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Sosabowski, Jane K. [Queen Mary, University of London, Centre for Molecular Oncology and Imaging, Institute of Cancer, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London (United Kingdom); Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Reubi, Jean-Claude [University of Berne, Institute of Pathology, Berne (Switzerland)

    2011-08-15

    Cholecystokinin 2 (CCK-2) receptor overexpression has been demonstrated in various tumours such as medullary thyroid carcinomas and small-cell lung cancers. Due to this high expression, CCK-2 receptors might be suitable targets for radionuclide imaging and/or radionuclide therapy. Several CCK-2 receptor-binding radiopeptides have been developed and some have been tested in patients. Here we aimed to compare the in vivo tumour targeting properties of 12 {sup 111}In-labelled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-conjugated gastrin/CCK2 receptor-binding peptides. Two CCK8-based peptides and ten gastrin-based peptide analogues were tested. All peptides were conjugated with DOTA and labelled with {sup 111}In. Biodistribution studies were performed in mice with subcutaneous CCK2/gastrin receptor-expressing tumours and with receptor-negative tumours contralaterally. Biodistribution was studied by counting dissected tissues at 1 and 4 h after injection. Both the CCK analogues displayed relatively low tumour uptake (approximately 2.5%ID/g) as compared to minigastrin analogues. Two linear minigastrin peptides (MG0 and sargastrin) displayed moderate tumour uptake at both 1 and 4 h after injection, but also very high kidney uptake (both higher than 48%ID/g). The linear MG11, lacking the penta-Glu sequence, showed lower tumour uptake and also low kidney uptake. Varying the N-terminal Glu residues in the minigastrin analogues led to improved tumour targeting properties, with PP-F11 displaying the optimal biodistribution. Besides the monomeric linear peptides, a cyclized peptide and a divalent peptide were tested. Based on these studies, optimal peptides for peptide receptor radionuclide targeting of CCK2/gastrin receptor-expressing tumours were the linear minigastrin analogue with six D-Glu residues (PP-F11), the divalent analogue MGD5 and the cyclic peptide cyclo-MG1. These peptides combined high tumour uptake with low kidney retention, and may

  16. Appetite suppressive effects of yeast hydrolysate on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) immunoreactivity in hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, E Y; Suh, H J; Kim, S Y; Hong, Y S; Kim, M J; Chang, U J

    2008-11-01

    To investigate the effects of yeast hydrolysate on appetite regulation mechanisms in the central nervous system, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) immunoreactivity in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) of the hypothalamus were examined. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were assigned to five groups: control (normal diet), BY-1 and BY-2 (normal diet with oral administration of 0.1 g and 1.0 g of yeast hydrolysate yeast hydrolysate 10-30 kDa/kg body weight, respectively). The body weight gain in the BY groups was less than that in the control. In particular, the weight gain of the BY-2 group (133.0 +/- 5.1 g) was significantly lower (p yeast hydrolysate of <10 kDa reduced the body weight gain and body fat in normal diet-fed rats and increased the lipid energy metabolism by altering the expression of NOS and VIP in neurons.

  17. Role of vasoactive intestinal peptide and nitric oxide in the modulation of electroacupucture on gastric motility in stressed rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Ming Shen; Mei-Qi Zhou; Guan-Sun Xu; Ying Xu; Gang Yin

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects and mechanisms of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and nitric oxide (NO)in the modulation of electroacupucture (EA) on gastric motility in restrained-cold stressed rats.METHODS: An animal model of gastric motility disorder was established by restrained-cold stress. Gastric myoelectric activities were recorded by electrogastroent erography (EGG). VIP and NO concentrations in plasma and gastric mucosal and bulb tissues were detected by radioimmunoassay (RIA). VIP expression in the gastric wails was assayed using avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) and image analysis.RESULTS: In cold restrained stressed rats, EGG was disordered and irregular. The frequency and amplitude of gastric motility were higher than that in control group (P< 0.01). VIP and NO contents of plasma, gastric mucosal and bulb tissues were obviously decreased (P < 0.01).Following EA at "Zusanli" (ST36), the frequency and amplitude of gastric motility were obviously lowered (P <0.01), while the levels of VIP and NO in plasma, gastric mucosal and bulb tissues increased strikingly (P < 0.01,P < 0.05) and expression of VIP in antral smooth muscle was elevated significantly (P < 0.01) in comparison with those of model group.CONCLUSION: VIP and NO participate in the modulatory effect of EA on gastric motility. EA at "Zusanli"acupoint (ST36) can improve gastric motility of the stressed rats by increasing the levels of VIP and NO.

  18. Vasoactive intestinal peptide antagonist treatment during mouse embryogenesis impairs social behavior and cognitive function of adult male offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joanna M; Cuasay, Katrina; Abebe, Daniel T

    2007-07-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a regulator of rodent embryogenesis during the period of neural tube closure. VIP enhanced growth in whole cultured mouse embryos; treatment with a VIP antagonist during embryogenesis inhibited growth and development. VIP antagonist treatment during embryogenesis also had permanent effects on adult brain chemistry and impaired social recognition behavior in adult male mice. The neurological deficits of autism appear to be initiated during neural tube closure and social behavior deficits are among the key characteristics of this disorder that is more common in males and is frequently accompanied by mental retardation. The current study examined the blockage of VIP during embryogenesis as a model for the behavioral deficits of autism. Treatment of pregnant mice with a VIP antagonist during embryonic days 8 through 10 had no apparent effect on the general health or sensory or motor capabilities of adult offspring. However, male offspring exhibited reduced sociability in the social approach task and deficits in cognitive function, as assessed through cued and contextual fear conditioning. Female offspring did not show these deficiencies. These results suggest that this paradigm has usefulness as a mouse model for aspects of autism as it selectively impairs male offspring who exhibit the reduced social behavior and cognitive dysfunction seen in autism. Furthermore, the study indicates that the foundations of some aspects of social behavior are laid down early in mouse embryogenesis, are regulated in a sex specific manner and that interference with embryonic regulators such as VIP can have permanent effects on adult social behavior.

  19. Distribution of Vasotocin- and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide-like Immunoreactivity in the Brain of Blue Tit (Cyanistes coeruleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Monique Montagnese

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Blue tits (Cyanistes coeruleus are songbirds, used as model animals in numerous studies covering a wide field of research. Nevertheless, the distribution of neuropeptides in the brain of this avian species remains largely unknown. Here we present some of the first results on distribution of Vasotocine (AVT and Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP in the brain of males and females of this songbird species, using immunohistochemistry mapping.The bulk of AVT-like cells are found in the hypothalamic supraoptic, paraventricular and suprachiasmatic nuclei, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and along the lateral forebrain bundle. Most AVT-like fibers course toward the median eminence, some reaching the arcopallium, and lateral septum. Further terminal fields occur in the dorsal thalamus, ventral tegmental area and pretectal area. Most VIP-like cells are in the lateral septal organ and arcuate nucleus. VIP-like fibers are distributed extensively in the hypothalamus, preoptic area, lateral septum, diagonal band of Broca. They are also found in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, amygdaloid nucleus of taenia, robust nucleus of the arcopallium, caudo-ventral hyperpallium, nucleus accumbens and the brainstem. Taken together, these results suggest that both AVT and VIP immunoreactive structures show similar distribution to other avian species, emphasizing evolutionary conservatism in the history of vertebrates. The current study may enable future investigation into the localization of AVT and VIP, in relation to behavioral and ecological traits in the brain of tit species.

  20. Inulin-enriched pasta improves intestinal permeability and modifies the circulating levels of zonulin and glucagon-like peptide 2 in healthy young volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Francesco; Linsalata, Michele; Clemente, Caterina; Chiloiro, Marisa; Orlando, Antonella; Marconi, Emanuele; Chimienti, Guglielmina; Riezzo, Giuseppe

    2012-12-01

    Apart from the intestinal environment, inulin induces physiological effects, which includes a reduction in glucose and lipid concentrations and modulation of gastrointestinal motility through the release of different peptides. We hypothesized that inulin-enriched pasta may also improve small intestine permeability in relation to zonulin and glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) levels in healthy young subjects. Twenty healthy, young male volunteers completed a randomized, double-blind crossover study consisting of a 2-week run-in period and two 5-week study periods (11% inulin-enriched or control pasta), with an 8-week washout period in between. The intestinal barrier function was assessed by lactulose-mannitol excretion in urine. Zonulin values and GLP-2 release were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the inulin group, the urinary lactulose recovery was significantly lower than the other 2 groups. There were no significant differences in urinary mannitol levels between groups. Accordingly, the lactulose-mannitol excretion ratio was significantly decreased in the inulin-enriched pasta group compared with the other 2 groups. The inulin-enriched pasta group had significantly lower zonulin serum values and significantly higher GLP-2 basal values when compared with the baseline and control pasta groups. The dietary use of inulin-enriched pasta preserves intestinal mucosal barrier functioning and modulates circulating levels of zonulin and GLP-2, suggesting that prebiotics could be used in the prevention of gastrointestinal diseases and metabolic disorders.

  1. Neuropeptide Y and vasoactive intestinal peptide in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage; Immunocytochemistry, radioimmunoassay and pharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alafaci, C.; Jansen, I. (Department of Experimental Research, Lund University, Malmoe General Hospital (Sweden)); Uddman, R. (Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Lund University, Malmoe General Hospital (Sweden)); Delgado, T.; Svendgaard, N.A. (Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden)); Edvinsson, L. (Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden)); Ekman, R. (Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    The involvement of noradrenaline (NA), neuropeptide Y, (NPY), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), acetylcholine (ACh) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) has been examined in the late phase of spasm after an experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in a rat model. Immunocytochemistry and radioimmunoassay of blood vessels from the circle of Willis did not show significant differences in NPY- and VIP-like immunoreactivity 2 days post SAH as compared to control vessels. The postjunctional effects of NA, NPY, 5-HT, Ach and VIP were studied two days after SAH using a sensitive in vitro system. NPY induced contractions were significantly (p<0.01) weaker (lower E{sub max}) in SAH as compared to control rats while the relaxant responses to ACh and VIP were slightly increased after SAH. These observations reveal that in a rat model of SAH, with an approximately 20% in vivo constriction at two days, dynamic changes occur in cerebral artery reactivity without any obvious change in sympathetic or parasympathetic perivascular nerve networks. (author).

  2. A Novel Non-Peptidic Agonist of the Ghrelin Receptor with Orexigenic Activity In vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor-Cavada, Elena; Pardo, Leticia M.; Kandil, Dalia; Torres-Fuentes, Cristina; Clarke, Sarah L.; Shaban, Hamdy; McGlacken, Gerard P.; Schellekens, Harriet

    2016-11-01

    Loss of appetite in the medically ill and ageing populations is a major health problem and a significant symptom in cachexia syndromes, which is the loss of muscle and fat mass. Ghrelin is a gut-derived hormone which can stimulate appetite. Herein we describe a novel, simple, non-peptidic, 2-pyridone which acts as a selective agonist for the ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1a). The small 2-pyridone demonstrated clear agonistic activity in both transfected human cells and mouse hypothalamic cells with endogenous GHS-R1a receptor expression. In vivo tests with the hit compound showed significant increased food intake following peripheral administration, which highlights the potent orexigenic effect of this novel GHS-R1a receptor ligand.

  3. Conjugation with receptor-targeted histidine-rich peptides enhances the pharmacological effectiveness of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Osamu; Ming, Xin; Carver, Kyle; Juliano, Rudy

    2014-01-15

    Ineffective delivery to intracellular sites of action is one of the key limitations to the use of antisense and siRNA oligonucleotides as therapeutic agents. Here, we describe molecular scale antisense oligonucleotide conjugates that bind selectively to a cell surface receptor, are internalized, and then partially escape from nonproductive endosomal locations to reach their sites of action in the nucleus. Peptides that include bombesin sequences for receptor targeting and a run of histidine residues for endosomal disruption were covalently linked to a splice switching antisense oligonucleotide. The conjugates were tested for their ability to correct splicing and up-regulate expression of a luciferase reporter in prostate cancer cells that express the bombesin receptor. We found that trivalent conjugates that included both the targeting sequence and several histidine residues were substantially more effective than conjugates containing only the bombesin or histidine moieties. This demonstrates the potential of creating molecular scale oligonucleotide conjugates with both targeting and endosome escape capabilities.

  4. Synthesis and biological activity of novel small peptides with aminophosphonates moiety as NOP receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naydenova, Emilia D; Todorov, Petar T; Mateeva, Polina I; Zamfirova, Rositza N; Pavlov, Nikola D; Todorov, Simeon B

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the present study was the synthesis and the biological screening of new analogs of Ac-RYYRWK-NH2, modified at the N-terminal with 1-[(methoxyphosphono)methylamino]cycloalkanecarboxylic acids. The four newly synthesized ligands for the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) receptor (NOP) have been prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis--Fmoc-strategy. These compounds were tested for agonistic activity in vitro on electrically stimulated smooth-muscle preparations isolated from vas deferens of Wistar rats. Our data showed that substitution of Arg at position 1 with aminophosphonates moiety decreased significantly the affinity of ligands to the NOP receptor. Furthermore, the enlargement of the cycle (with 5-8 carbon atoms) additionally diminished both the activity and the selectivity for NOP-receptor.

  5. β2-Adrenergic receptor agonists activate CFTR in intestinal organoids and subjects with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijftigschild, Lodewijk A W; Berkers, Gitte; Dekkers, Johanna F; Zomer-van Ommen, Domenique D; Matthes, Elizabeth; Kruisselbrink, Evelien; Vonk, Annelotte; Hensen, Chantal E; Heida-Michel, Sabine; Geerdink, Margot; Janssens, Hettie M; van de Graaf, Eduard A; Bronsveld, Inez; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; Majoor, Christof J; Heijerman, Harry G M; de Jonge, Hugo R; Hanrahan, John W; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-09-01

    We hypothesized that people with cystic fibrosis (CF) who express CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene mutations associated with residual function may benefit from G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-targeting drugs that can activate and enhance CFTR function.We used intestinal organoids to screen a GPCR-modulating compound library and identified β2-adrenergic receptor agonists as the most potent inducers of CFTR function.β2-Agonist-induced organoid swelling correlated with the CFTR genotype, and could be induced in homozygous CFTR-F508del organoids and highly differentiated primary CF airway epithelial cells after rescue of CFTR trafficking by small molecules. The in vivo response to treatment with an oral or inhaled β2-agonist (salbutamol) in CF patients with residual CFTR function was evaluated in a pilot study. 10 subjects with a R117H or A455E mutation were included and showed changes in the nasal potential difference measurement after treatment with oral salbutamol, including a significant improvement of the baseline potential difference of the nasal mucosa (+6.35 mV, pCFTR activation when administered ex vivo to organoids.This proof-of-concept study suggests that organoids can be used to identify drugs that activate CFTR function in vivo and to select route of administration.

  6. JTT-130, a novel intestine-specific inhibitor of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, suppresses food intake and gastric emptying with the elevation of plasma peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide-1 in a dietary fat-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Takahiro; Mera, Yasuko; Ishii, Yukihito; Tadaki, Hironobu; Tomimoto, Daisuke; Kuroki, Yukiharu; Kawai, Takashi; Ohta, Takeshi; Kakutani, Makoto

    2011-03-01

    The microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) takes part in the mobilization and secretion of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from enterocytes and hepatocytes. In this study, we investigated the effects of diethyl-2-({3-dimethylcarbamoyl-4-[(4'-trifluoromethylbiphenyl-2-carbonyl) amino] phenyl}acetyloxymethyl)-2-phenylmalonate (JTT-130), a novel intestine-specific MTP inhibitor, on food intake, gastric emptying, and gut peptides using Sprague-Dawley rats fed 3.1% fat, 13% fat, or 35% fat diets. JTT-130 treatment suppressed cumulative food intake and gastric emptying in rats fed a 35% fat diet, but not a 3.1% fat diet. In rats fed a 13% fat diet, JTT-130 treatment decreased cumulative food intake but not gastric emptying. In addition, treatment with orlistat, a lipase inhibitor, completely abolished the reduction of food intake and gastric emptying by JTT-130 in rats fed a 35% fat diet. On the other hand, JTT-130 treatment increased the plasma concentrations of gut peptides, peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) but not cholecystokinin, in the portal vein in rats fed a 35% fat diet. These elevations in PYY and GLP-1 were also abolished by treatment with orlistat. Furthermore, JTT-130 treatment in rats fed a 35% fat diet increased the contents of triglycerides and free fatty acids in the intestinal lumen, which might contribute to the elevation of PYY and GLP-1 levels. The present findings indicate that JTT-130 causes satiety responses, decreased food intake, and gastric emptying in a dietary fat-dependent manner, with enhanced production of gut peptides such as PYY and GLP-1 from the intestine.

  7. Discovery of peptide ligands through docking and virtual screening at nicotinic acetylcholine receptor homology models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Abba E; Kuryatov, Alexander; Zebroski, Henry A; Powell, Susan R; Filipenko, Petr; Hussein, Adel K; Gorson, Juliette; Heizmann, Anna; Lyskov, Sergey; Tsien, Richard W; Poget, Sébastien F; Nicke, Annette; Lindstrom, Jon; Rudy, Bernardo; Bonneau, Richard; Holford, Mandë

    2017-09-19

    Venom peptide toxins such as conotoxins play a critical role in the characterization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) structure and function and have potential as nervous system therapeutics as well. However, the lack of solved structures of conotoxins bound to nAChRs and the large size of these peptides are barriers to their computational docking and design. We addressed these challenges in the context of the α4β2 nAChR, a widespread ligand-gated ion channel in the brain and a target for nicotine addiction therapy, and the 19-residue conotoxin α-GID that antagonizes it. We developed a docking algorithm, ToxDock, which used ensemble-docking and extensive conformational sampling to dock α-GID and its analogs to an α4β2 nAChR homology model. Experimental testing demonstrated that a virtual screen with ToxDock correctly identified three bioactive α-GID mutants (α-GID[A10V], α-GID[V13I], and α-GID[V13Y]) and one inactive variant (α-GID[A10Q]). Two mutants, α-GID[A10V] and α-GID[V13Y], had substantially reduced potency at the human α7 nAChR relative to α-GID, a desirable feature for α-GID analogs. The general usefulness of the docking algorithm was highlighted by redocking of peptide toxins to two ion channels and a binding protein in which the peptide toxins successfully reverted back to near-native crystallographic poses after being perturbed. Our results demonstrate that ToxDock can overcome two fundamental challenges of docking large toxin peptides to ion channel homology models, as exemplified by the α-GID:α4β2 nAChR complex, and is extendable to other toxin peptides and ion channels. ToxDock is freely available at rosie.rosettacommons.org/tox_dock.

  8. Receptor-like Molecules on Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells Interact with an Adhesion Factor from Lactobacillus reuteri

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuo, Yosuke; MIYOSHI, Yukihiro; Okada, Sanae; SATOH, Eiichi

    2012-01-01

    A surface protein of Lactobacillus reuteri, mucus adhesion-promoting protein (MapA), is considered to be an adhesion factor. MapA is expressed in L. reuteri strains and adheres to piglet gastric mucus, collagen type I, and human intestinal epithelial cells such as Caco-2. The aim of this study was to identify molecules that mediate the attachment of MapA from L. reuteri to the intestinal epithelial cell surface by investigating the adhesion of MapA to receptor-like molecules on Caco-2 cells. ...

  9. The plant natriuretic peptide receptor is a guanylyl cyclase and enables cGMP-dependent signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2016-03-05

    The functional homologues of vertebrate natriuretic peptides (NPs), the plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs), are a novel class of peptidic hormones that signal via guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) and systemically affect plant salt and water balance and responses to biotrophic plant pathogens. Although there is increasing understanding of the complex roles of PNPs in plant responses at the systems level, little is known about the underlying signaling mechanisms. Here we report isolation and identification of a novel Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) protein that directly interacts with A. thaliana PNP, AtPNP-A. In vitro binding studies revealed that the Arabidopsis AtPNP-A binds specifically to the LRR protein, termed AtPNP-R1, and the active region of AtPNP-A is sufficient for the interaction to occur. Importantly, the cytosolic part of the AtPNP-R1, much like in some vertebrate NP receptors, harbors a catalytic center diagnostic for guanylyl cyclases and the recombinant AtPNP-R1 is capable of catalyzing the conversion of guanosine triphosphate to cGMP. In addition, we show that AtPNP-A causes rapid increases of cGMP levels in wild type (WT) leaf tissue while this response is significantly reduced in the atpnp-r1 mutants. AtPNP-A also causes cGMP-dependent net water uptake into WT protoplasts, and hence volume increases, whereas responses of the protoplasts from the receptor mutant are impaired. Taken together, our results suggest that the identified LRR protein is an AtPNP-A receptor essential for the PNP-dependent regulation of ion and water homeostasis in plants and that PNP- and vertebrate NP-receptors and their signaling mechanisms share surprising similarities. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

  10. Effect of Xiaoer Fuxie Waifu powder on the ultrastructure of intestinal Cajal cells and expression of neurotransmitter receptor VIP-R1 in rats with diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-wei CHEN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effect of Xiaoer Fuxie Waifu powder on intestinal Cajal cells (ICC and the expression of vasoactive peptide receptor 1 (VIP-R1 in rats with diarrhea. Methods Thirty Wistar rats were divided randomly into three groups: control group, model group, and treatment group (10 each. Folium sennae (2ml/100g was gavaged to reproduce the diarrheal model. Xiaoer Fuxie Waifu powder was applied topically in the treatment group. Transmission electron microscope was used to observe the changes in ultrastructure of ICC after application of the drug. Immunohistochemistry was used to observe the distribution of VIP-R1 in the intestine of diarrheic rats. RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to determine the expressions of mRNA and protein of VIP-R1. Results The ultrastructure of ICC showed that the drug treatment could normalize the cellular morphology and gap junction. VIP-R1 was found to be distributed mainly between circular muscle and longitudinal muscle, in the myenteric nerve plexus of the small intestine, and was found around the epithelial cells in the mucosal layer of the colon and lamina propria cells. Xiaoer Fuxie Waifu powder inhibited the secretion of VIP-R1 and down-regulated the mRNA and protein expression of VIP-R1. Conclusion Xiaoer Fuxie Waifu powder can repair the injured ICC of diarrheic rats and cure diarrhea by down-regulating the expression of VIP-R1. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.01.05

  11. Human formyl peptide receptor ligand binding domain(s). Studies using an improved mutagenesis/expression vector reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of receptor occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, H D; Vilander, L; Andrews, W H; Holmes, R

    1994-09-09

    Recently, we reported the domain requirements for the binding of formyl peptide to its specific receptor. Based on experiments using receptor chimeras, we also postulated an importance for the amino-terminal domain of the receptor in ligand binding (Perez, H. D., Holmes, R., Vilander, L., Adams, R., Manzana, W., Jolley, D., and Andrews, W. H. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 2292-2295). We have begun to perform a detailed analysis of the regions within the formyl peptide receptor involved in ligand binding. To address the importance of the receptor amino-terminal domain, we substituted (or inserted) hydrophilic sequences within the amino-terminal domain, expressed the receptors, and determined their ability to bind ligand. A stretch of nine amino acids next to the initial methionine was identified as crucial for receptor occupancy. A peptide containing such a sequence specifically completed binding of the ligand to the receptor. Alanine screen mutagenesis of the second extracellular domain also identified amino acids involved in ligand binding as well as a disulfide bond (Cys98 to Cys176) crucial for maintaining the binding pocket. These studies provide evidence for a novel mechanism involved in regulation of receptor occupancy. Binding of the ligand induces conformational changes in the receptor that result in the apposition of the amino-terminal domain over the ligand, providing a lid to the binding pocket.

  12. Enterococcus faecium stimulates human neutrophils via the formyl-peptide receptor 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Alexander Bloes

    Full Text Available The human formyl-peptide receptor 2 (FPR2/ALX senses phenol-soluble modulin (PSM peptide toxins produced by pathogenic staphylococcal species and plays a crucial role in directing neutrophil influx during staphylococcal infection. However, it has remained unclear if FPR2 responds also to molecules from other bacterial pathogens. Here we analyzed a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens and found that apart from staphylococci only certain enterococcal strains have the capacity to stimulate FPR2/ALX. Most of the analyzed Enterococcus faecium but only sporadic Enterococcus faecalis strains released FPR2/ALX-stimulating molecules leading to neutrophil calcium ion fluxes, chemotaxis, and complement receptor upregulation. Among ten test strains vancomycin-resistant E. faecium had a significantly higher capacity to stimulate FPR2/ALX than vancomycin-susceptible strains, suggesting an association of strong FPR2/ALX activation with health-care associated strains. The enterococcal FPR2/ALX agonists were found to be peptides or proteins, which appear, however, to be unrelated to staphylococcal PSMs in sequence and physicochemical properties. Enterococci are among the most frequent invasive bacterial pathogens but the basis of enterococcal virulence and immune activation has remained incompletely understood. Our study indicates that previously unrecognized proteinaceous agonists contribute to Enterococcus-host interaction and underscores the importance of FPR2/ALX in host defense against major endogenous bacterial pathogens.

  13. Urotensin II and urotensin II-related peptide activate somatostatin receptor subtypes 2 and 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagon, Maria M; Molina, Marcelo; Gahete, Manuel D; Duran-Prado, Mario; Martinez-Fuentes, Antonio J; Alcain, Francisco J; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Leprince, Jérôme; Vaudry, Hubert; Castaño, Justo P; Vazquez-Martinez, Rafael

    2008-05-01

    The UII and urotensin II-related peptide (URP) genes belong to the same superfamily as the somatostatin gene. It has been previously shown that somatostatin activates the UII-receptor (UTR). In contrast, the possible interaction between UII and URP and somatostatin receptors has remained scarcely analyzed. Herein, we have investigated the effects of UII and URP on cell proliferation and free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in CHO-K1 cells stably expressing the porcine somatostatin receptor subtypes sst2 and sst5. Results show that both UII and URP induce stimulation of cell proliferation mediated by sst2 receptors and UII provokes inhibition of cell proliferation mediated by sst5 receptors. UII and URP also provoked an increase of [Ca2+]i in both sst2- and sst5-transfected cells. Together, our present data demonstrate that UII and URP directly activate sst2 and sst5 and thus mimic the effect of somatostatin on its cognate receptors.

  14. Ethanol alters vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced steroid release from immature rat ovaries in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dees, W.L.; Hiney, J.K.; Fuentes, F.; Forrest, D.W. (Texas A M Univ., College Station (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The present study was conducted to examine the acute effects of ethanol (ETOH) on basal and VIP-induced release of testosterone (T) and estradiol (E{sub 2}) from immature ovaries in vitro. Ovaries were collected from anestrus (A) and both naturally occurring and pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG)-induced early proestrus (EP) animals. The ovaries were incubated in wither media alone, media plus 1 {mu}M VIP, media plus ETOH in doses ranging from 25 to 100 mM, or media plus each dose of ETOH containing VIP. The present results demonstrate that ETOH did not affect either basal or VIP-induced steroid release from ovaries collected from A animals. Likewise, the ETOH did not alter basal steroid secretion from EP animals; however, the drug significantly reduced the VIP-stimulated release of both T and E, from EP ovaries. Thus, these data demonstrate for the first time that ETOH is capable of altering prepubertal ovarian responsiveness to VIP, a peptide known to be involved in the developmental regulation of ovarian function.

  15. GluVII:06--a highly conserved and selective anchor point for non-peptide ligands in chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Schwartz, Thue W

    2006-01-01

    to be crucially important for the binding and action of a number of non-peptide ligands in for example the CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 receptors. It is proposed that in chemokine receptors in general GluVII:06 serves as a selective anchor point for the centrally located, positively charged nitrogen of the small molecule...

  16. Oxyntomodulin differentially affects glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor beta-arrestin recruitment and signaling through Galpha(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Rasmus; Kubale, Valentina; Vrecl, Milka

    2007-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor is a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity, and there is great interest in characterizing the pharmacology of the GLP-1 receptor and its ligands. In the present report, we have applied bioluminescence resonance energy transfer...

  17. Effect of moxonidine on contractile activity of isolated large intestine in mice: role of alpha2-adrenoceptors and Ii-imidazoline receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaeva, L P; Korobov, N V; Medvedev, O S

    2004-03-01

    We studied the ability of moxonidine to interact with alpha2-adrenoceptors and Ii-imidazoline receptors in isolated mouse large intestine. Moxonidine caused contractions of longitudinal muscles in the large intestine, which depended on the dose of this preparation. Pretreatment with yohimbine (alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist with low affinity for Ii-imidazoline receptors) and efaroxan (Ii-imidazoline receptor antagonist with low affinity for alpha2-adrenoceptors) abolished the effect of moxonidine. Antagonistic activity and relative selectivity of yohimbine and efaroxan suggest that the effects of moxonidine on mouse large intestine are realized via alpha2-adrenoceptors.

  18. Simulations of transferred NOE in a ternary peptide-receptor-lipid complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplicki, J.; Milon, A.

    1998-02-01

    Analyses of neuropeptides interacting with their receptors in presence of lipid membranes require the use of spin systems including several molecules (peptide, membrane, receptor) in at least three states (free, membrane-bound and receptor-bound ligand). Moreover, the exchange rates can be arbitrary. We have developed a program, based on the generalized relaxation matrix method, capable of treating all direct and indirect spin interactions. The program allows a simulation of homonuclear NOE and ROE experiments in case of arbitrary exchange rates, for systems with internal mobility and groups of equivalent spins. We present here some simulations for a system of three states, such as the free, membrane-bound and receptor-bound ligand, aiming at defining more precisely the limits of the transferred NOE experiments for the determination of the receptor-bound conformation of a neuropeptide. Dans le cas d'étude des interactions entre les neuropeptides et leurs récepteurs membranaires on travaille avec un système de plusieurs spins, dans au moins trois états (libre, intermédiaire et lié), qui peuvent appartenir à des molécules différentes (ligand, membrane et récepteur). De plus, les constantes d'échange parmi ces états sont arbitraires. Nous avons développé un logiciel, basé sur la méthode des matrices de relaxation, qui décrit tous les effets d'interactions (directes et indirectes) entre les spins. Ce logiciel permet de simuler les expériences homonucléaires NOE et ROE dans les cas d'échange arbitraire, pour les systèmes possédant une mobilité interne et des groupes de spins équivalents. Nous présentons le résultat de simulations obtenues dans un système à trois états du type peptide libre, peptide lié au lipide, peptide lié au récepteur, dont le but est de préciser les limites d'utilisation des NOEs transférés en vue de déterminer la conformation de neuropeptides liés à leur récepteur.

  19. Increased natriuretic peptide receptor A and C gene expression in rats with pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Tue E.H.; Aplin, Mark; Strom, Claes C.

    2006-01-01

    Both atrial (ANP) and brain (BNP) natriuretic peptide affect development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis via binding to natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A in the heart. A putative clearance receptor, NPR-C, is believed to regulate cardiac levels of ANP and BNP. The renin-angiotensin system...... also affects cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. In this study we examined the expression of genes for the NPRs in rats with pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy. The ANG II type 1 receptor was blocked with losartan (10 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)) to investigate a possible role of the renin-angiotensin system...

  20. Increased natriuretic peptide receptor A and C gene expression in rats with pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Tue E.H.; Aplin, Mark; Strom, Claes C.

    2006-01-01

    Both atrial (ANP) and brain (BNP) natriuretic peptide affect development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis via binding to natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A in the heart. A putative clearance receptor, NPR-C, is believed to regulate cardiac levels of ANP and BNP. The renin-angiotensin system...... also affects cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. In this study we examined the expression of genes for the NPRs in rats with pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy. The ANG II type 1 receptor was blocked with losartan (10 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)) to investigate a possible role of the renin-angiotensin system...

  1. The noncaloric sweetener rebaudioside a stimulates glucagon-like peptide 1 release and increases enteroendocrine cell numbers in 2-dimensional mouse organoids derived from different locations of the intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielen, van der Nikkie; Klooster, ten Jean Paul; Muckenschnabl, Susanne; Pieters, Raymond; Hendriks, Henk F.J.; Witkamp, Renger F.; Meijerink, Jocelijn

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) contributes to satiety and plays a pivotal role in insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis. Similar to GLP-1, peptide YY (PYY) and cholecystokinin also influence food intake. The secretion of these hormones by enteroendocrine cells along the intestine

  2. The Noncaloric Sweetener Rebaudioside A Stimulates Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Release and Increases Enteroendocrine Cell Numbers in 2-Dimensional Mouse Organoids Derived from Different Locations of the Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wielen, Nikkie; Ten Klooster, Jean Paul; Muckenschnabl, Susanne; Pieters, Raymond; Hendriks, Henk Fj; Witkamp, Renger F; Meijerink, Jocelijn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) contributes to satiety and plays a pivotal role in insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis. Similar to GLP-1, peptide YY (PYY) and cholecystokinin also influence food intake. The secretion of these hormones by enteroendocrine cells along the intestine is

  3. The noncaloric sweetener rebaudioside a stimulates glucagon-like peptide 1 release and increases enteroendocrine cell numbers in 2-dimensional mouse organoids derived from different locations of the intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielen, van der Nikkie; Klooster, ten Jean Paul; Muckenschnabl, Susanne; Pieters, Raymond; Hendriks, Henk F.J.; Witkamp, Renger F.; Meijerink, Jocelijn

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) contributes to satiety and plays a pivotal role in insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis. Similar to GLP-1, peptide YY (PYY) and cholecystokinin also influence food intake. The secretion of these hormones by enteroendocrine cells along the intestine

  4. The Noncaloric Sweetener Rebaudioside A Stimulates Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Release and Increases Enteroendocrine Cell Numbers in 2-Dimensional Mouse Organoids Derived from Different Locations of the Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wielen, Nikkie; Ten Klooster, Jean Paul; Muckenschnabl, Susanne; Pieters, Raymond; Hendriks, Henk Fj; Witkamp, Renger F; Meijerink, Jocelijn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) contributes to satiety and plays a pivotal role in insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis. Similar to GLP-1, peptide YY (PYY) and cholecystokinin also influence food intake. The secretion of these hormones by enteroendocrine cells along the intestine is

  5. A continued saga of Boc5, the first non-peptidic glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist with in vivo activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min; Guan, Ni; Gao, Wei-wei; Liu, Qing; Wu, Xiao-yan; Ma, Da-wei; Zhong, Da-fang; Ge, Guang-bo; Li, Chuan; Chen, Xiao-yan; Yang, Ling; Liao, Jia-yu; Wang, Ming-wei

    2012-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy presents a promising option for treating type 2 diabetes. However, there are several limitations relative to the peptidic GLP-1 mimetics currently on the market or under development. This concern has led to a continued interest in the search for non-peptidic agonists for GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). Here, we briefly review the discovery, characterization and current status of a novel class of cyclobutane-derivative-based non-peptidic agonists for GLP-1R, including Boc5 and its newly discovered analogue WB4-24. Although the oral bioavailability of such compounds still poses great challenges, the progress made so far encourages us to identify a truly 'druggable' small molecule agonist for GLP-1R.

  6. A continued saga of Boc5, the first non-peptidic glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist with in vivo activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min HE; Xiao-yan CHEN; Ling YANG; Jia-yu LIAO; Ming-wei WANG; Ni GUAN; Wei-wei GAO; Qing LIU; Xiao-yan WU; Da-wei MA; Da-fang ZHONG; Guang-bo GE; Chuan LI

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy presents a promising option for treating type 2 diabetes.However,there are several limitations relative to the peptidic GLP-1 mimetics currently on the market or under development.This concern has led to a continued interest in the search for non-peptidic agonists for GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R).Here,we briefly review the discovery,characterization and current status of a novel class of cyclobutane-derivative-based non-peptidic agonists for GLP-1R,including Boc5 and its newly discovered analogue WB4-24.Although the oral bioavailability of such compounds still poses great challenges,the progress made so far encourages us to identify a truly 'druggable' small molecule agonist for GLP-1R.

  7. Crystal structure of the human urokinase plasminogen activator receptor bound to an antagonist peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llinas, Paola; Le Du, Marie Hélène; Gårdsvoll, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    We report the crystal structure of a soluble form of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR/CD87), which is expressed at the invasive areas of the tumor-stromal microenvironment in many human cancers. The structure was solved at 2.7 A in association with a competitive peptide...... inhibitor of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)-uPAR interaction. uPAR is composed of three consecutive three-finger domains organized in an almost circular manner, which generates both a deep internal cavity where the peptide binds in a helical conformation, and a large external surface...... accessible for other protein interactions (vitronectin and integrins). By this unique structural assembly, uPAR can orchestrate the fine interplay with the partners that are required to guide uPA-focalized proteolysis on the cell surface and control cell adhesion and migration....

  8. Multimodal formyl peptide receptor 1 targeted inflammation imaging probe: cFLFLF-MHI-DOTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Yi; Chordia, Mahendra D; Wu, Hua; Shao, Li; Pan, Dongfeng

    2016-02-01

    Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) targeting multimodal probe cFLFLFK-MHI-DOTA for leukocyte based inflammation imaging is described. The compound consists of three domains, (a) cFLFLF peptide for FPR1 recognition and binding for activated leukocyte, (b) heptamethine cyanine dye (MHI) for near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) detection and imaging, and (c) metal chelator DOTA ligand that could form complex with a radiometal for nuclear (PET/SPECT) imaging or with a paramagnetic metal for MRI imaging. Detailed synthesis, characterization and in vitro evaluation are reported. The availability of dual mode inflammation imaging probe would allow in vivo gross level imaging of inflammation foci as well as ex vivo microscopic level cellular imaging for role played by innate immune cells in inflamed tissue. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Peptides identify multiple hotspots within the ligand binding domain of the TNF receptor 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennick Michael

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hotspots are defined as the minimal functional domains involved in protein:protein interactions and sufficient to induce a biological response. Results Here we describe the use of complex and high diversity phage display libraries to isolate peptides (called Hotspot Ligands or HSPLs which sub-divide the ligand binding domain of the tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2; p75 into multiple hotspots. We have shown that these libraries could generate HSPLs which not only subdivide hotspots on protein and non-protein targets but act as agonists or antagonists. Using this approach, we generated peptides which were specific for human TNFR2, could be competed by the natural ligands, TNFα and TNFβ and induced an unexpected biological response in a TNFR2-specific manner. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the dissection of the TNFR2 into biologically active hotspots with the concomitant identification of a novel and unexpected biological activity.

  10. The Effects of Serotonin Receptor Antagonists on Contraction and Relaxation Responses Induced by Electrical Stimulation in the Rat Small Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farajian Mashhadi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background The main source of 5-HT in body is in enterchromafin cells of intestine, different studies mentioned different roles for endogenous 5-HT and receptors involved and it is not clearified the mechanism of action of endogenous 5-HT. Objectives To study the role of endogenous 5-HT on modulation of contraction and relaxation responses induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS in different regions of the rat intestine. Materials and Methods Segments taken from the rat duodenum, jejunum, mid and terminal ileum were vertically mounted, connected to a transducer and exposed to EFS with different frequencies in the absence and presence of various inhibitors of enteric mediators i. e. specific 5-HT receptor antagonists. Results EFS-induced responses were sensitive to TTX and partly to atropine, indicating a major neuronal involvement and a cholinergic system. Pre-treatment with WAY100635 (a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist and granisetron up to 10.0 µM, GR113808 (a 5-HT4 receptor antagonist, methysergide and ritanserin up to 1.0 µM, failed to modify responses to EFS inall examined tissues. In the presence of SB258585 1.0 µM (a 5-HT6 receptor antagonist there was a trend to enhance contraction in the proximal part of the intestine and reduce contraction in the distal part. Pre-treatment with SB269970A 1.0 µM (5-HT7 receptor antagonist induced a greater contractile response to EFS at 0.4 Hz only in the duodenum. Conclusions The application of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 receptor antagonists, applied at concentrations lower than 1.0 µM did not modify the EFS-induced contraction and relaxation responses, whichsuggests the unlikely involvement of endogenous 5-HT in mediating responses to EFS in the described test conditions.

  11. Differential changes in atrial natriuretic peptide and vasopressin receptor bindings in kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogura, T.; Mitsui, T.; Yamamoto, I.; Katayama, E.; Ota, Z.; Ogawa, N.

    1987-01-19

    To elucidate the role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and vasopressin (VP) in a hypertensive state, ANP and VP receptor bindings in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) kidney were analyzed using the radiolabeled receptor assay (RRA) technique. Systolic blood pressure of SHR aged 12 weeks was statistically higher than that of age-matched Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of (/sup 125/I)-ANP binding to the SHR kidney membrane preparations was statistically lower than that of WKY rats, but dissociation constant (Kd) was not significantly different. On the other hand, Bmax of (/sup 3/H)-VP binding to the SHR kidney membrane preparations was statistically higher than that of WKY rats, but Kd were similar. Since the physiological action of ANP is natriuresis and VP is the most important antidiuretic hormone in mammalia, these opposite changes of ANP and VP receptor bindings in SHR kidney suggested that these peptides may play an important role in the pathophysiology of the hypertensive state, although it has not been confirmed as yet.

  12. Heterologously expressed formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2/ALX) does not respond to lipoxin A₄.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Julien; Ferreirós, Nerea; Pirotte, Bernard; Geisslinger, Gerd; Offermanns, Stefan

    2013-06-15

    Lipoxin A₄ (LXA₄) has been described as an anti-inflammatory mediator, which exerts its effects through the formyl peptide receptor FPR2, also known as ALX. However, there has been a controversy whether or not cells expressing FPR2/ALX, such as neutrophils, respond to LXA₄. We, therefore, systematically examined the ability of the human and murine forms of the receptor to respond to LXA₄. We show that both receptor orthologues responded to the FPR2/ALX peptide agonist WKYMVM when expressed heterologously. In contrast, LXA₄ from different sources neither increased [Ca²⁺](i) and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, nor did it induce a decrease in cAMP levels or a translocation of β-arrestin. Also, several LXA₄ analogs were found to be unable to signal through FPR2/ALX. We conclude that FPR2/ALX is not activated by LXA₄ and that the molecular mechanism by which LXA₄ functions still needs to be identified. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of rat spinal cord receptors to FLFQPQRFamide, a mammalian morphine modulating peptide: a binding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, M; Geoffre, S; Legendre, P; Vincent, J D; Simonnet, G

    1989-10-23

    An in vitro binding assay, using 125I-YLFQPQRFamide, a newly synthetized iodinated analog of FLFQPQRFamide, in which Phe1 (F) has been substituted by a Tyr (Y), was developed to demonstrate and characterize putative binding sites of this brain morphine modulating peptide. This radioligand bound in a time-dependent manner to rat spinal cord membrane preparation. This binding was dose-dependent, saturable and reversible. Both kinetic data and saturation measured at equilibrium lead to the existence of a homogenous population of high affinity binding sites with a Kd value of 0.09-0.1 nM and a maximal capacity Bmax of 14.5 +/- 2 fmol/mg protein. Results of competition experiments show that both FLFQPQRFamide and its analog YLFQPQRFamide had a similar capacity to inhibit the 125I-YLFQPQRFamide binding, suggesting that this radioiodinated analog is a good tool to study binding characteristics of FLFQPQRFamide receptors. The related octadecapeptide AGEGLSSPFWSLAAPQRFamide, another mammalian morphine modulating peptide competes for radioligand binding with similar potency. Our results also show that mu, delta and kappa opiate receptor agonists as well as the antagonist naloxone were not able to affect binding either in presence or in absence of 120 mM NaCl. Together, these data demonstrate that FLFQPQRFamide does not function as an endogenous opiate receptor antagonist and that is capacity to reduce opiate-induced analgesia is supported by specific binding sites.

  14. Role of murine intestinal interleukin-1 receptor 1-expressing lymphoid tissue inducer-like cells in Salmonella infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent L Chen

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-1 signaling plays a critical role in intestinal immunology. Here, we report that the major population of intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes expressing IL-1 receptor 1 (IL-1R1 is the lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi-like cell, a type of innate lymphoid cell. These cells are significant producers of IL-22, and this IL-22 production depends on IL-1R1 signaling. LTi-like cells are required for defense against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Moreover, colonic LTi-like cell numbers depend on the presence of the intestinal microbiota. LTi-like cells require IL-1R1 for production of protective cytokines and confer protection in infectious colitis, and their cell numbers in the colon depend upon having a microbiome.

  15. Pharmacological characterization of VIP and PACAP receptors in the human meningeal and coronary artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Kayi Y; Baun, Michael; de Vries, René;

    2011-01-01

    We pharmacologically characterized pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptides (PACAPs), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and the VPAC(1), VPAC(2) and PAC(1) receptors in human meningeal (for their role in migraine) and coronary (for potential side effects) arteries....

  16. A novel receptor cross-talk between the ATP receptor P2Y2 and formyl peptide receptors reactivates desensitized neutrophils to produce superoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önnheim, Karin; Christenson, Karin; Gabl, Michael; Burbiel, Joachim C; Müller, Christa E; Oprea, Tudor I; Bylund, Johan; Dahlgren, Claes; Forsman, Huamei

    2014-04-15

    Neutrophils express several G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and they cross regulate each other. We described a novel cross-talk mechanism in neutrophils, by which signals generated by the receptor for ATP (P2Y2) reactivate desensitized formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) so that these ligand-bound inactive FPRs resume signaling. At the signaling level, the cross-talk was unidirectional, i.e., P2Y2 ligation reactivated FPR, but not vice versa and was sensitive to the phosphatase inhibitor calyculinA. Further, we show that the cross talk between P2Y2 and FPR bypassed cytosolic Ca(2+) transients and did not rely on the actin cytoskeleton. In summary, our data demonstrate a novel cross-talk mechanism that results in reactivation of desensitized FPRs and, an amplification of the neutrophil response to ATP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Upregulation of the N-formyl Peptide receptors in scleroderma fibroblasts fosters the switch to myofibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Francesca Wanda; Napolitano, Filomena; Pesapane, Ada; Mascolo, Massimo; Staibano, Stefania; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Guiducci, Serena; Ragno, Pia; di Spigna, Gaetano; Postiglione, Loredana; Marone, Gianni; Montuori, Nunzia; de Paulis, Amato

    2015-06-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is characterized by chronic inflammation and fibrosis. N-Formyl peptide (fMLF) receptors (FPRs) are chemotactic receptors involved in inflammation. Three FPRs have been identified: FPR1, FPR2, and FPR3. We have examined, by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry, FPRs expression in skin fibroblasts from 10 normal subjects and 10 SSc patients, showing increased expression in SSc fibroblasts. Several functions of FPRs occur through the interaction with a region of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR88-92), able to interact with FPRs and to mediate urokinase (uPA) or fMLF-dependent cell migration. Soluble uPAR84-95 peptide can act as a direct ligand of FPRs. Furthermore, uPA or its aminoterminal fragment (ATF) can promote the exposure of the uPAR88-92 region. The WKYMVm peptide is a FPRs pan-agonist. We investigated the functional effects of these agonists on normal and SSc fibroblasts. ATF, uPAR84-95, and WKYMVm regulated adhesion, migration, and proliferation of normal fibroblasts. Despite FPR overexpression, the response of SSc fibroblasts to the same agonists was greatly reduced, except for the proliferative response to ATF. SSc fibroblasts showed increased α-smooth muscle actin expression and improved capability to induce wound closure. Indeed, they overexpressed a cleaved uPAR form, exposing the uPAR88-92 region, and vitronectin, both involved in fibrosis and in the fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition. FPR stimulation promoted α-smooth muscle actin expression in normal fibroblasts as well as motility, matrix deposition, αvβ5 integrin expression, and radical oxygen species generation in normal and SSc fibroblasts. This study provides evidence that FPRs may play a role in fibrosis and in the fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Altered vasoactive intestinal peptides expression in irritable bowel syndrome patients and rats with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle-Pinero, Arseima Y; Sherwin, LeeAnne B; Anderson, Ethan M; Caudle, Robert M; Henderson, Wendy A

    2015-01-07

    To investigate the vasoactive intestinal peptides (VIP) expression in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis. The VIP gene expression and protein plasma levels were measured in adult participants (45.8% male) who met Rome III criteria for IBS for longer than 6 mo and in a rat model of colitis as induced by TNBS. Plasma and colons were collected from naïve and inflamed rats. Markers assessing inflammation (i.e., weight changes and myeloperoxidase levels) were assessed on days 2, 7, 14 and 28 and compared to controls. Visceral hypersensitivity of the rats was assessed with colo-rectal distension and mechanical threshold testing on hind paws. IBS patients (n = 12) were age, gender, race, and BMI-matched with healthy controls (n = 12). Peripheral whole blood and plasma from fasting participants was collected and VIP plasma levels were assayed using a VIP peptide-enzyme immunoassay. Human gene expression of VIP was analyzed using a custom PCR array. TNBS induced colitis in the rats was confirmed with weight loss (13.7 ± 3.2 g) and increased myeloperoxidase activity. Visceral hypersensitivity to colo-rectal distension was increased in TNBS treated rats up to 21 d and resolved by day 28. Somatic hypersensitivity was also increased up to 14 d post TNBS induction of colitis. The expression of an inflammatory marker myeloperoxidase was significantly elevated in the intracellular granules of neutrophils in rat models following TNBS treatment compared to naïve rats. This confirmed the induction of inflammation in rats following TNBS treatment. VIP plasma concentration was significantly increased in rats following TNBS treatment as compared to naïve animals (P < 0.05). Likewise, the VIP gene expression from peripheral whole blood was significantly upregulated by 2.91-fold in IBS patients when compared to controls (P < 0.00001; 95%CI). VIP plasma protein was not significantly different when compared with controls (P = 0

  19. Visceral hyperalgesia caused by peptide YY deletion and Y2 receptor antagonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ahmed M.; Jain, Piyush; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Fröhlich, Esther E.; Farzi, Aitak; Reichmann, Florian; Herzog, Herbert; Holzer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Altered levels of colonic peptide YY (PYY) have been reported in patients suffering from functional and inflammatory bowel disorders. While the involvement of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Y receptors in the regulation of nociception is well established, the physiological role of PYY in somatic and visceral pain is poorly understood. In this work, the role of PYY in pain sensitivity was evaluated using PYY knockout (PYY(−/−)) mice and Y2 receptor ligands. PYY(−/−) mice were more sensitive to somatic thermal pain compared to wild type (WT) mice. Visceral pain was assessed by evaluating pain-related behaviors, mouse grimace scale (MGS) and referred hyperalgesia after intrarectal administration of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC, 1 or 2%) or its vehicle, peanut oil. The pain-related behaviors induced by AITC were significantly exaggerated by PYY deletion, whereas the MGS readout and the referred hyperalgesia were not significantly affected. The Y2 receptor antagonist, BII0246, increased pain-related behaviors in response to intrarectal AITC compared to vehicle treatment while the Y2 receptor agonist, PYY(3–36), did not have a significant effect. These results indicate that endogenous PYY has a hypoalgesic effect on somatic thermal and visceral chemical pain. The effect on visceral pain seems to be mediated by peripheral Y2 receptors. PMID:28106168

  20. Neurokinin receptor 3 peptide exacerbates 6-hydroxydopamine-induced dopaminergic degeneration in rats through JNK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, John Man Tak; Chan, Ying Shing; Chen, Liang Wei; Yung, Ken Kin Lam

    2012-11-01

    Neurokinin 3 (NK3) receptor is predominantly expressed in striatum and substantia nigra (SN). Evidences have indicated the roles of NK3 receptor in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. By administrating NK3 receptor agonist senktide into 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats, exacerbation of dopaminergic degeneration was found in striatum and substantia nigra pars compacta. From apomorphine rotation test, significant increase of contralateral rotation number was detected in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats with senktide injection. Furthermore, tyrosine hydroxylase expression in striatum and substantia nigra pars compacta were examined by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Further reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivities was found in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats that received senktide treatment. Also, phosphorylation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 subunit was investigated in SN region and significant up-regulation was revealed in senktide-treated 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Finally, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Jun were examined in nigral region. Up-regulation of phosphorylated JNK molecules was shown in SN region after senktide injection. In line with this evidence, phosphorylation of c-Jun at Ser 63 and Ser 73 was also up-regulated by senktide treatment, thus presenting new aspects that NK3 peptide could exacerbate 6-OHDA toxicity in in vivo models and the possible mechanism may be contributed by the modulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 subunit and JNK pathway activities.

  1. Identification of FAM3D as a new endogenous chemotaxis agonist for the formyl peptide receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xinjian; Xu, Enquan; Liang, Weiwei; Pei, Xiaolei; Chen, Dixin; Zheng, Danfeng; Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Can; Wang, Pingzhang; She, Shaoping; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Jing; Mo, Xiaoning; Zhang, Yingmei; Ma, Dalong; Wang, Ying

    2016-05-01

    The family with sequence similarity 3 (FAM3) gene family is a cytokine-like gene family with four members FAM3A, FAM3B, FAM3C and FAM3D. In this study, we found that FAM3D strongly chemoattracted human peripheral blood neutrophils and monocytes. To identify the FAM3D receptor, we used chemotaxis, receptor internalization, Ca(2+) flux and radioligand-binding assays in FAM3D-stimulated HEK293 cells that transiently expressed formyl peptide receptor (FPR)1 or FPR2 to show that FAM3D was a high affinity ligand of these receptors, both of which were highly expressed on the surface of neutrophils, and monocytes and macrophages. After being injected into the mouse peritoneal cavity, FAM3D chemoattracted CD11b+ Ly6G+ neutrophils in a short time. In response to FAM3D stimulation, phosphorylated ERK1/2 and phosphorylated p38 MAPK family proteins were upregulated in the mouse neutrophils, and this increase was inhibited upon treatment with an inhibitor of FPR1 or FPR2. FAM3D has been reported to be constitutively expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. We found that FAM3D expression increased significantly during colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium. Taken together, we propose that FAM3D plays a role in gastrointestinal homeostasis and inflammation through its receptors FPR1 and FPR2. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. The dynamics of interleukin-8 and its interaction with human CXC receptor I peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendrick, Agnieszka; Holliday, Michael; Isern, Nancy G.; Zhang, Fengli; Camilloni, Carlo; Huynh, Chi; Vendruscolo, Michele; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.

    2014-01-20

    Interleukin-8 (CXCL8, IL-8) is a pro-inflammatory chemokine important for the regulation of inflammatory and immune responses via its interaction with G-protein coupled receptors, including CXC receptor 1 (CXCR1). CXCL8 exists as both a monomer and as a dimer at physiological concentrations, yet the molecular basis of CXCL8 interaction with its receptor as well as the importance of CXCL8 dimer formation remain poorly characterized. Although several biological studies have indicated that both the CXCL8 monomer and dimer are active, biophysical studies have reported conflicting results regarding the binding of CXCL8 to CXCR1. To clarify this problem, we expressed and purified a peptide (hCXCR1pep) corresponding to the N-terminal region of human CXCR1 (hCXCR1) and utilized nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to interrogate the binding of wild-type CXCL8 and a previously reported mutant (CXCL8M) that stabilizes the monomeric form. Our data reveal that CXCL8M engages hCXCR1pep with a slightly higher affinity than CXCL8, and that CXCL8 does not dissociate upon binding hCXCR1pep. These investigations also indicate that CXCL8 exhibits inherent flexibility within its receptor-binding site on multiple timescales, which may help explain the versatility in this interleukin for engaging its target receptors.

  3. Effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on renal function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Theodosios; D; Filippatos; Moses; S; Elisaf

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1(GLP-1)receptor agonists result in greater improvements in glycemic control than placebo and promote weight loss with minimal hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.A number of case reports show an association of GLP-1receptor agonists,mainly exenatide,with the development of acute kidney injury.The present review aims to present the available data regarding the effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on renal function,their use in subjects with chronic renal failure and their possible association with acute kidney injury.Based on the current evidence,exenatide is eliminated by renal mechanisms and should not be given in patients with severe renal impairment or end stage renal disease.Liraglutide is not eliminated by renal or hepatic mechanisms,but it should be used with caution since there are only limited data in patients with renal or hepatic impairment.There is evidence from animal studies that GLP-1 receptor agonists exert protective role in diabetic nephropathy with mechanisms that seem to be independent of their glucose-lowering effect.Additionally,there is evidence that GLP-1 receptor agonists influence water and electrolyte balance.These effects may represent new ways to improve or even prevent diabetic nephropathy.

  4. Targeting formyl peptide receptor 1 of activated macrophages to monitor inflammation of experimental osteoarthritis in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinlin; Chordia, Mahendra D; Du, Xuejun; Graves, John L; Zhang, Yi; Park, Yong-Sang; Guo, Yongfei; Pan, Dongfeng; Cui, Quanjun

    2016-09-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). In this study, the feasibility of a formyl peptide receptor 1 (Fpr1)-targeting peptide probe cFLFLF-PEG-(64) Cu via positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was investigated for detection of macrophage activity during development of OA. Monoiodoacetate (MIA) was intraarticularly injected into the knee joint of Sprague-Dawley rats to induce OA. Five days later, cFLFLF-PEG-(64) Cu (∼7,400 kBq/rat) was injected into the tail vein and microPET/CT imaging was performed to assess the OA inflammation by detecting infiltration of macrophages by Fpr1 expression. In addition, a murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 and two fluorescent probes cFLFLF-PEG-cyanine 7 (cFLFLF-PEG-Cy7) and cFLFLF-PEG-cyanine 5 (cFLFLF-PEG-Cy5) were used to define the binding specificity of the peptide to macrophages. It was found with the MIA model that the maximal standard uptake values (SUVmax ) for right (MIA treated) and left (control) knees were 17.96 ± 5.45 and 3.00 ± 1.40, respectively. Histological evaluation of cryomicrotome sections showed that Fpr1 expression, cFLFLF-PEG-Cy5 binding, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity were elevated in the injured synovial membranes. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that both fluorescent peptide probes could bind specifically to RAW264.7 cells, which was blocked by cFLFLF but not by the scramble peptide. The findings highlighted the use of cFLFLF-PEG-(64) Cu/PET as an effective method potentially applied for detection and treatment evaluation of OA. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1529-1538, 2016. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Chemokine receptor CXCR5 supports solitary intestinal lymphoid tissue formation, B cell homing, and induction of intestinal IgA responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velaga, Sarvari; Herbrand, Heike; Friedrichsen, Michaela; Jiong, Tian; Dorsch, Martina; Hoffmann, Matthias W; Förster, Reinhold; Pabst, Oliver

    2009-03-01

    Solitary intestinal lymphoid tissue (SILT) comprises a spectrum of phenotypically diverse lymphoid aggregates interspersed throughout the small intestinal mucosa. Manifestations of SILT range from tiny lymphoid aggregates almost void of mature lymphocytes to large structures dominated by B cells. Large SILT phenotypically resemble a single Peyer's patch follicle, suggesting that SILT might contribute to intestinal humoral immune responses. In this study, we track the fate of individual SILT in vivo over time and analyze SILT formation and function in chemokine receptor CXCR5-deficient mice. We show that, in analogy to Peyer's patches, formation of SILT is invariantly determined during ontogeny and depends on CXCR5. Young CXCR5-deficient mice completely lack SILT, suggesting that CXCR5 is essential for SILT formation during regular postnatal development. However, microbiota and other external stimuli can induce the formation of aberrant SILT distinguished by impaired development of B cell follicles in CXCR5-deficient mice. Small intestinal transplantation and bone marrow transplantation reveal that defect follicle formation is due to impaired B cell homing. Moreover, oral immunization with cholera toxin or infection with noninvasive Salmonella fail to induce efficient humoral immune responses in CXCR5-deficient mice. Bone marrow transplantation of CXCR5-deficient recipients with wild-type bone marrow rescued B cell follicle formation in SILT but failed to restore full humoral immune responses. These results reveal an essential role of CXCR5 in Peyer's patch and SILT development and function and indicate that SILT do not fully compensate for the lack of Peyer's patches in T cell-dependent humoral immune responses.

  6. Dopamine D₂-receptor antagonists ameliorate indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulceration in mice by activating α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Masashi; Kawahara, Ryoji; Hashimura, Hiroshi; Yamanaka, Naoki; Iimori, Maho; Amagase, Kikuko; Kato, Shinichi; Takeuchi, Koji

    2011-01-01

    We have reported that nicotine and the specific α7AChR agonist ameliorate indomethacin-induced intestinal lesions in mice by activating α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChR). Dopamine D₂-receptor antagonists, such as domperidone and metoclopramide, enhance the release of ACh from vagal efferent nerves. The present study examined the effects of domperidone and metoclopramide on indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulceration in mice, focusing on the α7AChR. Male C57BL/6 mice were administered indomethacin (10 mg/kg, s.c.) and sacrificed 24 h later. Domperidone (0.1-10 mg/kg) and metoclopramide (0.03-0.3 mg/kg) were administered i.p. twice, at 0.5 h before and 8 h after indomethacin treatment, while methyllycaconitine (a selective antagonist of α7nAChR, 30 mg/kg) was administered twice, at 0.5 h before each domperidone treatment. Indomethacin caused severe hemorrhagic lesions in the small intestine, mostly to the jejunum and ileum, with a concomitant increase in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Domperidone suppressed the severity of lesions and the increase in MPO activity at low doses (0.1-3 mg/kg), but not at a high dose (10 mg/kg). Similar effects were also observed by metoclopramide. The protective effects of domperidone and metoclopramide were totally abolished by prior administration of methyllycaconitine. Indomethacin treatment markedly enhanced inducible nitric oxide synthase and chemokine mRNA expression in the small intestine, but these responses were all significantly attenuated by either domperidone or metoclopramide. These findings suggest that dopamine D₂-receptor antagonists ameliorate indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulceration through the activation of endogenous anti-inflammatory pathways mediated by α7nAChR.

  7. Neoadjuvant peptide receptor radionuclide therapy for an inoperable neuroendocrine pancreatic tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel Kaemmerer; Vikas Prasad; Wolfgang Daffner; Dieter H(o)rsch; Günter Kl(o)ppel; Merten Hommann; Richard P Baum

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare but are among the most common neuroendocrine neoplasms of the abdomen. At diagnosis many of them are already advanced and difficult to treat. We report on an initially inoperable malignant pancreatic endocrine tumor in a 33-year-old woman, who received neoadjuvant peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) as first-line treatment. This resulted in a significant downstaging of the tumor and allowed its subsequent complete surgical removal. Follow-up for eighteen months revealed a complete remission. This is the first report on neoadjuvant PRRT in a neuroendocrine neoplasm with subsequent successful complete resection.

  8. A lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived soluble protein, p40, stimulates ligand release from intestinal epithelial cells to transactivate epidermal growth factor receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived soluble protein, ameliorates intestinal injury and colitis, reduces apoptosis and preserves barrier function by activation of EGF receptor (EGFR) in intestinal epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms by which p40...

  9. Lymphocyte Cc Chemokine Receptor 9 and Epithelial Thymus-Expressed Chemokine (Teck) Expression Distinguish the Small Intestinal Immune Compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Eric J.; Campbell, James J.; Haraldsen, Guttorm; Pan, Junliang; Boisvert, Judie; Roberts, Arthur I.; Ebert, Ellen C.; Vierra, Mark A.; Goodman, Stuart B.; Genovese, Mark C.; Wardlaw, Andy J.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Parker, Christina M.; Butcher, Eugene C.; Andrew, David P.; Agace, William W.

    2000-01-01

    The immune system has evolved specialized cellular and molecular mechanisms for targeting and regulating immune responses at epithelial surfaces. Here we show that small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and lamina propria lymphocytes migrate to thymus-expressed chemokine (TECK). This attraction is mediated by CC chemokine receptor (CCR)9, a chemoattractant receptor expressed at high levels by essentially all CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the small intestine. Only a small subset of lymphocytes in the colon are CCR9+, and lymphocytes from other tissues including tonsils, lung, inflamed liver, normal or inflamed skin, inflamed synovium and synovial fluid, breast milk, and seminal fluid are universally CCR9−. TECK expression is also restricted to the small intestine: immunohistochemistry reveals that intense anti-TECK reactivity characterizes crypt epithelium in the jejunum and ileum, but not in other epithelia of the digestive tract (including stomach and colon), skin, lung, or salivary gland. These results imply a restricted role for lymphocyte CCR9 and its ligand TECK in the small intestine, and provide the first evidence for distinctive mechanisms of lymphocyte recruitment that may permit functional specialization of immune responses in different segments of the gastrointestinal tract. Selective expression of chemokines by differentiated epithelium may represent an important mechanism for targeting and specialization of immune responses. PMID:10974041

  10. Expression of 5-HT3 receptors by extrinsic duodenal afferents contribute to intestinal inhibition of gastric emptying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Helen E; Glatzle, Jorg; Robin, Carla; Meyer, James H; Phan, Thomas; Wong, Helen; Sternini, Catia

    2003-03-01

    Intestinal perfusion with carbohydrates inhibits gastric emptying via vagal and spinal capsaicin-sensitive afferent pathways. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of 1) 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(3) receptors (5-HT(3)R) in mediating glucose-induced inhibition of gastric emptying and 2) 5-HT(3)R expression in vagal and spinal afferents in innervating the duodenum. In awake rats fitted with gastric and duodenal cannulas, perfusion of the duodenum with glucose (50 and 100 mg) inhibited gastric emptying. Intestinal perfusion of mannitol inhibited gastric emptying only at the highest concentration (990 mosm/kgH(2)O). Pretreatment with the 5-HT(3)R antagonist tropisetron abolished both glucose- and mannitol-induced inhibition of gastric emptying. Retrograde labeling of visceral afferents by injection of dextran-conjugated Texas Red into the duodenal wall was used to identify extrinsic primary afferents. Immunoreactivity for 5-HT(3)R, visualized with an antibody directed to the COOH terminus of the rat 5-HT(3)R, was found in >80% of duodenal vagal and spinal afferents. These results show that duodenal extrinsic afferents express 5-HT(3)R and that the receptor mediates specific glucose-induced inhibition of gastric emptying. These findings support the hypothesis that enterochromaffin cells in the intestinal mucosa release 5-HT in response to glucose, which activates 5-HT(3)R on afferent nerve terminals to evoke reflex changes in gastric motility. The primary glucose sensors of the intestine may be mucosal enterochromaffin cells.

  11. GABA(A) receptors on calbindin-immunoreactive myenteric neurons of guinea pig intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X; Galligan, J J

    2000-01-14

    These studies were carried out to characterize the properties of gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABA(A)) receptors on guinea pig intestinal myenteric neurons maintained in primary culture. In addition, the type of neuron expressing GABA(A) receptors was identified using immunohistochemical methods. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of currents elicited by GABA and acetylcholine (ACh) were obtained using pipettes containing Neurobiotin. After electrophysiological studies, neurons were processed for localization of calbindin-D28K-immunoreactivity (calbindin-ir). GABA (1 mM) and ACh (3 mM) caused inward currents in most cells tested. GABA currents were mimicked by muscimol (1-300 microM) and were blocked by bicuculline (10 microM) indicating that GABA was acting at GABA(A) receptors. GABA currents were associated with a conductance increase and a linear current/voltage relationship with a reversal potential of 1 +/- 1 mV (n = 5). Pentobarbital (PB, 3-1000 microM) and diazepam (DZP, 0.01-10 microM) potentiated GABA-induced currents. A maximum concentration of DZP (1 microM) increased GABA-induced currents 3.1 +/- 0.3 times while PB (1000 microM) increased GABA currents by 11 +/- 2 times. In outside-out patches, the amplitude of GABA-activated single-channel currents was linearly related to membrane potential with a single-channel conductance of 28.5 + 0.5 pS (n = 10). PB and DZP increased the open probability of GABA-induced single-channel currents. Neurons containing calbindin-ir were large, were isolated from other neurons and had GABA current amplitudes of -3.4 +/- 0.3 nA (n = 48). Neurons with weak or absent calbindin-ir were smaller, were localized in clusters of cells and had GABA-induced current amplitudes of -0.6 +/- 0.1 nA (n = 20). ACh-induced currents were smaller in calbindin-ir neurons (-0.7 +/- 0.1 nA) compared to weakly calbindin-ir neurons (-1.4 +/- 0.1 nA). These results indicate that myenteric calbindin-ir neurons express a high density of GABA

  12. Vasodilatory effect of the stable vasoactive intestinal peptide analog RO 25-1553 in murine and rat lungs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yin

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Stable analogs of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP have been proposed as novel line of therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD based on their bronchodilatory and anti-inflammatory effects. We speculated that VIP analogs may provide additional benefits in that they exert vasodilatory properties in the lung, and tested this hypothesis in both ex vivo and in vivo models. METHODS: In isolated perfused mouse lungs and in an in vivo rat model, pulmonary blood vessels were preconstricted by hypoxia and hemodynamic changes in response to systemic (ex vivo or inhaled (in vivo administration of the cyclic VIP analog RO 25-1553 were determined. RESULTS: In mouse lungs, RO 25-1553 reduced intrinsic vascular resistance at normoxia, and attenuated the increase in pulmonary artery pressure in response to acute hypoxia. Consistently, inhalation of RO 25-1553 (1 mg · mL(-1 for 3 min caused an extensive and sustained (> 60 min inhibition of the pulmonary arterial pressure increase in response to hypoxia in vivo that was comparable to the effects of inhaled sildenafil. This effect was not attributable to systemic cardiovascular effects of RO 25-1553, but to a lung specific reduction in pulmonary vascular resistance, while cardiac output and systemic arterial hemodynamics remained unaffected. No adverse effects of RO 25-1553 inhalation on pulmonary gas exchange, ventilation-perfusion matching, or lung fluid content were detected. CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrate that inhaled delivery of the stable VIP analog RO 25-1553 induces a potent and sustained vasodilatory effect in the pulmonary circulation with no detectable adverse effects. Therapeutic inhalation of RO 25-1553 may provide vascular benefits in addition to its reported anti-inflammatory and bronchodilatory effects in COPD, yet caution is warranted given the overall poor results of vasodilator therapies for pulmonary hypertension secondary to COPD in a series of recent

  13. Intracerebroventricular Infusion of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP Rescues the Luteinizing Hormone Surge in Middle-Aged Female Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan eSun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive aging is characterized by delayed and attenuated luteinizing hormone (LH surges apparent in middle-aged rats. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN contains the circadian clock that is responsible for the timing of diverse neuroendocrine rhythms. Electrophysiological studies suggest vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP originating from the SCN excites gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons and affects daily patterns of GnRH-LH release. Age-related LH surge dysfunction correlates with reduced VIP mRNA expression in the SCN and fewer GnRH neurons with VIP contacts expressing c-fos, a marker of neuronal activation, on the day of the LH surge. To determine if age-related LH surge dysfunction reflects reduced VIP availability or altered VIP responsiveness under estradiol positive feedback conditions, we assessed the effect of intracerebroventricular (icv VIP infusion on c-fos expression in GnRH neurons and on LH release in ovariohysterectomized, hormone-primed young and middle-aged rats. Icv infusion of VIP between 1300 and 1600 h significantly advanced the time of peak LH release, increased total and peak LH release, and increased the number of GnRH neurons expressing c-fos on the day of the LH surge in middle-aged rats. Surprisingly, icv infusion of VIP in young females significantly reduced the number of GnRH neurons expressing c-fos and delayed and reduced the LH surge. These observations suggest that a critical balance of VIP signaling is required to activate GnRH neurons for an appropriately timed and robust LH surge in young and middle-aged females. Age-related LH surge changes may, in part, result from decreased availability and reduced VIP-mediated neurotransmission under estradiol positive feedback conditions.

  14. Leptin and the obesity receptor (OB-R) in the small intestine and colon: a colocalization study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert H; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte; Danielsen, E Michael

    2008-01-01

    Leptin is a hormone that plays an important role in overall body energy homeostasis, and the obesity receptor, OB-R, is widely distributed in the organism. In the intestine, a multitude of leptin actions have been reported, but it is currently unclear to what extent the hormone affects...... the intestinal epithelial cells by an endocrine or exocrine signaling pathway. To elucidate this, the localization of endogenous porcine leptin and OB-R in enterocytes and colonocytes was studied. By immunofluorescence microscopy, both leptin and OB-R were mainly observed in the basolateral membrane...... of enterocytes and colonocytes but also in the apical microvillar membrane of the cells. By electron microscopy, coclustering of hormone and receptor in the plasma membrane and localization in endosomes was frequently detected at the basolateral surface of the epithelial cells, indicative of leptin signaling...

  15. Peptide imprinted receptors for the determination of the small cell lung cancer associated biomarker progastrin releasing peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qader, A. A.; Urraca, J.; Torsetnes, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    Peptide imprinted polymers were developed for detection of progastrin releasing peptide (ProGRP); a low abundant blood based biomarker for small cell lung cancer. The polymers targeted the proteotypic nona-peptide sequence NLLGLIEAK and were used for selective enrichment of the proteotypic peptide...... prior to LCMS based quantification. Peptide imprinted polymers with the best affinity characteristics were first identified from a 96-polymer combinatorial library. The effects of functional monomers, crosslinker, porogen, and template on adsorption capacity and selectivity for NLLGLIEAK were...

  16. Fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 regulates Paneth cell lineage allocation and accrual of epithelial stem cells during murine intestinal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrich, Alda; Buzan, Jenny M; Brodrick, Brooks; Ilo, Chibuzo; Bradley, Leigh; Fendig, Kirstin Skaar; Sturgill, Thomas; Cohn, Steven M

    2009-07-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR-3) is expressed in the lower crypt epithelium, where stem cells of the intestine reside. The role of FGFR-3 signaling in regulating features of intestinal morphogenesis was examined in FGFR-3-null (FGFR-3(-/-)) mice. FGFR-3(-/-) mice had only about half the number of intestinal crypts and a marked decrease in the number of functional clonogenic stem cells, as assessed by an in vivo microcolony-forming assay, compared with wild-type littermates. A marked deficit in allocation of progenitor cells to Paneth cell differentiation was noted, although all the principal epithelial lineages were represented in FGFR-3(-/-) mice. The total cellular content and nuclear localization of beta-catenin protein were reduced in FGFR-3(-/-) mice, as was expression of cyclin D1 and matrix metalloproteinase-7, major downstream targets of beta-catenin/T cell factor-4 (Tcf-4) signaling. Activation of FGFR-3 in Caco-2 cells, an intestinal epithelial cell line, abrogated the fall in beta-catenin/Tcf-4 signaling activity that is normally observed in these cells as cultures become progressively more confluent. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that, during intestinal development, FGFR-3 signaling regulates crypt epithelial stem cell expansion and crypt morphogenesis, as well as Paneth cell lineage specification, through beta-catenin/Tcf-4-dependent and -independent pathways.

  17. Glucagon-like peptide-1 suppresses advanced glycation end product-induced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression in mesangial cells by reducing advanced glycation end product receptor level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Nishino, Yuri; Matsui, Takanori; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2011-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE) and receptor for AGE (RAGE) interaction elicits reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and inflammatory reactions, thereby being involved in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Recently, we, along with others, found that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), one of the incretins and a gut hormone secreted from L cells in the intestine in response to food intake, could have anti-inflammatory and antithrombogenic properties in cultured endothelial cells. However, the effects of GLP-1 on renal mesangial cells are largely unknown. Therefore, to elucidate the role of GLP-1 in diabetic nephropathy, this study investigated whether and how GLP-1 blocked AGE-induced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression in human cultured mesangial cells. Gene and protein expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions, Western blots, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The ROS generation was measured with dihydroethidium staining. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) was expressed in mesangial cells. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibited RAGE gene expression in mesangial cells, which was blocked by small interfering RNAs raised against GLP-1R. Furthermore, GLP-1 decreased ROS generation and subsequently reduced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene and protein expression in AGE-exposed mesangial cells. An analogue of cyclic adenosine monophosphate mimicked the effects of GLP-1 on mesangial cells. Our present study suggests that GLP-1 may directly act on mesangial cells via GLP-1R and that it could work as an anti-inflammatory agent against AGE by reducing RAGE expression via activation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate pathway.

  18. Study on vasoactive intestinal polypeptide receptor 1 gene translation in psoriatic epidermis with the topical treatment of capsaicin ointment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mechanism of capsaicin in treating active psoriasis vulgaris.Methods A total of 42 patients with active psoriasis vulgaris diagnosed by histology and clinical features were given either placebo or 0.025% capsaicin ointment four times daily for 30 days randomly by double-blind method.Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide receptor 1(VIPR1)gene translation in active psoriatic lesions before and after treatment with capsaicin ointment was detected by in situ hybridization.Results There ...

  19. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, obesity and psoriasis: diabetes meets dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, D J; Rosen, C F

    2011-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterised by beta cell failure, which frequently develops in the setting of insulin resistance. Inflammation contributes to the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes by impairing insulin action in peripheral tissues and via reduction of beta cell function. Inflammation may also play an important role in the development of complications that arise in patients with type 2 diabetes. Hence, the anti-inflammatory actions of commonly used glucose-lowering drugs may contribute, indirectly, to their mechanisms of action and therapeutic benefit. Herein we highlight the anti-inflammatory actions of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which exerts direct and indirect actions on immune function. The observations that GLP-1 receptor agonists exert anti-inflammatory actions in preclinical studies, taken together with case reports linking improvements in psoriasis with GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy, illustrates the emerging clinical implications of non-classical anti-inflammatory actions of incretin-based therapeutics.

  20. Treatment of type 2 diabetes with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K B; Knop, F K; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2009-01-01

    ongoing decline in pancreatic beta-cell function and, lastly, they have a number of side effects including hypoglycaemia and weight gain. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new class of pharmacological agents, which improve glucose homeostasis in a multifaceted way. Their effects...... of hypoglycaemia with GLP-1 receptor agonists is low, the compounds have clinically relevant effects on body weight, and data are suggesting beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors. Exenatide was released in 2005 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and liraglutide is expected to be approved by the Food...... and Drug Administration in US and the European Medical Agency in Europe for use in 2009. In this review, the available data on the two drugs are presented and discussed....

  1. Pharmacological characterization of VIP and PACAP receptors in the human meningeal and coronary artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Kayi Y; Baun, Michael; de Vries, René;

    2011-01-01

    We pharmacologically characterized pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptides (PACAPs), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and the VPAC(1), VPAC(2) and PAC(1) receptors in human meningeal (for their role in migraine) and coronary (for potential side effects) arteries.......We pharmacologically characterized pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptides (PACAPs), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and the VPAC(1), VPAC(2) and PAC(1) receptors in human meningeal (for their role in migraine) and coronary (for potential side effects) arteries....

  2. Differential peristaltic motor effects of prostanoid (DP, EP, IP, TP) and leukotriene receptor agonists in the guinea-pig isolated small intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Shahbazian, Anaid; Heinemann, Akos; Peskar, Bernhard A; Holzer, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Since the role of prostanoid receptors in intestinal peristalsis is largely unknown, the peristaltic motor effects of some prostaglandin (DP, EP, IP), thromboxane (TP) and leukotriene (LT) receptor agonists and antagonists were investigated.Propulsive peristalsis in fluid-perfused segments from the guinea-pig small intestine was triggered by a rise of the intraluminal pressure and recorded via the intraluminal pressure changes associated with the peristaltic waves. Alterations of distension s...

  3. Soluble Human Intestinal Lactoferrin Receptor: Ca(2+)-Dependent Binding to Sepharose-Based Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Yuta; Seki, Kohei; Shibuya, Masataka; Naka, Yuki; Yokoyama, Tatsuya; Sato, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    A soluble form of human intestinal lactoferrin receptor (shLFR) is identical to human intelectin-1 (hITLN-1), a galactofuranose-binding protein that acts as a host defense against invading pathogenic microorganisms. We found that recombinant shLFR, expressed in mammalian cells (CHO DG44, COS-1, and RK13), binds tightly to Sepharose 4 Fast Flow (FF)-based matrices in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. This binding of shLFR to Sepharose 4 FF-based matrices was inhibited by excess D-galactose, but not by D-glucose, suggesting that shLFR recognizes repeating units of α-1,6-linked D-galactose in Sepharose 4 FF. Furthermore, shLFR could bind to both Sepharose 4B- and Sepharose 6B-based matrices that were not crosslinked in a similar manner as to Sepharose 4 FF-based matrices. Therefore, shLFR (hITLN-1) binds to Sepharose-based matrices in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. This binding property is most likely related to the ability, as host defense lectins, to recognize sepharose (agarobiose)-like structures present on the surface of invading pathogenic microorganisms.

  4. Nociceptin effect on intestinal motility depends on opioidreceptor like-1 receptors and nitric oxide synthase colocalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrei; Sibaev; Jakub; Fichna; Dieter; Saur; Birol; Yuece; Jean-Pierre; Timmermans; Martin; Storr

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of the opioid-receptor like-1(ORL1) agonist nociceptin on gastrointestinal(GI)myenteric neurotransmission and motility. METHODS: Reverse transcriptase- polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry were used to localize nociceptin and ORL1 in mouse tissues. Intracellular electrophysiological recordings of excitatory and inhibitory junction potentials(EJP, IJP) were made in a chambered organ bath. Intestinal motility was measured in vivo. RESULTS: Nociceptin accelerated whole and upper GI transit, but slowed colonic expulsion in vivo in an ORL1-dependent manner, as shown using [Nphe1]NOC and AS ODN pretreatment. ORL1 and nociceptin immunoreactivity were found on enteric neurons. Nociceptin reduced the EJP and the nitric oxide-sensitive slow IJP in an ORL1-dependent manner, whereas the fast IJP was unchanged. Nociceptin further reduced the spatial spreading of the EJP up to 2 cm. CONCLUSION: Compounds acting at ORL1 are good candidates for the future treatment of disorders associated with increased colonic transit, such as diarrhea or diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

  5. A graphene oxide-based fluorescent biosensor for the analysis of peptide-receptor interactions and imaging in somatostatin receptor subtype 2 overexpressed tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianying, Feng; Linjie, Guo; Lihua, Wang; Fan, Li; Jianxin, Lu; Jimin, Gao; Chunhai, Fan; Qing, Huang

    2013-08-20

    Analysis of peptide-receptor interactions provides insights for understanding functions of proteins in cells. In this work, we report the development of a fluorescent biosensor for the analysis of peptide-receptor interactions using graphene oxide (GO) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled octreotide (FOC). Octreotide is a synthesized cyclic peptide with somatostatin-like bioactivity that has been clinically employed. FOC exhibits high adsorption affinity for GO, and its binding results in efficient fluorescence quenching of FITC. Interestingly, the specific binding of the antibody anti-octreotide (AOC) with FOC competitively releases FOC from the GO surface, leading to the recovery of fluorescence. By using this GO-based fluorescent platform, we can detect AOC with a low detection limit of 2 ng/mL. As a step further, we employ this GO-FOC biosensor to image somatostatin receptor subtype 2 overexpressed AR42J tumor cells, which demonstrates high promise for molecular imaging in cancer diagnosis.

  6. Differences in the morphine-induced inhibition of small and large intestinal transit: Involvement of central and peripheral μ-opioid receptors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Umemoto, Hiroyuki; Mori, Tomohisa; Akatsu, Ryuya; Saito, Shinichiro; Tashima, Kimihito; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Kato, Shinichi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Horie, Syunji

    2016-01-15

    Constipation is the most common side effect of morphine. Morphine acts centrally and on peripheral sites within the enteric nervous system. There are a few comprehensive studies on morphine-induced constipation in the small and large intestine by the activation of central and peripheral μ-opioid receptors. We investigated the differences in the inhibition of the small and large intestinal transit in normal and morphine-tolerant mice. Morphine reduced the geometric center in the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran assay and prolonged the bead expulsion time in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of morphine were blocked by μ-opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine, but not by δ- and κ-opioid antagonists. The peripheral opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone methiodide, partially blocked morphine's effect in the small intestine and completely blocked its effect in the large intestine. The intracerebroventricular administration of naloxone significantly reversed the delay of small intestinal transit but did not affect morphine-induced inhibition of large intestinal transit. Naloxone methiodide completely reversed the inhibition of large intestinal transit in normal and morphine-tolerant mice. Naloxone methiodide partially reversed the morphine-induced inhibition of small intestinal transit in normal mice but completely reversed the effects of morphine in tolerant mice. Chronic treatment with morphine results in tolerance to its inhibitory effect on field-stimulated contraction in the isolated small intestine but not in the large intestine. These results suggest that peripheral and central opioid receptors are involved in morphine-induced constipation in the small and large intestine during the early stage of treatment, but the peripheral receptors mainly regulate constipation during long-term morphine treatment.

  7. Glucagon-like peptides 1 and 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kissow, Hannelouise

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Chemotherapy often causes adverse effects, including pain, bloating, diarrhea, and inflammation and ulceration of the mucous membranes lining the digestive tract, which are collectively referred to as mucositis. Unfortunately, no remedy has been found yet to manage these side......-effects. RECENT FINDINGS: The intestinal glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is secreted from the intestinal endocrine L cells after nutrient intake, but recent findings show that the peptide concentration in the plasma also rises after intestinal injury and that GLP-2 receptor activation is crucial for intestinal...... for therapeutic use. In type 2 diabetic and obese patients, GLP secretion is impaired. Elucidating the role of these endogenous hormones could lead to the identification of mucositis risk factors and an alternative preventive therapy for these patients....

  8. Direct demonstration of unique mode of natural peptide binding to the type 2 cholecystokinin receptor using photoaffinity labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Maoqing; Miller, Laurence J

    2013-08-01

    Direct analysis of mode of peptide docking using intrinsic photoaffinity labeling has provided detailed insights for the molecular basis of cholecystokinin (CCK) interaction with the type 1 CCK receptor. In the current work, this technique has been applied to the closely related type 2 CCK receptor that also binds the natural full agonist peptide, CCK, with high affinity. A series of photolabile CCK analog probes with sites of covalent attachment extending from position 26 through 32 were characterized, with the highest affinity analogs that possessed full biological activity utilized in photoaffinity labeling. The position 29 probe, incorporating a photolabile benzoyl-phenylalanine in that position, was shown to bind with high affinity and to be a full agonist, with potency not different from that of natural CCK, and to covalently label the type 2 CCK receptor in a saturable, specific and efficient manner. Using proteolytic peptide mapping, mutagenesis, and radiochemical Edman degradation sequencing, this probe was shown to establish a covalent bond with type 2 CCK receptor residue Phe¹²⁰ in the first extracellular loop. This was in contrast to its covalent attachment to Glu³⁴⁵ in the third extracellular loop of the type 1 CCK receptor, directly documenting differences in mode of docking this peptide to these receptors.

  9. Formyl Peptide Receptor Activation Elicits Endothelial Cell Contraction and Vascular Leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenceslau, Camilla F; McCarthy, Cameron G; Webb, R Clinton

    2016-01-01

    The major pathophysiological characteristic of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis is the loss of control of vascular tone and endothelial barrier dysfunction. These changes are attributed to pro-inflammatory mediators. It has been proposed that in patients and rats without infection, cell components from damaged tissue are the primary instigators of vascular damage. Mitochondria share several characteristics with bacteria, and when fragments of mitochondria are released into the circulation after injury, they are recognized by the innate immune system. N-Formyl peptides are common molecular signatures of bacteria and mitochondria and are known to play a role in the initiation of inflammation by activating the formyl peptide receptor (FPR). We have demonstrated that infusion of mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (F-MIT) leads to sepsis-like symptoms, including vascular leakage. We have also observed that F-MIT, via FPR activation, elicits changes in cytoskeleton-regulating proteins in endothelial cells. Therefore, we hypothesize that these FPR-mediated changes in cytoskeleton can cause endothelial cell contraction and, consequently vascular leakage. Here, we propose that endothelial FPR is a key contributor to impaired barrier function in SIRS and sepsis patients following trauma.

  10. A D-peptide ligand of nicotine acetylcholine receptors for brain-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaoli; Zhan, Changyou; Shen, Qing; Fu, Wei; Xie, Cao; Gao, Jie; Peng, Chunmei; Zheng, Ping; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomes of brain capillary endothelial cells are implicated in nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated transcytosis and act as an enzymatic barrier for the transport of peptide ligands to the brain. A D-peptide ligand of nAChRs (termed (D)CDX), which binds to nAChRs with an IC50 value of 84.5 nM, was developed by retro-inverso isomerization. (D)CDX displayed exceptional stability in lysosomal homogenate and serum, and demonstrated significantly higher transcytosis efficiency in an in vitro blood-brain barrier monolayer compared with the parent L-peptide. When modified on liposomal surface, (D)CDX facilitated significant brain-targeted delivery of liposomes. As a result, brain-targeted delivery of (D)CDX modified liposomes enhanced therapeutic efficiency of encapsulated doxorubicin for glioblastoma. This study illustrates the importance of ligand stability in nAChRs-mediated transcytosis, and paves the way for developing stable brain-targeted entities.

  11. Ghrelin receptor inverse agonists: identification of an active peptide core and its interaction epitopes on the receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Lang, Manja; Brandt, Erik

    2006-01-01

    (TM)-III, TM-VI and TM-VII]. In contrast, the inverse agonist peptides bind in a pocket that extends all the way from the extracellular end of TM-II (AspII:20) across between TM-III and TM-VI/VII to TM-V and TM-IV. The potency of the main inverse agonist could be improved up to 20-fold by a number...... of space-generating mutants located relatively deep in the binding pocket at key positions in TM-III, TM-IV and TM-V. It is proposed that the inverse agonists prevent the spontaneous receptor activation by inserting relatively deeply across the main ligand-binding pocket and sterically blocking...

  12. Urinary responses to acute moxonidine are inhibited by natriuretic peptide receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ayoubi, Rouwayda; Menaouar, Ahmed; Gutkowska, Jolanta; Mukaddam-Daher, Suhayla

    2005-05-01

    We have previously shown that acute intravenous injections of moxonidine and clonidine increase plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a vasodilator, diuretic and natriuretic hormone. We hypothesized that moxonidine stimulates the release of ANP, which would act on its renal receptors to cause diuresis and natriuresis, and these effects may be altered in hypertension. Moxonidine (0, 10, 50, 100 or 150 microg in 300 microl saline) and clonidine (0, 1, 5 or 10 microg in 300 microl saline) injected intravenously in conscious normally hydrated normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats (SD, approximately 200 g) and 12-14-week-old Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) dose-dependently stimulated diuresis, natriuresis, kaliuresis and cGMP excretion, with these effects being more pronounced during the first hour post-injection. The actions of 5 microg clonidine and 50 microg moxonidine were inhibited by yohimbine, an alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist, and efaroxan, an imidazoline I1-receptor antagonist. Moxonidine (100 microg) stimulated (P<0.01) diuresis in SHR (0.21+/-0.04 vs 1.16+/-0.06 ml h(-1) 100 g(-1)), SD (0.42+/-0.06 vs 1.56+/-0.19 ml h(-1) 100 g(-1)) and WKY (0.12+/-0.04 vs 1.44+/-0.21 ml h(-1) 100 g(-1)). Moxonidine-stimulated urine output was lower in SHR than in SD and WKY. Moxonidine-stimulated sodium and potassium excretions were lower in SHR than in SD, but not WKY, demonstrating an influence of strain but not of pressure. Pretreatment with the natriuretic peptide antagonist anantin (5 or 10 microg) resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of moxonidine-stimulated urinary actions. Anantin (10 microg) inhibited (P<0.01) urine output to 0.38+/-0.06, 0.12+/-0.01, and 0.16+/-0.04 ml h(-1) 100 g(-1) in SD, WKY, and SHR, respectively. Moxonidine increased (P<0.01) plasma ANP in SD (417+/-58 vs 1021+/-112 pg ml(-1)) and WKY (309+/-59 vs 1433+/-187 pg ml(-1)), and in SHR (853+/-96 vs 1879+/-229 pg ml(-1)). These results demonstrate that natriuretic

  13. Design and development of a peptide-based adiponectin receptor agonist for cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovas Sandor

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adiponectin, a fat tissue-derived adipokine, exhibits beneficial effects against insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, inflammatory conditions, and cancer. Circulating adiponectin levels are decreased in obese individuals, and this feature correlates with increased risk of developing several metabolic, immunological and neoplastic diseases. Thus, pharmacological replacement of adiponectin might prove clinically beneficial, especially for the obese patient population. At present, adiponectin-based therapeutics are not available, partly due to yet unclear structure/function relationships of the cytokine and difficulties in converting the full size adiponectin protein into a viable drug. Results We aimed to generate adiponectin-based short peptide that can mimic adiponectin action and be suitable for preclinical and clinical development as a cancer therapeutic. Using a panel of 66 overlapping 10 amino acid-long peptides covering the entire adiponectin globular domain (residues 105-254, we identified the 149-166 region as the adiponectin active site. Three-dimensional modeling of the active site and functional screening of additional 330 peptide analogs covering this region resulted in the development of a lead peptidomimetic, ADP 355 (H-DAsn-Ile-Pro-Nva-Leu-Tyr-DSer-Phe-Ala-DSer-NH2. In several adiponectin receptor-positive cancer cell lines, ADP 355 restricted proliferation in a dose-dependent manner at 100 nM-10 μM concentrations (exceeding the effects of 50 ng/mL globular adiponectin. Furthermore, ADP 355 modulated several key signaling pathways (AMPK, Akt, STAT3, ERK1/2 in an adiponectin-like manner. siRNA knockdown experiments suggested that ADP 355 effects can be transmitted through both adiponectin receptors, with a greater contribution of AdipoR1. In vivo, intraperitoneal administration of 1 mg/kg/day ADP 355 for 28 days suppressed the growth of orthotopic human breast cancer xenografts by ~31%. The peptide

  14. Update on D-ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA): a viral entry inhibitor that blocks CCR5 chemokine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Michael R; Polianova, Maria; Yang, Quan-en; Leoung, Gifford S; Ruscetti, Francis W; Pert, Candace B

    2003-01-01

    Peptide T, named for its high threonine content (ASTTTNYT), was derived by a database search which assumed that a relevant receptor binding epitope within env (gp120) would have sequence homology to a known signaling peptide. Binding of radiolabeled gp120 to brain membranes was displaced by peptide T and three octapeptide analogs (including "DAPTA", Dala1-peptide T-amide, the protease-resistant analog now in Phase II clinical trials) with the same potency that these four octapeptides blocked infectivity of an early passage patient isolate. This 1986 report was controversial due to a number of laboratories' failure to find peptide T antiviral effects; we now know that peptide T is a potent HIV entry inhibitor selectively targeting CCR5 receptors with minimal effects on the X4 tropic lab adapted virus exclusively in use at that time. Early clinical trials, which demonstrated lack of toxicity and focused on neurological and neurocognitive benefits, are reviewed and data from a small ongoing Phase II trial--the first to assess peptide T's antiviral effects--are presented. Studies using infectivity, receptor binding, chemotaxis, and blockade of gp120-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo are reviewed, discussed and presented here. Peptide T and analogs of its core pentapeptide, present near the V2 stem of numerous gp120 isolates, are potent ligands for CCR5. Clinical data showing peptide T's immunomodulation of plasma cytokine levels and increases in the percentage of IFNgamma secreting CD8+ T cells in patients with HIV disease are presented and suggests additional therapeutic mechanisms via regulation of specific immunity.

  15. Formyl peptide receptor as a novel therapeutic target for anxiety-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Irene; Rattazzi, Lorenza; Piras, Giuseppa; Gobbetti, Thomas; Panza, Elisabetta; Perretti, Mauro; Dalley, Jeffrey W; D'Acquisto, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPR) belong to a family of sensors of the immune system that detect microbe-associated molecules and inform various cellular and sensorial mechanisms to the presence of pathogens in the host. Here we demonstrate that Fpr2/3-deficient mice show a distinct profile of behaviour characterised by reduced anxiety in the marble burying and light-dark box paradigms, increased exploratory behaviour in an open-field, together with superior performance on a novel object recognition test. Pharmacological blockade with a formyl peptide receptor antagonist, Boc2, in wild type mice reproduced most of the behavioural changes observed in the Fpr2/3(-/-) mice, including a significant improvement in novel object discrimination and reduced anxiety in a light/dark shuttle test. These effects were associated with reduced FPR signalling in the gut as shown by the significant reduction in the levels of p-p38. Collectively, these findings suggest that homeostatic FPR signalling exerts a modulatory effect on anxiety-like behaviours. These findings thus suggest that therapies targeting FPRs may be a novel approach to ameliorate behavioural abnormalities present in neuropsychiatric disorders at the cognitive-emotional interface.

  16. Formyl peptide receptor as a novel therapeutic target for anxiety-related disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Gallo

    Full Text Available Formyl peptide receptors (FPR belong to a family of sensors of the immune system that detect microbe-associated molecules and inform various cellular and sensorial mechanisms to the presence of pathogens in the host. Here we demonstrate that Fpr2/3-deficient mice show a distinct profile of behaviour characterised by reduced anxiety in the marble burying and light-dark box paradigms, increased exploratory behaviour in an open-field, together with superior performance on a novel object recognition test. Pharmacological blockade with a formyl peptide receptor antagonist, Boc2, in wild type mice reproduced most of the behavioural changes observed in the Fpr2/3(-/- mice, including a significant improvement in novel object discrimination and reduced anxiety in a light/dark shuttle test. These effects were associated with reduced FPR signalling in the gut as shown by the significant reduction in the levels of p-p38. Collectively, these findings suggest that homeostatic FPR signalling exerts a modulatory effect on anxiety-like behaviours. These findings thus suggest that therapies targeting FPRs may be a novel approach to ameliorate behavioural abnormalities present in neuropsychiatric disorders at the cognitive-emotional interface.

  17. Regulation of the formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1 gene in primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Gemperle

    Full Text Available The formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1 is mainly expressed by mammalian phagocytic leukocytes and plays a role in chemotaxis, killing of microorganisms through phagocytosis, and the generation of reactive oxygen species. A large number of ligands have been identified triggering FPR1 including formylated and non-formylated peptides of microbial and endogenous origin. While the expression of FPR1 in neutrophils has been investigated intensively, knowledge on the regulation of FPR1 expression in polarized macrophages is lacking. In this study we show that primary human neutrophils, monocytes and resting macrophages do express the receptor on their cell surface. Polarization of macrophages with IFNγ, LPS and with the TLR8 ligand 3M-002 further increases FPR1 mRNA levels but does not consistently increase protein expression or chemotaxis towards the FPR1 ligand fMLF. In contrast, polarization of primary human macrophages with IL-4 and IL-13 leading to the alternative activated macrophages, reduces FPR1 cell surface expression and abolishes chemotaxis towards fMLF. These results show that M2 macrophages will not react to triggering of FPR1, limiting the role for FPR1 to chemotaxis and superoxide production of resting and pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages.

  18. Patient-specific dosimetry in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkia, M T; Stefanoyiannis, A P; Chatziioannou, S N; Round, W H; Efstathopoulos, E P; Nikiforidis, G C

    2015-03-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) belong to a relatively rare class of neoplasms. Nonetheless, their prevalence has increased significantly during the last decades. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a relatively new treatment approach for inoperable or metastasised NETs. The therapeutic effect is based on the binding of radiolabelled somatostatin analogue peptides with NETs' somatostatin receptors, resulting in internal irradiation of tumours. Pre-therapeutic patient-specific dosimetry is essential to ensure that a treatment course has high levels of safety and efficacy. This paper reviews the methods applied for PRRT dosimetry, as well as the dosimetric results presented in the literature. Focus is given on data concerning the therapeutic somatostatin analogue radiopeptides (111)In-[DTPA(0),D-Phe(1)]-octreotide ((111)In-DTPA-octreotide), (90)Y-[DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]-octreotide ((90)Y-DOTATOC) and (177)Lu-[DOTA(0),Tyr(3),Thr(8)]-octreotide ((177)Lu-DOTATATE). Following the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee formalism, dosimetric analysis demonstrates large interpatient variability in tumour and organ uptake, with kidneys and bone marrow being the critical organs. The results are dependent on the image acquisition and processing protocol, as well as the dosimetric imaging radiopharmaceutical.

  19. [Critical role of peptidic toxins in the functional and structural analysis of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchart-Gaillard, Carole; Ménez, André; Servent, Denis

    2005-01-01

    Animal toxins which interact on various receptors and channels have been often used in the studies of the functional roles of these targets. Nicotinic toxins have been purified from snake and cone venoms and are characterized by high affinity and various selectivity of interactions on the different nicotinic receptors subtypes. Since 30 years they have been used as molecular probes to identify, localize and purify these receptors. Furthermore, they have played a crucial role in the better understanding of their functional properties and have been useful in their structural studies. These peptidic toxins could be chemically synthetized or recombinantly expressed and nonnatural residues could be introduced in their sequences in order to delineate their functional interaction sites. The structural modelisation of toxin-nAChR interaction allows us to understand the antagonistic property of these toxins and open the way to the design of engineered ligands with predetermined specificity, useful as pharmacological tools or therapeutic agents in the numerous diseases involving this receptor family.

  20. Involvement of GABA and opioid peptide receptors in sevoflurane-induced antinociception in rat spinal cord

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-wei WANG; Xiao-ming DENG; Xin-min YOU; Shu-xiao LIU; Zhi-qi ZHAO

    2005-01-01

    Aim: The spinal cord is pivotal in immobility induced by volatile anesthetics because the anesthetics depress the activity of motor neurons in the spinal cord.The aim of this study was to observe the effects of sevoflurane on pain processing at the spinal level. Methods: The firing of the gastrocnemius muscle was evoked by electrical stimulation to the ipsilateral hindpaw in rats. The nociceptive C response of electromyography (EMG)was selected to study. The GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (0.1 mg/kg) and opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (0.4 mg/kg) were administered intravenously, either in the presence or in the absence of 1.0% sevoflurane. Results: In rats with transected spinal cord,sevoflurane produced a profound reduction in the C response in a dose- and timedependent manner. In the presence of 1.0% sevoflurane, the C responses were increased after injections of bicuculline and naloxone. Conclusion: Sevoflurane is a volatile anesthetic that acts directly on the spinal cord to suppress the nociceptive reflex. The sevoflurane-induced suppression of the C response is antagonized by either bicuculline or naloxone. The results suggest that spinal GABAA receptors and opioid peptide receptors are involved in the sevoflurane-induced suppression of spinal nociception.

  1. A peptide antagonist of the ErbB1 receptor inhibits receptor activation, tumor cell growth and migration in vitro and xenograft tumor growth in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Ruodan; Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard; Soroka, Vladislav

    2010-01-01

    B1 phosphorylation, cell growth, and migration in two human tumor cell lines, A549 and HN5, expressing moderate and high ErbB1 levels, respectively. Furthermore, we show that Inherbin3 inhibits tumor growth in vivo and induces apoptosis in a tumor xenograft model employing the human non-small cell...... lung cancer cell line A549. The Inherbin3 peptide may be a useful tool for investigating the mechanisms of ErbB receptor homo- and heterodimerization. Moreover, the here described biological effects of Inherbin3 suggest that peptide-based targeting of ErbB receptor dimerization is a promising anti...

  2. Stimulation of human formyl peptide receptors by calpain inhibitors: homology modeling of receptors and ligand docking simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hisakazu; Kato, Takayuki; Watanabe, Norifumi; Takahashi, Tatsuji; Kitagawa, Seiichi

    2011-12-15

    Calpain inhibitors, including peptide aldehydes (N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-Nle-CHO and N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-Met-CHO) and α-mercapto-acrylic acid derivatives (PD150606 and PD151746), have been shown to stimulate phagocyte functions via activation of human formyl peptide receptor (hFPR) and/or hFPR-like 1 (hFPRL1). Using the homology modeling of the receptors and the ligand docking simulation, here we show that these calpain inhibitors could bind to the putative N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF) binding site on hFPR and/or hFPRL1. The studies with HEK-293 cells stably expressing hFPR or hFPRL1 showed that the concentrations of calpain inhibitors required to induce an increase in cytoplasmic free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) was much higher (>100 folds) than those of fMLF and Trp-Lys-Tyr-Met-Val-D-Met (WKYMVm). HEK-293 cells expressing hFPR or hFPRL1 with the mutated fMLF binding site never exhibited the [Ca(2+)](i) response to calpain inhibitors. When the optimal concentrations of each stimulus were used, pretreatment of cells with fMLF or WKYMVm abolished an increase in [Ca(2+)](i) induced by calpain inhibitors as well as the same stimulus, whereas pretreatment of cells with calpain inhibitors significantly suppressed, but never abolished, the [Ca(2+)](i) response induced by fMLF or WKYMVm, suggesting that the binding affinity of the inhibitors to the putative fMLF binding site may be lower than that of fMLF or WKYMVm. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Receptors involved in moxonidine-stimulated atrial natriuretic peptide release from isolated normotensive rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaddam-Daher, Suhayla; Menaouar, Ahmed; Gutkowska, Jolanta

    2006-07-10

    Imidazoline I1-receptors are present in the heart and may be involved in atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release. The following studies investigated whether moxonidine (an antihypertensive imidazoline I1-receptor and alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist) acts directly on the heart to stimulate ANP release, and to characterize the receptor type involved in this action. Perfusion of rat (200-225 g) isolated hearts with moxonidine (10(-6) and 10(-5) M), for 30 min, resulted in ANP release (83+/-29 and 277+/-70 ng/30 min, above basal, respectively), significantly (Palpha1-adrenoceptors), and prazosin (alpha1>alpha2-adrenoceptors), but increased by rauwolscine (alpha2-adrenoceptors). Perfusion with 10(-5) M brimonidine (full alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist) inhibited moxonidine-stimulated ANP release. Similarly, moxonidine (10(-6) M) tended to reduce coronary flow, but significantly increased coronary flow in the presence of brimonidine, which was vasoconstrictive when perfused alone. Coronary flow was reduced by 10(-5) M each, brimonidine>clonidine>moxonidine; while similar bradycardia was observed with clonidine and moxonidine, but not with brimonidine. In conclusion, these results argue in favor of moxonidine acting primarily on imidazoline I1-receptors to release ANP, with both alpha2-adrenoceptor and imidazoline I1-receptors exerting inhibitory inter-relation. In contrast, the coronary vasodilatory effect of moxonidine requires full activation of alpha2-adrenoceptor. The sympatholytic and ANP-releasing effects of moxonidine appear to be mediated by cardiac imidazoline receptors that may be differentially localized. Most importantly, moxonidine can stimulate ANP release from the heart without contribution of the central nervous system.

  4. AT2 receptor non-peptide agonist C21 promotes natriuresis in obese Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Quaisar; Hussain, Tahir

    2012-06-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that angiotensin II type 2 (AT(2)) receptors have a role in natriuresis in obese Zucker rats (OZR). In the present study, we investigated the role of a novel, non-peptide agonist, C21, in natriuresis via AT(2) receptor activation in OZR. Infusion of C21 (1 and 5 μg kg(-1) min(-1)) into rats under anesthesia caused a dose-dependent increase in urine flow (UF) and urinary Na volume (U(Na)V). These effects of C21 were blocked by pre-infusion of the AT(2) receptor antagonist, PD123319, (50 μg kg(-1) min(-1)), suggesting involvement of the AT(2) receptor. Infusion of C21 (5 μg kg(-1) min(-1)) significantly increased the fractional excretion of sodium without changing the glomerular filtration rate or blood pressure, suggesting a tubular effect. Similarly, C21 infusion increased the fractional excretion of lithium, suggesting a proximal tubular effect. Furthermore, we tested the effect of C21 on natriuresis after blocking two main, distal-nephron Na transporters, the epithelial Na channels (ENaC), with amiloride (AM, 3 mg kg(-1) body wt), and the NaCl cotransporters (NCC), with bendroflumethiazide (BFTZ, 7 mg kg(-1) body wt). Infusion of AM + BFTZ caused significant increases in both diuresis and natriuresis, which were further increased by infusion of C21 (5 μg kg(-1) min(-1)). Natriuresis in response to C21 was associated with increases in urinary NO and cGMP levels. The data indicate that the AT(2) receptor agonist, C21, promotes natriuresis via AT(2) receptor activation and that this effect is potentially based in the proximal tubules and linked to the nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway. The natriuretic response to C21 may have therapeutic significance by improving kidney function in obesity.

  5. Wound healing of intestinal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masahiro Iizuka; Shiho Konno

    2011-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) form a selective permeability barrier separating luminal content from underlying tissues. Upon injury, the intestinal epithelium undergoes a wound healing process. Intestinal wound healing is dependent on the balance of three cellular events;restitution, proliferation, and differentiation of epithelial cells adjacent to the wounded area. Previous studies have shown that various regulatory peptides, including growth factors and cytokines, modulate intestinal epithelial wound healing. Recent studies have revealed that novel factors, which include toll-like receptors (TLRs), regulatory peptides, particular dietary factors, and some gastroprotective agents, also modulate intestinal epithelial wound repair. Among these factors, the activation of TLRs by commensal bacteria is suggested to play an essential role in the maintenance of gut homeostasis. Recent studies suggest that mutations and dysregulation of TLRs could be major contributing factors in the predisposition and perpetuation of inflammatory bowel disease. Additionally, studies have shown that specific signaling pathways are involved in IEC wound repair. In this review, we summarize the function of IECs, the process of intestinal epithelial wound healing, and the functions and mechanisms of the various factors that contribute to gut homeostasis and intestinal epithelial wound healing.

  6. HIV-1 envelope gp41 peptides promote migration of human Fc epsilon RI+ cells and inhibit IL-13 synthesis through interaction with formyl peptide receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paulis, Amato; Florio, Giovanni; Prevete, Nella; Triggiani, Massimo; Fiorentino, Isabella; Genovese, Arturo; Marone, Gianni

    2002-10-15

    We evaluated the effects of synthetic peptides (2017, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2023, 2027, 2029, 2030, 2031, and 2035) encompassing the structure of HIV-1(MN) envelope gp41 on both chemotaxis of human basophils and the release of preformed mediators (histamine) and of cytokines (IL-13). Peptides 2019 and 2021 were potent basophil chemoattractants, whereas the other peptides examined were ineffective. Preincubation of basophils with FMLP or gp41 2019 resulted in complete desensitization to a subsequent challenge with homologous stimulus. Incubation of basophils with low concentration (5 x 10(-7) M) of FMLP, which binds with high affinity to N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR), but not to FPR-like 1, did not affect the chemotactic response to a heterologous stimulus (gp41 2019). In contrast, a high concentration (10(-4) M) of FMLP, which binds also to FPR-like 1, significantly reduced the chemotactic response to gp41 2019. The FPR antagonist cyclosporin H inhibited chemotaxis induced by FMLP, but not by gp41 2019. None of these peptides singly induced the release of histamine or cytokines (IL-4 and IL-13) from basophils. However, low concentrations of peptides 2019 and 2021 (10(-8)-10(-6) M) inhibited histamine release from basophils challenged with FMLP but not the secretion caused by anti-IgE and gp120. Preincubation of basophils with peptides 2019 and 2021 inhibited the expression of both IL-13 mRNA, and the FMLP-induced release of IL-13 from basophils. These data highlight the complexity of the interactions between viral and bacterial peptides with FPR subtypes on human basophils.

  7. Cathepsin G-regulated release of formyl peptide receptor agonists modulate neutrophil effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloszynek, Josh C; Hu, Ying; Pham, Christine T N

    2012-10-05

    Neutrophil serine proteases play an important role in inflammation by modulating neutrophil effector functions. We have previously shown that neutrophils deficient in the serine proteases cathepsin G and neutrophil elastase (CG/NE neutrophils) exhibit severe defects in chemokine CXCL2 release and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production when activated on immobilized immune complex. Exogenously added active CG rescues these defects, but the mechanism remains undefined. Using a protease-based proteomic approach, we found that, in vitro, the addition of exogenous CG to immune complex-stimulated CG/NE neutrophils led to a decrease in the level of cell-associated annexin A1 (AnxA1) and cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP), both known inflammatory mediators. We further confirmed that, in vivo, CG was required for the extracellular release of AnxA1 and CRAMP in a subcutaneous air pouch model. In vitro, CG efficiently cleaved AnxA1, releasing the active N-terminal peptide Ac2-26, and processed CRAMP in limited fashion. Ac2-26 and CRAMP peptides enhanced the release of CXCL2 by CG/NE neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner via formyl peptide receptor (FPR) stimulation. Blockade of FPRs by an antagonist, Boc2 (t-Boc-Phe-d-Leu-Phe-d-Leu-Phe), abrogates CXCL2 release, whereas addition of FPR agonists, fMLF and F2L, relieves Boc2 inhibition. Furthermore, the addition of active CG, but not inactive CG, also relieves Boc2 inhibition. These findings suggest that CG modulates neutrophil effector functions partly by controlling the release (and proteolysis) of FPR agonists. Unexpectedly, we found that mature CRAMP, but not Ac2-26, induced ROS production through an FPR-independent pathway.

  8. Targeted Delivery of siRNA to Transferrin Receptor Overexpressing Tumor Cells via Peptide Modified Polyethylenimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuran Xie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of small interference RNA (siRNA to target oncogenes is a promising treatment approach for cancer. However, siRNA cancer therapies are hindered by poor delivery of siRNA to cancer cells. Transferrin receptor (TfR is overexpressed in many types of tumor cells and therefore is a potential target for the selective delivery of siRNA to cancer cells. Here, we used the TfR binding peptide HAIYPRH (HAI peptide conjugated to cationic polymer branched polyethylenimine (bPEI, optimized the coupling strategy, and the TfR selective delivery of siRNA was evaluated in cells with high (H1299 and low TfR expression (A549 and H460. The HAI-bPEI conjugate exhibited chemico-physical properties in terms of size, zeta-potential, and siRNA condensation efficiency similar to unmodified bPEI. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry results revealed that HAI-bPEI selectively delivered siRNA to H1299 cells compared with A549 or H460 cells. Moreover, HAI-bPEI achieved more efficient glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH gene knockdown in H1299 cells compared with bPEI alone. However, despite optimization of the targeting peptide and coupling strategy, HAI-bPEI can only silence reporter gene enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP at the protein level when chloroquine is present, indicating that further optimization of the conjugate is required. In conclusion, the HAI peptide may be useful to target TfR overexpressing tumors in targeted gene and siRNA delivery approaches.

  9. Steviol glycoside rebaudioside A induces glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY release in a porcine ex vivo intestinal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripken, D.; Wielen, van der N.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Meijerink, J.; Witkamp, R.F.; Hendriks, H.F.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) are hormones important for satiation and are involved in the process called "ileal brake". The aim of this study was to investigate the GLP-1- and PYY-stimulating efficacy of rebaudioside A, casein, and sucrose. This was studied using tissue segme

  10. Steviol Glycoside Rebaudioside A Induces Glucagon-like Peptide-1 and Peptide YY Release in a Porcine ex Vivo Intestinal Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripken, D.; Wielen, N. van der; Wortelboer, H.M.; Meijerink, J.; Witkamp, R.F.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) are hormones important for satiation and are involved in the process called “ileal brake”. The aim of this study was to investigate the GLP-1- and PYY-stimulating efficacy of rebaudioside A, casein, and sucrose. This was studied using tissue segme

  11. A strategy using NMR peptide structures of thromboxane A2 receptor as templates to construct ligand-recognition pocket of prostacyclin receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruan Ke-He

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Prostacyclin receptor (IP and thromboxane A2 receptor (TP belong to rhodopsin-type G protein-coupling receptors and respectively bind to prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 derived from arachidonic acid. Recently, we have determined the extracellular loop (eLP structures of the human TP receptor by 2-D 1H NMR spectroscopy using constrained peptides mimicking the individual eLP segments. The studies have identified the segment along with several residues in the eLP domains important to ligand recognition, as well as proposed a ligand recognition pocket for the TP receptor. Results: The IP receptor shares a similar primary structure in the eLPs with those of the TP receptor. Forty percent residues in the second eLPs of the receptors are identical, which is the major region involved in forming the ligand recognition pocket in the TP receptor. Based on the high homology score, the eLP domains of the IP receptor were constructed by the homology modeling approach using the NMR structures of the TP eLPs as templates, and then configured to the seven transmembrane (TM domains model constructed using the crystal structure of the bovine rhodopsin as a template. A NMR structure of iloprost was docked into the modeled IP ligand recognition pocket. After dynamic studies, the segments and residues involved in the IP ligand recognition were proposed. A key residue, Arg173 involved in the ligand recognition for the IP receptor, as predicted from the modeling, was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. Conclusion: A 3-D model of the human IP receptor was constructed by homology modeling using the crystal structure of bovine rhodopsin TM domains and the NMR structures of the synthetic constrained peptides of the eLP domains of the TP receptor as templates. This strategy can be applied to molecular modeling and the prediction of ligand recognition pockets for other prostanoid receptors.

  12. Prolonged signaling at the parathyroid hormone receptor by peptide ligands targeted to a specific receptor conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Makoto; Ferrandon, Sebastien; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Bouxsein, Mary L; Potts, John T; Gardella, Thomas J

    2008-10-28

    The parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) is a class B G protein-coupled receptor that plays critical roles in bone and mineral ion metabolism. Ligand binding to the PTHR involves interactions to both the amino-terminal extracellular (N) domain, and transmembrane/extracellular loop, or juxtamembrane (J) regions of the receptor. Recently, we found that PTH(1-34), but not PTH-related protein, PTHrP(1-36), or M-PTH(1-14) (M = Ala/Aib(1),Aib(3),Gln(10),Har(11),Ala(12),Trp(14),Arg(19)), binds to the PTHR in a largely GTPgammaS-resistant fashion, suggesting selective binding to a novel, high-affinity conformation (R(0)), distinct from the GTPgammaS-sensitive conformation (RG). We examined the effects in vitro and in vivo of introducing the M substitutions, which enhance interaction to the J domain, into PTH analogs extended C-terminally to incorporate residues involved in the N domain interaction. As compared with PTH(1-34), M-PTH(1-28) and M-PTH(1-34) bound to R(0) with higher affinity, produced more sustained cAMP responses in cells, formed more stable complexes with the PTHR in FRET and subcellular localization assays, and induced more prolonged calcemic and phosphate responses in mice. Moreover, after 2 weeks of daily injection in mice, M-PTH(1-34) induced larger increases in trabecular bone volume and greater increases in cortical bone turnover, than did PTH(1-34). Thus, the putative R(0) PTHR conformation can form highly stable complexes with certain PTH ligand analogs and thereby mediate surprisingly prolonged signaling responses in bone and/or kidney PTH target cells. Controlling, via ligand analog design, the selectivity with which a PTH ligand binds to R(0), versus RG, may be a strategy for optimizing signaling duration time, and hence therapeutic efficacy, of PTHR agonist ligands.

  13. Current status of rational design of pro-drugs targeting the intestinal di/tri-peptide transporter hPEPT1 (SLC15A1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saaby, Lasse; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Steffansen, Bente;

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal di/tri-peptide transporter hPEPT1 has broad substrate specificity, accommodating uptake of the majority of investigated di- and tripeptides, as well as of a number of drug compounds. This transport system has a high capacity and it has been hypothesized that hPEPT1-mediated uptake ...... in the field, the present review aims at giving a brief overview of structure-activity relationships for hPEPT1, and to provide a critical evaluation of whether hPEPT1-targeted prodrugs can be rationally designed....

  14. The role of formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapkov, Igor; Öqvist, Carl Otto; Figenschau, Yngve; Kogner, Per; Johnsen, John Inge; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur

    2016-07-18

    Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor mainly expressed by the cells of myeloid origin, where it mediates the innate immune response to bacterial formylated peptides. High expression of FPR1 has been detected in various cancers but the function of FPR1 in tumorigenesis is poorly understood. Expression of FPR1 in neuroblastoma cell lines and primary tumors was studied using RT-PCR, western blotting, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. Calcium mobilization assays and western blots with phospho-specific antibodies were used to assess the functional activity of FPR1 in neuroblastoma. The tumorigenic capacity of FPR1 was assessed by xenografting of neuroblastoma cells expressing inducible FPR1 shRNA, FPR1 cDNA or control shRNA in nude mice. FPR1 is expressed in neuroblastoma primary tumors and cell lines. High expression of FPR1 corresponds with high-risk disease and poor patient survival. Stimulation of FPR1 in neuroblastoma cells using fMLP, a selective FPR1 agonist, induced intracellular calcium mobilization and activation of MAPK/Erk, PI3K/Akt and P38-MAPK signal transduction pathways that were inhibited by using Cyclosporin H, a selective receptor antagonist for FPR1. shRNA knock-down of FPR1 in neuroblastoma cells conferred a delayed xenograft tumor development in nude mice, whereas an ectopic overexpression of FPR1 promoted augmented tumorigenesis in nude mice. Our data demonstrate that FPR1 is involved in neuroblastoma development and could represent a therapy option for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  15. Peptide receptor chemoradionuclide therapy in small cell carcinoma: from bench to bedside

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewin, Jeremy; Rao, Aparna; Mileshkin, Linda [Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Cullinane, Carleen [Division of Cancer Research, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The University of Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Akhurst, Tim; Eu, Peter [Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Waldeck, Kelly [Division of Cancer Research, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Watkins, D.N. [Monash University, Monash Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The University of Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Small cell cancers (SmCC), whether pulmonary (SCLC) or extrapulmonary, have a poor prognosis unless localised at diagnosis. Given a proportion of these cancers express somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2), we aimed to investigate the efficacy of targeted peptide receptor chemoradionuclide therapy (PRCRT). In this preclinical study, we used a SCLC xenograft mouse model with high expression of SSTR2 to investigate the effect of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with chemotherapy compared to either alone. We subsequently explored the clinical utility in a patient with SmCC with high SSTR expression treated with PRCRT. Robust expression of SSTR2 in NCI-H69 SCLC xenografts was documented by {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotate (GaTate) (tumour to background uptake ratio = 35). The combination of PRRT using {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-octreotate (LuTate) with carboplatin/etoposide (C/E) chemotherapy was more effective than either LuTate or C/E alone for regression of the NCI-H69 model (p value < 0.05). PRCRT was associated with significantly prolonged survival versus PRRT (p value = 0.0001) or chemotherapy alone (p value = 0.0058). In the subsequent case study, a patient with relapsed SmCC with high SSTR2 expression on GaTate PET underwent PRCRT with radiosensitising etoposide with evidence of a complete metabolic response for 4 months. Given the limited treatment options in this setting, PRCRT is a promising therapeutic option for SSTR2-expressing SmCC. (orig.)

  16. Effects of Food Components That Activate TRPA1 Receptors on Mucosal Ion Transport in the Mouse Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fothergill, Linda J; Callaghan, Brid; Rivera, Leni R; Lieu, TinaMarie; Poole, Daniel P; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Bravo, David M; Furness, John B

    2016-10-10

    TRPA1 is a ligand-activated cation channel found in the intestine and other tissues. Components of food that stimulate TRPA1 receptors (phytonutrients) include allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamaldehyde and linalool, but these may also act at other receptors. Cells lining the intestinal mucosa are immunoreactive for TRPA1 and Trpa1 mRNA occurs in mucosal extracts, suggesting that the TRPA1 receptor is the target for these agonists. However, in situ hybridisation reveals Trpa1 expression in 5-HT containing enteroendocrine cells, not enterocytes. TRPA1 agonists evoke mucosal secretion, which may be indirect (through release of 5-HT) or direct by activation of enterocytes. We investigated effects of the phytonutrients on transmucosal ion currents in mouse duodenum and colon, and the specificity of the phytonutrients in cells transfected with Trpa1, and in Trpa1-deficient mice. The phytonutrients increased currents in the duodenum with the relative potencies: allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) > cinnamaldehyde > linalool (0.1 to 300 μM). The rank order was similar in the colon, but linalool was ineffective. Responses to AITC were reduced by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 (100 μM), and were greatly diminished in Trpa1-/- duodenum and colon. Responses were not reduced by tetrodotoxin, 5-HT receptor antagonists, or atropine, but inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis reduced responses. Thus, functional TRPA1 channels are expressed by enterocytes of the duodenum and colon. Activation of enterocyte TRPA1 by food components has the potential to facilitate nutrient absorption.

  17. Sustained glucagon-like peptide-2 infusion is required for intestinal adaptation, and cessation reverses increased cellularity in rats with intestinal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopmann, Matthew C; Chen, Xueyan; Holst, Jens Juul

    2010-01-01

    in a rat model of human SBS that results in intestinal failure requiring total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Rats underwent 60% jejunoileal resection plus cecectomy and jugular vein cannulation and were maintained exclusively with TPN for 18 days in these treatments: TPN control (no GLP-2); sustained GLP-2...

  18. Acute Effects of the Glucagon-Like Peptide 2 Analogue, Teduglutide, on Intestinal Adaptation in Short Bowel Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thymann, Thomas; Stoll, B.; Mecklenburg, L.;

    2014-01-01

    objective was to test the efficacy of the long-acting synthetic human GLP-2 analogue, teduglutide (ALX-0600), in a neonatal piglet jejunostomy model. Two-day-old pigs were subjected to resection of 50% of the small intestine (distal part), and the remnant intestine was exteriorized on the abdominal wall...

  19. Heart specific up-regulation of genes for B-type and C-type natriuretic peptide receptors in diabetic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Christina; Bartels, E D; Nielsen, L B

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes may cause cardiomyopathy characterized by cardiac fibrosis. Recent studies of genetically modified mice have elucidated a role of the natriuretic peptides (NP), type-A and type-B (ANP and BNP), and their common receptor [natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR), type-A] in development of cardi...

  20. Expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor contributes to the establishment of intestinal microbial community structure in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Iain A.; Nichols, Robert G.; Zhang, Limin; Patterson, Andrew D.; Perdew, Gary H.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental and genetic factors represent key components in the establishment/maintenance of the intestinal microbiota. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is emerging as a pleiotropic factor, modulating pathways beyond its established role as a xenobiotic sensor. The AHR is known to regulate immune surveillance within the intestine through retention of intraepithelial lymphocytes, functional redistribution of Th17/Treg balance. Consequently, environmental/genetic manipulation of AHR activity likely influences host-microbe homeostasis. Utilizing C57BL6/J Ahr−/+ and Ahr−/− co-housed littermates followed by 18 days of genotypic segregation, we examined the influence of AHR expression upon intestinal microbe composition/functionality and host physiology. 16S sequencing/quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed significant changes in phyla abundance, particularly Verrucomicrobia together with segmented filamentous bacteria, and an increase in species diversity in Ahr−/− mice following genotypic segregation. Metagenomics/metabolomics indicate microbial composition is associated with functional shifts in bacterial metabolism. Analysis identified Ahr−/−-dependent increases in ileal gene expression, indicating increased inflammatory tone. Transfer of Ahr−/− microbiota to wild-type germ-free mice recapitulated the increase Verrucomicrobia and inflammatory tone, indicating Ahr−/−-microbial dependence. These data suggest a role for the AHR in influencing the community structure of the intestinal microbiota. PMID:27659481

  1. Inhibitory modulation of CART peptides in accumbal neuron through decreasing interaction of CaMKIIα with dopamine D3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhenyu; Zhang, Dalei; Ying, Ying; Yan, Min; Yang, Jianhua; Xu, Fangyun; Oh, Kiwan; Hu, Zhenzhen

    2014-04-04

    Previous studies in rats have shown that microinjections of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide into the nucleus accumbens (NAc; the area of the brain that mediates drug reward and reinforcement) attenuate the locomotor effects of psychostimulants. CART peptide has also been shown to induce decreased intracellular concentrations of calcium (Ca(2+)) in primary cultures of hippocampus neurons. The purpose of this study was to characterize the interaction of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinases (CaMKIIα) with dopamine D3 (D3) receptors (R) in primary cultures of accumbal neurons. This interaction is involved in inhibitory modulation of CART peptides. In vitro, CART (55-102) peptide (0.1, 0.5 or 1μM) was found to dose-dependently inhibit K(+) depolarization-elicited Ca(2+) influx and CaMKIIα phosphorylation in accumbal neurons. Moreover, CART peptides were also found to block cocaine (1μM)-induced Ca(2+) influx, CaMKIIα phosphorylation, CaMKIIα-D3R interaction, and CREB phosphorylation. In vivo, repeated microinjections of CART (55-102) peptide (2μg/1μl/side) into the NAc over a 5-day period had no effect on behavioral activity but blocked cocaine-induced locomotor activity. These results indicate that D3R function in accumbal neurons is a target of CART (55-102) peptide and suggest that CART peptide by dephosphorylating limbic D3Rs may have potential as a treatment for cocaine abuse.

  2. Delayed cardioprotection is mediated via a non-peptide delta opioid agonist, SNC-121, independent of opioid receptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hemal H; Hsu, Anna; Gross, Garrett J

    2004-01-01

    Acute cardioprotection is mediated primarily through delta opioid receptor stimulation independent of micro or kappa opioid receptor stimulation. Delayed cardioprotection is mediated by delta opioid receptor agonists but ambiguity remains about direct receptor involvement. Therefore, we investigated the potential of SNC-121, a non-peptide delta opioid agonist, to produce delayed cardioprotection and characterized the role of opioid receptors in this delayed response. All rats underwent 30 minutes of ischemia followed by 2 hours of reperfusion. SNC-121 induced a significant delayed cardioprotective effect. To determine the nature of this SNC-121-induced delayed cardioprotection, rats were treated with specific opioids receptor antagonists and underwent pertussis toxin (PT) treatment prior to opioid agonist stimulation. Control rats were injected with saline and allowed to recover for 24 hours. Pretreatment and early treatment with opioid receptor antagonists failed to inhibit the delayed protective effects of SNC-121, as did pretreatment with PT. Treatment with a free radical scavenger, 2-mercaptopropionyl glycine, at the time of opioid stimulation attenuated the delayed cardioprotective effects of SNC-121. These data suggest that delayed cardioprotection is stimulated via non-peptide delta opioid agonists by a mechanism unrelated to opioid receptor activation. The mechanism appears to be a non-opioid receptor mediated production of reactive oxygen species that triggers the signaling cascade leading to delayed cardioprotection.

  3. Design of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist for Diabetes Mellitus from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Chieh Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 is a promising target for diabetes mellitus (DM therapy and reduces the occurrence of diabetes due to obesity. However, GLP-1 will be hydrolyzed soon by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4. We tried to design small molecular drugs for GLP-1 receptor agonist from the world's largest traditional Chinese medicine (TCM Database@Taiwan. According to docking results of virtual screening, we selected 2 TCM compounds, wenyujinoside and 28-deglucosylchikusetsusaponin IV, for further molecular dynamics (MD simulation. GLP-1 was assigned as the control compound. Based on the results of root mean square deviation (RMSD, solvent accessible surface (SAS, mean square deviation (MSD, Gyrate, total energy, root mean square fluctuation (RMSF, matrices of smallest distance of residues, database of secondary structure assignment (DSSP, cluster analysis, and distance of H-bond, we concluded that all the 3 compounds could bind and activate GLP-1 receptor by computational simulation. Wenyujinoside and 28-deglucosylchikusetsusaponin IV were the TCM compounds that could be GLP-1 receptor agonists.

  4. A Review on the Association between Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists and Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yih Chiu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a concern on the risk of thyroid cancer associated with glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 analogs including liraglutide and exenatide. In this article, we review related experimental studies, clinical trials and observational human studies currently available. In rodents, liraglutide activated the GLP-1 receptors on C-cells, causing an increased incidence of C-cell neoplasia. Animal experiments with monkeys demonstrated no increase in calcitonin release and no C-cell proliferation after long-term liraglutide administration. Longitudinal 2-year data from clinical trials do not support any significant risk for the activation or growth of C-cell cancer in humans in response to liraglutide. However, an analysis of the FDA adverse event reporting system database suggested an increased risk for thyroid cancer associated with exenatide after its marketing. Noticeably, a recent study discovered that GLP-1 receptor could also be expressed in human papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC, but the impact of GLP-1 analogs on PTC is not known. Therefore, GLP-1 analogs might increase the risk of thyroid C-cell pathology in rodents, but its risk in humans awaits confirmation. Since GLP-1 receptor is also expressed in PTC besides C-cells, it is important to investigate the actions of GLP-1 on different subtypes of thyroid cancer in the future.

  5. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Agonists for Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnen, Deborah

    2017-08-01

    The incretin system has become an important target in the treatment of type 2 diabetes in recent years, and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is of particular interest for its glucose-lowering effects. The physiological response to oral ingestion of nutrients, involving the incretin system, is reduced in some patients with type 2 diabetes but may be augmented by administration of GLP-1 receptor agonists. The GLP-1 receptor agonists currently approved in the United States for the treatment of type 2 diabetes include exenatide (administered twice daily), liraglutide and lixisenatide (administered once daily), and the once-weekly agents exenatide extended-release, albiglutide, and dulaglutide. These agents have been shown to reduce A1C (by ∼0.8-1.6%), body weight (by ∼1-3 kg), blood pressure, and lipids. GLP-1 receptor agonists are associated with a low risk of hypoglycemia, and the most common adverse effects are gastrointestinal. Proper patient selection and education can assist in achieving positive treatment outcomes.

  6. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC in recurrent meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolomei, Mirco; Bodei, Lisa; De Cicco, Concetta; Grana, Chiara Maria; Baio, Silvia Melania; Arico, Demetrio; Paganelli, Giovanni [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Cremonesi, Marta [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, Milan (Italy); Botteri, Edoardo [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Milan (Italy); Sansovini, Maddalena [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (I.R.S.T.), Radiometabolic Medicine Division, Meldola (Italy)

    2009-09-15

    Meningiomas are generally benign and in most cases surgery is curative. However, for high-grade histotypes or partially resected tumours, recurrence is fairly common. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is usually given in such cases but is not always effective. We assessed peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC in a group of patients with meningioma recurring after standard treatments in all of whom somatostatin receptors were strongly expressed on meningioma cell surfaces. Twenty-nine patients with scintigraphically proven somatostatin subtype 2 receptor-positive meningiomas were enrolled: 14 had benign (grade I), 9 had atypical (grade II) and 6 had malignant (grade III) disease. Patients received intravenous {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC for 2-6 cycles for a cumulative dose in the range of 5-15 GBq. Clinical and neuroradiological evaluations were performed at baseline, during and after PRRT. The treatment was well tolerated in all patients. MRI 3 months after treatment completion showed disease stabilization in 19 of 29 patients (66%) and progressive disease in the remaining 10 (34%). Better results were obtained in patients with grade I meningioma than in those with grade II-III, with median time to progression (from beginning PRRT) of 61 months in the low-grade group and 13 months in the high-grade group. PRRT with {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC can interfere with the growth of meningiomas. The adjuvant role of this treatment, soon after surgery, especially in atypical and malignant histotypes, deserves further investigation. (orig.)

  7. Imidazoline receptors in the heart: a novel target and a novel mechanism of action that involves atrial natriuretic peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mukaddam-Daher

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stimulation of sympathetic nervous activity contributes to the development and maintenance of hypertension, leading to left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH, arrhythmias and cardiac death. Moxonidine, an imidazoline antihypertensive compound that preferentially activates imidazoline receptors in brainstem rostroventrolateral medulla, suppresses sympathetic activation and reverses LVH. We have identified imidazoline receptors in the heart atria and ventricles, and shown that atrial I1-receptors are up-regulated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, and ventricular I1-receptors are up-regulated in hamster and human heart failure. Furthermore, cardiac I1-receptor binding decreased after chronic in vivo exposure to moxonidine. These studies implied that cardiac I1-receptors are involved in cardiovascular regulation. The presence of I1-receptors in the heart, the primary site of production of natriuretic peptides, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP, cardiac hormones implicated in blood pressure control and cardioprotection, led us to propose that ANP may be involved in the actions of moxonidine. In fact, acute iv administration of moxonidine (50 to 150 µg/rat dose-dependently decreased blood pressure, stimulated diuresis and natriuresis and increased plasma ANP and its second messenger, cGMP. Chronic SHR treatment with moxonidine (0, 60 and 120 µg kg-1 h-1, sc for 4 weeks dose-dependently decreased blood pressure, resulted in reversal of LVH and decreased ventricular interleukin 1ß concentration after 4 weeks of treatment. These effects were associated with a further increase in already elevated ANP and BNP synthesis and release (after 1 week, and normalization by 4 weeks. In conclusion, cardiac imidazoline receptors and natriuretic peptides may be involved in the acute and chronic effects of moxonidine.

  8. Advances in the research of the drugs targeting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor%胰高血糖素样肽-1受体靶向药物研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李彩娜; 申竹芳

    2009-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) ,a 30 amino-acid peptide,is an incretin secreted from the in-testinal L cells. It can bind to the GLP-1