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Sample records for intestinal interstitial cells

  1. Interstitial cells of Cajal in human small intestine. Ultrastructural identification and organization between the main smooth muscle layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johannes; Thuneberg, Lars

    1991-01-01

    Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, small intestine, gut motility, pacemaker cells, smooth muscle......Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, small intestine, gut motility, pacemaker cells, smooth muscle...

  2. Interstitial cells of Cajal and Auerbach's plexus. A scanning electron microscopical study of guinea-pig small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Harry; Thuneberg, Lars

    1991-01-01

    Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy......Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy...

  3. Bone Marrow Derivation of Interstitial Cells of Cajal in Small Intestine Following Intestinal Injury

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    Dengqun Liu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs in gastrointestinal tract are specialized cells serving as pacemaker cells. The origin of ICCs is currently not fully characterized. In this work, we aimed to study whether bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs could contribute to the origin of ICCs in the muscular plexus of small intestine using GFP-C57BL/6 chimeric mice.Engraftment of BMDCs in the intestine was investigated for GFP expression. GFP positive bone marrow mononuclear cells reached a proportion of 95.65%±3.72% at different times in chimerism. Donor-derived cells distributed widely in all the layers of the gastrointestinal tract. There were GFP positive BMDCs in the myenteric plexus, which resembled characteristics of ICCs, including myenteric location, c-Kit positive staining, and ramified morphology. Donor-derived ICCs in the myenteric plexus contributed to a percentage ranging 9.25%±4.9% of all the ICCs in the myenteric plexus. In conclusion, here we described that donor-derived BMDCs might differentiate into gastrointestinal ICCs after radiation injury, which provided an alternative source for the origin of the ICCs in the muscular plexus of adult intestine. These results further identified the plasticity of BMDCs and indicated therapeutic implications of BMDCs for the gastrointestinal dysmotility caused by ICCs disorders.

  4. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal associated with deep muscular plexus of human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Mikkelsen, H B; Thuneberg, L

    1992-01-01

    Evidence showing that interstitial cells of Cajal have important regulatory functions in the gut musculature is accumulating. In the current study, the ultrastructure of the deep muscular plexus and associated interstial cells of Cajal in human small intestine were studied to provide a reference...... a continuous basal lamina, caveolae, intermediate filaments, dense bodies, dense bands, and a well-developed subsurface smooth endoplasmic reticulum), but the arrangement of organelles was clearly different, and cisternae of granular endoplasmic reticulum were abundant. Interstitial cells of Cajal were......, and only few gap junctions with other interstitial cells of Cajal or with the musculature were observed. Compared with interstitial cells of Cajal from other mammals, those associated with the deep muscular plexus in the human small intestine more closely resemble smooth muscle cells...

  5. W/kit gene required for interstitial cells of Cajal and for intestinal pacemaker activity

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    Huizinga, J D; Thuneberg, L; Klüppel, M

    1995-01-01

    The pacemaker activity in the mammalian gut is responsible for generating anally propagating phasic contractions. The cellular basis for this intrinsic activity is unknown. The smooth muscle cells of the external muscle layers and the innervated cellular network of interstitial cells of Cajal......, which is closely associated with the external muscle layers of the mammalian gut, have both been proposed to stimulate pacemaker activity. The interstitial cells of Cajal were identified in the last century but their developmental origin and function have remained unclear. Here we show...... of Cajal associated with Auerbach's nerve plexus and intestinal pacemaker activity....

  6. Interstitial cells of Cajal in human small intestine. Ultrastructural identification and organization between the main smooth muscle layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Thuneberg, L

    1991-01-01

    with elastin fibers. The organization shown in this study strongly supports the concept of interstitial cells of Cajal as important regulatory cells also in the human small intestine. The characteristic cytology and organization of interstitial cells of Cajal may provide a basis for future morphological......Previous morphological and electrophysiological studies have supported the hypothesis that interstitial cells of Cajal have important regulatory (pacemaker) functions in the gut. In the current study, interstitial cells of Cajal associated with Auerbach's plexus in human small intestine were...... studied. Freshly resected intestine was examined by light and electron microscopy. The interstitial cells of Cajal resembled modified smooth muscle cells. They had caveolae and dense bodies, an incomplete basal lamina, a very well-developed smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and abundant intermediate (10 nm...

  7. Identification of interstitial cells of Cajal. Significance for studies of human small intestine and colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J

    1994-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) were described a century ago by Ramón y Cajal a.o. as primitive neurons in the intestines. In the period 1900-1960 a large number of light microscopical studies of ICC were published, in which ICC were identified by heir characteristic morphology. After 1960...... electron microscopical studies emphasized similarities between ICC and fibroblasts. In our early studies of ICC in the external musculature of mouse small intestine, we identified ICC by their characteristic morphology and topography, and we analyzed the relation between ICC, autonomic nerves and smooth...... muscle. These studies strongly suggested that ICC were fundamental regulators of external muscle function. These hypotheses have since been supported by independent morphological and electrophysiological evidence, strongly suggesting a pacemaker role of some ICC populations as well as other regulatory...

  8. Depolarizing Effects of Daikenchuto on Interstitial Cells of Cajal from Mouse Small Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungwoo; Kim, Hyun Jung; Yang, Dongki; Jung, Myeong Ho; Kim, Byung Joo

    2017-01-01

    Daikenchuto (DKT; TJ-100, TU-100), a traditional herbal medicineis used in modern medicine to treat gastrointestinal (GI) functional disorders. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are the pacemaker cells of the GI tract and play important roles in the regulation of GI motility. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of DKT on the pacemaker potentials (PPs) of cultured ICCs from murine small intestine. Enzymatic digestions were used to dissociate ICCs from mouse small intestine tissues. All experiments on ICCs were performed after 12 h of culture. The whole-cell patch-clamp configuration was used to record ICC PPs (current clamp mode). All experiments were performed at 30-32°C. In current-clamp modeDKT depolarized and concentration-dependently decreased the amplitudes of PPs. Y25130 (a 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist) or SB269970 (a 5-HT 7 receptor antagonist) did not block DKT-induced PP depolarization, but RS39604 (a 5-HT 4 receptor antagonist) did. Methoctramine (a muscarinic M 2 receptor antagonist) failed to block DKT-induced PP depolarization, but pretreating 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide (a muscarinic M 3 receptor antagonist) facilitated blockade of DKT-induced PP depolarization. Pretreatment with an external Ca 2+ -free solution or thapsigargin abolished PPsand under these conditions, DKT did not induce PP depolarization. Furthermore Ginseng radix and Zingiberis rhizomes depolarized PPs, whereas Zanthoxyli fructus fruit (the third component of DKT) hyperpolarized PPs. These results suggest that DKT depolarizes ICC PPs in an internal or external Ca 2+ -dependent manner by stimulating 5-HT 4 and M 3 receptors. Furthermore, the authors suspect that the component in DKT largely responsible for depolarization is probably also a component of Ginseng radix and Zingiberis rhizomes. Daikenchuto (DKT) depolarized and concentration-dependently decreased the amplitudes of pacemaker potentials (PPs)Y25130 (a 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist) or

  9. Modulation of Pacemaker Potentials by Pyungwi-San in Interstitial Cells of Cajal from Murine Small Intestine - Pyungwi-San and Interstitial Cells of Cajal -

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    Kim Jung Nam

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pyungwi-san (PWS plays a role in a number of physiologic and pharmacologic functions in many organs. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs are pacemaker cells that generate slow waves in the gastrointestinal (GI tract. We aimed to investigate the beneficial effects of PWS in mouse small-intestinal ICCs. Methods: Enzymatic digestion was used to dissociate ICCs from the small intestine of a mouse. The wholecell patch-clamp configuration was used to record membrane potentials from the cultured ICCs. Results: ICCs generated pacemaker potentials in the GI tract. PWS produced membrane depolarization in the current clamp mode. Pretreatment with a Ca2+-free solution and a thapsigargin, a Ca2+-ATPase, inhibitor in the endoplasmic reticulum, eliminated the generation of pacemaker potentials. However, only when the thapsigargin was applied in a bath solution, the membrane depolarization was not produced by PWS. Furthermore, the membrane depolarizations due to PWS were inhibited not by U-73122, an active phospholipase C inhibitor, but by chelerythrine and calphostin C, protein kinase C inhibitors. Conclusions: These results suggest that PWS might affect GI motility by modulating the pacemaker activity in the ICCs.

  10. Plexus muscularis profundus and associated interstitial cells. I. Light microscopical studies of mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Thuneberg, L

    1982-01-01

    The zinc iodide/osmic acid (ZIO) method was used in a modification that selectively stained nerves and associated interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) of muscularis externa. Due to its selectivity the method allowed a detailed stereoscopical analysis of whole mounts with respect to the topography an...

  11. Impact of the alterations in the interstitial cells of Cajal on intestinal motility in post-infection irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Zhou, Xu-Chun; Lan, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are basic components of gastrointestinal motility. However, changes in ICC and their role in post‑infection irritable bowel syndrome (PI‑IBS) remain to be elucidated. To observe the impact of alterations in the ICC on intestinal motility in a PI‑IBS mouse model, female C57BL\\6 mice were infected by the oral administration of 400 Trichinella spiralis larvae. The abdominal withdrawal reflex, intestine transportation time (ITT), grain numbers, Bristol scores, wet/dry weights and the percentage water content of the mice feces every 2 h were used to assess changes in the intestinal motor function. The intestines were excised and sectioned for pathological and histochemical examination. These intestines were also used to quantify the protein and mRNA expression of c‑kit. The C57BL\\6 mouse can act as a PI‑IBS model at day 56 post‑infection. Compared with the control mice, the ITT was shorter, the grain numbers, Bristol scores, wet weights and water contents of the mice feces were higher and the dry weights were unchanged in the PI‑IBS mice. The protein and mRNA expression levels of c‑kit were upregulated in the entire PI‑IBS mouse intestines. Following immunohistochemical staining, the increased number of c‑kit‑positive cells were detected predominantly in the submucosa and myenteron. These results suggested that the alterations of the ICC resulted in the changes of the intestinal motility patterns in the PI‑IBS mouse models induced by Trichinella spiralis infection, which may be the main mechanism underlying intestinal motility disorders in PI‑IBS.

  12. Total Glucosides of Paeony Promote Intestinal Motility in Slow Transit Constipation Rats through Amelioration of Interstitial Cells of Cajal.

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    Feiye Zhu

    Full Text Available Using an atropine-diphenoxylate-induced slow transit constipation (STC model, this study explored the effects of the total glucosides of paeony (TGP in the treatment of STC and the possible mechanisms.A prospective experimental animal study.The constipation model was set up in rats with an oral gavage of atropine-diphenoxylate and then treated with the TGP. The volume and moisture content of the faeces were observed and the intestinal kinetic power was evaluated. Meanwhile, the colorimetric method and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were employed to determine the changes of nitric oxide (NO, nitric oxide synthase (NOS, vasoative intestinal peptide (VIP and the P substance (SP in the serum, respectively. The protein expressions of c-kit and stem cell factor (SCF were assessed by immunohistochemical analysis and western blot, respectively, and the mRNA level of c-kit was measured by a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR.The TGP attenuated STC responses in terms of an increase in the fecal volume and moisture content, an enhancement of intestinal transit rate and the reduction of NO, NOS and VIP in the serum. In addition, the c-kit, a labeling of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC increased at both protein and mRNA levels. SCF, which serves as a ligand of c-kit also increased at protein level.The analysis of our data indicated that the TGP could obviously attenuate STC through improving the function of ICC and blocking the inhibitory neurotransmitters such as NO, NOS and VIP.

  13. Total Glucosides of Paeony Promote Intestinal Motility in Slow Transit Constipation Rats through Amelioration of Interstitial Cells of Cajal

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    Zhu, Feiye; Xu, Shan; Zhang, Yongsheng; Chen, Fangming; Ji, Jinjun; Xie, Guanqun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Using an atropine-diphenoxylate-induced slow transit constipation (STC) model, this study explored the effects of the total glucosides of paeony (TGP) in the treatment of STC and the possible mechanisms. Study Design A prospective experimental animal study. Methods The constipation model was set up in rats with an oral gavage of atropine-diphenoxylate and then treated with the TGP. The volume and moisture content of the faeces were observed and the intestinal kinetic power was evaluated. Meanwhile, the colorimetric method and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were employed to determine the changes of nitric oxide (NO), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), vasoative intestinal peptide (VIP) and the P substance (SP) in the serum, respectively. The protein expressions of c-kit and stem cell factor (SCF) were assessed by immunohistochemical analysis and western blot, respectively, and the mRNA level of c-kit was measured by a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results The TGP attenuated STC responses in terms of an increase in the fecal volume and moisture content, an enhancement of intestinal transit rate and the reduction of NO, NOS and VIP in the serum. In addition, the c-kit, a labeling of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) increased at both protein and mRNA levels. SCF, which serves as a ligand of c-kit also increased at protein level. Conclusion The analysis of our data indicated that the TGP could obviously attenuate STC through improving the function of ICC and blocking the inhibitory neurotransmitters such as NO, NOS and VIP. PMID:27478893

  14. Spontaneous Ca2+ transients in interstitial cells of Cajal located within the deep muscular plexus of the murine small intestine

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    Baker, Salah A.; Drumm, Bernard T.; Saur, Dieter; Hennig, Grant W.; Ward, Sean M.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Interstitial cells of Cajal at the level of the deep muscular plexus (ICC‐DMP) in the small intestine generate spontaneous Ca2+ transients that consist of localized Ca2+ events and limited propagating Ca2+ waves.Ca2+ transients in ICC‐DMP display variable characteristics: from discrete, highly localized Ca2+ transients to regionalized Ca2+ waves with variable rates of occurrence, amplitude, duration and spatial spread.Ca2+ transients fired stochastically, with no cellular or multicellular rhythmic activity being observed. No correlation was found between the firing sites in adjacent cells.Ca2+ transients in ICC‐DMP are suppressed by the ongoing release of inhibitory neurotransmitter(s).Functional intracellular Ca2+ stores are essential for spontaneous Ca2+ transients, and the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+‐ATPase (SERCA) pump is necessary for maintenance of spontaneity.Ca2+ release mechanisms involve both ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol triphosphate receptors (InsP3Rs). Release from these channels is interdependent.ICC express transcripts of multiple RyRs and InsP3Rs, with Itpr1 and Ryr2 subtypes displaying the highest expression. Abstract Interstitial cells of Cajal in the deep muscular plexus of the small intestine (ICC‐DMP) are closely associated with varicosities of enteric motor neurons and generate responses contributing to neural regulation of intestinal motility. Responses of ICC‐DMP are mediated by activation of Ca2+‐activated Cl− channels; thus, Ca2+ signalling is central to the behaviours of these cells. Confocal imaging was used to characterize the nature and mechanisms of Ca2+ transients in ICC‐DMP within intact jejunal muscles expressing a genetically encoded Ca2+ indicator (GCaMP3) selectively in ICC. ICC‐DMP displayed spontaneous Ca2+ transients that ranged from discrete, localized events to waves that propagated over variable distances. The occurrence of Ca2+ transients was highly variable, and it was

  15. Spontaneous Ca(2+) transients in interstitial cells of Cajal located within the deep muscular plexus of the murine small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Salah A; Drumm, Bernard T; Saur, Dieter; Hennig, Grant W; Ward, Sean M; Sanders, Kenton M

    2016-06-15

    Interstitial cells of Cajal at the level of the deep muscular plexus (ICC-DMP) in the small intestine generate spontaneous Ca(2+) transients that consist of localized Ca(2+) events and limited propagating Ca(2+) waves. Ca(2+) transients in ICC-DMP display variable characteristics: from discrete, highly localized Ca(2+) transients to regionalized Ca(2+) waves with variable rates of occurrence, amplitude, duration and spatial spread. Ca(2+) transients fired stochastically, with no cellular or multicellular rhythmic activity being observed. No correlation was found between the firing sites in adjacent cells. Ca(2+) transients in ICC-DMP are suppressed by the ongoing release of inhibitory neurotransmitter(s). Functional intracellular Ca(2+) stores are essential for spontaneous Ca(2+) transients, and the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) -ATPase (SERCA) pump is necessary for maintenance of spontaneity. Ca(2+) release mechanisms involve both ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol triphosphate receptors (InsP3 Rs). Release from these channels is interdependent. ICC express transcripts of multiple RyRs and InsP3 Rs, with Itpr1 and Ryr2 subtypes displaying the highest expression. Interstitial cells of Cajal in the deep muscular plexus of the small intestine (ICC-DMP) are closely associated with varicosities of enteric motor neurons and generate responses contributing to neural regulation of intestinal motility. Responses of ICC-DMP are mediated by activation of Ca(2+) -activated Cl(-) channels; thus, Ca(2+) signalling is central to the behaviours of these cells. Confocal imaging was used to characterize the nature and mechanisms of Ca(2+) transients in ICC-DMP within intact jejunal muscles expressing a genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicator (GCaMP3) selectively in ICC. ICC-DMP displayed spontaneous Ca(2+) transients that ranged from discrete, localized events to waves that propagated over variable distances. The occurrence of Ca(2+) transients was highly variable, and it

  16. Inhibitory Neural Regulation of the Ca2+ Transients in Intramuscular Interstitial Cells of Cajal in the Small Intestine

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    Salah A. Baker

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal motility is coordinated by enteric neurons. Both inhibitory and excitatory motor neurons innervate the syncytium consisting of smooth muscle cells (SMCs interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC and PDGFRα+ cells (SIP syncytium. Confocal imaging of mouse small intestines from animals expressing GCaMP3 in ICC were used to investigate inhibitory neural regulation of ICC in the deep muscular plexus (ICC-DMP. We hypothesized that Ca2+ signaling in ICC-DMP can be modulated by inhibitory enteric neural input. ICC-DMP lie in close proximity to the varicosities of motor neurons and generate ongoing Ca2+ transients that underlie activation of Ca2+-dependent Cl− channels and regulate the excitability of SMCs in the SIP syncytium. Electrical field stimulation (EFS caused inhibition of Ca2+ for the first 2–3 s of stimulation, and then Ca2+ transients escaped from inhibition. The NO donor (DEA-NONOate inhibited Ca2+ transients and Nω-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA or a guanylate cyclase inhibitor (ODQ blocked inhibition induced by EFS. Purinergic neurotransmission did not affect Ca2+ transients in ICC-DMP. Purinergic neurotransmission elicits hyperpolarization of the SIP syncytium by activation of K+ channels in PDGFRα+ cells. Generalized hyperpolarization of SIP cells by pinacidil (KATP agonist or MRS2365 (P2Y1 agonist also had no effect on Ca2+ transients in ICC-DMP. Peptidergic transmitter receptors (VIP and PACAP are expressed in ICC and can modulate ICC-DMP Ca2+ transients. In summary Ca2+ transients in ICC-DMP are blocked by enteric inhibitory neurotransmission. ICC-DMP lack a voltage-dependent mechanism for regulating Ca2+ release, and this protects Ca2+ handling in ICC-DMP from membrane potential changes in other SIP cells.

  17. Modulation of Pacemaker Potentials in Murine Small Intestinal Interstitial Cells of Cajal by Gamisoyo-San, a Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Doeun; Kim, Jung Nam; Nam, Joo Hyun; Lee, Jong Rok; Kim, Sang Chan; Kim, Byung Joo

    2018-04-19

    The Gamisoyo-san (GSS) has been used for -improving the gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of GSS, a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, on the pacemaker potentials of mouse small intestinal interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs). ICCs from the small intestines were dissociated and cultured. Whole-cell patch-clamp configuration was used to record pacemaker potentials and membrane currents. GSS depolarized ICC pacemaker potentials in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with 4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide completely inhibited GSS-induced pacemaker potential depolarizations. Intracellular GDP-β-S inhibited GSS-induced effects, and in the presence of U-73122, GSS-induced effects were inhibited. Also, GSS in the presence of a Ca2+-free solution or thapsigargin did not depolarize pacemaker potentials. However, in the presence of calphostin C, GSS slightly depolarized pacemaker potentials. Furthermore, GSS inhibited both transient receptor potential melastatin7 and Ca2+-activated Cl- channel (anoctamin1) currents. GSS depolarized pacemaker potentials of ICCs via G protein and muscarinic M3 receptor signaling pathways and through internal or external Ca2+-, phospholipase C-, and protein kinase C-dependent and transient receptor potential melastatin 7-, and anoctamin 1-independent pathways. The study shows that GSS may regulate GI tract motility, suggesting that GSS could be a basis for developing novel prokinetic agents for treating GI motility dysfunctions. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Interstitial Cells of Blood Vessels

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    Vladimír Pucovský

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood vessels are made up of several distinct cell types. Although it was originally thought that the tunica media of blood vessels was composed of a homogeneous population of fully differentiated smooth muscle cells, more recent data suggest the existence of multiple smooth muscle cell subpopulations in the vascular wall. One of the cell types contributing to this heterogeneity is the novel, irregularly shaped, noncontractile cell with thin processes, termed interstitial cell, found in the tunica media of both veins and arteries. While the principal role of interstitial cells in veins seems to be pacemaking, the role of arterial interstitial cells is less clear. This review summarises the knowledge of the functional and structural properties of vascular interstitial cells accumulated so far, offers hypotheses on their physiological role, and proposes directions for future research.

  19. Action potential generation in the small intestine of W mutant mice that lack interstitial cells of Cajal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malysz, J; Thuneberg, L; Mikkelsen, Hanne Birte

    1996-01-01

    significantly changed. Neither FLC nor MLC were part of a network nor did they form specialized junctions with neighboring cells as ICC do. Hence no cell type had replaced ICC at their normal morphological position associated with Auerbach's plexus. ICC were present in W/Wv mice at the deep muscular plexus...

  20. Interstitial cells of Cajal, macrophages and mast cells in the gut musculature: morphology, distribution, spatial and possible functional interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are recognized as pacemaker cells for gastrointestinal movement and are suggested to be mediators of neuromuscular transmission. Intestinal motility disturbances are often associated with a reduced number of ICC and/or ultrastructural damage, sometimes associated...... conditions such as Crohn's disease and achalasia, ICC and mast cells develop close spatial contacts and piecemeal degranulation is possibly triggered....

  1. The evaluation of interstitial Cajal cells distribution in non-tumoral colon disorders.

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    Becheanu, G; Manuc, M; Dumbravă, Mona; Herlea, V; Hortopan, Monica; Costache, Mariana

    2008-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are pacemakers that generate electric waves recorded from the gut and are important for intestinal motility. The aim of the study was to evaluate the distribution of interstitial cells of Cajal in colon specimens from patients with idiopathic chronic pseudo-obstruction and other non-tumoral colon disorders as compared with samples from normal colon. The distribution pattern of ICC in the normal and pathological human colon was evaluated by immunohistochemistry using antibodies for CD117, CD34, and S-100. In two cases with intestinal chronic idiopathic pseudo-obstruction we found a diffuse or focal reducing number of Cajal cells, the loss of immunoreactivity for CD117 being correlated with loss of immunoreactivity for CD34 marker. Our study revealed that the number of interstitial cells of Cajal also decrease in colonic diverticular disease and Crohn disease (p<0.05), whereas the number of enteric neurones appears to be normal. These findings might explain some of the large bowel motor abnormalities known to occur in these disorders. Interstitial Cajal cells may play an important role in pathogenesis and staining for CD117 on transmural intestinal surgical biopsies could allow a more extensive diagnosis in evaluation of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

  2. Experimental depletion of different renal interstitial cell populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohman, S.O.; Sundelin, B.; Forsum, U.; Tribukait, B.

    1988-01-01

    To define different populations of renal interstitial cells and investigate some aspects of their function, we studied the kidneys of normal rats and rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus (DI, Brattleboro) after experimental manipulations expected to alter the number of interstitial cells. DI rats showed an almost complete loss of interstitial cells in their renal papillae after treatment with a high dose of vasopressin. In spite of the lack of interstitial cells, the animals concentrated their urine to the same extent as vasopressin-treated normal rats, indicating that the renomedullary interstitial cells do not have an important function in concentrating the urine. The interstitial cells returned nearly to normal within 1 week off vasopressin treatment, suggesting a rapid turnover rate of these cells. To further distinguish different populations of interstitial cells, we studied the distribution of class II MHC antigen expression in the kidneys of normal and bone-marrow depleted Wistar rats. Normal rats had abundant class II antigen-positive interstitial cells in the renal cortex and outer medulla, but not in the inner medulla (papilla). Six days after 1000 rad whole body irradiation, the stainable cells were almost completely lost, but electron microscopic morphometry showed a virtually unchanged volume density of interstitial cells in the cortex and outer medulla, as well as the inner medulla. Thus, irradiation abolished the expression of the class II antigen but caused no significant depletion of interstitial cells

  3. Interstitial cells of Cajal in chagasic megaesophagus.

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    de Lima, Marcus Aurelho; Cabrine-Santos, Marlene; Tavares, Marcelo Garcia; Gerolin, Gustavo Pacheco; Lages-Silva, Eliane; Ramirez, Luis Eduardo

    2008-08-01

    Chagasic visceromegalies are the most important digestive manifestations of Chagas disease and are characterized by motor disorders and dilation of organs such as esophagus and colon. One of the theories raised to explain the physiopathogenesis of chagasic megas is the plexus theory. Recent studies have shown a reduction of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in the colon of chagasic patients. These cells are present throughout the gastrointestinal tract and are considered to be pacemaker cells, that is, they are responsible for coordinating peristalsis and for mediating nerve impulses. In view of the lack of studies on these cells in megaesophagus and the previous observation of a reduction of ICCs in chagasic megacolons, we compared the distribution of ICCs in the esophagus of chagasic and nonchagasic patients to contribute to a better understanding of the physiopathogenesis of this esophageal disease. Esophageal biopsy samples from 10 chagasic and 5 nonchagasic patients were used. Cells were identified with the anti-CD117 antibody. The number of ICCs was quantified in longitudinal and circular muscle layers and myenteric plexus. The results were analyzed statistically by comparison of means. An intense reduction in the number of ICCs was observed in muscle layers and in the myenteric plexus of patients with megaesophagus. We conclude that there is an intense reduction of ICCs in the esophagus of chagasic patients when compared to nonchagasic patients, a finding supporting the important role of these cells in gastrointestinal tract motility. A deficiency in these cells might be implied in the genesis of megaesophagus.

  4. Advanced sickle cell associated interstitial lung disease presenting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous studies have reported abnormal pulmonary function and pulmonary hypertension among Nigerians with sickle cell disease, but there is no report of interstitial lung disease among them. We report a Nigerian sickle cell patient who presented with computed tomography proven interstitial lung disease complicated by ...

  5. Interstitial cells of Cajal in human gut and gastrointestinal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderwinden, J M; Rumessen, J J

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the distribution of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract, based on ultrastructural and immunohistochemical evidence. The distribution and morphology of ICC at each level of the normal GI tracts is addressed from the perspective of their fun......This paper reviews the distribution of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract, based on ultrastructural and immunohistochemical evidence. The distribution and morphology of ICC at each level of the normal GI tracts is addressed from the perspective...

  6. CD34-positive interstitial cells of the human detrusor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle; Hansen, Alastair; Smedts, Frank

    2007-01-01

    using a panel of antibodies directed against CD117/c-kit, CD34, CD31, S100, tryptase, neurofilament, NSE, Factor-VIII and GFAP. A striking finding was an interstitial type of cell which is CD34 immunoreactive (CD34-ir) but CD117/c-kit negative. The cells have a tentacular morphology, enveloping...... flattened processes, ramifying primarily in a bipolar fashion. Using immunoelectron microscopy (I-TEM) it was possible to view CD34 gold labelling of cells corresponding to interstitial cells. Although similar CD34-positive cells have been demonstrated in the bowel wall, they have never been described...... in the detrusor. The ontogeny and function of CD34-ir, a kit-negative cell, is unknown, but it may be involved in smooth muscle contraction....

  7. Update on small intestinal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tesori, Valentina; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Lattanzi, Wanda; Gasbarrini, Giovanni Battista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Among somatic stem cells, those residing in the intestine represent a fascinating and poorly explored research field. Particularly, somatic stem cells reside in the small intestine at the level of the crypt base, in a constant balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Aim of the present review is to delve into the mechanisms that regulate the delicate equilibrium through which intestinal stem cells orchestrate intestinal architecture. To this aim, special focus will be addressed to id...

  8. Effects of γ irradiation of hydra: elimination of interstitial cells from viable hydra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradkin, M.; Kakis, H.; Campbell, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Hydra attenuata and H. magnipapillata were γ-irradiated from a cesium source. All doses which had any observable effect (3000 rad and above) resulted in a reduction in the number of interstitial cells and of their differentiated product cells, or in the complete elimination of these cells. Interstitial cells were essentially completely eliminated within 5 days after irradiation doses above 5500 rad, and these hydra died. Irradiation doses of 4200 to 5500 rad resulted in a mixture of effects: some hydra recovered completely, some lost all interstitial cells and died, and some lost interstitial cells but could be propagated, as asexually reproducing clones, by hand feeding them. Hydra of some of these hand-fed clones entirely lacked interstitial cells and did not recover interstitial cells during subsequent culturing. Yet when these hydra were repopulated by interstitial cells from a normal hydra, they were restored to normal. Nerve cells became depleted more slowly than interstitial cells following irradiation, so animals can be obtained which possess nerve but no stem (interstitial) cells. The nerve cells and other derivatives of interstitial cells eventually disappear upon prolonged culture of the hydra. Thus γ irradiation can be used to eliminate interstitial cells from hydra, leaving viable polyps composed only of epithelial cells

  9. Update on small intestinal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesori, Valentina; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Lattanzi, Wanda; Gasbarrini, Giovanni Battista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2013-08-07

    Among somatic stem cells, those residing in the intestine represent a fascinating and poorly explored research field. Particularly, somatic stem cells reside in the small intestine at the level of the crypt base, in a constant balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Aim of the present review is to delve into the mechanisms that regulate the delicate equilibrium through which intestinal stem cells orchestrate intestinal architecture. To this aim, special focus will be addressed to identify the integrating signals from the surrounding niche, supporting a model whereby distinct cell populations facilitate homeostatic vs injury-induced regeneration.

  10. Aortic calcified particles modulate valvular endothelial and interstitial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Engeland, Nicole C A; Bertazzo, Sergio; Sarathchandra, Padmini; McCormack, Ann; Bouten, Carlijn V C; Yacoub, Magdi H; Chester, Adrian H; Latif, Najma

    Normal and calcified human valve cusps, coronary arteries, and aortae harbor spherical calcium phosphate microparticles of identical composition and crystallinity, and their role remains unknown. The objective was to examine the direct effects of isolated calcified particles on human valvular cells. Calcified particles were isolated from healthy and diseased aortae, characterized, quantitated, and applied to valvular endothelial cells (VECs) and interstitial cells (VICs). Cell differentiation, viability, and proliferation were analyzed. Particles were heterogeneous, differing in size and shape, and were crystallized as calcium phosphate. Diseased donors had significantly more calcified particles compared to healthy donors (Pinnocent bystanders but induce a phenotypical and pathological change of VECs and VICs characteristic of activated and pathological cells. Therapy tailored to reduce these calcified particles should be investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Interstitial Fluid Flow: The Mechanical Environment of Cells and Foundation of Meridians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Using information from the deep dissection, microobservation, and measurement of acupoints in the upper and lower limbs of the human body, we developed a three-dimensional porous medium model to simulate the flow field using FLUENT software and to study the shear stress on the surface of interstitial cells (mast cells caused by interstitial fluid flow. The numerical simulation results show the following: (i the parallel nature of capillaries will lead to directional interstitial fluid flow, which may explain the long interstitial tissue channels or meridians observed in some experiments; (ii when the distribution of capillaries is staggered, increases in the velocity alternate, and the velocity tends to be uniform, which is beneficial for substance exchange; (iii interstitial fluid flow induces a shear stress, with magnitude of several Pa, on interstitial cell membranes, which will activate cells and lead to a biological response; (iv capillary and interstitial parameters, such as capillary density, blood pressure, capillary permeability, interstitial pressure, and interstitial porosity, affect the shear stress on cell surfaces. The numerical simulation results suggest that in vivo interstitial fluid flow constitutes the mechanical environment of cells and plays a key role in guiding cell activities, which may explain the meridian phenomena and the acupuncture effects observed in experiments.

  12. Lymphoid cells in chicken intestinal epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, P

    1975-01-01

    The intraepithelial lymphoid cells of chicken small intestine were studied by light microscopy using 1 mu Epon sections, and by electron microscopy. Three cell types were found: small lymphocytes, large lymphoid cells, and granular cells. These cells correspond to the theliolymphocytes and globule...

  13. Lipoprotein(a Induces Human Aortic Valve Interstitial Cell Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Yu, PhD

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein(a, or Lp(a, significantly increased alkaline phosphatase activity, release of phosphate, calcium deposition, hydroxyapatite, cell apoptosis, matrix vesicle formation, and phosphorylation of signal transduction proteins; increased expression of chondro-osteogenic mediators; and decreased SOX9 and matrix Gla protein (p < 0.001. Inhibition of MAPK38 and GSK3β significantly reduced Lp(a-induced calcification of human aortic valve interstitial cells (p < 0.001. There was abundant presence of Lp(a and E06 immunoreactivity in diseased human aortic valves. The present study demonstrates a causal effect for Lp(a in aortic valve calcification and suggests that interfering with the Lp(apathway could provide a novel therapeutic approach in the management of this debilitating disease.

  14. Intestinal endocrine cells in radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietroletti, R.; Blaauwgeers, J.L.; Taat, C.W.; Simi, M.; Brummelkamp, W.H.; Becker, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    In this study, the intestinal endocrine cells were investigated in 13 surgical specimens affected by radiation enteritis. Endocrine cells were studied by means of Grimelius' silver staining and immunostaining for chromogranin, a general marker of endocrine cells. Positively stained cells were quantified by counting their number per unit length of muscularis mucosa. Results in radiation enteritis were compared with matched control specimens by using Student's t test. Chromogranin immunostaining showed a statistically significant increase of endocrine cells in radiation enteritis specimens compared with controls both in small and large intestine (ileum, 67.5 +/- 23.5 cells per unit length of muscularis mucosa in radiation enteritis versus 17.0 +/- 6.1 in controls; colon, 40.9 +/- 13.7 cells per unit length of muscularis mucosa in radiation enteritis versus 9.5 +/- 4.1 in controls--p less than 0.005 in both instances). Increase of endocrine cells was demonstrated also by Grimelius' staining; however, without reaching statistical significance. It is not clear whether or not the increase of endocrine cells in radiation enteritis reported in this study is caused by a hyperplastic response or by a sparing phenomenon. We should consider that increased endocrine cells, when abnormally secreting their products, may be involved in some of the clinical features of radiation enteropathy. In addition, as intestinal endocrine cells produce trophic substances to the intestine, their increase could be responsible for the raised risk of developing carcinoma of the intestine in long standing radiation enteritis

  15. Intestinal endocrine cells in radiation enteritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pietroletti, R.; Blaauwgeers, J. L.; Taat, C. W.; Simi, M.; Brummelkamp, W. H.; Becker, A. E.

    1989-01-01

    In this study, the intestinal endocrine cells were investigated in 13 surgical specimens affected by radiation enteritis. Endocrine cells were studied by means of Grimelius' silver staining and immunostaining for chromogranin, a general marker of endocrine cells. Positively stained cells were

  16. Turnover time of Leydig cells and other interstitial cells in testes of adult rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerds, K. J.; de rooij, D. G.; Rommerts, F. F.; van der Tweel, I.; Wensing, C. J.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the turnover of Leydig cells and other interstitial cells in the adult rat testis. Normal adult rats received injections of [3H]thymidine at 9:00 and 21:00 for 2, 5, or 8 days. The percentage of labeled Leydig cells, which was initially low (0.8% +/- 0.2%),

  17. The effect of interstitial 125I seeds implantation on intestinal wall: a pathological observation in experimental dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Houfa; Zhang Fenglian; Shen An; Cao Guiwen; Cui Xinjiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To observe the radiation injury of the bowel wall due to the implantation of interstitial 125 I seeds in experimental dogs. Methods: A total of 12 healthy male dogs were randomly and equally divided into 3 experimental groups and 1 control group, with 3 dogs in each group.In the experimental groups, two 125 I seeds with the active radiation dose of 0.8mCi were symmetrically implanted under the serous membrane of the dog's small intestinal wall. The dogs were fed for 14 days (group A), for one month (group B) and for two months (group C) respectively when the animals were scheduled to be sacrificed. The dogs' general condition was observed till they were sacrificed. The seed-implanting intestinal segments were then removed and dyed with HE staining method for electronic microscopic exam. The histopathologic findings were recorded and the results were compared between four groups. Results: No obvious histopathological changes were found in the dog's bowel wall 14 days after the implantation. One month after the procedure cellular injury was observed under electronic microscope, and two months after the operation partial fibrosis of the intestinal wall appeared but no ulceration or perforation occurred. Conclusion: The implantation of 125 I seeds can cause reversible cellular injuries of the intestinal wall in experimental dogs, the degree of the damage reaches its peak at one month after the implant when the partial fibrosis of bowel wall becomes evident. However, the seeds do not cause any serious complications, such as ulceration or perforation. (authors)

  18. Recent Advances in Intestinal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Laura R; Parameswaran, Narayanan

    2017-09-01

    The intestine is a dynamic organ with rapid stem cell division generating epithelial cells that mature and apoptose in 3-5 days. Rapid turnover maintains the epithelial barrier and homeostasis. Current insights on intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and their regulation are discussed here. The Lgr5+ ISCs maintain intestinal homeostasis by dividing asymmetrically, but also divide symmetrically to extinguish or replace ISCs. Following radiation or mucosal injury, reserve BMI1+ ISCs as well as other crypt cells can de-differentiate into Lgr5+ ISCs. ISC niche cells, including Paneth, immune and myofibroblast cells secrete factors that regulate ISC proliferation. Finally, several studies indicate that the microbiome metabolites regulate ISC growth. ISC cells can be plastic and integrate a complexity of environmental/niche cues to trigger or suppress proliferation as needed.

  19. Transcriptome changes during intestinal cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadjali, Mehrdad; Seidelin, Jakob B; Olsen, Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    The expression of 18149 genes have been analysed during the differentiation of the human intestinal cell line Caco-2. cDNA probes from undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells were separately hybridised to EST DNAs spotted in an array on a nylon membrane. A remarkable change in the transc......The expression of 18149 genes have been analysed during the differentiation of the human intestinal cell line Caco-2. cDNA probes from undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells were separately hybridised to EST DNAs spotted in an array on a nylon membrane. A remarkable change...... cells by performing reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction on RNA extracted from laser dissected intestinal crypt and villi. In a screen of eight transcripts one - SART3 - was identified as a marker for human colonic crypts....

  20. Persistent pulmonary interstitial emphysema in a case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbey, Pooja; Narula, Mahender K.; Anand, Rama; Chandra, Jagdish

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 10-month-old boy with multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis showing thin-walled lung cysts along with computed tomography (CT) evidence of persistent pulmonary interstitial emphysema (PPIE), in the absence of pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum. Follow-up CT performed after 6 months demonstrated complete resolution of interstitial emphysema

  1. The Glycoprofile Patterns of Endothelial Cells in Usual Interstitial Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Barkhordari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available [THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED FOR DUPLICATE PUBLICATION] Background: The pathological classification of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis has been a matter of debate and controversy for histopathologists. Objective: To identify and specify the glycotypes of capillary endothelial cells in usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP compared to those found in normal tissue. Methods: Sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded blocks from 16 cases of UIP were studied by lectin histochemistry with a panel of 27 biotinylated lectins and an avidin-peroxidase revealing system. Results: High expression of several classes of glycan was seen de novo in capillary endothelial cells from patients with UIP including small complex and bi/tri-antennary bisected complex N-linked sequences bolund by Concanavalin A and erythro-phytohemagglutinin, respectively, GalNAca1 residues bound by Helix pomatia and Maclura pomifera agglutinins, and L-fucosylated derivatives of type II glycan chains recognized by Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I. Glycans bound by agglutinins from Lycopersicon esculentum (β1,4GlcNAc and Wisteria floribunda (GalNAc as well as GlcNAc oligomers bound by Phytolacca americana and succinylated Wheat Germ agglutinin were also seen in the capillary endothelial cells of UIP. In contrast, L-fucosylated derivatives of type I glycan chains were absent in cells from cases of UIP when Anguilla anguilla agglutinin was applied, unlike the situation in normal tissue. Conclusion: These results may indicate existence of two distinct populations of endothelial cell in UIP with markedly different patterns of glycosylation, reflecting a pattern of differentiation and angiogenesis, which is not detectable morphologically.

  2. Transcriptome changes during intestinal cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadjali, Mehrdad; Seidelin, Jakob B; Olsen, Jørgen Lillelund

    2002-01-01

    The expression of 18149 genes have been analysed during the differentiation of the human intestinal cell line Caco-2. cDNA probes from undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells were separately hybridised to EST DNAs spotted in an array on a nylon membrane. A remarkable change in the transc...

  3. Interstitial flows promote an amoeboid cell phenotype and motility of breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Huang, Yu Ling; Zheng, Angela; Wu, Mingming

    2015-03-01

    Lymph nodes, the drainage systems for interstitial flows, are clinically known to be the first metastatic sites of many cancer types including breast and prostate cancers. Here, we demonstrate that breast cancer cell morphology and motility is modulated by interstitial flows in a cell-ECM adhesion dependent manner. The average aspect ratios of the cells are significantly lower (or are more amoeboid like) in the presence of the flow in comparison to the case when the flow is absent. The addition of exogenous adhesion molecules within the extracellular matrix (type I collagen) enhances the overall aspect ratio (or are more mesenchymal like) of the cell population. Using measured cell trajectories, we find that the persistence of the amoeboid cells (aspect ratio less than 2.0) is shorter than that of mesenchymal cells. However, the maximum speed of the amoeboid cells is larger than that of mesenchymal cells. Together these findings provide the novel insight that interstitial flows promote amoeboid cell morphology and motility and highlight the plasticity of tumor cell motility in response to its biophysical environment. Supported by NIH Grant R21CA138366.

  4. Perivascular Interstitial Cells of Cajal in Human ColonSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-An Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC closely associate with nerves and smooth muscles to modulate gut motility. In the ICC microenvironment, although the circulating hormones/factors have been shown to influence ICC activities, the association between ICC and microvessels in the gut wall has not been described. We applied three-dimensional (3D vascular histology with c-kit staining to identify the perivascular ICC and characterize their morphologic and population features in the human colon wall. Methods: Full-thickness colons were obtained from colectomies performed for colorectal cancer. We targeted the colon wall away from the tumor site. Confocal microscopy with optical clearing (use of immersion solution to reduce scattering in optical imaging was performed to simultaneously reveal the ICC and vascular networks in space. 3D image rendering and projection were digitally conducted to illustrate the ICC–vessel contact patterns. Results: Perivascular ICC were identified in the submucosal border, myenteric plexus, and circular and longitudinal muscles via high-definition 3D microscopy. Through in-depth image projection, we specified two contact patterns—the intimate cell body-to-vessel contact (type I, 18% of ICC in circular muscle and the long-distance process-to-vessel contact (type II, 16%—to classify perivascular ICC. Particularly, type I perivascular ICC were detected with elevated c-kit staining levels and were routinely found in clusters, making them readily distinguishable from other ICC in the network. Conclusions: We propose a new subclass of ICC that closely associates with microvessels in the human colon. Our finding suggests a functional relationship between these mural ICC and microvessels based on the morphologic proximity. Keywords: 3D Histology, c-kit, ICC, Mural Cells

  5. Interactions between the intestinal microbiota and innate lymphoid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vincent L; Kasper, Dennis L

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian intestine must manage to contain 100 trillion intestinal bacteria without inducing inappropriate immune responses to these microorganisms. The effects of the immune system on intestinal microorganisms are numerous and well-characterized, and recent research has determined that the microbiota influences the intestinal immune system as well. In this review, we first discuss the intestinal immune system and its role in containing and maintaining tolerance to commensal organisms. We next introduce a category of immune cells, the innate lymphoid cells, and describe their classification and function in intestinal immunology. Finally, we discuss the effects of the intestinal microbiota on innate lymphoid cells. PMID:24418741

  6. Radiobiology of intestinal epithelium stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konoplyannikova, O.A.

    1988-01-01

    After a single or three-fold whole body irradiation of mice with a dose of 4 Gy and the time interval for the proliferation to be restored (5 days or 3 weeks) the survival curve for stem cells of small intestine epithelium with regard to radiation dose was the same as that for non-preirradiated mice. This indicated that the proliferative potential of stem cells in these experimental conditions was not reduced

  7. Transcriptome of interstitial cells of Cajal reveals unique and selective gene signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Young Lee

    Full Text Available Transcriptome-scale data can reveal essential clues into understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms behind specific cellular functions and biological processes. Transcriptomics is a continually growing field of research utilized in biomarker discovery. The transcriptomic profile of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC, which serve as slow-wave electrical pacemakers for gastrointestinal (GI smooth muscle, has yet to be uncovered. Using copGFP-labeled ICC mice and flow cytometry, we isolated ICC populations from the murine small intestine and colon and obtained their transcriptomes. In analyzing the transcriptome, we identified a unique set of ICC-restricted markers including transcription factors, epigenetic enzymes/regulators, growth factors, receptors, protein kinases/phosphatases, and ion channels/transporters. This analysis provides new and unique insights into the cellular and biological functions of ICC in GI physiology. Additionally, we constructed an interactive ICC genome browser (http://med.unr.edu/physio/transcriptome based on the UCSC genome database. To our knowledge, this is the first online resource that provides a comprehensive library of all known genetic transcripts expressed in primary ICC. Our genome browser offers a new perspective into the alternative expression of genes in ICC and provides a valuable reference for future functional studies.

  8. Expression of Nestin, Vimentin, and NCAM by Renal Interstitial Cells after Ischemic Tubular Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vansthertem

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work explores the distribution of various markers expressed by interstitial cells in rat kidneys after ischemic injury (35 minutes during regeneration of S3 tubules of outer stripe of outer medulla (OSOM. Groups of experimental animals (n=4 were sacrificed every two hours during the first 24 hours post-ischemia as well as 2, 3, 7, 14 days post-ischemia. The occurrence of lineage markers was analyzed on kidney sections by immunohistochemistry and morphometry during the process of tubular regeneration. In postischemic kidneys, interstitial cell proliferation, assessed by 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA labeling, was prominent in outer medulla and reach a maximum between 24 and 72 hours after reperfusion. This population was characterized by the coexpression of vimentin and nestin. The density of -Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM positive interstitial cells increased transiently (18–72 hours in the vicinity of altered tubules. We have also localized a small population of α-Smooth Muscle Actin (SMA-positive cells confined to chronically altered areas and characterized by a small proliferative index. In conclusion, we observed in the postischemic kidney a marked proliferation of interstitial cells that underwent transient phenotypical modifications. These interstitial cells could be implicated in processes leading to renal fibrosis.

  9. Recurrent nitrofurantoin-induced giant cell interstitial pneumonia: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boeun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell interstitial pneumonia (GIP is a rare form of chronic interstitial pneumonia typically associated with hard metal exposure. Only two cases of GIP induced by nitrofurantoin have been reported in the medical literature. We are reporting a case of recurrent nitrofurantoin-induced GIP. Although extremely rare, GIP needs to be included in the differential diagnosis in patients with chronic nitrofurantoin use who present with respiratory illness.

  10. Intestinal Stem Cell Niche: The Extracellular Matrix and Cellular Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laween Meran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium comprises a monolayer of polarised columnar cells organised along the crypt-villus axis. Intestinal stem cells reside at the base of crypts and are constantly nourished by their surrounding niche for maintenance, self-renewal, and differentiation. The cellular microenvironment including the adjacent Paneth cells, stromal cells, smooth muscle cells, and neural cells as well as the extracellular matrix together constitute the intestinal stem cell niche. A dynamic regulatory network exists among the epithelium, stromal cells, and the matrix via complex signal transduction to maintain tissue homeostasis. Dysregulation of these biological or mechanical signals could potentially lead to intestinal injury and disease. In this review, we discuss the role of different intestinal stem cell niche components and dissect the interaction between dynamic matrix factors and regulatory signalling during intestinal stem cell homeostasis.

  11. Mast cells play no role in the pathogenesis of postoperative ileus induced by intestinal manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Pinilla, Pedro J; Farro, Giovanna; Di Giovangiulio, Martina; Stakenborg, Nathalie; Némethova, Andrea; de Vries, Annick; Liston, Adrian; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Rodewald, Hans-Reimwer; Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Matteoli, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal manipulation (IM) during abdominal surgery results in intestinal inflammation leading to hypomotility or ileus. Mast cell activation is thought to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of postoperative ileus (POI). However, this conclusion was mainly drawn using mast cell-deficient mouse models with abnormal Kit signaling. These mice also lack interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) resulting in aberrant gastrointestinal motility even prior to surgery, compromising their use as model to study POI. To avoid these experimental weaknesses we took advantage of a newly developed knock-in mouse model, Cpa3(Cre/+) , devoid of mast cells but with intact Kit signaling. The role of mast cells in the development of POI and intestinal inflammation was evaluated assessing gastrointestinal transit and muscularis externa inflammation after IM in two strains of mice lacking mast cells, i.e. Kit(W-sh/W-sh) and Cpa3(Cre/+) mice, and by use of the mast cell stabilizer cromolyn. Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice lack ICC networks and already revealed significantly delayed gastrointestinal transit even before surgery. IM did not further delay intestinal transit, but induced infiltration of myeloperoxidase positive cells, expression of inflammatory cytokines and recruitment of monocytes and neutrophils into the muscularis externa. On the contrary, Cpa3(Cre/+) mice have a normal network of ICC and normal gastrointestinal. Surprisingly, IM in Cpa3(Cre/+) mice caused delay in gut motility and intestinal inflammation as in wild type littermates mice (Cpa3(+/+) ). Furthermore, treatment with the mast cell inhibitor cromolyn resulted in an inhibition of mast cells without preventing POI. Here, we confirm that IM induced mast cell degranulation. However, our data demonstrate that mast cells are not required for the pathogenesis of POI in mice. Although there might be species differences between mouse and human, our results argue against mast cell inhibitors as a therapeutic approach to shorten POI.

  12. Mast cells play no role in the pathogenesis of postoperative ileus induced by intestinal manipulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J Gomez-Pinilla

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Intestinal manipulation (IM during abdominal surgery results in intestinal inflammation leading to hypomotility or ileus. Mast cell activation is thought to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of postoperative ileus (POI. However, this conclusion was mainly drawn using mast cell-deficient mouse models with abnormal Kit signaling. These mice also lack interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC resulting in aberrant gastrointestinal motility even prior to surgery, compromising their use as model to study POI. To avoid these experimental weaknesses we took advantage of a newly developed knock-in mouse model, Cpa3(Cre/+ , devoid of mast cells but with intact Kit signaling. DESIGN: The role of mast cells in the development of POI and intestinal inflammation was evaluated assessing gastrointestinal transit and muscularis externa inflammation after IM in two strains of mice lacking mast cells, i.e. Kit(W-sh/W-sh and Cpa3(Cre/+ mice, and by use of the mast cell stabilizer cromolyn. RESULTS: Kit(W-sh/W-sh mice lack ICC networks and already revealed significantly delayed gastrointestinal transit even before surgery. IM did not further delay intestinal transit, but induced infiltration of myeloperoxidase positive cells, expression of inflammatory cytokines and recruitment of monocytes and neutrophils into the muscularis externa. On the contrary, Cpa3(Cre/+ mice have a normal network of ICC and normal gastrointestinal. Surprisingly, IM in Cpa3(Cre/+ mice caused delay in gut motility and intestinal inflammation as in wild type littermates mice (Cpa3(+/+ . Furthermore, treatment with the mast cell inhibitor cromolyn resulted in an inhibition of mast cells without preventing POI. CONCLUSIONS: Here, we confirm that IM induced mast cell degranulation. However, our data demonstrate that mast cells are not required for the pathogenesis of POI in mice. Although there might be species differences between mouse and human, our results argue against mast

  13. Inherent rhythmcity and interstitial cells of Cajal in a frog vein

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Interstitial cells of Cajal are responsible for rhythmic contractions of the musculature of the gastrointestinal tract and blood vessels. The existence of these cells and spontaneous rhythmicity were noticed in amphibian vein and the findings are reported in this paper. The postcaval vein was identified in the frog, Rana tigrina ...

  14. Endocrine cells in the denervated intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Gilda C; Zucoloto, Sérgio; Garcia, Sérgio B

    2000-01-01

    This study deals with the effects of myenteric denervation of the proximal jejunum on endocrine cell population of the crypt-villus unit, 5 months after treatment with benzalkonium chloride (BAC). Male Wistar albino rats weighing on average 100 g were allocated to two groups: the BAC group − the proximal jejunal serosa was treated with 2 mm BAC for 30 min, and the control group − treated with saline solution (0,9% NaCl). There was a significant reduction in neurone number in the jejunal myenteric plexus of the BAC group and the endocrine cell population (serotoninergic and argyrophilic cells) was significantly increased in this intestine segment. In conclusion, the present findings provide further evidence that the myenteric denervation induced by BAC may lead to the development of a local imbalance of the neurotransmitters, with a consequent induction of enteroendocrine cell (argyrophilic and serotoninergic cells) hyperplasia in the crypt and villus. PMID:10971748

  15. c-Kit mutation reduce intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and migration, but not influence intestinal permeability stimulated by lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hong; Wang, Feng Yun; Kang, Qian; Tang, Xu Dong

    2018-06-20

    The proto-oncogene c-kit, as a marker of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in the gastrointestinal tract, plays an important role in the ICCs. Although limited evidences showed c-kit is present in the colonic epithelium but its roles remain unclear. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the expression, location and function of c-kit in the intestinal epithelium. Immunofluorescence, western blotting, and RT-PCR were performed to detect the expression and location of c-kit in the intestinal mucosa of WT mice. We investigated intestinal epithelial proliferation and migration in vivo by performing 5-Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and Ki-67 staining in WT and Wads m/m mice. An Ussing chamber with fluorescein-isothiocyanate dextran 4000 was used to detect the transepithelial electric resistance (TER), short circuit current (ISC) and permeability across ex vivo colon segments under control and endotoxaemia conditions. We demonstrated that c-kit was located and expressed in the gut crypt compartment in WT mice, which was demonstrated in the c-kit mutant mice (Wads m/m ). In addition, both the number of proliferating cells and the percentage of the distance migrated were lower in the Wads m/m mice than those in the WT mice. Moreover, the intestinal permeability, TER and tight junction were unaltered in the Wads m/m mice under endotoxic conditions compared with those in both the control condition and the WT mice. Altogether, these observations imply that the expression of c-kit in the colonic epithelium is involved in the proliferation and permeability of the colonic epithelium. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  16. Intestinal Stem Cell Dynamics: A Story of Mice and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, Michael C; Flanagan, Dustin J; Sansom, Owen J

    2018-06-01

    Stem cell dynamics define the probability of accumulating mutations within the intestinal epithelium. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Nicholson et al. (2018) report that human intestinal stem cell dynamics differ significantly from those of mice and establish that oncogenic mutations are more likely to expand; therefore, "normal" epithelium may carry multiple mutations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sequential cancer mutations in cultured human intestinal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drost, Jarno; van Jaarsveld, Richard H.; Ponsioen, Bas; Zimberlin, Cheryl; van Boxtel, Ruben; Buijs, Arjan; Sachs, Norman; Overmeer, René M.; Offerhaus, G. Johan; Begthel, Harry; Korving, Jeroen; van de Wetering, Marc; Schwank, Gerald; Logtenberg, Meike; Cuppen, Edwin; Snippert, Hugo J.; Medema, Jan Paul; Kops, Geert J. P. L.; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Crypt stem cells represent the cells of origin for intestinal neoplasia. Both mouse and human intestinal stem cells can be cultured in medium containing the stem-cell-niche factors WNT, R-spondin, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and noggin over long time periods as epithelial organoids that remain

  18. Controlling the frontier: regulatory T-cells and intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollrath, Julia; Powrie, Fiona M

    2013-11-30

    The intestine represents one of the most challenging sites for the immune system as immune cells must be able to mount an efficient response to invading pathogens while tolerating the large number and diverse array of resident commensal bacteria. Foxp3(+) regulatory T-cells (Tregs) play a non-redundant role at maintaining this balance. At the same time Treg cell differentiation and function can be modulated by the intestinal microbiota. In this review, we will discuss effector mechanisms of Treg cells in the intestine and how these cells can be influenced by the intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. IRF8 Transcription-Factor-Dependent Classical Dendritic Cells Are Essential for Intestinal T Cell Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luda, Katarzyna M.; Joeris, Thorsten; Persson, Emma K.

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in intestinal immune homeostasis remains incompletely defined. Here we show that mice lacking IRF8 transcription-factor-dependent DCs had reduced numbers of T cells in the small intestine (SI), but not large intestine (LI), including an almost complete absence...... dependent DCs in the maintenance of intestinal T cell homeostasis....

  20. Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting as Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Vali Khojeini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBL is a rare subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that resides in the lumen of blood vessels. Patients typically present with nonspecific findings, particularly bizarre neurologic symptoms, fever, and skin lesions. A woman presented with shortness of breath and a chest CT scan showed diffuse interstitial thickening and ground glass opacities suggestive of an interstitial lung disease. On physical exam she was noted to have splenomegaly. The patient died and at autopsy was found to have an IVLBL in her lungs as well as nearly all her organs that were sampled. Although rare, IVLBL should be included in the differential diagnosis of interstitial lung disease and this case underscores the importance of the continuation of autopsies.

  1. Clinical role in biopsy after interstitial irradiation to squamous cell carcinoma of tongue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomoichi

    1995-01-01

    The clinical role of biopsy after interstitial irradiation therapy was evaluated in 44 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of tongue on which biopsy was done in our hospital. More residual tumors were observed in the induration-positive groups compared to those of the induration-negative groups. No tumor was histologically observed in 71.4% of the induration-positive groups. On the adjacent and covering mucous membranes, epithelial dysplasia was detected in 15 patients, 1 of them was Grade III and 9 were Grade IV. Two patients had recurrence. In the initial stage of interstitial irradiation, reaction of stoma showed decrease of edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, regeneration and dilation of vessels after 6 weeks. The regeneration of collagen fiber increased within 3-14 weeks after irradiation, followed by decrease of its activity. After interstitial irradiation, 2 of 9 Grade IIb patients treated by surgery and 2 by re-interstitial irradiation survived. One of 3 Grade III patients manifested recurrence and was treated by surgery. All patients were alive. Fourteen of 17 Grade IV patients under careful observation were still alive. Eleven of 15 patients treated by total neck dissection after interstitial irradiation survived. Four Grade IV patients showed recurrence. Two-year primary lesion control rate was 91.2% and the survival rate for 5 year was 74.0%. (S.Y.). 54 refs

  2. Clinical role in biopsy after interstitial irradiation to squamous cell carcinoma of tongue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Tomoichi [Kanagawa Dental Coll., Yokosuka (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    The clinical role of biopsy after interstitial irradiation therapy was evaluated in 44 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of tongue on which biopsy was done in our hospital. More residual tumors were observed in the induration-positive groups compared to those of the induration-negative groups. No tumor was histologically observed in 71.4% of the induration-positive groups. On the adjacent and covering mucous membranes, epithelial dysplasia was detected in 15 patients, 1 of them was Grade III and 9 were Grade IV. Two patients had recurrence. In the initial stage of interstitial irradiation, reaction of stoma showed decrease of edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, regeneration and dilation of vessels after 6 weeks. The regeneration of collagen fiber increased within 3-14 weeks after irradiation, followed by decrease of its activity. After interstitial irradiation, 2 of 9 Grade IIb patients treated by surgery and 2 by re-interstitial irradiation survived. One of 3 Grade III patients manifested recurrence and was treated by surgery. All patients were alive. Fourteen of 17 Grade IV patients under careful observation were still alive. Eleven of 15 patients treated by total neck dissection after interstitial irradiation survived. Four Grade IV patients showed recurrence. Two-year primary lesion control rate was 91.2% and the survival rate for 5 year was 74.0%. (S.Y.). 54 refs.

  3. Innate Lymphoid Cells in Intestinal Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geremia, Alessandra; Arancibia-Cárcamo, Carolina V.

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the intestine that encompasses Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis. The cause of IBD is unknown, but the evidence suggests that an aberrant immune response toward the commensal bacterial flora is responsible for disease in genetically susceptible individuals. Results from animal models of colitis and human studies indicate a role for innate lymphoid cells (ILC) in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation in IBD. ILC are a population of lymphocytes that are enriched at mucosal sites, where they play a protective role against pathogens including extracellular bacteria, helminthes, and viruses. ILC lack an antigen-specific receptor, but can respond to environmental stress signals contributing to the rapid orchestration of an early immune response. Several subsets of ILC reflecting functional characteristics of T helper subsets have been described. ILC1 express the transcription factor T-bet and are characterized by secretion of IFNγ, ILC2 are GATA3+ and secrete IL5 and IL13 and ILC3 depend on expression of RORγt and secrete IL17 and IL22. However, ILC retain a degree of plasticity depending on exposure to cytokines and environmental factors. IL23 responsive ILC have been implicated in the pathogenesis of colitis in several innate murine models through the production of IL17, IFNγ, and GM-CSF. We have previously identified IL23 responsive ILC in the human intestine and found that they accumulate in the inflamed colon and small bowel of patients with CD. Other studies have confirmed accumulation of ILC in CD with increased frequencies of IFNγ-secreting ILC1 in both the intestinal lamina propria and the epithelium. Moreover, IL23 driven IL22 producing ILC have been shown to drive bacteria-induced colitis-associated cancer in mice. Interestingly, our data show increased ILC accumulation in patients with IBD and primary sclerosing cholangitis, who carry an increased risk of

  4. Innate Lymphoid Cells in Intestinal Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Geremia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the intestine that encompasses Crohn’s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis. The cause of IBD is unknown, but the evidence suggests that an aberrant immune response toward the commensal bacterial flora is responsible for disease in genetically susceptible individuals. Results from animal models of colitis and human studies indicate a role for innate lymphoid cells (ILC in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation in IBD. ILC are a population of lymphocytes that are enriched at mucosal sites, where they play a protective role against pathogens including extracellular bacteria, helminthes, and viruses. ILC lack an antigen-specific receptor, but can respond to environmental stress signals contributing to the rapid orchestration of an early immune response. Several subsets of ILC reflecting functional characteristics of T helper subsets have been described. ILC1 express the transcription factor T-bet and are characterized by secretion of IFNγ, ILC2 are GATA3+ and secrete IL5 and IL13 and ILC3 depend on expression of RORγt and secrete IL17 and IL22. However, ILC retain a degree of plasticity depending on exposure to cytokines and environmental factors. IL23 responsive ILC have been implicated in the pathogenesis of colitis in several innate murine models through the production of IL17, IFNγ, and GM-CSF. We have previously identified IL23 responsive ILC in the human intestine and found that they accumulate in the inflamed colon and small bowel of patients with CD. Other studies have confirmed accumulation of ILC in CD with increased frequencies of IFNγ-secreting ILC1 in both the intestinal lamina propria and the epithelium. Moreover, IL23 driven IL22 producing ILC have been shown to drive bacteria-induced colitis-associated cancer in mice. Interestingly, our data show increased ILC accumulation in patients with IBD and primary sclerosing cholangitis, who carry an

  5. Evolutionary insights into postembryonic development of adult intestinal stem cells

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    Ishizuya-Oka Atsuko

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the adult vertebrate intestine, multi-potent stem cells continuously generate all of the epithelial cells throughout the adulthood. While it has long been known that the frog intestine is formed via the development of adult intestinal stem cells during thyroid hormone (TH-dependent metamorphosis, the basic structure of the adult intestine is formed by birth in mammals and it is unclear if the subsequent maturation of the intestine involves any changes in the intestinal stem cells. Two recent papers showing that B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1 regulates postnatal epithelial stem cell reprogramming during mouse intestinal maturation support the model that adult intestinal stem cells are developed during postembryonic development in mammals, in a TH-dependent process similar to intestinal remodeling during amphibian metamorphosis. Since the formation of the adult intestine in both mammals and amphibians is closely associated with the adaptation from aquatic to terrestrial life during the peak of endogenous TH levels, the molecular mechanisms by which the adult stem cells are developed are likely evolutionally conserved.

  6. Differential gene expression in the murine gastric fundus lacking interstitial cells of Cajal

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    Ward Sean M

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The muscle layers of murine gastric fundus have no interstitial cells of Cajal at the level of the myenteric plexus and only possess intramuscular interstitial cells and this tissue does not generate electric slow waves. The absence of intramuscular interstitial cells in W/WV mutants provides a unique opportunity to study the molecular changes that are associated with the loss of these intercalating cells. Method The gene expression profile of the gastric fundus of wild type and W/WV mice was assayed by murine microarray analysis displaying a total of 8734 elements. Queried genes from the microarray analysis were confirmed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results Twenty-one genes were differentially expressed in wild type and W/WV mice. Eleven transcripts had 2.0–2.5 fold higher mRNA expression in W/WV gastric fundus when compared to wild type tissues. Ten transcripts had 2.1–3.9 fold lower expression in W/WV mutants in comparison with wild type animals. None of these genes have ever been implicated in any bowel motility function. Conclusions These data provides evidence that several important genes have significantly changed in the murine fundus of W/WV mutants that lack intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal and have reduced enteric motor neurotransmission.

  7. Microenvironmental regulation of stem cells in intestinal homeostasis and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Jan Paul; Vermeulen, Louis

    2011-01-01

    The identification of intestinal stem cells as well as their malignant counterparts, colon cancer stem cells, has undergone rapid development in recent years. Under physiological conditions, intestinal homeostasis is a carefully balanced and efficient interplay between stem cells, their progeny and

  8. Paneth cells, antimicrobial peptides and maintenance of intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevins, Charles L; Salzman, Nita H

    2011-05-01

    Building and maintaining a homeostatic relationship between a host and its colonizing microbiota entails ongoing complex interactions between the host and the microorganisms. The mucosal immune system, including epithelial cells, plays an essential part in negotiating this equilibrium. Paneth cells (specialized cells in the epithelium of the small intestine) are an important source of antimicrobial peptides in the intestine. These cells have become the focus of investigations that explore the mechanisms of host-microorganism homeostasis in the small intestine and its collapse in the processes of infection and chronic inflammation. In this Review, we provide an overview of the intestinal microbiota and describe the cell biology of Paneth cells, emphasizing the composition of their secretions and the roles of these cells in intestinal host defence and homeostasis. We also highlight the implications of Paneth cell dysfunction in susceptibility to chronic inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. Cdc42-dependent leading edge coordination is essential for interstitial dendritic cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lammermann, Tim; Renkawitz, Jorg; Wu, Xunwei

    2009-01-01

    Mature dendritic cells (DCs) moving from the skin to the lymph node are a prototypic example of rapidly migrating amoeboid leukocytes. Interstitial DC migration is directionally guided by chemokines, but independent of specific adhesive interactions with the tissue as well as pericellular proteol...

  10. Wnt, stem cells and cancer in the intestine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinto, D.; Clevers, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is a self-renewing tissue which represents a unique model for studying interconnected cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, cell migration and carcinogenesis. Although the stem cells of the intestine have not yet been physically characterized or

  11. Stem cell self-renewal in intestinal crypt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, B.D.; Clevers, H.

    2011-01-01

    As a rapidly cycling tissue capable of fast repair and regeneration, the intestinal epithelium has emerged as a favored model system to explore the principles of adult stem cell biology. However, until recently, the identity and characteristics of the stem cell population in both the small intestine

  12. Regulation of intestinal homeostasis by innate immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayama, Hisako; Nishimura, Junichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2013-12-01

    The intestinal immune system has an ability to distinguish between the microbiota and pathogenic bacteria, and then activate pro-inflammatory pathways against pathogens for host defense while remaining unresponsive to the microbiota and dietary antigens. In the intestine, abnormal activation of innate immunity causes development of several inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Thus, activity of innate immunity is finely regulated in the intestine. To date, multiple innate immune cells have been shown to maintain gut homeostasis by preventing inadequate adaptive immune responses in the murine intestine. Additionally, several innate immune subsets, which promote Th1 and Th17 responses and are implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD, have recently been identified in the human intestinal mucosa. The demonstration of both murine and human intestinal innate immune subsets contributing to regulation of adaptive immunity emphasizes the conserved innate immune functions across species and might promote development of the intestinal innate immunity-based clinical therapy.

  13. Interstitial mononuclear cell infiltrates in chronic rejection of the kidney and correlation with peripheral blood.

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, H. J.; Hong, S. W.; Kim, Y. S.; Kim, M. S.; Choi, I. H.; Park, K.; Choi, I. J.

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of interstitial inflammatory cells and possible involvement of nudelta T cells, 16 renal allograft biopsies showing chronic rejection were stained by immunohistochemical method and correlated with the data of peripheral blood evaluated by flow cytometry. For immunophenotyping, fresh frozen sections were stained with monoclonal antibodies against CD3, CD4, CD8, CD68, CD56, TCRdelta1 and HLA DR. Paraffin embedded tissue was stained with CD45RO, CD20-Cy and CD6...

  14. Interstitial cell migration: integrin-dependent and alternative adhesion mechanisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, S.; Friedl, P.H.A.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesion and migration are integrated cell functions that build, maintain and remodel the multicellular organism. In migrating cells, integrins are the main transmembrane receptors that provide dynamic interactions between extracellular ligands and actin cytoskeleton and signalling machineries. In

  15. Thyroid hormone regulation of adult intestinal stem cells: Implications on intestinal development and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guihong; Roediger, Julia; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2016-12-01

    Organ-specific adult stem cells are essential for organ homeostasis, tissue repair and regeneration. The formation of such stem cells often takes place during postembryonic development, a period around birth in mammals when plasma thyroid hormone concentration is high. The life-long self-renewal of the intestinal epithelium has made mammalian intestine a valuable model to study the function and regulation and adult stem cells. On the other hand, much less is known about how the adult intestinal stem cells are formed during vertebrate development. Here, we will review some recent progresses on this subject, focusing mainly on the formation of the adult intestine during Xenopus metamorphosis. We will discuss the role of thyroid hormone signaling pathway in the process and potential molecular conservations between amphibians and mammals as well as the implications in organ homeostasis and human diseases.

  16. Stem cell self-renewal in intestinal crypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, Benjamin D.; Clevers, Hans

    2011-01-01

    As a rapidly cycling tissue capable of fast repair and regeneration, the intestinal epithelium has emerged as a favored model system to explore the principles of adult stem cell biology. However, until recently, the identity and characteristics of the stem cell population in both the small intestine and colon has remained the subject of debate. Recent studies based on targeted lineage tracing strategies, combined with the development of an organotypic culture system, have identified the crypt base columnar cell as the intestinal stem cell, and have unveiled the strategy by which the balance between proliferation and differentiation is maintained. These results show that intestinal stem cells operate in a dynamic environment in which frequent and stochastic stem cell loss is compensated by the proliferation of neighboring stem cells. We review the basis of these experimental findings and the insights they offer into the mechanisms of homeostatic stem cell regulation.

  17. T Cell Interstitial Migration: Motility Cues from the Inflamed Tissue for Micro- and Macro-Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylo, Alison; Schrock, Dillon C; Fernandes, Ninoshka R J; Fowell, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Effector T cells exit the inflamed vasculature into an environment shaped by tissue-specific structural configurations and inflammation-imposed extrinsic modifications. Once within interstitial spaces of non-lymphoid tissues, T cells migrate in an apparent random, non-directional, fashion. Efficient T cell scanning of the tissue environment is essential for successful location of infected target cells or encounter with antigen-presenting cells that activate the T cell's antimicrobial effector functions. The mechanisms of interstitial T cell motility and the environmental cues that may promote or hinder efficient tissue scanning are poorly understood. The extracellular matrix (ECM) appears to play an important scaffolding role in guidance of T cell migration and likely provides a platform for the display of chemotactic factors that may help to direct the positioning of T cells. Here, we discuss how intravital imaging has provided insight into the motility patterns and cellular machinery that facilitates T cell interstitial migration and the critical environmental factors that may optimize the efficiency of effector T cell scanning of the inflamed tissue. Specifically, we highlight the local micro-positioning cues T cells encounter as they migrate within inflamed tissues, from surrounding ECM and signaling molecules, as well as a requirement for appropriate long-range macro-positioning within distinct tissue compartments or at discrete foci of infection or tissue damage. The central nervous system (CNS) responds to injury and infection by extensively remodeling the ECM and with the de novo generation of a fibroblastic reticular network that likely influences T cell motility. We examine how inflammation-induced changes to the CNS landscape may regulate T cell tissue exploration and modulate function.

  18. Changes of bronchoalveolar cell pattern and lecithin content in experimental interstitial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manabe, Hideki; Yasuoka, Susumu; Tsubura, Eiro

    1978-01-01

    The pathogenesis of diffuse interstitial fibrosing pneumonitis (DIFP) was studied by histological observations and analysis of the cells and lecithin content of bronchoalveolar lavage of rats with cyclophosphamide (CY)-induced pneumonitis or irradiation pneumonitis. The rats developed diffuse interstitial pneumonitis one week after the last of 5 intraperitoneal injections of 50 mg/kg of CY and gradually recovered in the next 14 weeks. The number of alveolar macrophages and the lecithin content in the bronchoalveolar lavage from these rats corresponded to the degree of inflammatory change of the lung tissue. The results of cell counts and analysis of the bronchoalveolar lavage from rats with irradiated pneumonitis were similar to those on rats with CY-induced pneumonitis, except that in irradiated rats the lecithin content of the lavage decreased with increase in severity of pulmonary fibrosis. These results indicate that the cell number and lecithin content of bronchoalveolar lavage are good parameters for use in diagnosis of DIFP. (auth.)

  19. Interstitial administration of perfluorochemical emulsions for reoxygenation of hypoxic tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, D.V.; Seegenschmiedt, H.; Schweighardt, F.K.; Emrich, J.; McGarvey, K.; Caridi, M.; Brady, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    Microparticulate perfluorochemical (PFC) emulsions have the capacity to solubilize significant quantities of oxygen compared to water. Although systemic administration of such emulsions may enhance oxygen delivery to some tissues, hypoxic tumor cells have marginal vascular supplies. The authors report studies which directly attempt to oxygenate hypoxic tumor cells by interstitial administration of oxygenated PFC emulsions followed by radiation therapy. Fortner MMI malignant melanomas (21 day old) grown in Syrian Golden hamsters were injected directly with either oxygenated PFC emulsions or Ringers solution. The volume of test substance administered was equal to 50% of the tumor volume. The tumors were immediately irradiated with 25 Gy of 10 MeV photons (Clinac 18). The tumor dimensions were measured daily post irradiation and the tumor doubling time determined. The results suggest that interstitial administration of oxygenated PFC emulsions directly into tumors followed by radiation therapy may increase the likelihood of killing hypoxic tumor cells

  20. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells maintain intestinal epithelial stem cells after tissue damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Aparicio-Domingo (Patricia); M. Romera Hernández (Mónica); J.J. Karrich (Julien J.); F.H.J. Cornelissen (Ferry); N. Papazian (Natalie); D.J. Lindenbergh-Kortleve (Dicky); J.A. Butler (James A.); L. Boon (Louis); M. Coles (Mark); J.N. Samsom (Janneke); T. Cupedo (Tom)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDisruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier allows bacterial translocation and predisposes to destructive inflammation. To ensure proper barrier composition, crypt-residing stem cells continuously proliferate and replenish all intestinal epithelial cells within days. As a consequence

  1. An Interstitial Network of Podoplanin-Expressing Cells in the Human Endolymphatic Duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerl, Christina; Rubin, Kristofer; Wick, Georg; Rask-Andersen, Helge

    2006-01-01

    The human endolymphatic duct (ED) with encompassing interstitial connective tissue (CT) is believed to be important for endolymph resorption and fluid pressure regulation of the inner ear. The periductal CT cells are interconnected via numerous cellular extensions, but do not form vessel structures. Here we report that the periductal CT is populated by two distinct cell phenotypes; one expressing podoplanin, a protein otherwise found on lymph endothelia and on epithelia involved in fluid fluxes, and a second expressing a fibroblast marker. A majority of the interstitial cells expressed podoplanin but not the lymphatic endothelial cell markers hyaluronan receptor (LYVE-1) or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3). The fibroblast marker positive cells were found close to the ED epithelium. In the mid- and distal parts of the ED, these cells were enriched under folded epithelia. Furthermore, subepithelial CT cells were found to express activated platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)-β receptors. Cultured CT cells from human inner ear periductal and perisaccular explant tissues were identified as fibroblasts. These cells compacted a three-dimensional collagen lattice by a process that could be promoted by PDGF-BB, a factor involved in interstitial fluid pressure regulation. Our results are compatible with the notion that the periductal CT cells are involved in the regulation of inner ear fluid pressure. By active compaction of the periductal CT and by the formation of villous structures, the CT cells could modulate fluid fluxes over the ED epithelium as well as the longitudinal flow of endolymph in the ED. PMID:16408168

  2. Intestinal Stem Cell Markers in the Intestinal Metaplasia of Stomach and Barrett's Esophagus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Gun Jang

    Full Text Available Gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM is a highly prevalent preneoplastic lesion; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating its development remain unclear. We have previously shown that a population of cells expressing the intestinal stem cell (ISC marker LGR5 increases remarkably in IM. In this study, we further investigated the molecular characteristics of these LGR5+ cells in IM by examining the expression profile of several ISC markers. Notably, we found that ISC markers-including OLFM4 and EPHB2-are positively associated with the CDX2 expression in non-tumorous gastric tissues. This finding was confirmed in stomach lesions with or without metaplasia, which demonstrated that OLFM4 and EPHB2 expression gradually increased with metaplastic progression. Moreover, RNA in situ hybridization revealed that LGR5+ cells coexpress several ISC markers and remained confined to the base of metaplastic glands, reminiscent to that of normal intestinal crypts, whereas those in normal antral glands expressed none of these markers. Furthermore, a large number of ISC marker-expressing cells were diffusely distributed in gastric adenomas, suggesting that these markers may facilitate gastric tumorigenesis. In addition, Barrett's esophagus (BE-which is histologically similar to intestinal metaplasia-exhibited a similar distribution of ISC markers, indicating the presence of a stem cell population with intestinal differentiation potential. In conclusion, we identified that LGR5+ cells in gastric IM and BE coexpress ISC markers, and exhibit the same expression profile as those found in normal intestinal crypts. Taken together, these results implicate an intestinal-like stem cell population in the pathogenesis of IM, and provide an important basis for understanding the development and maintenance of this disease.

  3. Bovine lactoferrin regulates cell survival, apoptosis and inflammation in intestinal epithelial cells and preterm pig intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Jiang, Pingping; Stensballe, Allan; Bendixen, Emøke; Sangild, Per T; Chatterton, Dereck E W

    2016-04-29

    Bovine lactoferrin (bLF) may modulate neonatal intestinal inflammation. Previous studies in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) indicated that moderate bLF doses enhance proliferation whereas high doses trigger inflammation. To further elucidate cellular mechanisms, we profiled the porcine IEC proteome after stimulation with bLF at 0, 0.1, 1 and 10g/L by LC-MS-based proteomics. Key pathways were analyzed in the intestine of formula-fed preterm pigs with and without supplementation of 10g/L bLF. Levels of 123 IEC proteins were altered by bLF. Low bLF doses (0.1-1g/L) up-regulated 11 proteins associated with glycolysis, energy metabolism and protein synthesis, indicating support of cell survival. In contrast, a high bLF dose (10g/L) up-regulated three apoptosis-inducing proteins, down-regulated five anti-apoptotic and proliferation-inducing proteins and 15 proteins related to energy and amino acid metabolism, and altered three proteins enhancing the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) pathway. In the preterm pig intestine, bLF at 10g/L decreased villus height/crypt depth ratio and up-regulated the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and HIF-1α, indicating elevated intestinal apoptosis and inflammation. In conclusion, bLF dose-dependently affects IECs via metabolic, apoptotic and inflammatory pathways. It is important to select an appropriate dose when feeding neonates with bLF to avoid detrimental effects exerted by excessive doses. The present work elucidates dose-dependent effects of bLF on the proteomic changes of IECs in vitro supplemented with data from a preterm pig study confirming detrimental effects of enteral feeding with the highest dose of bLF (10g/L). The study contributes to further understanding on mechanisms that bLF, as an important milk protein, can regulate the homeostasis of the immature intestine. Results from this study urge neonatologists to carefully consider the dose of bLF to supplement into infant formula used for preterm neonates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  4. TNF-α inhibits SCF, ghrelin, and substance P expressions through the NF-κB pathway activation in interstitial cells of Cajal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Keyu; Yong, Chunming; Yuan, Hao; Cao, Bin; Zhao, Kun; Wang, Jin

    2018-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon where intestinal motility is disturbed. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are required to maintain normal intestinal motility. In the present study, we assessed the effect of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) on viability and apoptosis of ICC, as well as on the expression of stem cell factor (SCF), ghrelin, and substance P. ICC were derived from the small intestines of Swiss albino mice. Cell viability and apoptosis were measured using CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. ELISA was used to measure the concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, ghrelin, substance P, and endothelin-1. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to measure the expression of SCF. Western blotting was used to measure the expression of apoptosis-related proteins, interleukins, SCF, and NF-κB signaling pathway proteins. TNF-α induced inflammatory injury in ICC by decreasing cell viability and increasing apoptosis and levels of IL-1β and IL-6. TNF-α decreased the levels of SCF, ghrelin, and substance P, but had no effect on endothelin-1. TNF-α down-regulated expressions of SCF, ghrelin, and substance P by activating the NF-κB pathway in ICC. In conclusion, TNF-α down-regulated the expressions of SCF, ghrelin, and substance P via the activation of the NF-κB pathway in ICC.

  5. Distribution of mast cell subtypes in interstitial cystitis: implications for novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Shabana T; Birch, Brian R; Voegeli, David; Fader, Mandy; Foria, Vipul; Cooper, Alan J; Walls, Andrew F; Lwaleed, Bashir A

    2018-05-15

    To identify the presence and geographical distribution of mast cell (MC) subtypes: MC T (tryptase positive-chymase negative) and MC TC (tryptase positive-chymase positive) in bladder tissue. Bladder tissue was obtained from patients with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (n=14) and normal histology from University Hospital Southampton tissue bank. Sequential tissue slices were immunohistochemically stained for MC subtypes using anti-MC tryptase (for MC T and MC TC ) and anti-MC chymase (for MC TC ). Stained sections were photographed, and positively stained MCs were quantified using ImageJ. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and individual paired t-tests. There was a significant difference in the density of MCs between each layer of the disease bladder, with the greatest accumulation within the detrusor (p<0.001). There was a significant increase in MC TC subtype in the lamina (p=0.009) in painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Our results suggest that mastocytosis is present within all layers of disease bladder, especially the muscle layer. The varying increase in MC subtypes in the lamina and mucosa may explain the variability in painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis symptoms. A high influx of MC TC in the mucosa of individuals who also had ulceration noted within their diagnostic notes may be of the Hunner's ulcer subclassification. These findings suggest a relationship between the pathogenesis of MC subtypes and the clinical presentation of painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis. A cohort study would further elucidate the diagnostic and/or therapeutic potential of MCs in patients with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells in subserosa of human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johannes; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Hansen, Alastair

    2013-01-01

    vesicles) were prominent. The IC-SS ultrastructure was different from that of FLC in the longitudinal layer, which had no caveolae and fewer intermediate filaments. Peg-and-socket junctions between IC-SS and between IC-SS and muscle cells were present, and IC-SS processes had close, selective appositions...

  7. Fluorescent labelling of intestinal epithelial cells reveals independent long-lived intestinal stem cells in a crypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horita, Nobukatsu; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Hayashi, Ryohei; Fukushima, Keita; Hibiya, Shuji; Fukuda, Masayoshi; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Yui, Shiro; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Lentivirus mixed with Matrigel enables direct infection of intestinal organoids. • Our original approach allows the marking of a single stem cell in a crypt. • Time-lapse imaging shows the dynamics of a single stem cell. • Our lentivirus transgene system demonstrates plural long-lived stem cells in a crypt. - Abstract: Background and aims: The dynamics of intestinal stem cells are crucial for regulation of intestinal function and maintenance. Although crypt stem cells have been identified in the intestine by genetic marking methods, identification of plural crypt stem cells has not yet been achieved as they are visualised in the same colour. Methods: Intestinal organoids were transferred into Matrigel® mixed with lentivirus encoding mCherry. The dynamics of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using time-lapse imaging, and the localisation of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using 3D immunofluorescence. Results: We established an original method for the introduction of a transgene into an organoid generated from mouse small intestine that resulted in continuous fluorescence of the mCherry protein in a portion of organoid cells. Three-dimensional analysis using confocal microscopy showed a single mCherry-positive cell in an organoid crypt that had been cultured for >1 year, which suggested the presence of long-lived mCherry-positive and -negative stem cells in the same crypt. Moreover, a single mCherry-positive stem cell in a crypt gave rise to both crypt base columnar cells and transit amplifying cells. Each mCherry-positive and -negative cell contributed to the generation of organoids. Conclusions: The use of our original lentiviral transgene system to mark individual organoid crypt stem cells showed that long-lived plural crypt stem cells might independently serve as intestinal epithelial cells, resulting in the formation of a completely functional villus

  8. Fluorescent labelling of intestinal epithelial cells reveals independent long-lived intestinal stem cells in a crypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horita, Nobukatsu [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Tsuchiya, Kiichiro, E-mail: kii.gast@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Diseases, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Hayashi, Ryohei [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Hiroshima University (Japan); Fukushima, Keita; Hibiya, Shuji; Fukuda, Masayoshi; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Yui, Shiro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Okamoto, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya [Department of Advanced Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Diseases, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Watanabe, Mamoru [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Lentivirus mixed with Matrigel enables direct infection of intestinal organoids. • Our original approach allows the marking of a single stem cell in a crypt. • Time-lapse imaging shows the dynamics of a single stem cell. • Our lentivirus transgene system demonstrates plural long-lived stem cells in a crypt. - Abstract: Background and aims: The dynamics of intestinal stem cells are crucial for regulation of intestinal function and maintenance. Although crypt stem cells have been identified in the intestine by genetic marking methods, identification of plural crypt stem cells has not yet been achieved as they are visualised in the same colour. Methods: Intestinal organoids were transferred into Matrigel® mixed with lentivirus encoding mCherry. The dynamics of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using time-lapse imaging, and the localisation of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using 3D immunofluorescence. Results: We established an original method for the introduction of a transgene into an organoid generated from mouse small intestine that resulted in continuous fluorescence of the mCherry protein in a portion of organoid cells. Three-dimensional analysis using confocal microscopy showed a single mCherry-positive cell in an organoid crypt that had been cultured for >1 year, which suggested the presence of long-lived mCherry-positive and -negative stem cells in the same crypt. Moreover, a single mCherry-positive stem cell in a crypt gave rise to both crypt base columnar cells and transit amplifying cells. Each mCherry-positive and -negative cell contributed to the generation of organoids. Conclusions: The use of our original lentiviral transgene system to mark individual organoid crypt stem cells showed that long-lived plural crypt stem cells might independently serve as intestinal epithelial cells, resulting in the formation of a completely functional villus.

  9. Activated STAT5 Confers Resistance to Intestinal Injury by Increasing Intestinal Stem Cell Proliferation and Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shila Gilbert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal epithelial stem cells (IESCs control the intestinal homeostatic response to inflammation and regeneration. The underlying mechanisms are unclear. Cytokine-STAT5 signaling regulates intestinal epithelial homeostasis and responses to injury. We link STAT5 signaling to IESC replenishment upon injury by depletion or activation of Stat5 transcription factor. We found that depletion of Stat5 led to deregulation of IESC marker expression and decreased LGR5+ IESC proliferation. STAT5-deficient mice exhibited worse intestinal histology and impaired crypt regeneration after γ-irradiation. We generated a transgenic mouse model with inducible expression of constitutively active Stat5. In contrast to Stat5 depletion, activation of STAT5 increased IESC proliferation, accelerated crypt regeneration, and conferred resistance to intestinal injury. Furthermore, ectopic activation of STAT5 in mouse or human stem cells promoted LGR5+ IESC self-renewal. Accordingly, STAT5 promotes IESC proliferation and regeneration to mitigate intestinal inflammation. STAT5 is a functional therapeutic target to improve the IESC regenerative response to gut injury.

  10. Cellular Evidence of Telocytes as Novel Interstitial Cells Within the Magnum of Chicken Oviduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Zhu, Xudong; Wang, Lingling; Ahmed, Nisar; Huang, Yufei; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Qian; Ullah, Shakeeb; Liu, Tengfei; Guo, Dawei; Brohi, Sarfaraz Ahmed; Chen, Qiusheng

    2017-01-24

    Telocytes are a novel type of interstitial cell that has been identified in many organs of mammals, but there is little information available on these cells in avian species. This study shows the latest findings associated with telocytes in the muscular layer and lamina propria of the magnum of chicken oviduct analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Telocytes are characterized by telopodes, which are thin and long prolongations, and a small amount of cytoplasm rich with mitochondria. Spindle- or triangular-shaped telocytes were detected at various locations in the magnum. In the muscular layer, telocytes have direct connection with smooth muscle cells. The cell body of telocytes along with their long telopodes mainly exists in the interstitial space between the smooth muscle bundles, whereas large numbers of short telopodes are scattered in between the smooth muscle cells. In the lamina propria, extremely long telopodes are twisting around each other and are usually collagen embedded. Both in the lamina propria and muscular layer, telocytes have a close relationship with other cell types, such as immune cells and blood vessels. Telopodes appear with dichotomous branching alternating between the podom and podomer, forming a 3D network structure with complex homo- and heterocellular junctions. In addition, a distinctive size of the vesicles is visible around the telopodes and may be released from telopodes because of the close relation between the vesicle and telopode. All characteristics of telocytes in the magnum indicate that telocytes may play a potential, but important, role in the pathogenesis of oviduct diseases.

  11. Plasticity of intestinal epithelial cells in regeneration and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetteh, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular plasticity refers to the ability of a cell to change its fate or identity in response to external or intrinsic factors. Regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury is driven mainly by plasticity of crypt stem cells that can rapidly divide to replace all the lost cells. Stem cell

  12. Hyperandrogenism from an ovarian interstitial-cell tumor in an alpaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Rosanne; Kutzler, Michelle; Valentine, Beth A; Semevolos, Stacy

    2006-11-01

    An 8-year-old intact female Huacaya alpaca (Lama pacos) was presented for recent development of male behavior. Serum testosterone concentration was determined to be 969.1 pg/ml by using radioimmunoassay, while the range in 33 healthy female adult intact alpacas was 11.7-62.1 pg/ml. An ovarian mass was suspected, and an exploratory laparotomy was performed. A tan mass was present on the left ovary. Histologically, the mass was composed of closely packed, plump, polygonal cells with central round nuclei with granular chromatin and abundant eosinophilic finely granular to vesiculate cytoplasm. An ovarian benign interstitial (Leydig) cell tumor was diagnosed.

  13. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue and floor of mouth. Evaluation of interstitial radium therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delclos, L.; Lindberg, R.D.; Fletcher, G.H.

    1976-01-01

    From January 1965, to December 1972, 46 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the floor of the mouth and 102 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue were treated at M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute by interstitial irradiation alone or in combination with external irradiation. Through the years the combination of radiation therapy modalities has been adjusted in an attempt to improve local control, keeping complications to a minimum. In this paper we analyze local control, cause of failure and complications as related to the primary size (T Stage) and radiation therapy techniques employed

  14. Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Huaqi; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. The recent discovery of somatic stem cells in adult Drosophila, particularly the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) of the midgut, has established Drosophila as an exciting model to study stem cell-mediated adult tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Here, we review the major signaling pathways that regulate the self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation of Drosophila ISCs, discussing how this regulation maintains midgut homeostasis and mediates regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury. -- Highlights: ► The homeostasis and regeneration of adult fly midguts are mediated by ISCs. ► Damaged enterocytes induce the proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISC). ► EGFR and Jak/Stat signalings mediate compensatory ISC proliferation. ► Notch signaling regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation.

  15. Identification of Interstitial Cajal-like cells in the Human Thoracic Duct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødtkjer, Donna Marie Briggs; Rumessen, Jüri; Baandrup, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    were used to identify ICLCs in live tissue. Methylene blue stained cells with morphology suggestive of ICLCs in the TD. Immunoreactivity localized the ICLC protein markers c-kit, CD34 and vimentin to many cells and processes associated with smooth muscle cells (SMCs): coexpression of c......-kit with vimentin or CD34 was observed in some cells. Electron microscopy analysis confirmed ICLCs as a major cell type of the human TD. Lymphatic ICLCs possess caveolae, dense bands, a patchy basal lamina, intermediate filaments and specific junctions to SMCs. ICLCs were ultrastructurally differentiable from other......Interstitial Cajal-like cells (ICLCs) are speculated to be pacemakers in smooth muscle tissues. While the human thoracic duct (TD) is spontaneously active, the origin of this activity is unknown. We hypothesized that ICLCs could be present in the TD and using histological techniques...

  16. Epithelial Cell Inflammasomes in Intestinal Immunity and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea C. Lei-Leston

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRR, such as NOD-like receptors (NLRs, sense conserved microbial signatures, and host danger signals leading to the coordination of appropriate immune responses. Upon activation, a subset of NLR initiate the assembly of a multimeric protein complex known as the inflammasome, which processes pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediates a specialized form of cell death known as pyroptosis. The identification of inflammasome-associated genes as inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility genes implicates a role for the inflammasome in intestinal inflammation. Despite the fact that the functional importance of inflammasomes within immune cells has been well established, the contribution of inflammasome expression in non-hematopoietic cells remains comparatively understudied. Given that intestinal epithelial cells (IEC act as a barrier between the host and the intestinal microbiota, inflammasome expression by these cells is likely important for intestinal immune homeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the inflammasome plays a key role in shaping epithelial responses at the host–lumen interface with many inflammasome components highly expressed by IEC. Recent studies have exposed functional roles of IEC inflammasomes in mucosal immune defense, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. In this review, we present the main features of the predominant inflammasomes and their effector mechanisms contributing to intestinal homeostasis and inflammation. We also discuss existing controversies in the field and open questions related to their implications in disease. A comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of intestinal inflammasome signaling could hold therapeutic potential for clinical translation.

  17. Synthesis of protein in intestinal cells exposed to cholera toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.W.; Berg, W.D. Jr.; Coppenhaver, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism by which cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), formed by intestinal epithelial cells in response to cholera toxin, ultimately results in alterations in water and electrolyte transport is poorly understood. Several studies have indicated that inhibitors of transcription or translation block much of the transport of ions and water in the intestine and edema formation in tissue elicited by cholera toxin. Data presented in this study confirmed the inhibitory effects of cycloheximide on cholera toxin-induced fluid accumulation in the rabbit intestinal loop model. Neither cycloheximide nor actinomycin D altered the amount of cyclic AMP that accumulated in intestinal cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed to cholera toxin. An increase in [ 3 H] leucine incorporation was readily demonstrable in intestinal epithelial cells from rabbits challenged with Vibrio cholerae. Similarly, intestinal epithelial cells incubated with cholera toxin for 4 hr synthesized substantially more protein than controls as determined by relative incorporation of [ 35 S] methionine. Most of the new protein synthesized in response to cholera toxin was membrane associated and of high molecular weight. The possible significance of the toxin-induced protein relative to cholera pathogenesis was discussed

  18. Very late onset small intestinal B cell lymphoma associated with primary intestinal lymphangiectasia and diffuse cutaneous warts

    OpenAIRE

    Bouhnik, Y; Etienney, I; Nemeth, J; Thevenot, T; Lavergne-Slove, A; Matuchansky, C

    2000-01-01

    As only a handful of lymphoma cases have been reported in conjunction with primary intestinal lymphangiectasia, it is not yet clear if this association is merely fortuitous or related to primary intestinal lymphangiectasia induced immune deficiency. We report on two female patients, 50 and 58 years old, who developed small intestinal high grade B cell lymphoma a long time (45 and 40 years, respectively) after the initial clinical manifestations of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia. They pre...

  19. BVES Regulates Intestinal Stem Cell Programs and Intestinal Crypt Viability after Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vishruth K.; Short, Sarah P.; Barrett, Caitlyn W.; Mittal, Mukul K.; Keating, Cody E.; Thompson, Joshua J.; Harris, Elizabeth I.; Revetta, Frank; Bader, David M.; Brand, Thomas; Washington, M. Kay; Williams, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Blood Vessel Epicardial Substance (BVES/Popdc1) is a junctional-associated transmembrane protein that is underexpressed in a number of malignancies and regulates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. We previously identified a role for BVES in regulation of the Wnt pathway, a modulator of intestinal stem cell programs, but its role in small intestinal (SI) biology remains unexplored. We hypothesized that BVES influences intestinal stem cell programs and is critical to SI homeostasis after radiation injury. At baseline, Bves−/− mice demonstrated increased crypt height, as well as elevated proliferation and expression of the stem cell marker Lgr5 compared to wildtype (WT) mice. Intercross with Lgr5-EGFP reporter mice confirmed expansion of the stem cell compartment in Bves−/− mice. To examine stem cell function after BVES deletion, we employed ex vivo 3D-enteroid cultures. Bves−/− enteroids demonstrated increased stemness compared to WT, when examining parameters such as plating efficiency, stem spheroid formation, and retention of peripheral cystic structures. Furthermore, we observed increased proliferation, expression of crypt-base columnar “CBC” and “+4” stem cell markers, amplified Wnt signaling, and responsiveness to Wnt activation in the Bves−/− enteroids. Bves expression was downregulated after radiation in WT mice. Moreover, after radiation, Bves−/− mice demonstrated significantly greater small intestinal crypt viability, proliferation, and amplified Wnt signaling in comparison to WT mice. Bves−/− mice also demonstrated elevations in Lgr5 and Ascl2 expression, and putative damage-responsive stem cell populations marked by Bmi1 and TERT. Therefore, BVES is a key regulator of intestinal stem cell programs and mucosal homeostasis. PMID:26891025

  20. Occurrence of lymphoid cells in the intestine of the Goldfish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinberg, Steven

    1975-01-01

    The Goldfish intestine normally contains a large number of lymphocytes, many of them being present in the epithelial layer. After stimulation with antigen, the number of lymphoid cells does not increase, but the proportion of large pyroninophilic cells and plasma cells does. It seems therefore that

  1. Interstitial Fluid Flow Increases Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Invasion through CXCR4/CXCL12 and MEK/ERK Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of liver cancer (~80%), and it is one of the few cancer types with rising incidence in the United States. This highly invasive cancer is very difficult to detect until its later stages, resulting in limited treatment options and low survival rates. There is a dearth of knowledge regarding the mechanisms associated with the effects of biomechanical forces such as interstitial fluid flow (IFF) on hepatocellular carcinoma invasion. We hypothesized that interstitial fluid flow enhanced hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion through chemokine-mediated autologous chemotaxis. Utilizing a 3D in vitro invasion assay, we demonstrated that interstitial fluid flow promoted invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma derived cell lines. Furthermore, we showed that autologous chemotaxis influences this interstitial fluid flow-induced invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma derived cell lines via the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4)/C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12) signaling axis. We also demonstrated that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling affects interstitial fluid flow-induced invasion; however, this pathway was separate from CXCR4/CXCL12 signaling. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the potential role of interstitial fluid flow in hepatocellular carcinoma invasion. Uncovering the mechanisms that control hepatocellular carcinoma invasion will aid in enhancing current liver cancer therapies and provide better treatment options for patients. PMID:26560447

  2. Intestinal dendritic cells in the regulation of mucosal immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekiaris, Vasileios; Persson, Emma K.; Agace, William Winston

    2014-01-01

    immune cells within the mucosa must suitably respond to maintain intestinal integrity, while also providing the ability to mount effective immune responses to potential pathogens. Dendritic cells (DCs) are sentinel immune cells that play a central role in the initiation and differentiation of adaptive....... The recognition that dietary nutrients and microbial communities in the intestine influence both mucosal and systemic immune cell development and function as well as immune-mediated disease has led to an explosion of literature in mucosal immunology in recent years and a growing interest in the functionality...

  3. Intestinal stromal cells in mucosal immunity and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, B M J; Simmons, A

    2013-03-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that non-hematopoietic stromal cells of the intestine have multiple roles in immune responses and inflammation at this mucosal site. Despite this, many still consider gut stromal cells as passive structural entities, with past research focused heavily on their roles in fibrosis, tumor progression, and wound healing, rather than their contributions to immune function. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of stromal cells in intestinal immunity, highlighting the many immunological axes in which stromal cells have a functional role. We also consider emerging data that broaden the potential scope of their contribution to immunity in the gut and argue that these so-called "non-immune" cells are reclassified in light of their diverse contributions to intestinal innate immunity and the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis.

  4. Changes in the Interstitial Cells of Cajal and Immunity in Chronic Psychological Stress Rats and Therapeutic Effects of Acupuncture at the Zusanli Point (ST36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mucang Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Now, chronic psychological stress (CPS related diseases are increasing. Many CPS patients have gastrointestinal complaints, immune suppression, and immune imbalance. Increasing evidence is indicating that acupuncture (AP at the Zusanli point (ST36 can alleviate functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID, immune suppression, and immune imbalance. However, few studies have investigated the potential mechanisms. In this study, CPS rat models were established, and electroacupuncture (EA at ST36 was done for CPS rats. Daily food intake, weight, intestinal sensitivity, the morphology of interstitial cell of Cajal (ICC in the small intestine, and serum indexes were measured. The study found that, in CPS rats, EA at ST36 could improve food intake, weight, visceral hypersensitivity, and immunity; in CPS rats, in small intestine, the morphology of ICCs was abnormal and the number was decreased, which may be part causes of gastrointestinal motility dysfunction. EA at ST36 showed useful therapeutic effects. The mechanisms may be partially related to its repairing effects on ICCs damages; in CPS rats, there were immune suppression and immune imbalance, which may be part causes of visceral hypersensitivity. EA at ST36 showed useful therapeutic effects. The mechanisms may be partially related to its regulation on immunity.

  5. Abdominal Manual Therapy Repairs Interstitial Cells of Cajal and Increases Colonic c-Kit Expression When Treating Bowel Dysfunction after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effects of abdominal manual therapy (AMT on bowel dysfunction after spinal cord injury (SCI, investigating interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs and related c-kit expression. Methods. Model rats were divided as SCI and SCI with drug treatment (intragastric mosapride, low-intensity (SCI + LMT; 50 g, 50 times/min, and high-intensity AMT (SCI + HMT; 100 g, 150 times/min. After 14 days of treatment, weight, improved Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB locomotor score, and intestinal movement were evaluated. Morphological structure of spinal cord and colon tissues were examined. Immunostaining, RT-PCR, and western blot were used to assess c-kit expression. Results. In SCI rats, AMT could not restore BBB, but it significantly increased weight, shortened time to defecation, increased feces amounts, and improved fecal pellet traits and colon histology. AMT improved the number, distribution, and ultrastructure of colonic ICCs, increasing colonic c-kit mRNA and protein levels. Compared with the SCI + Drug and SCI + LMT groups, the SCI + HMT group showed better therapeutic effect in improving intestinal transmission function and promoting c-kit expression. Conclusions. AMT is an effective therapy for recovery of intestinal transmission function. It could repair ICCs and increase c-kit expression in colon tissues after SCI, in a frequency-dependent and pressure-dependent manner.

  6. Crohn's disease of the colon: ultrastructural changes in submuscular interstitial cells of Cajal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johs.; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    of the submuscular plexus were often empty and dilated. Fibroblast-like cells selectively encased macrophages and mast cells. The cytological changes in ICC-SMP in CD are thus similar to changes seen in ulcerative colitis and may be of pathophysiological significance with regard to the motility and sensory......Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) at the submuscular border of the human colon (ICC-SMP) are the proposed pacemaker cells of the musculature. In patients with Crohn's disease (CD) of the colon, ICC-SMP showed characteristic cytological changes from controls. The changes comprised secondary...... lysosomes in connection with lipid droplets and cytoplasmic vacuoles or multiple empty, confluent and often outbulging vacuoles merging with cisterns of granular endoplasmic reticulum and clusters of glycogen granules. These changes were most pronounced in patients with macroscopical mucosal inflammation...

  7. Clinical Implications of Intestinal Stem Cell Markers in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Olsen, Jesper; Linnemann, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) still has one of the highest incidence and mortality rate among cancers. Therefore, improved differential diagnostics and personalized treatment are still needed. Several intestinal stem cell markers have been found to be associated with CRC and might have a prognostic...... and predictive significance in CRC patients. This review provides an overview of the intestinal stem cell markers leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (LGR5), B cell–specific Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion site 1 (BMI1), Musashi1 (MSI1), and sex-determining region y-box 9 (SOX9......) and their implications in human CRC. The exact roles of the intestinal stem cell markers in CRC development and progression remain unclear; however, high expression of these stem cell markers have a potential prognostic significance and might be implicated in chemotherapy resistance...

  8. Interpreting heterogeneity in intestinal tuft cell structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amrita; McKinley, Eliot T; von Moltke, Jakob; Coffey, Robert J; Lau, Ken S

    2018-05-01

    Intestinal tuft cells are a morphologically unique cell type, best characterized by striking microvilli that form an apical tuft. These cells represent approximately 0.5% of gut epithelial cells depending on location. While they are known to express chemosensory receptors, their function has remained unclear. Recently, numerous groups have revealed startling insights into intestinal tuft cell biology. Here, we review the latest developments in understanding this peculiar cell type's structure and function. Recent advances in volumetric microscopy have begun to elucidate tuft cell ultrastructure with respect to its cellular neighbors. Moreover, single-cell approaches have revealed greater diversity in the tuft cell population than previously appreciated and uncovered novel markers to characterize this heterogeneity. Finally, advanced model systems have revealed tuft cells' roles in mucosal healing and orchestrating type 2 immunity against eukaryotic infection. While much remains unknown about intestinal tuft cells, these critical advances have illuminated the physiological importance of these previously understudied cells and provided experimentally tractable tools to interrogate this rare cell population. Tuft cells act as luminal sensors, linking the luminal microbiome to the host immune system, which may make them a potent clinical target for modulating host response to a variety of acute or chronic immune-driven conditions.

  9. TRAPping telomerase within the intestinal stem cell niche

    OpenAIRE

    Pech, Matthew F; Artandi, Steven E

    2011-01-01

    Recent work from Hans Clevers' lab reveals high telomerase activity and telomere length in dividing LGR5-positive intestinal stem cells. They further report random chromosome segregation and thus challenge the ‘immortal strand' hypothesis at least for this stem cell population.

  10. Intracellular Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum regulates slow wave currents and pacemaker activity of interstitial cells of Cajal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mei Hong; Sung, Tae Sik; O'Driscoll, Kate; Koh, Sang Don; Sanders, Kenton M

    2015-04-15

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) provide pacemaker activity in gastrointestinal muscles that underlies segmental and peristaltic contractions. ICC generate electrical slow waves that are due to large-amplitude inward currents resulting from anoctamin 1 (ANO1) channels, which are Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels. We investigated the hypothesis that the Ca(2+) responsible for the stochastic activation of ANO1 channels during spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs) and synchronized activation of ANO1 channels during slow wave currents comes from intracellular Ca(2+) stores. ICC, obtained from the small intestine of Kit(+/copGFP) mice, were studied under voltage and current clamp to determine the effects of blocking Ca(2+) uptake into stores and release of Ca(2+) via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-dependent and ryanodine-sensitive channels. Cyclocpiazonic acid, thapsigargin, 2-APB, and xestospongin C inhibited STICs and slow wave currents. Ryanodine and tetracaine also inhibited STICs and slow wave currents. Store-active compounds had no direct effects on ANO1 channels expressed in human embryonic kidney-293 cells. Under current clamp, store-active drugs caused significant depolarization of ICC and reduced spontaneous transient depolarizations (STDs). After block of ryanodine receptors with ryanodine and tetracaine, repolarization did not restore STDs. ANO1 expressed in ICC has limited access to cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration, suggesting that pacemaker activity depends on Ca(2+) dynamics in restricted microdomains. Our data from studies of isolated ICC differ somewhat from studies on intact muscles and suggest that release of Ca(2+) from both IP3 and ryanodine receptors is important in generating pacemaker activity in ICC. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Intracellular Ca2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum regulates slow wave currents and pacemaker activity of interstitial cells of Cajal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mei Hong; Sung, Tae Sik; O'Driscoll, Kate; Koh, Sang Don

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) provide pacemaker activity in gastrointestinal muscles that underlies segmental and peristaltic contractions. ICC generate electrical slow waves that are due to large-amplitude inward currents resulting from anoctamin 1 (ANO1) channels, which are Ca2+-activated Cl− channels. We investigated the hypothesis that the Ca2+ responsible for the stochastic activation of ANO1 channels during spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs) and synchronized activation of ANO1 channels during slow wave currents comes from intracellular Ca2+ stores. ICC, obtained from the small intestine of Kit+/copGFP mice, were studied under voltage and current clamp to determine the effects of blocking Ca2+ uptake into stores and release of Ca2+ via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-dependent and ryanodine-sensitive channels. Cyclocpiazonic acid, thapsigargin, 2-APB, and xestospongin C inhibited STICs and slow wave currents. Ryanodine and tetracaine also inhibited STICs and slow wave currents. Store-active compounds had no direct effects on ANO1 channels expressed in human embryonic kidney-293 cells. Under current clamp, store-active drugs caused significant depolarization of ICC and reduced spontaneous transient depolarizations (STDs). After block of ryanodine receptors with ryanodine and tetracaine, repolarization did not restore STDs. ANO1 expressed in ICC has limited access to cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, suggesting that pacemaker activity depends on Ca2+ dynamics in restricted microdomains. Our data from studies of isolated ICC differ somewhat from studies on intact muscles and suggest that release of Ca2+ from both IP3 and ryanodine receptors is important in generating pacemaker activity in ICC. PMID:25631870

  12. Radioprotection of intestinal crypt cells by cox-inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisnar, Paul O.; Dones, Rosa Angela S.A.; Serna, Paulene-Ver A.; Deocaris, Chester C.; Guttierez, Kalangitan V.; Deocaris, Custer C.

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of tissue homeostasis in the gastrointestinal epithelium after epithelial injury focuses on the prostaglandins(PGs) as its major mediators. The two cyclooxygenase isoforms, cox-1 and cox-2, catalyze synthesis of PGs. Cox-1 is the predominant cyclooxygenase isoform found in the normal intestine. In contrast, cox-2 is present at low levels in normal intestine but is elevated at sites of inflammation, and in adenomas and carcinomas. To study the effects of various commercially-available cox-inhibitors (Ketorolac: cox-1 selective; Celecoxib: cox-2 selective; and Indocid: cox-1/2 non-selective), we determine mouse crypt epithelial cell fate after genotoxic injury with whole-body gamma-ray exposure at 15 Gy. Intestinal tissues of mice treated with cox-2 inhibitors that showed invariable apoptotic event, however, have increased occurrence of regenerating cells. Our results suggest a potential application of cox-2 selective inhibitors as radioprotective agent for normal cells after radiotherapy. (Author)

  13. Modulation of invasive phenotype by interstitial pressure-driven convection in aggregates of human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Tien

    Full Text Available This paper reports the effect of elevated pressure on the invasive phenotype of patterned three-dimensional (3D aggregates of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. We found that the directionality of the interstitial pressure profile altered the frequency of invasion by cells located at the surface of an aggregate. In particular, application of pressure at one end of an aggregate suppressed invasion at the opposite end. Experimental alteration of the configuration of cell aggregates and computational modeling of the resulting flow and solute concentration profiles revealed that elevated pressure inhibited invasion by altering the chemical composition of the interstitial fluid near the surface of the aggregate. Our data reveal a link between hydrostatic pressure, interstitial convection, and invasion.

  14. Homing of immune cells: role in homeostasis and intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Ailsa L; Ng, Siew C; Mann, Elizabeth; Al-Hassi, Hafid Omar; Bernardo, David; Knight, Stella C

    2010-11-01

    Rather like a satellite navigation system directing a vehicle to a particular destination defined by post-code, immune cells have homing molecules or "immune post-codes" enabling them to be recruited to specific organs, such as the intestine or skin. An efficient system would be designed such that the site of entry of an antigen influences the homing of effector T cells back to the appropriate organ. For example, to mount an immune response against an intestinal pathogen, T cells with a propensity to home to the gut to clear the infection would be induced. In health, there is such a sophisticated and finely tuned system in operation, enabling an appropriate balance of immune activity in different anatomical compartments. In disease states such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which is characterized by intestinal inflammation and often an inflammatory process involving other organs such as skin, joints, liver, and eye, there is accumulating evidence that there is malfunction of this immune cell trafficking system. The clinical importance of dysregulated immune cell trafficking in IBD is reflected in recently proven efficacious therapies that target trafficking pathways such as natalizumab, an α4 integrin antibody, and Traficet-EN, a chemokine receptor-9 (CCR9) antagonist. Here we review the mechanisms involved in the homing of immune cells to different tissues, in particular the intestine, and focus on alterations in immune cell homing pathways in IBD. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying the immune post-code system would assist in achieving the goal of tissue-specific immunotherapy.

  15. HDAC1 and HDAC2 restrain the intestinal inflammatory response by regulating intestinal epithelial cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomie Turgeon

    Full Text Available Acetylation and deacetylation of histones and other proteins depends on histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs activities, leading to either positive or negative gene expression. HDAC inhibitors have uncovered a role for HDACs in proliferation, apoptosis and inflammation. However, little is known of the roles of specific HDACs in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC. We investigated the consequences of ablating both HDAC1 and HDAC2 in murine IECs. Floxed Hdac1 and Hdac2 homozygous mice were crossed with villin-Cre mice. Mice deficient in both IEC HDAC1 and HDAC2 weighed less and survived more than a year. Colon and small intestinal sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, or with Alcian blue and Periodic Acid Schiff for goblet cell identification. Tissue sections from mice injected with BrdU for 2 h, 14 h and 48 h were stained with anti-BrdU. To determine intestinal permeability, 4-kDa FITC-labeled dextran was given by gavage for 3 h. Microarray analysis was performed on total colon RNAs. Inflammatory and IEC-specific gene expression was assessed by Western blot or semi-quantitative RT-PCR and qPCR with respectively total colon protein and total colon RNAs. HDAC1 and HDAC2-deficient mice displayed: 1 increased migration and proliferation, with elevated cyclin D1 expression and phosphorylated S6 ribosomal protein, a downstream mTOR target; 2 tissue architecture defects with cell differentiation alterations, correlating with reduction of secretory Paneth and goblet cells in jejunum and goblet cells in colon, increased expression of enterocytic markers such as sucrase-isomaltase in the colon, increased expression of cleaved Notch1 and augmented intestinal permeability; 3 loss of tissue homeostasis, as evidenced by modifications of claudin 3 expression, caspase-3 cleavage and Stat3 phosphorylation; 4 chronic inflammation, as determined by inflammatory molecular expression signatures and altered inflammatory gene expression

  16. PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY FOR HEAD AND NECK BASAL CELL SKIN CANCER WITH ADDITIONAL INTERSTITIAL LASER IRRADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kapinus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the development and evaluation of the effi ciency of photodynamic therapy (PDT with photosensitizer photolon with additional interstitial laser irradiation in patients with head and  neck basal cell skin cancer (BCSC. Treatment was performed in 55  patients. On the fi rst stage, all patients underwent photodynamic  therapy with interstitial irradiation using fl exible optical fi bers with  cylindrical diffuser, on the second stage PDT with distant delivery of  laser at a dose of 50-300 J/cm2 was carried out. During the follow- up period of 6 months to 4 years in 13 (23.6% of the 55 patients a  recurrence of the disease was diagnosed. A higher rate of recurrence was in the group of patients who underwent PDT for recurrent  neoplasms compared with patients with primary disease (37.5% and 4.3%, respectively, in patients with endophytic growth of the tumor compared to patients with exophytic component (30.0% and 16.0%,respectively and in patients with large tumors (up to 2.0 cm – 14.3%, from 2.0 to 5.0 cm – 16.7% and more than 5.0 cm – 54.4%.

  17. Transformation of intestinal stem cells into gastric stem cells on loss of transcription factor Cdx2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simmini, Salvatore; Bialecka, Monika; Huch, Meritxell; Kester, Lennart; van de Wetering, Marc; Sato, Toshiro; Beck, Felix; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Clevers, Hans; Deschamps, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    The endodermal lining of the adult gastro-intestinal tract harbours stem cells that are responsible for the day-to-day regeneration of the epithelium. Stem cells residing in the pyloric glands of the stomach and in the small intestinal crypts differ in their differentiation programme and in the gene

  18. Fusion of intestinal epithelial cells with bone marrow derived cells is dispensable for tissue homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Joan H.; Rodermond, Hans M.; Zimberlin, Cheryl D.; Lascano, Valeria; de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Richel, Dick J.; Medema, Jan Paul; Vermeulen, Louis

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the intestine is characterized by an immense cellular turn-over ascertaining an extensive regenerative capacity. Multiple reports suggest that besides the local intestinal stem cell pool, circulating cells of bone marrow origin (BMDCs) contribute to this process by fusing

  19. Biochemical and morphological changes in endothelial cells in response to hypoxic interstitial edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miserocchi Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A correlation between interstial pulmonary matrix disorganization and lung cellular response was recently documented in cardiogenic interstitial edema as changes in the signal-cellular transduction platforms (lipid microdomains: caveoale and lipid rafts. These findings led to hypothesize a specific "sensing" function by lung cells resulting from a perturbation in cell-matrix interaction. We reason that the cell-matrix interaction may differ between the cardiogenic and the hypoxic type of lung edema due to the observed difference in the sequential degradation of matrix proteoglycans (PGs family. In cardiogenic edema a major fragmentation of high molecular weight PGs of the interfibrillar matrix was found, while in hypoxia the fragmentation process mostly involved the PGs of the basement membrane controlling microvascular permeability. Based on these considerations, we aim to describe potential differences in the lung cellular response to the two types of edema. Methods We analysed the composition of plasma membrane and of lipid microdomains in lung tissue samples from anesthetized rabbits exposed to mild hypoxia (12 % O2 for 3–5 h causing interstitial lung edema. Lipid analysis was performed by chromatographic techniques, while protein analysis by electrophoresis and Western blotting. Lipid peroxidation was assessed on total plasma membranes by a colorimetric assay (Bioxytech LPO-586, OxisResearch. Plasma membrane fluidity was also assessed by fluorescence. Lipid microdomains were isolated by discontinuous sucrose gradient. We also performed a morphometric analysis on lung cell shape on TEM images from lung tissue specimen. Results After hypoxia, phospholipids content in plasma membranes remained unchanged while the cholesterol/phospholipids ratio increased significantly by about 9% causing a decrease in membrane fluidity. No significant increase in lipid peroxidation was detected. Analysis of lipid microdomains showed a

  20. Heterovalent Cation Substitutional and Interstitial Doping in Semiconductor Sensitizers for Quantum Dot Cosensitized Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningning Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Doped films of TiO2/PbS/CdS have been prepared by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR method. Bi- and Ag-doped-PbS quantum dot (QD were produced by admixing Bi3+ or Ag+ during deposition and the existing forms of the doping element in PbS QD were analyzed. The results show that Bi3+ entered the cube space of PbS as donor yielding interstitial doping Bi-doped-PbS QD, while Ag+ replaced Pb2+ of PbS as acceptor yielding substitutional doping Ag-doped-PbS QD. The novel Bi-doped-PbS/CdS and Ag-doped-PbS/CdS quantum dot cosensitized solar cell (QDCSC were fabricated and power conversion efficiency (PCE of 2.4% and 2.2% was achieved, respectively, under full sun illumination.

  1. Tranilast prevents renal interstitial fibrosis by blocking mast cell infiltration in a rat model of diabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Dan-Dan; Luo, Jun-Hui; Zhao, Zhu-Ye; Liao, Ying-Jun; Li, Ying

    2018-05-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis is a final pathway that is observed in various types of kidney diseases, including diabetic kidney disease (DKD). The present study investigated the effect of tranilast on renal interstitial fibrosis and the association between its role and mast cell infiltration in a rat model of DKD. A total of 30 healthy 6‑week‑old male Sprague‑Dawley rats were randomly divided into the following four groups: Normal control group; DKD model group; low‑dose tranilast group (200 mg/kg/day); and high‑dose tranilast group (400 mg/kg/day). The morphological alterations of tubulointerstitial fibrosis were evaluated by Masson's trichrome staining, while mast cell infiltration into the renal tubular interstitium was measured by toluidine blue staining and complement C3a receptor 1 (C3aR) immunohistochemical staining (IHC). The expression of fibronectin (FN), collagen I (Col‑I), stem cell factor (SCF) and proto‑oncogene c‑kit (c‑kit) was detected by IHC, western blotting and reverse transcription‑quantitative‑polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that tubulointerstitial fibrosis and mast cell infiltration were observed in DKD model rats, and this was improved dose‑dependently in the tranilast treatment groups. The expression of FN, Col‑I, SCF and c‑kit mRNA and protein was upregulated in the tubulointerstitium of DKD model rats compared with the normal control rats, and tranilast inhibited the upregulated expression of these markers. Furthermore, the degree of SCF and c‑kit expression demonstrated a significant positive correlation with C3aR‑positive mast cells and the markers of renal interstitial fibrosis. The results of the present study indicate that mast cell infiltration may promote renal interstitial fibrosis via the SCF/c‑kit signaling pathway. Tranilast may prevent renal interstitial fibrosis through inhibition of mast cell infiltration mediated through the SCF/c-kit signaling pathway.

  2. Effects of Raloxifene on the Proliferation and Apoptosis of Human Aortic Valve Interstitial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Fu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to explore the effects of raloxifene (RAL on the proliferation and apoptosis of human aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs. Different concentrations of RAL were used to act on AVICs. MTS kit is used to test the effects of different concentrations of RAL on the proliferation of AVICs. Cell cycle and apoptosis test used flow cytometry after seven-day treatment. The relative expression levels of caspase-3 and caspase-8 are tested with RT-qPCR and Western blot. The results of MTS testing revealed that the absorbance value (OD value of the cells in the concentration groups of 10 and 100 nmol/L RAL at a wavelength of 490 nm at five, seven, and nine days significantly decreased compared with that in the control group. Meanwhile, the results of flow cytometry of the cells collected after seven days showed that the ratio of the S stage and the cell apoptosis rate of AVICs can be significantly reduced by RAL in the concentration groups of 10 and 100 nmol/L. The mRNA and protein expressions of caspase-3 and caspase-8 were significantly decreased compared with those in the control group. This study laid the foundation for further treatment of aortic valve disease by using RAL.

  3. Aging effects on intestinal homeostasis associated with expansion and dysfunction of intestinal epithelial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorefield, Emily C; Andres, Sarah F; Blue, R Eric; Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Mah, Amanda T; Santoro, M Agostina; Ding, Shengli

    2017-08-29

    Intestinal epithelial stem cells (IESCs) are critical to maintain intestinal epithelial function and homeostasis. We tested the hypothesis that aging promotes IESC dysfunction using old (18-22 months) and young (2-4 month) Sox9-EGFP IESC reporter mice. Different levels of Sox9-EGFP permit analyses of active IESC (Sox9-EGFP Low ), activatable reserve IESC and enteroendocrine cells (Sox9-EGFP High ), Sox9-EGFP Sublow progenitors, and Sox9-EGFP Negative differentiated lineages. Crypt-villus morphology, cellular composition and apoptosis were measured by histology. IESC function was assessed by crypt culture, and proliferation by flow cytometry and histology. Main findings were confirmed in Lgr5-EGFP and Lgr5-LacZ mice. Aging-associated gene expression changes were analyzed by Fluidigm mRNA profiling. Crypts culture from old mice yielded fewer and less complex enteroids. Histology revealed increased villus height and Paneth cells per crypt in old mice. Old mice showed increased numbers and hyperproliferation of Sox9-EGFP Low IESC and Sox9-EGFP High cells. Cleaved caspase-3 staining demonstrated increased apoptotic cells in crypts and villi of old mice. Gene expression profiling revealed aging-associated changes in mRNAs associated with cell cycle, oxidative stress and apoptosis specifically in IESC. These findings provide new, direct evidence for aging associated IESC dysfunction, and define potential biomarkers and targets for translational studies to assess and maintain IESC function during aging.

  4. Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Huaqi, E-mail: Huaqi.Jiang@UTSouthwestern.edu [Department of Developmental Biology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, 6000 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, TX, 75235 (United States); Edgar, Bruce A., E-mail: b.edgar@dkfz.de [ZMBH-DKFZ Alliance, Im Neuenheimer Feld 282, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave. N., Seattle, WA 98109 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. The recent discovery of somatic stem cells in adult Drosophila, particularly the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) of the midgut, has established Drosophila as an exciting model to study stem cell-mediated adult tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Here, we review the major signaling pathways that regulate the self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation of Drosophila ISCs, discussing how this regulation maintains midgut homeostasis and mediates regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The homeostasis and regeneration of adult fly midguts are mediated by ISCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damaged enterocytes induce the proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGFR and Jak/Stat signalings mediate compensatory ISC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch signaling regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation.

  5. Esterification of xanthophylls by human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yamashita, Kyoko; Asai, Akira; Nagao, Akihiko; Shiraishi, Tomotaka; Imai, Ichiro; Hirata, Takashi

    2009-03-15

    We recently found that peridinin, which is uniquely present in dinoflagellates, reduced cell viability by inducing apoptosis in human colon cancer cells. Peridinin is also found in edible clams and oysters because the major food sources of those shellfish are phytoplanktons such as dinoflagellates. Little is known, however, about the fate of dietary peridinin and its biological activities in mammals. The aim of the present study was to investigate the enzymatic esterification of xanthophylls, especially peridinin which is uniquely present in dinoflagellates, using differentiated cultures of Caco-2 human intestinal cells. We found that peridinin is converted to peridininol and its fatty acid esters in differentiated Caco-2 cells treated with 5mumol/L peridinin solubilized with mixed micelles. The cell homogenate was also able to deacetylate peridinin and to esterify peridininol. Other xanthophylls, such as fucoxanthin, astaxanthin and zeaxanthin, were also esterified, but at relatively lower rates than peridinin. In this study, we found the enzymatic esterification of xanthophylls in mammalian intestinal cells for the first time. Our results suggest that the esterification of xanthophylls in intestinal cells is dependent on their polarity.

  6. File list: Oth.Dig.20.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Unc.Dig.50.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Dig.50.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells mm9 Unclassified Digestive tract Intestinal ...stem cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Dig.50.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells mm9 TFs and others Digestive tract Intestina...l stem cells SRX1141904,SRX856961,SRX1141903 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells.bed ...

  9. Insulin resistance in vascular endothelial cells promotes intestinal tumour formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X; Häring, M-F; Rathjen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    in vascular endothelial cells. Strikingly, these mice had 42% more intestinal tumours than controls, no change in tumour angiogenesis, but increased expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in primary culture of tumour endothelial cells. Insulin decreased VCAM-1 expression and leukocyte...... adhesion in quiescent tumour endothelial cells with intact insulin receptors and partly prevented increases in VCAM-1 and leukocyte adhesion after treatment with tumour necrosis factor-α. Knockout of insulin receptors in endothelial cells also increased leukocyte adhesion in mesenteric venules...

  10. Stem cells and cancer of the stomach and intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vries, Robert G J; Huch, Meritxell; Clevers, Hans

    2010-10-01

    Cancer in the 21st century has become the number one cause of death in developed countries. Although much progress has been made in improving patient survival, tumour relapse is one of the important causes of cancer treatment failure. An early observation in the study of cancer was the heterogeneity of tumours. Traditionally, this was explained by a combination of genomic instability of tumours and micro environmental factors leading to diverse phenotypical characteristics. It was assumed that cells in a tumour have an equal capacity to propagate the cancer. This model is currently known as the stochastic model. Recently, the Cancer stem cell model has been proposed to explain the heterogeneity of a tumour and its progression. According to this model, the heterogeneity of tumours is the result of aberrant differentiation of tumour cells into the cells of the tissue the tumour originated from. Tumours were suggested to contain stem cell-like cells, the cancer stem cells or tumour-initiating cells, which are uniquely capable of propagating a tumour much like normal stem cells fuel proliferation and differentiation in normal tissue. In this review we discuss the normal stem cell biology of the stomach and intestine followed by both the stochastic and cancer stem cell models in light of recent findings in the gastric and intestinal systems. The molecular pathways underlying normal and tumourigenic growth have been well studied, and recently the stem cells of the stomach and intestine have been identified. Furthermore, intestinal stem cells were identified as the cells-of-origin of colon cancer upon loss of the tumour suppressor APC. Lastly, several studies have proposed the positive identification of a cancer stem cell of human colon cancer. At the end we compare the cancer stem cell model and the stochastic model. We conclude that clonal evolution of tumour cells resulting from genetic mutations underlies tumour initiation and progression in both cancer models. This

  11. Intestinal bacteria and the regulation of immune cell homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David A; Artis, David

    2010-01-01

    The human intestine is colonized by an estimated 100 trillion bacteria. Some of these bacteria are essential for normal physiology, whereas others have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple inflammatory diseases including IBD and asthma. This review examines the influence of signals from intestinal bacteria on the homeostasis of the mammalian immune system in the context of health and disease. We review the bacterial composition of the mammalian intestine, known bacterial-derived immunoregulatory molecules, and the mammalian innate immune receptors that recognize them. We discuss the influence of bacterial-derived signals on immune cell function and the mechanisms by which these signals modulate the development and progression of inflammatory disease. We conclude with an examination of successes and future challenges in using bacterial communities or their products in the prevention or treatment of human disease.

  12. Differentiation-dependent activation of the human intestinal alkaline phosphatase promoter by HNF-4 in intestinal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Line; Bressendorff, Simon; Troelsen, Jesper T

    2005-01-01

    The intestinal alkaline phosphatase gene (ALPI) encodes a digestive brush-border enzyme, which is highly upregulated during small intestinal epithelial cell differentiation. To identify new putative promoter motifs responsible for the regulation of ALPI expression during differentiation of the en...

  13. Wnt, RSPO and Hippo Signalling in the Intestine and Intestinal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriz, Vitezslav; Korinek, Vladimir

    2018-01-08

    In this review, we address aspects of Wnt, R-Spondin (RSPO) and Hippo signalling, in both healthy and transformed intestinal epithelium. In intestinal stem cells (ISCs), the Wnt pathway is essential for intestinal crypt formation and renewal, whereas RSPO-mediated signalling mainly affects ISC numbers. In human colorectal cancer (CRC), aberrant Wnt signalling is the driving mechanism initiating this type of neoplasia. The signalling role of the RSPO-binding transmembrane proteins, the leucine-rich-repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptors (LGRs), is possibly more pleiotropic and not only limited to the enhancement of Wnt signalling. There is growing evidence for multiple crosstalk between Hippo and Wnt/β-catenin signalling. In the ON state, Hippo signalling results in serine/threonine phosphorylation of Yes-associated protein (YAP1) and tafazzin (TAZ), promoting formation of the β-catenin destruction complex. In contrast, YAP1 or TAZ dephosphorylation (and YAP1 methylation) results in β-catenin destruction complex deactivation and β-catenin nuclear localization. In the Hippo OFF state, YAP1 and TAZ are engaged with the nuclear β-catenin and participate in the β-catenin-dependent transcription program. Interestingly, YAP1/TAZ are dispensable for intestinal homeostasis; however, upon Wnt pathway hyperactivation, the proteins together with TEA domain (TEAD) transcription factors drive the transcriptional program essential for intestinal cell transformation. In addition, in many CRC cells, YAP1 phosphorylation by YES proto-oncogene 1 tyrosine kinase (YES1) leads to the formation of a transcriptional complex that includes YAP1, β-catenin and T-box 5 (TBX5) DNA-binding protein. YAP1/β-catenin/T-box 5-mediated transcription is necessary for CRC cell proliferation and survival. Interestingly, dishevelled (DVL) appears to be an important mediator involved in both Wnt and Hippo (YAP1/TAZ) signalling and some of the DVL functions were assigned to the nuclear DVL

  14. Maturation State and Matrix Microstructure Regulate Interstitial Cell Migration in Dense Connective Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Feini; Li, Qing; Wang, Xiao; Cao, Xuan; Zgonis, Miltiadis H; Esterhai, John L; Shenoy, Vivek B; Han, Lin; Mauck, Robert L

    2018-02-19

    Few regenerative approaches exist for the treatment of injuries to adult dense connective tissues. Compared to fetal tissues, adult connective tissues are hypocellular and show limited healing after injury. We hypothesized that robust repair can occur in fetal tissues with an immature extracellular matrix (ECM) that is conducive to cell migration, and that this process fails in adults due to the biophysical barriers imposed by the mature ECM. Using the knee meniscus as a platform, we evaluated the evolving micromechanics and microstructure of fetal and adult tissues, and interrogated the interstitial migratory capacity of adult meniscal cells through fetal and adult tissue microenvironments with or without partial enzymatic digestion. To integrate our findings, a computational model was implemented to determine how changing biophysical parameters impact cell migration through these dense networks. Our results show that the micromechanics and microstructure of the adult meniscus ECM sterically hinder cell mobility, and that modulation of these ECM attributes via an exogenous matrix-degrading enzyme permits migration through this otherwise impenetrable network. By addressing the inherent limitations to repair imposed by the mature ECM, these studies may define new clinical strategies to promote repair of damaged dense connective tissues in adults.

  15. The Potential for Gut Organoid Derived Interstitial Cells of Cajal in Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry Zhou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Effective digestion requires propagation of food along the entire length of the gastrointestinal tract. This process involves coordinated waves of peristalsis produced by enteric neural cell types, including different categories of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC. Impaired food transport along the gastrointestinal tract, either too fast or too slow, causes a range of gut motility disorders that affect millions of people worldwide. Notably, loss of ICC has been shown to affect gut motility. Patients that suffer from gut motility disorders regularly experience diarrhoea and/or constipation, insomnia, anxiety, attention lapses, irritability, dizziness, and headaches that greatly affect both physical and mental health. Limited treatment options are available for these patients, due to the scarcity of human gut tissue for research and transplantation. Recent advances in stem cell technology suggest that large amounts of rudimentary, yet functional, human gut tissue can be generated in vitro for research applications. Intriguingly, these stem cell-derived gut organoids appear to contain functional ICC, although their frequency and functional properties are yet to be fully characterised. By reviewing methods of gut organoid generation, together with what is known of the molecular and functional characteristics of ICC, this article highlights short- and long-term goals that need to be overcome in order to develop ICC-based therapies for gut motility disorders.

  16. Metabolic regulation of collagen gel contraction by porcine aortic valvular interstitial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Peter I.; Qu, Xin; Geiszler, Andrew M.; Nagrath, Deepak; Harmancey, Romain; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2014-01-01

    Despite a high incidence of calcific aortic valve disease in metabolic syndrome, there is little information about the fundamental metabolism of heart valves. Cell metabolism is a first responder to chemical and mechanical stimuli, but it is unknown how such signals employed in valve tissue engineering impact valvular interstitial cell (VIC) biology and valvular disease pathogenesis. In this study porcine aortic VICs were seeded into three-dimensional collagen gels and analysed for gel contraction, lactate production and glucose consumption in response to manipulation of metabolic substrates, including glucose, galactose, pyruvate and glutamine. Cell viability was also assessed in two-dimensional culture. We found that gel contraction was sensitive to metabolic manipulation, particularly in nutrient-depleted medium. Contraction was optimal at an intermediate glucose concentration (2 g l−1) with less contraction with excess (4.5 g l−1) or reduced glucose (1 g l−1). Substitution with galactose delayed contraction and decreased lactate production. In low sugar concentrations, pyruvate depletion reduced contraction. Glutamine depletion reduced cell metabolism and viability. Our results suggest that nutrient depletion and manipulation of metabolic substrates impacts the viability, metabolism and contractile behaviour of VICs. Particularly, hyperglycaemic conditions can reduce VIC interaction with and remodelling of the extracellular matrix. These results begin to link VIC metabolism and macroscopic behaviour such as cell–matrix interaction. PMID:25320066

  17. IRF8 dependent classical dendritic cells are essential for intestinal T cell homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luda, K.; Joeris, Thorsten; Persson, E. K.

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in intestinal immune homeostasis remains incompletely defined. Here we show that mice lacking IRF8 dependent DCs have reduced numbers of T cells in the small intestine (SI), but not large intestine (LI), including an almost complete absence of SI CD8ab+ andCD4+CD8......aa+ T cells; the latter requiring b8 integrin expression by migratory IRF8 dependent CD103+CD11b- DCs. SI homing receptor induction was impaired during T cell priming in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), which correlated with a reduction in aldehyde dehydrogenase activity by SI derived MLN DCs......, and inefficient T cell localization to the SI. Finally, mice with a DC deletion in IRF8 lacked intestinal T helper 1 (Th1) cells, and failed to support Th1 cell differentiation in MLN and mount Th1 responses to Trichuris muris infection. Collectively these results highlight multiple non-redundant roles for IRF8...

  18. Dendritic Cells in the Gut: Interaction with Intestinal Helminths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fela Mendlovic

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The mucosal environment in mammals is highly tolerogenic; however, after exposure to pathogens or danger signals, it is able to shift towards an inflammatory response. Dendritic cells (DCs orchestrate immune responses and are highly responsible, through the secretion of cytokines and expression of surface markers, for the outcome of such immune response. In particular, the DC subsets found in the intestine have specialized functions and interact with different immune as well as nonimmune cells. Intestinal helminths primarily induce Th2 responses where DCs have an important yet not completely understood role. In addition, this cross-talk results in the induction of regulatory T cells (T regs as a result of the homeostatic mucosal environment. This review highlights the importance of studying the particular relation “helminth-DC-milieu” in view of the significance that each of these factors plays. Elucidating the mechanisms that trigger Th2 responses may provide the understanding of how we might modulate inflammatory processes.

  19. Interstitial nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papper, S

    1980-01-01

    There are many causes of interstitial nephritis other than pyelonephritis. The term interstitial nephritis does not connote a single etiologic or pathogenetic mechanism; it rather arbitrarily places together a wider variety of renal diseases that have a predilection for early and major involvement of the renal interstitium. The prototype of acute interstitial nephritis is acute pyelonephritis. In addition, there is a drug-related acute interstitial disease that is probably of immunological nature and usually reverses with discontinuance of the offending drug. Chronic interstitial nephritis includes many diverse illnesses. Nonobstructive pyelonephritis occurs but its prevalence is debated. Analgesic abuse nephropathy is not rare and is potentially reversible. Papillary necrosis has many causes and a wide spectrum of clinical presentations. Heavy metals, such as lead, cause interstitial nephritis. Balkan nephropathy occurs in an endemic area and although not bacterial in origin is of unknown cause.

  20. Development of Functional Microfold (M Cells from Intestinal Stem Cells in Primary Human Enteroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D Rouch

    Full Text Available Intestinal microfold (M cells are specialized epithelial cells that act as gatekeepers of luminal antigens in the intestinal tract. They play a critical role in the intestinal mucosal immune response through transport of viruses, bacteria and other particles and antigens across the epithelium to immune cells within Peyer's patch regions and other mucosal sites. Recent studies in mice have demonstrated that M cells are generated from Lgr5+ intestinal stem cells (ISCs, and that infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium increases M cell formation. However, it is not known whether and how these findings apply to primary human small intestinal epithelium propagated in an in vitro setting.Human intestinal crypts were grown as monolayers with growth factors and treated with recombinant RANKL, and assessed for mRNA transcripts, immunofluorescence and uptake of microparticles and S. Typhimurium.Functional M cells were generated by short-term culture of freshly isolated human intestinal crypts in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. RANKL stimulation of the monolayer cultures caused dramatic induction of the M cell-specific markers, SPIB, and Glycoprotein-2 (GP2 in a process primed by canonical WNT signaling. Confocal microscopy demonstrated a pseudopod phenotype of GP2-positive M cells that preferentially take up microparticles. Furthermore, infection of the M cell-enriched cultures with the M cell-tropic enteric pathogen, S. Typhimurium, led to preferential association of the bacteria with M cells, particularly at lower inoculum sizes. Larger inocula caused rapid induction of M cells.Human intestinal crypts containing ISCs can be cultured and differentiate into an epithelial layer with functional M cells with characteristic morphological and functional properties. This study is the first to demonstrate that M cells can be induced to form from primary human intestinal epithelium, and that S. Typhimurium preferentially infect these cells in an

  1. Foxl1-Expressing Mesenchymal Cells Constitute the Intestinal Stem Cell NicheSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reina Aoki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Intestinal epithelial stem cells that express leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5 and/or B cell specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (Bmi1 continuously replicate and generate differentiated cells throughout life. Previously, Paneth cells were suggested to constitute an epithelium-intrinsic niche that regulates the behavior of these stem cells. However, ablating Paneth cells has no effect on the maintenance of functional stem cells. Here, we show definitively that a small subset of mesenchymal subepithelial cells expressing the winged-helix transcription factor forkhead box l1 (Foxl1 are a critical component of the intestinal stem cell niche. Methods: We genetically ablated Foxl1+ mesenchymal cells in adult mice using 2 separate models by expressing either the human or simian diphtheria toxin receptor under Foxl1 promoter control. Conclusions: Killing Foxl1+ cells by diphtheria toxin administration led to an abrupt cessation of proliferation of both epithelial stem- and transit-amplifying progenitor cell populations that was associated with a loss of active Wnt signaling to the intestinal epithelium. Therefore, Foxl1-expressing mesenchymal cells constitute the fundamental niche for intestinal stem cells. Keywords: Intestinal Stem Cell Niche, Wnt, Mesenchyme

  2. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors in bronchoalveolar lavage cells of patients with interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branley, Howard M.; Bois, Roland M. du; Wells, Athol U.; Jones, Hazel A.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: PK11195 is a ligand with high affinity for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs), which are present in large numbers in macrophages. PBRs play a role in antioxidant pathways and apoptosis, key factors in control of lung health. Intrapulmonary PBRs, assessed in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET), are decreased in interstitial lung disease (ILD) despite increased macrophage numbers. We wished to ascertain whether the observed decrease in in vivo expression of PBRs in the PET scans could be accounted for by a reduction in PBRs per cell by saturation-binding assays of R-PK11195 in cells obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Methods: We performed receptor saturation-binding assays with [ 3 H]-R-PK11195 on a mixed population of cells recovered by BAL to quantify the number of R-PK11195 binding sites per macrophage in 10 subjects with ILD and 10 normal subjects. Results: Receptor affinity [dissociation constant (Kd)] was similar in ILD patients and controls. However, R-PK11195 binding sites per cell [(maximal binding sites available (B max )] were decreased in macrophages obtained by BAL from subjects with ILD compared to normal (P<.0005). Microautoradiography confirmed localization of R-PK11195 to macrophages in a mixed inflammatory cell population obtained by BAL. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that in vitro PBR expression per cell on macrophages obtained by BAL is reduced in patients with ILD indicating a potentially functionally different macrophage phenotype. As PBRs are involved in the orchestration of lung inflammatory responses, this finding offers further insight into the role of macrophages in the pathogenesis of ILDs and offers a potential avenue for pharmacological strategy

  3. Concise review: the yin and yang of intestinal (cancer) stem cells and their progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stange, D.E.; Clevers, H.

    2013-01-01

    The intestine has developed over the last few years into a prime model system for adult stem cell research. Intestinal cells have an average lifetime of 5 days, moving within this time from the bottom of intestinal crypts to the top of villi. This rapid self-renewal capacity combined with an easy to

  4. Enhancement of CD147 on M1 macrophages induces differentiation of Th17 cells in the lung interstitial fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jie-jie; Zhang, Kui; Chen, Li-na; Miao, Jin-lin; Yao, Meng; Ren, Ying; Fu, Zhi-guang; Chen, Zhi-nan; Zhu, Ping

    2014-09-01

    Lung interstitial fibrosis is a chronic lung disease, and few effective therapies are available to halt or reverse the progression of the disease. In murine and human lung fibrosis, the expression of CD147 is increased. However, the role of CD147 in lung fibrosis has not been identified, and it remains to be determined whether lung fibrosis would be improved by decreasing the expression of CD147. A murine bleomycin-induced lung interstitial fibrosis model was used in the experiments, and HAb18 mAbs and CsA were administered during the induction of lung fibrosis. In our study, we found that the HAb18 mAbs markedly reduced the collagen score and down-regulated M1 macrophages and Th17 cells. In vitro, flow cytometry analysis showed that M1 macrophages induced higher Th17 differentiation than M2 macrophages. After treatment with HAb18 mAbs or after reducing the expression of CD147 by lentivirus interference in M1 macrophages, the level of Th17 cells were significantly inhibited. In conclusion, HAb18 mAbs or CsA treatment ameliorates lung interstitial fibrosis. CD147 promoted M1 macrophage and induced the differentiation of Th17 cells in lung interstitial fibrosis, perhaps by regulating some cytokines such as IL-6, IL-1β, IL-12 and IL-23. These results indicated that CD147 may play an important role in the development of lung interstitial fibrosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Intestinal Microbiota and Relapse After Hematopoietic-Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Jonathan U; Devlin, Sean M; Staffas, Anna; Lumish, Melissa; Khanin, Raya; Littmann, Eric R; Ling, Lilan; Kosuri, Satyajit; Maloy, Molly; Slingerland, John B; Ahr, Katya F; Porosnicu Rodriguez, Kori A; Shono, Yusuke; Slingerland, Ann E; Docampo, Melissa D; Sung, Anthony D; Weber, Daniela; Alousi, Amin M; Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Ponce, Doris M; Barker, Juliet N; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Giralt, Sergio A; Taur, Ying; Pamer, Eric G; Jenq, Robert R; van den Brink, Marcel R M

    2017-05-20

    Purpose The major causes of mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation (allo-HCT) are relapse, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and infection. We have reported previously that alterations in the intestinal flora are associated with GVHD, bacteremia, and reduced overall survival after allo-HCT. Because intestinal bacteria are potent modulators of systemic immune responses, including antitumor effects, we hypothesized that components of the intestinal flora could be associated with relapse after allo-HCT. Methods The intestinal microbiota of 541 patients admitted for allo-HCT was profiled by means of 16S ribosomal sequencing of prospectively collected stool samples. We examined the relationship between abundance of microbiota species or groups of related species and relapse/progression of disease during 2 years of follow-up time after allo-HCT by using cause-specific proportional hazards in a retrospective discovery-validation cohort study. Results Higher abundance of a bacterial group composed mostly of Eubacterium limosum in the validation set was associated with a decreased risk of relapse/progression of disease (hazard ratio [HR], 0.82 per 10-fold increase in abundance; 95% CI, 0.71 to 0.95; P = .009). When the patients were categorized according to presence or absence of this bacterial group, presence also was associated with less relapse/progression of disease (HR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.87; P = .01). The 2-year cumulative incidences of relapse/progression among patients with and without this group of bacteria were 19.8% and 33.8%, respectively. These associations remained significant in multivariable models and were strongest among recipients of T-cell-replete allografts. Conclusion We found associations between the abundance of a group of bacteria in the intestinal flora and relapse/progression of disease after allo-HCT. These might serve as potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets to prevent relapse and improve survival after allo-HCT.

  6. Adult zebrafish intestine resection: a novel model of short bowel syndrome, adaptation, and intestinal stem cell regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, K A; Holoyda, K A; Grant, C N; Levin, D E; Torres, E R; Maxwell, A; Pollack, H A; Moats, R A; Frey, M R; Darehzereshki, A; Al Alam, D; Lien, C; Grikscheit, T C

    2015-08-01

    Loss of significant intestinal length from congenital anomaly or disease may lead to short bowel syndrome (SBS); intestinal failure may be partially offset by a gain in epithelial surface area, termed adaptation. Current in vivo models of SBS are costly and technically challenging. Operative times and survival rates have slowed extension to transgenic models. We created a new reproducible in vivo model of SBS in zebrafish, a tractable vertebrate model, to facilitate investigation of the mechanisms of intestinal adaptation. Proximal intestinal diversion at segment 1 (S1, equivalent to jejunum) was performed in adult male zebrafish. SBS fish emptied distal intestinal contents via stoma as in the human disease. After 2 wk, S1 was dilated compared with controls and villus ridges had increased complexity, contributing to greater villus epithelial perimeter. The number of intervillus pockets, the intestinal stem cell zone of the zebrafish increased and contained a higher number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells after 2 wk of SBS. Egf receptor and a subset of its ligands, also drivers of adaptation, were upregulated in SBS fish. Igf has been reported as a driver of intestinal adaptation in other animal models, and SBS fish exposed to a pharmacological inhibitor of the Igf receptor failed to demonstrate signs of intestinal adaptation, such as increased inner epithelial perimeter and BrdU incorporation. We describe a technically feasible model of human SBS in the zebrafish, a faster and less expensive tool to investigate intestinal stem cell plasticity as well as the mechanisms that drive intestinal adaptation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. The Inside Story of Shigella Invasion of Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayol, Nathalie; Tran Van Nhieu, Guy

    2013-01-01

    As opposed to other invasive pathogens that reside into host cells in a parasitic mode, Shigella, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery, invades the colonic mucosa but does not penetrate further to survive into deeper tissues. Instead, Shigella invades, replicates, and disseminates within the colonic mucosa. Bacterial invasion and spreading in intestinal epithelium lead to the elicitation of inflammatory responses responsible for the tissue destruction and shedding in the environment for further infection of other hosts. In this article, we highlight specific features of the Shigella arsenal of virulence determinants injected by a type III secretion apparatus (T3SA) that point to the targeting of intestinal epithelial cells as a discrete route of invasion during the initial event of the infectious process. PMID:24086068

  8. Incidence of interstitial pneumonia after hyperfractionated total body irradiation before autologous bone marrow/stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohr, F.; Schraube, P.; Wenz, F.; Flentje, M.; Kalle, K. von; Haas, R.; Hunstein, W.; Wannenmacher, M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Interstitial pneumonia (IP) is a severe complication after allogenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with incidence rates between 10 % and 40 % in different series. It is a polyetiologic disease that occurs depending on age, graft vs. host disease (GvHD), CMV-status, total body irradiation (TBI) and immunosuppressive therapy after BMT. The effects of fractionation and dose rate are not entirely clear. This study evaluates the incidence of lethal IP after hyperfractionated TBI for autologous BMT or stem cell transplantation. Materials and Methods Between 1982 and 1992, 182 patients (60 % male, 40 % female) were treated with hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) before autologous bone marrow transplantation. Main indications were leukemias and lymphomas (53 % AML, 21 % ALL, 22 % NHL, 4 % others) Median age was 30 ys (15 - 55 ys). A total dose of 14.4 Gy was applied using lung blocks (12 fractions of 1.2 Gy in 4 days, dose rate 7-18 cGy/min, lung dose 9 - 9.5 Gy). TBI was followed by cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg). 72 % were treated with bone marrow transplantation, 28 % were treated with stem cell transplantation. Interstitial pneumonia was diagnosed clinically, radiologically and by autopsy. Results 4 patients died most likely of interstitial pneumonia. For another 12 patients interstitial pneumonia was not the most likely cause of death but could not be excluded. Thus, the incidence of lethal IP was at least 2.2 % but certainly below 8.8 %. Conclusion Lethal interstitial pneumonia is a rare complication after total body irradiation before autologous bone marrow transplantation in this large, homogeously treated series. In the autologous setting, total doses of 14.4 Gy can be applied with a low risk for developing interstitial pneumonia if hyperfractionation and lung blocks are used. This falls in line with data from series with identical twins or t-cell depleted marrow and smaller, less homogeneous autologous transplant studies. Thus

  9. Existence of c-Kit negative cells with ultrastructural features of interstitial cells of Cajal in the subserosal layer of the W/Wv mutant mouse colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamada, Hiromi; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are mesenchymal cells that are distributed along the gastrointestinal tract and function as pacemaker cells or intermediary cells between nerves and smooth muscle cells. ICC express a receptor tyrosine kinase c-Kit, which is an established marker for ICC. The c-kit gene is allelic with the murine white-spotting locus (W), and some ICC subsets were reported to be missing in heterozygous mutant W/Wv mice carrying W and Wv mutated alleles. In this study, the characterization of interstitial cells in the subserosal layer of W/Wv mice was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. In the proximal and distal colon of W/Wv mutant mice, no c-Kit-positive cells were detected in the subserosal layer by immunohistochemistry. By electron microscopy, the interstitial cells, which were characterized by the existence of caveolae, abundant mitochondria and gap junctions, were observed in the W/Wv mutant colon.The morphological characteristics were comparable to those of the multipolar c-Kit positive ICC seen in the subserosa of proximal and distal colon of wild-type mice. Fibroblasts were also located in the same layers,but the morphology of the fibroblasts was distinguishable from that of ICC in wild type mice or of ICC-like cells in W/Wv mutant mice. Collectively, it is concluded that c-Kit-negative interstitial cells showing a typical ICC ultrastructure exist in the proximal and distal colon of W/Wv mutant mice.

  10. Gliadin, zonulin and gut permeability: Effects on celiac and non-celiac intestinal mucosa and intestinal cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Sandro; El Asmar, Ramzi; Di Pierro, Mariarosaria; Grazia Clemente, Maria; Tripathi, Amit; Sapone, Anna; Thakar, Manjusha; Iacono, Giuseppe; Carroccio, Antonio; D'Agate, Cinzia; Not, Tarcisio; Zampini, Lucia; Catassi, Carlo; Fasano, Alessio

    2006-04-01

    Little is known about the interaction of gliadin with intestinal epithelial cells and the mechanism(s) through which gliadin crosses the intestinal epithelial barrier. We investigated whether gliadin has any immediate effect on zonulin release and signaling. Both ex vivo human small intestines and intestinal cell monolayers were exposed to gliadin, and zonulin release and changes in paracellular permeability were monitored in the presence and absence of zonulin antagonism. Zonulin binding, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) redistribution were evaluated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Tight junction occludin and ZO-1 gene expression was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). When exposed to gliadin, zonulin receptor-positive IEC6 and Caco2 cells released zonulin in the cell medium with subsequent zonulin binding to the cell surface, rearrangement of the cell cytoskeleton, loss of occludin-ZO1 protein-protein interaction, and increased monolayer permeability. Pretreatment with the zonulin antagonist FZI/0 blocked these changes without affecting zonulin release. When exposed to luminal gliadin, intestinal biopsies from celiac patients in remission expressed a sustained luminal zonulin release and increase in intestinal permeability that was blocked by FZI/0 pretreatment. Conversely, biopsies from non-celiac patients demonstrated a limited, transient zonulin release which was paralleled by an increase in intestinal permeability that never reached the level of permeability seen in celiac disease (CD) tissues. Chronic gliadin exposure caused down-regulation of both ZO-1 and occludin gene expression. Based on our results, we concluded that gliadin activates zonulin signaling irrespective of the genetic expression of autoimmunity, leading to increased intestinal permeability to macromolecules.

  11. Nephron progenitor cell death elicits a limited compensatory response associated with interstitial expansion in the neonatal kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sree Deepthi Muthukrishnan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The final nephron number in an adult kidney is regulated by nephron progenitor cell availability and collecting duct branching in the fetal period. Fetal environmental perturbations that cause reductions in cell numbers in these two compartments result in low nephron endowment. Previous work has shown that maternal dietary factors influence nephron progenitor cell availability, with both caloric restriction and protein deprivation leading to reduced cell numbers through apoptosis. In this study, we evaluate the consequences of inducing nephron progenitor cell death on progenitor niche dynamics and on nephron endowment. Depletion of approximately 40% of nephron progenitor cells by expression of diphtheria toxin A at embryonic day 15 in the mouse results in 10-20% nephron reduction in the neonatal period. Analysis of cell numbers within the progenitor cell pool following induction of apoptosis reveals a compensatory response in which surviving progenitor cells increase their proliferation and replenish the niche. The proliferative response is temporally associated with infiltration of macrophages into the nephrogenic zone. Colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 has a mitogenic effect on nephron progenitor cells, providing a potential explanation for the compensatory proliferation. However, CSF1 also promotes interstitial cell proliferation, and the compensatory response is associated with interstitial expansion in recovering kidneys which can be pharmacologically inhibited by treatment with clodronate liposomes. Our findings suggest that the fetal kidney employs a macrophage-dependent compensatory regenerative mechanism to respond to acute injury caused by death of nephron progenitor cells, but that this regenerative response is associated with neonatal interstitial expansion.

  12. Selective sparing of goblet cells and paneth cells in the intestine of methotrexate-treated rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Verburg (Melissa); I.B. Renes (Ingrid); H.P. Meijer; J.A. Taminiau; H.A. Büller (Hans); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra); J. Dekker (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractProliferation, differentiation, and cell death were studied in small intestinal and colonic epithelia of rats after treatment with methotrexate. Days 1-2 after treatment were characterized by decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and decreased numbers and depths

  13. Small intestinal eosinophils regulate Th17 cells by producing IL-1 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Reiko; Lee, Eun-Jung; Jang, Min Seong; Jeun, Eun-Ji; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Park, Areum; Yun, Chang Ho; Hong, Sung-Wook; Kim, You-Me; Seoh, Ju-Young; Jung, YunJae; Surh, Charles D; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Yang, Bo-Gie; Jang, Myoung Ho

    2016-04-04

    Eosinophils play proinflammatory roles in helminth infections and allergic diseases. Under steady-state conditions, eosinophils are abundantly found in the small intestinal lamina propria, but their physiological function is largely unexplored. In this study, we found that small intestinal eosinophils down-regulate Th17 cells. Th17 cells in the small intestine were markedly increased in the ΔdblGATA-1 mice lacking eosinophils, and an inverse correlation was observed between the number of eosinophils and that of Th17 cells in the small intestine of wild-type mice. In addition, small intestinal eosinophils suppressed the in vitro differentiation of Th17 cells, as well as IL-17 production by small intestinal CD4(+)T cells. Unlike other small intestinal immune cells or circulating eosinophils, we found that small intestinal eosinophils have a unique ability to constitutively secrete high levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), a natural inhibitor of IL-1β. Moreover, small intestinal eosinophils isolated from IL-1Ra-deficient mice failed to suppress Th17 cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that small intestinal eosinophils play a pivotal role in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis by regulating Th17 cells via production of IL-1Ra. © 2016 Sugawara et al.

  14. Autocrine EGF receptor activation mediates endothelial cell migration and vascular morphogenesis induced by VEGF under interstitial flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semino, Carlos E.; Kamm, Roger D.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2006-01-01

    We show here that autocrine ligand activation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor in combination with interstitial flow is critically involved in the morphogenetic response of endothelial cells to VEGF stimulation. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers cultured on a collagen gel and exposed to low interstitial flow in the absence of EGF and VEGF remained viable and mitotic but exhibited little evidence of vascular morphogenesis. Addition of VEGF produced a flow-dependent morphogenetic response within 48 to 72 h, characterized by branched capillary-like structures. The response was substantially abolished by inhibitors related to the autocrine EGF receptor pathway including Galardin, AG1478, PD98059, and an EGF receptor-blocking antibody, indicating that regulation of the morphogenetic process operates via autocrine EGF receptor activation. Moreover, we observed that in our system the EGF receptor was always activated independently of the interstitial flow, and, in addition, the EGF receptor inhibitors used above reduced the phosphorylation state of the receptor, correlating with inhibition of capillary morphogenesis. Finally, 5'bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling identified dividing cells at the monolayer but not in the extending capillary-like structures. EGF pathway inhibitors Galardin and AG1478 did not reduce BrdU incorporation in the monolayer, indicating that the EGF-receptor-mediated morphogenetic behavior is mainly due to cell migration rather than proliferation. Based on these results, we propose a two-step model for in vitro capillary morphogenesis in response to VEGF stimulation with interstitial fluid flow: monolayer maintenance by mitotic activity independent of EGF receptors and a migratory response mediated by autocrine EGF receptor activation wherein cells establish capillary-like structures

  15. Linking stem cell function and growth pattern of intestinal organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalheim, Torsten; Quaas, Marianne; Herberg, Maria; Braumann, Ulf-Dietrich; Kerner, Christiane; Loeffler, Markus; Aust, Gabriela; Galle, Joerg

    2018-01-15

    Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) require well-defined signals from their environment in order to carry out their specific functions. Most of these signals are provided by neighboring cells that form a stem cell niche, whose shape and cellular composition self-organize. Major features of this self-organization can be studied in ISC-derived organoid culture. In this system, manipulation of essential pathways of stem cell maintenance and differentiation results in well-described growth phenotypes. We here provide an individual cell-based model of intestinal organoids that enables a mechanistic explanation of the observed growth phenotypes. In simulation studies of the 3D structure of expanding organoids, we investigate interdependences between Wnt- and Notch-signaling which control the shape of the stem cell niche and, thus, the growth pattern of the organoids. Similar to in vitro experiments, changes of pathway activities alter the cellular composition of the organoids and, thereby, affect their shape. Exogenous Wnt enforces transitions from branched into a cyst-like growth pattern; known to occur spontaneously during long term organoid expansion. Based on our simulation results, we predict that the cyst-like pattern is associated with biomechanical changes of the cells which assign them a growth advantage. The results suggest ongoing stem cell adaptation to in vitro conditions during long term expansion by stabilizing Wnt-activity. Our study exemplifies the potential of individual cell-based modeling in unraveling links between molecular stem cell regulation and 3D growth of tissues. This kind of modeling combines experimental results in the fields of stem cell biology and cell biomechanics constituting a prerequisite for a better understanding of tissue regeneration as well as developmental processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Lgr5 intestinal stem cell signature: robust expression of proposed quiescent '+4' cell markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muñoz, Javier; Stange, Daniel E.; Schepers, Arnout G.; van de Wetering, Marc; Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Volckmann, Richard; Kung, Kevin S.; Koster, Jan; Radulescu, Sorina; Myant, Kevin; Versteeg, Rogier; Sansom, Owen J.; van Es, Johan H.; Barker, Nick; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J. R.; Clevers, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Two types of stem cells are currently defined in small intestinal crypts: cycling crypt base columnar (CBC) cells and quiescent '+4' cells. Here, we combine transcriptomics with proteomics to define a definitive molecular signature for Lgr5(+) CBC cells. Transcriptional profiling of FACS-sorted

  17. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal in circular muscle of human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Mikkelsen, H B; Qvortrup, K

    1993-01-01

    and in the outer third of the circular lamellae. The other ICC type had a complete basal lamina and conspicuous caveolae. This ICC type was observed only in the inner third of the circular lamellae. Both ICC types were close to nerves, but only the latter type formed gap junctions with one another and with muscle...

  18. The relative efficacy of HDR and LDR interstitial brachytherapy in squamous cell carcinoma of vagina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demanes, D. J.; Hsu, I-C.; Lin, S.; Ewing, T.; Rodriguez, R.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: Beginning in 1982 we performed low dose rate (LDR) interstitial template brachytherapy (ISTB) for carcinoma of the vagina. High dose rate (HDR) remote afterloading has been used exclusively since 1991. We compare the results LDR and HDR brachytherapy. Material and Methods: Between 1982 and 1994, 30 patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of vagina received external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy. The AJCC stage distribution was 3 stage I, 25 stage II, and 2 stage III. The average central pelvic EBRT dose was 35 Gy. Pelvic side wall EBRT doses ranged from 45 to 50.4 Gy. Nineteen patients had LDR treatment; 3 intracavitary brachytherapy (ICB) and 16 ISTB. Eleven patients had HDR treatment; 2 ICB and 9 ISB. The average dose delivered by LDR was 41.2 Gy usually in 2 fractions, and by HDR 32.5 Gy in 6 fractions of 500-550 cGy. Local failures were confirmed pathologically. The absolute survival (AS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method and compared with logrank statistics. Results: The mean follow-up was 77 months for LDR and 23 months for HDR. Local and regional control was achieved in 90% (27/30) of the patients. Three year AS was 84% and RFS was 87%. There was no significant difference between LDR and HDR in AS, RFS or local-regional control, (log rank p=0.85, p=0.12 and p=0.35 respectively). The single HDR local failure presented in a patient with extensive stage II disease who declined ISTB. There were fewer complications following HDR. The 1 case of extensive vaginal necrosis and the 3 cases of rectovaginal fistula that required surgery occurred only with LDR brachytherapy. Discussion: Excellent local and regional control of carcinoma of the vagina can be achieved by administering limited doses of external radiation and brachytherapy. Interstitial template implants are the best means of encompassing paravaginal disease while sparing the adjacent uninvolved normal tissues from high doses of

  19. Proliferation of Interstitial Cells in the Cyclophosphamide-Induced Cystitis and the Preventive Effect of Imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sancho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclophosphamide- (CYP- induced cystitis in the rat is a well-known model of bladder inflammation that leads to an overactive bladder, a process that appears to involve enhanced nitric oxide (NO production. We investigated the changes in the number and distribution of interstitial cells (ICs and in the expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS in the bladder and urethra of rats subjected to either intermediate or chronic CYP treatment. Pronounced hyperplasia and hypertrophy of ICs were evident within the lamina propria and in the muscle layer. IC immunolabeling with CD34, PDGFRα, and vimentin was enhanced, as reflected by higher colocalization indexes of the distinct pairs of markers. Moreover, de novo expression of eNOS was evident in vimentin and CD34 positive ICs. Pretreatment with the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor Imatinib prevented eNOS expression and ICs proliferation, as well as the increased voiding frequency and urinary tract weight provoked by CYP. As similar results were obtained in the urethra, urethritis may contribute to the uropathology of CYP-induced cystitis.

  20. Comparative study of the organisation and phenotypes of bladder interstitial cells in human, mouse and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Thomas; Neuhaus, Jochen; Vanstreels, Els; Daelemans, Dirk; Everaerts, Wouter; Der Aa, Frank Van; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Roskams, Tania; Steiner, Clara; Pintelon, Isabel; De Ridder, Dirk

    2017-12-01

    With most research on interstitial cells (IC) in the bladder being conducted on animal models, it remains unclear whether all structural and functional data on IC from animal models can be translated to the human context. This prompted us to compare the structural and immunohistochemical properties of IC in bladders from mouse, rat and human. Tissue samples were obtained from the bladder dome and subsequently processed for immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. The ultrastructural properties of IC were compared by means of electron microscopy and IC were additionally characterized with single/double immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence. Our results reveal a similar organization of the IC network in the upper lamina propria (ULP), the deep lamina propria (DLP) and the detrusor muscle in human, rat and mouse bladders. Furthermore, despite several similarities in IC phenotypes, we also found several obvious inter-species differences in IC, especially in the ULP. Most remarkably in this respect, ULP IC in human bladder predominantly displayed a myoid phenotype with abundant presence of contractile micro-filaments, while those in rat and mouse bladders showed a fibroblast phenotype. In conclusion, the organization of ULP IC, DLP IC and detrusor IC is comparable in human, rat and mouse bladders, although several obvious inter-species differences in IC phenotypes were found. The present data show that translating research data on IC in laboratory animals to the human setting should be carried out with caution.

  1. Distribution of Interstitial Cells of Cajal in the Esophagus of Fetal Rats with Esophageal Atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caner Isbir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Scarcity of the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC is related to motility disorders. In the study, we aimed to evaluate the number and density of ICCs in the fetal rat esophagus in the adriamycin - esophageal atresia (EA model. Material and Method: Rat fetuses were divided into three groups as a control, adriamycin group without EA and adriamycin group with EA. Four doses of adriamycin, 2 mg/kg each, were injected intraperitoneally to the adriamycin group rats between on 6 and 9 days of gestation. The presence of ICCs in the esophagus of the rat fetuses was determined by using an immunohistochemistry technique (c-kit, CD117. The average numbers of ICCs were calculated with microscopic evaluation by using a visual scoring system (range1 to 3. Results: Seven fetuses were included in each group. The ICCs score 3 distributions of fetuses were 5 (72% fetuses in the control group, 3 (43% fetuses in the adriamycin group without EA, 1 (14% fetus in the adriamycin group with EA. It have been found that there was a marked reduction of ICCs distribution in the adriamycin group with EA compared to control group (p 0.05. Discussion: ICCs density was significantly decreased in the rat fetuses with EA compared to the fetuses without EA. These findings support the idea that ICCs density may be congenitally abnormal in EA. This may be led to dismotility seen in the operated esophagus due to EA.

  2. Use of anoctamin 1 (ANO1) to evaluate interstitial cells of Cajal in Hirschsprung's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, David; Kelly, Danielle A M; O'Donnell, Anne Marie; Gillick, John; Puri, Prem

    2016-02-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are pacemaker cells involved in facilitating neurotransmission and the generation of slow electrical waves necessary for colonic peristalsis. Their distribution has been found to be abnormal in the aganglionic and ganglionic colon in Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) using c-kit-labelling. Anoctamin-1 (ANO1) is a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel thought to be specifically expressed on ICCs. Unlike c-kit, it plays a key role in ICC pacemaker activity. We aimed to investigate the utility of ANO1 in evaluating the colonic ICC network in HSCR. We collected full-length pull-through specimens from children with HSCR (n = 10). Control colon specimens were collected at colostomy closure in children with anorectal malformation (n = 6). The distribution of ANO1 and c-kit expression was evaluated using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. ANO1 expression was quantified using Western blot analysis. ANO1 was not expressed on 23 % of c-kit immuno-positive cells in the circular muscle; however, 100 % of ANO1-positive ICCs were c-kit positive. The distribution of ANO1-positive ICCs was sparse in aganglionic colon, with a modest reduction in ICCs seen in the ganglionic colon in HSCR compared to controls (p = 0.044). ANO1 protein expression was reduced in aganglionic colon but similar in ganglionic colon relative to controls. ANO1 is preferential to c-kit in evaluating the ICC network in HSCR due to its specificity and functional importance. Abnormal distribution of ANO1-positive ICCs in the ganglionic colon in HSCR may contribute to persistent bowel symptoms in some patients after pull-through surgery.

  3. Genomic dissection of conserved transcriptional regulation in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin R Lickwar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium serves critical physiologic functions that are shared among all vertebrates. However, it is unknown how the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms underlying these functions have changed over the course of vertebrate evolution. We generated genome-wide mRNA and accessible chromatin data from adult intestinal epithelial cells (IECs in zebrafish, stickleback, mouse, and human species to determine if conserved IEC functions are achieved through common transcriptional regulation. We found evidence for substantial common regulation and conservation of gene expression regionally along the length of the intestine from fish to mammals and identified a core set of genes comprising a vertebrate IEC signature. We also identified transcriptional start sites and other putative regulatory regions that are differentially accessible in IECs in all 4 species. Although these sites rarely showed sequence conservation from fish to mammals, surprisingly, they drove highly conserved IEC expression in a zebrafish reporter assay. Common putative transcription factor binding sites (TFBS found at these sites in multiple species indicate that sequence conservation alone is insufficient to identify much of the functionally conserved IEC regulatory information. Among the rare, highly sequence-conserved, IEC-specific regulatory regions, we discovered an ancient enhancer upstream from her6/HES1 that is active in a distinct population of Notch-positive cells in the intestinal epithelium. Together, these results show how combining accessible chromatin and mRNA datasets with TFBS prediction and in vivo reporter assays can reveal tissue-specific regulatory information conserved across 420 million years of vertebrate evolution. We define an IEC transcriptional regulatory network that is shared between fish and mammals and establish an experimental platform for studying how evolutionarily distilled regulatory information commonly controls IEC development

  4. Action of cholera toxin in the intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    The primary event in the action of cholera toxin on the isolated chick intestinal epithelial cell is its interaction with the cell membrane. This involves a large number (17 million per cell) of high affinity binding sites which belong to a single class. Binding of biologically active 125 I-labeled toxin is rapid, temperature-dependent, reversible, and saturable over a wide range of concentrations and includes only a small contribution from nonspecific sites. A characteristic lag phase of 10 min occurs following the complete binding of toxin before any increase in cellular cAMP levels can be detected in the isolated cells. The response (elevation of cellular cAMP) of the enterocytes to cholera toxin is linear with time for 40-50 min and causes a six- to eight-fold increase over control levels at steady stae. cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Cl - -independent Na + influx into the isolated enterocytes whereas chlorporomazine (CPZ) which completely abolishes toxin-induced elevation of cAMP both reverses and prevents the cAMP-mediated inhibition of Na + entry. Correlation between cellular cAMP levels and the magnitude of Na + influx into the enterocytes provides evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal Na + uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT and Na + during induction of intestinal secretion. The effect of cAMP on Na + but no Cl - influx in our villus cell preparation can be partially explained in terms of a cAMP-regulated Na + /H + neutral exchange system

  5. Inhibition of EV71 by curcumin in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsing-I; Chio, Chi-Chong; Lin, Jhao-Yin

    2018-01-01

    EV71 is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the Picornaviridae family. EV71 infection may cause various symptoms ranging from hand-foot-and-mouth disease to neurological pathological conditions such as aseptic meningitis, ataxia, and acute transverse myelitis. There is currently no effective treatment or vaccine available. Various compounds have been examined for their ability to restrict EV71 replication. However, most experiments have been performed in rhabdomyosarcoma or Vero cells. Since the gastrointestinal tract is the entry site for this pathogen, we anticipated that orally ingested agents may exert beneficial effects by decreasing virus replication in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, curcumin (diferuloylmethane, C21H20O6), an active ingredient of turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn) with anti-cancer properties, was investigated for its anti-enterovirus activity. We demonstrate that curcumin treatment inhibits viral translation and increases host cell viability. Curcumin does not exert its anti-EV71 effects by modulating virus attachment or virus internal ribosome entry site (IRES) activity. Furthermore, curcumin-mediated regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways is not involved. We found that protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) plays a role in virus translation in EV71-infected intestinal epithelial cells and that curcumin treatment decreases the phosphorylation of this enzyme. In addition, we show evidence that curcumin also limits viral translation in differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells. In summary, our data demonstrate the anti-EV71 properties of curcumin, suggesting that ingestion of this phytochemical may protect against enteroviral infections.

  6. Inhibition of EV71 by curcumin in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsing-I Huang

    Full Text Available EV71 is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the Picornaviridae family. EV71 infection may cause various symptoms ranging from hand-foot-and-mouth disease to neurological pathological conditions such as aseptic meningitis, ataxia, and acute transverse myelitis. There is currently no effective treatment or vaccine available. Various compounds have been examined for their ability to restrict EV71 replication. However, most experiments have been performed in rhabdomyosarcoma or Vero cells. Since the gastrointestinal tract is the entry site for this pathogen, we anticipated that orally ingested agents may exert beneficial effects by decreasing virus replication in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, curcumin (diferuloylmethane, C21H20O6, an active ingredient of turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn with anti-cancer properties, was investigated for its anti-enterovirus activity. We demonstrate that curcumin treatment inhibits viral translation and increases host cell viability. Curcumin does not exert its anti-EV71 effects by modulating virus attachment or virus internal ribosome entry site (IRES activity. Furthermore, curcumin-mediated regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways is not involved. We found that protein kinase C delta (PKCδ plays a role in virus translation in EV71-infected intestinal epithelial cells and that curcumin treatment decreases the phosphorylation of this enzyme. In addition, we show evidence that curcumin also limits viral translation in differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells. In summary, our data demonstrate the anti-EV71 properties of curcumin, suggesting that ingestion of this phytochemical may protect against enteroviral infections.

  7. Inhibition of EV71 by curcumin in intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chio, Chi-Chong; Lin, Jhao-Yin

    2018-01-01

    EV71 is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the Picornaviridae family. EV71 infection may cause various symptoms ranging from hand-foot-and-mouth disease to neurological pathological conditions such as aseptic meningitis, ataxia, and acute transverse myelitis. There is currently no effective treatment or vaccine available. Various compounds have been examined for their ability to restrict EV71 replication. However, most experiments have been performed in rhabdomyosarcoma or Vero cells. Since the gastrointestinal tract is the entry site for this pathogen, we anticipated that orally ingested agents may exert beneficial effects by decreasing virus replication in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, curcumin (diferuloylmethane, C21H20O6), an active ingredient of turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn) with anti-cancer properties, was investigated for its anti-enterovirus activity. We demonstrate that curcumin treatment inhibits viral translation and increases host cell viability. Curcumin does not exert its anti-EV71 effects by modulating virus attachment or virus internal ribosome entry site (IRES) activity. Furthermore, curcumin-mediated regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways is not involved. We found that protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) plays a role in virus translation in EV71-infected intestinal epithelial cells and that curcumin treatment decreases the phosphorylation of this enzyme. In addition, we show evidence that curcumin also limits viral translation in differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells. In summary, our data demonstrate the anti-EV71 properties of curcumin, suggesting that ingestion of this phytochemical may protect against enteroviral infections. PMID:29370243

  8. Intestinal cell proliferation following hyperthermia-radiation combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burholt, D.R.; Wilkinson, D.A.; Shrivastava, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    The present work is an investigation of the extent to which hyperthermia enhances x-ray induced inhibition of intestinal epithelial cell proliferation in mice. Hyperthermia was achieved by whole body immersion of anesthetized ice in a temperature controlled water bath (+-0.1 0 C). Post-treatment proliferative activity was monitored by determining the incorporation of /sup 3/H-TdR into intestinal crypt cells and by the counting of epithelial cell mitotic figures. Initial levels of cell kill were assessed by the microcolony crypt survival technique. All heat treatments were 41.5 0 C for 0.5h. Heat alone reduced the /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation to 50% of the control value by 2h post-treatment. This was followed by a return to control value by 10h and a slight hyperplasia at 24h. Heat either immediately before or after 2Gy abdominal field x-irradiation produced a prolonged period of depressed cell proliferation: /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation remained below control value for the first 24h. As the heat and radiation were separated in time from each other (up to 4h) the interaction between the two decreased. The development of thermotolerance was observed following the second and third treatment during either a heat-only or a heat-radiation multifraction treatments schedule with the treatment spaced 24h apart

  9. IRF8 Transcription-Factor-Dependent Classical Dendritic Cells Are Essential for Intestinal T Cell Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luda, Katarzyna M; Joeris, Thorsten; Persson, Emma K; Rivollier, Aymeric; Demiri, Mimoza; Sitnik, Katarzyna M; Pool, Lieneke; Holm, Jacob B; Melo-Gonzalez, Felipe; Richter, Lisa; Lambrecht, Bart N; Kristiansen, Karsten; Travis, Mark A; Svensson-Frej, Marcus; Kotarsky, Knut; Agace, William W

    2016-04-19

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in intestinal immune homeostasis remains incompletely defined. Here we show that mice lacking IRF8 transcription-factor-dependent DCs had reduced numbers of T cells in the small intestine (SI), but not large intestine (LI), including an almost complete absence of SI CD8αβ(+) and CD4(+)CD8αα(+) T cells; the latter requiring β8 integrin expression by migratory IRF8 dependent CD103(+)CD11b(-) DCs. SI homing receptor induction was impaired during T cell priming in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), which correlated with a reduction in aldehyde dehydrogenase activity by SI-derived MLN DCs, and inefficient T cell localization to the SI. These mice also lacked intestinal T helper 1 (Th1) cells, and failed to support Th1 cell differentiation in MLN and mount Th1 cell responses to Trichuris muris infection. Collectively these results highlight multiple non-redundant roles for IRF8 dependent DCs in the maintenance of intestinal T cell homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Caffeine inhibits nonselective cationic currents in interstitial cells of Cajal from the murine jejunum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Nan Ge; Koh, Sang Don; Sanders, Kenton M

    2009-10-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) discharge unitary potentials in gastrointestinal muscles that constitute the basis for pacemaker activity. Caffeine has been used to block unitary potentials, but the ionic conductance responsible for unitary potentials is controversial. We investigated currents in cultured ICC from murine jejunum that may underlie unitary potentials and studied the effects of caffeine. Networks of ICC generated slow wave events under current clamp, and these events were blocked by caffeine in a concentration-dependent manner. Single ICC generated spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs) under voltage clamp at -60 mV and noisy voltage fluctuations in current clamp. STICs were unaffected when the equilibrium potential for Cl- (ECl) was set to -60 mV (excluding Cl- currents) and reversed at 0 mV, demonstrating that a nonselective cationic conductance, and not a Cl- conductance, is responsible for STICs in ICC. Caffeine inhibited STICs in a concentration-dependent manner. Reduced intracellular Ca2+ and calmidazolium (CMZ; 1 microM) activated persistent inward, nonselective cation currents in ICC. Currents activated by CMZ and by dialysis of cells with 10 mM BAPTA were also inhibited by caffeine. Excised inside-out patches contained channels that exhibited spontaneous openings, and resulting currents reversed at 0 mV. Channel openings were increased by reducing Ca2+ concentration from 10(-6) M to 10(-8) M. CMZ (1 microM) also increased openings of nonselective cation channels. Spontaneous currents and channels activated by CMZ were inhibited by caffeine (5 mM). The findings demonstrate that the Ca2+-inhibited nonselective cation channels that generate STICs in ICC are blocked directly by caffeine. STICs are responsible for unitary potentials in intact muscles, and the block of these events by caffeine is consistent with the idea that a nonselective cation conductance underlies unitary potentials in ICC.

  11. Muscarinic activation of Ca2+-activated Cl- current in interstitial cells of Cajal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mei Hong; Sung, In Kyung; Zheng, Haifeng; Sung, Tae Sik; Britton, Fiona C; O'Driscoll, Kate; Koh, Sang Don; Sanders, Kenton M

    2011-09-15

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) provide pacemaker activity and functional bridges between enteric motor nerve terminals and gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells. The ionic conductance(s) in ICC that are activated by excitatory neural inputs are unknown. Transgenic mice (Kit(copGFP/+)) with constitutive expression of a bright green fluorescent protein were used to investigate cellular responses of ICC to cholinergic stimulation. ICC displayed spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs) under voltage clamp that corresponded to spontaneous transient depolarizations (STDs) under current clamp. STICs reversed at 0 mV when E(Cl) = 0 mV and at -40 mV when E(Cl) was -40 mV, suggesting the STICs were due to a chloride conductance. Carbachol (CCh, 100 nm and 1 μm) induced a sustained inward current (depolarization in current clamp) and increased the amplitude and frequency of STICs and STDs. CCh responses were blocked by atropine (10 μm) or 4-DAMP (100 nm), an M(3) receptor antagonist. STDs were blocked by niflumic acid and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (both 100 μm), and CCh had no effect in the presence of these drugs. The responses of intact circular muscles to CCh and stimulation of intrinsic excitatory nerves by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were also compared. CCh (1 μm) caused atropine-sensitive depolarization and increased the maximum depolarization of slow waves. Similar atropine-sensitive responses were elicited by stimulation of intrinsic excitatory neurons. Niflumic acid (100 μm) blocked responses to EFS but had minor effect on responses to exogenous CCh. These data suggest that different ionic conductances are responsible for electrical responses elicited by bath-applied CCh and cholinergic nerve stimulation.

  12. Muscarinic activation of Ca2+-activated Cl− current in interstitial cells of Cajal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mei Hong; Sung, In Kyung; Zheng, Haifeng; Sung, Tae Sik; Britton, Fiona C; O'Driscoll, Kate; Koh, Sang Don; Sanders, Kenton M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) provide pacemaker activity and functional bridges between enteric motor nerve terminals and gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells. The ionic conductance(s) in ICC that are activated by excitatory neural inputs are unknown. Transgenic mice (KitcopGFP/+) with constitutive expression of a bright green fluorescent protein were used to investigate cellular responses of ICC to cholinergic stimulation. ICC displayed spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs) under voltage clamp that corresponded to spontaneous transient depolarizations (STDs) under current clamp. STICs reversed at 0 mV when ECl = 0 mV and at –40 mV when ECl was –40 mV, suggesting the STICs were due to a chloride conductance. Carbachol (CCh, 100 nm and 1 μm) induced a sustained inward current (depolarization in current clamp) and increased the amplitude and frequency of STICs and STDs. CCh responses were blocked by atropine (10 μm) or 4-DAMP (100 nm), an M3 receptor antagonist. STDs were blocked by niflumic acid and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (both 100 μm), and CCh had no effect in the presence of these drugs. The responses of intact circular muscles to CCh and stimulation of intrinsic excitatory nerves by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were also compared. CCh (1 μm) caused atropine-sensitive depolarization and increased the maximum depolarization of slow waves. Similar atropine-sensitive responses were elicited by stimulation of intrinsic excitatory neurons. Niflumic acid (100 μm) blocked responses to EFS but had minor effect on responses to exogenous CCh. These data suggest that different ionic conductances are responsible for electrical responses elicited by bath-applied CCh and cholinergic nerve stimulation. PMID:21768263

  13. Comparative immunohistochemical characterization of interstitial cells in the urinary bladder of human, guinea pig and pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Clara; Gevaert, Thomas; Ganzer, Roman; De Ridder, Dirk; Neuhaus, Jochen

    2018-05-01

    Interstitial cells (ICs) are thought to play a functional role in urinary bladder. Animal models are commonly used to elucidate bladder physiology and pathophysiology. However, inter-species comparative studies on ICs are rare. We therefore analyzed ICs and their distribution in the upper lamina propria (ULP), the deeper lamina propria (DLP) and the detrusor muscular layer (DET) of human, guinea pig (GP) and pig. Paraffin slices were examined by immunohistochemistry and 3D confocal immunofluorescence of the mesenchymal intermediate filament vimentin (VIM), alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα) and transient receptor potential cation channel A1 (TRPA1). Image stacks were processed for analysis using Huygens software; quantitative analysis was performed with Fiji macros. ICs were identified by immunoreactivity for VIM (excluding blood vessels). In all species ≥ 75% of ULP ICs were VIM + /PDGFRα + and ≥ 90% were VIM + /TRPA1 + . In human and pig ≥ 74% of ULP ICs were VIM + /αSMA + , while in GP the percentage differed significantly with only 37% VIM + /αSMA + ICs. Additionally, over 90% of αSMA + ICs were also TRPA1 + and PDGFRα + in human, GP and pig. In all three species, TRPA1 + and PDGFRα + ICs point to an active role for these cells in bladder physiology, regarding afferent signaling processes and signal modification. We hypothesize that decline in αSMA-positivity in GP reflects adaptation of bladder histology to smaller bladder size. In our experiments, pig bladder proved to be highly comparable to human urinary bladder and seems to provide safer interpretation of experimental findings than GP.

  14. Regeneration of stem-cells in intestinal epithelium after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendry, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    Stem-cells can be defined as pluripotent progenitor cells, capable of both self-renewal and differentitation into all the functional end-cells typical of that cell family. Intestinal crypts contain population of cells which is capable of a) self-renewal following the severe depletion after radiation injury, b) replacing all other cypt cell types, and c) regeneration following repeated depletion (in colon). These are the properties of stem cells. Most measurements of the rate of regeneration of these cells following the severe depletion by radiation have been made by employing large test dose at increasing times. Such measurements have produced widely differing rates of increase in the survival under the test dose, from 4 hours (macrocolonies in jejunum) to 43 hours (microcolonies in stomach). In other tissues, large single test doses have been used to derive the time of doubling survival ratio e.g. for epidermal clones. Although cryptogenic cell number per crypt can be virtually restored by day 4 after a single dose and probably after many such doses, the status quo cannot be reached until the number of crypts is restored to normal. Stem cell numbers form a necessary part of the integrity of epitheliums. The quality of the stem cell function of survivors as expressed in the differentiated progeny, and the maintenance of function of the supportive environment are equally important for late radiation damage. (Yamashita, S.)

  15. SITS-sensitive Cl- conductance pathway in chick intestinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montrose, M.; Randles, J.; Kimmich, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    The unidirectional influx of 36 Cl - into isolated chick epithelial cells is 30% inhibited by 300 μM SITS. Characteristics of the SITS-sensitive flux pathway were examined in terms of sensitivity to changes in membrane potential and intracellular pH. Potential dependence was evaluated using unidirectional influx of [ 14 C]tetraphenylphosphonium ([ 14 C]-TPP + ) as a qualitative sensor of diffusion potentials created by experimentally imposed gradients of CL - . Steady-state distribution of [ 14 C]methylamine ([ 14 C]MA) was used to examine for Cl - -dependent changes in intracellular pH. Imposed Na + gradients, but not Cl - gradients, induce changes in [ 14 C]MA distribution. SITS does not alter the [ 14 C]MA distribution observed in cells with imposed gradients of Na + and Cl - . Both results suggest that inhibition of Cl - influx. However, if relative permeabilities for ion pairs via conductance pathways are compared, it can be shown that SITS causes a marked reduction of P Cl relative to either P Na or P K . SITS also inhibits electrically induced influx of [ 14 C]TPP + or [ 14 C]α-methylglucoside driven by imposed Cl - influx can be blocked by SITS. These observations are all consistent with a SITS-sensitive Cl - conductance pathway associated with the plasma membrane of chick intestinal cells. No Cl - -OH - exchange capability can be detected for chick intestinal cells

  16. Enhancing oral vaccine potency by targeting intestinal M cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Azizi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The immune system in the gastrointestinal tract plays a crucial role in the control of infection, as it constitutes the first line of defense against mucosal pathogens. The attractive features of oral immunization have led to the exploration of a variety of oral delivery systems. However, none of these oral delivery systems have been applied to existing commercial vaccines. To overcome this, a new generation of oral vaccine delivery systems that target antigens to gut-associated lymphoid tissue is required. One promising approach is to exploit the potential of microfold (M cells by mimicking the entry of pathogens into these cells. Targeting specific receptors on the apical surface of M cells might enhance the entry of antigens, initiating the immune response and consequently leading to protection against mucosal pathogens. In this article, we briefly review the challenges associated with current oral vaccine delivery systems and discuss strategies that might potentially target mouse and human intestinal M cells.

  17. An essential role of intestinal cell kinase in lung development is linked to the perinatal lethality of human ECO syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yixin; Park, So Hyun; Wu, Di; Xu, Wenhao; Guillot, Stacey J.; Jin, Li; Li, Xudong; Wang, Yalin; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Fu, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Human endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome, caused by the loss-of-function mutation R272Q in the ICK (intestinal cell kinase) gene, is a neonatal-lethal developmental disorder. To elucidate the molecular basis of ECO syndrome, we constructed an Ick R272Q knock-in mouse model that recapitulates ECO pathological phenotypes. Newborns bearing Ick R272Q homozygous mutations die at birth due to respiratory distress. Ick mutant lungs exhibit not only impaired branching morphogenesis associated with reduced mesenchymal proliferation, but also significant airspace deficiency in primitive alveoli concomitant with abnormal interstitial mesenchymal differentiation. ICK dysfunction induces elongated primary cilia and perturbs ciliary Hedgehog signaling and autophagy during lung sacculation. Our study identifies an essential role for ICK in lung development and advances the mechanistic understanding of ECO syndrome. PMID:28380258

  18. Interstitial cystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms get better. Reduce or stop consuming caffeine, chocolate, carbonated beverages, citrus drinks, and foods with a ... rarely done anymore Support Groups Some people may benefit from taking part in interstitial cystitis support groups . ...

  19. Interstitial Cystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... relieve symptoms. Diet. Alcohol, tomatoes, spices, carbonated drinks, chocolate, caffeine, citrus fruits and drinks, pickled foods, artificial ... at scheduled times and using relaxation techniques. Physical therapy. People who have interstitial cystitis may have painful ...

  20. Cdx2 modulates proliferation in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escaffit, Fabrice; Pare, Frederic; Gauthier, Remy; Rivard, Nathalie; Boudreau, Francois; Beaulieu, Jean-Francois

    2006-01-01

    The homeobox gene Cdx2 is involved in the regulation of the expression of intestine specific markers such as sucrase-isomaltase and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase. Previous studies performed with immortalized or transformed intestinal cell lines have provided evidence that Cdx2 can promote morphological and functional differentiation in these experimental models. However, no data exist concerning the implication of this factor in normal human intestinal cell physiology. In the present work, we have investigated the role of Cdx2 in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt (HIEC) cells that lack this transcription factor. The establishment of HIEC cells expressing Cdx2 in an inducible manner shows that forced expression of Cdx2 significantly alters the proliferation of intestinal crypt cells and stimulates dipeptidylpeptidase IV expression but is not sufficient to trigger intestinal terminal differentiation. These observations suggest that Cdx2 requires additional factors to activate the enterocyte differentiation program in normal undifferentiated cells

  1. Hydrogen Passivation of Interstitial Zn Defects in Heteroepitaxial InP Cell Structures and Influence on Device Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringel, S. A.; Chatterjee, B.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen passivation of heteroepitaxial InP solar cells is of recent interest for deactivation of dislocations and other defects caused by the cell/substrate lattice mismatch that currently limit the photovoltaic performance of these devices. In this paper we present strong evidence that, in addition to direct hydrogen-dislocation interactions, hydrogen forms complexes with the high concentration of interstitial Zn defects present within the p(+) Zn-doped emitter of MOCVD-grown heteroepitaxial InP devices, resulting in a dramatic increase of the forward bias turn-on voltage by as much as 280 mV, from 680 mV to 960 mV. This shift is reproducible and thermally reversible and no such effect is observed for either n(+)p structures or homoepitaxial p(+)n structures grown under identical conditions. A combination of photoluminescence (PL), electrochemical C-V dopant profiling, SIMS and I-V measurements were performed on a set of samples having undergone a matrix of hydrogenation and post-hydrogenation annealing conditions to investigate the source of this voltage enhancement and confirm the expected role of interstitial Zn and hydrogen. A precise correlation between all measurements is demonstrated which indicates that Zn interstitials within the p(+) emitter and their interaction with hydrogen are indeed responsible for this device behavior.

  2. Human Primary Intestinal Epithelial Cells as an Improved In Vitro Model for Cryptosporidium parvum Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabada, Miguel M.; Nichols, Joan; Gomez, Guillermo; White, A. Clinton

    2013-01-01

    The study of human intestinal pathogens has been limited by the lack of methods for the long-term culture of primary human intestinal epithelial cells (PECs). The development of infection models with PECs would allow a better understanding of host-parasite interactions. The objective of this study was to develop a novel method for prolonged in vitro cultivation of PECs that can be used to study Cryptosporidium infection. We isolated intact crypts from human intestines removed during weight loss surgery. The fragments of intestinal layers were cultivated with culture medium supplemented with growth factors and antiapoptotic molecules. After 7 days, the PECs formed self-regenerating cell clusters, forming villi that resemble intestinal epithelium. The PECs proliferated and remained viable for at least 60 days. The cells expressed markers for intestinal stem cells, epithelial cells, and mature enterocytes. The PECs were infected with Cryptosporidium. In contrast to older models in which parasite numbers decay, the burden of parasites increased for >120 h. In summary, we describe here a novel method for the cultivation of self-regenerating human epithelial cells from small intestinal crypts, which contain both intestinal stem cells and mature villus cells. We present data that suggest these cells support Cryptosporidium better than existing cell lines. PECs should provide an improved tool for studying host-parasite interactions involving Cryptosporidium and other intestinal pathogens. PMID:23509153

  3. Culture of human intestinal epithelial cell using the dissociating enzyme thermolysin and endothelin-3

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Z.; Zhang, P.; Zhou, Y.; Qin, H.; Shen, T.

    2010-01-01

    Epithelium, a highly dynamic system, plays a key role in the homeostasis of the intestine. However, thus far a human intestinal epithelial cell line has not been established in many countries. Fetal tissue was selected to generate viable cell cultures for its sterile condition, effective generation, and differentiated character. The purpose of the present study was to culture human intestinal epithelial cells by a relatively simple method. Thermolysin was added to improve the yield of epithel...

  4. Serotonin receptor 2B signaling with interstitial cell activation and leaflet remodeling in degenerative mitral regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driesbaugh, Kathryn H; Branchetti, Emanuela; Grau, Juan B; Keeney, Samuel J; Glass, Kimberly; Oyama, Mark A; Rioux, Nancy; Ayoub, Salma; Sacks, Michael S; Quackenbush, John; Levy, Robert J; Ferrari, Giovanni

    2018-02-01

    Mitral valve interstitial cells (MVIC) play an important role in the pathogenesis of degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR) due to mitral valve prolapse (MVP). Numerous clinical studies have observed serotonin (5HT) dysregulation in cardiac valvulopathies; however, the impact of 5HT-mediated signaling on MVIC activation and leaflet remodeling in MVP have been investigated to a limited extent. Here we test the hypothesis that 5HT receptors (5HTRs) signaling contributes to MVP pathophysiology. Diseased human MV leaflets were obtained during cardiac surgery for MVP; normal MV leaflets were obtained from heart transplants. MV RNA was used for microarray analysis of MVP patients versus control, highlighting genes that indicate the involvement of 5HTR pathways and extracellular matrix remodeling in MVP. Human MV leaflets were also studied in vitro and ex vivo with biomechanical testing to assess remodeling in the presence of a 5HTR2B antagonist (LY272015). MVP leaflets from Cavalier King Charles Spaniels were used as a naturally acquired in vivo model of MVP. These canine MVP leaflets (N=5/group) showed 5HTR2B upregulation. This study also utilized CB57.1ML/6 mice in order to determine the effect of Angiotensin II infusion on MV remodeling. Histological analysis showed that MV thickening due to chronic Angiotensin II remodeling is mitigated by a 5HTR2B antagonist (LY272015) but not by 5HTR2A inhibitors. In humans, MVP is associated with an upregulation in 5HTR2B expression and increased 5HT receptor signaling in the leaflets. Antagonism of 5HTR2B mitigates MVIC activation in vitro and MV remodeling in vivo. These observations support the view that 5HTR signaling is involved not only in previously reported 5HT-related valvulopathies, but it is also involved in the pathological remodeling of MVP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Culture of human intestinal epithelial cell using the dissociating enzyme thermolysin and endothelin-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Liu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Epithelium, a highly dynamic system, plays a key role in the homeostasis of the intestine. However, thus far a human intestinal epithelial cell line has not been established in many countries. Fetal tissue was selected to generate viable cell cultures for its sterile condition, effective generation, and differentiated character. The purpose of the present study was to culture human intestinal epithelial cells by a relatively simple method. Thermolysin was added to improve the yield of epithelial cells, while endothelin-3 was added to stimulate their growth. By adding endothelin-3, the achievement ratio (viable cell cultures/total cultures was enhanced to 60% of a total of 10 cultures (initiated from 8 distinct fetal small intestines, allowing the generation of viable epithelial cell cultures. Western blot, real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining showed that cytokeratins 8, 18 and mouse intestinal mucosa-1/39 had high expression levels in human intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated markers such as sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV also showed high expression levels in human intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells, with the expression of surface markers (cytokeratins 8, 18 and mouse intestinal mucosa-1/39 and secretion of cytokines (sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV, may be cultured by the thermolysin and endothelin-3 method and maintained for at least 20 passages. This is relatively simple, requiring no sophisticated techniques or instruments, and may have a number of varied applications.

  6. Action of cholera toxin in the intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    The primary event in the action of cholera toxin on the isolated chick intestinal epithelial cell is its interaction with a large number of high affinity binding sites in the cell membrane. Binding of 125 I-labeled toxin is rapid, temperature-dependent, reversible, and saturable over a wide range of concentrations and includes only a small contribution from nonspecific sites. A characteristic lag phase of 10 min occurs following the complete binding of toxin before any increase in cellular cAMP levels can be detected. The response (elevation of cellular cAMP) is linear with time for 40 to 50 min and causes a six- to eight-fold increase over control levels (10 to 15 picomole cAMP/mg cellular protein) at steady state. cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Cl - -independent Na + influx into the isolated enterocytes whereas chlorpromazine (CPZ) which completely abolishes toxin-induced elevation of cAMP both reverses and prevents the cAMP-mediated inhibition of Na + entry. Correlation between cellular cAMP levels and the magnitude of Na + influx provides evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal Na + uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT on Na + during induction of intestinal secretion. The effect of cAMP on Na + but not Cl - influx preparations can be partially explained in terms of a cAMP-regulated Na + /H + neutral exchange system. Data on the coupling relationship between Na + transport and the intra- and extracellular pH in the enterocytes show that an amiloride-sensitive electroneutral Na + /H + exchange process occurs. This coupling between Na + and H + is partially inhibited by CT and dbcAMP, suggesting that the Na + /H + exchange may be a cAMP-regulated process. 31 references, 32 figures, 5 tables

  7. Limited external irradiation and interstitial 192iridium implant in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puthawala, A.A.; Syed, A.M.; Eads, D.L.; Neblett, D.; Gillin, L.; Gates, T.C.

    1985-01-01

    Between January 1976 and March 1982, 80 patients with histologically proven diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar region were treated with definitive radiotherapy. Sixty-five (81%) of these patients had locally advanced tumors (Stage III and IV); 49% of patients had clinically palpable cervical lymphadenopathy. All patients received a combined external megavoltage and interstitial irradiation. The dose of external irradiation was limited to 4500-5000 cGy over 41/2 to 51/2 weeks. This was followed by interstitial 192 iridium implants to doses of 2000-2500 cGy in 50-60 hours for T1, T2 lesions and 3000-4000 cGy in 60-100 hours for T3, T4 lesions. The neck masses were also separately implanted to deliver additional doses of 2000-4000 cGy in 50-80 hours. Overall local tumor control was observed in 84% of patients with a minimum follow-up period of 2 years. An absolute 3-year disease free survival of the entire group was 72%. Treatment related complications such as soft tissue necrosis or osteoradionecrosis occurred in 6% (5/80) of patients. The salvage of neck failures and local failures was possible in 78 and 38% of patients, respectively, either by surgery or by re-irradiation employing interstitial 192 iridium implants. Functional and esthetic integrity was well preserved in most cases

  8. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Ray, Ramesh M.; Johnson, Leonard R.

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal epithelium is dependent upon a balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are well known for their role in cell proliferation. Previous studies from our group have shown that polyamine-depletion of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, increases p53 and p21Cip1 protein levels, induces G1 arrest, and protects cells from camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptosis. Although emerging evidence suggests that members of the Cdk family are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, their roles directing apoptosis of IEC-6 cells are not known. In this study, we report that inhibition of Cdk1, 2, and 9 (with the broad range Cdk inhibitor, AZD5438) in proliferating IEC-6 cells triggered DNA damage, activated p53 signaling, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis. By contrast, inhibition of Cdk2 (with NU6140) increased p53 protein and activity, inhibited proliferation, but had no effect on apoptosis. Notably, AZD5438 sensitized, whereas, NU6140 rescued proliferating IEC-6 cells from CPT-induced apoptosis. However, in colon carcinoma (Caco2) cells with mutant p53, treatment with either AZD5438 or NU6140 blocked proliferation, albeit more robustly with AZD5438. Both Cdk inhibitors induced apoptosis in Caco2 cells in a p53-independent manner. In serum starved quiescent IEC-6 cells, both AZD5438 and NU6140 decreased TNF- /CPT-induced activation of p53 and, consequently, rescued cells from apoptosis, indicating that sustained Cdk activity is required for apoptosis of quiescent cells. Furthermore, AZD5438 partially reversed the protective effect of polyamine depletion whereas NU6140 had no effect. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdks possess opposing roles in the control of apoptosis in quiescent and proliferating cells. In addition, Cdk inhibitors uncouple proliferation from apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:24242917

  9. The safety and efficacy of carboplatin plus nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer patients with interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Yuichiro; Hattori, Yoshihiro; Tohnai, Rie; Ito, Shoichi; Kawa, Yoshitaka; Kono, Yuko; Urata, Yoshiko; Nogami, Munenobu; Takenaka, Daisuke; Negoro, Shunichi; Satouchi, Miyako

    2018-01-01

    The optimal chemotherapy regimen for non-small cell lung cancer patients with interstitial lung disease is unclear. We therefore investigated the safety and efficacy of carboplatin plus nab-paclitaxel as a first-line regimen for non-small cell lung cancer in patients with interstitial lung disease. We retrospectively reviewed advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients with interstitial lung disease who received carboplatin plus nab-paclitaxel as a first-line chemotherapy regimen at Hyogo Cancer Center between February 2013 and August 2016. interstitial lung disease was diagnosed according to the findings of pretreatment chest high-resolution computed tomography. Twelve patients were included (male, n = 11; female, n = 1). The overall response rate was 67% and the disease control rate was 100%. The median progression free survival was 5.1 months (95% CI: 2.9-8.3 months) and the median overall survival was 14.9 months (95% CI: 4.8-not reached). A chemotherapy-related acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease was observed in one patient; the extent of this event was Grade 2. There were no treatment-related deaths. Carboplatin plus nab-paclitaxel, as a first-line chemotherapy regimen for non-small cell lung cancer, showed favorable efficacy and safety in patients with preexisting interstitial lung disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Existence of c-Kit negative cells with ultrastructural features of interstitial cells of Cajal in the subserosal layer of the W/W(v) mutant mouse colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamada, Hiromi; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are mesenchymal cells that are distributed along the gastrointestinal tract and function as pacemaker cells or intermediary cells between nerves and smooth muscle cells. ICC express a receptor tyrosine kinase c-Kit, which is an established marker for ICC. The c-kit gene is allelic with the murine white-spotting locus (W), and some ICC subsets were reported to be missing in heterozygous mutant W/W(v) mice carrying W and W(v) mutated alleles. In this study, the characterization of interstitial cells in the subserosal layer of W/W(v) mice was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. In the proximal and distal colon of W/W(v) mutant mice, no c-Kit-positive cells were detected in the subserosal layer by immunohistochemistry. By electron microscopy, the interstitial cells, which were characterized by the existence of caveolae, abundant mitochondria and gap junctions, were observed in the W/W(v) mutant colon. The morphological characteristics were comparable to those of the multipolar c-Kit positive ICC seen in the subserosa of proximal and distal colon of wild-type mice. Fibroblasts were also located in the same layers, but the morphology of the fibroblasts was distinguishable from that of ICC in wild type mice or of ICC-like cells in W/W(v) mutant mice. Collectively, it is concluded that c-Kit-negative interstitial cells showing a typical ICC ultrastructure exist in the proximal and distal colon of W/W(v) mutant mice.

  11. Human intestinal dendritic cells as controllers of mucosal immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bernardo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are the most potent, professional antigen-presenting cells in the body; following antigen presentation they control the type (proinflammatory/regulatory of immune response that will take place, as well as its location. Given their high plasticity and maturation ability in response to local danger signals derived from innate immunity, dendritic cells are key actors in the connection between innate immunity and adaptive immunity responses. In the gut dendritic cells control immune tolerance mechanisms against food and/or commensal flora antigens, and are also capable of initiating an active immune response in the presence of invading pathogens. Dendritic cells are thus highly efficient in controlling the delicate balance between tolerance and immunity in an environment so rich in antigens as the gut, and any factor involving these cells may impact their function, ultimately leading to the development of bowel conditions such as celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease. In this review we shall summarize our understanding of human intestinal dendritic cells, their ability to express and induce migration markers, the various environmental factors modulating their properties, their subsets in the gut, and the problems entailed by their study, including identification strategies, differences between humans and murine models, and phenotypical variations along the gastrointestinal tract.

  12. Live Cells Decreased Methane Production in Intestinal Content of Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Gong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available An in vitro gas production technique was used in this study to elucidate the effect of two strains of active live yeast on methane (CH4 production in the large intestinal content of pigs to provide an insight to whether active live yeast could suppress CH4 production in the hindgut of pigs. Treatments used in this study include blank (no substrate and no live yeast cells, control (no live yeast cells and yeast (YST supplementation groups (supplemented with live yeast cells, YST1 or YST2. The yeast cultures contained 1.8×1010 cells per g, which were added at the rates of 0.2 mg and 0.4 mg per ml of the fermented inoculum. Large intestinal contents were collected from 2 Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire pigs, mixed with a phosphate buffer (1:2, and incubated anaerobically at 39°C for 24 h using 500 mg substrate (dry matter (DM basis. Total gas and CH4 production decreased (p<0.05 with supplementation of yeast. The methane production reduction potential (MRP was calculated by assuming net methane concentration for the control as 100%. The MRP of yeast 2 was more than 25%. Compared with the control group, in vitro DM digestibility (IVDMD and total volatile fatty acids (VFA concentration increased (p<0.05 in 0.4 mg/ml YST1 and 0.2 mg/ml YST2 supplementation groups. Proportion of propionate, butyrate and valerate increased (p<0.05, but that of acetate decreased (p<0.05, which led to a decreased (p<0.05 acetate: propionate (A: P ratio in the both YST2 treatments and the 0.4 mg/ml YST 1 supplementation groups. Hydrogen recovery decreased (p<0.05 with yeast supplementation. Quantity of methanogenic archaea per milliliter of inoculum decreased (p<0.05 with yeast supplementation after 24 h of incubation. Our results suggest that live yeast cells suppressed in vitro CH4 production when inoculated into the large intestinal contents of pigs and shifted the fermentation pattern to favor propionate production together with an increased population of acetogenic

  13. Advanced three-dimensional culture of equine intestinal epithelial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A Stieler; Freund, J M; Gonzalez, L M

    2018-03-01

    Intestinal epithelial stem cells are critical to epithelial repair following gastrointestinal injury. The culture of intestinal stem cells has quickly become a cornerstone of a vast number of new research endeavours that range from determining tissue viability to testing drug efficacy for humans. This study aims to describe the methods of equine stem cell culture and highlights the future benefits of these techniques for the advancement of equine medicine. To describe the isolation and culture of small intestinal stem cells into three-dimensional (3D) enteroids in horses without clinical gastrointestinal abnormalities. Descriptive study. Intestinal samples were collected by sharp dissection immediately after euthanasia. Intestinal crypts containing intestinal stem cells were dissociated from the underlying tissue layers, plated in a 3D matrix and supplemented with growth factors. After several days, resultant 3D enteroids were prepared for immunofluorescent imaging and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to detect and characterise specific cell types present. Intestinal crypts were cryopreserved immediately following collection and viability assessed. Intestinal crypts were successfully cultured and matured into 3D enteroids containing a lumen and budding structures. Immunofluorescence and PCR were used to confirm the existence of stem cells and all post mitotic, mature cell types, described to exist in the horse intestinal epithelium. Previously frozen crypts were successfully cultured following a freeze-thaw cycle. Tissues were all derived from normal horses. Application of this technique for the study of specific disease was not performed at this time. The successful culture of equine intestinal crypts into 3D "mini-guts" allows for in vitro studies of the equine intestine. Additionally, these results have relevance to future development of novel therapies that harness the regenerative potential of equine intestine in horses with gastrointestinal disease

  14. Urokinase and the intestinal mucosa: evidence for a role in epithelial cell turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, P; Birchall, I; Rosella, O; Albert, V; Finch, C; Barkla, D; Young, G

    1998-01-01

    Background—The functions of urokinase in intestinal epithelia are unknown. 
Aims—To determine the relation of urokinase expressed by intestinal epithelial cells to their position in the crypt-villus/surface axis and of mucosal urokinase activity to epithelial proliferative kinetics in the distal colon. 
Methods—Urokinase expression was examined immunohistochemically in human intestinal mucosa. Urokinase activity was measured colorimetrically in epithelial cells isolated sequ...

  15. Bovine TLR2 and TLR4 mediate Cryptosporidium parvum recognition in bovine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengtao; Fu, Yunhe; Gong, Pengtao; Zheng, Jingtong; Liu, Li; Yu, Yuqiang; Li, Jianhua; Li, He; Yang, Ju; Zhang, Xichen

    2015-08-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) is an intestinal parasite that causes diarrhea in neonatal calves. It results in significant morbidity of neonatal calves and economic losses for producers worldwide. Innate resistance against C. parvum is thought to depend on engagement of pattern recognition receptors. However, the role of innate responses to C. parvum has not been elucidated in bovine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of TLRs in host-cell responses during C. parvum infection of cultured bovine intestinal epithelial cells. The expressions of TLRs in bovine intestinal epithelial cells were detected by qRT-PCR. To determine which, if any, TLRs may play a role in the response of bovine intestinal epithelial cells to C. parvum, the cells were stimulated with C. parvum and the expression of TLRs were tested by qRT-PCR. The expression of NF-κB was detected by western blotting. Further analyses were carried out in bovine TLRs transfected HEK293 cells and by TLRs-DN transfected bovine intestinal epithelial cells. The results showed that bovine intestinal epithelial cells expressed all known TLRs. The expression of TLR2 and TLR4 were up-regulated when bovine intestinal epithelial cells were treated with C. parvum. Meanwhile, C. parvum induced IL-8 production in TLR2 or TLR4/MD-2 transfected HEK293 cells. Moreover, C. parvum induced NF-κB activation and cytokine expression in bovine intestinal epithelial cells. The induction of NF-κB activation and cytokine expression by C. parvum were reduced in TLR2-DN and TLR4-DN transfected cells. The results showed that bovine intestinal epithelial cells expressed all known TLRs, and bovine intestinal epithelial cells recognized and responded to C. parvum via TLR2 and TLR4. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. ADAM10 regulates Notch function in intestinal stem cells of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Hwai; VanDussen, Kelli L; Sawey, Eric T; Wade, Alex W; Kasper, Chelsea; Rakshit, Sabita; Bhatt, Riha G; Stoeck, Alex; Maillard, Ivan; Crawford, Howard C; Samuelson, Linda C; Dempsey, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10 (ADAM10) is a cell surface sheddase that regulates physiologic processes, including Notch signaling. ADAM10 is expressed in all intestinal epithelial cell types, but the requirement for ADAM10 signaling in crypt homeostasis is not well defined. We analyzed intestinal tissues from mice with constitutive (Vil-Cre;Adam10(f/f) mice) and conditional (Vil-CreER;Adam10(f/f) and Leucine-rich repeat-containing GPCR5 [Lgr5]-CreER;Adam10(f/f) mice) deletion of ADAM10. We performed cell lineage-tracing experiments in mice that expressed a gain-of-function allele of Notch in the intestine (Rosa26(NICD)), or mice with intestine-specific disruption of Notch (Rosa26(DN-MAML)), to examine the effects of ADAM10 deletion on cell fate specification and intestinal stem cell maintenance. Loss of ADAM10 from developing and adult intestine caused lethality associated with altered intestinal morphology, reduced progenitor cell proliferation, and increased secretory cell differentiation. ADAM10 deletion led to the replacement of intestinal cell progenitors with 2 distinct, post-mitotic, secretory cell lineages: intermediate-like (Paneth/goblet) and enteroendocrine cells. Based on analysis of Rosa26(NICD) and Rosa26(DN-MAML) mice, we determined that ADAM10 controls these cell fate decisions by regulating Notch signaling. Cell lineage-tracing experiments showed that ADAM10 is required for survival of Lgr5(+) crypt-based columnar cells. Our findings indicate that Notch-activated stem cells have a competitive advantage for occupation of the stem cell niche. ADAM10 acts in a cell autonomous manner within the intestinal crypt compartment to regulate Notch signaling. This process is required for progenitor cell lineage specification and crypt-based columnar cell maintenance. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Distinct Roles for Intestinal Epithelial Cell-Specific Hdac1 and Hdac2 in the Regulation of Murine Intestinal Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonneaud, Alexis; Turgeon, Naomie; Boudreau, François; Perreault, Nathalie; Rivard, Nathalie; Asselin, Claude

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium responds to and transmits signals from the microbiota and the mucosal immune system to insure intestinal homeostasis. These interactions are in part conveyed by epigenetic modifications, which respond to environmental changes. Protein acetylation is an epigenetic signal regulated by histone deacetylases, including Hdac1 and Hdac2. We have previously shown that villin-Cre-inducible intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific Hdac1 and Hdac2 deletions disturb intestinal homeostasis. To determine the role of Hdac1 and Hdac2 in the regulation of IEC function and the establishment of the dual knockout phenotype, we have generated villin-Cre murine models expressing one Hdac1 allele without Hdac2, or one Hdac2 allele without Hdac1. We have also investigated the effect of short-term deletion of both genes in naphtoflavone-inducible Ah-Cre and tamoxifen-inducible villin-Cre(ER) mice. Mice with one Hdac1 allele displayed normal tissue architecture, but increased sensitivity to DSS-induced colitis. In contrast, mice with one Hdac2 allele displayed intestinal architecture defects, increased proliferation, decreased goblet cell numbers as opposed to Paneth cells, increased immune cell infiltration associated with fibrosis, and increased sensitivity to DSS-induced colitis. In comparison to dual knockout mice, intermediary activation of Notch, mTOR, and Stat3 signaling pathways was observed. While villin-Cre(ER) Hdac1 and Hdac2 deletions led to an impaired epithelium and differentiation defects, Ah-Cre-mediated deletion resulted in blunted proliferation associated with the induction of a DNA damage response. Our results suggest that IEC determination and intestinal homeostasis are highly dependent on Hdac1 and Hdac2 activity levels, and that changes in the IEC acetylome may alter the mucosal environment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Communication between B-Cells and Microbiota for the Maintenance of Intestinal Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuying Liu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The human intestine is populated with an extremely dense and diverse bacterial community. Commensal bacteria act as an important antigenic stimulus producing the maturation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT. The production of immunoglobulin (Ig A by B-cells in the GALT is one of the immune responses following intestinal colonization of bacteria. The switch of B-cells from IgM to IgA-producing cells in the Peyer’s patches and neighboring lamina propria proceeds by T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent mechanisms. Several grams of secretory IgA (SIgA are released into the intestine each day. SIgA serves as a first-line of defense in protecting the intestinal epithelium from enteric toxins and pathogenic microorganisms. SIgA has a capacity to directly quench bacterial virulence factors, influence the composition of the intestinal microbiota, and promote the transportation of antigens across the intestinal epithelium to GALT and down-regulate proinflammatory responses associated with the uptake of highly pathogenic bacteria and potentially allergenic antigens. This review summarizes the reciprocal interactions between intestinal B cells and bacteria, specifically, the formation of IgA in the gut, the role of intestinal IgA in the regulation of bacterial communities and the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis, and the effects of probiotics on IgA levels in the gastrointestinal tract.

  19. Toward a Concept of Stretch Coupling in Smooth Muscle: A Thesis by Lars Thuneberg on Contractile Activity in Neonatal Interstitial Cells of Cajal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huizinga, Jan D; Lammers, Wim J E P; Mikkelsen, Hanne B

    2010-01-01

    The hypothesis was put forward by Thuneberg that rhythmically contracting interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) were sensing stretch of the musculature and that this information was transmitted to smooth muscle cells via peg and socket contacts. The present study provides the evidence for the contrac......The hypothesis was put forward by Thuneberg that rhythmically contracting interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) were sensing stretch of the musculature and that this information was transmitted to smooth muscle cells via peg and socket contacts. The present study provides the evidence...

  20. Fermented soya bean (tempe) extracts reduce adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to intestinal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roubos-van den Hil, P.J.; Nout, M.J.R.; Beumer, R.R.; Meulen, van der J.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: This study aimed to investigate the effect of processed soya bean, during the successive stages of tempe fermentation and different fermentation times, on adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 to intestinal brush border cells as well as Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells; and

  1. Peroxisomes in intestinal and gallbladder epithelial cells of the stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus L. (Teleostei)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, A.J.H. de; Veenhuis, M.; Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    The occurrence of microbodies in the epithelial cells of the intestine and gallbladder of the stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus L., is described. In the intestine the organelles are predominantly located in the apical and perinuclear zone of the cells and may contain small crystalline cores. In

  2. Oral Administration of Probiotics Increases Paneth Cells and Intestinal Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia I. Cazorla

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The huge amount of intestinal bacteria represents a continuing threat to the intestinal barrier. To meet this challenge, gut epithelial cells produce antimicrobial peptides (AMP that act at the forefront of innate immunity. We explore whether this antimicrobial activity and Paneth cells, the main intestinal cell responsible of AMP production, are influenced by probiotics administration, to avoid the imbalance of intestinal microbiota and preserve intestinal barrier. Administration of Lactobacillus casei CRL 431 (Lc 431 and L. paracasei CNCM I-1518 (Lp 1518 to 42 days old mice, increases the number of Paneth cells on small intestine, and the antimicrobial activity against the pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella Typhimurium in the intestinal fluids. Specifically, strong damage of the bacterial cell with leakage of cytoplasmic content, and cellular fragmentation were observed in S. Typhimurium and S. aureus. Even more important, probiotics increase the antimicrobial activity of the intestinal fluids at the different ages, from weaning (21 days old to old age (180 days old. Intestinal antimicrobial activity stimulated by oral probiotics, do not influence significantly the composition of total anaerobic bacteria, lactobacilli and enterobacteria in the large intestine, at any age analyzed. This result, together with the antimicrobial activity observed against the same probiotic bacteria; endorse the regular consumption of probiotics without adverse effect on the intestinal homeostasis in healthy individuals. We demonstrate that oral probiotics increase intestinal antimicrobial activity and Paneth cells in order to strengthen epithelial barrier against pathogens. This effect would be another important mechanism by which probiotics protect the host mainly against infectious diseases.

  3. Basement membrane and interstitial proteoglycans produced by MDCK cells correspond to those expressed in the kidney cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erickson, A C; Couchman, J R

    2001-01-01

    Multiple proteoglycans (PGs) are present in all basement membranes (BM) and may contribute to their structure and function, but their effects on cell behavior are not well understood. Their postulated functions include: a structural role in maintaining tissue histoarchitecture, or aid in selective...... filtration processes; sequestration of growth factors; and regulation of cellular differentiation. Furthermore, expression PGs has been found to vary in several disease states. In order to elucidate the role of PGs in the BM, a well-characterized model of polarized epithelium, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK...... core proteins or CS stubs generated by cABC treatment, revealed that both basement membrane and interstitial PGs are secreted by MDCK cells. HSPGs expressed by MDCK cells are perlecan, agrin, and collagen XVIII. Various CSPG core proteins are made by MDCK cells and have been identified as biglycan...

  4. In-vitro analysis of early calcification in aortic valvular interstitial cells using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davari, Seyyed Ali; Masjedi, Shirin; Ferdous, Zannatul; Mukherjee, Dibyendu

    2018-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a major cardiovascular disorder caused by osteogenic differentiation of valvular interstitial cells (VICs) within aortic valves. Conventional methods like colorimetric assays and histology fail to detect small calcium depositions during in-vitro VIC cultures. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a robust analytical tool used for inorganic materials characterizations, but relatively new to biomedical applications. We employ LIBS, for the first time, for quantitative in-vitro detection of calcium depositions in VICs at various osteogenic differentiation stages. VICs isolated from porcine aortic valves were cultured in osteogenic media over various days. Colorimetric calcium assays based on arsenazo dye and Von Kossa staining measured the calcium depositions within VICs. Simultaneously, LIBS signatures for Ca I (422.67 nm) atomic emission lines were collected for estimating calcium depositions in lyophilized VIC samples. Our results indicate excellent linear correlation between the calcium assay and our LIBS measurements. Furthermore, unlike the assay results, the LIBS results could resolve calcium signals from cell samples with as early as 2 days of osteogenic culture. Quantitatively, the LIBS measurements establish the limit of detection for calcium content in VICs to be ∼0.17±0.04 μg which indicates a 5-fold improvement over calcium assay. Picture: Quantitative LIBS enables in-vitro analysis for early stage detection of calcium deposition within aortic valvular interstitial cells (VICs). © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The recruitability and cell-cycle state of intestinal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potten, C.S.; Chadwick, C.; Ijiri, K.; Tsubouchi, S.; Hanson, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    Evidence is presented which suggests that the crypts of the small intestine contain at least two discrete but interdependent classes of stem cells, some with discrete cell kinetic properties and some with discrete radiation responses or radiosensitivities. Very low doses of X rays or gamma rays, or neutrons, kill a few cells in the stem cell regions of the crypt in a sensitive dose-dependent manner. Similar doses generate several different cell kinetic responses within either the clonogenic fraction or the cells at the stem cell position within the crypt. The cell kinetic responses range from apparent recruitment of G0 clonogenic cells into cycle, to a marked shortening of the average cell cycle of the cells at the stem cell position. It is suggested that the cell kinetic changes may be the consequence of the cell destruction

  6. PGE2 suppresses intestinal T cell function in thermal injury: a cause of enhanced bacterial translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, M A; Fazal, N; Namak, S Y; Haque, F; Ravindranath, T; Sayeed, M M

    2001-09-01

    Increased gut bacterial translocation in burn and trauma patients has been demonstrated in a number of previous studies, however, the mechanism for such an increased gut bacterial translocation in injured patients remains poorly understood. Utilizing a rat model of burn injury, in the present study we examined the role of intestinal immune defense by analyzing the T cell functions. We investigated if intestinal T cells dysfunction contributes to bacterial translocation after burn injury. Also our study determined if burn-mediated alterations in intestinal T cell functions are related to enhanced release of PGE2. Finally, we examined whether or not burn-related alterations in intestinal T cell function are due to inappropriate activation of signaling molecule P59fyn, which is required for T cell activation and proliferation. The results presented here showed an increase in gut bacterial accumulation in mesenteric lymph nodes after thermal injury. This was accompanied by a decrease in the intestinal T cell proliferative responses. Furthermore, the treatments of burn-injured animals with PGE2 synthesis blocker (indomethacin or NS398) prevented both the decrease in intestinal T cell proliferation and enhanced bacterial translocation. Finally, our data suggested that the inhibition of intestinal T cell proliferation could result via PGE2-mediated down-regulation of the T cell activation-signaling molecule P59fyn. These findings support a role of T cell-mediated immune defense against bacterial translocation in burn injury.

  7. JAK/STAT-1 Signaling Is Required for Reserve Intestinal Stem Cell Activation during Intestinal Regeneration Following Acute Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla A. Richmond

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium serves as an essential barrier to the outside world and is maintained by functionally distinct populations of rapidly cycling intestinal stem cells (CBC ISCs and slowly cycling, reserve ISCs (r-ISCs. Because disruptions in the epithelial barrier can result from pathological activation of the immune system, we sought to investigate the impact of inflammation on ISC behavior during the regenerative response. In a murine model of αCD3 antibody-induced small-intestinal inflammation, r-ISCs proved highly resistant to injury, while CBC ISCs underwent apoptosis. Moreover, r-ISCs were induced to proliferate and functionally contribute to intestinal regeneration. Further analysis revealed that the inflammatory cytokines interferon gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha led to r-ISC activation in enteroid culture, which could be blocked by the JAK/STAT inhibitor, tofacitinib. These results highlight an important role for r-ISCs in response to acute intestinal inflammation and show that JAK/STAT-1 signaling is required for the r-ISC regenerative response.

  8. Tumor interstitial fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Olsen, Charlotta J.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) is a proximal fluid that, in addition to the set of blood soluble phase-borne proteins, holds a subset of aberrantly externalized components, mainly proteins, released by tumor cells and tumor microenvironment through various mechanisms, which include classical...

  9. Serratia marcescens is injurious to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochieng, John B; Boisen, Nadia; Lindsay, Brianna; Santiago, Araceli; Ouma, Collins; Ombok, Maurice; Fields, Barry; Stine, O Colin; Nataro, James P

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhea causes substantial morbidity and mortality in children in low-income countries. Although numerous pathogens cause diarrhea, the etiology of many episodes remains unknown. Serratia marcescens is incriminated in hospital-associated infections, and HIV/AIDS associated diarrhea. We have recently found that Serratia spp. may be found more commonly in the stools of patients with diarrhea than in asymptomatic control children. We therefore investigated the possible enteric pathogenicity of S. marcescens in vitro employing a polarized human colonic epithelial cell (T84) monolayer. Infected monolayers were assayed for bacterial invasion, transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), cytotoxicity, interleukin-8 (IL-8) release and morphological changes by scanning electron microscopy. We observed significantly greater epithelial cell invasion by S. marcescens compared to Escherichia coli strain HS (p = 0.0038 respectively). Cell invasion was accompanied by reduction in TEER and secretion of IL-8. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) extracellular concentration rapidly increased within a few hours of exposure of the monolayer to S. marcescens. Scanning electron microscopy of S. marcescens-infected monolayers demonstrated destruction of microvilli and vacuolization. Our results suggest that S. marcescens interacts with intestinal epithelial cells in culture and induces dramatic alterations similar to those produced by known enteric pathogens.

  10. SAM pointed domain ETS factor (SPDEF) regulates terminal differentiation and maturation of intestinal goblet cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noah, Taeko K.; Kazanjian, Avedis [Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Whitsett, Jeffrey [Developmental Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Neonatology and Pulmonary Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Shroyer, Noah F., E-mail: noah.shroyer@cchmc.org [Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Developmental Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Background and Aims: SPDEF (also termed PDEF or PSE) is an ETS family transcription factor that regulates gene expression in the prostate and goblet cell hyperplasia in the lung. Spdef has been reported to be expressed in the intestine. In this paper, we identify an important role for Spdef in regulating intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis and differentiation. Methods: SPDEF expression was inhibited in colon cancer cells to determine its ability to control goblet cell gene activation. The effects of transgenic expression of Spdef on intestinal differentiation and homeostasis were determined. Results: In LS174T colon cancer cells treated with Notch/{gamma}-secretase inhibitor to activate goblet cell gene expression, shRNAs that inhibited SPDEF also repressed expression of goblet cell genes AGR2, MUC2, RETLNB, and SPINK4. Transgenic expression of Spdef caused the expansion of intestinal goblet cells and corresponding reduction in Paneth, enteroendocrine, and absorptive enterocytes. Spdef inhibited proliferation of intestinal crypt cells without induction of apoptosis. Prolonged expression of the Spdef transgene caused a progressive reduction in the number of crypts that expressed Spdef, consistent with its inhibitory effects on cell proliferation. Conclusions: Spdef was sufficient to inhibit proliferation of intestinal progenitors and induce differentiation into goblet cells; SPDEF was required for activation of goblet cell associated genes in vitro. These data support a model in which Spdef promotes terminal differentiation into goblet cells of a common goblet/Paneth progenitor.

  11. Peritumoral interstitial double-nuclide double-compound lymphoscintigraphy (PIDDL) in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munz, D.L.; Jung, H.

    1985-01-01

    PIDDL is a new two-phase lymphoscintigraphic approach developed by MUNZ et al. for identification of lymph node drainage groups of primary tumors followed by direct visualization of metastases in the nodes. The present study was done to test the diagnostic usefulness of PIDDL in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. 58 patients of either sex, aged 31-86 years, were examined prior to surgery. In the first phase of PIDDL, lymph node groups draining the primary lesions were identified after peritumoral interstitial injection of 1.52.0 mCi Tc-99m antimony trisulfide colloid or Tc-99m human serum albumin microcolloid. In the second phase, metastases located in the draining lymph nodes were visualized following peritumoral interstitial injection of 200-300 μCi Ga-67 citrate. Ga-67 accumulated in 71% of lymph node drainage groups identified. No GA-67 uptake was observed in lymph nodes other than those identified by the radiocolloid. Based on the radiocolloid lymphoscintigraphic data, selective lymph node dissection was performed in 41 of the patients examined. The study concludes that PIDDL offers a promising approach for the noninvasive assessment of lymph node metastases in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

  12. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans mediate interstitial flow mechanotransduction regulating MMP-13 expression and cell motility via FAK-ERK in 3D collagen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Dong Shi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial flow directly affects cells that reside in tissues and regulates tissue physiology and pathology by modulating important cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and migration. However, the structures that cells utilize to sense interstitial flow in a 3-dimensional (3D environment have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we have shown that interstitial flow upregulates matrix metalloproteinase (MMP expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs and fibroblasts/myofibroblasts via activation of an ERK1/2-c-Jun pathway, which in turn promotes cell migration in collagen. Herein, we focused on uncovering the flow-induced mechanotransduction mechanism in 3D.Cleavage of rat vascular SMC surface glycocalyx heparan sulfate (HS chains from proteoglycan (PG core proteins by heparinase or disruption of HS biosynthesis by silencing N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase 1 (NDST1 suppressed interstitial flow-induced ERK1/2 activation, interstitial collagenase (MMP-13 expression, and SMC motility in 3D collagen. Inhibition or knockdown of focal adhesion kinase (FAK also attenuated or blocked flow-induced ERK1/2 activation, MMP-13 expression, and cell motility. Interstitial flow induced FAK phosphorylation at Tyr925, and this activation was blocked when heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs were disrupted. These data suggest that HSPGs mediate interstitial flow-induced mechanotransduction through FAK-ERK. In addition, we show that integrins are crucial for mechanotransduction through HSPGs as they mediate cell spreading and maintain cytoskeletal rigidity.We propose a conceptual mechanotransduction model wherein cell surface glycocalyx HSPGs, in the presence of integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesions and cytoskeleton organization, sense interstitial flow and activate the FAK-ERK signaling axis, leading to upregulation of MMP expression and cell motility in 3D. This is the first study to describe a flow-induced mechanotransduction

  13. File list: NoD.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: NoD.Dig.20.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: InP.Dig.20.AllAg.Intestinal_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. Th17 Cell Induction by Adhesion of Microbes to Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atarashi, Koji; Tanoue, Takeshi; Ando, Minoru; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Nagano, Yuji; Narushima, Seiko; Suda, Wataru; Imaoka, Akemi; Setoyama, Hiromi; Nagamori, Takashi; Ishikawa, Eiji; Shima, Tatsuichiro; Hara, Taeko; Kado, Shoichi; Jinnohara, Toshi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Kondo, Takashi; Toyooka, Kiminori; Watanabe, Eiichiro; Yokoyama, Shin-Ichiro; Tokoro, Shunji; Mori, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Yurika; Morita, Hidetoshi; Ivanov, Ivaylo I; Sugiyama, Tsuyoshi; Nuñez, Gabriel; Camp, J Gray; Hattori, Masahira; Umesaki, Yoshinori; Honda, Kenya

    2015-10-08

    Intestinal Th17 cells are induced and accumulate in response to colonization with a subgroup of intestinal microbes such as segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) and certain extracellular pathogens. Here, we show that adhesion of microbes to intestinal epithelial cells (ECs) is a critical cue for Th17 induction. Upon monocolonization of germ-free mice or rats with SFB indigenous to mice (M-SFB) or rats (R-SFB), M-SFB and R-SFB showed host-specific adhesion to small intestinal ECs, accompanied by host-specific induction of Th17 cells. Citrobacter rodentium and Escherichia coli O157 triggered similar Th17 responses, whereas adhesion-defective mutants of these microbes failed to do so. Moreover, a mixture of 20 bacterial strains, which were selected and isolated from fecal samples of a patient with ulcerative colitis on the basis of their ability to cause a robust induction of Th17 cells in the mouse colon, also exhibited EC-adhesive characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The intestinal stem cell signature identifies colorectal cancer stem cells and predicts disease relapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merlos-Suarez, A.; Barriga, F.M.; Jung, P.; Iglesias, M.; Cespedes, M.V.; Rossell, D.; Sevillano, M.; Hernando-Momblona, X.; da Silva-Diz, V.; Munoz, P.; Clevers, H.; Sancho, E.; Mangues, R.; Batlle, E.

    2011-01-01

    A frequent complication in colorectal cancer (CRC) is regeneration of the tumor after therapy. Here, we report that a gene signature specific for adult intestinal stem cells (ISCs) predicts disease relapse in CRC patients. ISCs are marked by high expression of the EphB2 receptor, which becomes

  18. Intestinal Stem Cell Niche Insights Gathered from Both In Vivo and Novel In Vitro Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolce Gjorevski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal stem cells are located at the base of the crypts and are surrounded by a complex structure called niche. This environment is composed mainly of epithelial cells and stroma which provides signals that govern cell maintenance, proliferation, and differentiation. Understanding how the niche regulates stem cell fate by controlling developmental signaling pathways will help us to define how stem cells choose between self-renewal and differentiation and how they maintain their undifferentiated state. Tractable in vitro assay systems, which reflect the complexity of the in vivo situation but provide higher level of control, would likely be crucial in identifying new players and mechanisms controlling stem cell function. Knowledge of the intestinal stem cell niche gathered from both in vivo and novel in vitro models may help us improve therapies for tumorigenesis and intestinal damage and make autologous intestinal transplants a feasible clinical practice.

  19. Development and Characterization of a Human and Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cell Monolayer Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Kozuka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: We describe the development and characterization of a mouse and human epithelial cell monolayer platform of the small and large intestines, with a broad range of potential applications including the discovery and development of minimally systemic drug candidates. Culture conditions for each intestinal segment were optimized by correlating monolayer global gene expression with the corresponding tissue segment. The monolayers polarized, formed tight junctions, and contained a diversity of intestinal epithelial cell lineages. Ion transport phenotypes of monolayers from the proximal and distal colon and small intestine matched the known and unique physiology of these intestinal segments. The cultures secreted serotonin, GLP-1, and FGF19 and upregulated the epithelial sodium channel in response to known biologically active agents, suggesting intact secretory and absorptive functions. A screen of over 2,000 pharmacologically active compounds for inhibition of potassium ion transport in the mouse distal colon cultures led to the identification of a tool compound. : Siegel and colleagues describe their development of a human and mouse intestinal epithelial cell monolayer platform that maintains the cellular, molecular, and functional characteristics of tissue for each intestinal segment. They demonstrate the platform's application to drug discovery by screening a library of over 2,000 compounds to identify an inhibitor of potassium ion transport in the mouse distal colon. Keywords: intestinal epithelium, organoids, monolayer, colon, small intestine, phenotype screening assays, enteroid, colonoid

  20. Transepithelial transport of flavanone in intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Shoko; Konishi, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    Our recent study [S. Kobayashi, S. Tanabe, M. Sugiyama, Y. Konishi, Transepithelial transport of hesperetin and hesperidin in intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers, Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 1778 (2008) 33-41] shows that the mechanism of absorption of hesperetin involves both proton-coupled active transport and transcellular passive diffusion. Here, as well as analyzing the cell permeability of hesperetin, we also study the transport of other flavanones, naringenin and eriodictyol, using Caco-2 cell monolayers. Similar to hesperetin mentioned, naringenin and eriodictyol showed proton-coupled polarized transport in apical-to-basolateral direction in non-saturable manner, constant permeation in the apical-to-basolateral direction (J ap→bl ) irrespective of the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), and preferable distribution into the basolateral side after apical loading in the presence of a proton gradient. Furthermore, the proton-coupled J ap→bl of hesperetin, naringenin and eriodictyol, were inhibited by substrates of the monocarboxylic acid transporter (MCT), such as benzoic acid, but not by ferulic acid. In contrast, both benzoic and ferulic acids have no stimulatory effect on J ap→bl of each flavanone by trans-stimulation analysis. These results indicates that proton-driven active transport is commonly participated in the absorption of flavanone in general, and that its transport is presumed to be unique other than MCT-mediated transport for absorption of phenolic acids (PAs), sodium-dependent MCT (SMCT) nor anion exchanger-mediated transport

  1. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4{sup +} intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru, E-mail: atotuka@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4{sup +} IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4{sup +} IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4{sup +} IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} LPLs and primed splenic CD4{sup +} T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4{sup +} IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo.

  2. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4 + IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4 + IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4 + IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4 + IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4 + LPLs and primed splenic CD4 + T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4 + IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo

  3. De Novo Formation of Insulin-Producing “Neo-β Cell Islets” from Intestinal Crypts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ju Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to interconvert terminally differentiated cells could serve as a powerful tool for cell-based treatment of degenerative diseases, including diabetes mellitus. To determine which, if any, adult tissues are competent to activate an islet β cell program, we performed an in vivo screen by expressing three β cell “reprogramming factors” in a wide spectrum of tissues. We report that transient intestinal expression of these factors—Pdx1, MafA, and Ngn3 (PMN—promotes rapid conversion of intestinal crypt cells into endocrine cells, which coalesce into “neoislets” below the crypt base. Neoislet cells express insulin and show ultrastructural features of β cells. Importantly, intestinal neoislets are glucose-responsive and able to ameliorate hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. Moreover, PMN expression in human intestinal “organoids” stimulates the conversion of intestinal epithelial cells into β-like cells. Our results thus demonstrate that the intestine is an accessible and abundant source of functional insulin-producing cells.

  4. Genome-wide analysis of CDX2 binding in intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Mette; Hansen, Morten; Jensen, Tine G K

    2010-01-01

    The CDX2 transcription factor is known to play a crucial role in inhibiting proliferation, promoting differentiation and the expression of intestinal specific genes in intestinal cells. The overall effect of CDX2 in intestinal cells has previously been investigated in conditional knock-out mice......, revealing a critical role of CDX2 in the formation of the normal intestinal identity. The identification of direct targets of transcription factors is a key problem in the study of gene regulatory networks. The ChIP-seq technique combines chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with next generation sequencing...... resulting in a high throughput experimental method of identifying direct targets of specific transcription factors. The method was applied to CDX2, leading to the identification of the direct binding of CDX2 to several known and novel target genes in the intestinal cell. Examination of the transcript levels...

  5. Passivation of interstitial and vacancy mediated trap-states for efficient and stable triple-cation perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Md Arafat; Elumalai, Naveen Kumar; Upama, Mushfika Baishakhi; Wang, Dian; Gonçales, Vinicius R.; Wright, Matthew; Xu, Cheng; Haque, Faiazul; Uddin, Ashraf

    2018-04-01

    The current work reports the concurrent passivation of interstitial and oxygen vacancy mediated defect states in low temperature processed ZnO electron transport layer (ETL) via Ultraviolet-Ozone (UVO) treatment for fabricating highly efficient (maximum efficiency: 16.70%), triple cation based MA0.57FA0.38Rb0.05PbI3 (MA: methyl ammonium, FA: formamidinium, Rb: rubidium) perovskite solar cell (PSC). Under UV exposure, ozone decomposes to free atomic oxygen and intercalates into the interstitial and oxygen vacancy induced defect sites in the ZnO lattice matrix, which contributes to suppressed trap-assisted recombination phenomena in perovskite device. UVO treatment also reduces the content of functional hydroxyl group on ZnO surface, that increases the inter-particle connectivity and grain size of perovskite film on UVO treated ZnO ETL. Owing to this, the perovskite film atop UVO treated ZnO film exhibits reduced micro-strain and dislocation density values, which contribute to the enhanced photovoltaic performance of PSC with modified ZnO ETL. The modified PSCs exhibit higher recombination resistance (RRec) ∼40% compared to pristine ZnO ETL based control devices. Adding to the merit, the UVO treated ZnO PSC also demonstrates superior device stability, retaining about 88% of its initial PCE in the course of a month-long, systematic degradation study.

  6. CD34+ mesenchymal cells are a major component of the intestinal stem cells niche at homeostasis and after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stzepourginski, Igor; Nigro, Giulia; Jacob, Jean-Marie; Dulauroy, Sophie; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Eberl, Gérard; Peduto, Lucie

    2017-01-24

    The intestinal epithelium is continuously renewed by intestinal epithelial stem cells (IESCs) positioned at the base of each crypt. Mesenchymal-derived factors are essential to maintain IESCs; however, the cellular composition and development of such mesenchymal niche remains unclear. Here, we identify pericryptal CD34 + Gp38 + αSMA - mesenchymal cells closely associated with Lgr5 + IESCs. We demonstrate that CD34 + Gp38 + cells are the major intestinal producers of the niche factors Wnt2b, Gremlin1, and R-spondin1, and are sufficient to promote maintenance of Lgr5 + IESCs in intestinal organoids, an effect mainly mediated by Gremlin1. CD34 + Gp38 + cells develop after birth in the intestinal submucosa and expand around the crypts during the third week of life in mice, independently of the microbiota. We further show that pericryptal CD34 + gp38 + cells are rapidly activated by intestinal injury, up-regulating niche factors Gremlin1 and R-spondin1 as well as chemokines, proinflammatory cytokines, and growth factors with key roles in gut immunity and tissue repair, including IL-7, Ccl2, Ptgs2, and Amphiregulin. Our results indicate that CD34 + Gp38 + mesenchymal cells are programmed to develop in the intestine after birth to constitute a specialized microenvironment that maintains IESCs at homeostasis and contribute to intestinal inflammation and repair after injury.

  7. Shear stress induced by an interstitial level of slow flow increases the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells through TAZ activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Min Kim

    Full Text Available Shear stress activates cellular signaling involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and migration. However, the mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC differentiation under interstitial flow are not fully understood. Here, we show the increased osteogenic differentiation of MSCs under exposure to constant, extremely low shear stress created by osmotic pressure-induced flow in a microfluidic chip. The interstitial level of shear stress in the proposed microfluidic system stimulated nuclear localization of TAZ (transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif, a transcriptional modulator of MSCs, activated TAZ target genes such as CTGF and Cyr61, and induced osteogenic differentiation. TAZ-depleted cells showed defects in shear stress-induced osteogenic differentiation. In shear stress induced cellular signaling, Rho signaling pathway was important forthe nuclear localization of TAZ. Taken together, these results suggest that TAZ is an important mediator of interstitial flow-driven shear stress signaling in osteoblast differentiation of MSCs.

  8. Feasibility of pig and human-derived aortic valve interstitial cells seeding on fixative-free decellularized animal pericardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Rosaria; Consolo, Filippo; Spiccia, Marco; Piola, Marco; Kassem, Samer; Prandi, Francesca; Vinci, Maria Cristina; Forti, Elisa; Polvani, Gianluca; Fiore, Gianfranco Beniamino; Soncini, Monica; Pesce, Maurizio

    2016-02-01

    Glutaraldehyde-fixed pericardium of animal origin is the elective material for the fabrication of bio-prosthetic valves for surgical replacement of insufficient/stenotic cardiac valves. However, the pericardial tissue employed to this aim undergoes severe calcification due to chronic inflammation resulting from a non-complete immunological compatibility of the animal-derived pericardial tissue resulting from failure to remove animal-derived xeno-antigens. In the mid/long-term, this leads to structural deterioration, mechanical failure, and prosthesis leaflets rupture, with consequent need for re-intervention. In the search for novel procedures to maximize biological compatibility of the pericardial tissue into immunocompetent background, we have recently devised a procedure to decellularize the human pericardium as an alternative to fixation with aldehydes. In the present contribution, we used this procedure to derive sheets of decellularized pig pericardium. The decellularized tissue was first tested for the presence of 1,3 α-galactose (αGal), one of the main xenoantigens involved in prosthetic valve rejection, as well as for mechanical tensile behavior and distensibility, and finally seeded with pig- and human-derived aortic valve interstitial cells. We demonstrate that the decellularization procedure removed the αGAL antigen, maintained the mechanical characteristics of the native pig pericardium, and ensured an efficient surface colonization of the tissue by animal- and human-derived aortic valve interstitial cells. This establishes, for the first time, the feasibility of fixative-free pericardial tissue seeding with valve competent cells for derivation of tissue engineered heart valve leaflets. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Urokinase and the intestinal mucosa: evidence for a role in epithelial cell turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, P; Birchall, I; Rosella, O; Albert, V; Finch, C; Barkla, D; Young, G

    1998-01-01

    Background—The functions of urokinase in intestinal epithelia are unknown. 
Aims—To determine the relation of urokinase expressed by intestinal epithelial cells to their position in the crypt-villus/surface axis and of mucosal urokinase activity to epithelial proliferative kinetics in the distal colon. 
Methods—Urokinase expression was examined immunohistochemically in human intestinal mucosa. Urokinase activity was measured colorimetrically in epithelial cells isolated sequentially from the crypt-villus axis of the rat small intestine. In separate experiments, urokinase activity and epithelial kinetics (measured stathmokinetically) were measured in homogenates of distal colonic mucosa of 14 groups of eight rats fed diets known to alter epithelial turnover. 
Results—From the crypt base, an ascending gradient of expression and activity of urokinase was associated with the epithelial cells. Median mucosal urokinase activities in each of the dietary groups of rats correlated positively with autologous median number of metaphase arrests per crypt (r=0.68; p<0.005) and per 100 crypt cells (r=0.75; p<0.001), but not with crypt column height. 
Conclusions—Localisation of an enzyme capable of leading to digestion of cell substratum in the region where cells are loosely attached to their basement membrane, and the association of its activity with indexes of cell turnover, suggest a role for urokinase in facilitating epithelial cell loss in the intestine. 

 Keywords: urokinase; intestinal epithelium; colon; epithelial proliferation PMID:9824347

  10. Abnormal distribution of the interstitial cells of cajal in an adult patient with pseudo-obstruction and megaduodenum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Rumessen, Jüri J; de Wit, Laurens

    2002-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are fundamental regulators of GI motility. Here, we report the manometrical abnormalities and abnormalities of ICC distribution and ultrastructure encountered in a 30-yr-old patient with megaduodenum and pseudo-obstruction. Full thickness biopsies taken during...... laparoscopic placement of a jejunostomy showed vacuolated myocytes and fibrosis predominantly in the outer third of the circular muscle layer of the duodenum, suggestive for visceral myopathy. The distribution of ICC was also strikingly abnormal: by light microscopy, ICC surrounding the myenteric plexus were...... lacking in the megaduodenum, whereas ICC were normally present in the duodenal circular muscle and in the jejunum. By electron microscopy, very few ICC were identified around the duodenal myenteric plexus. These findings suggest that abnormalities in ICC may contribute to the disturbed motility in some...

  11. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, Leon J.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we

  12. Indian hedgehog regulates intestinal stem cell fate through epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosinski, C.; Stange, D.E.; Xu, C.; Chan, A.S.; Ho, C.; Yuen, S.T.; Mifflin, R.C.; Powell, D.W.; Clevers, H.; Leung, S.Y.; Chen, X.N.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are regulated by the mesenchymal environment via physical interaction and diffusible factors. We examined the role of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) in mesenchymal organization and the mechanisms by which perturbations in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions

  13. Reciprocal Inflammatory Signaling Between Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Adipocytes in the Absence of Immune Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Takahashi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Visceral fat accumulation as observed in Crohn's disease and obesity is linked to chronic gut inflammation, suggesting that accumulation of gut adipocytes can trigger local inflammatory signaling. However, direct interactions between intestinal epithelial cells (IECs and adipocytes have not been investigated, in part because IEC physiology is difficult to replicate in culture. In this study, we originally prepared intact, polarized, and cytokine responsive IEC monolayers from primary or induced pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal organoids by simple and repeatable methods. When these physiological IECs were co-cultured with differentiated adipocytes in Transwell, pro-inflammatory genes were induced in both cell types, suggesting reciprocal inflammatory activation in the absence of immunocompetent cells. These inflammatory responses were blocked by nuclear factor-κB or signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 inhibition and by anti-tumor necrosis factor- or anti-interleukin-6-neutralizing antibodies. Our results highlight the utility of these monolayers for investigating IEC biology. Furthermore, this system recapitulates the intestinal epithelium–mesenteric fat signals that potentially trigger or worsen inflammatory disorders such as Crohn's disease and obesity-related enterocolitis.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein: localization in secretory granules of Paneth cells in the mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert H; Rasmussen, Karina; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) is an acute-phase protein involved in the host's response to endotoxin and mainly synthesized and secreted to the blood by the liver. But in addition, LBP is also made by extrahepatic cells, including the enterocyte-like cell line Caco-2. To study...... in closer detail the synthesis and storage of LBP in the intestinal mucosal epithelium, we performed an immunolocalization of LBP in mouse small intestine. By immunofluorescence microscopy, an antibody recognizing the 58-60 kDa protein of LBP distinctly labeled a small population of cells located deep...... into the crypts. This cell population was also positive for lysozyme and alpha-defensin 4, identifying Paneth cells as the main intestinal LBP-producing cells. By immunogold electron microscopy, intense labeling was observed in the secretory granules of these cells. We conclude that Paneth cells express LBP...

  15. PAF-Myc-Controlled Cell Stemness Is Required for Intestinal Regeneration and Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon Jong; Xia, Bo; Suh, Han Na; Lee, Sung Ho; Jun, Sohee; Lien, Esther M; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Kaifu; Park, Jae-Il

    2018-03-12

    The underlying mechanisms of how self-renewing cells are controlled in regenerating tissues and cancer remain ambiguous. PCNA-associated factor (PAF) modulates DNA repair via PCNA. Also, PAF hyperactivates Wnt/β-catenin signaling independently of PCNA interaction. We found that PAF is expressed in intestinal stem and progenitor cells (ISCs and IPCs) and markedly upregulated during intestinal regeneration and tumorigenesis. Whereas PAF is dispensable for intestinal homeostasis, upon radiation injury, genetic ablation of PAF impairs intestinal regeneration along with the severe loss of ISCs and Myc expression. Mechanistically, PAF conditionally occupies and transactivates the c-Myc promoter, which induces the expansion of ISCs/IPCs during intestinal regeneration. In mouse models, PAF knockout inhibits Apc inactivation-driven intestinal tumorigenesis with reduced tumor cell stemness and suppressed Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity, supported by transcriptome profiling. Collectively, our results unveil that the PAF-Myc signaling axis is indispensable for intestinal regeneration and tumorigenesis by positively regulating self-renewing cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Lgr5 intestinal stem cells have high telomerase activity and randomly segregate their chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, A.G.; Vries, R.G.J.; van den Born, M.M.W.; van de Wetering, M.L.; Clevers, H.

    2011-01-01

    Somatic cells have been proposed to be limited in the number of cell divisions they can undergo. This is thought to be a mechanism by which stem cells retain their integrity preventing disease. However, we have recently discovered intestinal crypt stem cells that persist for the lifetime of a mouse,

  17. Impact of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control after permanent interstitial brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe (Jay); Roberts, Kenneth; Decker, Roy; Pathare, Pradip; Rockwell, Sara; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the procedure-induced prostate edema during permanent interstitial brachytherapy (PIB) can cause significant variations in the dose delivered to the prostate gland. Because the clinical impact of edema-induced dose variations depends strongly on the magnitude of the edema, the temporal pattern of its resolution and its interplay with the decay of radioactivity and the underlying biological processes of tumor cells (such as tumor potential doubling time), we investigated the impact of edema-induced dose variations on the tumor cell survival and tumor control probability after PIB with the 131Cs, 125I and 103Pd sources used in current clinical practice. The exponential edema resolution model reported by Waterman et al. (Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41, 1069–1077–1998) was used to characterize the edema evolutions observed previously during clinical PIB for prostate cancer. The concept of biologically effective dose (BED), taking into account tumor cell proliferation and sublethal damage repair during dose delivery, was used to characterize the effects of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control probability. Our calculation indicated that prostate edema, if not taken into account appropriately, can increase the cell survival and decrease the probability of local control of PIB. The edema-induced increase in cell survival increased with increasing edema severity, decreasing half-life for radioactive decay and decreasing energy of the photons energy emitted by the source. At the doses currently prescribed for PIB and for prostate cancer cells characterized by nominal radiobiology parameters recommended by AAPM TG-137, PIB using 125I sources was less affected by edema than PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd sources due to the long radioactive decay half-life of 125I. The effect of edema on PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd was similar. The effect of edema on 103Pd PIB was slightly greater, even though the decay half-life of 103Pd (17 days

  18. The impact of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control after permanent interstitial brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth; Decker, Roy; Pathare, Pradip; Rockwell, Sara; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that procedure-induced prostate edema during permanent interstitial brachytherapy (PIB) can cause significant variations in the dose delivered to the prostate gland. Because the clinical impact of edema-induced dose variations strongly depends on the magnitude of the edema, the temporal pattern of its resolution and its interplay with the decay of radioactivity and the underlying biological processes of tumor cells (such as tumor potential doubling time), we investigated the impact of edema-induced dose variations on the tumor cell survival and tumor control probability after PIB with the 131 Cs, 125 I and 103 Pd sources used in current clinical practice. The exponential edema resolution model reported by Waterman et al (1998 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41 1069-77) was used to characterize the edema evolutions previously observed during clinical PIB for prostate cancer. The concept of biologically effective dose, taking into account tumor cell proliferation and sublethal damage repair during dose delivery, was used to characterize the effects of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control probability. Our calculation indicated that prostate edema, if not appropriately taken into account, can increase the cell survival and decrease the probability of local control of PIB. The magnitude of an edema-induced increase in cell survival increased with increasing edema severity, decreasing half-life of radioactive decay and decreasing photon energy emitted by the source. At the doses currently prescribed for PIB and for prostate cancer cells characterized by nominal radiobiology parameters recommended by AAPM TG-137, PIB using 125 I sources was less affected by edema than PIB using 131 Cs or 103 Pd sources due to the long radioactive decay half-life of 125 I. The effect of edema on PIB using 131 Cs or 103 Pd was similar. The effect of edema on 103 Pd PIB was slightly greater, even though the decay half-life of 103 Pd (17 days) is

  19. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klunder, Leon J; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C D

    2017-07-05

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we highlight recent advances with regard to the molecular mechanisms of cell polarity-controlled epithelial homeostasis and immunity in the human intestine. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  20. Radioprotective effect of dextran sulphate and aerogenic hypoxia on intestinal crypt stem cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, A.; Bartonickova, A.; Rotkovska, D.; Konoplyanikova, O.A.; Konoplyanikov, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    A single intraperitoneal injection of dextran sulfate given 6 h before irradiation produced higher numbers of microcolonies of intestinal crypt stem cells in whole-body irradiated mice than an injection of saline in control mice. If dextran sulfate and hypoxia are combined, the radioprotective effect of hypoxia on intestinal crypt stem cells depends on the time interval between irradiation and administration of dextran sulfate. (author). 2 figs., 12 refs

  1. Gut microbiota regulates NKG2D ligand expression on intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Holm, Thomas L.; Krych, Lukasz

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) are one of a few cell types in the body with constitutive surface expression of natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) ligands, although the magnitude of ligand expression by IECs varies. Here, we investigated whether the gut microbiota regulates the NKG2D ligand...... expression is kept in check by an intestinal regulatory immune milieu induced by members of the gut microbiota, for example A. muciniphila....

  2. Regulation of T-cell Responses in the Inflamed Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Van Leeuwen (Marieke)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The intestinal immune system protects the mucosal surfaces from pathogenic microorganisms. On the other hand it maintains tolerance towards dietary antigens and non-pathogenic microorganisms. The immune system continuously tailors these inflammatory and tolerogenic

  3. The role of CD103+ Dendritic cells in the intestinal mucosal immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Thomas Ruane

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available While dendritic cells (DC are central to the induction and regulation of adaptive immunity, these cells are very heterogenous and specific subsets can be characterized based on the expression of cell surface markers and functional properties. Intestinal CD103+ DCs are the subject of particular interest due to their role in regulating mucosal immunity. Since the epithelial surfaces are constantly exposed to a high antigenic load, tight regulation of innate and adaptive intestinal immune responses is vital as intestinal inflammation can have detrimental consequences for the host. Strategically positioned within the lamina propria, CD103+ DCs play an important role in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis. These cells are required for the induction of tolerogenic immune responses and imprinting gut homing phenotypic changes on antigen-specific T cells. Recent insights into their development and regulatory properties have revealed additional immunoregulatory roles and further highlighted their importance for intestinal immunity. In this review we discuss the nature of the intestinal CD103+ DC population and the emerging roles of these cells in the regulation of mucosal immunity.

  4. Effects of fasting and refeeding on intestinal cell proliferation and apoptosis in hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideya Takahashi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the effects of fasting and refeeding on intestinal cell proliferation and apoptosis in an opportunistic predator, hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini of elasmobranch fishes which are among the earliest known extant groups of vertebrates to have the valvular intestine typical for the primitive species. Methods: Animals were euthanized after 5-10 d of fasting or feeding, or after 10-day fasting and 5-day refeeding. Intestinal apoptosis and cell proliferation were assessed by using oligonucleotide detection assay, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining, and immunohistochemistry of proliferating cells nuclear antigen. Results: Plasma levels of cholesterol and glucose were reduced by fasting. Intestinal apoptosis generally decreased during fasting. Numerous apoptotic cells were observed around the tips of the villi, primarily in the epithelium in the fed sharks, whereas fewer labeled nuclei were detected in the epithelium of fasted sharks. Refeeding returned intestinal apoptosis to the level in the fed sharks. Proliferating cells were observed in the epithelium around the troughs of the villi and greater in number in fed sharks, whereas fewer labeled nuclei were detected in fasted sharks. Conclusions: The cell turnover is modified in both intestinal epithelia of the shark and the murines by fasting/feeding, but in opposite directions. The difference may reflect the feeding ecology of the elasmobranchs, primitive intermittent feeders.

  5. Epithelial Cell Damage Activates Bactericidal/Permeability Increasing-Protein (BPI Expression in Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Balakrishnan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available As the first line of defense against invading pathogen, intestinal epithelium produces various antimicrobial proteins (AMP that help in clearance of pathogen. Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI is a 55 kDa AMP that is expressed in intestinal epithelium. Dysregulation of BPI in intestinal epithelium is associated with various inflammatory diseases like Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative colitis, and Infectious enteritis’s. In this paper, we report a direct correlation between intestinal damage and BPI expression. In Caco-2 cells, we see a significant increase in BPI levels upon membrane damage mediated by S. aureus infection and pore-forming toxins (Streptolysin and Listeriolysin. Cells detect changes in potassium level as a Danger-associated molecular pattern associated with cell damage and induce BPI expression in a p38 dependent manner. These results are further supported by in vivo findings that the BPI expression in murine intestinal epithelium is induced upon infection with bacteria which cause intestinal damage (Salmonella Typhimurium and Shigella flexneri whereas mutants that do not cause intestinal damage (STM ΔfliC and STM ΔinvC did not induce BPI expression. Our results suggest that epithelial damage associated with infection act as a signal to induce BPI expression.

  6. Crohn's disease intestinal CD4+ T cells have impaired interleukin-10 productionwhich is not restored by probiotic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian L; Kelsen, Jens; Agnholt, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Crohn's disease (CD) has been associated with low mucosal interleukin (IL)-10 production, but the mechanism behind this deficiency remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate IL-10 and interferon (IFN)-gamma production in intestinal CD4+ T cells from CD patients and healthy...... volunteers (HV) and to examine how this was affected by bacterial products and the presence or absence of autologous dendritic cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We cultured intestinal CD4+ T cells from CD patients (n=9) and HV (n=6) and differentiated dendritic cells from their peripheral monocytes. Intestinal T...... this imbalance in CD, but tended to do so in HV. When there were no dendritic cells, CD intestinal T cells responded to autologous bacteria with an increased IFN-gamma production (2.3+/-1.3 ng/ml) compared with HV intestinal T cells (0.3+/-0.2 ng/ml). CONCLUSIONS: Crohn's disease intestinal CD4+ T cells display...

  7. Interstitial radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scardino, P.T.; Bretas, F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors now have 20 years of experience with modern techniques of brachytherapy. The large number of patients treated in medical centers around the world and the widespread use of this type of radiotherapy have provided us with substantial information about the indications and contraindications, advantages and disadvantages, pitfalls and complications, as well as the results of these techniques. Although the focus of this review is the experience at Baylor using the combined technique of gold seed implantation plus external beam irradiation, the alternative forms of brachytherapy will be described and compared. The authors' intention is to provide the busy clinician with a succinct and informative review indicating the status of modern interstitial radiotherapy and describing day-to-day approach and results

  8. Lack of spontaneous and radiation-induced chromosome breakage at interstitial telomeric sites in murine scid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H-P; Mozdarani, H; Finnegan, C; McIlrath, J; Bryant, P E; Slijepcevic, P

    2004-01-01

    Interstitial telomeric sites (ITSs) in chromosomes from DNA repair-proficient mammalian cells are sensitive to both spontaneous and radiation-induced chromosome breakage. Exact mechanisms of this chromosome breakage sensitivity are not known. To investigate factors that predispose ITSs to chromosome breakage we used murine scid cells. These cells lack functional DNA-PKcs, an enzyme involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Interestingly, our results revealed lack of both spontaneous and radiation-induced chromosome breakage at ITSs found in scid chromosomes. Therefore, it is possible that increased sensitivity of ITSs to chromosome breakage is associated with the functional DNA double-strand break repair machinery. To investigate if this is the case we used scid cells in which DNA-PKcs deficiency was corrected. Our results revealed complete disappearance of ITSs in scid cells with functional DNA-PKcs, presumably through chromosome breakage at ITSs, but their unchanged frequency in positive and negative control cells. Therefore, our results indicate that the functional DNA double-strand break machinery is required for elevated sensitivity of ITSs to chromosome breakage. Interestingly, we observed significant differences in mitotic chromosome condensation between scid cells and their counterparts with restored DNA-PKcs activity suggesting that lack of functional DNA-PKcs may cause a defect in chromatin organization. Increased condensation of mitotic chromosomes in the scid background was also confirmed in vivo. Therefore, our results indicate a previously unanticipated role of DNA-PKcs in chromatin organisation, which could contribute to the lack of ITS sensitivity to chromosome breakage in murine scid cells. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Enteroendocrine cells are specifically marked by cell surface expression of claudin-4 in mouse small intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Nagatake

    Full Text Available Enteroendocrine cells are solitary epithelial cells scattered throughout the gastrointestinal tract and produce various types of hormones, constituting one of the largest endocrine systems in the body. The study of these rare epithelial cells has been hampered by the difficulty in isolating them because of the lack of specific cell surface markers. Here, we report that enteroendocrine cells selectively express a tight junction membrane protein, claudin-4 (Cld4, and are efficiently isolated with the use of an antibody specific for the Cld4 extracellular domain and flow cytometry. Sorted Cld4+ epithelial cells in the small intestine exclusively expressed a chromogranin A gene (Chga and other enteroendocrine cell-related genes (Ffar1, Ffar4, Gpr119, and the population was divided into two subpopulations based on the activity of binding to Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1. A Cld4+UEA-1- cell population almost exclusively expressed glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide gene (Gip, thus representing K cells, whereas a Cld4+UEA-1+ cell population expressed other gut hormone genes, including glucagon-like peptide 1 (Gcg, pancreatic polypeptide-like peptide with N-terminal tyrosine amide (Pyy, cholecystokinin (Cck, secretin (Sct, and tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1. In addition, we found that orally administered luminal antigens were taken up by the solitary Cld4+ cells in the small intestinal villi, raising the possibility that enteroendocrine cells might also play a role in initiation of mucosal immunity. Our results provide a useful tool for the cellular and functional characterization of enteroendocrine cells.

  10. Intestinal epithelial cell-specific RARα depletion results in aberrant epithelial cell homeostasis and underdeveloped immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jijon, H B; Suarez-Lopez, L; Diaz, O E; Das, S; De Calisto, J; Yaffe, M B; Pittet, M J; Mora, J R; Belkaid, Y; Xavier, R J; Villablanca, E J

    2018-05-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), a dietary vitamin A metabolite, is crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. RA acts on intestinal leukocytes to modulate their lineage commitment and function. Although the role of RA has been characterized in immune cells, whether intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) rely on RA signaling to exert their immune-regulatory function has not been examined. Here we demonstrate that lack of RA receptor α (RARα) signaling in IECs results in deregulated epithelial lineage specification, leading to increased numbers of goblet cells and Paneth cells. Mechanistically, lack of RARα resulted in increased KLF4 + goblet cell precursors in the distal bowel, whereas RA treatment inhibited klf4 expression and goblet cell differentiation in zebrafish. These changes in secretory cells are associated with increased Reg3g, reduced luminal bacterial detection, and an underdeveloped intestinal immune system, as evidenced by an almost complete absence of lymphoid follicles and gut resident mononuclear phagocytes. This underdeveloped intestinal immune system shows a decreased ability to clear infection with Citrobacter rodentium. Collectively, our findings indicate that epithelial cell-intrinsic RARα signaling is critical to the global development of the intestinal immune system.

  11. Intestinal Epithelial Cells Modulate Antigen-Presenting Cell Responses to Bacterial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeau, J. L.; Salim, S. Y.; Albert, E. J.; Hotte, N.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells and antigen-presenting cells orchestrate mucosal innate immunity. This study investigated the role of bacterial DNA in modulating epithelial and bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting cells (BM-APCs) and subsequent T-lymphocyte responses. Murine MODE-K epithelial cells and BM-APCs were treated with DNA from either Bifidobacterium breve or Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin directly and under coculture conditions with CD4+ T cells. Apical stimulation of MODE-K cells with S. Dublin DNA enhanced secretion of cytokines from underlying BM-APCs and induced interleukin-17 (IL-17) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) secretion from CD4+ T cells. Bacterial DNA isolated from either strain induced maturation and increased cytokine secretion from BM-APCs. Conditioned medium from S. Dublin-treated MODE-K cells elicited an increase in cytokine secretion similar to that seen for S. Dublin DNA. Treatment of conditioned medium from MODE-K cells with RNase and protease prevented the S. Dublin-induced increased cytokine secretion. Oral feeding of mice with B. breve DNA resulted in enhanced levels of colonic IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) compared with what was seen for mice treated with S. Dublin DNA. In contrast, feeding mice with S. Dublin DNA increased levels of colonic IL-17 and IL-12p70. T cells from S. Dublin DNA-treated mice secreted high levels of IL-12 and IFN-γ compared to controls and B. breve DNA-treated mice. These results demonstrate that intestinal epithelial cells are able to modulate subsequent antigen-presenting and T-cell responses to bacterial DNA with pathogenic but not commensal bacterial DNA inducing effector CD4+ T lymphocytes. PMID:22615241

  12. Bmi1 regulates murine intestinal stem cell proliferation and self-renewal downstream of Notch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Arribillaga, Erika; Rodilla, Verónica; Pellegrinet, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Genetic data indicate that abrogation of Notch-Rbpj or Wnt-β-catenin pathways results in the loss of the intestinal stem cells (ISCs). However, whether the effect of Notch is direct or due to the aberrant differentiation of the transit-amplifying cells into post-mitotic goblet cells is unknown. T...

  13. TGFβR signalling controls CD103+CD11b+ dendritic cell development in the intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Bain (Lisa); Montgomery, J. (J.); C.L. Scott (C.); J.M. Kel (Junda); M.J.H. Girard-Madoux (Mathilde); L. Martens (Liesbet); Zangerle-Murray, T.F.P. (T. F.P.); J.L. Ober-Blöbaum (Julia); D.J. Lindenbergh-Kortleve (Dicky); J.N. Samsom (Janneke); S. Henri (Sandrine); T. Lawrence (Toby); Y. Saeys (Yvan); B. Malissen (Bernard); M. Dalod (Marc); B.E. Clausen (Bjorn); Mowat, A.M. (A. McI.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractCD103+CD11b+ dendritic cells (DCs) are unique to the intestine, but the factors governing their differentiation are unclear. Here we show that transforming growth factor receptor 1 (TGFβR1) has an indispensable, cell intrinsic role in the development of these cells. Deletion of Tgfbr1

  14. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J.; Jiang, Y. [Southern Medical University, Nanfang Hospital, Department of Anesthesia, Guangzhou, China, Department of Anesthesia, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Tang, Y.; Chen, B. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China); Sun, X. [Laboratory of Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndrome, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Su, L.; Liu, Z. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-06-25

    Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries.

  15. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, J.; Jiang, Y.; Tang, Y.; Chen, B.; Sun, X.; Su, L.; Liu, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries

  16. Fermented soya bean (tempe) extracts reduce adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubos-van den Hil, P J; Nout, M J R; Beumer, R R; van der Meulen, J; Zwietering, M H

    2009-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of processed soya bean, during the successive stages of tempe fermentation and different fermentation times, on adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 to intestinal brush border cells as well as Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells; and to clarify the mechanism of action. Tempe was prepared at controlled laboratory scale using Rhizopus microsporus var. microsporus as the inoculum. Extracts of raw, soaked and cooked soya beans reduced ETEC adhesion to brush border cells by 40%. Tempe extracts reduced adhesion by 80% or more. ETEC adhesion to Caco-2 cells reduced by 50% in the presence of tempe extracts. ETEC K88 bacteria were found to interact with soya bean extracts, and this may contribute to the observed decrease of ETEC adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells. Fermented soya beans (tempe) reduce the adhesion of ETEC to intestinal epithelial cells of pig and human origin. This reduced adhesion is caused by an interaction between ETEC K88 bacteria and soya bean compounds. The results strengthen previous observations on the anti-diarrhoeal effect of tempe. This effect indicates that soya-derived compounds may reduce adhesion of ETEC to intestinal cells in pigs as well as in humans and prevent against diarrhoeal diseases.

  17. Establishment of primary bovine intestinal epithelial cell culture and clone method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Kang; Lin, Miao; Liu, Ming-Mei; Sui, Yang-Nan; Zhao, Guo-Qi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish bovine intestinal epithelial cell (BIEC) line and provide a novel clone cell method. Although various strategies of bovine cell culture and clone techniques have been reported, these methods remain not established. Here, we culture successfully primary BIECs and establish a novel clone cell method. Our result showed that BIECs could be successfully cultured and passaged about generation 5. These cellular aggregates and clusters were adherent loosely at day 2 of culture. Cell aggregates and clusters start to proliferate after approximately 4 d. The BIECs showed positive reaction against cytokeratin 18, E-cadherin, and characteristics of epithelial-like morphology. In addition, the fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs), villin, and intestinal peptidase (IP) band were positive in BIECs. Our results suggest that the establishment of culturing and clone BIEC methods will apply to isolate and clone other primary cells. These BIECs could therefore contribute to the study of bovine intestinal nutrient absorption and regulation, immune regulation, and the pathogenesis of the bovine intestinal disease, which will provide intestinal cell model in vitro.

  18. Defining new criteria for selection of cell-based intestinal models using publicly available databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Jon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The criteria for choosing relevant cell lines among a vast panel of available intestinal-derived lines exhibiting a wide range of functional properties are still ill-defined. The objective of this study was, therefore, to establish objective criteria for choosing relevant cell lines to assess their appropriateness as tumor models as well as for drug absorption studies. Results We made use of publicly available expression signatures and cell based functional assays to delineate differences between various intestinal colon carcinoma cell lines and normal intestinal epithelium. We have compared a panel of intestinal cell lines with patient-derived normal and tumor epithelium and classified them according to traits relating to oncogenic pathway activity, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and stemness, migratory properties, proliferative activity, transporter expression profiles and chemosensitivity. For example, SW480 represent an EMT-high, migratory phenotype and scored highest in terms of signatures associated to worse overall survival and higher risk of recurrence based on patient derived databases. On the other hand, differentiated HT29 and T84 cells showed gene expression patterns closest to tumor bulk derived cells. Regarding drug absorption, we confirmed that differentiated Caco-2 cells are the model of choice for active uptake studies in the small intestine. Regarding chemosensitivity we were unable to confirm a recently proposed association of chemo-resistance with EMT traits. However, a novel signature was identified through mining of NCI60 GI50 values that allowed to rank the panel of intestinal cell lines according to their drug responsiveness to commonly used chemotherapeutics. Conclusions This study presents a straightforward strategy to exploit publicly available gene expression data to guide the choice of cell-based models. While this approach does not overcome the major limitations of such models

  19. Passive leg movement enhances interstitial VEGF protein, endothelial cell proliferation, and eNOS mRNA content in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Rufener, Nora; Nielsen, Jens J

    2008-01-01

    .05) in blood flow without a significant enhancement in oxygen uptake. Muscle interstitial fluid was sampled with microdialysis technique and analyzed for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein and for the effect on endothelial cell proliferation. Biopsies obtained from the musculus vastus lateralis...... to cultured endothelial cells revealed that dialysate obtained during leg movement induced a 3.2-fold higher proliferation rate (P level fourfold above resting levels. VEGF mRNA and MMP-2 mRNA levels were...

  20. Zinc sulfide in intestinal cell granules of Ancylostoma caninum adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianotti, A.J.; Clark, D.T.; Dash, J. (Portland State Univ., OR (USA))

    1991-04-01

    A source of confusion has existed since the turn of the century about the reddish brown, weakly birefringent 'sphaerocrystals' located in the intestines of strongyle nematodes, Strongylus and Ancylostoma. X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometric analyses were used for accurate determination of the crystalline order and elemental composition of the granules in the canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum. The composition of the intestinal pigmented granules was identified unequivocally as zinc sulfide. It seems most probable that the granules serve to detoxify high levels of metallic ions (specifically zinc) present due to the large intake of host blood.

  1. Mucosal innate immune cells regulate both gut homeostasis and intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashima, Yosuke; Goto, Yoshiyuki; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Continuous exposure of intestinal mucosal surfaces to diverse microorganisms and their metabolites reflects the biological necessity for a multifaceted, integrated epithelial and immune cell-mediated regulatory system. The development and function of the host cells responsible for the barrier function of the intestinal surface (e.g., M cells, Paneth cells, goblet cells, and columnar epithelial cells) are strictly regulated through both positive and negative stimulation by the luminal microbiota. Stimulation by damage-associated molecular patterns and commensal bacteria-derived microbe-associated molecular patterns provokes the assembly of inflammasomes, which are involved in maintaining the integrity of the intestinal epithelium. Mucosal immune cells located beneath the epithelium play critical roles in regulating both the mucosal barrier and the relative composition of the luminal microbiota. Innate lymphoid cells and mast cells, in particular, orchestrate the mucosal regulatory system to create a mutually beneficial environment for both the host and the microbiota. Disruption of mucosal homeostasis causes intestinal inflammation such as that seen in inflammatory bowel disease. Here, we review the recent research on the biological interplay among the luminal microbiota, epithelial cells, and mucosal innate immune cells in both healthy and pathological conditions. © 2013 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Dll1- and Dll4-mediated Notch signaling is required for homeostasis of intestinal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrinet, Luca; Rodilla, Veronica; Liu, Zhenyi; Chen, Shuang; Koch, Ute; Espinosa, Lluis; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Kopan, Raphael; Lewis, Julian; Radtke, Freddy

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Ablation of Notch signaling within the intestinal epithelium results in loss of proliferating crypt progenitors, due to their conversion into post-mitotic secretory cells. We aimed to confirm that Notch was active in stem cells (SC), investigate consequences of loss of Notch signaling within the intestinal SC compartment, and identify the physiological ligands of Notch in mouse intestine. Furthermore, we investigated whether the induction of goblet cell differentiation that results from loss of Notch requires the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4). Methods Trasgenic mice that carried a reporter of Notch1 activation were used for lineage tracing experiments. The in vivo functions of the Notch ligands Jagged1 (Jag1), Delta-like1 (Dll1), Delta-like4 (Dll4), and the transcription factor Klf4 were assessed in mice with inducible, gut-specific gene targeting (Vil-Cre-ERT2). Results Notch1 signaling was found to be activated in intestinal SC. Although deletion of Jag1 or Dll4 did not perturb the intestinal epithelium, inactivation of Dll1 resulted in a moderate increase in number of goblet cells without noticeable effects of progenitor proliferation. However, simultaneous inactivation of Dll1 and Dll4 resulted in the complete conversion of proliferating progenitors into post-mitotic goblet cells, concomitant with loss of SC (Olfm4+, Lgr5+ and Ascl2+). Klf4 inactivation did not interfere with goblet cell differentiation in adult wild-type or in Notch pathway-deficient gut. Conclusions Notch signaling in SC and progenitors is activated by Dll1 and Dll4 ligands and is required for maintenance of intestinal progenitor and SC. Klf4 is dispensable for goblet cell differentiation in intestines of adult Notch-deficient mice. PMID:21238454

  3. Dll1- and dll4-mediated notch signaling are required for homeostasis of intestinal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrinet, Luca; Rodilla, Veronica; Liu, Zhenyi; Chen, Shuang; Koch, Ute; Espinosa, Lluis; Kaestner, Klaus H; Kopan, Raphael; Lewis, Julian; Radtke, Freddy

    2011-04-01

    Ablation of Notch signaling within the intestinal epithelium results in loss of proliferating crypt progenitors due to their conversion into postmitotic secretory cells. We aimed to confirm that Notch was active in stem cells (SCs), investigate consequences of loss of Notch signaling within the intestinal SC compartment, and identify the physiologic ligands of Notch in mouse intestine. Furthermore, we investigated whether the induction of goblet cell differentiation that results from loss of Notch requires the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4). Transgenic mice that carried a reporter of Notch1 activation were used for lineage tracing experiments. The in vivo functions of the Notch ligands Jagged1 (Jag1), Delta-like1 (Dll1), Delta-like4 (Dll4), and the transcription factor Klf4 were assessed in mice with inducible, gut-specific gene targeting (Vil-Cre-ER(T2)). Notch1 signaling was found to be activated in intestinal SCs. Although deletion of Jag1 or Dll4 did not perturb the intestinal epithelium, inactivation of Dll1 resulted in a moderate increase in number of goblet cells without noticeable effects of progenitor proliferation. However, simultaneous inactivation of Dll1 and Dll4 resulted in the complete conversion of proliferating progenitors into postmitotic goblet cells, concomitant with loss of SCs (Olfm4(+), Lgr5(+), and Ascl2(+)). Klf4 inactivation did not interfere with goblet cell differentiation in adult wild-type or in Notch pathway-deficient gut. Notch signaling in SCs and progenitors is activated by Dll1 and Dll4 ligands and is required for maintenance of intestinal progenitor and SCs. Klf4 is dispensable for goblet cell differentiation in intestines of adult Notch-deficient mice. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Deletion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in genetically targeted mice supports development of intestinal inflammation

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    Boehm Franziska

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mice lacking Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg cells develop severe tissue inflammation in lung, skin, and liver with premature death, whereas the intestine remains uninflamed. This study aims to demonstrate the importance of Foxp3+ Treg for the activation of T cells and the development of intestinal inflammation. Methods Foxp3-GFP-DTR (human diphtheria toxin receptor C57BL/6 mice allow elimination of Foxp3+ Treg by treatment with Dx (diphtheria toxin. The influence of Foxp3+ Treg on intestinal inflammation was tested using the CD4+ T-cell transfer colitis model in Rag−/− C57BL/6 mice and the acute DSS-colitis model. Results Continuous depletion of Foxp3+ Treg in Foxp3-GFP-DTR mice led to dramatic weight loss and death of mice by day 28. After 10 days of depletion of Foxp3+ Treg, isolated CD4+ T-cells were activated and produced extensive amounts of IFN-γ, IL-13, and IL-17A. Transfer of total CD4+ T-cells isolated from Foxp3-GFP-DTR mice did not result in any changes of intestinal homeostasis in Rag−/− C57BL/6 mice. However, administration of DTx between days 14 and 18 after T-cell reconstitution, lead to elimination of Foxp3+ Treg and to immediate weight loss due to intestinal inflammation. This pro-inflammatory effect of Foxp3+ Treg depletion consecutively increased inflammatory cytokine production. Further, the depletion of Foxp3+ Treg from Foxp3-GFP-DTR mice increased the severity of acute dSS-colitis accompanied by 80% lethality of Treg-depleted mice. CD4+ effector T-cells from Foxp3+ Treg-depleted mice produced significantly more pro-inflammatory cytokines. Conclusion Intermittent depletion of Foxp3+ Treg aggravates intestinal inflammatory responses demonstrating the importance of Foxp3+ Treg for the balance at the mucosal surface of the intestine.

  5. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pathogenesis: An Update Review

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    Xiaoshi Ma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelial cells serve essential roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, which relies on appropriate endoplasmic reticulum (ER function for proper protein folding, modification, and secretion. Exogenous or endogenous risk factors with an ability to disturb the ER function can impair the intestinal barrier function and activate inflammatory responses in the host. The last decade has witnessed considerable progress in the understanding of the functional role of ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR in the gut homeostasis and its significant contribution to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Herein, we review recent evidence supporting the viewpoint that deregulation of ER stress and UPR signaling in the intestinal epithelium, including the absorptive cells, Paneth cells, goblet cells, and enteroendocrine cells, mediates the action of genetic or environmental factors driving colitis in experimental animals and IBD patients. In addition, we highlight pharmacologic application of chaperones or small molecules that enhance protein folding and modification capacity or improve the function of the ER. These molecules represent potential therapeutic strategies in the prevention or treatment of IBD through restoring ER homeostasis in intestinal epithelial cells.

  6. Irgm1-deficient mice exhibit Paneth cell abnormalities and increased susceptibility to acute intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Gulati, Ajay S; Cantillana, Viviana; Henry, Stanley C; Schmidt, Elyse A; Daniell, Xiaoju; Grossniklaus, Emily; Schoenborn, Alexi A; Sartor, R Balfour; Taylor, Gregory A

    2013-10-15

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, immune-mediated, inflammatory disorder of the intestine that has been linked to numerous susceptibility genes, including the immunity-related GTPase (IRG) M (IRGM). IRGs comprise a family of proteins known to confer resistance to intracellular infections through various mechanisms, including regulation of phagosome processing, cell motility, and autophagy. However, despite its association with CD, the role of IRGM and other IRGs in regulating intestinal inflammation is unclear. We investigated the involvement of Irgm1, an ortholog of IRGM, in the genesis of murine intestinal inflammation. After dextran sodium sulfate exposure, Irgm1-deficient [Irgm1 knockout (KO)] mice showed increased acute inflammation in the colon and ileum, with worsened clinical responses. Marked alterations of Paneth cell location and granule morphology were present in Irgm1 KO mice, even without dextran sodium sulfate exposure, and were associated with impaired mitophagy and autophagy in Irgm1 KO intestinal cells (including Paneth cells). This was manifested by frequent tubular and swollen mitochondria and increased LC3-positive autophagic structures. Interestingly, these LC3-positive structures often contained Paneth cell granules. These results suggest that Irgm1 modulates acute inflammatory responses in the mouse intestine, putatively through the regulation of gut autophagic processes, that may be pivotal for proper Paneth cell functioning.

  7. Differential cell reaction upon Toll-like receptor 4 and 9 activation in human alveolar and lung interstitial macrophages

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    Meyerhans Andreas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigations on pulmonary macrophages (MΦ mostly focus on alveolar MΦ (AM as a well-defined cell population. Characteristics of MΦ in the interstitium, referred to as lung interstitial MΦ (IM, are rather ill-defined. In this study we therefore aimed to elucidate differences between AM and IM obtained from human lung tissue. Methods Human AM and IM were isolated from human non-tumor lung tissue from patients undergoing lung resection. Cell morphology was visualized using either light, electron or confocal microscopy. Phagocytic activity was analyzed by flow cytometry as well as confocal microscopy. Surface marker expression was measured by flow cytometry. Toll-like receptor (TLR expression patterns as well as cytokine expression upon TLR4 or TLR9 stimulation were assessed by real time RT-PCR and cytokine protein production was measured using a fluorescent bead-based immunoassay. Results IM were found to be smaller and morphologically more heterogeneous than AM, whereas phagocytic activity was similar in both cell types. HLA-DR expression was markedly higher in IM compared to AM. Although analysis of TLR expression profiles revealed no differences between the two cell populations, AM and IM clearly varied in cell reaction upon activation. Both MΦ populations were markedly activated by LPS as well as DNA isolated from attenuated mycobacterial strains (M. bovis H37Ra and BCG. Whereas AM expressed higher amounts of inflammatory cytokines upon activation, IM were more efficient in producing immunoregulatory cytokines, such as IL10, IL1ra, and IL6. Conclusion AM appear to be more effective as a non-specific first line of defence against inhaled pathogens, whereas IM show a more pronounced regulatory function. These dissimilarities should be taken into consideration in future studies on the role of human lung MΦ in the inflammatory response.

  8. Perforated small intestine in a patient with T-cell lymphoma; a rare cause of peritonitis

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    Petrişor Banu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The nontraumatic perforations of the small intestine are pathological entities with particular aspects in respect to diagnosis and treatment. These peculiarities derive from the nonspecific clinical expression of the peritonitis syndrome, and from the multitude of causes that might be the primary sources of the perforation: foreign bodies, inflammatory diseases, tumors, infectious diseases, etc. Accordingly, in most cases intestinal perforation is discovered only by laparotomy and the definitive diagnosis is available only after histopathologic examination. Small bowel malignancies are rare; among them, lymphomas rank third in frequency, being mostly B-cell non Hodgkin lymphomas. Only 10% of non-Hodgkin lymphomas are with T-cell. We report the case of a 57 years’ old woman with intestinal T-cell lymphoma, whose first clinical symptomatology was related to a complication represented by perforation of the small intestine. Laparotomy performed in emergency identified an ulcerative lesion with perforation in the jejunum, which required segmental enterectomy with anastomosis. The nonspecific clinical manifestations of intestinal lymphomas make from diagnosis a difficult procedure. Due to the fact that surgery does not have a definite place in the treatment of the small intestinal lymphomas (for cases complicated with perforation, and beyond the morbidity associated with the surgery performed in emergency conditions, prognosis of these patients is finally given by the possibility to control the systemic disease through adjuvant therapy.

  9. Nlrp9b inflammasome restricts rotavirus infection in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shu; Ding, Siyuan; Wang, Penghua; Wei, Zheng; Pan, Wen; Palm, Noah W; Yang, Yi; Yu, Hua; Li, Hua-Bing; Wang, Geng; Lei, Xuqiu; de Zoete, Marcel R; Zhao, Jun; Zheng, Yunjiang; Chen, Haiwei; Zhao, Yujiao; Jurado, Kellie A; Feng, Ningguo; Shan, Liang; Kluger, Yuval; Lu, Jun; Abraham, Clara; Fikrig, Erol; Greenberg, Harry B; Flavell, Richard A

    2017-06-29

    Rotavirus, a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis and diarrhoea in young children, accounts for around 215,000 deaths annually worldwide. Rotavirus specifically infects the intestinal epithelial cells in the host small intestine and has evolved strategies to antagonize interferon and NF-κB signalling, raising the question as to whether other host factors participate in antiviral responses in intestinal mucosa. The mechanism by which enteric viruses are sensed and restricted in vivo, especially by NOD-like receptor (NLR) inflammasomes, is largely unknown. Here we uncover and mechanistically characterize the NLR Nlrp9b that is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells and restricts rotavirus infection. Our data show that, via RNA helicase Dhx9, Nlrp9b recognizes short double-stranded RNA stretches and forms inflammasome complexes with the adaptor proteins Asc and caspase-1 to promote the maturation of interleukin (Il)-18 and gasdermin D (Gsdmd)-induced pyroptosis. Conditional depletion of Nlrp9b or other inflammasome components in the intestine in vivo resulted in enhanced susceptibility of mice to rotavirus replication. Our study highlights an important innate immune signalling pathway that functions in intestinal epithelial cells and may present useful targets in the modulation of host defences against viral pathogens.

  10. Nlrp9b inflammasome restricts rotavirus infection in intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shu; Ding, Siyuan; Wang, Penghua; Wei, Zheng; Pan, Wen; Palm, Noah W; Yang, Yi; Yu, Hua; Li, Hua-Bing; Wang, Geng; Lei, Xuqiu; de Zoete, Marcel R.; Zhao, Jun; Zheng, Yunjiang; Chen, Haiwei; Zhao, Yujiao; Jurado, Kellie A.; Feng, Ningguo; Shan, Liang; Kluger, Yuval; Lu, Jun; Abraham, Clara; Fikrig, Erol; Greenberg, Harry B.; Flavell, Richard A.

    2018-01-01

    Rotavirus, a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis and diarrhoea in young children, accounts for around 215,000 deaths annually worldwide1. Rotavirus specifically infects the intestinal epithelial cells in the host small intestine and has evolved strategies to antagonize interferon and NF-κB signalling2–5, raising the question as to whether other host factors participate in antiviral responses in intestinal mucosa. The mechanism by which enteric viruses are sensed and restricted in vivo, especially by NOD-like receptor (NLR) inflammasomes, is largely unknown. Here we uncover and mechanistically characterize the NLR Nlrp9b that is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells and restricts rotavirus infection. Our data show that, via RNA helicase Dhx9, Nlrp9b recognizes short double-stranded RNA stretches and forms inflammasome complexes with the adaptor proteins Asc and caspase-1 to promote the maturation of interleukin (Il)-18 and gasdermin D (Gsdmd)-induced pyroptosis. Conditional depletion of Nlrp9b or other inflammasome components in the intestine in vivo resulted in enhanced susceptibility of mice to rotavirus replication. Our study highlights an important innate immune signalling pathway that functions in intestinal epithelial cells and may present useful targets in the modulation of host defences against viral pathogens. PMID:28636595

  11. Divergent Roles of Interferon-γ and Innate Lymphoid Cells in Innate and Adaptive Immune Cell-Mediated Intestinal Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseit, Jennifer; Kwong Chung, Cheong K C; Noti, Mario; Zysset, Daniel; Hoheisel-Dickgreber, Nina; Genitsch, Vera; Corazza, Nadia; Mueller, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    Aberrant interferon gamma (IFNγ) expression is associated with the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune- and inflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, the requirement of IFNγ for the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation remains controversial. The aim of this study was thus to investigate the role of IFNγ in experimental mouse models of innate and adaptive immune cell-mediated intestinal inflammation using genetically and microbiota-stabilized hosts. While we find that IFNγ drives acute intestinal inflammation in the anti-CD40 colitis model in an innate lymphoid cell (ILC)-dependent manner, IFNγ secreted by both transferred CD4 T cells and/or cells of the lymphopenic Rag1 -/- recipient mice was dispensable for CD4 T cell-mediated colitis. In the absence of IFNγ, intestinal inflammation in CD4 T cell recipient mice was associated with enhanced IL17 responses; consequently, targeting IL17 signaling in IFNγ-deficient mice reduced T cell-mediated colitis. Intriguingly, in contrast to the anti-CD40 model of colitis, depletion of ILC in the Rag1 -/- recipients of colitogenic CD4 T cells did not prevent induction of colonic inflammation. Together, our findings demonstrate that IFNγ represents an essential, or a redundant, pro-inflammatory cytokine for the induction of intestinal inflammation, depending on the experimental mouse model used and on the nature of the critical disease inducing immune cell populations involved.

  12. Wnt signaling in adult intestinal stem cells and cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krausová, Michaela; Kořínek, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 3 (2014), s. 570-579 ISSN 0898-6568 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2347; GA ČR GAP305/11/1780 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Wnt * intestine * cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.315, year: 2014

  13. Centrosome/Cell cycle uncoupling and elimination in the endoreduplicating intestinal cells of C. elegans.

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    Yu Lu

    Full Text Available The centrosome cycle is most often coordinated with mitotic cell division through the activity of various essential cell cycle regulators, consequently ensuring that the centriole is duplicated once, and only once, per cell cycle. However, this coupling can be altered in specific developmental contexts; for example, multi-ciliated cells generate hundreds of centrioles without any S-phase requirement for their biogenesis, while Drosophila follicle cells eliminate their centrosomes as they begin to endoreduplicate. In order to better understand how the centrosome cycle and the cell cycle are coordinated in a developmental context we use the endoreduplicating intestinal cell lineage of C. elegans to address how novel variations of the cell cycle impact this important process. In C. elegans, the larval intestinal cells undergo one nuclear division without subsequent cytokinesis, followed by four endocycles that are characterized by successive rounds of S-phase. We monitored the levels of centriolar/centrosomal markers and found that centrosomes lose their pericentriolar material following the nuclear division that occurs during the L1 stage and is thereafter never re-gained. The centrioles then become refractory to S phase regulators that would normally promote duplication during the first endocycle, after which they are eliminated during the L2 stage. Furthermore, we show that SPD-2 plays a central role in the numeral regulation of centrioles as a potential target of CDK activity. On the other hand, the phosphorylation on SPD-2 by Polo-like kinase, the transcriptional regulation of genes that affect centriole biogenesis, and the ubiquitin/proteasome degradation pathway, contribute collectively to the final elimination of the centrioles during the L2 stage.

  14. Radiosensitivity of mice of different lines and age as determinated with reference to ''intestinal'' death and DNA repair in intestinal epithelium cells

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    Konoplyannikova, O.A.; Sklobovskaya, M.V.; Konoplyannikov, A.G.; Saenko, A.S. (Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Obninsk. Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Meditsinskoj Radiologii)

    A study was made of the influence of strain- and age-related differences on mouse mortality after irradiation with doses lying within the ''intestinal'' dose range, and also damages to stem cells of intestinal epithelium and induction and repair of single-strand DNA breaks in intestinal epitherium cells. Mice of different lines and age vary in LDsub(50/4) and stem cell radiosensitivity. There are no differences in the sedimentation constants of DNA fragments in alkaline lysates of intestinal crypts of intact mice of different age. Radiosensitivity determined with reference to single-strand breaks induction in DNA is similar with different mouse groups. Repair of single-strand DNA breaks of elderly mice is slower than that of young animals.

  15. Analysis of interactions of Salmonella type three secretion mutants with 3-D intestinal epithelial cells.

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    Andrea L Radtke

    Full Text Available The prevailing paradigm of Salmonella enteropathogenesis based on monolayers asserts that Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 Type Three Secretion System (SPI-1 T3SS is required for bacterial invasion into intestinal epithelium. However, little is known about the role of SPI-1 in mediating gastrointestinal disease in humans. Recently, SPI-1 deficient nontyphoidal Salmonella strains were isolated from infected humans and animals, indicating that SPI-1 is not required to cause enteropathogenesis and demonstrating the need for more in vivo-like models. Here, we utilized a previously characterized 3-D organotypic model of human intestinal epithelium to elucidate the role of all characterized Salmonella enterica T3SSs. Similar to in vivo reports, the Salmonella SPI-1 T3SS was not required to invade 3-D intestinal cells. Additionally, Salmonella strains carrying single (SPI-1 or SPI-2, double (SPI-1/2 and complete T3SS knockout (SPI-1/SPI-2: flhDC also invaded 3-D intestinal cells to wildtype levels. Invasion of wildtype and TTSS mutants was a Salmonella active process, whereas non-invasive bacterial strains, bacterial size beads, and heat-killed Salmonella did not invade 3-D cells. Wildtype and T3SS mutants did not preferentially target different cell types identified within the 3-D intestinal aggregates, including M-cells/M-like cells, enterocytes, or Paneth cells. Moreover, each T3SS was necessary for substantial intracellular bacterial replication within 3-D cells. Collectively, these results indicate that T3SSs are dispensable for Salmonella invasion into highly differentiated 3-D models of human intestinal epithelial cells, but are required for intracellular bacterial growth, paralleling in vivo infection observations and demonstrating the utility of these models in predicting in vivo-like pathogenic mechanisms.

  16. Culture media from hypoxia conditioned endothelial cells protect human intestinal cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummitzsch, Lars; Zitta, Karina; Bein, Berthold; Steinfath, Markus; Albrecht, Martin

    2014-03-10

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is a phenomenon, whereby short episodes of non-lethal ischemia to an organ or tissue exert protection against ischemia/reperfusion injury in a distant organ. However, there is still an apparent lack of knowledge concerning the RIPC-mediated mechanisms within the target organ and the released factors. Here we established a human cell culture model to investigate cellular and molecular effects of RIPC and to identify factors responsible for RIPC-mediated intestinal protection. Human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC) were exposed to repeated episodes of hypoxia (3 × 15 min) and conditioned culture media (CM) were collected after 24h. Human intestinal cells (CaCo-2) were cultured with or without CM and subjected to 90 min of hypoxia/reoxygenation injury. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, gelatin zymography, hydrogen peroxide measurements and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays were performed. In HUVEC cultures hypoxic conditioning did not influence the profile of secreted proteins but led to an increased gelatinase activity (Pcultures 90 min of hypoxia/reoxygenation resulted in morphological signs of cell damage, increased LDH levels (Pculture model may help to unravel RIPC-mediated cellular events and to identify molecules released by RIPC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dclk1+ small intestinal epithelial tuft cells display the hallmarks of quiescence and self-renewal

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    Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Weygant, Nathaniel; Taylor, Vivian E.; Li, James D.; Ali, Naushad; Sureban, Sripathi M.; Qante, Michael; Wang, Timothy C.; Bronze, Michael S.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2015-01-01

    To date, no discrete genetic signature has been defined for isolated Dclk1+ tuft cells within the small intestine. Furthermore, recent reports on the functional significance of Dclk1+ cells in the small intestine have been inconsistent. These cells have been proposed to be fully differentiated cells, reserve stem cells, and tumor stem cells. In order to elucidate the potential function of Dclk1+ cells, we FACS-sorted Dclk1+ cells from mouse small intestinal epithelium using transgenic mice expressing YFP under the control of the Dclk1 promoter (Dclk1-CreER;Rosa26-YFP). Analysis of sorted YFP+ cells demonstrated marked enrichment (~6000 fold) for Dclk1 mRNA compared with YFP− cells. Dclk1+ population display ~6 fold enrichment for the putative quiescent stem cell marker Bmi1. We observed significantly greater expression of pluripotency genes, pro-survival genes, and quiescence markers in the Dclk1+ population. A significant increase in self-renewal capability (14-fold) was observed in in vitro isolated Dclk1+ cells. The unique genetic report presented in this manuscript suggests that Dclk1+ cells may maintain quiescence, pluripotency, and metabolic activity for survival/longevity. Functionally, these reserve characteristics manifest in vitro, with Dclk1+ cells exhibiting greater ability to self-renew. These findings indicate that quiescent stem-like functionality is a feature of Dclk1-expressing tuft cells. PMID:26362399

  18. Interstitial Granulomatous Dermatitis (IGD

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    Tiberiu Tebeica

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 42 years old male patient suffering from skin changes , which appeared in the last 7-8 years.  Two biopsies were performed during the evolution of the lesion. Both showed similar findings that consisted in a busy dermis with interstitial, superficial and deep infiltrates of lymphocytes and histiocytes dispersed among collagen bundles, with variable numbers of neutrophils scattered throughout. Some histiocytes were clustered in poorly formed granuloma that included rare giant cells, with discrete Palisades and piecemeal collagen degeneration, but without mucin deposition or frank necrobiosis of collagen. The clinical and histologic findings were supportive for interstitial granulomatous dermatitis. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis (IGD is a poorly understood entity that was regarded by many as belonging to the same spectrum of disease or even synonym with palisaded and neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis (PNGD. Although IGD and PNGD were usually related to connective tissue disease, mostly rheumatoid arthritis, some patients with typical histologic findings of IGD never develop autoimmune disorders, but they have different underlying conditions, such as metabolic diseases, lymphoproliferative disorders or other malignant tumours. These observations indicate that IGD and PNGD are different disorders with similar manifestations.

  19. Loss of Sonic hedgehog leads to alterations in intestinal secretory cell maturation and autophagy.

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    Jessica Gagné-Sansfaçon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intestinal epithelial cells express the Sonic and Indian hedgehog ligands. Despite the strong interest in gut hedgehog signaling in GI diseases, no studies have specifically addressed the singular role of intestinal epithelial cell Sonic hedgehog signaling. The aim of this study was to investigate the specific role of Sonic hedgehog in adult ileal epithelial homeostasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A Sonic hedgehog intestinal epithelial conditional knockout mouse model was generated. Assessment of ileal histological abnormalities, crypt epithelial cell proliferation, epithelial cell fate, junctional proteins, signaling pathways, as well as ultrastructural analysis of intracellular organelles were performed in control and mutant mice. Mice lacking intestinal epithelial Sonic Hedgehog displayed decreased ileal crypt/villus length, decreased crypt proliferation as well as a decrease in the number of ileal mucin-secreting goblet cells and antimicrobial peptide-secreting Paneth cells during adult life. These secretory cells also exhibited disruption of their secretory products in mutant mice. Ultrastructural microscopy analysis revealed a dilated ER lumen in secretory cells. This phenotype was also associated with a decrease in autophagy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether, these findings indicate that the loss of Sonic hedgehog can lead to ileal secretory cell modifications indicative of endoplasmic reticulum stress, accompanied by a significant reduction in autophagy.

  20. Precision-cut intestinal slices as a culture system to analyze the infection of differentiated intestinal epithelial cells by avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punyadarsaniya, Darsaniya; Winter, Christine; Mork, Ann-Kathrin; Amiri, Mahdi; Naim, Hassan Y; Rautenschlein, Silke; Herrler, Georg

    2015-02-01

    Many viruses infect and replicate in their host via the intestinal tract, e.g. many picornaviruses, several coronaviruses and avian influenza viruses of waterfowl. To analyze infection of enterocytes is a challenging task as culture systems for differentiated intestinal epithelial cells are not readily available and often have a life span that is too short for infection studies. Precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) from chicken embryos were prepared and shown that the epithelial cells lining the lumen of the intestine are viable for up to 4 days. Using lectin staining, it was demonstrated that α2,3-linked sialic acids, the preferred receptor determinants of avian influenza viruses, are present on the apical side of the epithelial cells. Furthermore, the epithelial cells (at the tips) of the villi were shown to be susceptible to infection by an avian influenza virus of the H9N2 subtype. This culture system will be useful to analyze virus infection of intestinal epithelial cells and it should be applicable also to the intestine of other species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabolic changes during B cell differentiation for the production of intestinal IgA antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisawa, Jun

    2017-04-01

    To sustain the bio-energetic demands of growth, proliferation, and effector functions, the metabolism of immune cells changes dramatically in response to immunologic stimuli. In this review, I focus on B cell metabolism, especially regarding the production of intestinal IgA antibody. Accumulating evidence has implicated not only host-derived factors (e.g., cytokines) but also gut environmental factors, including the possible involvement of commensal bacteria and diet, in the control of B cell metabolism during intestinal IgA antibody production. These findings yield new insights into the regulation of immunosurveillance and homeostasis in the gut.

  2. Diacylglycerol kinase regulation of protein kinase D during oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Jun; Li Jing; Mourot, Joshua M.; Mark Evers, B.; Chung, Dai H.

    2008-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that protein kinase D (PKD) exerts a protective function during oxidative stress-induced intestinal epithelial cell injury; however, the exact role of DAG kinase (DGK)ζ, an isoform expressed in intestine, during this process is unknown. We sought to determine the role of DGK during oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury and whether DGK acts as an upstream regulator of PKD. Inhibition of DGK with R59022 compound or DGKζ siRNA transfection decreased H 2 O 2 -induced RIE-1 cell apoptosis as measured by DNA fragmentation and increased PKD phosphorylation. Overexpression of kinase-dead DGKζ also significantly increased PKD phosphorylation. Additionally, endogenous nuclear DGKζ rapidly translocated to the cytoplasm following H 2 O 2 treatment. Our findings demonstrate that DGK is involved in the regulation of oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury. PKD activation is induced by DGKζ, suggesting DGK is an upstream regulator of oxidative stress-induced activation of the PKD signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells

  3. CD34 immunoreactivity and interstitial cells of Cajal in the human and mouse gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderwinden, J M; Rumessen, J J; De Laet, M H

    2000-01-01

    , we observed that CD34-ir labeled Kit-negative fibroblast-like cells, closely adjacent to, but distinct from, the Kit-ir ICC. The existence of cells expressing both CD34-ir and Kit-ir remains controversial. CD34-ir and Kit-ir were studied by high-resolution confocal microscopy on cryostat sections...... of human and murine gut as well as murine whole-mounts, using specific antibodies raised to human and murine CD34, respectively. CD34-ir labeled numerous cells in all parts of the gut, in man and in mouse. CD34-ir was consistently observed in Kit-negative cells, distinct from the closely adjacent Kit......-ir ICC. Thin processes of both cell types intermingled extensively, often at the limit of resolution for light microscopy. CD34-ir was also observed in Kit-negative mesenchymal cells in the submucosa, in capillaries and in mesothelial cells. CD34-ir is not a marker for Kit-ir ICC in the human and murine...

  4. Distinct ATOH1 and Neurog3 requirements define tuft cells as a new secretory cell type in the intestinal epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbe, F.; van Es, J.H.; Makrini, L.; Brulin, B.; Mellitzer, G.; Robine, S.; Romagnolo, B.; Shroyer, N.F.; Bourgaux, J.F.; Pignodel, C.; Clevers, H.; Jay, P.

    2011-01-01

    The unique morphology of tuft cells was first revealed by electron microscopy analyses in several endoderm-derived epithelia. Here, we explore the relationship of these cells with the other cell types of the intestinal epithelium and describe the first marker signature allowing their unambiguous

  5. Arthritis by autoreactive T cell lines obtained from rats after injection of intestinal bacterial cell wall fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Klasen (Ina); J. Kool (Jeanette); M.J. Melief (Marie-José); I. Loeve (I.); W.B. van den Berg (Wim); A.J. Severijnen; M.P.H. Hazenberg (Maarten)

    1992-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ T cell lines (B13, B19) were isolated from the lymph nodes of Lewis rats 12 days after an arthritogenic injection of cell wall fragments of Eubacterium aerofaciens (ECW), a major resident of the human intestinal flora. These cell wall fragments consist of

  6. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, K.

    2007-01-01

    The most important smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Although traditionally considered to be discrete entities, smoking-related ILDs often coexist, thus accounting for the sometimes complex patterns encountered on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative role of smoking in the development of pulmonary fibrosis

  7. Analysis of gene expression in prostate cancer epithelial and interstitial stromal cells using laser capture microdissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, Jennifer L; Brown, Kathleen E; Mintz, Eric M; Piontkivska, Helen; Fraizer, Gail C

    2010-01-01

    The prostate gland represents a multifaceted system in which prostate epithelia and stroma have distinct physiological roles. To understand the interaction between stroma and glandular epithelia, it is essential to delineate the gene expression profiles of these two tissue types in prostate cancer. Most studies have compared tumor and normal samples by performing global expression analysis using a mixture of cell populations. This report presents the first study of prostate tumor tissue that examines patterns of differential expression between specific cell types using laser capture microdissection (LCM). LCM was used to isolate distinct cell-type populations and identify their gene expression differences using oligonucleotide microarrays. Ten differentially expressed genes were then analyzed in paired tumor and non-neoplastic prostate tissues by quantitative real-time PCR. Expression patterns of the transcription factors, WT1 and EGR1, were further compared in established prostate cell lines. WT1 protein expression was also examined in prostate tissue microarrays using immunohistochemistry. The two-step method of laser capture and microarray analysis identified nearly 500 genes whose expression levels were significantly different in prostate epithelial versus stromal tissues. Several genes expressed in epithelial cells (WT1, GATA2, and FGFR-3) were more highly expressed in neoplastic than in non-neoplastic tissues; conversely several genes expressed in stromal cells (CCL5, CXCL13, IGF-1, FGF-2, and IGFBP3) were more highly expressed in non-neoplastic than in neoplastic tissues. Notably, EGR1 was also differentially expressed between epithelial and stromal tissues. Expression of WT1 and EGR1 in cell lines was consistent with these patterns of differential expression. Importantly, WT1 protein expression was demonstrated in tumor tissues and was absent in normal and benign tissues. The prostate represents a complex mix of cell types and there is a need to analyze

  8. Actions of vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin on chief cells prepared from guinea pig stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutliff, V.E.; Raufman, J.P.; Jensen, R.T.; Gardner, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin increased cellular cAMP and pepsinogen secretion in dispersed chief cells from guinea pig gastric mucosa. With each peptide there was a close correlation between the dose-response curve for changes in cellular cAMP and that for changes in pepsinogen secretion. Vasoactive intestinal peptide- (10-28) and secretin- (5-27) had no agonist activity and antagonized the actions of vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin on cellular cAMP and pepsinogen secretion. Studies of binding of 125 I-vasoactive intestinal peptide and of 125 -secretin indicated that gastric chief cells possess four classes of binding sites for vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin and that occupation of two of these classes of binding sites correlates with the abilities of vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin to increase cellular cAMP and pepsinogen secretion. What function, in any, is mediated by occupation by the other two classes of binding sites remains to be determined

  9. Crypt base columnar stem cells in small intestines of mice are radioresistant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hua, G.; Thin, T.H.; Feldman, R.; Haimovitz-Friedman, A.; Clevers, H.; Fuks, Z.; Kolesnick, R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Adult stem cells have been proposed to be quiescent and radiation resistant, repairing DNA double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end joining. However, the population of putative small intestinal stem cells (ISCs) at position +4 from the crypt base contradicts this model, in that

  10. Stem cell factor enhances the survival of murine intestinal stem cells after photon irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, B.R.; Khan, W.; Hancock, S.L.

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant rat stem cell factor (SCF) has been shown to decrease lethality in mice exposed to total-body irradiation (TBI) in the lower range of lethality through radioprotection of hematopoietic stem cells and acceleration of bone marrow repopulation. This study evaluates the effect of SCF on the survival of the intestinal mucosal stem cell after TBI. This non-hematopoietic cell is clinically relevant. Gastrointestinal toxicity is common during and after abdominal and pelvic radiation therapy and limits the radiation dose in these regions. As observed with bone marrow, the administration of SCF to mice prior to TBI enhanced the survival of mouse duodenal crypt stem cells. The maximum enhancement of survival was seen when 100 μ/kg of SCF was given intraperitoneally 8 h before irradiation. This regimen increased the survival of duodenal crypt stem cells after 12.0 Gy TBI from 22.5 ± 0.7 per duodenal cross section for controls to 30.0 ± 1.7 after treatment with SCF (P=0.03). The TBI dose producing 50% mortality of 6 days (LD 50/6 ) was increased from 14.9 Gy for control mice to 19.0 Gy for mice treated with SCF (dose modification factor = 1.28). These findings demonstrate that SCF (dose modification factor = 1.28). These findings demonstrate that SCF has radioprotective effects on a non-hematopoietic stem cell population and suggest that SCF may be of clinical value in preventing radiation injury to the intestine. 29 refs., 4 figs

  11. Tolerogenic CX3CR1+ B cells suppress food allergy-induced intestinal inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z Q; Wu, Y; Song, J P; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Zheng, P Y; Yang, P C

    2013-10-01

    B lymphocytes are an important cell population of the immune regulation; their role in the regulation of food allergy has not been fully understood yet. This study aims to investigate the role of a subpopulation of tolerogenic B cells (TolBC) in the generation of regulatory T cells (Treg) and in the suppression of food allergy-induced intestinal inflammation in mice. The intestinal mucosa-derived CD5+ CD19+ CX3CR1+ TolBCs were characterized by flow cytometry; a mouse model of intestinal T helper (Th)2 inflammation was established to assess the immune regulatory role of this subpopulation of TolBCs. A subpopulation of CD5+ CD19+ CX3CR1+ B cells was detected in the mouse intestinal mucosa. The cells also expressed transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and carried integrin alpha v beta 6 (αvβ6). Exposure to recombinant αvβ6 and anti-IgM antibody induced naive B cells to differentiate into the TGF-β-producing TolBCs. Coculturing this subpopulation of TolBCs with Th0 cells generated CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ Tregs. Adoptive transfer with the TolBCs markedly suppressed the food allergy-induced intestinal Th2 pattern inflammation in mice. CD5+ CD19+ CX3CR1+ TolBCs are capable of inducing Tregs in the intestine and suppress food allergy-related Th2 pattern inflammation in mice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Radiation, an ideal cytotoxic for the study of cell biology in the small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potten, C.

    2003-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are highly polarised with the proliferative compartment sometimes subdivided into units of proliferation in many instances. My interests have been in trying to understand how many cellular constituents exist, what their function is and intercommunicants are that ensure appropriate steady state cell replacement rates. Radiation has proved to be a valuable tool to induce cell death, reproductive sterilisation, and regenerative proliferation in these systems, the responses to which can provide information on the number of regenerative cells (a function associated with stem cells). Such studies have helped define the epidermal proliferative units and the structurally similar units on the dorsal surface of the tongue. The radiation responses considered in conjunction with a wide range of cell kinetic lineage tracking and somatic mutation studies with complex mathematical modelling, provide insights into the functioning of the poliferative units (crypts) of the small intestine. Comparative studies have then been undertaken with the crypts in the large bowel. In the small intestine, which rarely develops cancer, various protective mechanisms have evolved to ensure the genetic integrity of the stem cell compartment. Stem cells in the small intestinal crypts have an intolerance of genotoxic damage (including that induced by very low doses of radiation), they do not undergo cell cycle arrest and repair but commit an altruistic p53 dependent cell suicide (apoptosis). This process is compromised in the large bowel by bcl-2 expression. Recent studies have suggested a second genome protection mechanism operating in the stem cells of the small intestinal crypts that may also have a p53 dependence. Such studies have allowed the cell lineages and genome protection mechanisms operating in the small intestinal crypts to be defined

  13. An endogenous nanomineral chaperones luminal antigen and peptidoglycan to intestinal immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jonathan J; Thomas-McKay, Emma; Thoree, Vinay; Robertson, Jack; Hewitt, Rachel E; Skepper, Jeremy N; Brown, Andy; Hernandez-Garrido, Juan Carlos; Midgley, Paul A; Gomez-Morilla, Inmaculada; Grime, Geoffrey W; Kirkby, Karen J; Mabbott, Neil A; Donaldson, David S; Williams, Ifor R; Rios, Daniel; Girardin, Stephen E; Haas, Carolin T; Bruggraber, Sylvaine F A; Laman, Jon D; Tanriver, Yakup; Lombardi, Giovanna; Lechler, Robert; Thompson, Richard P H; Pele, Laetitia C

    2015-04-01

    In humans and other mammals it is known that calcium and phosphate ions are secreted from the distal small intestine into the lumen. However, why this secretion occurs is unclear. Here, we show that the process leads to the formation of amorphous magnesium-substituted calcium phosphate nanoparticles that trap soluble macromolecules, such as bacterial peptidoglycan and orally fed protein antigens, in the lumen and transport them to immune cells of the intestinal tissue. The macromolecule-containing nanoparticles utilize epithelial M cells to enter Peyer's patches, small areas of the intestine concentrated with particle-scavenging immune cells. In wild-type mice, intestinal immune cells containing these naturally formed nanoparticles expressed the immune tolerance-associated molecule 'programmed death-ligand 1', whereas in NOD1/2 double knockout mice, which cannot recognize peptidoglycan, programmed death-ligand 1 was undetected. Our results explain a role for constitutively formed calcium phosphate nanoparticles in the gut lumen and show how this helps to shape intestinal immune homeostasis.

  14. An endogenous nanomineral chaperones luminal antigen and peptidoglycan to intestinal immune cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jonathan J.; Thomas-McKay, Emma; Thoree, Vinay; Robertson, Jack; Hewitt, Rachel E.; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Brown, Andy; Hernandez-Garrido, Juan Carlos; Midgley, Paul A.; Gomez-Morilla, Inmaculada; Grime, Geoffrey W.; Kirkby, Karen J.; Mabbott, Neil A.; Donaldson, David S.; Williams, Ifor R.; Rios, Daniel; Girardin, Stephen E.; Haas, Carolin T.; Bruggraber, Sylvaine F. A.; Laman, Jon D.; Tanriver, Yakup; Lombardi, Giovanna; Lechler, Robert; Thompson, Richard P. H.; Pele, Laetitia C.

    2015-05-01

    In humans and other mammals it is known that calcium and phosphate ions are secreted from the distal small intestine into the lumen. However, why this secretion occurs is unclear. Here, we show that the process leads to the formation of amorphous magnesium-substituted calcium phosphate nanoparticles that trap soluble macromolecules, such as bacterial peptidoglycan and orally fed protein antigens, in the lumen and transport them to immune cells of the intestinal tissue. The macromolecule-containing nanoparticles utilize epithelial M cells to enter Peyer's patches, small areas of the intestine concentrated with particle-scavenging immune cells. In wild-type mice, intestinal immune cells containing these naturally formed nanoparticles expressed the immune tolerance-associated molecule ‘programmed death-ligand 1’, whereas in NOD1/2 double knockout mice, which cannot recognize peptidoglycan, programmed death-ligand 1 was undetected. Our results explain a role for constitutively formed calcium phosphate nanoparticles in the gut lumen and show how this helps to shape intestinal immune homeostasis.

  15. A20 restricts wnt signaling in intestinal epithelial cells and suppresses colon carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Shao

    Full Text Available Colon carcinogenesis consists of a multistep process during which a series of genetic and epigenetic adaptations occur that lead to malignant transformation. Here, we have studied the role of A20 (also known as TNFAIP3, a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that restricts NFκB and cell death signaling, in intestinal homeostasis and tumorigenesis. We have found that A20 expression is consistently reduced in human colonic adenomas than in normal colonic tissues. To further investigate A20's potential roles in regulating colon carcinogenesis, we have generated mice lacking A20 specifically in intestinal epithelial cells and interbred these with mice harboring a mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC(min. While A20(FL/FL villin-Cre mice exhibit uninflamed intestines without polyps, A20(FL/FL villin-Cre APC(min/+ mice contain far greater numbers and larger colonic polyps than control APC(min mice. We find that A20 binds to the β-catenin destruction complex and restricts canonical wnt signaling by supporting ubiquitination and degradation of β-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, acute deletion of A20 from intestinal epithelial cells in vivo leads to enhanced expression of the β-catenin dependent genes cyclinD1 and c-myc, known promoters of colon cancer. Taken together, these findings demonstrate new roles for A20 in restricting β-catenin signaling and preventing colon tumorigenesis.

  16. Long-pulse gastric electrical stimulation protects interstitial cells of Cajal in diabetic rats via IGF-1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai; Chen, Yan; Liu, Shi; Hou, Xiao-Hua

    2016-06-21

    To investigate the effects of different parameters of gastric electrical stimulation (GES) on interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) and changes in the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signal pathway in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Male rats were randomized into control, diabetic (DM), diabetic with sham GES (DM + SGES), diabetic with GES1 (5.5 cpm, 100 ms, 4 mA) (DM + GES1), diabetic with GES2 (5.5 cpm, 300 ms, 4 mA) (DM + GES2) and diabetic with GES3 (5.5 cpm, 550 ms, 2 mA) (DM + GES3) groups. The expression levels of c-kit, M-SCF and IGF-1 receptors were evaluated in the gastric antrum using Western blot analysis. The distribution of ICCs was observed using immunolabeling for c-kit, while smooth muscle cells and IGF-1 receptors were identified using α-SMA and IGF-1R antibodies. Serum level of IGF-1 was tested using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Gastric emptying was delayed in the DM group but improved in all GES groups, especially in the GES2 group. The expression levels of c-kit, M-SCF and IGF-1R were decreased in the DM group but increased in all GES groups. More ICCs (c-kit(+)) and smooth muscle cells (α-SMA(+)/IGF-1R(+)) were observed in all GES groups than in the DM group. The average level of IGF-1 in the DM group was markedly decreased, but it was up-regulated in all GES groups, especially in the GES2 group. The results suggest that long-pulse GES promotes the regeneration of ICCs. The IGF-1 signaling pathway might be involved in the mechanism underlying this process, which results in improved gastric emptying.

  17. Peroxiredoxin 5 Protects TGF-β Induced Fibrosis by Inhibiting Stat3 Activation in Rat Kidney Interstitial Fibroblast Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoon-In Choi

    Full Text Available Renal fibrosis is a common final pathway of end-stage kidney disease which is induced by aberrant accumulation of myofibroblasts. This process is triggered by reactive oxygen species (ROS and proinflammatory cytokines generated by various source of injured kidney cells. Peroxiredoxin 5 (Prdx5 is a thiol-dependent peroxidase that reduces oxidative stress by catalyzing intramolecular disulfide bonds. Along with its antioxidant effects, expression level of Prdx5 also was involved in inflammatory regulation by immune stimuli. However, the physiological effects and the underlying mechanisms of Prdx5 in renal fibrosis have not been fully characterized. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO for 1 or 7 days. For the in vitro model, NRK49F cells, a rat kidney interstitial fibroblast cell lines, were treated with transforming growth factor β (TGF-β for 0, 1, 3, or 5 days. To access the involvement of its peroxidase activity in TGF-β induced renal fibrosis, wild type Prdx5 (WT and double mutant Prdx5 (DM, converted two active site cysteines at Cys 48 and Cys 152 residue to serine, were transiently expressed in NRK49F cells. The protein expression of Prdx5 was reduced in UUO kidneys. Upregulation of fibrotic markers, such as fibronectin and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, declined at 5 days in time point of higher Prdx5 expression in TGF-β treated NRK49F cells. The overexpression of wild type Prdx5 by transient transfection in NRK49F cells attenuated the TGF-β induced upregulation of fibronectin and α-SMA. On the other hand, the transient transfection of double mutant Prdx5 did not prevent the activation of fibrotic markers. Overexpression of Prdx5 also suppressed the TGF-β induced upregulation of Stat3 phosphorylation, while phosphorylation of Smad 2/3 was unchanged. In conclusion, Prdx5 protects TGF-β induced fibrosis in NRK49F cells by modulating Stat3 activation in a peroxidase activity dependent manner.

  18. Naturally occurring glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) receptors in human intestinal cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Anette; Hastrup, Sven; Andersen, Marie; Thim, Lars

    2006-02-17

    Although clinical trials with GLP-2 receptor agonists are currently ongoing, the mechanisms behind GLP-2-induced intestinal epithelial growth remain to be understood. To approach the GLP-2 mechanism of action this study aimed to identify intestinal cell lines endogenously expressing the GLP-2 receptor. Here we report the first identification of a cell line endogenously expressing functional GLP-2 receptors. The human intestinal epithelial cell line, FHC, expressed GLP-2 receptor encoding mRNA (RT-PCR) and GLP-2 receptor protein (Western blot). In cultured FHC cells, GLP-2 induced concentration dependent cAMP accumulation (pEC(50)=9.7+/-0.04 (mean+/-S.E.M., n=4)). In addition, a naturally occurring human intestinal fibroblast cell line, 18Co, endogenously expressing GLP-2 receptor encoding mRNA (RT-PCR) and protein (Western blot) was identified. No receptor functionality (binding or G-protein signalling) could be demonstrated in 18Co cells. The identified gut-relevant cell lines provide tools for future clarification of the mechanisms underlying GLP-2-induced epithelial growth.

  19. Valve interstitial cell culture: Production of mature type I collagen and precise detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lišková, Jana; Hadraba, Daniel; Filová, Elena; Koňařík, M.; Pirk, J.; Jelen, K.; Bačáková, Lucie

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 8 (2017), s. 936-942 ISSN 1059-910X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062; GA MZd(CZ) NV15-29153A; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ascorbic acid * cell culture * collagen * fluorescent microscopy * porcine VIC * second harmonic generation Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics OBOR OECD: Technologies involving the manipulation of cells, tissues, organs or the whole organism (assisted reproduction) Impact factor: 1.147, year: 2016

  20. Ultrastructure of Cajal-like interstitial cells in the human detrusor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle; Rumessen, Jüri J; Hansen, Alastair

    2009-01-01

    reticulum and Golgi apparatus were observed in the cell somata and cytoplasmic processes. Intermediate filaments were abundant but no thick filaments were found. ICC-L were interconnected by close appositions, gap junctions and peg-and-socket junctions (PSJ) but no specialised contacts to smooth muscle...

  1. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal in myenteric plexus of human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johs.; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Rasmussen, Helle

    2009-01-01

    and had myoid features such as scattered caveolae, prominent intermediate filaments, and cytoplasmic dense bodies. We found characteristic dense membrane-associated bands with a patchy basal lamina, invaginating cellular protrusions (peg and socket junctions) between ICC and between ICC and muscle cells......, and close contacts (socket...

  2. Bile acid receptor TGR5 overexpression is associated with decreased intestinal mucosal injury and epithelial cell proliferation in obstructive jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chen-Guang; Xie, Xiao-Li; Yin, Jie; Qi, Wei; Chen, Lei; Bai, Yun; Wang, Na; Zhao, Dong-Qiang; Jiang, Xiao-Yu; Jiang, Hui-Qing

    2017-04-01

    Bile acids stimulate intestinal epithelial proliferation in vitro. We sought to investigate the role of the bile acid receptor TGR5 in the protection of intestinal epithelial proliferation in obstructive jaundice. Intestinal tissues and serum samples were obtained from patients with malignant obstructive jaundice and from bile duct ligation (BDL) rats. Intestinal permeability and morphological changes in the intestinal mucosa were observed. The functions of TGR5 in cell proliferation in intestinal epithelial injury were determined by overexpression or knockdown studies in Caco-2 and FHs 74 Int cells pretreated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Internal biliary drainage was superior to external biliary drainage in recovering intestinal permeability and mucosal histology in patients with obstructive jaundice. In BDL rats, feeding of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) decreased intestinal mucosa injury. The levels of PCNA, a marker of proliferation, increased in response to CDCA feeding and were paralleled by elevated TGR5 expression. CDCA upregulated TGR5 expression and promoted proliferation in Caco-2 and FHs 74 Int cells pretreated with LPS. Overexpression of TGR5 resulted in increased PCNA, cell viability, EdU incorporation, and the proportion of cells in S phase, whereas knockdown of TGR5 had the opposite effect. Our data indicate that bile acids promote intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and decrease mucosal injury by upregulating TGR5 expression in obstructive jaundice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Campylobacter jejuni induces transcytosis of commensal bacteria across the intestinal epithelium through M-like cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent epidemiological analyses have implicated acute Campylobacter enteritis as a factor that may incite or exacerbate inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in susceptible individuals. We have demonstrated previously that C. jejuni disrupts the intestinal barrier function by rapidly inducing epithelial translocation of non-invasive commensal bacteria via a transcellular lipid raft-mediated mechanism ('transcytosis'). To further characterize this mechanism, the aim of this current study was to elucidate whether C. jejuni utilizes M cells to facilitate transcytosis of commensal intestinal bacteria. Results C. jejuni induced translocation of non-invasive E. coli across confluent Caco-2 epithelial monolayers in the absence of disrupted transepithelial electrical resistance or increased permeability to a 3 kDa dextran probe. C. jejuni-infected monolayers displayed increased numbers of cells expressing the M cell-specific marker, galectin-9, reduced numbers of enterocytes that stained with the absorptive enterocyte marker, Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1, and reduced activities of enzymes typically associated with absorptive enterocytes (namely alkaline phosphatase, lactase, and sucrase). Furthermore, in Campylobacter-infected monolayers, E. coli were observed to be internalized specifically within epithelial cells displaying M-like cell characteristics. Conclusion These data indicate that C. jejuni may utilize M cells to promote transcytosis of non-invasive bacteria across the intact intestinal epithelial barrier. This mechanism may contribute to the inflammatory immune responses against commensal intestinal bacteria commonly observed in IBD patients. PMID:21040540

  4. Campylobacter jejuni induces transcytosis of commensal bacteria across the intestinal epithelium through M-like cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalischuk Lisa D

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent epidemiological analyses have implicated acute Campylobacter enteritis as a factor that may incite or exacerbate inflammatory bowel disease (IBD in susceptible individuals. We have demonstrated previously that C. jejuni disrupts the intestinal barrier function by rapidly inducing epithelial translocation of non-invasive commensal bacteria via a transcellular lipid raft-mediated mechanism ('transcytosis'. To further characterize this mechanism, the aim of this current study was to elucidate whether C. jejuni utilizes M cells to facilitate transcytosis of commensal intestinal bacteria. Results C. jejuni induced translocation of non-invasive E. coli across confluent Caco-2 epithelial monolayers in the absence of disrupted transepithelial electrical resistance or increased permeability to a 3 kDa dextran probe. C. jejuni-infected monolayers displayed increased numbers of cells expressing the M cell-specific marker, galectin-9, reduced numbers of enterocytes that stained with the absorptive enterocyte marker, Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1, and reduced activities of enzymes typically associated with absorptive enterocytes (namely alkaline phosphatase, lactase, and sucrase. Furthermore, in Campylobacter-infected monolayers, E. coli were observed to be internalized specifically within epithelial cells displaying M-like cell characteristics. Conclusion These data indicate that C. jejuni may utilize M cells to promote transcytosis of non-invasive bacteria across the intact intestinal epithelial barrier. This mechanism may contribute to the inflammatory immune responses against commensal intestinal bacteria commonly observed in IBD patients.

  5. Developmental changes in intraepithelial T lymphocytes and NK cells in the small intestine of neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Castellote, Cristina; González-Castro, Ana M; Pelegrí, Carme; Castell, Margarida; Franch, Angels

    2005-11-01

    The main objective of this study was to characterize developmental changes in small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) subpopulations during the suckling period, thus contributing to the understanding of the development of diffuse gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) and to the identification of early mechanisms that protect the neonate from the first contact with diet and gut microbial antigens. The study was performed by double labeling and flow cytometry in IEL isolated from the proximal and distal small intestine of 1- to 21-d-old Lewis rats. During the suckling period, intraepithelial natural killer (NK) cells changed from a typical systemic phenotype, CD8+, to a specific intestinal phenotype, CD8-. Analysis of CD8+ IEL revealed a progressive increase in the relative number of CD8+ IEL co-expressing TCRalphabeta, cells associated with acquired immunity, whereas the percentage of CD8+ cells expressing the NK receptor, i.e. cells committed to innate immunity, decreased. At weaning, IEL maturity was still not achieved, as revealed by a phenotypic pattern that differed from that of adult rats. Thus, late after weaning, the regulatory CD8+CD4+ T IEL population appeared and the NK population declined. In summary, the intestinal intraepithelial compartment undergoes changes in its lymphocyte composition associated with the first ingestion of food. These changes are focused on a relatively high proportion of NK cells during the suckling period, and after weaning, an expansion of the regulatory CD8+CD4+ T cells.

  6. Chitosan-modified porous silicon microparticles for enhanced permeability of insulin across intestinal cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Neha; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Araújo, Francisca; Zhang, Hongbo; Mäkilä, Ermei M; Kauppila, Jussi; Sarmento, Bruno; Salonen, Jarno J; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Santos, Hélder A

    2014-08-01

    Porous silicon (PSi) based particulate systems are emerging as an important drug delivery system due to its advantageous properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability and ability to tailor the particles' physicochemical properties. Here, annealed thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (AnnTHCPSi) and undecylenic acid modified AnnTHCPSi (AnnUnTHCPSi) microparticles were developed as a PSi-based platform for oral delivery of insulin. Chitosan (CS) was used to modify the AnnUnTHCPSi microparticles to enhance the intestinal permeation of insulin. Surface modification with CS led to significant increase in the interaction of PSi microparticles with Caco-2/HT-29 cell co-culture monolayers. Compared to pure insulin, the CS-conjugated microparticles significantly improved the permeation of insulin across the Caco-2/HT-29 cell monolayers, with ca. 20-fold increase in the amount of insulin permeated and ca. 7-fold increase in the apparent permeability (P(app)) value. Moreover, among all the investigated particles, the CS-conjugated microparticles also showed the highest amount of insulin associated with the mucus layer and the intestinal Caco-2 cells and mucus secreting HT-29 cells. Our results demonstrate that CS-conjugated AnnUnTHCPSi microparticles can efficiently enhance the insulin absorption across intestinal cells, and thus, they are promising microsystems for the oral delivery of proteins and peptides across the intestinal cell membrane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Bacillus subtilis and yeast cell wall improve the intestinal health of broilers challenged by Clostridium perfringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Wang, W; Lv, Z; Liu, D; Guo, Y

    2017-12-01

    1. The objective was to investigate the effects of Bacillus subtilis, yeast cell wall (YCW) and their combination on intestinal health of broilers challenged by Clostridium perfringens over a 21-d period. 2. Using a 5 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments, 800 1-d-old male Cobb 500 broilers were used to study the effects of feed additives (without additive or with zinc bacitracin, B. subtilis, YCW, and the combination of B. subtilis and YCW), pathogen challenge (without or with Clostridium perfringens challenge), and their interactive effects. 3. C. perfringens infection increased intestinal lesions scores, damaged intestinal histomorphology, increased serum endotoxin concentration, cytokine mRNA expression and intestinal population of C. perfringens and Escherichia coli and decreased ileal bifidobacteria numbers. The 4 additives decreased serum endotoxin. Zinc bacitracin tended to decrease cytokine mRNA expression and the intestinal number of C. perfringens and E. coli. B. subtilis, YCW and their combination increased cytokine mRNA expression. B. subtilis and YCW decreased the number of C. perfringens and E. coli in the ileum, and their combination decreased pathogens numbers in the ileum and caecum. 4. In conclusion, B. subtilis, YCW and their combination improved the intestinal health of NE-infected broilers, and could be potential alternatives to antibiotics.

  8. Primary intestinal T cell lymphomas in Indian patients - In search of enteropathic T cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shet Tanuja

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This series of six intestinal T cell lymphomas (ITCL attempts to document enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma (EATCL in India. Materials and Methods: A total of six ITCL were selected from 170 gastrointestinal lymphomas in last 10 years. Results: The cases studied included EATCL (4, ITCL with a CD4 positive phenotype (1 and ITCL NK/T cell type (1. Of the four EATCL, two occurred in the ileum, one in right colon and one in duodenum. In three EATCL cases, there was history of celiac disease or lactose intolerance and enteropathic changes were noted in the adjacent mucosa. These tumors had CD3+/CD8+/CD56 (+/-/CD4-/ Granzyme B+ immunophenotype. One EATCL was monomorphic small cell type (type II EATCL with a CD3+/CD8-CD56+/CD4-/ Granzyme B+ phenotype. EBER- ISH (Epstein Barr virus coded RNA′s- in situ hybridization revealed positive tumor cells in ITCL NK/T cell type and in bystander cells in three EATCL. Conclusion: ITCL are rare in Indian patients but do occur and comprise a mixture of the enteropathic and non-enteropathic subtypes.

  9. Lactoferrin targets T cells in the small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sanne Mie; Hansen, Gert Helge; Danielsen, E Michael

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lactoferrin (Lf) belongs to the transferrin family of non-heme iron-binding proteins and is found in milk and mucosal secretions. Consequently, it is now considered a multifunctional protein mainly involved in both the innate and adaptive immune defenses of the organism against various...... explants of pig small intestine by immunofluorescence and immunogold microscopy. RESULTS: Lf rapidly bound to the brush border and subsequently appeared in punctae in the apical cytoplasm, indicating internalization into an endosomal compartment. Essentially, no labeling was detected elsewhere...

  10. Paraneoplastic hypereosinophilia in a dog with intestinal T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Veronica; Benetti, Cecilia; Citi, Simona; Taccini, Valentina

    2005-09-01

    A 9-year-old, intact male Doberman Pinscher was examined because of anorexia and weakness. Results of a CBC showed severe, microcytic, hypochromic anemia with mild eosinophilia (2944 cells/microL, reference interval 100-1250/microL) and thrombocytosis. Hypoferremia, hypoferritinemia, and a positive fecal occult blood test supported a diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia secondary to chronic intestinal hemorrhage. Abdominal ultrasound evaluation showed a thickened small intestinal loop, of which representative specimens were obtained during exploratory laparotomy. Histologically, the intestinal wall was infiltrated by a neoplastic population of large, round, lymphoid cells with vesicular chromatin, 1 or more prominent nucleoli, and a high number of mitotic figures. The cells were closely admixed with mature eosinophils, but were negative for metachromatic granules with toluidine blue. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were positive for CD3, and negative for CD21, Pan B, and CD79a. A diagnosis of intestinal T-cell lymphoma was made. Chemotherapy was begun, with 30 mg/m;2 of doxorubicin administered intravenously every 3 weeks. Eosinophil concentration was 880/microL 2 weeks after surgery (on day 15 after presentation) but increased markedly to 62,914/microL on day 30, 62,400/microL on day 37, and 39,444/microL on day 58 after presentation. An association between hypereosinophilia and T-cell lymphoma is well established in human patients, in whom production of IL-5 by neoplastic T cells has been demonstrated. Hypereosinophilia has been reported only rarely with intestinal lymphoma in cats and horses, and with T-cell lymphoma in dogs.

  11. Culturing human intestinal stem cells for regenerative applications in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Fredrik Eo; Seidelin, Jakob B; Yin, Xiaolei

    2017-01-01

    models suggests that intestinal stem cell transplantation could constitute a novel treatment strategy to re-establish mucosal barrier function in patients with severe disease. Intestinal stem cells can be grownin vitroin organoid structures, though only a fraction of the cells contained are stem cells...... with regenerative capabilities. Hence, techniques to enrich stem cell populations are being pursued through the development of multiple two-dimensional and three-dimensional culture protocols, as well as co-culture techniques and multiple growth medium compositions. Moreover, research in support matrices allowing...... for efficient clinical application is in progress.In vitroculture is accomplished by modulating the signaling pathways fundamental for the stem cell niche with a suitable culture matrix to provide additional contact-dependent stimuli and structural support. The aim of this review was to discuss medium...

  12. Development of microfluidic cell culture devices towards an in vitro human intestinal barrier model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Hsih-Yin

    to enable real-time detection of cell responses, adjustment of cellular stimulation etc. leading to establishment of conditional experiments. In this project, microfluidic systems engineering was leveraged to develop an eight chamber multi-layer microchip for intestinal barrier studies. Sandwiched between...... the layers was a modified Teflon porous membrane for cell culture. The novelty lies in modifying the surface of the porous Teflon support membrane using thiol-ene ‘click’ chemistry, thus allowing the modified Teflon membrane to be bonded between the chip layers to form an enclosed microchip. Successful...... application of the multi-layer microchip was demonstrated by integrating the microchip to an existing cell culture fluidic system to culture the human intestinal epithelial cells, Caco-2, for long term studies. Under the continuous low flow conditions, the cells differentiated into columnar cells displaying...

  13. Protective effect of NSA on intestinal epithelial cells in a necroptosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wei; Zhang, Min; Zhu, Yaxi; Chen, Yuanhan; Zhao, Xingchen; Li, Ruizhao; Zhang, Li; Ye, Zhiming; Liang, Xingling

    2017-10-17

    This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of the necroptosis inhibitor necrosulfonamide (NSA) on intestinal epithelial cells using a novel in vitro necroptosis model that mimics inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) was perfused into the rectum of BALB/c mice to established a colitis model. Pathologic injury and cell death were evaluated. A novel in vitro model of necroptosis was established in Caco-2 cells using TNF- α and Z-VAD-fmk, and the cells were treated with or without NSA. Morphologic changes, manner of cell death and the levels of phosphorylation of receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (p-RIPK3) and mixed-lineage kinase domain-like (p-MLKL) were detected. In the TNBS-induced colitis in mice, TUNEL-positive and caspase-3-negative cells were observed in the intestinal mucosa, and p-RIPK3 was found to be elevated. Under the stimulation of TNF- α and Z-VAD-fmk, the morphologic damage in the Caco-2 cells was aggravated, the proportion of necrosis was increased, and the level of p-RIPK3 and p-MLKL were increased, confirming that the regulated cell death was necroptosis. NSA reversed the morphological abnormalities and reduced necrotic cell death induced by TNF- α and Z-VAD-fmk. NSA can inhibit necroptosis in intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and might confer a potential protective effect against IBD.

  14. Translocation of differently sized and charged polystyrene nanoparticles in in vitro intestinal cell models of increasing complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walczak, A.P.; Kramer, E.; Hendriksen, P.J.M.; Tromp, P.; Helsper, J.P.F.G.; Zande, M. van der; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Bouwmeester, H.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal translocation is a key factor for determining bioavailability of nanoparticles (NPs) after oral uptake. Therefore, we evaluated three in vitro intestinal cell models of increasing complexity which might affect the translocation of NPs: a mono-culture (Caco-2 cells), a co-culture with

  15. Microbiota promote secretory cell determination in the intestinal epithelium by modulating host Notch signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troll, Joshua V; Hamilton, M Kristina; Abel, Melissa L; Ganz, Julia; Bates, Jennifer M; Stephens, W Zac; Melancon, Ellie; van der Vaart, Michiel; Meijer, Annemarie H; Distel, Martin; Eisen, Judith S; Guillemin, Karen

    2018-02-23

    Resident microbes promote many aspects of host development, although the mechanisms by which microbiota influence host tissues remain unclear. We showed previously that the microbiota is required for allocation of appropriate numbers of secretory cells in the zebrafish intestinal epithelium. Because Notch signaling is crucial for secretory fate determination, we conducted epistasis experiments to establish whether the microbiota modulates host Notch signaling. We also investigated whether innate immune signaling transduces microbiota cues via the Myd88 adaptor protein. We provide the first evidence that microbiota-induced, Myd88-dependent signaling inhibits host Notch signaling in the intestinal epithelium, thereby promoting secretory cell fate determination. These results connect microbiota activity via innate immune signaling to the Notch pathway, which also plays crucial roles in intestinal homeostasis throughout life and when impaired can result in chronic inflammation and cancer. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Porcine intestinal mast cells. Evaluation of different fixatives for histochemical staining techniques considering tissue shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rieger

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Staining of mast cells (MCs, including porcine ones, is critically dependent upon the fixation and staining technique. In the pig, mucosal and submucosal MCs do not stain or stain only faintly after formalin fixation. Some fixation methods are particularly recommended for MC staining, for example the fixation with Carnoy or lead salts. Zinc salt fixation (ZSF has been reported to work excellently for the preservation of fixation-sensitive antigens. The aim of this study was to establish a reliable histological method for counting of MCs in the porcine intestinum. For this purpose, different tissue fixation and staining methods that also allow potential subsequent immunohistochemical investigations were evaluated in the porcine mucosa, as well as submucosa of small and large intestine. Tissues were fixed in Carnoy, lead acetate, lead nitrate, Zamboni and ZSF and stained subsequently with either polychromatic methylene blue, alcian blue or toluidine blue. For the first time our study reveals that ZSF, a heavy metal fixative, preserves metachromatic staining of porcine MCs. Zamboni fixation was not suitable for histochemical visualization of MCs in the pig intestine. All other tested fixatives were suitable. Alcian blue and toluidine blue co-stained intestinal goblet cells which made a prima facie identification of MCs difficult. The polychromatic methylene blue proved to be the optimal staining. In order to compare MC counting results of the different fixation methods, tissue shrinkage was taken into account. As even the same fixation caused shrinkage-differences between tissue from small and large intestine, different factors for each single fixation and intestinal localization had to be calculated. Tissue shrinkage varied between 19% and 57%, the highest tissue shrinkage was found after fixation with ZSF in the large intestine, the lowest one in the small intestine after lead acetate fixation. Our study emphasizes that MC counting results from

  17. Interstitial cells of Cajal in the striated musculature of the mouse esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; de Kerchove d'Exaerde, A; Mignon, S

    2001-01-01

    . Sections and whole-mounts were studied by immunohistochemistry. KitW-lacZ transgenic mice, which carry the lacZ reporter gene inserted in place of the first exon of the Kit gene, were processed for Xgal histochemistry, for quantitative analysis and for ultrastructural studies. Spindle-shaped ICC were...... scarce in both muscle layers of the thoracic esophagus, while their number increased steeply toward the cardia in the striated portion of the intraabdominal esophagus. They did not form networks and had no relationship with intrinsic myenteric ganglia and motor end-plates. They were often close to nerve...... between striated muscle cells in the mouse esophagus. They are close to nerves with defined neurochemical coding and could possibly represent specialized esophageal spindle proprioceptors....

  18. Deoxynivalenol affects in vitro intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity through inhibition of protein synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van De Walle, Jacqueline; Sergent, Therese; Piront, Neil; Toussaint, Olivier; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Larondelle, Yvan

    2010-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common mycotoxin contaminants of raw and processed cereal food, adversely affects the gastrointestinal tract. Since DON acts as a protein synthesis inhibitor, the constantly renewing intestinal epithelium could be particularly sensitive to DON. We analyzed the toxicological effects of DON on intestinal epithelial protein synthesis and barrier integrity. Differentiated Caco-2 cells, as a widely used model of the human intestinal barrier, were exposed to realistic intestinal concentrations of DON (50, 500 and 5000 ng/ml) during 24 h. DON caused a concentration-dependent decrease in total protein content associated with a reduction in the incorporation of [ 3 H]-leucine, demonstrating its inhibitory effect on protein synthesis. DON simultaneously increased the paracellular permeability of the monolayer as reflected through a decreased transepithelial electrical resistance associated with an increased paracellular flux of the tracer [ 3 H]-mannitol. A concentration-dependent reduction in the expression level of the tight junction constituent claudin-4 was demonstrated by Western blot, which was not due to diminished transcription, increased degradation, or NF-κB, ERK or JNK activation, and was also observed for a tight junction independent protein, i.e. intestinal alkaline phosphatase. These results demonstrate a dual toxicological effect of DON on differentiated Caco-2 cells consisting in an inhibition of protein synthesis as well as an increase in monolayer permeability, and moreover suggest a possible link between them through diminished synthesis of the tight junction constituent claudin-4.

  19. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii (Seed of Burdock) Reinforces Intestinal Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee Soon; Jung, Sun Young; Back, Su Yeon; Do, Jeong-Ryong; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Fructus Arctii is used as a traditional herbal medicine to treat inflammatory diseases in oriental countries. This study aimed to investigate effect of F. Arctii extract on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and to reveal the active component of F. Arctii. We measured transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) value (as an index of barrier function) and ovalbumin (OVA) permeation (as an index of permeability) to observe the changes of intestinal barrier function. The treatment of F. Arctii increased TEER value and decreased OVA influx on Caco-2 cell monolayers. Furthermore, we found that arctigenin as an active component of F. Arctii increased TEER value and reduced permeability of OVA from apical to the basolateral side but not arctiin. In the present study, we revealed that F. Arctii could enhance intestinal barrier function, and its active component was an arctigenin on the functionality. We expect that the arctigenin from F. Arctii could contribute to prevention of inflammatory, allergic, and infectious diseases by reinforcing intestinal barrier function. PMID:26550018

  20. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii (Seed of Burdock Reinforces Intestinal Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Soon Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fructus Arctii is used as a traditional herbal medicine to treat inflammatory diseases in oriental countries. This study aimed to investigate effect of F. Arctii extract on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and to reveal the active component of F. Arctii. We measured transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER value (as an index of barrier function and ovalbumin (OVA permeation (as an index of permeability to observe the changes of intestinal barrier function. The treatment of F. Arctii increased TEER value and decreased OVA influx on Caco-2 cell monolayers. Furthermore, we found that arctigenin as an active component of F. Arctii increased TEER value and reduced permeability of OVA from apical to the basolateral side but not arctiin. In the present study, we revealed that F. Arctii could enhance intestinal barrier function, and its active component was an arctigenin on the functionality. We expect that the arctigenin from F. Arctii could contribute to prevention of inflammatory, allergic, and infectious diseases by reinforcing intestinal barrier function.

  1. A Unique Cause of Intestinal and Splenic Infarction in a Sickle Cell Trait Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Asfaw, Sofya H.; Falk, Gavin A.; Morris-Stiff, Gareth; Tuthill, Ralph J.; Moorman, Matthew L.; Samotowka, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Sickle-cell trait is a common genetic abnormality in the African American population. A sickle-cell crisis in a patient with sickle-cell trait is uncommon at best. Abdominal painful crises are typical of patients with sickle cell anemia. The treatment for an abdominal painful crisis is usually medical and rarely surgical. We present the case of a cocaine-induced sickle-cell crisis in a sickle-cell trait patient that resulted in splenic, intestinal, and cerebral infarctions and multisystem org...

  2. Neurotrophin 3 upregulates proliferation and collagen production in human aortic valve interstitial cells: a potential role in aortic valve sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qingzhou; Song, Rui; Ao, Lihua; Cleveland, Joseph C; Fullerton, David A; Meng, Xianzhong

    2017-06-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a leading cardiovascular disorder in the elderly. Diseased aortic valves are characterized by sclerosis (fibrosis) and nodular calcification. Sclerosis, an early pathological change, is caused by aortic valve interstitial cell (AVIC) proliferation and overproduction of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. However, the mechanism of aortic valve sclerosis remains unclear. Recently, we observed that diseased human aortic valves overexpress growth factor neurotrophin 3 (NT3). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that NT3 is a profibrogenic factor to human AVICs. AVICs isolated from normal human aortic valves were cultured in M199 growth medium and treated with recombinant human NT3 (0.10 µg/ml). An exposure to NT3 induced AVIC proliferation, upregulated the production of collagen and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), and augmented collagen deposition. These changes were abolished by inhibition of the Trk receptors. NT3 induced Akt phosphorylation and increased cyclin D1 protein levels in a Trk receptor-dependent fashion. Inhibition of Akt abrogated the effect of NT3 on cyclin D1 production. Furthermore, inhibition of either Akt or cyclin D1 suppressed NT3-induced cellular proliferation and MMP-9 and collagen production, as well as collagen deposition. Thus, NT3 upregulates cellular proliferation, ECM protein production, and collagen deposition in human AVICs. It exerts these effects through the Trk-Akt-cyclin D1 cascade. NT3 is a profibrogenic mediator in human aortic valve, and overproduction of NT3 by aortic valve tissue may contribute to the mechanism of valvular sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Function and expression differences between ergot and non-ergot dopamine D2 agonists on heart valve interstitial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oana, Fumiki; Onozuka, Hiroshi; Tsuchioka, Akihiro; Suzuki, Takayuki; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Kaidoh, Kouichi; Hoyano, Yuji; Hiratochi, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Shinji; Takehana, Yasuo; Shibata, Nobuo

    2014-03-01

    The symptoms of Parkinson's disease are alleviated by dopamine D2 agonists, which are classified as ergot dopamine D2 agonists and non-ergot D2 agonists. Among the former, pergolide has been associated with valvular heart disease, since it has both potent D2 receptor and serotonin 5-HT(2B) receptor agonistic properties. Among the latter, pramipexole has few incidences of heart valve disease onset, since it has an absence of 5-HT(2B) receptor agonism. A [3H]thymidine incorporation assay was performed to monitor function, and microarray global analysis to monitor gene expression, on porcine heart valve interstitial cells (VICs) treated with pergolide or pramipexole. The 5-HT(2B) receptor was abundantly expressed in porcine VICs. The 5-HT(2B) receptor agonist pergolide induced an increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation, accompanied by a decrease in 5-HT(2B) receptor mRNA expression. [3H]thymidine incorporation was blocked by lisuride, a 5-HT(2B) receptor antagonist, and also by LY-294002, a specific inhibitor of PI3K and Akt. Moreover, type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase (Dio2) expression in porcine VICs treated with pergolide was shown, by a global analysis of mRNA, to be markedly increased compared to that induced by pramipexole. Such changes in VICs may correlate with the mechanism of heart valve disease pathogenesis. There were substantial differences (increased [3H]thymidine incorporation, and Dio2 expression) between pergolide and pramipexole, which might correlate with the mechanism of heart valve disease onset.

  4. Effects of aqueous extracts of "Betel quid" and its constituents on testosterone production by dispersed mouse interstitial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nai-Yen Jack; Kaphle, Krishna; Wang, Pei-Hwa; Jong, De-Shien; Wu, Leang-Shin; Lin, Jen-Hsou

    2004-01-01

    Betel quid (BQ) is a favorite chewing item among many communities in different parts of Asia where it is popular by different names. BQ is a unique combination of nut or fruit from the Areca catechu Linn. (AN) tree, leaf from the Piper betle Linn. (BL) vine, slaked lime, paste of bark from the Acacia catechu tree and other spices. AN has been used successfully in various traditional medicines by different civilizations over several ages. Initially condemned by the medical communities for its health hazards, identification and application of potent pharmacologically bioactive compounds from different constituents of BQ have rekindled growing interest in related investigations. Curious about the stimulating role of BQ, we investigated the potential steroidogenic activity of hot water extract from BQ and its constituents and arecoline on testosterone producing ability in an in vitro experiment. Enzyme dissociated interstitial cells from adult mouse testes (ICR strain) were cultured with/without different doses of the extracts and the level of testosterone produced was assayed by an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) technique. It was found that at lower doses of arecoline, AN and BL extracts had significantly stimulated testosterone production over the basal level (p effect on testosterone production. Combinations of arecoline at low doses with 10 ng/ml ovine leutinizing hormone (oLH) showed increases in testosterone produced, while cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) co-culture showed dose-related inhibition. Our current finding hints at the possible dose-dependent dualistic role of AN and BL extracts and arecoline for testosterone production employing possible non-cAMP-dependent pathway of steroidogenesis. However, the identity of the active compounds besides arecoline and the exact mechanism involved remains to be further investigated.

  5. IKKα Promotes Intestinal Tumorigenesis by Limiting Recruitment of M1-like Polarized Myeloid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan I. Göktuna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The recruitment of immune cells into solid tumors is an essential prerequisite of tumor development. Depending on the prevailing polarization profile of these infiltrating leucocytes, tumorigenesis is either promoted or blocked. Here, we identify IκB kinase α (IKKα as a central regulator of a tumoricidal microenvironment during intestinal carcinogenesis. Mice deficient in IKKα kinase activity are largely protected from intestinal tumor development that is dependent on the enhanced recruitment of interferon γ (IFNγ-expressing M1-like myeloid cells. In IKKα mutant mice, M1-like polarization is not controlled in a cell-autonomous manner but, rather, depends on the interplay of both IKKα mutant tumor epithelia and immune cells. Because therapies aiming at the tumor microenvironment rather than directly at the mutated cancer cell may circumvent resistance development, we suggest IKKα as a promising target for colorectal cancer (CRC therapy.

  6. Gut-associated lymphoid tissue, T cell trafficking, and chronic intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koboziev, Iurii; Karlsson, Fridrik; Grisham, Matthew B

    2010-10-01

    The etiologies of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD; Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis) have not been fully elucidated. However, there is very good evidence implicating T cell and T cell trafficking to the gut and its associated lymphoid tissue as important components in disease pathogenesis. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the mechanisms involved in naive and effector T cell trafficking to the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT; Peyer's patches, isolated lymphoid follicles), mesenteric lymph nodes and intestine in response to commensal enteric antigens under physiological conditions as well as during the induction of chronic gut inflammation. In addition, recent data suggests that the GALT may not be required for enteric antigen-driven intestinal inflammation in certain mouse models of IBD. These new data suggest a possible paradigm shift in our understanding of how and where naive T cells become activated to yield disease-producing effector cells. © 2010 New York Academy of Sciences.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived inflammatory fibroblasts mediate interstitial fibrosis in the aging heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trial, JoAnn; Entman, Mark L; Cieslik, Katarzyna A

    2016-02-01

    Pathologic fibrosis in the aging mouse heart is associated with dysregulated resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) arising from reduced stemness and aberrant differentiation into dysfunctional inflammatory fibroblasts. Fibroblasts derived from aging MSC secrete higher levels of 1) collagen type 1 (Col1) that directly contributes to fibrosis, 2) monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) that attracts leukocytes from the blood and 3) interleukin-6 (IL-6) that facilitates transition of monocytes into myeloid fibroblasts. The transcriptional activation of these proteins is controlled via the farnesyltransferase (FTase)-Ras-Erk pathway. The intrinsic change in the MSC phenotype acquired by advanced age is specific for the heart since MSC originating from bone wall (BW-MSC) or fibroblasts derived from them were free of these defects. The potential therapeutic interventions other than clinically approved strategies based on findings presented in this review are discussed as well. This article is a part of a Special Issue entitled "Fibrosis and Myocardial Remodeling". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Probing the mystery of Chinese medicine meridian channels with special emphasis on the connective tissue interstitial fluid system, mechanotransduction, cells durotaxis and mast cell degranulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fung Peter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article hypothesizes that the Chinese medicine meridian system is a special channel network comprising of skin with abundant nerves and nociceptive receptors of various types, and deeper connective tissues inside the body with the flowing interstitial fluid system. These meridian channels provide efficient migratory tracks mainly due to durotaxis (also including chemotaxis for mast cells, fibroblasts and other cells to migrate and carry out a number of physiological functions. Acupuncture acting on meridian channel causes cytoskeletal remodeling through mechanotransduction, leading to regulation of gene expression and the subsequent production of related proteins. Also, stimulation on cell surface can trigger Ca2+ activities, resulting in a cascade of intra- and inter-cellular signaling. Moreover, nerve endings in the meridian channels interact with mast cells and induce the degranulation of these cells, leading to the release of many specific biomolecules needed for homeostasis, immune surveillance, wound healing and tissue repair. Acupoint along a meridian channel is a functional site to trigger the above functions with specificity and high efficiency.

  9. Radiosensitivity of mice of different lines and age as determinated with reference to ''intestinal'' death and DNA repair in intestinal epithelium cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konoplyannikova, O.A.; Sklobovskaya, M.V.; Konoplyannikov, A.G.; Saenko, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made of the influence of strain- and age-related differences on mouse mortality after irradiation with doses lying within the ''intest+nal'' dose range, and also damages to stem cells of intestinal epithelium and induction and repair of single-strand DNA breaks in intestinal epitherium cells. Mice of different lines and age vary in LDsub(50/4) and stem cell radiosensitivity. There are no differences in the sedimentation constants of DNA fragments in alkaline lysates of intestinal crypts of intact mice of different age. Radiosensitivity determined with reference to single-strand breaks induction in DNA is similar with different mo use groups. Repair of single-strand DNA breaks of eldery mice is slower than that of young animals

  10. Biogenic amines as regulators of the proliferative activity of normal and neoplastic intestinal epithelial cells (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1987-01-01

    The role of extracellular amines such as noradrenaline and serotonin and their interaction with cyclic nucleotides and intracellular polyamines in the regulation of intestinal epithelial cell proliferation is reviewed with particular reference to the differences between normal and neoplastic cells. In respect to the normal epithelium of the small intestine there is a strong case to support the notion that cell proliferation is controlled by, amongst other things, sympathetic nerves. In colonic carcinomas, antagonists for certain serotonin receptors, for histamine H2 receptors and for dopamine D2 receptors inhibit both cell division and tumour growth. Because of the reproducible variations between tumour lines in the response to these antagonists, this inhibition appears to be due to a direct effect on the tumour cells rather than an indirect effect via the tumour host or stroma. This conclusion is supported by the cytocidal effects of toxic congeners of serotonin on the tumour cells. The most salient difference between the amine responses of normal and neoplastic cells relates to the issue of amine uptake. Proliferation of crypt cells is promoted by amine uptake inhibitors, presumably because they block amine re-uptake by the amine secreting cells--sympathetic neurones and enteroendocrine cells. However, tumour cell proliferation is strongly inhibited by amine uptake inhibitors, suggesting that neoplastic cells can, and need to take up the amine before being stimulated by it. Recent revelations in the field of oncogenes also support an important association between amines, cyclic nucleotides and cell division. The ras oncogenes code for a protein that is a member of a family of molecules which relay information from extracellular regulators, such as biogenic amines, to the intracellular regulators, including cyclic nucleotides. Evidence is presented suggesting that enteroendocrine cells, enterocytes, carcinoid tumour cells and adenocarcinoma cells all have the same

  11. The alteration in intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A and its secreting cells during ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-qun SUN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the change in intestinal secretion immunoglobulin A (sIgA level and IgA-secreting cells during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. Methods Forty-eight BALB/c mice were randomly divided into 6 experimental groups in accordance with different reperfusion times (R2h, R6h, R12h, R24h, and R72h group, and one sham group (n=8. Bacterial translocation to distant organs (lung, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes was observed. The sIgA level of the intestinal tract was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The B cell subgroup in the lymphocytes related to the intestinal tract was measured by flow cytometry. Results The bacterial translocation occurred during I/R injury, and the intestinal sIgA level decreased, and they showed an obvious negative correlation (r2=0.729. With the increase in intestinal I/R injury, the ratio of IgM+B220+ cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue increased, whereas the proportion of IgA+B220+ cells decreased. The most significant change was found in R12h group (P < 0.01. Conclusions The proportion of IgM+ B cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue increased, whereas that of IgA+ B cells reduced during I/R injury. These phenomena may cause sIgA level to reduce and bacterial translocation of the distant organs to occur.

  12. Cell lineage identification and stem cell culture in a porcine model for the study of intestinal epithelial regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liara M Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Significant advances in intestinal stem cell biology have been made in murine models; however, anatomical and physiological differences between mice and humans limit mice as a translational model for stem cell based research. The pig has been an effective translational model, and represents a candidate species to study intestinal epithelial stem cell (IESC driven regeneration. The lack of validated reagents and epithelial culture methods is an obstacle to investigating IESC driven regeneration in a pig model. In this study, antibodies against Epithelial Adhesion Molecule 1 (EpCAM and Villin marked cells of epithelial origin. Antibodies against Proliferative Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA, Minichromosome Maintenance Complex 2 (MCM2, Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU and phosphorylated Histone H3 (pH3 distinguished proliferating cells at various stages of the cell cycle. SOX9, localized to the stem/progenitor cells zone, while HOPX was restricted to the +4/'reserve' stem cell zone. Immunostaining also identified major differentiated lineages. Goblet cells were identified by Mucin 2 (MUC2; enteroendocrine cells by Chromogranin A (CGA, Gastrin and Somatostatin; and absorptive enterocytes by carbonic anhydrase II (CAII and sucrase isomaltase (SIM. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated morphologic and sub-cellular characteristics of stem cell and differentiated intestinal epithelial cell types. Quantitative PCR gene expression analysis enabled identification of stem/progenitor cells, post mitotic cell lineages, and important growth and differentiation pathways. Additionally, a method for long-term culture of porcine crypts was developed. Biomarker characterization and development of IESC culture in the porcine model represents a foundation for translational studies of IESC-driven regeneration of the intestinal epithelium in physiology and disease.

  13. Distribution and characterisation of CCK containing enteroendocrine cells of the mouse small and large intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fakhry, Josiane; Wang, Joyce; Martins, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    but positive cells were rare in the rectum. Immunoreactive EEC were as common in the caecum and proximal colon as they were in the duodenum and jejunum. CCK gene transcripts were found in the mucosa throughout the intestine but mRNA for gastrin, a hormone that can bind some anti-CCK antibodies, was only found...

  14. Impact of thymectomy and antilymphocytic serum on stem cells of the intestinal epithelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparovich, G.G.; Trufakin, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    The population of stem cells of the intestinal epithelium was studied under conditions of the disturbed balance in the immune system on F 1 (CBAxC57B1) mice. It has been shown that thymectomy in adult mice does not influence the stem region of the intestinal epithelium at early time of observation but causes a tendency to the changed number of epithelial stem cells in 4-6 months. Administration of specific sera against T-, B- and mixed lymphoid populations on the 1st day of observation produces an ambi us effect on the stem region and results in an increase of the number of epithelial stem cells on the 5th day. After administration of the antilymphocytic serum there have been determined morphological changes in the population of mature erythrocytes and undulatory fluctuations in the number of mitotic cells of the intestinal epithelium. These data suggest functional correlation of the intestinal epithelium and the state of the immunocompetent tissue [ru

  15. Characterizing microbiota-independent effects of oligosaccharides on intestinal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari, Peyman; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna; Willems, Rianne H.A.M.; Difilippo, Elisabetta; Schols, Henk A.; Schoterman, Margriet H.C.; Garssen, Johan; Braber, Saskia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The direct effects of galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), including Vivinal® GOS syrup (VGOS) and purified Vivinal® GOS (PGOS), on the epithelial integrity and corresponding interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8) release were examined in a Caco-2 cell model for intestinal barrier dysfunction. To

  16. Intestinal handling-induced mast cell activation and inflammation in human postoperative ileus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    The, F. O.; Bennink, R. J.; Ankum, W. M.; Buist, M. R.; Busch, O. R. C.; Gouma, D. J.; van der Heide, S.; van den Wijngaard, R. M.; de Jonge, W. J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Murine postoperative ileus results from intestinal inflammation triggered by manipulation-induced mast cell activation. As its extent depends on the degree of handling and subsequent inflammation, it is hypothesised that the faster recovery after minimal invasive surgery results from

  17. Intestinal handling-induced mast cell activation and inflammation in human postoperative ileus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    The, F. O.; Bennink, R. J.; Ankum, W. M.; Buist, M. R.; Busch, O. R. C.; Gouma, D. J.; Van der Heide, S.; van den Wijngaard, R. M.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.; de Jonge, Wouter J.

    Background: Murine postoperative ileus results from intestinal inflammation triggered by manipulation-induced mast cell activation. As its extent depends on the degree of handling and subsequent inflammation, it is hypothesised that the faster recovery after minimal invasive surgery results from

  18. Poliovirus mutants excreted by a chronically infected hypogammaglobulinemic patient establish persistent infections in human intestinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labadie, Karine; Pelletier, Isabelle; Saulnier, Aure; Martin, Javier; Colbere-Garapin, Florence

    2004-01-01

    Immunodeficient patients whose gut is chronically infected by vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) may excrete large amounts of virus for years. To investigate how poliovirus (PV) establishes chronic infections in the gut, we tested whether it is possible to establish persistent VDPV infections in human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Four type 3 VDPV mutants, representative of the viral evolution in the gut of a hypogammaglobulinemic patient over almost 2 years [J. Virol. 74 (2000) 3001], were used to infect both undifferentiated, dividing cells, and differentiated, polarized enterocytes. A VDPV mutant excreted 36 days postvaccination by the patient was lytic in both types of intestinal cell cultures, like the parental Sabin 3 (S3) strain. In contrast, three VDPVs excreted 136, 442, and 637 days postvaccination, established persistent infections both in undifferentiated cells and in enterocytes. Thus, viral determinants selected between day 36 and 136 conferred on VDPV mutants the capacity to infect intestinal cells persistently. The percentage of persistently VDPV-infected cultures was higher in enterocytes than in undifferentiated cells, implicating cellular determinants involved in the differentiation of enterocytes in persistent VDPV infections. The establishment of persistent infections in enterocytes was not due to poor replication of VDPVs in these cells, but was associated with reduced viral adsorption to the cell surface

  19. Genome-wide RNAi Screen Identifies Networks Involved in Intestinal Stem Cell Regulation in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiankun Zeng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium is the most rapidly self-renewing tissue in adult animals and maintained by intestinal stem cells (ISCs in both Drosophila and mammals. To comprehensively identify genes and pathways that regulate ISC fates, we performed a genome-wide transgenic RNAi screen in adult Drosophila intestine and identified 405 genes that regulate ISC maintenance and lineage-specific differentiation. By integrating these genes into publicly available interaction databases, we further developed functional networks that regulate ISC self-renewal, ISC proliferation, ISC maintenance of diploid status, ISC survival, ISC-to-enterocyte (EC lineage differentiation, and ISC-to-enteroendocrine (EE lineage differentiation. By comparing regulators among ISCs, female germline stem cells, and neural stem cells, we found that factors related to basic stem cell cellular processes are commonly required in all stem cells, and stem-cell-specific, niche-related signals are required only in the unique stem cell type. Our findings provide valuable insights into stem cell maintenance and lineage-specific differentiation.

  20. Stem Cells in the Intestine: Possible Roles in Pathogenesis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanasirintrawoot, Sutheera; Israsena, Nipan

    2016-07-30

    Irritable bowel syndrome is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders that significantly impair quality of life in patients. Current available treatments are still not effective and the pathophysiology of this condition remains unclearly defined. Recently, research on intestinal stem cells has greatly advanced our understanding of various GI disorders. Alterations in conserved stem cell regulatory pathways such as Notch, Wnt, and bone morphogenic protein/TGF- β have been well documented in diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Interaction between intestinal stem cells and various signals from their environment is important for the control of stem cell self-renewal, regulation of number and function of specific intestinal cell types, and maintenance of the mucosal barrier. Besides their roles in stem cell regulation, these signals are also known to have potent effects on immune cells, enteric nervous system and secretory cells in the gut, and may be responsible for various aspects of pathogenesis of functional GI disorders, including visceral hypersensitivity, altered gut motility and low grade gut inflammation. In this article, we briefly summarize the components of these signaling pathways, how they can be modified by extrinsic factors and novel treatments, and provide evidenced support of their roles in the inflammation processes. Furthermore, we propose how changes in these signals may contribute to the symptom development and pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome.

  1. Inflammation induced by mast cell deficiency rather than the loss of interstitial cells of Cajal causes smooth muscle dysfunction in W/Wv mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, John H.; Chen, Jinghong; Shi, Xuan-Zheng; Sarna, Sushil K.

    2014-01-01

    The initial hypothesis suggested that the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) played an essential role in mediating enteric neuronal input to smooth muscle cells. Much information for this hypothesis came from studies in W/Wv mice lacking ICC. However, mast cells, which play critical roles in regulating inflammation in their microenvironment, are also absent in W/Wv mice. We tested the hypothesis that the depletion of mast cells in W/Wv mice generates inflammation in fundus muscularis externa (ME) that impairs smooth muscle reactivity to Ach, independent of the depletion of ICC. We performed experiments on the fundus ME from wild type (WT) and W/Wv mice before and after reconstitution of mast cells by bone marrow transplant. We found that mast cell deficiency in W/Wv mice significantly increased COX-2 and iNOS expression and decreased smooth muscle reactivity to Ach. Mast cell reconstitution or concurrent blockade of COX-2 and iNOS restored smooth muscle contractility without affecting the suppression of c-kit in W/Wv mice. The expression of nNOS and ChAT were suppressed in W/Wv mice; mast cell reconstitution did not restore them. We conclude that innate inflammation induced by mast cell deficiency in W/Wv mice impairs smooth muscle contractility independent of ICC deficiency. The impairment of smooth muscle contractility and the suppression of the enzymes regulating the synthesis of Ach and NO in W/Wv mice need to be considered in evaluating the role of ICC in regulating smooth muscle and enteric neuronal function in W/Wv mice. PMID:24550836

  2. Rorγt+ innate lymphoid cells in intestinal homeostasis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio-Domingo, Patricia; Cupedo, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) combine innate and adaptive immune functions and are part of the first line of defense against mucosal infections. ILC are set apart from adaptive lymphocytes by their independence on RAG genes and the resulting absence of specific antigen receptors. In this review, we will discuss the biology and function of intestinal ILC that express the nuclear hormone receptor Rorγt (encoded by the Rorc gene) and highlight their role in intestinal homeostasis and immunity. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Quantitative rather than qualitative differences in gene expression predominate in intestinal cell maturation along distinct cell lineages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velcich, Anna; Corner, Georgia; Paul, Doru; Zhuang Min; Mariadason, John M.; Laboisse, Christian; Augenlicht, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    Several cell types are present in the intestinal epithelium that likely arise from a common precursor, the stem cell, and each mature cell type expresses a unique set of genes that characterizes its functional phenotype. Although the process of differentiation is intimately linked to the cessation of proliferation, the mechanisms that dictate intestinal cell fate determination are not well characterized. To investigate the reprogramming of gene expression during the cell lineage allocation/differentiation process, we took advantage of a unique system of two clonal derivatives of HT29 cells, Cl16E and Cl19A cells, which spontaneously differentiate as mucus producing goblet and chloride-secreting cells, respectively, as a function of time. By profiling gene expression, we found that these two cell lines show remarkably similar kinetics of change in gene expression and common clusters of coordinately regulated genes. This demonstrates that lineage-specific differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells is characterized overall by the sequential recruitment of functionally similar gene sets independent of the final phenotype of the mature cells

  4. The crypt and cell size kinetics in the irradiated intestinal epithelium in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kononenko, A.M.; Gagarin, A.U.

    1975-01-01

    A study has been made of changes in the average values of the axial cross-sectional area of the crypt and of cell area in this cross-section for eight days after a single whole-body exposure of male mice to 400 rad of X-rays. A small reduction in the crypt area in the destructive period gives way to a much greater increase in the normal dimensions of the area in the regenerative period. Two very considerable waves of anomalous increase are observed in the dimensions of the cryptal cell cross-sections, the first in the destructive and the second in the regenerative period. These fluctuations in cell dimensions do not occur around but above the control level, attaining the latter level only at the minimum (4th day). The size of the cryptal cells of the intact intestinal epithelium is evidently close to the minimum needed for enterocyte proliferation. The considerable increase in crypt dimensions in the regenerative period (beginning from the 6th day) is not due to the larger number of cells (they are even somewhat fewer than normal) but rather to a substantial increase in cell dimensions. Thus, according to these data, on the 6th-8th day after irradiation the intestinal epithelium deviates strongly from the stationary state. The index I sub(v), where I is the mitotic index and v the cell volume, was used to evaluate the changes in the value of the material stream, connected with proliferation, to the intestinal epithelium per cryptal cell. A considerable increase was found in this stream (hypertrophy of proliferative cells) in the intestinal epithelium restored after irradiation. (author)

  5. The Xenobiotic Transporter Mdr1 Enforces T Cell Homeostasis in the Presence of Intestinal Bile Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Kayama, Hisako; Chen, Mei Lan; Delmas, Amber; Sun, Amy; Kim, Sang Yong; Rangarajan, Erumbi S; McKevitt, Kelly; Beck, Amanda P; Jackson, Cody B; Crynen, Gogce; Oikonomopoulos, Angelos; Lacey, Precious N; Martinez, Gustavo J; Izard, Tina; Lorenz, Robin G; Rodriguez-Palacios, Alex; Cominelli, Fabio; Abreu, Maria T; Hommes, Daniel W; Koralov, Sergei B; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Sundrud, Mark S

    2017-12-19

    CD4 + T cells are tightly regulated by microbiota in the intestine, but whether intestinalcells interface with host-derived metabolites is less clear. Here, we show that CD4 + T effector (Teff) cells upregulated the xenobiotic transporter, Mdr1, in the ileum to maintain homeostasis in the presence of bile acids. Whereas wild-type Teff cells upregulated Mdr1 in the ileum, those lacking Mdr1 displayed mucosal dysfunction and induced Crohn's disease-like ileitis following transfer into Rag1 -/- hosts. Mdr1 mitigated oxidative stress and enforced homeostasis in Teff cells exposed to conjugated bile acids (CBAs), a class of liver-derived emulsifying agents that actively circulate through the ileal mucosa. Blocking ileal CBA reabsorption in transferred Rag1 -/- mice restored Mdr1-deficient Teff cell homeostasis and attenuated ileitis. Further, a subset of ileal Crohn's disease patients displayed MDR1 loss of function. Together, these results suggest that coordinated interaction between mucosal Teff cells and CBAs in the ileum regulate intestinal immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimization of micro-fabricated porous membranes for intestinal epithelial cell culture and in vitro modeling of the human intestinal barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair Gourikutty Sajay, Bhuvanendran; Yin, Chiam Su; Ramadan, Qasem

    2017-12-01

    In vitro modeling of organs could provide a controlled platform for studying physiological events and has great potential in the field of pharmaceutical development. Here, we describe the characterization of in vitro modeling of the human intestinal barrier mimicked using silicon porous membranes as a substrate. To mimic an intestinal in vivo setup as closely as possible, a porous substrate is required in a dynamic environment for the cells to grow rather than a static setup with an impermeable surface such as a petri dish. In this study, we focus on the detailed characterization of Caco-2 cells cultured on a silicon membrane with different pore sizes as well as the effect of dynamic fluid flow on the model. The porous silicon membrane together with continuous perfusion of liquid applying shear stress on the cells enhances the differentiation of polarized cells by providing access to the both their basal and apical surfaces. Membranes with pore sizes of 0.5-3 µm were used and a shear stress of ~0.03 dyne cm-2 was created by applying a low flow rate of 20 nl s-1. By providing these optimized conditions, cells were able to differentiate with columnar morphology, which developed microvilli structures on their apical side and tight junctions between adjacent cells like those in a healthy human intestinal barrier. In this setup, it is possible to study the important cellular functions of the intestine such as transport, absorption and secretion, and thus this model has great potential in drug screening.

  7. Isolation and Flow Cytometry Analysis of Innate Lymphoid Cells from the Intestinal Lamina Propria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronke, Konrad; Kofoed-Nielsen, Michael; Diefenbach, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa constitutes the biggest surface area of the body. It is constantly challenged by bacteria, commensal and pathogenic, protozoa, and food-derived irritants. In order to maintain homeostasis, a complex network of signaling circuits has evolved that includes contributions of immune cells. In recent years a subset of lymphocytes, which belong to the innate immune system, has caught particular attention. These so-called innate lymphoid cells (ILC) reside within the lamina propria of the small and large intestines and rapidly respond to environmental challenges. They provide immunity to various types of infections but may also contribute to organ homeostasis as they produce factors acting on epithelial cells thereby enhancing barrier integrity. Here, we describe how these cells can be isolated from their environment and provide an in-depth protocol how to visualize the various ILC subsets by flow cytometry.

  8. Cell-permeable intrinsic cellular inhibitors of apoptosis protect and rescue intestinal epithelial cells from radiation-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki-Horibuchi, Shiori; Yasuda, Takeshi; Sakaguchi, Nagako; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Akashi, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    One of the important mechanisms for gastrointestinal (GI) injury following high-dose radiation exposure is apoptosis of epithelial cells. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) and cellular IAP2 (cIAP2) are intrinsic cellular inhibitors of apoptosis. In order to study the effects of exogenously added IAPs on apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells, we constructed bacterial expression plasmids containing genes of XIAP (full-length, BIR2 domain and BIR3-RING domain with and without mutations of auto-ubiquitylation sites) and cIAP2 proteins fused to a protein-transduction domain (PTD) derived from HIV-1 Tat protein (TAT) and purified these cell-permeable recombinant proteins. When the TAT-conjugated IAPs were added to rat intestinal epithelial cells IEC6, these proteins were effectively delivered into the cells and inhibited apoptosis, even when added after irradiation. Our results suggest that PTD-mediated delivery of IAPs may have clinical potential, not only for radioprotection but also for rescuing the GI system from radiation injuries. (author)

  9. A Refined Culture System for Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Intestinal Epithelial Organoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Takahashi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gut epithelial organoids are routinely used to investigate intestinal biology; however, current culture methods are not amenable to genetic manipulation, and it is difficult to generate sufficient numbers for high-throughput studies. Here, we present an improved culture system of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived intestinal organoids involving four methodological advances. (1 We adopted a lentiviral vector to readily establish and optimize conditioned medium for human intestinal organoid culture. (2 We obtained intestinal organoids from human iPSCs more efficiently by supplementing WNT3A and fibroblast growth factor 2 to induce differentiation into definitive endoderm. (3 Using 2D culture, followed by re-establishment of organoids, we achieved an efficient transduction of exogenous genes in organoids. (4 We investigated suspension organoid culture without scaffolds for easier harvesting and assays. These techniques enable us to develop, maintain, and expand intestinal organoids readily and quickly at low cost, facilitating high-throughput screening of pathogenic factors and candidate treatments for gastrointestinal diseases.

  10. Cdc42 and Rab8a are critical for intestinal stem cell division, survival, and differentiation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakamori, Ryotaro; Das, Soumyashree; Yu, Shiyan

    2012-01-01

    The constant self renewal and differentiation of adult intestinal stem cells maintains a functional intestinal mucosa for a lifetime. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate intestinal stem cell division and epithelial homeostasis are largely undefined. We report here that the small GTPases...... reminiscent of human microvillus inclusion disease (MVID), a devastating congenital intestinal disorder that results in severe nutrient deprivation. Further analysis revealed that Cdc42-deficient stem cells had cell division defects, reduced capacity for clonal expansion and differentiation into Paneth cells...... suggest that defects of the stem cell niche can cause MVID. This hypothesis represents a conceptual departure from the conventional view of this disease, which has focused on the affected enterocytes, and suggests stem cell-based approaches could be beneficial to infants with this often lethal condition....

  11. Steroid hormones as regulators of the proliferative activity of normal and neoplastic intestinal epithelial cells (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1988-01-01

    Glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors are present in normal epithelial cells of both the small and large intestine and there have also been contentious reports of androgen, oestrogen and progesterone receptors in the epithelium of the normal large intestine. The majority of reports suggest that stimulation of the intestinal glucocorticoid receptors results in increased proliferation of epithelial cells in the small bowel, as does stimulation of androgen receptors and possibly mineralocorticoid receptors. The proliferative response of the normal intestine to oestrogens is difficult to evaluate and that to progestigens appears not to have been reported. Epidemiological studies reveal a higher incidence of bowel cancer in premenopausal women than in men of the same age and yet there is a lower incidence of these tumors in women of higher parity. These findings have been atributted to a variety of non-epithelial gender characteristic such as differences in bile metabolism, colonic bacterial and fecal transit times. In experimental animals, androgens have also been shown to influence carcinogenesis and this could well be attributed to changes in food intake etc. However, many studies have now revealed steroid hormone receptors on colorectal tumor cells and thus a direct effect of the steroid hormones on the epithelium during and after malignant transformation must now be considered.

  12. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: histopathological and imaging perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, S.R.; Ryan, S.M.; Colby, T.V.

    2003-01-01

    The present review focuses on the interstitial lung diseases related to smoking. Thus, the pathology and radiology of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis and respiratory bronchiolitis-associated-interstitial lung disease are considered. The more tenuous association between pulmonary fibrosis and smoking is also discussed

  13. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: histopathological and imaging perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, S.R.; Ryan, S.M.; Colby, T.V

    2003-04-01

    The present review focuses on the interstitial lung diseases related to smoking. Thus, the pathology and radiology of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis and respiratory bronchiolitis-associated-interstitial lung disease are considered. The more tenuous association between pulmonary fibrosis and smoking is also discussed.

  14. Relevance of mast cell-nerve interactions in intestinal nociception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diest, Sophie A.; Stanisor, Oana I.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; de Jonge, Wouter J.; van den Wijngaard, René M.

    2012-01-01

    Cross-talk between the immune- and nervous-system is considered an important biological process in health and disease. Because mast cells are often strategically placed between nerves and surrounding (immune)cells they may function as important intermediate cells. This review summarizes the current

  15. Control mechanisms of cell proliferation in intestinal epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P.C. Rijke (Rudy)

    1977-01-01

    textabstractIn the adult organism some organs and tissues still contain proliferating and differentiating cells, whereas other organs only consist of non-dividing specialized cells. On the basis of their proliferative activity cell populations may be classified into three categories (135, 138,208).

  16. Wnt control of stem cells and differentiation in the intestinal epithelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Daniel; Clevers, Hans

    2005-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium represents a very attractive experimental model for the study of integrated key cellular processes such as proliferation and differentiation. The tissue is subjected to a rapid and perpetual self-renewal along the crypt-villus axis. Renewal requires division of multipotent stem cells, still to be morphologically identified and isolated, followed by transit amplification, and differentiation of daughter cells into specialized absorptive and secretory cells. Our understanding of the crucial role played by the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in controlling the fine balance between cell proliferation and differentiation in the gut has been significantly enhanced in recent years. Mutations in some of its components irreversibly lead to carcinogenesis in humans and in mice. Here, we discuss recent advances related to the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in regulating intestinal stem cells, homeostasis, and cancer. We emphasize how Wnt signaling is able to maintain a stem cell/progenitor phenotype in normal intestinal crypts, and to impose a very similar phenotype onto colorectal adenomas

  17. Polarity of fatty acid uptake and metabolism in a human intestinal cell line (CACO-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotter, P.J.; Storch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Free fatty acids (ffa) can enter the intestinal cell via the apical (AP) or basolateral (BL) membrane. The authors are using the Caco-2 intestinal cell line to examine the polarity of ffa uptake and metabolism in the enterocyte. Cells are grown on permeable polycarbonate Transwell filters in order to obtain access to both AP and BL compartments. Differentiated Caco-2 cells form tight polarized monolayers which express small intestine-specific enzymes and are impermeable to the fluid phase marker Lucifer Yellow. Submicellar concentrations of 3 H-palmitic acid (2uM) were added to AP or BL sides of Caco-2 monolayers at 37 degrees C and cells were incubated for various times between 2 and 120 minutes. Total AP and BL uptake is similar; however, when relative membrane surface areas are accounted for, AP uptake is about 2-fold higher. The metabolism of AP and BL ffa is not significantly different: triacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine account for most of the metabolites (32±4 and 24±2% respectively at 5 minutes). Little ffa oxidation is observed. Preincubation with albumin-bound 2-monoolein (100uM) and palmitate (50uM) increases the level of TG metabolites. The results suggest that in this cell line the uptake of AP ffa may be greater than BL ffa, but that AP (dietary) ffa and BL (plasma) ffa are metabolized similarly

  18. Indian Hedgehog Suppresses a Stromal Cell-Driven Intestinal Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westendorp, B Florien; Büller, Nikè V J A; Karpus, Olga N; van Dop, Willemijn A; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Koelink, Pim J; Snel, Clinton Y; Meisner, Sander; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Uhmann, Anja; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Heijmans, Jarom; Hahn, Heidi; Muncan, Vanesa; Wildenberg, Manon E; van den Brink, Gijs R

    2018-01-01

    Upon intestinal epithelial damage a complex wound healing response is initiated to restore epithelial integrity and defend against pathogenic invasion. Epithelium-derived Indian Hedgehog (Ihh) functions as a critical sensor in this process. Signaling occurs in a paracrine manner because the receptor for Ihh is expressed only in the mesenchyme, but the exact Hedgehog target cell has remained elusive. The aim of this study was to elucidate further the nature of this target cell in the context of intestinal inflammation. Hedgehog activity was modulated genetically in both cell type-specific and body-wide models and the resulting animals were analyzed for gene expression profiles and sensitivity for dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis. To characterize the Hedgehog target cell, Gli1-CreERT2-Rosa26-ZsGreen animals were generated, which express ZsGreen in all Hedgehog-responsive cells. These cells were characterized using flow cytometry and immunofluorescence. Loss of Indian Hedgehog from the intestinal epithelium resulted in a rapid increase in expression of inflammation-related genes, accompanied by increased influx of immune cells. Animals with epithelium-specific deletion of Ihh or lacking the Hedgehog receptor Smoothened from Hedgehog target cells were more sensitive to DSS colitis. In contrast, specific deletion of Smoothened in the myeloid compartment did not alter the response to DSS. This suggests that Hedgehog signaling does not repress intestinal immunity through an effect on myeloid cells. Indeed, we found that Hedgehog-responsive cells expressed gp38, smooth muscle actin, and desmin, indicating a fibroblastic nature. Ihh signaling inhibited expression of C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12) in fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo, thereby impairing the recruitment of immune cells. We show that epithelium-derived Indian Hedgehog signals exclusively to fibroblasts in the intestine. Loss of Ihh leads to a rapid immune response with up-regulation of fibroblast

  19. Osteopontin attenuates acute gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease by preventing apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Kentaro; Minami, Naoki; Matsuura, Minoru; Iida, Tomoya; Toyonaga, Takahiko; Nagaishi, Kanna; Arimura, Yoshiaki; Fujimiya, Mineko; Uede, Toshimitsu; Nakase, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which often targets gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Osteopontin (OPN) plays an important physiological role in the efficient development of Th1 immune responses and cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis. The role of OPN in acute GI-GVHD is poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the role of OPN in donor T cells in the pathogenicity of acute GI-GVHD. Methods: OPN knockout (KO) mice and C57BL/6 (B6) mice were used as donors, and (C57BL/6 × DBA/2) F1 (BDF1) mice were used as allograft recipients. Mice with acute GI-GVHD were divided into three groups: the control group (BDF1→BDF1), B6 group (B6→BDF1), and OPN-KO group (OPN-KO→BDF1). Bone marrow cells and spleen cells from donors were transplanted to lethally irradiated recipients. Clinical GVHD scores were assessed daily. Recipients were euthanized on day 7 after transplantation, and colons and small intestines were collected for various analyses. Results: The clinical GVHD score in the OPN-KO group was significantly increased compared with the B6 and control groups. We observed a difference in the severity of colonic GVHD between the OPN-KO group and B6 group, but not small intestinal-GVHD between these groups. Interferon-γ, Tumor necrosis factor-α, Interleukin-17A, and Interleukin-18 gene expression in the OPN-KO group was differed between the colon and small intestine. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the fluorescence intensity of splenic and colonic CD8 T cells expressing Fas Ligand was increased in the OPN-KO group compared with the B6 group. Conclusion: We demonstrated that the importance of OPN in T cells in the onset of acute GI-GVHD involves regulating apoptosis of the intestinal cell via the Fas-Fas Ligand pathway. - Highlights: • A lack of osteopontin in donor cells exacerbated clinical gastrointestinal GVHD. • Donor cells lacking

  20. Enteral peptide formulas inhibit radiation induced enteritis and apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells and suppress the expression and function of Alzheimer's and cell division control gene products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cope, F.O.; Issinger, O.G.; McArdle, A.H.; Shapiro, J.; Tomei, L.D.

    1991-01-01

    Studies have shown that patients receiving enteral peptide formulas prior to irradiation have a significantly reduced incidence of enteritis and express a profound increase in intestinal cellularity. Two conceptual approaches were taken to describe this response. First was the evaluation in changes in programmed intestinal cell death and secondly the evaluation of a gene product controlling cell division cycling. This study provided a relationship between the ratio of cell death to cell formulations. The results indicate that in the canine and murine models, irradiation induces expression of the Alzheimer's gene in intestinal crypt cells, while the incidence of apoptosis in apical cells is significantly increased. The use of peptide enteral formulations suppresses the expression of the Alzheimer's gene in crypt cells, while apoptosis is eliminated in the apical cells of the intestine. Concomitantly, enteral peptide formulations suppress the function of the CK-II gene product in the basal and baso-lateral cells of the intestine. These data indicate that although the mitotic index is significantly reduced in enterocytes, this phenomenon alone is not sufficient to account for the peptide-induced radio-resistance of the intestine. The data also indicate a significant reduction of normal apoptosis in the upper lateral and apical cells of the intestinal villi. Thus, the ratio of cell death to cell replacement is significantly decreased resulting in an increase in villus height and hypertrophy of the apical villus cells. Thus, peptide solutions should be considered as an adjunct treatment both in radio- and chemotherapy

  1. Immunity and Tolerance Induced by Intestinal Mucosal Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Aliberti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells present in the digestive tract are constantly exposed to environmental antigens, commensal flora, and invading pathogens. Under steady-state conditions, these cells have high tolerogenic potential, triggering differentiation of regulatory T cells to protect the host from unwanted proinflammatory immune responses to innocuous antigens or commensals. On the other hand, these cells must discriminate between commensal flora and invading pathogens and mount powerful immune response against pathogens. A potential result of unbalanced tolerogenic versus proinflammatory responses mediated by dendritic cells is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, food allergies, and celiac disease. Herein, we review the dendritic cell population involved in mediating tolerance and immunity in mucosal surfaces, the progress in unveiling their development in vivo, and factors that can influence their functions.

  2. Influence of adhesion and bacteriocin production by Lactobacillus salivarius on the intestinal epithelial cell transcriptional response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, John; Buttó, Ludovica F; MacSharry, John; Nally, Kenneth; O'Toole, Paul W

    2012-08-01

    Lactobacillus salivarius strain UCC118 is a human intestinal isolate that has been extensively studied for its potential probiotic effects in human and animal models. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of L. salivarius UCC118 on gene expression responses in the Caco-2 cell line to improve understanding of how the strain might modulate intestinal epithelial cell phenotypes. Exposure of Caco-2 cells to UCC118 led to the induction of several human genes (TNFAIP3, NFKBIA, and BIRC3) that are negative regulators of inflammatory signaling pathways. Induction of chemokines (CCL20, CXCL-1, and CXCL-2) with antimicrobial functions was also observed. Disruption of the UCC118 sortase gene srtA causes reduced bacterial adhesion to epithelial cells. Transcription of three mucin genes was reduced significantly when Caco-2 cells were stimulated with the ΔsrtA derivative of UCC118 compared to cells stimulated with the wild type, but there was no significant change in the transcription levels of the anti-inflammatory genes. UCC118 genes that were significantly upregulated upon exposure to Caco-2 cells were identified by bacterial genome microarray and consisted primarily of two groups of genes connected with purine metabolism and the operon for synthesis of the Abp118 bacteriocin. Following incubation with Caco-2 cells, the bacteriocin synthesis genes were transcribed at higher levels in the wild type than in the ΔsrtA derivative. These data indicate that L. salivarius UCC118 influences epithelial cells both through modulation of the inflammatory response and by modulation of intestinal cell mucin production. Sortase-anchored cell surface proteins of L. salivarius UCC118 have a central role in promoting the interaction between the bacterium and epithelial cells.

  3. Hes1-deficient mice show precocious differentiation of Paneth cells in the small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Katsumasa; Fukui, Hirokazu; Kayahara, Takahisa; Sawada, Mitsutaka; Seno, Hiroshi; Hiai, Hiroshi; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that Hes1 is expressed both in putative epithelial stem cells just above Paneth cells and in the crypt base columnar cells between Paneth cells, while Hes1 is completely absent in Paneth cells. This study was undertaken to clarify the role of Hes1 in Paneth cell differentiation, using Hes1-knockout (KO) newborn (P0) mice. Electron microscopy revealed premature appearance of distinct cells containing cytoplasmic granules in the intervillous region in Hes1-KO P0 mice, whereas those cells were absent in wild-type (WT) P0 mice. In Hes1-KO P0 mice, the gene expressions of cryptdins, exclusively present in Paneth cells, were all enhanced compared with WT P0 mice. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated increased number of both lysozyme-positive and cryptdin-4-positive cells in the small intestinal epithelium of Hes1-KO P0 mice as compared to WT P0 mice. Thus, Hes1 appears to have an inhibitory role in Paneth cell differentiation in the small intestine

  4. HIC1 links retinoic acid signalling to group 3 innate lymphoid cell-dependent regulation of intestinal immunity and homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antignano, Frann; Korinek, Vladimir; Underhill, T. Michael

    2018-01-01

    The intestinal immune system must be able to respond to a wide variety of infectious organisms while maintaining tolerance to non-pathogenic microbes and food antigens. The Vitamin A metabolite all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) has been implicated in the regulation of this balance, partially by regulating innate lymphoid cell (ILC) responses in the intestine. However, the molecular mechanisms of atRA-dependent intestinal immunity and homeostasis remain elusive. Here we define a role for the transcriptional repressor Hypermethylated in cancer 1 (HIC1, ZBTB29) in the regulation of ILC responses in the intestine. Intestinal ILCs express HIC1 in a vitamin A-dependent manner. In the absence of HIC1, group 3 ILCs (ILC3s) that produce IL-22 are lost, resulting in increased susceptibility to infection with the bacterial pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Thus, atRA-dependent expression of HIC1 in ILC3s regulates intestinal homeostasis and protective immunity. PMID:29470558

  5. Stress responsive miR-31 is a major modulator of mouse intestinal stem cells during regeneration and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuhua; Ma, Xianghui; Lv, Cong; Sheng, Xiaole; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Ran; Song, Yongli; Andl, Thomas; Plikus, Maksim V; Sun, Jinyue; Ren, Fazheng; Shuai, Jianwei; Lengner, Christopher J; Cui, Wei; Yu, Zhengquan

    2017-09-05

    Intestinal regeneration and tumorigenesis are believed to be driven by intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Elucidating mechanisms underlying ISC activation during regeneration and tumorigenesis can help uncover the underlying principles of intestinal homeostasis and disease including colorectal cancer. Here we show that miR-31 drives ISC proliferation, and protects ISCs against apoptosis, both during homeostasis and regeneration in response to ionizing radiation injury. Furthermore, miR-31 has oncogenic properties, promoting intestinal tumorigenesis. Mechanistically, miR-31 acts to balance input from Wnt, BMP, TGFβ signals to coordinate control of intestinal homeostasis, regeneration and tumorigenesis. We further find that miR-31 is regulated by the STAT3 signaling pathway in response to radiation injury. These findings identify miR-31 as a critical modulator of ISC biology, and a potential therapeutic target for a broad range of intestinal regenerative disorders and cancers.

  6. Stem-cell-specific endocytic degradation defects lead to intestinal dysplasia in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Nagy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available UV radiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG is a tumor suppressor involved in autophagy, endocytosis and DNA damage repair, but how its loss contributes to colorectal cancer is poorly understood. Here, we show that UVRAG deficiency in Drosophila intestinal stem cells leads to uncontrolled proliferation and impaired differentiation without preventing autophagy. As a result, affected animals suffer from gut dysfunction and short lifespan. Dysplasia upon loss of UVRAG is characterized by the accumulation of endocytosed ligands and sustained activation of STAT and JNK signaling, and attenuation of these pathways suppresses stem cell hyperproliferation. Importantly, the inhibition of early (dynamin-dependent or late (Rab7-dependent steps of endocytosis in intestinal stem cells also induces hyperproliferation and dysplasia. Our data raise the possibility that endocytic, but not autophagic, defects contribute to UVRAG-deficient colorectal cancer development in humans.

  7. Human Intestinal Cells Modulate Conjugational Transfer of Multidrug Resistance Plasmids between Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Sommer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation in the human gut microbiota is believed to play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence plasmids. However, the modulation of bacterial conjugation by the human host remains poorly understood and there is a need for controlled systems...... to study this process. We established an in vitro co-culture system to study the interaction between human intestinal cells and bacteria. We show that the conjugation efficiency of a plasmid encoding an extended spectrum beta-lactamase is reduced when clinical isolates of Escherichia coli are co...... of the intestinal cells exposed to bacteria leading to a two-fold reduction in conjugation efficiency. These results show that human gut epithelial cells can modulate bacterial conjugation and may have relevance to gene exchange in the gut....

  8. Effect of an inhibitor of noradrenaline uptake, desipramine, on cell proliferation in the intestinal crypt epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1989-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa receives an adrenergic innervation for which there is no commonly accepted function. However, in recent years, cell kinetic studies have raised the possibility that this innervation may be an important regulator of crypt cell proliferation. The effects of noradrenaline released from adrenergic nerves is terminated principally by re-uptake of the amine into the nerve and this process can be inhibited by the antidepressant drug, desipramine. In this report desipramine is shown to accelerate crypt cell proliferation in intact, but not in chemically sympathectomized rats, thus adding support to the notion that regulation of crypt cell division is an important function of the sympathetic nervous system.

  9. PAI-1-dependent endothelial cell death determines severity of radiation-induced intestinal injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rym Abderrahmani

    Full Text Available Normal tissue toxicity still remains a dose-limiting factor in clinical radiation therapy. Recently, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (SERPINE1/PAI-1 was reported as an essential mediator of late radiation-induced intestinal injury. However, it is not clear whether PAI-1 plays a role in acute radiation-induced intestinal damage and we hypothesized that PAI-1 may play a role in the endothelium radiosensitivity. In vivo, in a model of radiation enteropathy in PAI-1 -/- mice, apoptosis of radiosensitive compartments, epithelial and microvascular endothelium was quantified. In vitro, the role of PAI-1 in the radiation-induced endothelial cells (ECs death was investigated. The level of apoptotic ECs is lower in PAI-1 -/- compared with Wt mice after irradiation. This is associated with a conserved microvascular density and consequently with a better mucosal integrity in PAI-1 -/- mice. In vitro, irradiation rapidly stimulates PAI-1 expression in ECs and radiation sensitivity is increased in ECs that stably overexpress PAI-1, whereas PAI-1 knockdown increases EC survival after irradiation. Moreover, ECs prepared from PAI-1 -/- mice are more resistant to radiation-induced cell death than Wt ECs and this is associated with activation of the Akt pathway. This study demonstrates that PAI-1 plays a key role in radiation-induced EC death in the intestine and suggests that this contributes strongly to the progression of radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  10. Intestinal mast cells in gut inflammation and motility disturbances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, Benedicte Y.; van den Wijngaard, Rene M.; de Jonge, Wouter J.

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells may be regarded as prototypes of innate immune cells that can be controlled by neuronal mediators. Their activation has been implicated in many types of neuro-inflammatory responses, and related disturbances of gut motility, via direct or indirect mechanisms that involve several

  11. Increased chromogranin A cell density in the large intestine of patients with irritable bowel syndrome after receiving dietary guidance

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzawi, Tarek; Gundersen, Doris Irene; Hausken, Trygve; El-Salhy, Magdy

    2015-01-01

    The large intestine contains five types of endocrine cells that regulate its functions by sensing its luminal contents and releasing specific hormones. Chromogranin A (CgA) is a common marker for the gastrointestinal endocrine cells, and it is abnormal in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. Most IBS patients relate their symptoms to certain food elements. The present study investigated the effect of dietary guidance on the total endocrine cells of the large intestine as detected by CgA i...

  12. Cell Adhesion Molecule CD166/ALCAM Functions Within the Crypt to Orchestrate Murine Intestinal Stem Cell HomeostasisSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas R. Smith

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Intestinal epithelial homeostasis is maintained by active-cycling and slow-cycling stem cells confined within an instructive crypt-based niche. Exquisite regulating of these stem cell populations along the proliferation-to-differentiation axis maintains a homeostatic balance to prevent hyperproliferation and cancer. Although recent studies focus on how secreted ligands from mesenchymal and epithelial populations regulate intestinal stem cells (ISCs, it remains unclear what role cell adhesion plays in shaping the regulatory niche. Previously we have shown that the cell adhesion molecule and cancer stem cell marker, CD166/ALCAM (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule, is highly expressed by both active-cycling Lgr5+ ISCs and adjacent Paneth cells within the crypt base, supporting the hypothesis that CD166 functions to mediate ISC maintenance and signal coordination. Methods: Here we tested this hypothesis by analyzing a CD166–/– mouse combined with immunohistochemical, flow cytometry, gene expression, and enteroid culture. Results: We found that animals lacking CD166 expression harbored fewer active-cycling Lgr5+ ISCs. Homeostasis was maintained by expansion of the transit-amplifying compartment and not by slow-cycling Bmi1+ ISC stimulation. Loss of active-cycling ISCs was coupled with deregulated Paneth cell homeostasis, manifested as increased numbers of immature Paneth progenitors due to decreased terminal differentiation, linked to defective Wnt signaling. CD166–/– Paneth cells expressed reduced Wnt3 ligand expression and depleted nuclear β-catenin. Conclusions: These data support a function for CD166 as an important cell adhesion molecule that shapes the signaling microenvironment by mediating ISC–niche cell interactions. Furthermore, loss of CD166 expression results in decreased ISC and Paneth cell homeostasis and an altered Wnt microenvironment. Keywords: Intestinal Stem Cell, Homeostasis

  13. The fate of epithelial cells in the human large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla, D H; Gibson, P R

    1999-08-01

    One hundred and forty biopsies of the colon and rectum, collected during routine colonoscopies of 51 patients aged 19 to 74 years, were examined using light microscopy and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that surface epithelial cells undergo apoptosis, passing through fenestrations in the basement membrane to where they enter the lamina propria and are taken up by macrophages; and it is hypothesized that apoptotic cells are carried through the fenestrations on a current of fluid. The study also found that epithelial cells positioned over the crypts are better attached and more robust than those more distant from the crypt opening; and it is further hypothesized that, after reaching the top of the crypts, some goblet cells cease secreting mucus and pass onto the surface compartment of absorptive cells. An unexpected finding was that the lower regions of the crypts commonly contain isolated necrotic colonocytes. Apoptotic cells were rarely observed in the crypt epithelium. The findings of this study support the "recycling" model of epithelial cell death in the surface compartment of the human colon.

  14. Krüppel-like factor 5 is essential for proliferation and survival of mouse intestinal epithelial stem cells

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    Mandayam O. Nandan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5 is a pro-proliferative transcription factor that is expressed in dividing epithelial cells of the intestinal crypt. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5 has been identified as a stem cell marker in both small intestinal and colonic epithelial cells. To determine whether KLF5 regulates proliferation of intestinal stem cells, we investigated the effects of Klf5 deletion specifically from the intestinal stem cells in adult mice. Mice with inducible intestinal stem cell-specific deletion of Klf5 (Lgr5-Klf5fl/fl were injected with tamoxifen for 5 consecutive days to induce Lgr5-driven Cre expression. Intestinal and colonic tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry at various time points up to 112 days following start of tamoxifen treatment. Klf5 is co-localized in the crypt-based columnar (CBC cells that express Lgr5. By 11 days following the start of tamoxifen treatment, Lgr5-positive crypts from which Klf5 was deleted exhibited a loss of proliferation that was accompanied by an increase in apoptosis. Beginning at 14 days following the start of tamoxifen treatment, both Klf5 expression and proliferation were re-established in the transit-amplifying epithelial cells but not in the Lgr5-positive CBC cells. By 112 days post-treatment, up to 90% of the Lgr5-positive cells from which Klf5 was deleted were lost from the intestinal crypts. These results indicate a critical role for KLF5 in the survival and maintenance of intestinal stem cells.

  15. The behavior of interstitials in irradiated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedraza, D.F.

    1991-01-01

    A computer model is developed to simulate the behavior of self-interstitials with particular attention to clustering. Owing to the layer structure of graphite, atomistic simulations can be performed using a large parallelepipedic supercell containing a few layers. In particular, interstitial clustering is studied here using a supercell that contains two basal planes only. Frenkel pairs are randomly produced. Interstitials are placed at sites between the crystal planes while vacancies are distributed in the two crystal planes. The size of the computational cell is 20000 atoms and periodic boundary conditions are used in two dimensions. Vacancies are assumed immobile whereas interstitials are given a certain mobility. Two point defect sinks are considered, direct recombination of Frenkel pairs and interstitial clusters. The clusters are assumed to be mobile up to a certain size where they are presumed to become loop nuclei. Clusters can shrink by emission of singly bonded interstitials or by recombination of a peripheral interstitial with a neighboring vacancy. The conditions under which interstitial clustering occurs are reported. It is shown that when clustering occurs the cluster size population gradually shifts towards the largest size cluster. The implications of the present results for irradiation growth and irradiation-induced amorphization are discussed

  16. Functional modulation of human intestinal epithelial cell responses by Bifidobacterium infantis and Lactobacillus salivarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Ann M; O'Regan, Padraig; Fanning, Áine; O'Mahony, Caitlin; MacSharry, John; Lyons, Anne; Bienenstock, John; O'Mahony, Liam; Shanahan, Fergus

    2006-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in antigen sampling and the maintenance of gut homeostasis. However, the interaction of commensal bacteria with the intestinal surface remains incompletely understood. Here we investigated immune cell responses to commensal and pathogenic bacteria. HT-29 human IECs were incubated with Bifidobacterium infantis 35624, Lactobacillus salivarius UCC118 or Salmonella typhimurium UK1 for varying times, or were pretreated with a probiotic for 2 hr prior to stimulation with S. typhimurium or flagellin. Gene arrays were used to examine inflammatory gene expression. Nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation, interleukin (IL)-8 secretion, pathogen adherence to IECs, and mucin-3 (MUC3) and E-cadherin gene expression were assayed by TransAM assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), fluorescence, and real-time reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. IL-10 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion by bacteria-treated peripheral blood-derived DCs were measured using ELISA. S. typhimurium increased expression of 36 of the 847 immune-related genes assayed, including NF-κB and IL-8. The commensal bacteria did not alter expression levels of any of the 847 genes. However, B. infantis and L. salivarius attenuated both IL-8 secretion at baseline and S. typhimurium-induced pro-inflammatory responses. B. infantis also limited flagellin-induced IL-8 protein secretion. The commensal bacteria did not increase MUC3 or E-cadherin expression, or interfere with pathogen binding to HT-29 cells, but they did stimulate IL-10 and TNF-α secretion by DCs. The data demonstrate that, although the intestinal epithelium is immunologically quiescent when it encounters B. infantis or L. salivarius, these commensal bacteria exert immunomodulatory effects on intestinal immune cells that mediate host responses to flagellin and enteric pathogens. PMID:16771855

  17. Coating with luminal gut-constituents alters adherence of nanoparticles to intestinal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Sinnecker

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anthropogenic nanoparticles (NPs have found their way into many goods of everyday life. Inhalation, ingestion and skin contact are potential routes for NPs to enter the body. In particular the digestive tract with its huge absorptive surface area provides a prime gateway for NP uptake. Considering that NPs are covered by luminal gut-constituents en route through the gastrointestinal tract, we wanted to know if such modifications have an influence on the interaction between NPs and enterocytes.Results: We investigated the consequences of a treatment with various luminal gut-constituents on the adherence of nanoparticles to intestinal epithelial cells. Carboxylated polystyrene particles 20, 100 and 200 nm in size represented our anthropogenic NPs, and differentiated Caco-2 cells served as model for mature enterocytes of the small intestine. Pretreatment with the proteins BSA and casein consistently reduced the adherence of all NPs to the cultured enterocytes, while incubation of NPs with meat extract had no obvious effect on particle adherence. In contrast, contact with intestinal fluid appeared to increase the particle-cell interaction of 20 and 100 nm NPs.Conclusion: Luminal gut-constituents may both attenuate and augment the adherence of NPs to cell surfaces. These effects appear to be dependent on the particle size as well as on the type of interacting protein. While some proteins will rather passivate particles towards cell attachment, possibly by increasing colloid stability or camouflaging attachment sites, certain components of intestinal fluid are capable to modify particle surfaces in such a way that interactions with cellular surface structures result in an increased binding.

  18. Bioengineered Systems and Designer Matrices That Recapitulate the Intestinal Stem Cell Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between intestinal stem cells (ISCs and the surrounding niche environment is complex and dynamic. Key factors localized at the base of the crypt are necessary to promote ISC self-renewal and proliferation, to ultimately provide a constant stream of differentiated cells to maintain the epithelial barrier. These factors diminish as epithelial cells divide, migrate away from the crypt base, differentiate into the postmitotic lineages, and end their life span in approximately 7 days when they are sloughed into the intestinal lumen. To facilitate the rapid and complex physiology of ISC-driven epithelial renewal, in vivo gradients of growth factors, extracellular matrix, bacterial products, gases, and stiffness are formed along the crypt-villus axis. New bioengineered tools and platforms are available to recapitulate various gradients and support the stereotypical cellular responses associated with these gradients. Many of these technologies have been paired with primary small intestinal and colonic epithelial cells to re-create select aspects of normal physiology or disease states. These biomimetic platforms are becoming increasingly sophisticated with the rapid discovery of new niche factors and gradients. These advancements are contributing to the development of high-fidelity tissue constructs for basic science applications, drug screening, and personalized medicine applications. Here, we discuss the direct and indirect evidence for many of the important gradients found in vivo and their successful application to date in bioengineered in vitro models, including organ-on-chip and microfluidic culture devices.

  19. Bmi1 regulates murine intestinal stem cell proliferation and self-renewal downstream of Notch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Arribillaga, Erika; Rodilla, Verónica; Pellegrinet, Luca; Guiu, Jordi; Iglesias, Mar; Roman, Angel Carlos; Gutarra, Susana; González, Susana; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura; Fernández-Salguero, Pedro; Radtke, Freddy; Bigas, Anna; Espinosa, Lluís

    2015-01-01

    Genetic data indicate that abrogation of Notch-Rbpj or Wnt-β-catenin pathways results in the loss of the intestinal stem cells (ISCs). However, whether the effect of Notch is direct or due to the aberrant differentiation of the transit-amplifying cells into post-mitotic goblet cells is unknown. To address this issue, we have generated composite tamoxifen-inducible intestine-specific genetic mouse models and analyzed the expression of intestinal differentiation markers. Importantly, we found that activation of β-catenin partially rescues the differentiation phenotype of Rbpj deletion mutants, but not the loss of the ISC compartment. Moreover, we identified Bmi1, which is expressed in the ISC and progenitor compartments, as a gene that is co-regulated by Notch and β-catenin. Loss of Bmi1 resulted in reduced proliferation in the ISC compartment accompanied by p16(INK4a) and p19(ARF) (splice variants of Cdkn2a) accumulation, and increased differentiation to the post-mitotic goblet cell lineage that partially mimics Notch loss-of-function defects. Finally, we provide evidence that Bmi1 contributes to ISC self-renewal. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Heparin modulates human intestinal smooth muscle (HISM) cell proliferation and matrix production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, M.; Perr, H.; Drucker, D.E.; Diegelmann, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    (HISM) cell proliferation and collagen production may play a role in the pathogenesis of intestinal stricture in Crohn's disease. The present studies were performed to evaluate the effects of heparin, a known modulator of vascular smooth muscle cells, on HISM cell proliferation and collagen production. Heparin (100 μg/ml) was added daily to HISM cell cultures for cell proliferation studies and for 24 hours at various time points during culture for collagen synthesis studies. Collagen synthesis was determined by the uptake of 3 H proline into collagenase-sensitive protein. Heparin completely inhibited cell proliferation for 7 days, after which cell numbers increased but at a slower rate than controls. Cells released from heparin inhibition demonstrated catch-up growth to control levels. Collagen production was significantly inhibited by 24 hours exposure to heparin but only at those times during culture when collagen synthesis was maximal (8 to 12 days). Non-collagen protein synthesis was inhibited by heparin at all time points during culture. Heparin through its modulation of HISM cells may play an important role in the control of the extracellular matrix of the intestinal wall

  1. Effects of the ionising radiations on the structure and the function of the intestinal epithelial cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haton, C.

    2005-06-01

    The intestinal mucosa is a particularly radio-sensitive tissue and damage may occur following either accidental or therapeutic exposure. the deleterious actions of ionizing radiation are linked to the formation of sometimes overwhelming quantities of reactive oxygen species (R.O.S.). Production of R.O.S. is both direct and indirect from the secondary effects of irradiation. A better comprehension of the underlying mechanisms of injury will lead to more adapted therapeutic approaches to limit the harmful effects of irradiation. The homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium is regulated by three factors: proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. these three factors were studied using the cell model, HT29, in order to analyze modulations of this balance after irradiation. our results, in agreement with other data, showed the establishment of mitotic delay. This arrest of proliferation was followed by apoptosis to be the major mechanism leading to cell death in this model. thus, for the first time, we have shown that irradiated intestinal epithelial cells preserve their capacity to differentiate. This indicates, although indirectly, that intestinal cells have and preserve an intrinsic capacity restore a functional epithelium. R.O.S. are considered as intermediates between the physical nature of radiations and biological responses. It seems essential to understand anti-oxidant mechanisms used by the cell for defence against the deleterious effects of R.O.S post exposure. This study of several anti-oxidant defence mechanisms of intestinal mucosa, was carried out in vivo in the mouse at different times following abdominal irradiation. We observed an early mitochondrial response in the hours following irradiation revealing this organelle as a particular target. We demonstrated a strong alteration of anti-oxidant capacity as revealed by a decrease in S.O.D.s, catalase and an increase of the G.P.X.s and M.T.s. A part of these modifications appeared to depend on an

  2. A multicenter study to standardize reporting and analyses of fluorescence-activated cell-sorted murine intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magness, Scott T.; Puthoff, Brent J.; Crissey, Mary Ann; Dunn, James; Henning, Susan J.; Houchen, Courtney; Kaddis, John S.; Kuo, Calvin J.; Li, Linheng; Lynch, John; Martin, Martin G.; May, Randal; Niland, Joyce C.; Olack, Barbara; Qian, Dajun; Stelzner, Matthias; Swain, John R.; Wang, Fengchao; Wang, Jiafang; Wang, Xinwei; Yan, Kelley; Yu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) is an essential tool for studies requiring isolation of distinct intestinal epithelial cell populations. Inconsistent or lack of reporting of the critical parameters associated with FACS methodologies has complicated interpretation, comparison, and reproduction of important findings. To address this problem a comprehensive multicenter study was designed to develop guidelines that limit experimental and data reporting variability and provide a foundation for accurate comparison of data between studies. Common methodologies and data reporting protocols for tissue dissociation, cell yield, cell viability, FACS, and postsort purity were established. Seven centers tested the standardized methods by FACS-isolating a specific crypt-based epithelial population (EpCAM+/CD44+) from murine small intestine. Genetic biomarkers for stem/progenitor (Lgr5 and Atoh 1) and differentiated cell lineages (lysozyme, mucin2, chromogranin A, and sucrase isomaltase) were interrogated in target and control populations to assess intra- and intercenter variability. Wilcoxon's rank sum test on gene expression levels showed limited intracenter variability between biological replicates. Principal component analysis demonstrated significant intercenter reproducibility among four centers. Analysis of data collected by standardized cell isolation methods and data reporting requirements readily identified methodological problems, indicating that standard reporting parameters facilitate post hoc error identification. These results indicate that the complexity of FACS isolation of target intestinal epithelial populations can be highly reproducible between biological replicates and different institutions by adherence to common cell isolation methods and FACS gating strategies. This study can be considered a foundation for continued method development and a starting point for investigators that are developing cell isolation expertise to study physiology and

  3. Evaluation of preparation methods for MS-based analysis of intestinal epithelial cell proteomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselager, Marianne Overgaard; Codrea, Marius Cosmin; Bendixen, Emøke

    2015-01-01

    analyzed by LC and electrospray QTOF-MS. The methods were evaluated according to efficiency, purity, transmembrane protein recovery, as well as for suitability to large-scale preparations. Our data clearly demonstrate that mucosal shaving is by far the best-suited method for in-depth MS analysis in terms...... are low in abundance, and large amounts of sample is needed for their preparation and for undertaking MS-based analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate three different methods for isolation and preparation of pig intestinal epithelial cells for MS-based analysis of the proteome. Samples were...... of ease and speed of sample preparation, as well as protein recovery. In comparison, more gentle methods where intestinal epithelial cells are harvested by shaking are more time consuming, result in lower protein yield, and are prone to increased technical variation due to multiple steps involved....

  4. Intestinal Immunomodulatory Cells (T Lymphocytes: A Bridge between Gut Microbiota and Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingwei Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is one of the most familiar chronic diseases threatening human health. Recent studies have shown that the development of diabetes is closely related to an imbalance of the gut microbiota. Accordingly, there is increasing interest in how changes in the gut microbiota affect diabetes and its underlying mechanisms. Immunomodulatory cells play important roles in maintaining the normal functioning of the human immune system and in maintaining homeostasis. Intestinal immunomodulatory cells (IICs are located in the intestinal mucosa and are regarded as an intermediary by which the gut microbiota affects physiological and pathological properties. Diabetes can be regulated by IICs, which act as a bridge linking the gut microbiota and DM. Understanding this bridge role of IICs may clarify the mechanisms by which the gut microbiota contributes to DM. Based on recent research, we summarize this process, thereby providing a basis for further studies of diabetes and other similar immune-related diseases.

  5. HNF1 alpha activates the aminopeptidase N promoter in intestinal (Caco-2) cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jørgen; Laustsen, Lotte; Troelsen, J

    1994-01-01

    The importance of HNF1 binding proteins for intestinal aminopeptidase N expression was investigated using the Caco-2 cell-line. Aminopeptidase N promoter activity in Caco-2 cells depends on the HNF1 element (positions -85 to -58) and co-transfection with an HNF1 alpha expression vector demonstrates...... a direct activation of the promoter by HNF1 alpha through this element. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nuclear extracts from Caco-2 cells show the presence of high amounts of HNF1 binding proteins irrespective of their state of differentiation....

  6. A multi-chamber microfluidic intestinal barrier model using Caco-2 cells for drug transport studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Hsih-Yin; Trier, Sofie; Rahbek, Ulrik L

    2018-01-01

    with platinum wires, enabling parallel real-time monitoring of barrier integrity for the eight chambers. Additionally, the translucent porous Teflon membrane enabled optical monitoring of cell monolayers. The device was developed and tested with the Caco-2 intestinal model, and compared to the conventional...... through permeability studies of mannitol, dextran and insulin, alone or in combination with the absorption enhancer tetradecylmaltoside (TDM). The thiol-ene-based microchip material and electrodes were highly compatible with cell growth. In fact, Caco-2 cells cultured in the device displayed...

  7. IL-2 receptor γ-chain molecule is critical for intestinal T-cell reconstitution in humanized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, P W; Nochi, T; Lim, A; Krisko, J F; Martinez-Torres, F; Choudhary, S K; Wahl, A; Olesen, R; Zou, W; Di Santo, J P; Margolis, D M; Garcia, J V

    2012-09-01

    Intestinal immune cells are important in host defense, yet the determinants for human lymphoid homeostasis in the intestines are poorly understood. In contrast, lymphoid homeostasis has been studied extensively in mice, where the requirement for a functional common γ-chain molecule has been established. We hypothesized that humanized mice could offer insights into human intestinal lymphoid homeostasis if generated in a strain with an intact mouse common γ-chain molecule. To address this hypothesis, we used three mouse strains (non-obese diabetic (NOD)/severe-combined immunodeficient (SCID) (N/S); NOD/SCID γ-chain(-/-) (NSG); and Rag2(-/-) γ-chain(-/-) (DKO)) and two humanization techniques (bone marrow liver thymus (BLT) and human CD34(+) cell bone marrow transplant of newborn mice (hu)) to generate four common types of humanized mice: N/S-BLT, NSG-BLT, NSG-hu, and DKO-hu mice. The highest levels of intestinal human T cells throughout the small and large intestines were observed in N/S-BLT mice, which have an intact common γ-chain molecule. Furthermore, the small intestine lamina propria T-cell populations of N/S-BLT mice exhibit a human intestine-specific surface phenotype. Thus, the extensive intestinal immune reconstitution of N/S-BLT mice was both quantitatively and qualitatively better when compared with the other models tested such that N/S-BLT mice are well suited for the analysis of human intestinal lymphocyte trafficking and human-specific diseases affecting the intestines.

  8. Intestinal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: an evaluation of different staging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hee Sang; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Suh, Cheolwon; Park, Chan-Sik; Huh, Jooryung

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is the most common primary extranodal site for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, there is no consensus on the most appropriate staging system for intestinal DLBCL. We evaluated the utility of the modified Ann Arbor system, the Lugano system, and the Paris staging system (a modification of the Tumor, Node, Metastases [TNM] staging for epithelial tumors) in 66 cases of resected intestinal DLBCL. The cases were treated with surgery, plus either cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (CHOP) chemotherapy alone (n=26) or with the addition of rituximab immunotherapy (n=40). Median follow-up time was 40.4 months (range, 2.1-171.6 months). Fifty-six patients (84.8%) achieved complete remission. The overall 5-yr survival rate was 86.4% (57/66). Of the stage categories defined for each staging system, only the T stage of the Paris classification showed prognostic significance for overall survival by univariate analysis. However, none of the stage parameters was significantly correlated with patient survival on multivariate analysis. In conclusion, the results suggest that the T stage of the Paris classification system may be a prognostic indicator in intestinal DLBCL. The results also imply that in surgically resected intestinal DLBCL, the addition of rituximab to the CHOP regimen does not confer significant survival advantage.

  9. Sedentary lifestyle related exosomal release of Hotair from gluteal-femoral fat promotes intestinal cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaozhao; Bai, Danna; Liu, Xiangwei; Zhou, Chen; Yang, Guodong

    2017-03-31

    Pioneering epidemiological work has established strong association of sedentary lifestyle and obesity with the risk of colorectal cancer, while the detailed underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here we show that Hotair (HOX transcript antisense RNA) is a pro-adipogenic long non-coding RNA highly expressed in gluteal-femoral fat over other fat depots. Hotair knockout in adipose tissue results in gluteal-femoral fat defect. Squeeze of the gluteal-femoral fat induces intestinal proliferation in wildtype mice, while not in Hotair knockout mice. Mechanistically, squeeze of the gluteal-femoral fat induces exosomal Hotair secretion mainly by transcriptional upregulation of Hotair via NFκB. And increased exosomal Hotair in turn circulates in the blood and is partially endocytosed by the intestine, finally promoting the stemness and proliferation of intestinal stem/progenitor cells via Wnt activation. Clinically, obese subjects with sedentary lifestyle have much higher exosomal HOTAIR expression in the serum. These findings establish that sedentary lifestyle promotes exosomal Hotair release from the gluteal-femoral fat, which in turn facilitates intestinal stem and/or progenitor proliferation, raising a possible link between sedentary lifestyle with colorectal tumorigenesis.

  10. Eosinophils may play regionally disparate roles in influencing IgA(+) plasma cell numbers during large and small intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Ruth; Bramhall, Michael; Logunova, Larisa; Svensson-Frej, Marcus; Cruickshank, Sheena M; Else, Kathryn J

    2016-05-31

    Eosinophils are innate immune cells present in the intestine during steady state conditions. An intestinal eosinophilia is a hallmark of many infections and an accumulation of eosinophils is also observed in the intestine during inflammatory disorders. Classically the function of eosinophils has been associated with tissue destruction, due to the release of cytotoxic granule contents. However, recent evidence has demonstrated that the eosinophil plays a more diverse role in the immune system than previously acknowledged, including shaping adaptive immune responses and providing plasma cell survival factors during the steady state. Importantly, it is known that there are regional differences in the underlying immunology of the small and large intestine, but whether there are differences in context of the intestinal eosinophil in the steady state or inflammation is not known. Our data demonstrates that there are fewer IgA(+) plasma cells in the small intestine of eosinophil-deficient ΔdblGATA-1 mice compared to eosinophil-sufficient wild-type mice, with the difference becoming significant post-infection with Toxoplasma gondii. Remarkably, and in complete contrast, the absence of eosinophils in the inflamed large intestine does not impact on IgA(+) cell numbers during steady state, and is associated with a significant increase in IgA(+) cells post-infection with Trichuris muris compared to wild-type mice. Thus, the intestinal eosinophil appears to be less important in sustaining the IgA(+) cell pool in the large intestine compared to the small intestine, and in fact, our data suggests eosinophils play an inhibitory role. The dichotomy in the influence of the eosinophil over small and large intestinal IgA(+) cells did not depend on differences in plasma cell growth factors, recruitment potential or proliferation within the different regions of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). We demonstrate for the first time that there are regional differences in the requirement of

  11. Enhancing Oral Vaccine Potency by Targeting Intestinal M Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Azizi, A.; Kumar, A.; Diaz-Mitoma, F.; Městecký, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 11 (2010) ISSN 1553-7366 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : PATCH M-CELLS * UROPATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA-COLI * MUCOSAL IMMUNE-SYSTEM Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.079, year: 2010

  12. Fusion between Intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages in a cancer context results in nuclear reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Anne E; Anderson, Eric C; Davies, Paige S; Silk, Alain D; Pelz, Carl; Impey, Soren; Wong, Melissa H

    2011-02-15

    The most deadly phase in cancer progression is attributed to the inappropriate acquisition of molecular machinery leading to metastatic transformation and spread of disease to distant organs. Although it is appreciated that metastasis involves epithelial-mesenchymal interplay, the underlying mechanism defining this process is poorly understood. Specifically, how cancer cells evade immune surveillance and gain the ability to navigate the circulatory system remains a focus. One possible mechanism underlying metastatic conversion is fusion between blood-derived immune cells and cancer cells. While this notion is a century old, in vivo evidence that cell fusion occurs within tumors and imparts genetic or physiologic changes remains controversial. We have previously demonstrated in vivo cell fusion between blood cells and intestinal epithelial cells in an injury setting. Here, we hypothesize that immune cells, such as macrophages, fuse with tumor cells imparting metastatic capabilities by transferring their cellular identity. We used parabiosis to introduce fluorescent-labeled bone marrow-derived cells to mice with intestinal tumors, finding that fusion between circulating blood-derived cells and tumor epithelium occurs during the natural course of tumorigenesis. Moreover, we identify the macrophage as a key cellular partner for this process. Interestingly, cell fusion hybrids retain a transcriptome identity characteristic of both parental derivatives, while also expressing a unique subset of transcripts. Our data supports the novel possibility that tumorigenic cell fusion may impart physical behavior attributed to migratory macrophages, including navigation of circulation and immune evasion. As such, cell fusion may represent a promising novel mechanism underlying the metastatic conversion of cancer cells. ©2011 AACR.

  13. GATA4 Regulates Epithelial Cell Proliferation to Control Intestinal Growth and Development in MiceSummary

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    Bridget M. Kohlnhofer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: The embryonic small intestinal epithelium is highly proliferative, and although much is known about mechanisms regulating proliferation in the adult intestine, the mechanisms controlling epithelial cell proliferation in the developing intestine are less clear. GATA4, a transcription factor that regulates proliferation in other developing tissues, is first expressed early in the developing gut in midgut endoderm. GATA4 function within midgut endoderm and the early intestinal epithelium is unknown. Methods: By using Sonic Hedgehog Cre to eliminate GATA4 in the midgut endoderm of mouse embryos, we determined the impact of loss of GATA4 on intestinal development, including epithelial cell proliferation, between embryonic day (E9.5 and E18.5. Results: We found that intestinal length and width were decreased in GATA4 mutants compared with controls. GATA4-deficient intestinal epithelium contained fewer cells, and epithelial girth was decreased. We further observed a decreased proportion of proliferating epithelial cells at E10.5 and E11.5 in GATA4 mutants. We showed that GATA4 binds to chromatin containing GATA4 consensus binding sites within cyclin D2 (Ccnd2, cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (Cdk6, and frizzled 5 (Fzd5. Moreover, Ccnd2, Cdk6, and Fzd5 transcripts were reduced at E11.5 in GATA4 mutant tissue. Villus morphogenesis was delayed, and villus structure was abnormal in GATA4 mutant intestine. Conclusions: Our data identify GATA4 as an essential regulator of early intestinal epithelial cell proliferation. We propose that GATA4 controls proliferation in part by directly regulating transcription of cell-cycle mediators. Our data further suggest that GATA4 affects proliferation through transcriptional regulation of Fzd5, perhaps by influencing the response of the epithelium to WNT signaling. Keywords: Transcriptional Regulation, WNT Signaling, Villus Morphogenesis

  14. GLP-1 and GIP are colocalized in a subset of endocrine cells in the small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kristine; Christensen, Louise Lundby; Holst, Jens Juul

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incretin hormones GIP and GLP-1 are thought to be produced in separate endocrine cells located in the proximal and distal ends of the mammalian small intestine, respectively. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using double immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, we found that GLP-1 was ....... CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide a morphological basis to suggest simultaneous, rather than sequential, secretion of these hormones by postprandial luminal stimulation....

  15. Role of BK channels in the apoptotic volume decrease in native eel intestinal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lionetto, Maria Giulia; Giordano, Maria Elena; Calisi, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    High conductance Ca(+)-activated K(+) channels (BK channels) have previously been demonstrated in the eel intestine. They are specifically activated following a hypotonic stress and sustain Regulatory Volume Decrease (RVD). The aim of the present work was to address the possible role...... enterocytes that BK channels, which are involved in RVD in these cells, plays also a crucial role in the AVD process and in the progression of apoptosis....

  16. Autoradiographic quantification of vasoactive intestinal peptide binding sites in sections from human blood mononuclear cell pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutkind, J.S.; Kurihara, M.; Castren, E.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1988-09-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic methods were utilized to characterize specific, high-affinity vasoactive intestinal peptide binding sites (Kd = 310 +/- 60 pmol/L; Bmax = 93 +/- 11 fmol/mg protein) in frozen sections obtained from a mononuclear cell pellet derived from 20 ml of human blood. The method is at least one order of magnitude more sensitive than conventional membrane binding techniques, and it has the potential for wide applications in studies of neuropeptide, biogenic amine, and drug binding in clinical samples.

  17. Autoradiographic quantification of vasoactive intestinal peptide binding sites in sections from human blood mononuclear cell pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutkind, J.S.; Kurihara, M.; Castren, E.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic methods were utilized to characterize specific, high-affinity vasoactive intestinal peptide binding sites (Kd = 310 +/- 60 pmol/L; Bmax = 93 +/- 11 fmol/mg protein) in frozen sections obtained from a mononuclear cell pellet derived from 20 ml of human blood. The method is at least one order of magnitude more sensitive than conventional membrane binding techniques, and it has the potential for wide applications in studies of neuropeptide, biogenic amine, and drug binding in clinical samples

  18. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Couvigny

    Full Text Available The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health.

  19. A unique cause of intestinal and splenic infarction in a sickle cell trait patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfaw, Sofya H; Falk, Gavin A; Morris-Stiff, Gareth; Tuthill, Ralph J; Moorman, Matthew L; Samotowka, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Sickle-cell trait is a common genetic abnormality in the African American population. A sickle-cell crisis in a patient with sickle-cell trait is uncommon at best. Abdominal painful crises are typical of patients with sickle cell anemia. The treatment for an abdominal painful crisis is usually medical and rarely surgical. We present the case of a cocaine-induced sickle-cell crisis in a sickle-cell trait patient that resulted in splenic, intestinal, and cerebral infarctions and multisystem organ failure necessitating a splenectomy, subtotal colectomy, and small bowel resection. This case highlights the diagnostic dilemma that abdominal pain can present in the sickle-cell population and illustrates the importance of recognizing the potential for traditionally medically managed illnesses to become surgical emergencies.

  20. A Unique Cause of Intestinal and Splenic Infarction in a Sickle Cell Trait Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofya H. Asfaw

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle-cell trait is a common genetic abnormality in the African American population. A sickle-cell crisis in a patient with sickle-cell trait is uncommon at best. Abdominal painful crises are typical of patients with sickle cell anemia. The treatment for an abdominal painful crisis is usually medical and rarely surgical. We present the case of a cocaine-induced sickle-cell crisis in a sickle-cell trait patient that resulted in splenic, intestinal, and cerebral infarctions and multisystem organ failure necessitating a splenectomy, subtotal colectomy, and small bowel resection. This case highlights the diagnostic dilemma that abdominal pain can present in the sickle-cell population and illustrates the importance of recognizing the potential for traditionally medically managed illnesses to become surgical emergencies.

  1. The effect of storage time of human red cells on intestinal microcirculatory oxygenation in a rat isovolemic exchange model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raat, N. J.; Verhoeven, A. J.; Mik, E. G.; Gouwerok, C. W.; Verhaar, R.; Goedhart, P. T.; de Korte, D.; Ince, C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the storage time of human leukodepleted red blood cell concentrates compromises intestinal microvascular oxygen concentration oxygen (muPo(2)) during isovolemic exchange transfusion at low hematocrit. Design: Prospective, randomized, controlled study. Setting:

  2. Xenobiotic effects on intestinal stem cell proliferation in adult honey bee (Apis mellifera L) workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkpah, Cordelia; Dixon, Luke R; Fahrbach, Susan E; Rueppell, Olav

    2014-01-01

    The causes of the current global decline in honey bee health are unknown. One major group of hypotheses invokes the pesticides and other xenobiotics to which this important pollinator species is often exposed. Most studies have focused on mortality or behavioral deficiencies in exposed honey bees while neglecting other biological functions and target organs. The midgut epithelium of honey bees presents an important interface between the insect and its environment. It is maintained by proliferation of intestinal stem cells throughout the adult life of honey bees. We used caged honey bees to test multiple xenobiotics for effects on the replicative activity of the intestinal stem cells under laboratory conditions. Most of the tested compounds did not alter the replicative activity of intestinal stem cells. However, colchicine, methoxyfenozide, tetracycline, and a combination of coumaphos and tau-fluvalinate significantly affected proliferation rate. All substances except methoxyfenozide decreased proliferation rate. Thus, the results indicate that some xenobiotics frequently used in apiculture and known to accumulate in honey bee hives may have hitherto unknown physiological effects. The nutritional status and the susceptibility to pathogens of honey bees could be compromised by the impacts of xenobiotics on the maintenance of the midgut epithelium. This study contributes to a growing body of evidence that more comprehensive testing of xenobiotics may be required before novel or existing compounds can be considered safe for honey bees and other non-target species.

  3. Transplantation of Allogeneic PW1pos/Pax7neg Interstitial Cells Enhance Endogenous Repair of Injured Porcine Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona C. Lewis, BSc, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle-derived PW1pos/Pax7neg interstitial cells (PICs express and secrete a multitude of proregenerative growth factors and cytokines. Utilizing a porcine preclinical skeletal muscle injury model, delivery of allogeneic porcine PICs (pPICs significantly improved and accelerated myofiber regeneration and neocapillarization, compared with saline vehicle control-treated muscles. Allogeneic pPICs did not contribute to new myofibers or capillaries and were eliminated by the host immune system. In conclusion, allogeneic pPIC transplantation stimulated the endogenous stem cell pool to bring about enhanced autologous skeletal muscle repair and regeneration. This allogeneic cell approach is considered a cost-effective, easy to apply, and readily available regenerative therapeutic strategy.

  4. Potassium and ANO1/TMEM16A chloride channel profiles distinguish atypical and typical smooth muscle cells from interstitial cells in the mouse renal pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Javed; Tonta, Mary A; Mitsui, Retsu; Li, Qun; Kett, Michelle; Li, Jinhua; Parkington, Helena C; Hashitani, Hikaru; Lang, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Although atypical smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the proximal renal pelvis are thought to generate the pacemaker signals that drive pyeloureteric peristalsis, their location and electrical properties remain obscure. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Standard patch clamp, intracellular microelectrode and immunohistochemistry techniques were used. To unequivocally identify SMCs, transgenic mice with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) expressed in cells containing α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were sometimes used. KEY RESULTS Atypical SMCs were distinguished from typical SMCs by the absence of both a transient 4-aminopyridine-sensitive K+ current (IKA) and spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) upon the opening of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels. Many typical SMCs displayed a slowly activating, slowly decaying Cl- current blocked by niflumic acid (NFA). Immunostaining for KV4.3 and ANO1/ TMEM16A Cl- channel subunits co-localized with α-SMA immunoreactive product predominately in the distal renal pelvis. Atypical SMCs fired spontaneous inward currents that were either selective for Cl- and blocked by NFA, or cation-selective and blocked by La3+. α-SMA- interstitial cells (ICs) were distinguished by the presence of a Xe991-sensitive KV7 current, BK channel STOCs and Cl- selective, NFA-sensitive spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs). Intense ANO1/ TMEM16A and KV7.5 immunostaining was present in Kit-α-SMA- ICs in the suburothelial and adventitial regions of the renal pelvis. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We conclude that KV4.3+α-SMA+ SMCs are typical SMCs that facilitate muscle wall contraction, that ANO1/ TMEM16A and KV7.5 immunoreactivity may be selective markers of Kit- ICs and that atypical SMCs which discharge spontaneous inward currents are the pelviureteric pacemakers. PMID:22014103

  5. Thyroid Hormone-Induced Activation of Notch Signaling is Required for Adult Intestinal Stem Cell Development During Xenopus Laevis Metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasebe, Takashi; Fujimoto, Kenta; Kajita, Mitsuko; Fu, Liezhen; Shi, Yun-Bo; Ishizuya-Oka, Atsuko

    2017-04-01

    In Xenopus laevis intestine during metamorphosis, the larval epithelial cells are removed by apoptosis, and the adult epithelial stem (AE) cells appear concomitantly. They proliferate and differentiate to form the adult epithelium (Ep). Thyroid hormone (TH) is well established to trigger this remodeling by regulating the expression of various genes including Notch receptor. To study the role of Notch signaling, we have analyzed the expression of its components, including the ligands (DLL and Jag), receptor (Notch), and targets (Hairy), in the metamorphosing intestine by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization or immunohistochemistry. We show that they are up-regulated during both natural and TH-induced metamorphosis in a tissue-specific manner. Particularly, Hairy1 is specifically expressed in the AE cells. Moreover, up-regulation of Hairy1 and Hairy2b by TH was prevented by treating tadpoles with a γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI), which inhibits Notch signaling. More importantly, TH-induced up-regulation of LGR5, an adult intestinal stem cell marker, was suppressed by GSI treatment. Our results suggest that Notch signaling plays a role in stem cell development by regulating the expression of Hairy genes during intestinal remodeling. Furthermore, we show with organ culture experiments that prolonged exposure of tadpole intestine to TH plus GSI leads to hyperplasia of secretory cells and reduction of absorptive cells. Our findings here thus provide evidence for evolutionarily conserved role of Notch signaling in intestinal cell fate determination but more importantly reveal, for the first time, an important role of Notch pathway in the formation of adult intestinal stem cells during vertebrate development. Stem Cells 2017;35:1028-1039. © 2016 The Authors STEM CELLS published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  6. Fasting protects mice from lethal DNA damage by promoting small intestinal epithelial stem cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkum, Kelsey L; Stemler, Kristina M; White, Lynn S; Loza, Andrew J; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Michalski, Basia M; Kuzmicki, Catherine; Pless, Robert; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2015-12-22

    Short-term fasting protects mice from lethal doses of chemotherapy through undetermined mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that fasting preserves small intestinal (SI) architecture by maintaining SI stem cell viability and SI barrier function following exposure to high-dose etoposide. Nearly all SI stem cells were lost in fed mice, whereas fasting promoted sufficient SI stem cell survival to preserve SI integrity after etoposide treatment. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple SI stem cell populations, marked by Lgr5, Bmi1, or HopX expression, contributed to fasting-induced survival. DNA repair and DNA damage response genes were elevated in SI stem/progenitor cells of fasted etoposide-treated mice, which importantly correlated with faster resolution of DNA double-strand breaks and less apoptosis. Thus, fasting preserved SI stem cell viability as well as SI architecture and barrier function suggesting that fasting may reduce host toxicity in patients undergoing dose intensive chemotherapy.

  7. Physiology and pathophysiology of apoptosis in epithelial cells of the liver, pancreas, and intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B A; Gores, G J

    1997-12-01

    Cell death of gastrointestinal epithelial cells occurs by a process referred to as apoptosis. In this review, we succinctly define apoptosis and summarize the role of apoptosis in the physiology and pathophysiology of epithelial cells in the liver, pancreas, and small and large intestine. The physiological mediators regulating apoptosis in gastrointestinal epithelial cells, when known, are discussed. Selected pathophysiological consequences of excessive apoptosis and inhibition of apoptosis are used to illustrate the significance of apoptosis in disease processes. These examples demonstrate that excessive apoptosis may result in epithelial cell atrophy, injury, and dysfunction, whereas inhibition of apoptosis results in hyperplasia and promotes malignant transformation. The specific cellular mechanisms responsible for dysregulation of epithelial cell apoptosis during pathophysiological disturbances are emphasized. Potential future areas of physiological research regarding apoptosis in gastrointestinal epithelia are highlighted when appropriate.

  8. Celiac anti-type 2 transglutaminase antibodies induce phosphoproteome modification in intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetana Paolella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is an inflammatory condition of the small intestine that affects genetically predisposed individuals after dietary wheat gliadin ingestion. Type 2-transglutaminase (TG2 activity seems to be responsible for a strong autoimmune response in celiac disease, TG2 being the main autoantigen. Several studies support the concept that celiac anti-TG2 antibodies may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our recent findings on the ability of anti-TG2 antibodies to induce a rapid intracellular mobilization of calcium ions, as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, suggest that they potentially act as signaling molecules. In line with this concept, we have investigated whether anti-TG2 antibodies can induce phosphoproteome modification in an intestinal epithelial cell line. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied phosphoproteome modification in Caco-2 cells treated with recombinant celiac anti-TG2 antibodies. We performed a two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by specific staining of phosphoproteins and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially phosphorylated proteins. Of 14 identified proteins (excluding two uncharacterized proteins, three were hypophosphorylated and nine were hyperphosphorylated. Bioinformatics analyses confirmed the presence of phosphorylation sites in all the identified proteins and highlighted their involvement in several fundamental biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, cell stress response, cytoskeletal organization and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Identification of differentially phosphorylated proteins downstream of TG2-antibody stimulation suggests that in Caco-2 cells these antibodies perturb cell homeostasis by behaving as signaling molecules. We hypothesize that anti-TG2 autoantibodies may destabilize the integrity of the intestinal mucosa in celiac individuals, thus contributing to celiac disease establishment and progression. Since several proteins here

  9. Long-term Persistence of Innate Lymphoid Cells in the Gut After Intestinal Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Joshua; Zuber, Julien; Shonts, Brittany; Yang, Suxiao; Fu, Jianing; Martinez, Mercedes; Farber, Donna L; Kato, Tomoaki; Sykes, Megan

    2017-10-01

    Little is known about innate lymphoid cell (ILC) populations in the human gut, and the turnover of these cells and their subsets after transplantation has not been described. Intestinal samples were taken from 4 isolated intestine and 3 multivisceral transplant recipients at the time of any operative resection, such as stoma closure or revision. ILCs were isolated and analyzed by flow cytometry. The target population was defined as being negative for lineage markers and double-positive for CD45/CD127. Cells were further stained to define ILC subsets and a donor-specific or recipient-specific HLA marker to analyze chimerism. Donor-derived ILCs were found to persist greater than 8 years after transplantation. Additionally, the percentage of cells thought to be lymphoid tissue inducer cells among donor ILCs was far higher than that among recipient ILCs. Our findings demonstrate that donor-derived ILCs persist long-term after transplantation and support the notion that human lymphoid tissue inducer cells may form in the fetus and persist throughout life, as hypothesized in rodents. Correlation between chimerism and rejection, graft failure, and patient survival requires further study.

  10. Defining a stem cell hierarchy in the intestine: markers, caveats and controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas R.; Gallagher, Alexandra C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The past decade has appreciated rapid advance in identifying the once elusive intestinal stem cell (ISC) populations that fuel the continual renewal of the epithelial layer. This advance was largely driven by identification of novel stem cell marker genes, revealing the existence of quiescent, slowly‐ and active‐cycling ISC populations. However, a critical barrier for translating this knowledge to human health and disease remains elucidating the functional interplay between diverse stem cell populations. Currently, the precise hierarchical and regulatory relationships between these ISC populations are under intense scrutiny. The classical theory of a linear hierarchy, where quiescent and slowly‐cycling stem cells self‐renew but replenish an active‐cycling population, is well established in other rapidly renewing tissues such as the haematopoietic system. Efforts to definitively establish a similar stem cell hierarchy within the intestinal epithelium have yielded conflicting results, been difficult to interpret, and suggest non‐conventional alternatives to a linear hierarchy. While these new and potentially paradigm‐shifting discoveries are intriguing, the field will require development of a number of critical tools, including highly specific stem cell marker genes along with more rigorous experimental methodologies, to delineate the complex cellular relationships within this dynamic organ system. PMID:26864260

  11. Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz stimulates intestinal epithelial cell migration through a polyamine dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hou-Pan; Li, Ru-Liu; Zhou, Chi; Cai, Xiong; Huang, Hui-Yong

    2015-01-15

    Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz (AMK), a valuable traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has been widely used in clinical practice for treating patients with disorders of the digestive system. AMK has shown noteworthy promoting effect on improving gastrointestinal function and immunity, which might represent a promising candidate for the treatment of intestinal mucosa injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of AMK on intestinal mucosal restitution and the underlying mechanisms via intestinal epithelial (IEC-6) cell migration model. A cell migration model of IEC-6 cells was induced by a single-edge razor blade along the diameter of the cell layers in six-well polystyrene plates. After wounding, the cells were grown in control cultures and in cultures containing spermidine (5μM, SPD, reference drug), alpha-difluoromethylornithine (2.5mM, DFMO, polyamine inhibitor), AMK (50, 100, and 200mg/L), DFMO plus SPD and DFMO plus AMK for 12h. The polyamines content was detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with pre-column derivatization. The Rho mRNAs expression levels were assessed by Q-RT-PCR. The Rho and non-muscle myosin II proteins expression levels were analyzed by Western blot. The formation and distribution of non-muscle myosin II stress fibers were monitored with immunostaining techniques using specific antibodies and observed by confocal microscopy. Cell migration assay was carried out using inverted microscope and the Image-Pro Plus software. All of these indexes were used to evaluate the effectiveness of AMK. (1) Treatment with AMK caused significant increases in cellular polyamines content and Rho mRNAs and proteins expression levels, as compared to control group. Furthermore, AMK exposure increased non-muscle myosin II protein expression levels and formation of non-muscle myosin II stress fibers, and resulted in an acceleration of cell migration in IEC-6 cells. (2) Depletion of cellular polyamines by DFMO resulted in a

  12. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells mediate intestinal selection of commensal bacteria-specific CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Matthew R.; Fung, Thomas C.; Masur, Samuel H.; Kelsen, Judith R.; McConnell, Fiona M.; Dubrot, Juan; Withers, David R.; Hugues, Stephanie; Farrar, Michael A.; Reith, Walter; Eberl, Gerard; Baldassano, Robert N.; Laufer, Terri M.; Elson, Charles O.; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory CD4+ T cell responses to self or commensal bacteria underlie the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), respectively. While selection of self-specific T cells in the thymus limits responses to tissue antigens, the mechanisms that control selection of commensal bacteria-specific T cells remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that group 3 innate lymphoid cell (ILC3)-intrinsic expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) is regulated similarly to thymic epithelial cells, and that MHCII+ ILC3s directly induce cell death of activated commensal bacteria-specific T cells. Further, MHCII on human colonic ILC3s was reduced in pediatric IBD patients. Collectively, these results define a selection pathway for commensal bacteria-specific CD4+ T cells in the intestine, and suggest that this process is dysregulated in human IBD. PMID:25908663

  13. EGFR/Ras Signaling Controls Drosophila Intestinal Stem Cell Proliferation via Capicua-Regulated Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinhua Jin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial renewal in the Drosophila intestine is orchestrated by Intestinal Stem Cells (ISCs. Following damage or stress the intestinal epithelium produces ligands that activate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in ISCs. This promotes their growth and division and, thereby, epithelial regeneration. Here we demonstrate that the HMG-box transcriptional repressor, Capicua (Cic, mediates these functions of EGFR signaling. Depleting Cic in ISCs activated them for division, whereas overexpressed Cic inhibited ISC proliferation and midgut regeneration. Epistasis tests showed that Cic acted as an essential downstream effector of EGFR/Ras signaling, and immunofluorescence showed that Cic's nuclear localization was regulated by EGFR signaling. ISC-specific mRNA expression profiling and DNA binding mapping using DamID indicated that Cic represses cell proliferation via direct targets including string (Cdc25, Cyclin E, and the ETS domain transcription factors Ets21C and Pointed (pnt. pnt was required for ISC over-proliferation following Cic depletion, and ectopic pnt restored ISC proliferation even in the presence of overexpressed dominant-active Cic. These studies identify Cic, Pnt, and Ets21C as critical downstream effectors of EGFR signaling in Drosophila ISCs.

  14. Mapping of HNF4alpha target genes in intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Mette; Bressendorff, Simon; Moller, Jette

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The role of HNF4alpha has been extensively studied in hepatocytes and pancreatic beta-cells, and HNF4alpha is also regarded as key regulator of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation as well. The aim of the present work is to identify novel HNF4alpha target genes....... The HNF4alpha ChIP-chip data was matched with gene expression and histone H3 acetylation status of the promoters in order to identify HNF4alpha binding to actively transcribed genes with an open chromatin structure. RESULTS: 1,541 genes were identified as potential HNF4alpha targets, many of which have...

  15. HOXB4 Gene Expression Is Regulated by CDX2 in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Steffen; Coshun, Mehmet; Mikkelsen Homburg, Keld

    2016-01-01

    analysis and expression data from Caco2 cells also suggests a role for CDX2 in the regulation of HOXB4 gene expression in the intestinal epithelium. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether HOXB4 gene expression is regulated by CDX2 in the intestinal epithelium. We demonstrated binding of CDX......The mammalian Caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) plays a key role in the homeobox regulatory network and is essential in regulating the expression of several homeobox (HOX) genes during embryonic development, particularly in the gut. Genome-wide CDX2 chromatin immunoprecipitation......2 to four different CDX2 binding sites in an enhancer region located upstream of the HOXB4 transcription start site. Mutations in the CDX2 binding sites reduced HOXB4 gene activity, and knock down of endogenous CDX2 expression by shRNA reduced HOXB4 gene expression. This is the first report...

  16. Activation of Sox3 Gene by Thyroid Hormone in the Developing Adult Intestinal Stem Cell During Xenopus Metamorphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guihong; Fu, Liezhen; Wen, Luan

    2014-01-01

    The maturation of the intestine into the adult form involves the formation of adult stem cells in a thyroid hormone (T3)-dependent process in vertebrates. In mammals, this takes place during postembryonic development, a period around birth when the T3 level peaks. Due to the difficulty of manipulating late-stage, uterus-enclosed embryos, very little is known about the development of the adult intestinal stem cells. Interestingly, the remodeling of the intestine during the T3-dependent amphibian metamorphosis mimics the maturation of mammalian intestine. Our earlier microarray studies in Xenopus laevis revealed that the transcription factor SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 3 (Sox3), well known for its involvement in neural development, was upregulated in the intestinal epithelium during metamorphosis. Here, we show that Sox3 is highly and specifically expressed in the developing adult intestinal progenitor/stem cells. We further show that its induction by T3 is independent of new protein synthesis, suggesting that Sox3 is directly activated by liganded T3 receptor. Thus, T3 activates Sox3 as one of the earliest changes in the epithelium, and Sox3 in turn may facilitate the dedifferentiation of the larval epithelial cells into adult stem cells. PMID:25211587

  17. Staphylococcus aureus induces IL-8 expression through its lipoproteins in the human intestinal epithelial cell, Caco-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seok-Seong; Noh, Su Young; Park, Ok-Jin; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause the intestinal inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of S. aureus infection in the intestine. In the present study, we investigated whether S. aureus could stimulate human intestinal epithelial cells triggering inflammation. When the human intestinal epithelial cell-line, Caco-2, and the primary colon cells were stimulated with ethanol-inactivated S. aureus, IL-8 expression was induced in a dose-dependent manner. The inactivated S. aureus preferentially stimulated Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 rather than TLR4. Lipoproteins, lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and peptidoglycan (PGN) are considered as potential TLR2 ligands of S. aureus. Interestingly, S aureus lipoproteins and Pam2CSK4 mimicking Gram-positive bacterial lipoproteins, but not LTA and PGN of S. aureus, significantly induced IL-8 expression in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, lipoprotein-deficient S. aureus mutant strain failed to induce IL-8 production. Collectively, these results suggest that S. aureus stimulates the human intestinal epithelial cells to induce the chemokine IL-8 production through its lipoproteins, potentially contributing the development of intestinal inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Epimorphin Regulates the Intestinal Stem Cell Niche via Effects on the Stromal Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishy, Courtney E; Swietlicki, Elzbieta A; Gazit, Vered; Amara, Suneetha; Heslop, Gabriela; Lu, Jianyun; Levin, Marc S; Rubin, Deborah C

    2018-04-06

    Stem cell therapy is a potential therapeutic approach for disorders characterized by intestinal injury or loss of functional surface area. Stem cell function and proliferation are mediated by the stem cell niche. Stromal cells such as intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs) are important but poorly studied components of the stem cell niche. To examine the role of ISEMFs, we have previously generated mice with deletion of epimorphin (Epim), an ISEMF protein and member of the syntaxin family of intracellular vesicle docking proteins that regulate cell secretion. Herein we explore the mechanisms for previous observations that Epim deletion increases gut crypt cell proliferation, crypt fission and small bowel length in vivo. Stem cell derived crypt culture techniques were used to explore the interaction between enteroids and myofibroblasts from Epim -/- and WT mice. Enteroids co-cultured with ISEMFS had increased growth and crypt-like budding compared to enteroids cultured without stromal support. Epim deletion in ISEMFs resulted in increased enteroid budding and surface area compared to co-cultures with WT ISEMFs. In primary crypt cultures, Epim -/- enteroids had significantly increased surface area and budding compared WTs. However stem cell assays comparing the number of Epim -/- vs WT colony forming units after first passage showed no differences in the absence of ISEMF support. Epim -/- vs. WT ISEMFs had increased Wnt4 expression and addition of Wnt4 to WT co-cultures enhanced budding. We conclude that ISEMFs play an important role in the stem cell niche. Epim regulates stem cell proliferation and differentiation via stromal contributions to the niche microenvironment.

  19. In vitro and in vivo imaging and tracking of intestinal organoids from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwang Bo; Lee, Hana; Son, Ye Seul; Lee, Ji Hye; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Mi-Ok; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Lee, Jaemin; Kim, Seokho; Jung, Cho-Rok; Kim, Janghwan; Son, Mi-Young

    2018-01-01

    Human intestinal organoids (hIOs) derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have immense potential as a source of intestines. Therefore, an efficient system is needed for visualizing the stage of intestinal differentiation and further identifying hIOs derived from hPSCs. Here, 2 fluorescent biosensors were developed based on human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) lines that stably expressed fluorescent reporters driven by intestine-specific gene promoters Krüppel-like factor 5 monomeric Cherry (KLF5 mCherry ) and intestine-specific homeobox enhanced green fluorescence protein (ISX eGFP ). Then hIOs were efficiently induced from those transgenic hiPSC lines in which mCherry- or eGFP-expressing cells, which appeared during differentiation, could be identified in intact living cells in real time. Reporter gene expression had no adverse effects on differentiation into hIOs and proliferation. Using our reporter system to screen for hIO differentiation factors, we identified DMH1 as an efficient substitute for Noggin. Transplanted hIOs under the kidney capsule were tracked with fluorescence imaging (FLI) and confirmed histologically. After orthotopic transplantation, the localization of the hIOs in the small intestine could be accurately visualized using FLI. Our study establishes a selective system for monitoring the in vitro differentiation and for tracking the in vivo localization of hIOs and contributes to further improvement of cell-based therapies and preclinical screenings in the intestinal field.-Jung, K. B., Lee, H., Son, Y. S., Lee, J. H., Cho, H.-S., Lee, M.-O., Oh, J.-H., Lee, J., Kim, S., Jung, C.-R., Kim, J., Son, M.-Y. In vitro and in vivo imaging and tracking of intestinal organoids from human induced pluripotent stem cells. © FASEB.

  20. Posttranscriptional Regulation of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Rat Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghua Zhang

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 mRNA stability plays an important role in the regulation of its expression by oncogenic Ras. Here, we evaluate COX-2 mRNA stability in response to treatment with two known endogenous promoters of gastrointestinal cancer, the bile acid (chenodeoxycholate; CD and ceramide. Treatment with CD and ceramide resulted in a 10-fold increase in the level of COX-2 protein and a four-fold lengthening of the half-life of COX-2 mRNA. COX-2 mRNA stability was assessed by Northern blot analysis and by evaluating the AU-rich element located in the COX-2 3′-UTR. A known inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein (MAP/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK kinase (MEK, PD98059, reversed the effects of CD or ceramide to stabilize COX-2 mRNA. Overexpression of a dominant-negative ERK-1 or ERK-2 protein also led to destabilization of COX-2 mRNA. Treatment with a p38 MAPK inhibitor, PD169316, or transfection with a dominant-negative p38 MAPK construct reversed the effect of CD or ceramide to stabilize COX-2 mRNA. Expression of a dominant-negative c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK had no effect on COX-2 mRNA stability in cells treated with CD or ceramide. We conclude that posttranscriptional mechanisms play an important role in the regulation of COX-2 expression during carcinogenesis.

  1. Sugars increase non-heme iron bioavailability in human epithelial intestinal and liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Christides

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that sugars enhance iron bioavailability, possibly through either chelation or altering the oxidation state of the metal, however, results have been inconclusive. Sugar intake in the last 20 years has increased dramatically, and iron status disorders are significant public health problems worldwide; therefore understanding the nutritional implications of iron-sugar interactions is particularly relevant. In this study we measured the effects of sugars on non-heme iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and HepG2 hepatoma cells using ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. The effect of sugars on iron oxidation state was examined by measuring ferrous iron formation in different sugar-iron solutions with a ferrozine-based assay. Fructose significantly increased iron-induced ferritin formation in both Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. In addition, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS-55 increased Caco-2 cell iron-induced ferritin; these effects were negated by the addition of either tannic acid or phytic acid. Fructose combined with FeCl3 increased ferrozine-chelatable ferrous iron levels by approximately 300%. In conclusion, fructose increases iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. Given the large amount of simple and rapidly digestible sugars in the modern diet their effects on iron bioavailability may have important patho-physiological consequences. Further studies are warranted to characterize these interactions.

  2. Cell survival curves deduced from non-quantitative reactions of skin, intestinal mucosa and lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutreix, J.; Wambersie, A.

    1975-01-01

    The shape of the cell survival curve for the cell population relevant to some biological effects has been derived from the comparison of the total doses which result in the same biological effect for two irradiations delivered with N and 2N fractions in the same overall time. They show an initial slope which is interpreted as related to directly lethal, i.e. 'one-hit' or 'irreparable' events. The ratio of the initial slope and the slope at a dose D gives the contribution of the cell killing by directly lethal events relative to cell killing by accumulation of sublethal events. The bioligical effects which have been studied are: (i) dry desquamation of the skin of C 3 H mice and patients; (ii) intestinal death of BALB/c mice; and (iii) lung death of C 3 H mice. The shape of the cell survival curve has been found to be similar for skin desquamation and for intestinal death with a large contribution of lethal events, at single doses of 1000 rad. For lung death the initial tangent has a smaller slope and the shoulder is broader; this is interpreted as a relatively smaller contribution of lethal events with respect to accumulation of sublethal events. (author)

  3. Epithelial WNT Ligands Are Essential Drivers of Intestinal Stem Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnie Y. Zou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal stem cells (ISCs maintain and repair the intestinal epithelium. While regeneration after ISC-targeted damage is increasingly understood, injury-repair mechanisms that direct regeneration following injuries to differentiated cells remain uncharacterized. The enteric pathogen, rotavirus, infects and damages differentiated cells while sparing all ISC populations, thus allowing the unique examination of the response of intact ISC compartments during injury-repair. Upon rotavirus infection in mice, ISC compartments robustly expand and proliferating cells rapidly migrate. Infection results specifically in stimulation of the active crypt-based columnar ISCs, but not alternative reserve ISC populations, as is observed after ISC-targeted damage. Conditional ablation of epithelial WNT secretion diminishes crypt expansion and ISC activation, demonstrating a previously unknown function of epithelial-secreted WNT during injury-repair. These findings indicate a hierarchical preference of crypt-based columnar cells (CBCs over other potential ISC populations during epithelial restitution and the importance of epithelial-derived signals in regulating ISC behavior.

  4. Macrophage-like cells in the muscularis externa of mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, H B; Thuneberg, L; Rumessen, J J

    1985-01-01

    by processes of interstitial cells of Cajal. FITC-dextran used in combined fluorescence stereo microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and electron microscopy was employed as a tracer to study the endocytic qualities of the MLC. The mice were killed 5, 15, 30, and 60 min, 1 day, and 4 days after dextran...... administration. By fluorescence microscopy after 1 or 4 days MLC were observed as a constant cellular population with a strikingly regular distribution. By electron microscopy dextran-containing vacuoles were conspicuous after 1 h or more. MLC of the subserosal layer and between the circular and longitudinal...... muscle layers could be distinguished with respect to general appearance, pattern formation, and apparent dextran contents....

  5. Induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress by deletion of Grp78 depletes Apc mutant intestinal epithelial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lidth de Jeude, J F; Meijer, B J; Wielenga, M C B; Spaan, C N; Baan, B; Rosekrans, S L; Meisner, S; Shen, Y H; Lee, A S; Paton, J C; Paton, A W; Muncan, V; van den Brink, G R; Heijmans, J

    2017-06-15

    Intestinal epithelial stem cells are highly sensitive to differentiation induced by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Colorectal cancer develops from mutated intestinal epithelial stem cells. The most frequent initiating mutation occurs in Apc, which results in hyperactivated Wnt signalling. This causes hyperproliferation and reduced sensitivity to chemotherapy, but whether these mutated stem cells are sensitive to ER stress induced differentiation remains unknown. Here we examined this by generating mice in which both Apc and ER stress repressor chaperone Grp78 can be conditionally deleted from the intestinal epithelium. For molecular studies, we used intestinal organoids derived from these mice. Homozygous loss of Apc alone resulted in crypt elongation, activation of the Wnt signature and accumulation of intestinal epithelial stem cells, as expected. This phenotype was however completely rescued on activation of ER stress by additional deletion of Grp78. In these Apc-Grp78 double mutant animals, stem cells were rapidly lost and repopulation occurred by non-mutant cells that had escaped recombination, suggesting that Apc-Grp78 double mutant stem cells had lost self-renewal capacity. Although in Apc-Grp78 double mutant mice the Wnt signature was lost, these intestines exhibited ubiquitous epithelial presence of nuclear β-catenin. This suggests that ER stress interferes with Wnt signalling downstream of nuclear β-catenin. In conclusion, our findings indicate that ER stress signalling results in loss of Apc mutated intestinal epithelial stem cells by interference with the Wnt signature. In contrast to many known inhibitors of Wnt signalling, ER stress acts downstream of β-catenin. Therefore, ER stress poses a promising target in colorectal cancers, which develop as a result of Wnt activating mutations.

  6. Effects of intraoperative electron irradiation in the dog on cell turnover in intact and surgically-anastomosed aorta and intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, W.F.; Morrow, B.M.; Travis, E.L.; Tepper, J.; Merkel, A.B.; Kranda, K.; Terrill, R.

    1983-01-01

    Adults dogs were subjected to laparotomy and intraoperative electron irradiation after division and reanastomosis of aorta or after construction of a blind loop of small intestine having a transverse suture line and an end-to-side anastomosis. Dogs received intraoperative irradiation of both intact and anastomosed aorta or intestine in doses of 0, 2000, 3000, or 4500 rad. Animals were sacrificed at seven days or three months following treatment. At 24 hours prior to sacrifice, dogs received 5 mCi tritiated thymidine intravenously. Irradiated and non-irradiated segments of aorta and small intestine, including intact and anastomotic regions, were analyzed for tritiated thymidine incorporation and were subjected to autoradiography. Incorporation studies showed diminution in tritiated thymidine uptake by irradiated portions of aorta and small intestine, in both intact and anastomotic regions. Autoradiograms revealed that irradiated areas of intact or anastomotic aorta or intestine had diminished labeling of stromal cells, suggesting a lowered cell proliferative capacity of irradiated tissue compared to non-irradiated portions. Inflammatory cells showed similar labeling indices in irradiated and non-irradiated tissues, both intact and surgically-manipulated, suggesting that irradiation does not significantly affect a subsequent local inflammatory response. Radiation-induced decreases in tritiated thymidine incoporation in irradiated aorta and small intestine were generally more marked at seven days than at three months following irradiation, suggesting that radiation-induced depression of cell turnover rates decreases with time

  7. Three-Dimensional Organotypic Co-Culture Model of Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Macrophages to Study "Salmonella Enterica" Colonization Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Mark; Yang, J; Barilla, J.; Crabbe, A.; Sarker, S. F.; Liu, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional/3-D organotypic models of human intestinal epithelium mimic the differentiated form and function of parental tissues often not exhibited by 2-D monolayers and respond to Salmonella in ways that reflect in vivo infections. To further enhance the physiological relevance of 3-D models to more closely approximate in vivo intestinal microenvironments during infection, we developed and validated a novel 3-D intestinal co-culture model containing multiple epithelial cell types and phagocytic macrophages, and applied to study enteric infection by different Salmonella pathovars.

  8. Changes in the interstitial cells of Cajal and neuronal nitric oxide synthase positive neuronal cells with aging in the esophagus of F344 rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Jin Kim

    Full Text Available The aging-associated cellular and molecular changes in esophagus have not been established, yet. Thus we evaluated histological structure, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS-positive cells, and contractility in the esophagus of Fischer 344 rat at different ages (6-, 31-, 74-weeks, and 2-years. The lamina propria thickness and endomysial area were calculated. The immunoreactivity of c-Kit, nNOS and protein gene product (PGP 9.5 was counted after immunohistochemistry. Expression of c-Kit, stem cell factor (SCF, nNOS and PGP 9.5 mRNA was measured by real-time PCR, and expression of c-Kit and nNOS protein was detected by Western blot. Isovolumetric contractile force measurement and electrical field stimulation (EFS were conducted. The lamina propria thickness increased (6 week vs 2 year, P = 0.005 and the endomysial area of longitudinal muscle decreased with aging (6 week vs 2 year, P<0.001, while endomysial area of circular muscle did not significantly decrease. The proportions of NOS-immunoreactive cells and c-Kit-immunoreactive areas declined with aging (6 week vs 2 year; P<0.001 and P = 0.004, respectively, but there was no significant change of PGP 9.5-immunopositiviy. The expressions of nNOS, c-Kit and SCF mRNA also reduced with aging (6 week vs 2 year; P = 0.006, P = 0.001 and P = 0.006, respectively, while the change of PGP 9.5 mRNA expression was not significant. Western blot showed the significant decreases of nNOS and c-Kit protein expression with aging (6 week vs 2 year; P = 0.008 and P = 0.012, respectively. The EFS-induced esophageal contractions significantly decreased in 2-yr-old rat compared with 6-wk-old rats, however, L-NG-Nitroarginine methylester did not significantly increase the spontaneous and EFS-induced contractions in the 6-wk- and 2-yr-old rat esophagus. In conclusion, an increase of lamina propria thickness, a decrease of endomysial area, c-Kit, SCF and NOS expression with preserved

  9. Primary culture of cat intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and the cDNA library construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gui Hua; Liu, Ye; Cheng, Yun Tang; Zhao, Qing Song; Qiu, Xiao; Xu, Chao; Xiao, Ting; Zhu, Song; Liu, Gong Zhen; Yin, Kun

    2018-06-26

    Felids are the only definitive hosts of Toxoplasma gondii. To lay a foundation for screening the T. gondii-felids interaction factors, we have developed a reproducible primary culture method for cat intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). The primary IECs were isolated from a new born cat's small intestine jejunum region without food ingress, and respectively in vitro cultured by tissue cultivation and combined digestion method with collagenase XI and dispase I, then purified by trypsinization. After identification, the ds cDNA of cat IECs was synthesized for constructing pGADT7 homogenization three-frame plasmid, and transformed into the yeast Y187 for generating the cDNA library. Our results indicated that cultivation of primary cat IECs relays on combined digestion to form polarized and confluent monolayers within 3 days with typical features of normal epithelial cells. The purified cells cultured by digestion method were identified to be nature intestinal epithelial cells using immunohistochemical analysis and were able to maintain viability for at least 15 passages. The homogenizable ds cDNA, which is synthesized from the total RNA extracted from our cultured IECs, distributed among 0.5-2.0 kb, and generated satisfying three-frame cDNA library with the capacity of 1.2 × 106 and the titer of 5.2 × 107 pfu/mL. Our results established an optimal method for the culturing and passage of cat IECs model in vitro, and laid a cDNA library foundation for the subsequent interaction factors screening by yeast two-hybrid.

  10. Evaluation of Fetal Intestinal Cell Growth and Antimicrobial Biofunctionalities of Donor Human Milk After Preparative Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaprach, Pasinee; Pongsakul, Nutkridta; Apiwattanakul, Nopporn; Muanprasat, Chatchai; Supapannachart, Sarayut; Nuntnarumit, Pracha; Chutipongtanate, Somchai

    2018-04-01

    Donor human milk is considered the next best nutrition following mother's own milk to prevent neonatal infection and necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants who are admitted at neonatal intensive care unit. However, donor milk biofunctionalities after preparative processes have rarely been documented. To evaluate biofunctionalities preserved in donor milk after preparative processes by cell-based assays. Ten pools of donor milk were produced from 40 independent specimens. After preparative processes, including bacterial elimination methods (holder pasteurization and cold-sterilization microfiltration) and storage conditions (-20°C freezing storage and lyophilization) with varied duration of storage (0, 3, and 6, months), donor milk biofunctionalities were examined by fetal intestinal cell growth and antimicrobial assays. At baseline, raw donor milk exhibited 193.1% ± 12.3% of fetal intestinal cell growth and 42.4% ± 11.8% of antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli. After bacteria eliminating processes, growth promoting activity was better preserved in pasteurized donor milk than microfiltrated donor milk (169.5% ± 14.3% versus 146.0% ± 11.8%, respectively; p pasteurized donor milk was further examined for the effects of storage conditions at 3 and 6 months. Freezing storage, but not lyophilization, could preserve higher growth-promoting activity during 6 months of storage (163.0% ± 9.4% versus 72.8% ± 6.2%, respectively; p < 0.005). Nonetheless, antimicrobial activity was lost at 6 months, regardless of the storage methods. This study revealed that fetal intestinal cell growth and antimicrobial assays could be applied to measure donor milk biofunctionalities and support the utilization of donor milk within 3 months after preparative processes.

  11. Effects of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents on split-dose repair in intestinal crypt cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Theodore L.; Ross, Glenda Y.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Many cancer chemotherapeutic agents interact with radiation to enhance the amount of radiation damage observed in both tumor and normal tissues. It is important to predict this interaction and to determine the effect of drug on sublethal damage repair. To evaluate for effects in rapid renewing normal tissues, the intestinal crypt cell in vivo assay is an excellent one to employ. These studies investigate the effect of eleven cancer chemotherapeutic drugs on split-dose repair in the intestinal crypt cell of the mouse. Methods and Materials: LAF1 male mice, age 10-12 weeks, were exposed to whole-body irradiation with orthovoltage x-rays delivered as a single dose or as equally divided doses delivered with intervals between the two exposures of 2 to 24 h. In the experimental group, the cancer chemotherapeutic agent was administered intraperitoneally 2 h before the first radiation dose. At 3.6 days after the second irradiation, the mice were sacrificed; the jejunum was removed, fixed, and sectioned for light microscopy. The number of regenerating crypts were counted and corrected to represent the number of surviving cells per circumference. Results: Of the eleven drugs tested, only carmustine eliminated split-dose repair. Cisplatin delayed repair, and methotrexate caused marked synchronization obliterating the observation of split-dose repair. Conclusions: Most cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents do not inhibit sublethal damage repair in intestinal crypt cells when given 2 h before the first radiation exposure. Absence of the initial increase in survival seen with split-dose radiation is noted with carmustine and high-dose methotrexate

  12. Long chain poly-unsaturated fatty acids attenuate the IL-1?-induced pro-inflammatory response in human fetal intestinal epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wijendran, Vasuki; Brenna, JT; Wang, Dong Hao; Zhu, Weishu; Meng, Di; Ganguli, Kriston; Kothapalli, Kumar SD; Requena, Pilar; Innis, Sheila; Walker, WA

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that excessive inflammation of the immature intestine may predispose premature infants to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). We investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) in human fetal and adult intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) in primary culture. Methods Human fetal IEC in culture were derived from a healthy fetal small intestine (H4) or resected small intestine of a neonate wit...

  13. Starfruit Leaves as Glucose Absorption Inhibitor in Mice’s Small Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifqi Y Muhammad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Starfruit (Averrhoa carambola leaves contain flavone derivatives that exhibit anti-hyperglycemic effects. This study aims to determine the effect of starfruit leaves in reducing glucose absorption in intestinal epithelial cells of mice. Methods: This study was done by performing perfusion on the small intestines of mice. The mice that were used in this study were divided into four groups. The control group was given glucose solution without infused starfruit leaves whereas, the remaining 3 groups were given 3 mmol (540 mg/dL glucose solution with infused starfruit leaves of varying concentrations; 200, 400, and 600 mg/kg. Samples were collected at 0, 15th, 30th, 45th, and 60th minute. The sample was tested for glucose levels using spectrophotometry. Results: Test of significance showed a significant difference between the control group and the test group with p < 0.05. Conclusions: Starfruit leaves have a reduction effect towards glucose absorption in the small intestines in Wistar strains where the group using 600 mg/kg of infused starfruit leaves have the most significant effect as compared to other groups.

  14. Stem cell injury and restitution after ionizing irradiation in intestine, liver, salivary gland, mesenteric lymph node

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Hyun; Cho, Kyung Ja; Lee, Sun Joo; Jang, Won Suk

    1998-01-01

    There is little information about radiation injury on stem cell resident in other organs. In addition there is little experimental model in which radiation plays a role on proliferation stem cell in adult organ. This study was carried out to evaluate the early response of tissue injury and restitution in intestine, liver, salivary gland and lymph node, and to develop in vivo model to investigate stem cell biology by irradiation. The study is to assay the early response to radiation and setup an animal model for radiation effect on cellular response. Duodenal intestine, liver, submandibular salivary gland and mesenteric lymph node were selected to compare apoptosis and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression to radiosensitivity. For the effect of radiation on cellular responses, rats were irradiated during starvation. Conclusionly, this study showed the value of apoptosis in detection system for evaluating cellular damage against radiation injury. Because apoptosis was regularly inducted depending on tissue-specific pattern, dose and time sequence as well as cellular activity. Furthermore in vivo model in the study will be helped in the further study to elucidate the relationship between radiation injury and starvation or malnutrition. (author). 22 refs., 6 figs

  15. Lactobacillus reuteri glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase functions in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Ming; Wang, Hai-Feng; Gao, Kan; Wang, Cong; Liu, Li; Liu, Jian-Xin

    2015-05-01

    This study was aimed to identify key surface proteins mediating the adhesion of lactobacilli to intestinal epithelial cells. By using Caco-2 and IPEC-J2 cells labeled with sulfo-NHS-biotin in the western blotting, a protein band of an approximately 37 kDa was detected on the surface layer of Lactobacillus reuteri strains ZJ616, ZJ617, ZJ621, and ZJ623 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Mass spectrometry analysis using the adhesion-related protein from L. reuteri ZJ617 showed that it was 100% homologous to the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) of L. reuteri JCM 1112 (GenBank: YP_001841377). The ability of L. reuteri ZJ617 to adhere to epithelial cells decreased significantly by treatment with LiCl or by blocking with an anti-GAPDH antibody, in comparison with the untreated strain (p reuteri ZJ617. The results indicated that the GAPDH protein of L. reuteri ZJ617 acts as an adhesion component that plays an important role in binding to the intestinal epithelial cells.

  16. Modifications of S-phase cell distribution in the intestinal crypts after multiple daily fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becciolini, A; Cremonini, D; Fabbrica, D; Balzi, M [Florence Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Radiologia

    1983-01-01

    The effects obtained by multiple daily fractionation (3 Gy x2 or 3 Gy x2x2) on the distribution of S-phase cells along the crypt of the small intestine were investigated. The frequency of labelled cell distribution was reduced at early intervals; then the proliferating compartment gradually extended to the villus junctions. During recovery labelled cell frequency in the lower half of the crypts returned to control levels, while labelled cells were present in the differentiating area. With lower total dose modifications were milder and, as early as 72 h before exposure, distribution was already similar to controls. Invertase activity showed an initial increase and a higher reduction during acute damage when fractionation with higher doses was used. A lack of return to normal activity was present even 11 days after exposure when, however, the characteristic circadian pattern was observed.

  17. Alpha8 Integrin (Itga8 Signalling Attenuates Chronic Renal Interstitial Fibrosis by Reducing Fibroblast Activation, Not by Interfering with Regulation of Cell Turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Marek

    Full Text Available The α8 integrin (Itga8 chain contributes to the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis in renal glomerular cells. In unilateral ureteral obstruction Itga8 is de novo expressed in the tubulointerstitium and a deficiency of Itga8 results in more severe renal fibrosis after unilateral ureteral obstruction. We hypothesized that the increased tubulointerstitial damage after unilateral ureteral obstruction observed in mice deficient for Itga8 is associated with altered tubulointerstitial cell turnover and apoptotic mechanisms resulting from the lack of Itga8 in cells of the tubulointerstitium. Induction of unilateral ureteral obstruction was achieved by ligation of the right ureter in mice lacking Itga8. Unilateral ureteral obstruction increased proliferation and apoptosis rates of tubuloepithelial and interstitial cells, however, no differences were observed in the tubulointerstitium of mice lacking Itga8 and wild type controls regarding fibroblast or proliferating cell numbers as well as markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis after unilateral ureteral obstruction. In contrast, unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice lacking Itga8 led to more pronounced tubulointerstitial cell activation i.e. to the appearance of more phospho-SMAD2/3-positive cells and more α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells in the tubulointerstitium. Furthermore, a more severe macrophage and T-cell infiltration was observed in these animals compared to controls. Thus, Itga8 seems to attenuate tubulointerstitial fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstruction not via regulation of cell turnover, but via regulation of TGF-β signalling, fibroblast activation and/or immune cell infiltration.

  18. Total intermittent Pringle maneuver during liver resection can induce intestinal epithelial cell damage and endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon A W G Dello

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The intermittent Pringle maneuver (IPM is frequently applied to minimize blood loss during liver transection. Clamping the hepatoduodenal ligament blocks the hepatic inflow, which leads to a non circulating (hepatosplanchnic outflow. Also, IPM blocks the mesenteric venous drainage (as well as the splenic drainage with raising pressure in the microvascular network of the intestinal structures. It is unknown whether the IPM is harmful to the gut. The aim was to investigate intestinal epithelial cell damage reflected by circulating intestinal fatty acid binding protein levels (I-FABP in patients undergoing liver resection with IPM. METHODS: Patients who underwent liver surgery received total IPM (total-IPM or selective IPM (sel-IPM. A selective IPM was performed by selectively clamping the right portal pedicle. Patients without IPM served as controls (no-IPM. Arterial blood samples were taken immediately after incision, ischemia and reperfusion of the liver, transection, 8 hours after start of surgery and on the first post-operative day. RESULTS: 24 patients (13 males were included. 7 patients received cycles of 15 minutes and 5 patients received cycles of 30 minutes of hepatic inflow occlusion. 6 patients received cycles of 15 minutes selective hepatic occlusion and 6 patients underwent surgery without inflow occlusion. Application of total-IPM resulted in a significant increase in I-FABP 8 hours after start of surgery compared to baseline (p<0.005. In the no-IPM group and sel-IPM group no significant increase in I-FABP at any time point compared to baseline was observed. CONCLUSION: Total-IPM in patients undergoing liver resection is associated with a substantial increase in arterial I-FABP, pointing to intestinal epithelial injury during liver surgery. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01099475.

  19. Angiotensin II induces apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells through the AT2 receptor, GATA-6 and the Bax pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Lihua; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Weidong; Liang, Hongyin; Yang, Yang; Yang, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ang II-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cell through AT2 receptor. ► The apoptosis process involves in the Bax/Bcl-2 intrinsic pathway. ► GATA-6 short hairpin RNA reduced Bax expression, but not Bcl-2. ► GATA-6 may play a critical role in apoptosis in response to the Ang II challenge. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II (Ang II) has been shown to play an important role in cell apoptosis. However, the mechanisms of Ang-II-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells are not fully understood. GATA-6 is a zinc finger transcription factor expressed in the colorectal epithelium, which directs cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In the present study we investigated the underlying mechanism of which GATA-6 affects Ang-II induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells. The in vitro intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis model was established by co-culturing Caco-2 cells with Ang II. Pretreatment with Angiotensin type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist, PD123319, significantly reduced the expression of Bax and prevented the Caco-2 cells apoptosis induced by Ang II. In addition, Ang II up-regulated the expression of GATA-6. Interestingly, GATA-6 short hairpin RNA prevented Ang II-induced intestinal epithelial cells apoptosis and reduced the expression of Bax, but not Bcl-2. Taken together, the present study suggests that Angiotensin II promotes apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells through GATA-6 and the Bax pathway in an AT2 receptor-dependent manner.

  20. Omcg1 is critically required for mitosis in rapidly dividing mouse intestinal progenitors and embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léguillier, Teddy; Vandormael-Pournin, Sandrine; Artus, Jérôme; Houlard, Martin; Picard, Christel; Bernex, Florence; Robine, Sylvie; Cohen-Tannoudji, Michel

    2012-07-15

    Recent studies have shown that factors involved in transcription-coupled mRNA processing are important for the maintenance of genome integrity. How these processes are linked and regulated in vivo remains largely unknown. In this study, we addressed in the mouse model the function of Omcg1, which has been shown to participate in co-transcriptional processes, including splicing and transcription-coupled repair. Using inducible mouse models, we found that Omcg1 is most critically required in intestinal progenitors. In absence of OMCG1, proliferating intestinal epithelial cells underwent abnormal mitosis followed by apoptotic cell death. As a consequence, the crypt proliferative compartment of the small intestine was quickly and totally abrogated leading to the rapid death of the mice. Lack of OMCG1 in embryonic stem cells led to a similar cellular phenotype, with multiple mitotic defects and rapid cell death. We showed that mutant intestinal progenitors and embryonic stem cells exhibited a reduced cell cycle arrest following irradiation, suggesting that mitotic defects may be consecutive to M phase entry with unrepaired DNA damages. These findings unravel a crucial role for pre-mRNA processing in the homeostasis of the small intestine and point to a major role of OMCG1 in the maintenance of genome integrity.

  1. Omcg1 is critically required for mitosis in rapidly dividing mouse intestinal progenitors and embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teddy Léguillier

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that factors involved in transcription-coupled mRNA processing are important for the maintenance of genome integrity. How these processes are linked and regulated in vivo remains largely unknown. In this study, we addressed in the mouse model the function of Omcg1, which has been shown to participate in co-transcriptional processes, including splicing and transcription-coupled repair. Using inducible mouse models, we found that Omcg1 is most critically required in intestinal progenitors. In absence of OMCG1, proliferating intestinal epithelial cells underwent abnormal mitosis followed by apoptotic cell death. As a consequence, the crypt proliferative compartment of the small intestine was quickly and totally abrogated leading to the rapid death of the mice. Lack of OMCG1 in embryonic stem cells led to a similar cellular phenotype, with multiple mitotic defects and rapid cell death. We showed that mutant intestinal progenitors and embryonic stem cells exhibited a reduced cell cycle arrest following irradiation, suggesting that mitotic defects may be consecutive to M phase entry with unrepaired DNA damages. These findings unravel a crucial role for pre-mRNA processing in the homeostasis of the small intestine and point to a major role of OMCG1 in the maintenance of genome integrity.

  2. Changes in the interstitial cells of Cajal and neuronal nitric oxide synthase positive neuronal cells with aging in the esophagus of F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Yong Sung; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Lee, Sun Min; Park, Ji Hyun; Choi, Daeun; Hwang, Young-Jae; Lee, Jongchan; Lee, Hye Seung; Kim, Min-Seob; Lee, Moon Young; Lee, Dong Ho

    2017-01-01

    The aging-associated cellular and molecular changes in esophagus have not been established, yet. Thus we evaluated histological structure, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-positive cells, and contractility in the esophagus of Fischer 344 rat at different ages (6-, 31-, 74-weeks, and 2-years). The lamina propria thickness and endomysial area were calculated. The immunoreactivity of c-Kit, nNOS and protein gene product (PGP) 9.5 was counted after immunohistochemistry. Expression of c-Kit, stem cell factor (SCF), nNOS and PGP 9.5 mRNA was measured by real-time PCR, and expression of c-Kit and nNOS protein was detected by Western blot. Isovolumetric contractile force measurement and electrical field stimulation (EFS) were conducted. The lamina propria thickness increased (6 week vs 2 year, P = 0.005) and the endomysial area of longitudinal muscle decreased with aging (6 week vs 2 year, Pcells and c-Kit-immunoreactive areas declined with aging (6 week vs 2 year; Paging (6 week vs 2 year; P = 0.006, P = 0.001 and P = 0.006, respectively), while the change of PGP 9.5 mRNA expression was not significant. Western blot showed the significant decreases of nNOS and c-Kit protein expression with aging (6 week vs 2 year; P = 0.008 and P = 0.012, respectively). The EFS-induced esophageal contractions significantly decreased in 2-yr-old rat compared with 6-wk-old rats, however, L-NG-Nitroarginine methylester did not significantly increase the spontaneous and EFS-induced contractions in the 6-wk- and 2-yr-old rat esophagus. In conclusion, an increase of lamina propria thickness, a decrease of endomysial area, c-Kit, SCF and NOS expression with preserved total enteric neurons, and contractility in aged rat esophagus may explain the aging-associated esophageal dysmotility.

  3. Curcumin affects cell survival and cell volume regulation in human renal and intestinal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kössler, Sonja; Nofziger, Charity; Jakab, Martin; Dossena, Silvia; Paulmichl, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin (1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1E,6E-heptadiene-3,5-dione or diferuloyl methane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, commonly known as turmeric. This substance has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries for its anti-oxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activity. More recently curcumin has been found to possess anti-cancer properties linked to its pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions. The underlying mechanisms of these diverse effects are complex, not fully elucidated and subject of intense scientific debate. Despite increasing evidence indicating that different cation channels can be a molecular target for curcumin, very little is known about the effect of curcumin on chloride channels. Since, (i) the molecular structure of curcumin indicates that the substance could potentially interact with chloride channels, (ii) chloride channels play a role during the apoptotic process and regulation of the cell volume, and (iii) apoptosis is a well known effect of curcumin, we set out to investigate whether or not curcumin could (i) exert a modulatory effect (direct or indirect) on the swelling activated chloride current IClswell in a human cell system, therefore (ii) affect cell volume regulation and (iii) ultimately modulate cell survival. The IClswell channels, which are essential for regulating the cell volume after swelling, are also known to be activated under isotonic conditions as an early event in the apoptotic process. Here we show that long-term exposure of a human kidney cell line to extracellular 0.1–10 μM curcumin modulates IClswell in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 μM curcumin is ineffective, 0.5–5.0 μM curcumin increase, while 10 μM curcumin decrease the current), and short-term exposure to micromolar concentrations of curcumin does not affect IClswell neither if applied from the extracellular nor from the intracellular side – therefore, a direct effect of curcumin on

  4. Curcumin affects cell survival and cell volume regulation in human renal and intestinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kössler, Sonja; Nofziger, Charity; Jakab, Martin; Dossena, Silvia; Paulmichl, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin (1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1E,6E-heptadiene-3,5-dione or diferuloyl methane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, commonly known as turmeric. This substance has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries for its anti-oxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activity. More recently curcumin has been found to possess anti-cancer properties linked to its pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions. The underlying mechanisms of these diverse effects are complex, not fully elucidated and subject of intense scientific debate. Despite increasing evidence indicating that different cation channels can be a molecular target for curcumin, very little is known about the effect of curcumin on chloride channels. Since, (i) the molecular structure of curcumin indicates that the substance could potentially interact with chloride channels, (ii) chloride channels play a role during the apoptotic process and regulation of the cell volume, and (iii) apoptosis is a well known effect of curcumin, we set out to investigate whether or not curcumin could (i) exert a modulatory effect (direct or indirect) on the swelling activated chloride current ICl swell in a human cell system, therefore (ii) affect cell volume regulation and (iii) ultimately modulate cell survival. The ICl swell channels, which are essential for regulating the cell volume after swelling, are also known to be activated under isotonic conditions as an early event in the apoptotic process. Here we show that long-term exposure of a human kidney cell line to extracellular 0.1–10 μM curcumin modulates ICl swell in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 μM curcumin is ineffective, 0.5–5.0 μM curcumin increase, while 10 μM curcumin decrease the current), and short-term exposure to micromolar concentrations of curcumin does not affect ICl swell neither if applied from the extracellular nor from the intracellular side – therefore, a direct effect of curcumin on ICl

  5. The role of curcumin on intestinal oxidative stress, cell proliferation and apoptosis after ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Ahmet Fikret; Kanter, Mehmet; Pergel, Ahmet; Erboga, Mustafa; Guzel, Ahmet

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of curcumin on oxidative stress, cell proliferation and apoptosis in the rat intestinal mucosa after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). A total of 30 male Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups: sham, I/R and I/R+ curcumin; each group contain 10 animals. Sham group animals underwent laparotomy without I/R injury. After I/R groups animals underwent laparotomy, 1 h of superior mesenteric artery ligation were followed by 1 h of reperfusion. In the curcumin group, 3 days before I/R, curcumin (100 mg/kg) was administered by gastric gavage. All animals were sacrificed at the end of reperfusion and intestinal tissues samples were obtained for biochemical and histopathological investigation in all groups. Curcumin treatment significantly decreased the elevated tissue malondialdehyde levels and increased of reduced superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase enzyme activities in intestinal tissues samples. I/R caused severe histopathological injury including mucosal erosions and villous congestion and hemorrhage. Curcumin treatment significantly attenuated the severity of intestinal I/R injury, with inhibiting of I/R-induced apoptosis and cell proliferation. These results suggest that curcumin treatment has a protective effect against intestinal damage induced by intestinal I/R. This protective effect is possibly due to its ability to inhibit I/R-induced oxidative stress, apoptosis and cell proliferation.

  6. Protective Role of R-spondin1, an Intestinal Stem Cell Growth Factor, against Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Syndrome in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bhanja, Payel; Saha, Subhrajit; Kabarriti, Rafi; Liu, Laibin; Roy-Chowdhury, Namita; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta; Sellers, Rani S.; Alfieri, Alan A.; Guha, Chandan

    2009-01-01

    Background Radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS) results from a combination of direct cytocidal effects on intestinal crypt and endothelial cells and subsequent loss of the mucosal barrier, resulting in electrolyte imbalance, diarrhea, weight loss, infection and mortality. Because R-spondin1 (Rspo1) acts as a mitogenic factor for intestinal stem cells, we hypothesized that systemic administration of Rspo1 would amplify the intestinal crypt cells and accelerate the regeneration of...

  7. Mast Cell Tryptase Reduces Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Implications for the Mechanisms of Barrier Dysfunction in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilcz-Villega, Ewa M

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how mast cell tryptase may influence intestinal permeability and tight junction (TJ) proteins in vitro and explore translation to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

  8. Mild pulmonary emphysema a risk factor for interstitial lung disease when using cetuximab for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Isaku; Tsukahara, Kiyoaki; Sato, Hiroki; Motohashi, Ray; Yunaiyama, Daisuke; Shimizu, Akira

    2017-12-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is an occasionally fatal adverse event associated with cetuximab (Cmab) therapy. Our objective was to clarify to what degree pulmonary emphysema is a risk factor in the treatment of head and neck cancer with Cmab through a retrospective analysis. Subjects were 116 patients who were administered Cmab for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The degree of pulmonary emphysema before initiating treatment with Cmab was visually assessed retrospectively, with scoring according to the Goddard classification used in Japanese chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) guidelines for chest computed tomography (CT). Scoring was conducted by two diagnostic radiologists and mean scores were used. Cutoffs for the development and nondevelopment of ILD were examined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and Fisher's exact test. Values of p pulmonary emphysema would represent a risk factor for ILD when using Cmab.

  9. Acute interstitial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuervo M, Francisco; Carrillo Bayona, Jorge; Ojeda, Paulina

    2004-01-01

    The paper refers to a 71 year-old patient, to who is diagnosed acute interstitial pneumonia; with square of 20 days of evolution of cough dry emetizant, fever, general uneasiness, migraine, progressive dyspnoea and lost of weight

  10. A balance of Mad and Myc expression dictates larval cell apoptosis and adult stem cell development during Xenopus intestinal metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Morihiro; Miller, Thomas C; Wen, Luan; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2017-05-11

    The Myc/Mad/Max network has long been shown to be an important factor in regulating cell proliferation, death and differentiation in diverse cell types. In general, Myc-Max heterodimers activate target gene expression to promote cell proliferation, although excess of c-Myc can also induce apoptosis. In contrast, Mad competes against Myc to form Mad-Max heterodimers that bind to the same target genes to repress their expression and promote differentiation. The role of the Myc/Mad/Max network during vertebrate development, especially, the so-called postembryonic development, a period around birth in mammals, is unclear. Using thyroid hormone (T3)-dependent Xenopus metamorphosis as a model, we show here that Mad1 is induced by T3 in the intestine during metamorphosis when larval epithelial cell death and adult epithelial stem cell development take place. More importantly, we demonstrate that Mad1 is expressed in the larval cells undergoing apoptosis, whereas c-Myc is expressed in the proliferating adult stem cells during intestinal metamorphosis, suggesting that Mad1 may have a role in cell death during development. By using transcription activator-like effector nuclease-mediated gene-editing technology, we have generated Mad1 knockout Xenopus animals. This has revealed that Mad1 is not essential for embryogenesis or metamorphosis. On the other hand, consistent with its spatiotemporal expression profile, Mad1 knockout leads to reduced larval epithelial apoptosis but surprisingly also results in increased adult stem cell proliferation. These findings not only reveal a novel role of Mad1 in regulating developmental cell death but also suggest that a balance of Mad and Myc controls cell fate determination during adult organ development.

  11. Dynamics of absorption, metabolism, and excretion of 5-aminolevulinic acid in human intestinal Caco-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Saito

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available 5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA is a precursor for the biosynthesis of porphyrins and heme. Although the oral administration of ALA has been widely applied in clinical settings, the dynamics of its absorption, metabolism, and excretion within enterocytes remain unknown. In this study, after enterocytic differentiation, Caco-2 cells were incubated with 200 µM ALA and/or 100 µM sodium ferrous citrate (SFC for up to 72 h. Both ALA and the combination of ALA and SFC promoted the synthesis of heme, without affecting the expression of genes involved in intestinal iron transport, such as DMT1 and FPN. The enhanced heme synthesis in Caco-2 cells was more pronounced under the effect of the combination of ALA and SFC than under the effect of ALA alone, as reflected by the induced expression of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1, as well as a reduced protein level of the transcriptional corepressor Bach1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed Bach1 chromatin occupancy at the enhancer regions of HO-1, which were significantly decreased by the addition of ALA and SFC. Finally, Transwell culture of Caco-2 cells suggested that the administered ALA to the intestinal lumen was partially transported into vasolateral space. These findings enhance our understanding of the absorption and metabolism of ALA in enterocytes, which could aid in the development of a treatment strategy for various conditions such as anemia.

  12. The intestinal microbiota determines the colitis‐inducing potential of T‐bet‐deficient Th cells in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Jakob; Durek, Pawel; Kühl, Anja A.; Schattenberg, Florian; Maschmeyer, Patrick; Siracusa, Francesco; Lehmann, Katrin; Westendorf, Kerstin; Weber, Melanie; Riedel, René; Müller, Susann; Radbruch, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Conflicting evidence has been provided as to whether induction of intestinal inflammation by adoptive transfer of naïve T cells into Rag −/− mice requires expression of the transcription factor T‑bet by the T cells. Here, we formally show that the intestinal microbiota composition of the Rag −/− recipient determines whether or not T‐bet‐deficient Th cells can induce colitis and we have resolved the differences of the two microbiomes, permissive or non‐permissive to T‐bet‐independent colitis. Our data highlight the dominance of the microbiota over particular T cell differentiation programs in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation. PMID:28875499

  13. Intracranial interstitial radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, D.; Rittenmeyer, H.; Hitchon, P.

    1986-01-01

    Primary malignant brain tumors are fatal, with 90% of patients having these tumors dying within two years following diagnosis. Cranial interstitial radiation therapy, a technique under investigation to control these tumors, involves implantation of radioactive iodine 125 seeds into the tumor bed by stereotaxic technique. The interstitial radiation technique, monitoring of radiation, and nursing care of patients are discussed. Case histories are presented, along with discussion of results attained using this therapy, and its future

  14. Interfacial barrier height modification of indium tin oxide/a-Si:H(p) via control of density of interstitial oxygen for silicon heterojunction solar cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Shihyun; Kim, Sunbo; Dao, Vinh Ai; Lee, Seungho; Iftiquar, S.M. [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 400-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Doyoung [School of Electricity and Electronics, Ulsan College, Ulsan, 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Hussain, Shahzada Qamar [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 400-746 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyeongsik; Lee, Jaehyeong [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 400-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Youngseok [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 400-746 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jaehyun [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 400-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sangho [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 400-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Junsin, E-mail: yi@yurim.skku.ac.kr [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 400-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 400-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    An indium tin oxide (ITO) film with low carrier concentration (n), high mobility (μ) and high work function (Φ{sub ITO}) is a beneficial material for the front electrode in heterojunction silicon (HJ) solar cells due to its low free-carrier absorption in the near-infrared wavelength and low Schottky barrier height at the ITO/emitter-layer front contact. This low free-carrier absorption as well as the low Schottky barrier height increase the open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) and the short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}), which in turn increases the overall cell efficiency (η). Hence, ITO films with lower n, higher μ and higher Φ{sub ITO} were prepared by controlling the density of the interstitial oxygen [O{sub i}] in the films and used as anti-reflection electrodes in HJ solar cells. With increasing [O{sub i}] in the ITO, the preferential orientation of the (222) crystalline plane became more dominant. The Φ{sub ITO} and μ increased from 4.87 eV and 38.9 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} to 5.04 eV and 48.79 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, respectively, whereas n decreased from 4.7 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} to 2.8 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}. We attribute these changes to the chemisorbed oxygen into the ITO films, while the decrease of n is due to the ability of interstitial oxygen to capture electron, and the increase of μ is due to the reduction in free-carrier scattering. These ITO films were used to fabricate HJ solar cells. As [O{sub i}] in the ITO film increased, the device performance improved and the best cell performance was obtained with V{sub oc} of 714 mV, J{sub sc} 34.79 mA/cm{sup 2} and η of 17.82%. By computer simulation, we found that the higher Φ{sub ITO} and μ but lower n were responsible for the enhanced cell performance. The cell performance, however, deteriorated due to poor film properties when [O{sub i}] exceeded concentration limit from 3.2 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}. - Highlights: • The carrier concentration (n) decreases

  15. Laminin isoforms: biological roles and effects on the intracellular distribution of nuclear proteins in intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck, Natacha; Gross, Isabelle; Gendry, Patrick; Stutzmann, Jeanne; Freund, Jean-Noel; Kedinger, Michele; Simon-Assmann, Patricia; Launay, Jean-Francois

    2005-01-01

    Laminins are structurally and functionally major components of the extracellular matrix. Four isoforms of laminins (laminin-1, -2, -5 and -10) are expressed in a specific pattern along the crypt-villus axis of the intestine. Previous works indicated that expression of these isoforms is developmentally regulated and that laminins could modulate the behaviour of intestinal cells, but the exact role of each isoform remained unclear. Here, we report the first systematic analysis of the cellular functions of the four isoforms using the human colon adenocarcinoma Caco2/TC7 cell line as a model. We compared the respective abilities of each isoform to modulate adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. We found that the isoforms were functionally distinct, with laminin-10 being the most adhesive substratum, laminin-2, laminin-5 and laminin-10 enhancing cellular proliferation and at the opposite, laminin-1 stimulating intestinal cell differentiation. To begin to characterise the molecular events induced by the different isoforms, we examined by immunofluorescence the intracellular distribution of several nuclear proteins, recently highlighted by a nuclear proteomic approach. We observed clear nucleocytoplasmic redistribution of these proteins, which depended on the laminin isoform. These results provide evidence for a distinct functional role of laminins in intestinal cell functions characterised by specific localisation of nuclear proteins

  16. Intestinal T-cell responses in celiac disease - impact of celiac disease associated bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Sjöberg

    Full Text Available A hallmark of active celiac disease (CD, an inflammatory small-bowel enteropathy caused by permanent intolerance to gluten, is cytokine production by intestinal T lymphocytes. Prerequisites for contracting CD are that the individual carries the MHC class II alleles HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 and is exposed to gluten in the diet. Dysbiosis in the resident microbiota has been suggested to be another risk factor for CD. In fact, rod shaped bacteria adhering to the small intestinal mucosa were frequently seen in patients with CD during the "Swedish CD epidemic" and bacterial candidates could later be isolated from patients born during the epidemic suggesting long-lasting changes in the gut microbiota. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A plays a role in both inflammation and anti-bacterial responses. In active CD IL-17A was produced by both CD8(+ T cells (Tc17 and CD4(+ T cells (Th17, with intraepithelial Tc17 cells being the dominant producers. Gluten peptides as well as CD associated bacteria induced IL-17A responses in ex vivo challenged biopsies from patients with inactive CD. The IL-17A response was suppressed in patients born during the epidemic when a mixture of CD associated bacteria was added to gluten, while the reverse was the case in patients born after the epidemic. Under these conditions Th17 cells were the dominant producers. Thus Tc17 and Th17 responses to gluten and bacteria seem to pave the way for the chronic disease with interferon-γ-production by intraepithelial Tc1 cells and lamina propria Th1 cells. The CD associated bacteria and the dysbiosis they might cause in the resident microbiota may be a risk factor for CD either by directly influencing the immune responses in the mucosa or by enhancing inflammatory responses to gluten.

  17. Metamorphosis of the Drosophila visceral musculature and its role in intestinal morphogenesis and stem cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghajanian, Patrick; Takashima, Shigeo; Paul, Manash; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2016-12-01

    The visceral musculature of the Drosophila intestine plays important roles in digestion as well as development. Detailed studies investigating the embryonic development of the visceral muscle exist; comparatively little is known about postembryonic development and metamorphosis of this tissue. In this study we have combined the use of specific markers with electron microscopy to follow the formation of the adult visceral musculature and its involvement in gut development during metamorphosis. Unlike the adult somatic musculature, which is derived from a pool of undifferentiated myoblasts, the visceral musculature of the adult is a direct descendant of the larval fibers, as shown by activating a lineage tracing construct in the larval muscle and obtaining labeled visceral fibers in the adult. However, visceral muscles undergo a phase of remodeling that coincides with the metamorphosis of the intestinal epithelium. During the first day following puparium formation, both circular and longitudinal syncytial fibers dedifferentiate, losing their myofibrils and extracellular matrix, and dissociating into mononuclear cells ("secondary myoblasts"). Towards the end of the second day, this process is reversed, and between 48 and 72h after puparium formation, a structurally fully differentiated adult muscle layer has formed. We could not obtain evidence that cells apart from the dedifferentiated larval visceral muscle contributed to the adult muscle, nor does it appear that the number of adult fibers (or nuclei per fiber) is increased over that of the larva by proliferation. In contrast to the musculature, the intestinal epithelium is completely renewed during metamorphosis. The adult midgut epithelium rapidly expands over the larval layer during the first few hours after puparium formation; in case of the hindgut, replacement takes longer, and proceeds by the gradual caudad extension of a proliferating growth zone, the hindgut proliferation zone (HPZ). The subsequent

  18. Modulation of intestinal and liver fatty acid-binding proteins in Caco-2 cells by lipids, hormones and cytokines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dube, N.; Delvin, E.; Yotov, W.; Garofalo, C.; Bendayan, M.; Veerkamp, J.H.; Levy, E.

    2001-01-01

    Intestinal and liver fatty acid binding proteins (I- and L-FABP) are thought to play a role in enterocyte fatty acid (FA) trafficking. Their modulation by cell differentiation and various potential effectors was investigated in the human Caco-2 cell line. With the acquisition of enterocytic

  19. Deficiency in DNA damage response of enterocytes accelerates intestinal stem cell aging in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joung-Sun; Jeon, Ho-Jun; Pyo, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Shin; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2018-03-07

    Stem cell dysfunction is closely linked to tissue and organismal aging and age-related diseases, and heavily influenced by the niche cells' environment. The DNA damage response (DDR) is a key pathway for tissue degeneration and organismal aging; however, the precise protective role of DDR in stem cell/niche aging is unclear. The Drosophila midgut is an excellent model to study the biology of stem cell/niche aging because of its easy genetic manipulation and its short lifespan. Here, we showed that deficiency of DDR in Drosophila enterocytes (ECs) accelerates intestinal stem cell (ISC) aging. We generated flies with knockdown of Mre11 , Rad50 , Nbs1 , ATM , ATR , Chk1 , and Chk2 , which decrease the DDR system in ECs. EC-specific DDR depletion induced EC death, accelerated the aging of ISCs, as evidenced by ISC hyperproliferation, DNA damage accumulation, and increased centrosome amplification, and affected the adult fly's survival. Our data indicated a distinct effect of DDR depletion in stem or niche cells on tissue-resident stem cell proliferation. Our findings provide evidence of the essential role of DDR in protecting EC against ISC aging, thus providing a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of stem cell/niche aging.

  20. Morphology of the Interstitial Tissue of Active and Resting Testis of the Guinea Fowl

    OpenAIRE

    Dharani, Palanisamy; Kumary, S. Usha; Sundaram, Venkatesan; Joseph, Cecilia; Ramesh, Geetha

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY: The morphology of the interstitial tissue of sexually active and resting testis of the guinea fowl were studied. Six adult health birds of active and resting phases of reproductive cycle were used for this study. The interstitial tissue consisted of loose connective tissue, interstitial cells (Leydig cells), few connective cells, blood vessels and adrenergic nerve fibres in the present study in both active and resting testes. The interstitial tissue was compact in sexually active tes...

  1. Effect of heme oxygenase-1 transduced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on damaged intestinal epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yi; Wu, Ben-Juan; Zheng, Wei-Ping; Yin, Ming-Li; Liu, Tao; Song, Hong-Li

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we explored the effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from bone marrow overexpressing heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) on the damaged human intestinal epithelial barrier in vitro. Rat MSCs were isolated from bone marrow and transduced with rat HO-1 recombinant adenovirus (HO-MSCs) for stable expression of HO-1. Colorectal adenocarinoma 2 (Caco2) cells were treated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) to establish a damaged colon epithelial model. Damaged Caco2 were cocultured with MSCs, Ad-MSCs, Ad-HO + MSCs or HO-MSCs. mRNA and protein expression of Zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) and human HO-1 and the release of cytokines were measured. ZO-1 and human HO-1 in Caco2 were significantly decreased after treatment with TNF-α; and this effect was reduced when coculture with MSCs from bone marrow. Expression of ZO-1 was not significantly affected by Caco2 treatment with TNF-α, Ad-HO, and MSCs. In contrast, ZO-1 and human HO-1 increased significantly when the damaged Caco2 was treated with HO-MSCs. HO-MSCs showed the strongest effect on the expression of ZO-1 in colon epithelial cells. Coculture with HO-MSCs showed the most significant effects on reducing the expression of IL-2, IL-6, IFN-γ and increasing the expression of IL-10. HO-MSCs protected the intestinal epithelial barrier, in which endogenous HO-1 was involved. HO-MSCs play an important role in the repair process by reducing the release of inflammatory cytokines and increasing the release of anti-inflammatory factors. These results suggested that HO-MSCs from bone marrow were more effective in repairing the damaged intestinal epithelial barrier, and the effectiveness of MSCs was improved by HO-1 gene transduction, which provides favorable support for the application of stem cell therapy in the intestinal diseases. © 2017 The Authors. Cell Biology International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Federation of Cell Biology.

  2. Retinoic acid signalling is required for the pathogenicity of effector CD4+ T cells during the development of intestinal inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Pool, Lieneke; Frising, Ulrika

    The vitamin A metabolite retinoic acid (RA) seems to be a double-edge sword in CD4+ T cell biology, sustaining the development of foxp3+ Treg cells, but also being essential for the stability of the Th1 lineage. Here we explored the role of RA signalling in CD4+ T cells during the development...... of intestinal inflammation in the T cell transfer colitis model. RA signalling-deficient CD4+ T cells are less potent at inducing intestinal inflammation compared to their RA signalling-proficient counterparts and exhibit a differentiation skewing towards more IL-17+ and foxp3+ cells, while their capacity......-deficient and –proficient Tregs are equally competent to inhibit colitis development. Together our results indicate that RA, through its receptor RARα, negatively regulates the early expansion of CD4+ T cells during colitis and is necessary for the generation of colitogenic Th1/Th17 cells, while it is dispensable...

  3. Vitamin A Controls the Presence of RORγ+ Innate Lymphoid Cells and Lymphoid Tissue in the Small Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goverse, Gera; Labao-Almeida, Carlos; Ferreira, Manuela; Molenaar, Rosalie; Wahlen, Sigrid; Konijn, Tanja; Koning, Jasper; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique; Mebius, Reina E

    2016-06-15

    Changes in diet and microbiota have determining effects on the function of the mucosal immune system. For example, the active metabolite of vitamin A, retinoic acid (RA), has been described to maintain homeostasis in the intestine by its influence on both lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Additionally, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), important producers of cytokines necessary for intestinal homeostasis, are also influenced by vitamin A in the small intestines. In this study, we show a reduction of both NCR(-) and NCR(+) ILC3 subsets in the small intestine of mice raised on a vitamin A-deficient diet. Additionally, the percentages of IL-22-producing ILCs were reduced in the absence of dietary vitamin A. Conversely, mice receiving additional RA had a specific increase in the NCR(-) ILC3 subset, which contains the lymphoid tissue inducer cells. The dependence of lymphoid tissue inducer cells on vitamin A was furthermore illustrated by impaired development of enteric lymphoid tissues in vitamin A-deficient mice. These effects were a direct consequence of ILC-intrinsic RA signaling, because retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt-Cre × RARα-DN mice had reduced numbers of NCR(-) and NCR(+) ILC3 subsets within the small intestine. However, lymphoid tissue inducer cells were not affected in these mice nor was the formation of enteric lymphoid tissue, demonstrating that the onset of RA signaling might take place before retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt is expressed on lymphoid tissue inducer cells. Taken together, our data show an important role for vitamin A in controlling innate lymphoid cells and, consequently, postnatal formed lymphoid tissues within the small intestines. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases; Interstitielle Lungenerkrankungen bei Rauchern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marten, K. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinikum rechts der Isar, Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    2007-03-15

    The most important smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Although traditionally considered to be discrete entities, smoking-related ILDs often coexist, thus accounting for the sometimes complex patterns encountered on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative role of smoking in the development of pulmonary fibrosis.

  5. Platelet-activating factor induces TLR4 expression in intestinal epithelial cells: implication for the pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Soliman

    Full Text Available Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in neonatal intensive care units, however its pathogenesis is not completely understood. We have previously shown that platelet activating factor (PAF, bacteria and TLR4 are all important factors in the development of NEC. Given that Toll-like receptors (TLRs are expressed at low levels in enterocytes of the mature gastrointestinal tract, but were shown to be aberrantly over-expressed in enterocytes in experimental NEC, we examined the regulation of TLR4 expression and signaling by PAF in intestinal epithelial cells using human and mouse in vitro cell lines, and the ex vivo rat intestinal loop model. In intestinal epithelial cell (IEC lines, PAF stimulation yielded upregulation of both TLR4 mRNA and protein expression and led to increased IL-8 secretion following stimulation with LPS (in an otherwise LPS minimally responsive cell line. PAF stimulation resulted in increased human TLR4 promoter activation in a dose dependent manner. Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis showed PAF induced STAT3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation in IEC, and PAF-induced TLR4 expression was inhibited by STAT3 and NFκB Inhibitors. Our findings provide evidence for a mechanism by which PAF augments inflammation in the intestinal epithelium through abnormal TLR4 upregulation, thereby contributing to the intestinal injury of NEC.

  6. Casein kinase 1-epsilon or 1-delta required for Wnt-mediated intestinal stem cell maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Yael; Das Adhikari, Upasana; Ayyash, Muneef; Elyada, Ela; Tóth, Beáta; Moor, Andreas; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Ben-Neriah, Yinon

    2017-10-16

    The intestinal epithelium holds an immense regenerative capacity mobilized by intestinal stem cells (ISCs), much of it supported by Wnt pathway activation. Several unique regulatory mechanisms ensuring optimal levels of Wnt signaling have been recognized in ISCs. Here, we identify another Wnt signaling amplifier, CKIε, which is specifically upregulated in ISCs and is essential for ISC maintenance, especially in the absence of its close isoform CKIδ. Co-ablation of CKIδ/ε in the mouse gut epithelium results in rapid ISC elimination, with subsequent growth arrest, crypt-villous shrinking, and rapid mouse death. Unexpectedly, Wnt activation is preserved in all CKIδ/ε-deficient enterocyte populations, with the exception of Lgr5 + ISCs, which exhibit Dvl2-dependent Wnt signaling attenuation. CKIδ/ε-depleted gut organoids cease proliferating and die rapidly, yet survive and resume self-renewal upon reconstitution of Dvl2 expression. Our study underscores a unique regulation mode of the Wnt pathway in ISCs, possibly providing new means of stem cell enrichment for regenerative medicine. © 2017 The Authors.

  7. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Regno, Marisanta; Adesso, Simona; Popolo, Ada [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Quaroni, Andrea [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cornell University, Veterinary Research Tower, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853–6401 (United States); Autore, Giuseppina [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Severino, Lorella [Department of Pathology and Animal Health, Division of Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Naples “Federico II”, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Marzocco, Stefania, E-mail: smarzocco@unisa.it [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy)

    2015-06-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern. - Highlights: • Nivalenol induces oxidative stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). • Nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effects in IECs. • Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol trigger antioxidant response IECs. • These results indicate the importance of mycotoxins co-contamination.

  8. Hunner-Type (Classic Interstitial Cystitis: A Distinct Inflammatory Disorder Characterized by Pancystitis, with Frequent Expansion of Clonal B-Cells and Epithelial Denudation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daichi Maeda

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis (IC is a chronic bladder disease with urinary frequency, bladder discomfort or bladder pain of unknown etiology. Based on cystoscopic findings, patients with IC are classified as either Hunner-type/classic IC (HIC, presenting with a specific Hunner lesion, or non-Hunner-type IC (NHIC, presenting with no Hunner lesion, but post-hydrodistension mucosal bleeding. Inflammatory cell infiltration, composed predominantly of lymphocytes, plasma cells and epithelial denudation, has in the past been documented as a major pathological IC finding. However, the significance of the pathological evaluation of IC, especially with regard to the difference between HIC and NHIC, has been downplayed in recent years. In this study, we performed immunohistochemical quantification of infiltrating T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes and plasma cells, and measured the amount of residual epithelium in urinary bladder biopsy specimens taken from patients with HIC and NHIC, and those with no IC, using image analysis software. In addition, in situ hybridization of the light chains was performed to examine clonal B-cell expansion. Lymphoplasmacytic infiltration was significantly more severe in HIC specimens than in NHIC specimens (P <0.0001. Substantial lymphoplasmacytic inflammation (≥200 cells/mm2 was observed in 93% of HIC specimens, whereas only 8% of NHIC specim