WorldWideScience

Sample records for intestinal epithelial crypt

  1. Glucose stimulates intestinal epithelial crypt proliferation by modulating cellular energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weinan; Ramachandran, Deepti; Mansouri, Abdelhak; Dailey, Megan J

    2018-04-01

    The intestinal epithelium plays an essential role in nutrient absorption, hormone release, and barrier function. Maintenance of the epithelium is driven by continuous cell renewal by stem cells located in the intestinal crypts. The amount and type of diet influence this process and result in changes in the size and cellular make-up of the tissue. The mechanism underlying the nutrient-driven changes in proliferation is not known, but may involve a shift in intracellular metabolism that allows for more nutrients to be used to manufacture new cells. We hypothesized that nutrient availability drives changes in cellular energy metabolism of small intestinal epithelial crypts that could contribute to increases in crypt proliferation. We utilized primary small intestinal epithelial crypts from C57BL/6J mice to study (1) the effect of glucose on crypt proliferation and (2) the effect of glucose on crypt metabolism using an extracellular flux analyzer for real-time metabolic measurements. We found that glucose increased both crypt proliferation and glycolysis, and the glycolytic pathway inhibitor 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) attenuated glucose-induced crypt proliferation. Glucose did not enhance glucose oxidation, but did increase the maximum mitochondrial respiratory capacity, which may contribute to glucose-induced increases in proliferation. Glucose activated Akt/HIF-1α signaling pathway, which might be at least in part responsible for glucose-induced glycolysis and cell proliferation. These results suggest that high glucose availability induces an increase in crypt proliferation by inducing an increase in glycolysis with no change in glucose oxidation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Fluorescent labelling of intestinal epithelial cells reveals independent long-lived intestinal stem cells in a crypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horita, Nobukatsu; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Hayashi, Ryohei; Fukushima, Keita; Hibiya, Shuji; Fukuda, Masayoshi; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Yui, Shiro; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Lentivirus mixed with Matrigel enables direct infection of intestinal organoids. • Our original approach allows the marking of a single stem cell in a crypt. • Time-lapse imaging shows the dynamics of a single stem cell. • Our lentivirus transgene system demonstrates plural long-lived stem cells in a crypt. - Abstract: Background and aims: The dynamics of intestinal stem cells are crucial for regulation of intestinal function and maintenance. Although crypt stem cells have been identified in the intestine by genetic marking methods, identification of plural crypt stem cells has not yet been achieved as they are visualised in the same colour. Methods: Intestinal organoids were transferred into Matrigel® mixed with lentivirus encoding mCherry. The dynamics of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using time-lapse imaging, and the localisation of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using 3D immunofluorescence. Results: We established an original method for the introduction of a transgene into an organoid generated from mouse small intestine that resulted in continuous fluorescence of the mCherry protein in a portion of organoid cells. Three-dimensional analysis using confocal microscopy showed a single mCherry-positive cell in an organoid crypt that had been cultured for >1 year, which suggested the presence of long-lived mCherry-positive and -negative stem cells in the same crypt. Moreover, a single mCherry-positive stem cell in a crypt gave rise to both crypt base columnar cells and transit amplifying cells. Each mCherry-positive and -negative cell contributed to the generation of organoids. Conclusions: The use of our original lentiviral transgene system to mark individual organoid crypt stem cells showed that long-lived plural crypt stem cells might independently serve as intestinal epithelial cells, resulting in the formation of a completely functional villus

  3. Fluorescent labelling of intestinal epithelial cells reveals independent long-lived intestinal stem cells in a crypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horita, Nobukatsu [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Tsuchiya, Kiichiro, E-mail: kii.gast@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Diseases, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Hayashi, Ryohei [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Hiroshima University (Japan); Fukushima, Keita; Hibiya, Shuji; Fukuda, Masayoshi; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Yui, Shiro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Okamoto, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya [Department of Advanced Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Diseases, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Watanabe, Mamoru [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Lentivirus mixed with Matrigel enables direct infection of intestinal organoids. • Our original approach allows the marking of a single stem cell in a crypt. • Time-lapse imaging shows the dynamics of a single stem cell. • Our lentivirus transgene system demonstrates plural long-lived stem cells in a crypt. - Abstract: Background and aims: The dynamics of intestinal stem cells are crucial for regulation of intestinal function and maintenance. Although crypt stem cells have been identified in the intestine by genetic marking methods, identification of plural crypt stem cells has not yet been achieved as they are visualised in the same colour. Methods: Intestinal organoids were transferred into Matrigel® mixed with lentivirus encoding mCherry. The dynamics of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using time-lapse imaging, and the localisation of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using 3D immunofluorescence. Results: We established an original method for the introduction of a transgene into an organoid generated from mouse small intestine that resulted in continuous fluorescence of the mCherry protein in a portion of organoid cells. Three-dimensional analysis using confocal microscopy showed a single mCherry-positive cell in an organoid crypt that had been cultured for >1 year, which suggested the presence of long-lived mCherry-positive and -negative stem cells in the same crypt. Moreover, a single mCherry-positive stem cell in a crypt gave rise to both crypt base columnar cells and transit amplifying cells. Each mCherry-positive and -negative cell contributed to the generation of organoids. Conclusions: The use of our original lentiviral transgene system to mark individual organoid crypt stem cells showed that long-lived plural crypt stem cells might independently serve as intestinal epithelial cells, resulting in the formation of a completely functional villus.

  4. Cdx2 modulates proliferation in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escaffit, Fabrice; Pare, Frederic; Gauthier, Remy; Rivard, Nathalie; Boudreau, Francois; Beaulieu, Jean-Francois

    2006-01-01

    The homeobox gene Cdx2 is involved in the regulation of the expression of intestine specific markers such as sucrase-isomaltase and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase. Previous studies performed with immortalized or transformed intestinal cell lines have provided evidence that Cdx2 can promote morphological and functional differentiation in these experimental models. However, no data exist concerning the implication of this factor in normal human intestinal cell physiology. In the present work, we have investigated the role of Cdx2 in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt (HIEC) cells that lack this transcription factor. The establishment of HIEC cells expressing Cdx2 in an inducible manner shows that forced expression of Cdx2 significantly alters the proliferation of intestinal crypt cells and stimulates dipeptidylpeptidase IV expression but is not sufficient to trigger intestinal terminal differentiation. These observations suggest that Cdx2 requires additional factors to activate the enterocyte differentiation program in normal undifferentiated cells

  5. Naturally Occurring Deletion Mutants of the Pig-Specific, Intestinal Crypt Epithelial Cell Protein CLCA4b without Apparent Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Plog

    Full Text Available The human CLCA4 (chloride channel regulator, calcium-activated modulates the intestinal phenotype of cystic fibrosis (CF patients via an as yet unknown pathway. With the generation of new porcine CF models, species-specific differences between human modifiers of CF and their porcine orthologs are considered critical for the translation of experimental data. Specifically, the porcine ortholog to the human CF modulator gene CLCA4 has recently been shown to be duplicated into two separate genes, CLCA4a and CLCA4b. Here, we characterize the duplication product, CLCA4b, in terms of its genomic structure, tissue and cellular expression patterns as well as its in vitro electrophysiological properties. The CLCA4b gene is a pig-specific duplication product of the CLCA4 ancestor and its protein is exclusively expressed in small and large intestinal crypt epithelial cells, a niche specifically occupied by no other porcine CLCA family member. Surprisingly, a unique deleterious mutation of the CLCA4b gene is spread among modern and ancient breeds in the pig population, but this mutation did not result in an apparent phenotype in homozygously affected animals. Electrophysiologically, neither the products of the wild type nor of the mutated CLCA4b genes were able to evoke a calcium-activated anion conductance, a consensus feature of other CLCA proteins. The apparently pig-specific duplication of the CLCA4 gene with unique expression of the CLCA4b protein variant in intestinal crypt epithelial cells where the porcine CFTR is also present raises the question of whether it may modulate the porcine CF phenotype. Moreover, the naturally occurring null variant of CLCA4b will be valuable for the understanding of CLCA protein function and their relevance in modulating the CF phenotype.

  6. Transcriptional corepressor MTG16 regulates small intestinal crypt proliferation and crypt regeneration after radiation-induced injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, Shenika V; Reddy, Vishruth K; Mittal, Mukul K; Williams, Amanda M; Washington, M Kay; Harris, Elizabeth; Mah, Amanda; Hiebert, Scott W; Singh, Kshipra; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T; Lund, P Kay; Williams, Christopher S

    2015-03-15

    Myeloid translocation genes (MTGs) are transcriptional corepressors implicated in development, malignancy, differentiation, and stem cell function. While MTG16 loss renders mice sensitive to chemical colitis, the role of MTG16 in the small intestine is unknown. Histological examination revealed that Mtg16(-/-) mice have increased enterocyte proliferation and goblet cell deficiency. After exposure to radiation, Mtg16(-/-) mice exhibited increased crypt viability and decreased apoptosis compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Flow cytometric and immunofluorescence analysis of intestinal epithelial cells for phospho-histone H2A.X also indicated decreased DNA damage and apoptosis in Mtg16(-/-) intestines. To determine if Mtg16 deletion affected epithelial cells in a cell-autonomous fashion, intestinal crypts were isolated from Mtg16(-/-) mice. Mtg16(-/-) and WT intestinal crypts showed similar enterosphere forming efficiencies when cultured in the presence of EGF, Noggin, and R-spondin. However, when Mtg16(-/-) crypts were cultured in the presence of Wnt3a, they demonstrated higher enterosphere forming efficiencies and delayed progression to mature enteroids. Mtg16(-/-) intestinal crypts isolated from irradiated mice exhibited increased survival compared with WT intestinal crypts. Interestingly, Mtg16 expression was reduced in a stem cell-enriched population at the time of crypt regeneration. This is consistent with MTG16 negatively regulating regeneration in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate that MTG16 loss promotes radioresistance and impacts intestinal stem cell function, possibly due to shifting cellular response away from DNA damage-induced apoptosis and towards DNA repair after injury.

  7. Isolation and gene expression profiling of intestinal epithelial cells: crypt isolation by calcium chelation from in vivo samples.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Balfe, Aine

    2018-01-01

    The epithelial layer within the colon represents a physical barrier between the luminal contents and its underlying mucosa. It plays a pivotal role in mucosal homeostasis, and both tolerance and anti-pathogenic immune responses. Identifying signals of inflammation initiation and responses to stimuli from within the epithelial layer is critical to understanding the molecular pathways underlying disease pathology. This study validated a method to isolate and analyze epithelial populations, enabling investigations of epithelial function and response in a variety of disease setting.

  8. Radioprotection of intestinal crypt cells by cox-inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisnar, Paul O.; Dones, Rosa Angela S.A.; Serna, Paulene-Ver A.; Deocaris, Chester C.; Guttierez, Kalangitan V.; Deocaris, Custer C.

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of tissue homeostasis in the gastrointestinal epithelium after epithelial injury focuses on the prostaglandins(PGs) as its major mediators. The two cyclooxygenase isoforms, cox-1 and cox-2, catalyze synthesis of PGs. Cox-1 is the predominant cyclooxygenase isoform found in the normal intestine. In contrast, cox-2 is present at low levels in normal intestine but is elevated at sites of inflammation, and in adenomas and carcinomas. To study the effects of various commercially-available cox-inhibitors (Ketorolac: cox-1 selective; Celecoxib: cox-2 selective; and Indocid: cox-1/2 non-selective), we determine mouse crypt epithelial cell fate after genotoxic injury with whole-body gamma-ray exposure at 15 Gy. Intestinal tissues of mice treated with cox-2 inhibitors that showed invariable apoptotic event, however, have increased occurrence of regenerating cells. Our results suggest a potential application of cox-2 selective inhibitors as radioprotective agent for normal cells after radiotherapy. (Author)

  9. File list: Unc.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt mm9 Unclassified Digestive tract Intestinal crypt... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt.bed ...

  10. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells maintain intestinal epithelial stem cells after tissue damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Aparicio-Domingo (Patricia); M. Romera Hernández (Mónica); J.J. Karrich (Julien J.); F.H.J. Cornelissen (Ferry); N. Papazian (Natalie); D.J. Lindenbergh-Kortleve (Dicky); J.A. Butler (James A.); L. Boon (Louis); M. Coles (Mark); J.N. Samsom (Janneke); T. Cupedo (Tom)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDisruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier allows bacterial translocation and predisposes to destructive inflammation. To ensure proper barrier composition, crypt-residing stem cells continuously proliferate and replenish all intestinal epithelial cells within days. As a consequence

  11. BVES Regulates Intestinal Stem Cell Programs and Intestinal Crypt Viability after Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vishruth K.; Short, Sarah P.; Barrett, Caitlyn W.; Mittal, Mukul K.; Keating, Cody E.; Thompson, Joshua J.; Harris, Elizabeth I.; Revetta, Frank; Bader, David M.; Brand, Thomas; Washington, M. Kay; Williams, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Blood Vessel Epicardial Substance (BVES/Popdc1) is a junctional-associated transmembrane protein that is underexpressed in a number of malignancies and regulates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. We previously identified a role for BVES in regulation of the Wnt pathway, a modulator of intestinal stem cell programs, but its role in small intestinal (SI) biology remains unexplored. We hypothesized that BVES influences intestinal stem cell programs and is critical to SI homeostasis after radiation injury. At baseline, Bves−/− mice demonstrated increased crypt height, as well as elevated proliferation and expression of the stem cell marker Lgr5 compared to wildtype (WT) mice. Intercross with Lgr5-EGFP reporter mice confirmed expansion of the stem cell compartment in Bves−/− mice. To examine stem cell function after BVES deletion, we employed ex vivo 3D-enteroid cultures. Bves−/− enteroids demonstrated increased stemness compared to WT, when examining parameters such as plating efficiency, stem spheroid formation, and retention of peripheral cystic structures. Furthermore, we observed increased proliferation, expression of crypt-base columnar “CBC” and “+4” stem cell markers, amplified Wnt signaling, and responsiveness to Wnt activation in the Bves−/− enteroids. Bves expression was downregulated after radiation in WT mice. Moreover, after radiation, Bves−/− mice demonstrated significantly greater small intestinal crypt viability, proliferation, and amplified Wnt signaling in comparison to WT mice. Bves−/− mice also demonstrated elevations in Lgr5 and Ascl2 expression, and putative damage-responsive stem cell populations marked by Bmi1 and TERT. Therefore, BVES is a key regulator of intestinal stem cell programs and mucosal homeostasis. PMID:26891025

  12. File list: ALL.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt mm9 All antigens Digestive tract Intestinal crypt... SRX871676,SRX871671,SRX871675,SRX871672 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt mm9 TFs and others Digestive tract Intestinal cry...pt SRX871676,SRX871675,SRX871671,SRX871672 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt mm9 RNA polymerase Digestive tract Intestinal cry...pt http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt.bed ...

  15. File list: NoD.Dig.20.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Dig.20.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt mm9 No description Digestive tract Intestinal cry...pt http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Dig.20.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.Dig.20.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Dig.20.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt mm9 All antigens Digestive tract Intestinal crypt... SRX871676,SRX871672,SRX871675,SRX871671 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Dig.20.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt.bed ...

  17. File list: NoD.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt mm9 No description Digestive tract Intestinal cry...pt http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt.bed ...

  18. De Novo Formation of Insulin-Producing “Neo-β Cell Islets” from Intestinal Crypts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ju Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to interconvert terminally differentiated cells could serve as a powerful tool for cell-based treatment of degenerative diseases, including diabetes mellitus. To determine which, if any, adult tissues are competent to activate an islet β cell program, we performed an in vivo screen by expressing three β cell “reprogramming factors” in a wide spectrum of tissues. We report that transient intestinal expression of these factors—Pdx1, MafA, and Ngn3 (PMN—promotes rapid conversion of intestinal crypt cells into endocrine cells, which coalesce into “neoislets” below the crypt base. Neoislet cells express insulin and show ultrastructural features of β cells. Importantly, intestinal neoislets are glucose-responsive and able to ameliorate hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. Moreover, PMN expression in human intestinal “organoids” stimulates the conversion of intestinal epithelial cells into β-like cells. Our results thus demonstrate that the intestine is an accessible and abundant source of functional insulin-producing cells.

  19. Stem cell self-renewal in intestinal crypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, Benjamin D.; Clevers, Hans

    2011-01-01

    As a rapidly cycling tissue capable of fast repair and regeneration, the intestinal epithelium has emerged as a favored model system to explore the principles of adult stem cell biology. However, until recently, the identity and characteristics of the stem cell population in both the small intestine and colon has remained the subject of debate. Recent studies based on targeted lineage tracing strategies, combined with the development of an organotypic culture system, have identified the crypt base columnar cell as the intestinal stem cell, and have unveiled the strategy by which the balance between proliferation and differentiation is maintained. These results show that intestinal stem cells operate in a dynamic environment in which frequent and stochastic stem cell loss is compensated by the proliferation of neighboring stem cells. We review the basis of these experimental findings and the insights they offer into the mechanisms of homeostatic stem cell regulation.

  20. Urokinase and the intestinal mucosa: evidence for a role in epithelial cell turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, P; Birchall, I; Rosella, O; Albert, V; Finch, C; Barkla, D; Young, G

    1998-01-01

    Background—The functions of urokinase in intestinal epithelia are unknown. 
Aims—To determine the relation of urokinase expressed by intestinal epithelial cells to their position in the crypt-villus/surface axis and of mucosal urokinase activity to epithelial proliferative kinetics in the distal colon. 
Methods—Urokinase expression was examined immunohistochemically in human intestinal mucosa. Urokinase activity was measured colorimetrically in epithelial cells isolated sequentially from the crypt-villus axis of the rat small intestine. In separate experiments, urokinase activity and epithelial kinetics (measured stathmokinetically) were measured in homogenates of distal colonic mucosa of 14 groups of eight rats fed diets known to alter epithelial turnover. 
Results—From the crypt base, an ascending gradient of expression and activity of urokinase was associated with the epithelial cells. Median mucosal urokinase activities in each of the dietary groups of rats correlated positively with autologous median number of metaphase arrests per crypt (r=0.68; p<0.005) and per 100 crypt cells (r=0.75; p<0.001), but not with crypt column height. 
Conclusions—Localisation of an enzyme capable of leading to digestion of cell substratum in the region where cells are loosely attached to their basement membrane, and the association of its activity with indexes of cell turnover, suggest a role for urokinase in facilitating epithelial cell loss in the intestine. 

 Keywords: urokinase; intestinal epithelium; colon; epithelial proliferation PMID:9824347

  1. Urokinase and the intestinal mucosa: evidence for a role in epithelial cell turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, P; Birchall, I; Rosella, O; Albert, V; Finch, C; Barkla, D; Young, G

    1998-01-01

    Background—The functions of urokinase in intestinal epithelia are unknown. 
Aims—To determine the relation of urokinase expressed by intestinal epithelial cells to their position in the crypt-villus/surface axis and of mucosal urokinase activity to epithelial proliferative kinetics in the distal colon. 
Methods—Urokinase expression was examined immunohistochemically in human intestinal mucosa. Urokinase activity was measured colorimetrically in epithelial cells isolated sequ...

  2. Restorative effect of exogenous RNA on the intestinal crypts in mice after abdominal γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Guiying; Han Shichen; Liu Aiping; Xie Xuejun; Zhou Yuankai

    1995-01-01

    The author's previous investigation revealed a restorative effect of exogenous nucleic acids on the intestinal crypt in mice after abdominal γ-irradiation. In the article, the factors influencing the restorative effect of exogenous RNA on the intestinal crypt in mice post-irradiation were studied. The results showed that: (a) RNAs from different sources all showed the crypt survival enhancement capability. (b) Bell-shaped curves correlating the crypt survival fraction and RNA doses were obtained, with the optimal doses for different routes of administration estimated. (c) Comparing the different routes of RNA administration, the intravenous injection seemed to be the most effective. (d) An exponential relationship between the crypt survival fraction and the post-irradiation time of RNA administration was found. The earlier the administration, the more effective it was. (e) Administration of RNA merely once within 6h after irradiation, the increases of crypt survival fraction was statistically significant when compared with that of the irradiated control

  3. Radioprotective effect of dextran sulphate and aerogenic hypoxia on intestinal crypt stem cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, A.; Bartonickova, A.; Rotkovska, D.; Konoplyanikova, O.A.; Konoplyanikov, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    A single intraperitoneal injection of dextran sulfate given 6 h before irradiation produced higher numbers of microcolonies of intestinal crypt stem cells in whole-body irradiated mice than an injection of saline in control mice. If dextran sulfate and hypoxia are combined, the radioprotective effect of hypoxia on intestinal crypt stem cells depends on the time interval between irradiation and administration of dextran sulfate. (author). 2 figs., 12 refs

  4. Aging effects on intestinal homeostasis associated with expansion and dysfunction of intestinal epithelial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorefield, Emily C; Andres, Sarah F; Blue, R Eric; Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Mah, Amanda T; Santoro, M Agostina; Ding, Shengli

    2017-08-29

    Intestinal epithelial stem cells (IESCs) are critical to maintain intestinal epithelial function and homeostasis. We tested the hypothesis that aging promotes IESC dysfunction using old (18-22 months) and young (2-4 month) Sox9-EGFP IESC reporter mice. Different levels of Sox9-EGFP permit analyses of active IESC (Sox9-EGFP Low ), activatable reserve IESC and enteroendocrine cells (Sox9-EGFP High ), Sox9-EGFP Sublow progenitors, and Sox9-EGFP Negative differentiated lineages. Crypt-villus morphology, cellular composition and apoptosis were measured by histology. IESC function was assessed by crypt culture, and proliferation by flow cytometry and histology. Main findings were confirmed in Lgr5-EGFP and Lgr5-LacZ mice. Aging-associated gene expression changes were analyzed by Fluidigm mRNA profiling. Crypts culture from old mice yielded fewer and less complex enteroids. Histology revealed increased villus height and Paneth cells per crypt in old mice. Old mice showed increased numbers and hyperproliferation of Sox9-EGFP Low IESC and Sox9-EGFP High cells. Cleaved caspase-3 staining demonstrated increased apoptotic cells in crypts and villi of old mice. Gene expression profiling revealed aging-associated changes in mRNAs associated with cell cycle, oxidative stress and apoptosis specifically in IESC. These findings provide new, direct evidence for aging associated IESC dysfunction, and define potential biomarkers and targets for translational studies to assess and maintain IESC function during aging.

  5. Occult progression by Apc-deficient intestinal crypts as a target for chemoprevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskay, R.Michael

    2014-01-01

    Although Apc mutation is widely considered an initiating event in colorectal cancer, little is known about the earliest stages of tumorigenesis following sporadic Apc loss. Therefore, we have utilized a novel mouse model that facilitates the sporadic inactivation of Apc via frameshift reversion of Cre in single, isolated cells and subsequently tracks the fates of Apc-deficient intestinal cells. Our results suggest that consistent with Apc being a ‘gatekeeper’, loss of Apc early in life during intestinal growth leads to adenomas or increased crypt fission, manifested by fields of mutant but otherwise normal-appearing crypts. In contrast, Apc loss occurring later in life has minimal consequences, with mutant crypts being less prone to either increased crypt fission or adenoma formation. Using the stem cell-specific Lgr5-CreER mouse, we generated different sized fields of Apc-deficient crypts via independent recombination events and found that field size correlates with progression to adenoma. To evaluate this early stage prior to adenoma formation as a therapeutic target, we examined the chemopreventive effects of sulindac on Apc-deficient occult crypt fission. We found that sulindac treatment started early in life inhibits the morphologically occult spread of Apc-deficient crypts and thus reduces adenoma numbers. Taken together these results suggest that: (i) earlier Apc loss promotes increased crypt fission, (ii) a field of Apc-deficient crypts, which can form via occult crypt fission or independent neighboring events, is an important intermediate between loss of Apc and adenoma formation and (iii) normal-appearing Apc-deficient crypts are potential unappreciated targets for cancer screening and chemoprevention. PMID:23996931

  6. Effect of an inhibitor of noradrenaline uptake, desipramine, on cell proliferation in the intestinal crypt epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1989-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa receives an adrenergic innervation for which there is no commonly accepted function. However, in recent years, cell kinetic studies have raised the possibility that this innervation may be an important regulator of crypt cell proliferation. The effects of noradrenaline released from adrenergic nerves is terminated principally by re-uptake of the amine into the nerve and this process can be inhibited by the antidepressant drug, desipramine. In this report desipramine is shown to accelerate crypt cell proliferation in intact, but not in chemically sympathectomized rats, thus adding support to the notion that regulation of crypt cell division is an important function of the sympathetic nervous system.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide from Crypt-Specific Core Microbiota Modulates the Colonic Epithelial Proliferation-to-Differentiation Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoaki Naito

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We identified a crypt-specific core microbiota (CSCM dominated by strictly aerobic, nonfermentative bacteria in murine cecal and proximal colonic (PC crypts and hypothesized that, among its possible functions, it may affect epithelial regeneration. In the present work, we isolated representative CSCM strains using selective media based upon our initial 16S rRNA-based molecular identification (i.e., Acinetobacter, Delftia, and Stenotrophomonas. Their tropism for the crypt was confirmed, and their influence on epithelial regeneration was demonstrated in vivo by monocolonization of germfree mice. We also showed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS, through its endotoxin activity, was the dominant bacterial agonist controlling proliferation. The relevant molecular mechanisms were analyzed using colonic crypt-derived organoids exposed to bacterial sonicates or highly purified LPS as agonists. We identified a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4-dependent program affecting crypts at different stages of epithelial differentiation. LPS played a dual role: it repressed cell proliferation through RIPK3-mediated necroptosis of stem cells and cells of the transit-amplifying compartment and concurrently enhanced cell differentiation, particularly the goblet cell lineage.

  8. Changes in the transcriptional profile of transporters in the intestine along the anterior-posterior and crypt-villus axes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delorenzi Mauro

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this work was to characterize the expression of drug and nutrient carriers along the anterior-posterior and crypt-villus axes of the intestinal epithelium and to study the validity of utilizing whole gut tissue rather than purified epithelial cells to examine regional variations in gene expression. Results We have characterized the mRNA expression profiles of 76 % of all currently known transporters along the anterior-posterior axis of the gut. This is the first study to describe the expression profiles of the majority of all known transporters in the intestine. The expression profiles of transporters, as defined according to the Gene Ontology consortium, were measured in whole tissue of the murine duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon using high-density microarrays. For nine transporters (Abca1, Abcc1, Abcc3, Abcg8, Slc10a2, Slc28a2, Slc2a1, Slc34a2 and Slc5a8, the mRNA profiles were further measured by RT-PCR in laser micro-dissected crypt and villus epithelial cells corresponding to the aforementioned intestinal regions. With respect to differentially regulated transporters, the colon had a distinct expression profile from small intestinal segments. The majority (59 % for p cutoff ≤ 0.05 of transporter mRNA levels were constant across the intestinal sections studied. For the transporter subclass "carrier activity", which contains the majority of known carriers for biologically active compounds, a significant change (p ≤ 0.05 along the anterior-posterior axis was observed. Conclusion All nine transporters examined in laser-dissected material demonstrated good replication of the region-specific profiles revealed by microarray. Furthermore, we suggest that the distribution characteristics of Slc5a8 along the intestinal tract render it a suitable candidate carrier for monocarboxylate drugs in the posterior portion of the intestine. Our findings also predict that there is a significant difference in the

  9. Advanced three-dimensional culture of equine intestinal epithelial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A Stieler; Freund, J M; Gonzalez, L M

    2018-03-01

    Intestinal epithelial stem cells are critical to epithelial repair following gastrointestinal injury. The culture of intestinal stem cells has quickly become a cornerstone of a vast number of new research endeavours that range from determining tissue viability to testing drug efficacy for humans. This study aims to describe the methods of equine stem cell culture and highlights the future benefits of these techniques for the advancement of equine medicine. To describe the isolation and culture of small intestinal stem cells into three-dimensional (3D) enteroids in horses without clinical gastrointestinal abnormalities. Descriptive study. Intestinal samples were collected by sharp dissection immediately after euthanasia. Intestinal crypts containing intestinal stem cells were dissociated from the underlying tissue layers, plated in a 3D matrix and supplemented with growth factors. After several days, resultant 3D enteroids were prepared for immunofluorescent imaging and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to detect and characterise specific cell types present. Intestinal crypts were cryopreserved immediately following collection and viability assessed. Intestinal crypts were successfully cultured and matured into 3D enteroids containing a lumen and budding structures. Immunofluorescence and PCR were used to confirm the existence of stem cells and all post mitotic, mature cell types, described to exist in the horse intestinal epithelium. Previously frozen crypts were successfully cultured following a freeze-thaw cycle. Tissues were all derived from normal horses. Application of this technique for the study of specific disease was not performed at this time. The successful culture of equine intestinal crypts into 3D "mini-guts" allows for in vitro studies of the equine intestine. Additionally, these results have relevance to future development of novel therapies that harness the regenerative potential of equine intestine in horses with gastrointestinal disease

  10. Crypt base columnar stem cells in small intestines of mice are radioresistant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hua, G.; Thin, T.H.; Feldman, R.; Haimovitz-Friedman, A.; Clevers, H.; Fuks, Z.; Kolesnick, R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Adult stem cells have been proposed to be quiescent and radiation resistant, repairing DNA double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end joining. However, the population of putative small intestinal stem cells (ISCs) at position +4 from the crypt base contradicts this model, in that

  11. Radiation-induced hyperproliferation of intestinal crypts results in elevated genome instability with inactive p53-related genomic surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Ma, Xiaofei; Wang, Zhenhua; Sun, Chao; Wang, Yupei; He, Yang; Zhang, Hong

    2015-12-15

    Radiation-induced hyperproliferation of intestinal crypts is well documented, but its potential tumorigenic effects remain elusive. Here we aim to determine the genomic surveillance process during crypt hyperproliferation, and its consequential outcome after ionizing radiation. Crypt regeneration in the intestine was induced by a single dose of 12Gy abdominal irradiation. γ-H2AX, 53BP1 and DNA-PKcs were used as DNA repair surrogates to investigate the inherent ability of intestinal crypt cells to recognize and repair double-strand breaks. Ki67 staining and the 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation assay were used to study patterns of cell proliferation in regenerating crypts. Staining for ATM, p53, Chk1 and Chk2 was performed to study checkpoint activation and release. Apoptosis was evaluated through H&E staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (dUTP) nick-end labeling. The ATM-p53 pathway was immediately activated after irradiation. A second wave of DSBs in crypt cells was observed in regenerating crypts, accompanied with significantly increased chromosomal bridges. The p53-related genomic surveillance pathway was not active during the regeneration phase despite DSBs and chromosomal bridges in the cells of regenerating crypts. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DSBs repair was involved in the DSBs repair process, as indicated by p-DNA-PKcs staining. Intestinal crypt cells retained hyperproliferation with inactive p53-related genomic surveillance system. NHEJ was involved in the resultant genomic instability during hyperproliferation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Stem cell self-renewal in intestinal crypt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, B.D.; Clevers, H.

    2011-01-01

    As a rapidly cycling tissue capable of fast repair and regeneration, the intestinal epithelium has emerged as a favored model system to explore the principles of adult stem cell biology. However, until recently, the identity and characteristics of the stem cell population in both the small intestine

  13. Cell Adhesion Molecule CD166/ALCAM Functions Within the Crypt to Orchestrate Murine Intestinal Stem Cell HomeostasisSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas R. Smith

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Intestinal epithelial homeostasis is maintained by active-cycling and slow-cycling stem cells confined within an instructive crypt-based niche. Exquisite regulating of these stem cell populations along the proliferation-to-differentiation axis maintains a homeostatic balance to prevent hyperproliferation and cancer. Although recent studies focus on how secreted ligands from mesenchymal and epithelial populations regulate intestinal stem cells (ISCs, it remains unclear what role cell adhesion plays in shaping the regulatory niche. Previously we have shown that the cell adhesion molecule and cancer stem cell marker, CD166/ALCAM (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule, is highly expressed by both active-cycling Lgr5+ ISCs and adjacent Paneth cells within the crypt base, supporting the hypothesis that CD166 functions to mediate ISC maintenance and signal coordination. Methods: Here we tested this hypothesis by analyzing a CD166–/– mouse combined with immunohistochemical, flow cytometry, gene expression, and enteroid culture. Results: We found that animals lacking CD166 expression harbored fewer active-cycling Lgr5+ ISCs. Homeostasis was maintained by expansion of the transit-amplifying compartment and not by slow-cycling Bmi1+ ISC stimulation. Loss of active-cycling ISCs was coupled with deregulated Paneth cell homeostasis, manifested as increased numbers of immature Paneth progenitors due to decreased terminal differentiation, linked to defective Wnt signaling. CD166–/– Paneth cells expressed reduced Wnt3 ligand expression and depleted nuclear β-catenin. Conclusions: These data support a function for CD166 as an important cell adhesion molecule that shapes the signaling microenvironment by mediating ISC–niche cell interactions. Furthermore, loss of CD166 expression results in decreased ISC and Paneth cell homeostasis and an altered Wnt microenvironment. Keywords: Intestinal Stem Cell, Homeostasis

  14. Lack of correlation between villus and crypt damage in irradiated mouse intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, K.E.; Hamlet, R.; Nias, A.H.W.; Watt, C.

    1979-01-01

    It has been observed that scanning electron microscopy is a more sensitive indicator of mucosal damage at low radiation dose levels than conventional quantitative crypt counting techniques. Three different fractionation schedules were subjected to investigation by both of these methods to try and elucidate some features of irradiation damage to the whole of the intestinal mucosa, at dose levels commonly used in clinical practice. Despite variations in the qualitative observations, there was a marked difference in two of the schedules between damage expressed as crypt counts and that described by the qualitative techniques. In the first case high crypt numbers were associated with severe mucosal damage, whereas the second schedule produced a reduced crypt count in association with low damage to the surface mucosa. A third schedule produced results in which there was a general agreement between low crypt numbers and considerable surface mucosal damage. However, observations were made of mucosal formations not previously seen on damaged mucosa; surfaces. These resembled the appearance normally associated with the gut of patients suffering from coeliac disease. Variations in the qualitative observations were seen in the schedules so that their interpretation in terms of perturbation of cellular kinetics is difficult. (author)

  15. Radioprotection of the intestinal crypts of mice by recombinant human interleukin-1 alpha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.G.; Miyamoto, T.

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-1 alpha (rHIL-1 alpha or IL-1) protected the intestinal crypt cells of mice against X-ray-induced damage. The survival of crypt cells measured in terms of their ability to form colonies of regenerating duodenal epithelium in situ was increased when IL-1 was given either before or after irradiation. The maximum degree of radioprotection was seen when the drug was given between 13 and 25 h before irradiation. The IL-1 dose producing maximum protection was about 6.3 micrograms/kg. This is the first report indicating that the cytokine IL-1 has a radioprotective effect in the intestine. The finding suggests that IL-1 may be of potential value in preventing radiation injury to the gut in the clinic

  16. Scap is required for sterol synthesis and crypt growth in intestinal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Matthew R; Cantoria, Mary Jo; Linden, Albert G; January, Brandon A; Liang, Guosheng; Engelking, Luke J

    2015-08-01

    SREBP cleavage-activating protein (Scap) is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein required for cleavage and activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), which activate the transcription of genes in sterol and fatty acid biosynthesis. Liver-specific loss of Scap is well tolerated; hepatic synthesis of sterols and fatty acids is reduced, but mice are otherwise healthy. To determine whether Scap loss is tolerated in the intestine, we generated a mouse model (Vil-Scap(-)) in which tamoxifen-inducible Cre-ER(T2), a fusion protein of Cre recombinase with a mutated ligand binding domain of the human estrogen receptor, ablates Scap in intestinal mucosa. After 4 days of tamoxifen, Vil-Scap(-) mice succumb with a severe enteropathy and near-complete collapse of intestinal mucosa. Organoids grown ex vivo from intestinal crypts of Vil-Scap(-) mice are readily killed when Scap is deleted by 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Death is prevented when culture medium is supplemented with cholesterol and oleate. These data show that, unlike the liver, the intestine requires Scap to sustain tissue integrity by maintaining the high levels of lipid synthesis necessary for proliferation of intestinal crypts. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Human Primary Intestinal Epithelial Cells as an Improved In Vitro Model for Cryptosporidium parvum Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabada, Miguel M.; Nichols, Joan; Gomez, Guillermo; White, A. Clinton

    2013-01-01

    The study of human intestinal pathogens has been limited by the lack of methods for the long-term culture of primary human intestinal epithelial cells (PECs). The development of infection models with PECs would allow a better understanding of host-parasite interactions. The objective of this study was to develop a novel method for prolonged in vitro cultivation of PECs that can be used to study Cryptosporidium infection. We isolated intact crypts from human intestines removed during weight loss surgery. The fragments of intestinal layers were cultivated with culture medium supplemented with growth factors and antiapoptotic molecules. After 7 days, the PECs formed self-regenerating cell clusters, forming villi that resemble intestinal epithelium. The PECs proliferated and remained viable for at least 60 days. The cells expressed markers for intestinal stem cells, epithelial cells, and mature enterocytes. The PECs were infected with Cryptosporidium. In contrast to older models in which parasite numbers decay, the burden of parasites increased for >120 h. In summary, we describe here a novel method for the cultivation of self-regenerating human epithelial cells from small intestinal crypts, which contain both intestinal stem cells and mature villus cells. We present data that suggest these cells support Cryptosporidium better than existing cell lines. PECs should provide an improved tool for studying host-parasite interactions involving Cryptosporidium and other intestinal pathogens. PMID:23509153

  18. Effects of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents on split-dose repair in intestinal crypt cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Theodore L.; Ross, Glenda Y.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Many cancer chemotherapeutic agents interact with radiation to enhance the amount of radiation damage observed in both tumor and normal tissues. It is important to predict this interaction and to determine the effect of drug on sublethal damage repair. To evaluate for effects in rapid renewing normal tissues, the intestinal crypt cell in vivo assay is an excellent one to employ. These studies investigate the effect of eleven cancer chemotherapeutic drugs on split-dose repair in the intestinal crypt cell of the mouse. Methods and Materials: LAF1 male mice, age 10-12 weeks, were exposed to whole-body irradiation with orthovoltage x-rays delivered as a single dose or as equally divided doses delivered with intervals between the two exposures of 2 to 24 h. In the experimental group, the cancer chemotherapeutic agent was administered intraperitoneally 2 h before the first radiation dose. At 3.6 days after the second irradiation, the mice were sacrificed; the jejunum was removed, fixed, and sectioned for light microscopy. The number of regenerating crypts were counted and corrected to represent the number of surviving cells per circumference. Results: Of the eleven drugs tested, only carmustine eliminated split-dose repair. Cisplatin delayed repair, and methotrexate caused marked synchronization obliterating the observation of split-dose repair. Conclusions: Most cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents do not inhibit sublethal damage repair in intestinal crypt cells when given 2 h before the first radiation exposure. Absence of the initial increase in survival seen with split-dose radiation is noted with carmustine and high-dose methotrexate

  19. Modifications of S-phase cell distribution in the intestinal crypts after multiple daily fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becciolini, A; Cremonini, D; Fabbrica, D; Balzi, M [Florence Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Radiologia

    1983-01-01

    The effects obtained by multiple daily fractionation (3 Gy x2 or 3 Gy x2x2) on the distribution of S-phase cells along the crypt of the small intestine were investigated. The frequency of labelled cell distribution was reduced at early intervals; then the proliferating compartment gradually extended to the villus junctions. During recovery labelled cell frequency in the lower half of the crypts returned to control levels, while labelled cells were present in the differentiating area. With lower total dose modifications were milder and, as early as 72 h before exposure, distribution was already similar to controls. Invertase activity showed an initial increase and a higher reduction during acute damage when fractionation with higher doses was used. A lack of return to normal activity was present even 11 days after exposure when, however, the characteristic circadian pattern was observed.

  20. The crypt and cell size kinetics in the irradiated intestinal epithelium in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kononenko, A.M.; Gagarin, A.U.

    1975-01-01

    A study has been made of changes in the average values of the axial cross-sectional area of the crypt and of cell area in this cross-section for eight days after a single whole-body exposure of male mice to 400 rad of X-rays. A small reduction in the crypt area in the destructive period gives way to a much greater increase in the normal dimensions of the area in the regenerative period. Two very considerable waves of anomalous increase are observed in the dimensions of the cryptal cell cross-sections, the first in the destructive and the second in the regenerative period. These fluctuations in cell dimensions do not occur around but above the control level, attaining the latter level only at the minimum (4th day). The size of the cryptal cells of the intact intestinal epithelium is evidently close to the minimum needed for enterocyte proliferation. The considerable increase in crypt dimensions in the regenerative period (beginning from the 6th day) is not due to the larger number of cells (they are even somewhat fewer than normal) but rather to a substantial increase in cell dimensions. Thus, according to these data, on the 6th-8th day after irradiation the intestinal epithelium deviates strongly from the stationary state. The index I sub(v), where I is the mitotic index and v the cell volume, was used to evaluate the changes in the value of the material stream, connected with proliferation, to the intestinal epithelium per cryptal cell. A considerable increase was found in this stream (hypertrophy of proliferative cells) in the intestinal epithelium restored after irradiation. (author)

  1. Epithelial WNT Ligands Are Essential Drivers of Intestinal Stem Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnie Y. Zou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal stem cells (ISCs maintain and repair the intestinal epithelium. While regeneration after ISC-targeted damage is increasingly understood, injury-repair mechanisms that direct regeneration following injuries to differentiated cells remain uncharacterized. The enteric pathogen, rotavirus, infects and damages differentiated cells while sparing all ISC populations, thus allowing the unique examination of the response of intact ISC compartments during injury-repair. Upon rotavirus infection in mice, ISC compartments robustly expand and proliferating cells rapidly migrate. Infection results specifically in stimulation of the active crypt-based columnar ISCs, but not alternative reserve ISC populations, as is observed after ISC-targeted damage. Conditional ablation of epithelial WNT secretion diminishes crypt expansion and ISC activation, demonstrating a previously unknown function of epithelial-secreted WNT during injury-repair. These findings indicate a hierarchical preference of crypt-based columnar cells (CBCs over other potential ISC populations during epithelial restitution and the importance of epithelial-derived signals in regulating ISC behavior.

  2. Regulators of Intestinal Epithelial Migration in Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Mei; Klingensmith, Nathan J; Liang, Zhe; Lyons, John D; Fay, Katherine T; Chen, Ching-Wen; Ford, Mandy L; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2018-02-08

    The gut is a continuously renewing organ, with cell proliferation, migration and death occurring rapidly under basal conditions. Since the impact of critical illness on cell movement from crypt base to villus tip is poorly understood, the purpose of this study was to determine how sepsis alters enterocyte migration. Wild type, transgenic and knockout mice were injected with 5-bromo-2'deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label cells in S phase before and after the onset of cecal ligation and puncture and were sacrificed at pre-determined endpoints to determine distance proliferating cells migrated up the crypt-villus unit. Enterocyte migration rate was decreased from 24-96 hours following sepsis. BrdU was not detectable on villi 6 days after sham laparotomy, meaning all cells had migrated the length of the gut and been exfoliated into its lumen. However, BrdU positive cells were detectable on villi 10 days after sepsis. Multiple components of gut integrity altered enterocyte migration. Sepsis decreased crypt proliferation, which further slowed enterocyte transit as mice injected with BrdU after the onset of sepsis (decreased proliferation) had slower migration than mice injected with BrdU prior to the onset of sepsis (normal proliferation). Decreasing intestinal apoptosis via gut-specific overexpression of Bcl-2 prevented sepsis-induced slowing of enterocyte migration. In contrast, worsened intestinal hyperpermeability by genetic deletion of JAM-A increased enterocyte migration. Sepsis therefore significantly slows enterocyte migration, and intestinal proliferation, apoptosis and permeability all affect migration time, which can potentially be targeted both genetically and pharmacologically.

  3. Fractionation study: survival of mouse intestinal crypts to exposure of 60Co and 11 MeV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine a statistical procedure for the quantification of time, dose, fraction relations for mouse intestinal crypt survival after fractionated Co-60 and 11-MeV electron irradiation. In the initial phase of the investigation CDF/1 male mice were exposed to fractionated Co-60 irradiation. A completely randomized experimental design with three factors, total time from initiation to completion of fractionation schedule, number of fractions, and total dose was utilized. The experimental animals were irradiated with a Co-60 panoramic irradiator unit at an absorbed dose rate of approximately 51 rads per minute. Two days after completion of the fractionation schedule, the experimental animals were sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Sections of intestinal jejunum were resected and routine histological preparations performed. The surviving crypts were scored with a compound microscope using a quantitative counting technique. The resulting crypt survival was observed to increase for increasing total times and fraction numbers

  4. Cytokine Tuning of Intestinal Epithelial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Andrews

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The intestine serves as both our largest single barrier to the external environment and the host of more immune cells than any other location in our bodies. Separating these potential combatants is a single layer of dynamic epithelium composed of heterogeneous epithelial subtypes, each uniquely adapted to carry out a subset of the intestine’s diverse functions. In addition to its obvious role in digestion, the intestinal epithelium is responsible for a wide array of critical tasks, including maintaining barrier integrity, preventing invasion by microbial commensals and pathogens, and modulating the intestinal immune system. Communication between these epithelial cells and resident immune cells is crucial for maintaining homeostasis and coordinating appropriate responses to disease and can occur through cell-to-cell contact or by the release or recognition of soluble mediators. The objective of this review is to highlight recent literature illuminating how cytokines and chemokines, both those made by and acting on the intestinal epithelium, orchestrate many of the diverse functions of the intestinal epithelium and its interactions with immune cells in health and disease. Areas of focus include cytokine control of intestinal epithelial proliferation, cell death, and barrier permeability. In addition, the modulation of epithelial-derived cytokines and chemokines by factors such as interactions with stromal and immune cells, pathogen and commensal exposure, and diet will be discussed.

  5. MET Signaling Mediates Intestinal Crypt-Villus Development, Regeneration, and Adenoma Formation and Is Promoted by Stem Cell CD44 Isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Sander P J; Zeilstra, Jurrit; van Andel, Harmen; Mijnals, R Clinton; Zaunbrecher, Joost; Duivenvoorden, Annet A M; van de Wetering, Marc; Clevers, Hans; Spaargaren, Marcel; Pals, Steven T

    2017-10-01

    Resistance of metastatic human colorectal cancer cells to drugs that block epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signaling could be caused by aberrant activity of other receptor tyrosine kinases, activating overlapping signaling pathways. One of these receptor tyrosine kinases could be MET, the receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). We investigated how MET signaling, and its interaction with CD44 (a putative MET coreceptor regulated by Wnt signaling and highly expressed by intestinal stem cells [ISCs] and adenomas) affects intestinal homeostasis, regeneration, and adenoma formation in mini-gut organoids and mice. We established organoid cultures from ISCs stimulated with HGF or EGF and assessed intestinal differentiation by immunohistochemistry. Mice with total epithelial disruption of MET (Ah Cre /Met fl/fl /LacZ) or ISC-specific disruption of MET (Lgr5 Creert2 /Met fl/fl /LacZ) and control mice (Ah Cre /Met +/+ /LacZ, Lgr5 Creert2 /Met +/+ /LacZ) were exposed to 10 Gy total body irradiation; intestinal tissues were collected, and homeostasis and regeneration were assessed by immunohistochemistry. We investigated adenoma organoid expansion stimulated by HGF or EGF using adenomas derived from Lgr5 Creert2 /Met fl/fl /Apc fl/fl and Lgr5 Creert2 /Met +/+ /Apc fl/fl mice. The same mice were evaluated for adenoma prevalence and size. We also quantified adenomas in Ah Cre /Met fl/fl /Apc fl/+ mice compared with Ah Cre /Met +/+ /Apc fl/+ control mice. We studied expansion of organoids generated from crypts and adenomas, stimulated by HGF or EGF, that were derived from mice expressing different CD44 splice variants (Cd44 +/+ , Cd44 -/- , Cd44 s/s , or Cd44 v4-10/v4-10 mice). Crypts incubated with EGF or HGF expanded into self-organizing mini-guts with similar levels of efficacy and contained all differentiated cell lineages. MET-deficient mice did not have defects in intestinal homeostasis. Total body irradiation reduced numbers of proliferating crypts in Ah Cre

  6. Krüppel-like factor 5 is essential for proliferation and survival of mouse intestinal epithelial stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandayam O. Nandan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5 is a pro-proliferative transcription factor that is expressed in dividing epithelial cells of the intestinal crypt. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5 has been identified as a stem cell marker in both small intestinal and colonic epithelial cells. To determine whether KLF5 regulates proliferation of intestinal stem cells, we investigated the effects of Klf5 deletion specifically from the intestinal stem cells in adult mice. Mice with inducible intestinal stem cell-specific deletion of Klf5 (Lgr5-Klf5fl/fl were injected with tamoxifen for 5 consecutive days to induce Lgr5-driven Cre expression. Intestinal and colonic tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry at various time points up to 112 days following start of tamoxifen treatment. Klf5 is co-localized in the crypt-based columnar (CBC cells that express Lgr5. By 11 days following the start of tamoxifen treatment, Lgr5-positive crypts from which Klf5 was deleted exhibited a loss of proliferation that was accompanied by an increase in apoptosis. Beginning at 14 days following the start of tamoxifen treatment, both Klf5 expression and proliferation were re-established in the transit-amplifying epithelial cells but not in the Lgr5-positive CBC cells. By 112 days post-treatment, up to 90% of the Lgr5-positive cells from which Klf5 was deleted were lost from the intestinal crypts. These results indicate a critical role for KLF5 in the survival and maintenance of intestinal stem cells.

  7. RBE of the NCT beam at Petten (The Netherlands) for intestinal crypt regeneration in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueulette, J.; Coster, B.M. de; Wambersie, A.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.; Huiskamp, R.; Moss, R.; Morrissey, J.

    2000-01-01

    RBE of the BNCT epithermal neutron beam at Petten (The Netherlands) has been determined for intestinal crypt regeneration in mice i.e. an in vivo system. No boron was administered. This experiment is part of an IAEA programme aiming at intercomparing radiobiologically the NCT neutron beams of different facilities world-wide. Six MV photons were used as the reference radiation. For the NCT beam at Petten, irradiation times ranging between 1 and 3 hours were applied. These low dose rate irradiations (∼3 Gy/hour) were found ∼2.4 more effective than acute photon irradiations. This type of experiment - repeated at different BNCT facilities - will improve harmonisation in the radiobiological specification of NCT neutron beams and facilitate exchange of clinical information. (author)

  8. Intestinal epithelial apoptosis initiates gut mucosal injury during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in the newborn piglet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MohanKumar, Krishnan; Killingsworth, Cheryl R; McIlwain, R Britt; Timpa, Joseph G; Jagadeeswaran, Ramasamy; Namachivayam, Kopperuncholan; Kurundkar, Ashish R; Kelly, David R; Garzon, Steven A; Maheshwari, Akhil

    2014-02-01

    Neonates and young infants exposed to extracorporeal circulation during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and cardiopulmonary bypass are at risk of developing a systemic inflammatory response syndrome with multi-organ dysfunction. We used a piglet model of ECMO to investigate the hypothesis that epithelial apoptosis is an early event that precedes villous damage during ECMO-related bowel injury. Healthy 3-week-old piglets were subjected to ECMO for up to 8 h. Epithelial apoptosis was measured in histopathological analysis, nuclear imaging, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. Plasma intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) levels were measured by enzyme immunoassay. Intestinal mast cells were isolated by fluorescence-assisted cell sorting. Cleaved caspase-8, caspase-9, phospho-p38 MAPK, and fas ligand expression were investigated by immunohistochemistry, western blots, and reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR. Piglet ECMO was associated with increased gut epithelial apoptosis. Extensive apoptotic changes were noted on villus tips and in scattered crypt cells after 2 h of ECMO. After 8 h, the villi were denuded and apoptotic changes were evident in a majority of crypt cells. Increased circulating I-FABP levels, a marker of gut epithelial injury, showed that epithelial injury occurred during ECMO. We detected increased cleaved caspase-8, but not cleaved caspase-9, in epithelial cells indicating that the extrinsic apoptotic pathway was active. ECMO was associated with increased fas ligand expression in intestinal mast cells, which was induced through activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. We conclude that epithelial apoptosis is an early event that initiates gut mucosal injury in a piglet model of ECMO.

  9. Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 Enacts Wnt Signaling in Intestinal Homeostasis and Contributes to the Instigation of Stemness in Diseases Entailing Epithelial Hyperplasia or Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oittinen, Mikko; Popp, Alina; Kurppa, Kalle; Lindfors, Katri; Mäki, Markku; Kaikkonen, Minna U; Viiri, Keijo

    2017-02-01

    Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling regulates the homeostasis of intestinal epithelium by controlling the balance between intestinal stem cell self-renewal and differentiation but epigenetic mechanisms enacting the process are not known. We hypothesized that epigenetic regulator, Polycomb Repressive Complex-2 (PRC2), is involved in Wnt-mediated epithelial homeostasis on the crypt-villus axis and aberrancies therein are implicated both in celiac disease and in intestinal malignancies. We found that PRC2 establishes repressive crypt and villus specific trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) signature on genes responsible for, for example, nutrient transport and cell killing in crypts and, for example, proliferation and differentiation in mature villi, suggesting that PRC2 facilitates the Wnt-governed intestinal homeostasis. When celiac patients are on gluten-containing diet PRC2 is out-of-bounds active and consequently its target genes were found affected in intestinal epithelium. Significant set of effective intestinal PRC2 targets are also differentially expressed in colorectal adenoma and carcinomas. Our results suggest that PRC2 gives rise and maintains polar crypt and villus specific H3K27me3 signatures. As H3K27me3 is a mark enriched in developmentally important genes, identified intestinal PRC2 targets are possibly imperative drivers for enterocyte differentiation and intestinal stem cell maintenance downstream to Wnt-signaling. Our work also elucidates the mechanism sustaining the crypt hyperplasia in celiac disease and suggest that PRC2-dependent fostering of epithelial stemness is a common attribute in intestinal diseases in which epithelial hyperplasia or neoplasia prevails. Finally, this work demonstrates that in intestine PRC2 represses genes having both pro-stemness and pro-differentiation functions, fact need to be considered when designing epigenetic therapies including PRC2 as a drug target. Stem Cells 2017;35:445-457. © 2016 Alpha

  10. Timing of developmental reduction in epithelial glutathione redox potential is associated with increased epithelial proliferation in the immature murine intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Graham K; Berardinelli, Andrew J; Ray, Laurie; Jackson, Arena R; Neish, Andrew S; Hansen, Jason M; Denning, Patricia W

    2017-08-01

    BackgroundThe intracellular redox potential of the glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) couple regulates cellular processes. In vitro studies indicate that a reduced GSH/GSSG redox potential favors proliferation, whereas a more oxidized redox potential favors differentiation. Intestinal growth depends upon an appropriate balance between the two. However, how the ontogeny of intestinal epithelial cellular (IEC) GSH/GSSG redox regulates these processes in the developing intestine has not been fully characterized in vivo.MethodsOntogeny of intestinal GSH redox potential and growth were measured in neonatal mice.ResultsWe show that IEC GSH/GSSG redox potential becomes increasingly reduced (primarily driven by increased GSH concentration) over the first 3 weeks of life. Increased intracellular GSH has been shown to drive proliferation through increased poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) activity. We show that increasing IEC poly-ADP-ribose chains can be measured over the first 3 weeks of life, indicating an increase in IEC PARP activity. These changes are accompanied by increased intestinal growth and IEC proliferation as assessed by villus height/crypt depth, intestinal length, and Ki67 staining.ConclusionUnderstanding how IEC GSH/GSSG redox potential is developmentally regulated may provide insight into how premature human intestinal redox states can be manipulated to optimize intestinal growth and adaptation.

  11. The fate of epithelial cells in the human large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla, D H; Gibson, P R

    1999-08-01

    One hundred and forty biopsies of the colon and rectum, collected during routine colonoscopies of 51 patients aged 19 to 74 years, were examined using light microscopy and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that surface epithelial cells undergo apoptosis, passing through fenestrations in the basement membrane to where they enter the lamina propria and are taken up by macrophages; and it is hypothesized that apoptotic cells are carried through the fenestrations on a current of fluid. The study also found that epithelial cells positioned over the crypts are better attached and more robust than those more distant from the crypt opening; and it is further hypothesized that, after reaching the top of the crypts, some goblet cells cease secreting mucus and pass onto the surface compartment of absorptive cells. An unexpected finding was that the lower regions of the crypts commonly contain isolated necrotic colonocytes. Apoptotic cells were rarely observed in the crypt epithelium. The findings of this study support the "recycling" model of epithelial cell death in the surface compartment of the human colon.

  12. MicroRNA mir-16 is anti-proliferative in enterocytes and exhibits diurnal rhythmicity in intestinal crypts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishnan, Anita, E-mail: anita.balakrishnan@doctors.org.uk [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); School of Clinical Sciences, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GE (United Kingdom); Stearns, Adam T. [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom); Park, Peter J. [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Harvard Medical School, Center for Biomedical Informatics, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Dreyfuss, Jonathan M. [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Ashley, Stanley W. [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Rhoads, David B. [Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Pediatric Endocrine Unit, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Tavakkolizadeh, Ali, E-mail: atavakkoli@partners.org [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2010-12-10

    Background and aims: The intestine exhibits profound diurnal rhythms in function and morphology, in part due to changes in enterocyte proliferation. The regulatory mechanisms behind these rhythms remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that microRNAs are involved in mediating these rhythms, and studied the role of microRNAs specifically in modulating intestinal proliferation. Methods: Diurnal rhythmicity of microRNAs in rat jejunum was analyzed by microarrays and validated by qPCR. Temporal expression of diurnally rhythmic mir-16 was further quantified in intestinal crypts, villi, and smooth muscle using laser capture microdissection and qPCR. Morphological changes in rat jejunum were assessed by histology and proliferation by immunostaining for bromodeoxyuridine. In IEC-6 cells stably overexpressing mir-16, proliferation was assessed by cell counting and MTS assay, cell cycle progression and apoptosis by flow cytometry, and cell cycle gene expression by qPCR and immunoblotting. Results: mir-16 peaked 6 hours after light onset (HALO 6) with diurnal changes restricted to crypts. Crypt depth and villus height peaked at HALO 13-14 in antiphase to mir-16. Overexpression of mir-16 in IEC-6 cells suppressed specific G1/S regulators (cyclins D1-3, cyclin E1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6) and produced G1 arrest. Protein expression of these genes exhibited diurnal rhythmicity in rat jejunum, peaking between HALO 11 and 17 in antiphase to mir-16. Conclusions: This is the first report of circadian rhythmicity of specific microRNAs in rat jejunum. Our data provide a link between anti-proliferative mir-16 and the intestinal proliferation rhythm and point to mir-16 as an important regulator of proliferation in jejunal crypts. This function may be essential to match proliferation and absorptive capacity with nutrient availability.

  13. MicroRNA mir-16 is anti-proliferative in enterocytes and exhibits diurnal rhythmicity in intestinal crypts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, Anita; Stearns, Adam T.; Park, Peter J.; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M.; Ashley, Stanley W.; Rhoads, David B.; Tavakkolizadeh, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims: The intestine exhibits profound diurnal rhythms in function and morphology, in part due to changes in enterocyte proliferation. The regulatory mechanisms behind these rhythms remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that microRNAs are involved in mediating these rhythms, and studied the role of microRNAs specifically in modulating intestinal proliferation. Methods: Diurnal rhythmicity of microRNAs in rat jejunum was analyzed by microarrays and validated by qPCR. Temporal expression of diurnally rhythmic mir-16 was further quantified in intestinal crypts, villi, and smooth muscle using laser capture microdissection and qPCR. Morphological changes in rat jejunum were assessed by histology and proliferation by immunostaining for bromodeoxyuridine. In IEC-6 cells stably overexpressing mir-16, proliferation was assessed by cell counting and MTS assay, cell cycle progression and apoptosis by flow cytometry, and cell cycle gene expression by qPCR and immunoblotting. Results: mir-16 peaked 6 hours after light onset (HALO 6) with diurnal changes restricted to crypts. Crypt depth and villus height peaked at HALO 13-14 in antiphase to mir-16. Overexpression of mir-16 in IEC-6 cells suppressed specific G1/S regulators (cyclins D1-3, cyclin E1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6) and produced G1 arrest. Protein expression of these genes exhibited diurnal rhythmicity in rat jejunum, peaking between HALO 11 and 17 in antiphase to mir-16. Conclusions: This is the first report of circadian rhythmicity of specific microRNAs in rat jejunum. Our data provide a link between anti-proliferative mir-16 and the intestinal proliferation rhythm and point to mir-16 as an important regulator of proliferation in jejunal crypts. This function may be essential to match proliferation and absorptive capacity with nutrient availability.

  14. Zinc Transporter SLC39A7/ZIP7 Promotes Intestinal Epithelial Self-Renewal by Resolving ER Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Wakana; Kimura, Shunsuke; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Furusawa, Yukihiro; Irié, Tarou; Izumi, Hironori; Watanabe, Takashi; Hara, Takafumi; Ohara, Osamu; Koseki, Haruhiko; Sato, Toshiro; Robine, Sylvie; Mori, Hisashi; Hattori, Yuichi; Mishima, Kenji; Ohno, Hiroshi; Hase, Koji; Fukada, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Zinc transporters play a critical role in spatiotemporal regulation of zinc homeostasis. Although disruption of zinc homeostasis has been implicated in disorders such as intestinal inflammation and aberrant epithelial morphology, it is largely unknown which zinc transporters are responsible for the intestinal epithelial homeostasis. Here, we show that Zrt-Irt-like protein (ZIP) transporter ZIP7, which is highly expressed in the intestinal crypt, is essential for intestinal epithelial proliferation. Mice lacking Zip7 in intestinal epithelium triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in proliferative progenitor cells, leading to significant cell death of progenitor cells. Zip7 deficiency led to the loss of Olfm4+ intestinal stem cells and the degeneration of post-mitotic Paneth cells, indicating a fundamental requirement for Zip7 in homeostatic intestinal regeneration. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for the importance of ZIP7 in maintenance of intestinal epithelial homeostasis through the regulation of ER function in proliferative progenitor cells and maintenance of intestinal stem cells. Therapeutic targeting of ZIP7 could lead to effective treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:27736879

  15. Zinc Transporter SLC39A7/ZIP7 Promotes Intestinal Epithelial Self-Renewal by Resolving ER Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakana Ohashi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Zinc transporters play a critical role in spatiotemporal regulation of zinc homeostasis. Although disruption of zinc homeostasis has been implicated in disorders such as intestinal inflammation and aberrant epithelial morphology, it is largely unknown which zinc transporters are responsible for the intestinal epithelial homeostasis. Here, we show that Zrt-Irt-like protein (ZIP transporter ZIP7, which is highly expressed in the intestinal crypt, is essential for intestinal epithelial proliferation. Mice lacking Zip7 in intestinal epithelium triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in proliferative progenitor cells, leading to significant cell death of progenitor cells. Zip7 deficiency led to the loss of Olfm4+ intestinal stem cells and the degeneration of post-mitotic Paneth cells, indicating a fundamental requirement for Zip7 in homeostatic intestinal regeneration. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for the importance of ZIP7 in maintenance of intestinal epithelial homeostasis through the regulation of ER function in proliferative progenitor cells and maintenance of intestinal stem cells. Therapeutic targeting of ZIP7 could lead to effective treatment of gastrointestinal disorders.

  16. Enhancement of radiation effect on mouse intestinal crypt survival by timing of 5-fluorouracil administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, E.; Coffey, C.; Maruyama, Y.

    1977-01-01

    There is a marked dependence of mouse crypt survival on the sequence of combined drug-radiation treatment and on the time lapse between irradiation and drug administration. When 5-fluorouracil is administered 6 hours after irradiation or later (up to 18 hours postirradiation), crypt survival drops significantly

  17. Early establishment of epithelial apoptosis in the developing human small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, P H; Cardin, E; Harnois, C; Reed, J C; Vézina, A

    2000-12-01

    In the adult small intestine, the dynamic renewal of the epithelium is characterized by a sequence of cell production in the crypts, cell maturation and cell migration to the tip of villi, where apoptosis is undertaken. Little is known about enterocytic apoptosis during development. In man, intestinal architectural features and functions are acquired largely by mid-gestation (18-20 wks); the question whether the establishment of enterocytic apoptotic processes parallels or not the acquisition of other intestinal functional features remains open. In the present study, we approached this question by examining enterocytic apoptosis during development of the human jejunum (9-20 wks gestation), using the ISEL (in situ terminal uridine deoxynucleotidyl nick-end labelling) method. Between 9 and 17 wks, apoptotic enterocytes were not evidenced. However, beginning at the 18 wks stage, ISEL-positive enterocytes were regularly observed at the tip of villi. Since the Bcl-2 family of proteins constitutes a critical checkpoint in apoptosis, acting upstream of the apoptotic machinery, we investigated the expression of six Bcl-2 homologs (Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L), Mcl-1, Bax, Bak, Bad) and one non-homologous associated molecule (Bag-1). By immunofluorescence, we found that all homologs analyzed were expressed by enterocytes between 9 and 20 wks. However, Bcl-2 homologs underwent a gradual compartmentalization of epithelial expression along the maturing crypt-villus axis, to establish gradients of expression by 18-20 wks. Western blot analyses indicated that the expression levels of Bcl-2 homologs were modulated during morphogenesis of the crypt-villus axis, in parallel to their gradual compartmentalization of expression. Altogether, these data suggest that regulatory mechanisms of human enterocytic apoptosis become established by mid-gestation (18-20 wks) and coincide with the maturation of the crypt-villus axis of cell proliferation, differentiation and renewal.

  18. Plasticity of intestinal epithelial cells in regeneration and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetteh, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular plasticity refers to the ability of a cell to change its fate or identity in response to external or intrinsic factors. Regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury is driven mainly by plasticity of crypt stem cells that can rapidly divide to replace all the lost cells. Stem cell

  19. HIV enteropathy: HAART reduces HIV-induced stem cell hyperproliferation and crypt hypertrophy to normal in jejunal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batman, Philip A; Kapembwa, Moses S; Belmonte, Liliana; Tudor, Gregory; Kotler, Donald P; Potten, Christopher S; Booth, Catherine; Cahn, Pedro; Griffin, George E

    2014-01-01

    To analyse the structural and kinetic response of small intestinal crypt epithelial cells including stem cells to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Crypt size and proliferative activity of transit and stem cells in jejunal mucosa were quantified using morphometric techniques. Crypt length was measured by counting the number of enterocytes along one side of a number of crypts in each biopsy specimen and the mean crypt length was calculated. Proliferating crypt cells were identified with MIB-1 monoclonal antibody, and the percentage of crypt cells in proliferation was calculated at each cell position along the length of the crypt (proliferation index). Data were obtained from 9 HIV-positive test patients co-infected with microsporidia, 34 HIV-positive patients receiving HAART and 13 control cases. Crypt length was significantly greater in test patients than in controls, but crypt length in patients receiving HAART was normal. The proliferation index was greater in test subjects than in controls in stem and transit cell compartments, and was decreased in patients treated with HAART only in the stem cell region of the crypt. Villous atrophy in HIV enteropathy is attributed to crypt hypertrophy and encroachment of crypt cells onto villi. HAART restores normal crypt structure by inhibition of HIV-driven stem cell hyperproliferation at the crypt bases.

  20. Mechanisms of decreased intestinal epithelial proliferation and increased apoptosis in murine acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Kareem D; Stromberg, Paul E; Woolsey, Cheryl A; Turnbull, Isaiah R; Dunne, W Michael; Javadi, Pardis; Buchman, Timothy G; Karl, Irene E; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of acute lung injury on the gut epithelium and examine mechanisms underlying changes in crypt proliferation and apoptosis. The relationship between severity and timing of lung injury to intestinal pathology was also examined. Randomized, controlled study. University research laboratory. Genetically inbred mice. Following induction of acute lung injury, gut epithelial proliferation and apoptosis were assessed in a) C3H/HeN wild-type and C3H/HeJ mice, which lack functional Toll-like receptor 4 (n = 17); b) C57Bl/6 mice that received monoclonal anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha or control antibody (n = 22); and c) C57Bl/6 wild-type and transgenic mice that overexpress Bcl-2 in their gut epithelium (n = 21). Intestinal epithelial proliferation and death were also examined in animals with differing degrees of lung inflammation (n = 24) as well as in a time course analysis following a fixed injury (n = 18). Acute lung injury caused decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis in crypt epithelial cells in all animals studied. C3H/HeJ mice had higher levels of proliferation than C3H/HeN animals without additional changes in apoptosis. Anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha antibody had no effect on gut epithelial proliferation or death. Overexpression of Bcl-2 did not change proliferation despite decreasing gut apoptosis. Proliferation and apoptosis were not correlated to severity of lung injury, as gut alterations were lost in mice with more severe acute lung injury. Changes in both gut epithelial proliferation and death were apparent within 12 hrs, but proliferation was decreased 36 hrs following acute lung injury while apoptosis returned to normal. Acute lung injury causes disparate effects on crypt proliferation and apoptosis, which occur, at least in part, through differing mechanisms involving Toll-like receptor 4 and Bcl-2. Severity of lung injury does not correlate with perturbations in proliferation or death in the

  1. The circadian rhythm for the number and sensitivity of radiation-induced apoptosis in the crypts of mouse small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, K.; Potten, C.S.

    1990-01-01

    Survival curves were constructed from dose-incidence curves for apoptosis in the crypts of mouse small intestine, using the number of apoptotic cells after high doses (N M ) as maximum cell population size. The mean lethal doses (D 0 ) for the dose range 0-0.5 Gy were calculated for each time of day. A circadian rhythm in both D 0 and N M values was detected, indicating that both the number and sensitivity of radiation-induced apoptosis were changing throughout the day. (author)

  2. The re-establishment of hypersensitive cells in the crypts of irradiated mouse intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, K.; Potten, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    Two doses of γ-radiation separated by various time intervals have been used to investigate when after irradiation the cell population susceptible to acute cell death is re-established. Dead cells were scored 3 or 6 h after the second dose. Within 1-2 days of small doses (0.5 Gy) the sensitive cells, recognized histologically as apoptotic cells, are re-established at the base of the crypt (around cell position 6). After higher doses (9.0 Gy) they are not re-established until about the fourth day after irradiation. Even in the enlarged regenerating crypts the sensitive cells are found at the same position at the crypt base. It has been estimated that the crypt contains five or six cells that are susceptible to low doses (0.5 Gy) (hypersensitive cells) and up to a total of only seven or eight susceptible cells that can be induced by any dose to enter the sequence of changes implicit in apoptosis. Between 4 and 10 days after an intitial irradiation of 9.0 Gy the total number of susceptible cells increased from seven to eight to about 10 to 13 per crypt. (author)

  3. Bovine lactoferrin regulates cell survival, apoptosis and inflammation in intestinal epithelial cells and preterm pig intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Jiang, Pingping; Stensballe, Allan; Bendixen, Emøke; Sangild, Per T; Chatterton, Dereck E W

    2016-04-29

    Bovine lactoferrin (bLF) may modulate neonatal intestinal inflammation. Previous studies in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) indicated that moderate bLF doses enhance proliferation whereas high doses trigger inflammation. To further elucidate cellular mechanisms, we profiled the porcine IEC proteome after stimulation with bLF at 0, 0.1, 1 and 10g/L by LC-MS-based proteomics. Key pathways were analyzed in the intestine of formula-fed preterm pigs with and without supplementation of 10g/L bLF. Levels of 123 IEC proteins were altered by bLF. Low bLF doses (0.1-1g/L) up-regulated 11 proteins associated with glycolysis, energy metabolism and protein synthesis, indicating support of cell survival. In contrast, a high bLF dose (10g/L) up-regulated three apoptosis-inducing proteins, down-regulated five anti-apoptotic and proliferation-inducing proteins and 15 proteins related to energy and amino acid metabolism, and altered three proteins enhancing the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) pathway. In the preterm pig intestine, bLF at 10g/L decreased villus height/crypt depth ratio and up-regulated the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and HIF-1α, indicating elevated intestinal apoptosis and inflammation. In conclusion, bLF dose-dependently affects IECs via metabolic, apoptotic and inflammatory pathways. It is important to select an appropriate dose when feeding neonates with bLF to avoid detrimental effects exerted by excessive doses. The present work elucidates dose-dependent effects of bLF on the proteomic changes of IECs in vitro supplemented with data from a preterm pig study confirming detrimental effects of enteral feeding with the highest dose of bLF (10g/L). The study contributes to further understanding on mechanisms that bLF, as an important milk protein, can regulate the homeostasis of the immature intestine. Results from this study urge neonatologists to carefully consider the dose of bLF to supplement into infant formula used for preterm neonates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  4. Long-term expansion of epithelial organoids from human colon, adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and Barrett's epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sato, T.; Stange, D.E.; Ferrante, M.; Vries, R.G.J.; van Es, J.H.; van den Brink, S.; Houdt, W.J.; Pronk, A.; van Gorp, J.; Siersema, P.D.; Clevers, H.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We previously established long-term culture conditions under which single crypts or stem cells derived from mouse small intestine expand over long periods. The expanding crypts undergo multiple crypt fission events, simultaneously generating villus-like epithelial domains that

  5. The proliferative response of mouse intestinal crypts during fractionated irradiation of carbon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abo, M.; Abe, Y.; Mariya, Y.; Ando, K.

    2000-01-01

    Clonogenic assay of jejunal crypt during carbon beam and X-ray irradiations was performed. Fractionation with top-up dose assay revealed carbon beam irradiations caused more damage than X-ray did. To clarify this problem is urgent. (author)

  6. Preterm infant gut microbiota affects intestinal epithelial development in a humanized microbiome gnotobiotic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yueyue; Lu, Lei; Sun, Jun; Petrof, Elaine O; Claud, Erika C

    2016-09-01

    Development of the infant small intestine is influenced by bacterial colonization. To promote establishment of optimal microbial communities in preterm infants, knowledge of the beneficial functions of the early gut microbiota on intestinal development is needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of early preterm infant microbiota on host gut development using a gnotobiotic mouse model. Histological assessment of intestinal development was performed. The differentiation of four epithelial cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, enteroendocrine cells) and tight junction (TJ) formation was examined. Using weight gain as a surrogate marker for health, we found that early microbiota from a preterm infant with normal weight gain (MPI-H) induced increased villus height and crypt depth, increased cell proliferation, increased numbers of goblet cells and Paneth cells, and enhanced TJs compared with the changes induced by early microbiota from a poor weight gain preterm infant (MPI-L). Laser capture microdissection (LCM) plus qRT-PCR further revealed, in MPI-H mice, a higher expression of stem cell marker Lgr5 and Paneth cell markers Lyz1 and Cryptdin5 in crypt populations, along with higher expression of the goblet cell and mature enterocyte marker Muc3 in villus populations. In contrast, MPI-L microbiota failed to induce the aforementioned changes and presented intestinal characteristics comparable to a germ-free host. Our data demonstrate that microbial communities have differential effects on intestinal development. Future studies to identify pioneer settlers in neonatal microbial communities necessary to induce maturation may provide new insights for preterm infant microbial ecosystem therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Comparison of the dose-response relationship of radiation-induced apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and intestinal crypt of adult mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. S.; Yang, M.; Kim, J.; Lee, D.; Kim, J. C.; Shin, T.; Kim, S. H.; Moon, C.

    2012-01-01

    The present study compared the dose-response curves for the frequency of apoptosis in mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and intestinal crypt using whole-body gamma irradiation. The incidence of gamma-ray-induced apoptosis was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end-labelling (TUNEL) method. TUNEL-positive apoptotic nuclei in the DG and intestinal crypt were increased in a dose-dependent pattern (0-2 Gy). The dose-response curves were linear-quadratic, with a significant relationship between the appearance of apoptosis and irradiation dose. The slopes of the dose-response curves in the DG were much steeper (∼5-6-fold) than those in the intestinal crypt within the range of 0-1 Gy exposure. Hippocampal DG might be a more effective and sensitive evaluation structure than the intestinal crypt to estimate the degree of radiation exposure in damaged organs of adult mice exposed to low irradiation dose. copy; The Author 2011. Published by Oxford Univ. Press. All rights reserved. (authors)

  8. Induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress by deletion of Grp78 depletes Apc mutant intestinal epithelial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lidth de Jeude, J F; Meijer, B J; Wielenga, M C B; Spaan, C N; Baan, B; Rosekrans, S L; Meisner, S; Shen, Y H; Lee, A S; Paton, J C; Paton, A W; Muncan, V; van den Brink, G R; Heijmans, J

    2017-06-15

    Intestinal epithelial stem cells are highly sensitive to differentiation induced by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Colorectal cancer develops from mutated intestinal epithelial stem cells. The most frequent initiating mutation occurs in Apc, which results in hyperactivated Wnt signalling. This causes hyperproliferation and reduced sensitivity to chemotherapy, but whether these mutated stem cells are sensitive to ER stress induced differentiation remains unknown. Here we examined this by generating mice in which both Apc and ER stress repressor chaperone Grp78 can be conditionally deleted from the intestinal epithelium. For molecular studies, we used intestinal organoids derived from these mice. Homozygous loss of Apc alone resulted in crypt elongation, activation of the Wnt signature and accumulation of intestinal epithelial stem cells, as expected. This phenotype was however completely rescued on activation of ER stress by additional deletion of Grp78. In these Apc-Grp78 double mutant animals, stem cells were rapidly lost and repopulation occurred by non-mutant cells that had escaped recombination, suggesting that Apc-Grp78 double mutant stem cells had lost self-renewal capacity. Although in Apc-Grp78 double mutant mice the Wnt signature was lost, these intestines exhibited ubiquitous epithelial presence of nuclear β-catenin. This suggests that ER stress interferes with Wnt signalling downstream of nuclear β-catenin. In conclusion, our findings indicate that ER stress signalling results in loss of Apc mutated intestinal epithelial stem cells by interference with the Wnt signature. In contrast to many known inhibitors of Wnt signalling, ER stress acts downstream of β-catenin. Therefore, ER stress poses a promising target in colorectal cancers, which develop as a result of Wnt activating mutations.

  9. The effects of herbs on the radiation-induced apoptosis in intestinal crypt cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; An, Mi Ra; Nah, Seung Yeol; Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Jae Ha; Shin, Dong Ho [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Sung Kee [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jong Sik [Sangju National Univ., Sangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    This study was performed to determine the effect of several herbs on radiation-induced apoptosis in jejunal crypt cells. Longyanrou(Euphoris logana), Suanzaoren(Zizyphus vulgaris), Yuanzhi(Polygala tenuifolia), Rensan(Panax ginseng), Fuling(Poria cocos), Muxiang(Saussurea lappa), Chuanxiong(Cnidium offcinale), Baishaoyao(Paeonia lactifolia), Shengma(Cimicifuga heracleifolia), Chaihu(Bupleurum falcatum) and Dongchongxiacao(Paecilomyces japonica) reduced the frequency of radiation-induced apoptosis(p<0.05). Although the mechanisms of this effect remain to be elucidated, these results indicated that Longyanrou, Suanzaoren, Yuanzhi, Rensan, Fuling, Muxiang, Chuanxiong, Baishaoyao, Shengma, Chaihu and Dongchongxiacao might be useful inhibitors of apoptosis, especially since these are relative nontoxic natural products.

  10. Effect of postradiation bleeding on proliferative activity of cells in small intestine crypts of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, N V [Institut za Nuklearne Nauke Boris Kidric, Vinca (Yugoslavia)

    1975-12-01

    The effect of postradiation bleeding on the dynamics of duodenal crypt's cell proliferation in rats was studied. The animals, females, three months old, weighing 170 or 180 g, were exposed to radiation of 800 R (115 R/min) and immediately after irradiation were bled by cardiac puncture to 50% of total blood volume. Proliferative activity of duodenal epithelium cells was monitored for a period of five days after irradiation. For control purposes normal, irradiated and only bled animals were used. The results demonstrated that although there are no significant differences in proliferative activity of duodenal epithelium cells in irradiated and bled animals and only irradiated animals, the postradiation reparative processes in irradiated and bled animals is considerably more stable. It is considered that bleeding itself by its hypoxic activity reduced the sensitivity of epithelium to the dose of radiation used. On the other hand, bleeding removed the damaging agents which appear after total body irradiation.

  11. c-Kit mutation reduce intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and migration, but not influence intestinal permeability stimulated by lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hong; Wang, Feng Yun; Kang, Qian; Tang, Xu Dong

    2018-06-20

    The proto-oncogene c-kit, as a marker of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in the gastrointestinal tract, plays an important role in the ICCs. Although limited evidences showed c-kit is present in the colonic epithelium but its roles remain unclear. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the expression, location and function of c-kit in the intestinal epithelium. Immunofluorescence, western blotting, and RT-PCR were performed to detect the expression and location of c-kit in the intestinal mucosa of WT mice. We investigated intestinal epithelial proliferation and migration in vivo by performing 5-Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and Ki-67 staining in WT and Wads m/m mice. An Ussing chamber with fluorescein-isothiocyanate dextran 4000 was used to detect the transepithelial electric resistance (TER), short circuit current (ISC) and permeability across ex vivo colon segments under control and endotoxaemia conditions. We demonstrated that c-kit was located and expressed in the gut crypt compartment in WT mice, which was demonstrated in the c-kit mutant mice (Wads m/m ). In addition, both the number of proliferating cells and the percentage of the distance migrated were lower in the Wads m/m mice than those in the WT mice. Moreover, the intestinal permeability, TER and tight junction were unaltered in the Wads m/m mice under endotoxic conditions compared with those in both the control condition and the WT mice. Altogether, these observations imply that the expression of c-kit in the colonic epithelium is involved in the proliferation and permeability of the colonic epithelium. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  12. N-acetylcysteine improves redox status, mitochondrial dysfunction, mucin-depleted crypts and epithelial hyperplasia in dextran sulfate sodium-induced oxidative colitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrouche-Mekkioui, Ilhem; Djerdjouri, Bahia

    2012-09-15

    The effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a pharmacological antioxidant was investigated in a murine model of chronic colitis. Male NMRI mice were given 5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for 5 days followed by 10 days of water, three times. Compared to control mice given water, DSS-treated mice displayed severe imbalanced redox status with decreased glutathione and catalase, but increased malondialdehyde, protein carbonyls, nitric oxide and myeloperoxidase levels, at days 35th (active colitis) and 45th (recovery period). It also resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, mucosal ulcers, mucin-depleted crypts and epithelial cell apoptosis. Crypt abscesses and glandular hyperplasia occurred selectively in distal colon. NAC (150 mg/kg) given in drinking water for 45 days along with 3 DSS cycles improved the hallmarks of DSS-colitis. Interestingly, the moderate impact of NAC on lipids and proteins oxidation correlated with myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide levels.NAC as a mucoregulator and a thiol restoring agent is protective on oxidative crypt alterations, mucin depletion, epithelial cell hyperplasia and apoptosis. Taken together, our results highlight the role of NAC as a scavenger of phagocytes-derived reactive oxygen species in mice DDS-colitis, suggesting that a long term NAC diet might be beneficial in inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cell organisation in the colonic crypt: a theoretical comparison of the pedigree and niche concepts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C van der Wath

    Full Text Available The intestinal mucosa is a monolayer of rapidly self-renewing epithelial cells which is not only responsible for absorption of water and nutrients into the bloodstream but also acts as a protective barrier against harmful microbes entering the body. New functional epithelial cells are produced from stem cells, and their proliferating progeny. These stem cells are found within millions of crypts (tubular pits spaced along the intestinal tract. The entire intestinal epithelium is replaced every 2-3 days in mice (3-5 days in humans and hence cell production, differentiation, migration and turnover need to be tightly regulated. Malfunctions in this regulation are strongly linked to inflammatory bowel diseases and to the formation of adenomas and ultimately cancerous tumours. Despite a great deal of biological experimentation and observation, precisely how colonic crypts are regulated to produce mature colonocytes remains unclear. To assist in understanding how cell organisation in crypts is achieved, two very different conceptual models of cell behaviour are developed here, referred to as the 'pedigree' and the 'niche' models. The pedigree model proposes that crypt cells are largely preprogrammed and receive minimal prompting from the environment as they move through a routine of cell differentiation and proliferation to become mature colonocytes. The niche model proposes that crypt cells are primarily influenced by the local microenvironments along the crypt, and that predetermined cell behaviour plays a negligible role in their development. In this paper we present a computational model of colonic crypts in the mouse, which enables a comparison of the quality and controllability of mature coloncyte production by crypts operating under these two contrasting conceptual models of crypt regulation.

  14. Cell lineage identification and stem cell culture in a porcine model for the study of intestinal epithelial regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liara M Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Significant advances in intestinal stem cell biology have been made in murine models; however, anatomical and physiological differences between mice and humans limit mice as a translational model for stem cell based research. The pig has been an effective translational model, and represents a candidate species to study intestinal epithelial stem cell (IESC driven regeneration. The lack of validated reagents and epithelial culture methods is an obstacle to investigating IESC driven regeneration in a pig model. In this study, antibodies against Epithelial Adhesion Molecule 1 (EpCAM and Villin marked cells of epithelial origin. Antibodies against Proliferative Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA, Minichromosome Maintenance Complex 2 (MCM2, Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU and phosphorylated Histone H3 (pH3 distinguished proliferating cells at various stages of the cell cycle. SOX9, localized to the stem/progenitor cells zone, while HOPX was restricted to the +4/'reserve' stem cell zone. Immunostaining also identified major differentiated lineages. Goblet cells were identified by Mucin 2 (MUC2; enteroendocrine cells by Chromogranin A (CGA, Gastrin and Somatostatin; and absorptive enterocytes by carbonic anhydrase II (CAII and sucrase isomaltase (SIM. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated morphologic and sub-cellular characteristics of stem cell and differentiated intestinal epithelial cell types. Quantitative PCR gene expression analysis enabled identification of stem/progenitor cells, post mitotic cell lineages, and important growth and differentiation pathways. Additionally, a method for long-term culture of porcine crypts was developed. Biomarker characterization and development of IESC culture in the porcine model represents a foundation for translational studies of IESC-driven regeneration of the intestinal epithelium in physiology and disease.

  15. Fish oil enhances recovery of intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity in chronic rejection of intestinal transplant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiurong Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intestinal chronic rejection (CR is the major limitation to long-term survival of transplanted organs. This study aimed to investigate the interaction between intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity in chronic rejection of intestinal transplantation, and to find out whether fish oil enhances recovery of intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The luminal and mucosal microbiota composition of CR rats were characterized by DGGE analysis at 190 days after intestinal transplant. The specific bacterial species were determined by sequence analysis. Furthermore, changes in the localization of intestinal TJ proteins were examined by immunofluorescent staining. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that gut microbiota in CR rats had a shift towards Escherichia coli, Bacteroides spp and Clostridium spp and a decrease in the abundance of Lactobacillales bacteria in the intestines. Fish oil supplementation could enhance the recovery of gut microbiota, showing a significant decrease of gut bacterial proportions of E. coli and Bacteroides spp and an increase of Lactobacillales spp. In addition, CR rats showed pronounced alteration of tight junction, depicted by marked changes in epithelial cell ultrastructure and redistribution of occuldin and claudins as well as disruption in TJ barrier function. Fish oil administration ameliorated disruption of epithelial integrity in CR, which was associated with an improvement of the mucosal structure leading to improved tight junctions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study have presented novel evidence that fish oil is involved in the maintenance of epithelial TJ integrity and recovery of gut microbiota, which may have therapeutic potential against CR in intestinal transplantation.

  16. Epithelial Cell Inflammasomes in Intestinal Immunity and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea C. Lei-Leston

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRR, such as NOD-like receptors (NLRs, sense conserved microbial signatures, and host danger signals leading to the coordination of appropriate immune responses. Upon activation, a subset of NLR initiate the assembly of a multimeric protein complex known as the inflammasome, which processes pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediates a specialized form of cell death known as pyroptosis. The identification of inflammasome-associated genes as inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility genes implicates a role for the inflammasome in intestinal inflammation. Despite the fact that the functional importance of inflammasomes within immune cells has been well established, the contribution of inflammasome expression in non-hematopoietic cells remains comparatively understudied. Given that intestinal epithelial cells (IEC act as a barrier between the host and the intestinal microbiota, inflammasome expression by these cells is likely important for intestinal immune homeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the inflammasome plays a key role in shaping epithelial responses at the host–lumen interface with many inflammasome components highly expressed by IEC. Recent studies have exposed functional roles of IEC inflammasomes in mucosal immune defense, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. In this review, we present the main features of the predominant inflammasomes and their effector mechanisms contributing to intestinal homeostasis and inflammation. We also discuss existing controversies in the field and open questions related to their implications in disease. A comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of intestinal inflammasome signaling could hold therapeutic potential for clinical translation.

  17. Biogenic amines as regulators of the proliferative activity of normal and neoplastic intestinal epithelial cells (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1987-01-01

    The role of extracellular amines such as noradrenaline and serotonin and their interaction with cyclic nucleotides and intracellular polyamines in the regulation of intestinal epithelial cell proliferation is reviewed with particular reference to the differences between normal and neoplastic cells. In respect to the normal epithelium of the small intestine there is a strong case to support the notion that cell proliferation is controlled by, amongst other things, sympathetic nerves. In colonic carcinomas, antagonists for certain serotonin receptors, for histamine H2 receptors and for dopamine D2 receptors inhibit both cell division and tumour growth. Because of the reproducible variations between tumour lines in the response to these antagonists, this inhibition appears to be due to a direct effect on the tumour cells rather than an indirect effect via the tumour host or stroma. This conclusion is supported by the cytocidal effects of toxic congeners of serotonin on the tumour cells. The most salient difference between the amine responses of normal and neoplastic cells relates to the issue of amine uptake. Proliferation of crypt cells is promoted by amine uptake inhibitors, presumably because they block amine re-uptake by the amine secreting cells--sympathetic neurones and enteroendocrine cells. However, tumour cell proliferation is strongly inhibited by amine uptake inhibitors, suggesting that neoplastic cells can, and need to take up the amine before being stimulated by it. Recent revelations in the field of oncogenes also support an important association between amines, cyclic nucleotides and cell division. The ras oncogenes code for a protein that is a member of a family of molecules which relay information from extracellular regulators, such as biogenic amines, to the intracellular regulators, including cyclic nucleotides. Evidence is presented suggesting that enteroendocrine cells, enterocytes, carcinoid tumour cells and adenocarcinoma cells all have the same

  18. The effect of 60Co γ-radiation and hydroxyurea on the in vivo chain growth of DNA in crypt cells of the small intestine of the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johanson, K.J.; Rydberg, B.

    1977-01-01

    DNA chain growth has been studied in small intestinal crypt cells of the mouse in vivo using a sensitive method. The method was designed primarily to study radiation-induced DNA-breaks and their repair; but since there were breaks in DNA at the replicating fork, it was also possible to study DNA chain growth after a 3 H-thymidine pulse. It was found that DNA chain growth was not depressed by 200 rad of 60 Co γ-radiation. This finding supports the hypothesis that irradiation interferes mainly with the initiation of new replicons in mammalian cells affecting DNA chain growth only at higher doses. Hydroxyurea at sufficient dosage, however, depressed or even stopped DNA chain growth in mouse crypt cells in vivo. (author)

  19. Up-regulation of intestinal epithelial cell derived IL-7 expression by keratinocyte growth factor through STAT1/IRF-1, IRF-2 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jiao Cai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epithelial cells(EC-derived interleukin-7 (IL-7 plays a crucial role in control of development and homeostasis of neighboring intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL, and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF exerts protective effects on intestinal epithelial cells and up-regulates EC-derived IL-7 expression through KGFR pathway. This study was to further investigate the molecular mechanism involved in the regulation of IL-7 expression by KGF in the intestine. METHODS: Intestinal epithelial cells (LoVo cells and adult C57BL/6J mice were treated with KGF. Epithelial cell proliferation was studied by flow cytometry for BrdU-incorporation and by immunohistochemistry for PCNA staining. Western blot was used to detect the changes of expression of P-Tyr-STAT1, STAT1, and IL-7 by inhibiting STAT1. Alterations of nuclear extracts and total proteins of IRF-1, IRF-2 and IL-7 following IRF-1 and IRF-2 RNA interference with KGF treatment were also measured with western blot. Moreover, IL-7 mRNA expressions were also detected by Real-time PCR and IL-7 protein level in culture supernatants was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA. RESULTS: KGF administration significantly increased LoVo cell proliferation and also increased intestinal wet weight, villus height, crypt depth and crypt cell proliferation in mice. KGF treatment led to increased levels of P-Tyr-STAT1, RAPA and AG490 both blocked P-Tyr-STAT1 and IL-7 expression in LoVo cells. IRF-1 and IRF-2 expression in vivo and in vitro were also up-regulated by KGF, and IL-7 expression was decreased after IRF-1 and IRF-2 expression was silenced by interfering RNA, respectively. CONCLUSION: KGF could up-regulate IL-7 expression through the STAT1/IRF-1, IRF-2 signaling pathway, which is a new insight in potential effects of KGF on the intestinal mucosal immune system.

  20. Laminin isoforms: biological roles and effects on the intracellular distribution of nuclear proteins in intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck, Natacha; Gross, Isabelle; Gendry, Patrick; Stutzmann, Jeanne; Freund, Jean-Noel; Kedinger, Michele; Simon-Assmann, Patricia; Launay, Jean-Francois

    2005-01-01

    Laminins are structurally and functionally major components of the extracellular matrix. Four isoforms of laminins (laminin-1, -2, -5 and -10) are expressed in a specific pattern along the crypt-villus axis of the intestine. Previous works indicated that expression of these isoforms is developmentally regulated and that laminins could modulate the behaviour of intestinal cells, but the exact role of each isoform remained unclear. Here, we report the first systematic analysis of the cellular functions of the four isoforms using the human colon adenocarcinoma Caco2/TC7 cell line as a model. We compared the respective abilities of each isoform to modulate adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. We found that the isoforms were functionally distinct, with laminin-10 being the most adhesive substratum, laminin-2, laminin-5 and laminin-10 enhancing cellular proliferation and at the opposite, laminin-1 stimulating intestinal cell differentiation. To begin to characterise the molecular events induced by the different isoforms, we examined by immunofluorescence the intracellular distribution of several nuclear proteins, recently highlighted by a nuclear proteomic approach. We observed clear nucleocytoplasmic redistribution of these proteins, which depended on the laminin isoform. These results provide evidence for a distinct functional role of laminins in intestinal cell functions characterised by specific localisation of nuclear proteins

  1. Effects of the ionising radiations on the structure and the function of the intestinal epithelial cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haton, C.

    2005-06-01

    The intestinal mucosa is a particularly radio-sensitive tissue and damage may occur following either accidental or therapeutic exposure. the deleterious actions of ionizing radiation are linked to the formation of sometimes overwhelming quantities of reactive oxygen species (R.O.S.). Production of R.O.S. is both direct and indirect from the secondary effects of irradiation. A better comprehension of the underlying mechanisms of injury will lead to more adapted therapeutic approaches to limit the harmful effects of irradiation. The homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium is regulated by three factors: proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. these three factors were studied using the cell model, HT29, in order to analyze modulations of this balance after irradiation. our results, in agreement with other data, showed the establishment of mitotic delay. This arrest of proliferation was followed by apoptosis to be the major mechanism leading to cell death in this model. thus, for the first time, we have shown that irradiated intestinal epithelial cells preserve their capacity to differentiate. This indicates, although indirectly, that intestinal cells have and preserve an intrinsic capacity restore a functional epithelium. R.O.S. are considered as intermediates between the physical nature of radiations and biological responses. It seems essential to understand anti-oxidant mechanisms used by the cell for defence against the deleterious effects of R.O.S post exposure. This study of several anti-oxidant defence mechanisms of intestinal mucosa, was carried out in vivo in the mouse at different times following abdominal irradiation. We observed an early mitochondrial response in the hours following irradiation revealing this organelle as a particular target. We demonstrated a strong alteration of anti-oxidant capacity as revealed by a decrease in S.O.D.s, catalase and an increase of the G.P.X.s and M.T.s. A part of these modifications appeared to depend on an

  2. Circadian rhythms in the incidence of apoptotic cells and number of clonogenic cells in intestinal crypts after radiation using normal and reversed light conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, K.; Potten, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    Variations in the number of radiation-induced morphologically dead or dying cells (apoptotic cells) in the crypts in the small intestine of the mouse have been studied throughout a 24-h period under a normal light regimen. A clear circadian rhythm was displayed in the apoptotic incidence 3 or 6 h after irradiation for each gamma-ray dose studied (range 0.14-9.0 Gy). The most prominent circadian rhythm was obtained after 0.5 Gy. Peak time of day for inducing apoptosis was 06.00-09.00 h, and the trough occurred at 18.00-21.00 h. Some mice were also transferred to a reversed light cycle, and irradiated on different days after transfer. Apoptosis induced by 0.5 Gy or 9.0 Gy, or number of surviving crypts (microcolonies) after 11.0 Gy or 13.0 Gy was examined. The transition point for reversal of circadian rhythm in apoptosis (after 0.5 Gy) occurred 7 days after transfer and the rhythm was reversed by 14 days. The rhythm for crypt survival (i.e. for clonogenic cell radiosensitivity) was disturbed on 1 day and transition point for reversal occurred 3 days after transfer. The rhythm became reversed by 7 days. (author)

  3. In Inflamed Intestinal Tissues and Epithelial Cells, Interleukin 22 Signaling Increases Expression of H19 Long Noncoding RNA, Which Promotes Mucosal Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hua; Bu, Heng-Fu; Liu, Fangyi; Wu, Longtao; Pfeifer, Karl; Chou, Pauline M; Wang, Xiao; Sun, Jiaren; Lu, Lu; Pandey, Ashutosh; Bartolomei, Marisa S; De Plaen, Isabelle G; Wang, Peng; Yu, Jindan; Qian, Jiaming; Tan, Xiao-Di

    2018-04-03

    Inflammation affects regeneration of the intestinal epithelia; long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) regulate cell functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and migration. We investigated the mechanisms by which the lncRNA H19, imprinted maternally expressed transcript (H19) regulates regeneration of intestinal epithelium using cell cultures and mouse models of inflammation. We performed RNA-sequencing transcriptome analyses of intestinal tissues from mice with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis to identify lncRNAs associated with inflammation; findings were confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization analyses of intestinal tissues from mice with sepsis or dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced mucosal wound healing and patients with ulcerative colitis compared to healthy individuals (controls). We screened cytokines for their ability to induce expression of H19 in HT-29 cells and intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), and confirmed findings in crypt epithelial organoids derived from mouse small intestine. IECs were incubated with different signal transduction inhibitors and effects on H19 lncRNA levels were measured. We assessed intestinal epithelial proliferation or regeneration in H19 ΔEx1/+ mice given LPS or DSS vs wild-type littermates (control mice). H19 was overexpressed in IECs using lentiviral vectors and cell proliferation was measured. We performed RNA antisense purification, RNA immunoprecipitation, and luciferase reporter assays to study functions of H19 in IECs. In RNA-sequencing transcriptome analysis of lncRNA expression in intestinal tissues from mice, we found levels of H19 only changed significantly with LPS exposure. Levels of H19 lncRNA increased in intestinal tissues of patients with ulcerative colitis, mice with LPS-induced sepsis, or mice with DSS-induced colitis, compared with controls. Increased H19 lncRNA localized to epithelial cells in the intestine, regardless of Lgr5 messenger RNA

  4. Defects in small intestinal epithelial barrier function and morphology associated with peri-weaning failure to thrive syndrome (PFTS) in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeser, Adam J; Borst, Luke B; Overman, Beth L; Pittman, Jeremy S

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate intestinal function and morphology associated with peri-weaning failure to thrive syndrome (PFTS) in swine. Jejunum and distal ileum from control and pigs exhibiting PFTS was harvested at weaning, 4 and 11 days post-weaning (PW) for intestinal barrier function studies and histological analyses (n=6 pigs per group). Marked disturbances in intestinal barrier function was observed in PFTS pigs, compared with controls, indicated by lower (p<0.05) TER and increased (p<0.01) permeability to FITC dextran (4 kDa). Intestines from weaned pigs, subjected to a 4-day fast, exhibited minor disturbances in intestinal barrier function. Villus atrophy and crypt hyperplasia were observed in the PFTS intestine compared with control and fasted pigs. These data demonstrate that PFTS is associated with profound disturbances in intestinal epithelial barrier function and alterations in mucosal and epithelial morphology in which anorexia is not the sole factor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A multicenter study to standardize reporting and analyses of fluorescence-activated cell-sorted murine intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magness, Scott T.; Puthoff, Brent J.; Crissey, Mary Ann; Dunn, James; Henning, Susan J.; Houchen, Courtney; Kaddis, John S.; Kuo, Calvin J.; Li, Linheng; Lynch, John; Martin, Martin G.; May, Randal; Niland, Joyce C.; Olack, Barbara; Qian, Dajun; Stelzner, Matthias; Swain, John R.; Wang, Fengchao; Wang, Jiafang; Wang, Xinwei; Yan, Kelley; Yu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) is an essential tool for studies requiring isolation of distinct intestinal epithelial cell populations. Inconsistent or lack of reporting of the critical parameters associated with FACS methodologies has complicated interpretation, comparison, and reproduction of important findings. To address this problem a comprehensive multicenter study was designed to develop guidelines that limit experimental and data reporting variability and provide a foundation for accurate comparison of data between studies. Common methodologies and data reporting protocols for tissue dissociation, cell yield, cell viability, FACS, and postsort purity were established. Seven centers tested the standardized methods by FACS-isolating a specific crypt-based epithelial population (EpCAM+/CD44+) from murine small intestine. Genetic biomarkers for stem/progenitor (Lgr5 and Atoh 1) and differentiated cell lineages (lysozyme, mucin2, chromogranin A, and sucrase isomaltase) were interrogated in target and control populations to assess intra- and intercenter variability. Wilcoxon's rank sum test on gene expression levels showed limited intracenter variability between biological replicates. Principal component analysis demonstrated significant intercenter reproducibility among four centers. Analysis of data collected by standardized cell isolation methods and data reporting requirements readily identified methodological problems, indicating that standard reporting parameters facilitate post hoc error identification. These results indicate that the complexity of FACS isolation of target intestinal epithelial populations can be highly reproducible between biological replicates and different institutions by adherence to common cell isolation methods and FACS gating strategies. This study can be considered a foundation for continued method development and a starting point for investigators that are developing cell isolation expertise to study physiology and

  6. Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein Enables Intestinal Epithelial Restitution Despite Lipopolysaccharide Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Juli M.; Schanbacher, Brandon L.; Huang, Hong; Xue, Jianjing; Bauer, John A.; Giannone, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial restitution is the first part in the process of mucosal repair after injury in the intestine. Integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier is important as a first line of defense against bacteria and endotoxin. Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in extremely low birth weight infants, but its mechanisms are not well defined. Abnormal bacterial colonization, immature barrier function, innate immunity activation and inflammation likely play a role. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding protein (LBP) is secreted by enterocytes in response to inflammatory stimuli and has concentration-dependent effects. At basal concentrations, LBP stimulates the inflammatory response by presenting LPS to its receptor. However, at high concentrations, LBP is able to neutralize LPS and prevent an exaggerated inflammatory response. We sought to determine how LBP would affect wound healing in an in vitro model of intestinal cell restitution and protect against intestinal injury in a rodent model of NEC. Immature intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) were seeded in poly-l-lysine coated 8 chamber slides and grown to confluence. A 500μm wound was created using a cell scraper mounted on the microscope to achieve uniform wounding. Media was replaced with media containing LPS +/− LBP. Slide wells were imaged after 0, 8, and 24 hours and then fixed. Cellular restitution was evaluated via digital images captured on an inverted microscope and wound closure was determined by automated analysis. TLR4 was determined by rtPCR after RNA isolation from wounded cells 24 hours after treatment. LPS alone attenuated wound healing in immature intestinal epithelium. This attenuation is reversed by 24 hours with increasing concentrations of LBP so that wound healing is equivalent to control (p< 0.001). TLR4 was increased with LPS alone but levels returned to that of control after addition of LBP in the higher concentrations. LBP had no effect on the

  7. Polyamine regulation of ornithine decarboxylase and its antizyme in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Q; Ray, R M; Viar, M J; Johnson, L R

    2001-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is feedback regulated by polyamines. ODC antizyme mediates this process by forming a complex with ODC and enhancing its degradation. It has been reported that polyamines induce ODC antizyme and inhibit ODC activity. Since exogenous polyamines can be converted to each other after they are taken up into cells, we used an inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, diethylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (DEGBG), to block the synthesis of spermidine and spermine from putrescine and investigated the specific roles of individual polyamines in the regulation of ODC in intestinal epithelial crypt (IEC-6) cells. We found that putrescine, spermidine, and spermine inhibited ODC activity stimulated by serum to 85, 46, and 0% of control, respectively, in the presence of DEGBG. ODC activity increased in DEGBG-treated cells, despite high intracellular putrescine levels. Although exogenous spermidine and spermine reduced ODC activity of DEGBG-treated cells close to control levels, spermine was more effective than spermidine. Exogenous putrescine was much less effective in inducing antizyme than spermidine or spermine. High putrescine levels in DEGBG-treated cells did not induce ODC antizyme when intracellular spermidine and spermine levels were low. The decay of ODC activity and reduction of ODC protein levels were not accompanied by induction of antizyme in the presence of DEGBG. Our results indicate that spermine is the most, and putrescine the least, effective polyamine in regulating ODC activity, and upregulation of antizyme is not required for the degradation of ODC protein.

  8. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, Leon J.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we

  9. Intestinal epithelial barrier function and tight junction proteins with heat and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dokladny, Karol; Zuhl, Micah N; Moseley, Pope L

    2016-01-01

    A single layer of enterocytes and tight junctions (intercellular multiprotein complexes) form the intestinal epithelial barrier that controls transport of molecules through transcellular and paracellular pathways. A dysfunctional or "leaky" intestinal tight junction barrier allows augmented perme...

  10. A strategy for isolation of cDNAs encoding proteins affecting human intestinal epithelial cell growth and differentiation: characterization of a novel gut-specific N-myristoylated annexin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wice, B M; Gordon, J I

    1992-01-01

    The human intestinal epithelium is rapidly and perpetually renewed as the descendants of multipotent stem cells located in crypts undergo proliferation, differentiation, and eventual exfoliation during a very well organized migration along the crypt to villus axis. The mechanisms that establish and maintain this balance between proliferation and differentiation are largely unknown. We have utilized HT-29 cells, derived from a human colon adenocarcinoma, as a model system for identifying gene products that may regulate these processes. Proliferating HT-29 cells cultured in the absence of glucose (e.g., using inosine as the carbon source) have some of the characteristics of undifferentiated but committed crypt epithelial cells while postconfluent cells cultured in the absence of glucose resemble terminally differentiated enterocytes or goblet cells. A cDNA library, constructed from exponentially growing HT-29 cells maintained in inosine-containing media, was sequentially screened with a series of probes depleted of sequences encoding housekeeping functions and enriched for intestine-specific sequences that are expressed in proliferating committed, but not differentiated, epithelial cells. Of 100,000 recombinant phage surveyed, one was found whose cDNA was derived from an apparently gut-specific mRNA. It encodes a 316 residue, 35,463-D protein that is a new member of the annexin/lipocortin family. Other family members have been implicated in regulation of cellular growth and in signal transduction pathways. RNA blot and in situ hybridization studies indicate that the gene encoding this new annexin exhibits region-specific expression along both axes of the human gut: (a) highest levels of mRNA are present in the jejunum with marked and progressive reductions occurring distally; (b) its mRNA appears in crypt-associated epithelial cells and increases in concentration as they exit the crypt. Villus-associated epithelial cells continue to transcribe this gene during their

  11. Inhibition of EV71 by curcumin in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsing-I; Chio, Chi-Chong; Lin, Jhao-Yin

    2018-01-01

    EV71 is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the Picornaviridae family. EV71 infection may cause various symptoms ranging from hand-foot-and-mouth disease to neurological pathological conditions such as aseptic meningitis, ataxia, and acute transverse myelitis. There is currently no effective treatment or vaccine available. Various compounds have been examined for their ability to restrict EV71 replication. However, most experiments have been performed in rhabdomyosarcoma or Vero cells. Since the gastrointestinal tract is the entry site for this pathogen, we anticipated that orally ingested agents may exert beneficial effects by decreasing virus replication in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, curcumin (diferuloylmethane, C21H20O6), an active ingredient of turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn) with anti-cancer properties, was investigated for its anti-enterovirus activity. We demonstrate that curcumin treatment inhibits viral translation and increases host cell viability. Curcumin does not exert its anti-EV71 effects by modulating virus attachment or virus internal ribosome entry site (IRES) activity. Furthermore, curcumin-mediated regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways is not involved. We found that protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) plays a role in virus translation in EV71-infected intestinal epithelial cells and that curcumin treatment decreases the phosphorylation of this enzyme. In addition, we show evidence that curcumin also limits viral translation in differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells. In summary, our data demonstrate the anti-EV71 properties of curcumin, suggesting that ingestion of this phytochemical may protect against enteroviral infections.

  12. Inhibition of EV71 by curcumin in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsing-I Huang

    Full Text Available EV71 is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the Picornaviridae family. EV71 infection may cause various symptoms ranging from hand-foot-and-mouth disease to neurological pathological conditions such as aseptic meningitis, ataxia, and acute transverse myelitis. There is currently no effective treatment or vaccine available. Various compounds have been examined for their ability to restrict EV71 replication. However, most experiments have been performed in rhabdomyosarcoma or Vero cells. Since the gastrointestinal tract is the entry site for this pathogen, we anticipated that orally ingested agents may exert beneficial effects by decreasing virus replication in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, curcumin (diferuloylmethane, C21H20O6, an active ingredient of turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn with anti-cancer properties, was investigated for its anti-enterovirus activity. We demonstrate that curcumin treatment inhibits viral translation and increases host cell viability. Curcumin does not exert its anti-EV71 effects by modulating virus attachment or virus internal ribosome entry site (IRES activity. Furthermore, curcumin-mediated regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways is not involved. We found that protein kinase C delta (PKCδ plays a role in virus translation in EV71-infected intestinal epithelial cells and that curcumin treatment decreases the phosphorylation of this enzyme. In addition, we show evidence that curcumin also limits viral translation in differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells. In summary, our data demonstrate the anti-EV71 properties of curcumin, suggesting that ingestion of this phytochemical may protect against enteroviral infections.

  13. Inhibition of EV71 by curcumin in intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chio, Chi-Chong; Lin, Jhao-Yin

    2018-01-01

    EV71 is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the Picornaviridae family. EV71 infection may cause various symptoms ranging from hand-foot-and-mouth disease to neurological pathological conditions such as aseptic meningitis, ataxia, and acute transverse myelitis. There is currently no effective treatment or vaccine available. Various compounds have been examined for their ability to restrict EV71 replication. However, most experiments have been performed in rhabdomyosarcoma or Vero cells. Since the gastrointestinal tract is the entry site for this pathogen, we anticipated that orally ingested agents may exert beneficial effects by decreasing virus replication in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, curcumin (diferuloylmethane, C21H20O6), an active ingredient of turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn) with anti-cancer properties, was investigated for its anti-enterovirus activity. We demonstrate that curcumin treatment inhibits viral translation and increases host cell viability. Curcumin does not exert its anti-EV71 effects by modulating virus attachment or virus internal ribosome entry site (IRES) activity. Furthermore, curcumin-mediated regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways is not involved. We found that protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) plays a role in virus translation in EV71-infected intestinal epithelial cells and that curcumin treatment decreases the phosphorylation of this enzyme. In addition, we show evidence that curcumin also limits viral translation in differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells. In summary, our data demonstrate the anti-EV71 properties of curcumin, suggesting that ingestion of this phytochemical may protect against enteroviral infections. PMID:29370243

  14. The Inside Story of Shigella Invasion of Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayol, Nathalie; Tran Van Nhieu, Guy

    2013-01-01

    As opposed to other invasive pathogens that reside into host cells in a parasitic mode, Shigella, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery, invades the colonic mucosa but does not penetrate further to survive into deeper tissues. Instead, Shigella invades, replicates, and disseminates within the colonic mucosa. Bacterial invasion and spreading in intestinal epithelium lead to the elicitation of inflammatory responses responsible for the tissue destruction and shedding in the environment for further infection of other hosts. In this article, we highlight specific features of the Shigella arsenal of virulence determinants injected by a type III secretion apparatus (T3SA) that point to the targeting of intestinal epithelial cells as a discrete route of invasion during the initial event of the infectious process. PMID:24086068

  15. (Na+ + K+)-ATPase and plasma membrane polarity of intestinal epithelial cells: Presence of a brush border antigen in the distal large intestine that is immunologically related to beta subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marxer, A.; Stieger, B.; Quaroni, A.; Kashgarian, M.; Hauri, H.P. (Univ. of Basel (Switzerland))

    1989-09-01

    The previously produced monoclonal antibody IEC 1/48 against cultured rat intestinal crypt cells was extensively characterized and found to be directed against the beta subunit of (Na+ + K+)-ATPase as assessed by immunological and enzymatic criteria. Under nondenaturing conditions the antibody precipitated the alpha-beta enzyme complex (98,000 and 48,000 Mr). This probe, together with the monoclonal antibody C 62.4 against the alpha subunit was used to localize (Na+ + K+)-ATPase in epithelial cells along the rat intestinal tract by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. Both antibodies exclusively labeled the basolateral membrane of small intestine and proximal colon epithelial cells. However, in the distal colon, IEC 1/48, but not C 62.4, also labeled the brush border membrane. The cross-reacting beta-subunit-like antigen on the apical cell pole was tightly associated with isolated brush borders but was apparently devoid of (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity. Subcellular fractionation of colonocytes in conjunction with limited proteolysis and surface radioiodination of intestinal segments suggested that the cross-reacting antigen in the brush border may be very similar to the beta subunit. The results support the notion that in the small intestine and proximal colon the enzyme subunits are exclusively targeted to the basolateral membrane while in the distal colon nonassembled beta subunit or a beta-subunit-like protein is also transported to the apical cell pole.

  16. Serratia marcescens is injurious to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochieng, John B; Boisen, Nadia; Lindsay, Brianna; Santiago, Araceli; Ouma, Collins; Ombok, Maurice; Fields, Barry; Stine, O Colin; Nataro, James P

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhea causes substantial morbidity and mortality in children in low-income countries. Although numerous pathogens cause diarrhea, the etiology of many episodes remains unknown. Serratia marcescens is incriminated in hospital-associated infections, and HIV/AIDS associated diarrhea. We have recently found that Serratia spp. may be found more commonly in the stools of patients with diarrhea than in asymptomatic control children. We therefore investigated the possible enteric pathogenicity of S. marcescens in vitro employing a polarized human colonic epithelial cell (T84) monolayer. Infected monolayers were assayed for bacterial invasion, transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), cytotoxicity, interleukin-8 (IL-8) release and morphological changes by scanning electron microscopy. We observed significantly greater epithelial cell invasion by S. marcescens compared to Escherichia coli strain HS (p = 0.0038 respectively). Cell invasion was accompanied by reduction in TEER and secretion of IL-8. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) extracellular concentration rapidly increased within a few hours of exposure of the monolayer to S. marcescens. Scanning electron microscopy of S. marcescens-infected monolayers demonstrated destruction of microvilli and vacuolization. Our results suggest that S. marcescens interacts with intestinal epithelial cells in culture and induces dramatic alterations similar to those produced by known enteric pathogens.

  17. Culture of human intestinal epithelial cell using the dissociating enzyme thermolysin and endothelin-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Liu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Epithelium, a highly dynamic system, plays a key role in the homeostasis of the intestine. However, thus far a human intestinal epithelial cell line has not been established in many countries. Fetal tissue was selected to generate viable cell cultures for its sterile condition, effective generation, and differentiated character. The purpose of the present study was to culture human intestinal epithelial cells by a relatively simple method. Thermolysin was added to improve the yield of epithelial cells, while endothelin-3 was added to stimulate their growth. By adding endothelin-3, the achievement ratio (viable cell cultures/total cultures was enhanced to 60% of a total of 10 cultures (initiated from 8 distinct fetal small intestines, allowing the generation of viable epithelial cell cultures. Western blot, real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining showed that cytokeratins 8, 18 and mouse intestinal mucosa-1/39 had high expression levels in human intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated markers such as sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV also showed high expression levels in human intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells, with the expression of surface markers (cytokeratins 8, 18 and mouse intestinal mucosa-1/39 and secretion of cytokines (sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV, may be cultured by the thermolysin and endothelin-3 method and maintained for at least 20 passages. This is relatively simple, requiring no sophisticated techniques or instruments, and may have a number of varied applications.

  18. Hypersensitive responses of cells in the thymus, spleen, and intestinal crypt of mice to interphase death after treatment with x rays and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinuta, Masakatsu

    1986-01-01

    Upon whole-body exposure of mice to X rays or administration of chemical mutagens, cells in thymus, spleen and intestinal crypt undergo sensitive response to interphase death. We developed an effective method for detecting dead cells in the interphase by scoring stained cells in situ in exposed tissues after staining frozen section with erythrosin B. Cell killing was detected at doses as low as 1 % of lethal doses after treatment with X rays and chemicals. Strain N4 was highly sensitive to interphase-cell-death and hybrids of N4 and resistant strain HT or C3H were also sensitive to cell-death, indicating a dominant trait of the sensitive cell-death response. (author)

  19. A two-dimensional model of the colonic crypt accounting for the role of the basement membrane and pericryptal fibroblast sheath.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara-Jane Dunn

    Full Text Available The role of the basement membrane is vital in maintaining the integrity and structure of an epithelial layer, acting as both a mechanical support and forming the physical interface between epithelial cells and the surrounding connective tissue. The function of this membrane is explored here in the context of the epithelial monolayer that lines the colonic crypt, test-tube shaped invaginations that punctuate the lining of the intestine and coordinate a regular turnover of cells to replenish the epithelial layer every few days. To investigate the consequence of genetic mutations that perturb the system dynamics and can lead to colorectal cancer, it must be possible to track the emerging tissue level changes that arise in the crypt. To that end, a theoretical crypt model with a realistic, deformable geometry is required. A new discrete crypt model is presented, which focuses on the interaction between cell- and tissue-level behaviour, while incorporating key subcellular components. The model contains a novel description of the role of the surrounding tissue and musculature, based upon experimental observations of the tissue structure of the crypt, which are also reported. A two-dimensional (2D cross-sectional geometry is considered, and the shape of the crypt is allowed to evolve and deform. Simulation results reveal how the shape of the crypt may contribute mechanically to the asymmetric division events typically associated with the stem cells at the base. The model predicts that epithelial cell migration may arise due to feedback between cell loss at the crypt collar and density-dependent cell division, an hypothesis which can be investigated in a wet lab. This work forms the basis for investigation of the deformation of the crypt structure that can occur due to proliferation of cells exhibiting mutant phenotypes, experiments that would not be possible in vivo or in vitro.

  20. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klunder, Leon J; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C D

    2017-07-05

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we highlight recent advances with regard to the molecular mechanisms of cell polarity-controlled epithelial homeostasis and immunity in the human intestine. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  1. Genomic dissection of conserved transcriptional regulation in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin R Lickwar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium serves critical physiologic functions that are shared among all vertebrates. However, it is unknown how the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms underlying these functions have changed over the course of vertebrate evolution. We generated genome-wide mRNA and accessible chromatin data from adult intestinal epithelial cells (IECs in zebrafish, stickleback, mouse, and human species to determine if conserved IEC functions are achieved through common transcriptional regulation. We found evidence for substantial common regulation and conservation of gene expression regionally along the length of the intestine from fish to mammals and identified a core set of genes comprising a vertebrate IEC signature. We also identified transcriptional start sites and other putative regulatory regions that are differentially accessible in IECs in all 4 species. Although these sites rarely showed sequence conservation from fish to mammals, surprisingly, they drove highly conserved IEC expression in a zebrafish reporter assay. Common putative transcription factor binding sites (TFBS found at these sites in multiple species indicate that sequence conservation alone is insufficient to identify much of the functionally conserved IEC regulatory information. Among the rare, highly sequence-conserved, IEC-specific regulatory regions, we discovered an ancient enhancer upstream from her6/HES1 that is active in a distinct population of Notch-positive cells in the intestinal epithelium. Together, these results show how combining accessible chromatin and mRNA datasets with TFBS prediction and in vivo reporter assays can reveal tissue-specific regulatory information conserved across 420 million years of vertebrate evolution. We define an IEC transcriptional regulatory network that is shared between fish and mammals and establish an experimental platform for studying how evolutionarily distilled regulatory information commonly controls IEC development

  2. Culture of human intestinal epithelial cell using the dissociating enzyme thermolysin and endothelin-3

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Z.; Zhang, P.; Zhou, Y.; Qin, H.; Shen, T.

    2010-01-01

    Epithelium, a highly dynamic system, plays a key role in the homeostasis of the intestine. However, thus far a human intestinal epithelial cell line has not been established in many countries. Fetal tissue was selected to generate viable cell cultures for its sterile condition, effective generation, and differentiated character. The purpose of the present study was to culture human intestinal epithelial cells by a relatively simple method. Thermolysin was added to improve the yield of epithel...

  3. Rhubarb Supplementation Promotes Intestinal Mucosal Innate Immune Homeostasis through Modulating Intestinal Epithelial Microbiota in Goat Kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jinzhen; Wu, Jian; Wang, Min; Zhou, Chuanshe; Zhong, Rongzhen; Tan, Zhiliang

    2018-01-31

    The abuse and misuse of antibiotics in livestock production pose a potential health risk globally. Rhubarb can serve as a potential alternative to antibiotics, and several studies have looked into its anticancer, antitumor, and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to test the effects of rhubarb supplementation to the diet of young ruminants on innate immune function and epithelial microbiota in the small intestine. Goat kids were fed with a control diet supplemented with or without rhubarb (1.25% DM) and were slaughtered at days 50 and 60 of age. Results showed that the supplementation of rhubarb increased ileal villus height (P = 0.036), increased jejujal and ileal anti-inflammatory IL-10 production (P immune function were accompanied by shifts in ileal epithelial bacterial ecosystem in favor of Blautia, Clostridium, Lactobacillus, and Pseudomonas, and with a decline in the relative abundance of Staphylococcus (P immune homeostasis by modulating intestinal epithelial microbiota during the early stages of animal development.

  4. Activation of intestinal epithelial Stat3 orchestrates tissue defense during gastrointestinal infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Wittkopf

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal infections with EHEC and EPEC are responsible for outbreaks of diarrheal diseases and represent a global health problem. Innate first-line-defense mechanisms such as production of mucus and antimicrobial peptides by intestinal epithelial cells are of utmost importance for host control of gastrointestinal infections. For the first time, we directly demonstrate a critical role for Stat3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells upon infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium - a murine pathogen that mimics human infections with attaching and effacing Escherichia coli. C. rodentium induced transcription of IL-6 and IL-22 in gut samples of mice and was associated with activation of the transcription factor Stat3 in intestinal epithelial cells. C. rodentium infection induced expression of several antimicrobial peptides such as RegIIIγ and Pla2g2a in the intestine which was critically dependent on Stat3 activation. Consequently, mice with specific deletion of Stat3 in intestinal epithelial cells showed increased susceptibility to C. rodentium infection as indicated by high bacterial load, severe gut inflammation, pronounced intestinal epithelial cell death and dissemination of bacteria to distant organs. Together, our data implicate an essential role for Stat3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells during C. rodentium infection. Stat3 concerts the host response to bacterial infection by controlling bacterial growth and suppression of apoptosis to maintain intestinal epithelial barrier function.

  5. Sequential cancer mutations in cultured human intestinal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drost, Jarno; van Jaarsveld, Richard H.; Ponsioen, Bas; Zimberlin, Cheryl; van Boxtel, Ruben; Buijs, Arjan; Sachs, Norman; Overmeer, René M.; Offerhaus, G. Johan; Begthel, Harry; Korving, Jeroen; van de Wetering, Marc; Schwank, Gerald; Logtenberg, Meike; Cuppen, Edwin; Snippert, Hugo J.; Medema, Jan Paul; Kops, Geert J. P. L.; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Crypt stem cells represent the cells of origin for intestinal neoplasia. Both mouse and human intestinal stem cells can be cultured in medium containing the stem-cell-niche factors WNT, R-spondin, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and noggin over long time periods as epithelial organoids that remain

  6. HDAC1 and HDAC2 restrain the intestinal inflammatory response by regulating intestinal epithelial cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomie Turgeon

    Full Text Available Acetylation and deacetylation of histones and other proteins depends on histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs activities, leading to either positive or negative gene expression. HDAC inhibitors have uncovered a role for HDACs in proliferation, apoptosis and inflammation. However, little is known of the roles of specific HDACs in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC. We investigated the consequences of ablating both HDAC1 and HDAC2 in murine IECs. Floxed Hdac1 and Hdac2 homozygous mice were crossed with villin-Cre mice. Mice deficient in both IEC HDAC1 and HDAC2 weighed less and survived more than a year. Colon and small intestinal sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, or with Alcian blue and Periodic Acid Schiff for goblet cell identification. Tissue sections from mice injected with BrdU for 2 h, 14 h and 48 h were stained with anti-BrdU. To determine intestinal permeability, 4-kDa FITC-labeled dextran was given by gavage for 3 h. Microarray analysis was performed on total colon RNAs. Inflammatory and IEC-specific gene expression was assessed by Western blot or semi-quantitative RT-PCR and qPCR with respectively total colon protein and total colon RNAs. HDAC1 and HDAC2-deficient mice displayed: 1 increased migration and proliferation, with elevated cyclin D1 expression and phosphorylated S6 ribosomal protein, a downstream mTOR target; 2 tissue architecture defects with cell differentiation alterations, correlating with reduction of secretory Paneth and goblet cells in jejunum and goblet cells in colon, increased expression of enterocytic markers such as sucrase-isomaltase in the colon, increased expression of cleaved Notch1 and augmented intestinal permeability; 3 loss of tissue homeostasis, as evidenced by modifications of claudin 3 expression, caspase-3 cleavage and Stat3 phosphorylation; 4 chronic inflammation, as determined by inflammatory molecular expression signatures and altered inflammatory gene expression

  7. Bovine TLR2 and TLR4 mediate Cryptosporidium parvum recognition in bovine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengtao; Fu, Yunhe; Gong, Pengtao; Zheng, Jingtong; Liu, Li; Yu, Yuqiang; Li, Jianhua; Li, He; Yang, Ju; Zhang, Xichen

    2015-08-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) is an intestinal parasite that causes diarrhea in neonatal calves. It results in significant morbidity of neonatal calves and economic losses for producers worldwide. Innate resistance against C. parvum is thought to depend on engagement of pattern recognition receptors. However, the role of innate responses to C. parvum has not been elucidated in bovine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of TLRs in host-cell responses during C. parvum infection of cultured bovine intestinal epithelial cells. The expressions of TLRs in bovine intestinal epithelial cells were detected by qRT-PCR. To determine which, if any, TLRs may play a role in the response of bovine intestinal epithelial cells to C. parvum, the cells were stimulated with C. parvum and the expression of TLRs were tested by qRT-PCR. The expression of NF-κB was detected by western blotting. Further analyses were carried out in bovine TLRs transfected HEK293 cells and by TLRs-DN transfected bovine intestinal epithelial cells. The results showed that bovine intestinal epithelial cells expressed all known TLRs. The expression of TLR2 and TLR4 were up-regulated when bovine intestinal epithelial cells were treated with C. parvum. Meanwhile, C. parvum induced IL-8 production in TLR2 or TLR4/MD-2 transfected HEK293 cells. Moreover, C. parvum induced NF-κB activation and cytokine expression in bovine intestinal epithelial cells. The induction of NF-κB activation and cytokine expression by C. parvum were reduced in TLR2-DN and TLR4-DN transfected cells. The results showed that bovine intestinal epithelial cells expressed all known TLRs, and bovine intestinal epithelial cells recognized and responded to C. parvum via TLR2 and TLR4. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quality assurance (QA) program in BNCT. RBE of 7 NCT beams for intestinal crypt regeneration in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Gueulette; De Coster, Blanche-Marie; Wambersie, Andre; Gregoire, Vincent; Rasmussen, Finn S.; Auterinen, Iiro; Binns, Peter; Blaumann, Herman; Matsumura, Akira; Liu Hongming

    2006-01-01

    The epithermal neutron beams presently used for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) differ substantially in their composition (relative contribution of the different dose components to the total dose), in their dose rate (depending on the power of the reactor) as well as in their general feature (e.g. beam delivery system). Each of these elements might alter significantly the biological effectiveness of the beams. Therefore, the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of 7 NCT beams was intercompared, for a reference biological system (crypt regeneration in mice) and under well-defined irradiation conditions. This type of experiments - which should facilitate the exchange of radiobiological/clinical information - should take part of the Quality Assurance (QA) procedure of all NCT beams. (author)

  9. Action of cholera toxin in the intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    The primary event in the action of cholera toxin on the isolated chick intestinal epithelial cell is its interaction with the cell membrane. This involves a large number (17 million per cell) of high affinity binding sites which belong to a single class. Binding of biologically active 125 I-labeled toxin is rapid, temperature-dependent, reversible, and saturable over a wide range of concentrations and includes only a small contribution from nonspecific sites. A characteristic lag phase of 10 min occurs following the complete binding of toxin before any increase in cellular cAMP levels can be detected in the isolated cells. The response (elevation of cellular cAMP) of the enterocytes to cholera toxin is linear with time for 40-50 min and causes a six- to eight-fold increase over control levels at steady stae. cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Cl - -independent Na + influx into the isolated enterocytes whereas chlorporomazine (CPZ) which completely abolishes toxin-induced elevation of cAMP both reverses and prevents the cAMP-mediated inhibition of Na + entry. Correlation between cellular cAMP levels and the magnitude of Na + influx into the enterocytes provides evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal Na + uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT and Na + during induction of intestinal secretion. The effect of cAMP on Na + but no Cl - influx in our villus cell preparation can be partially explained in terms of a cAMP-regulated Na + /H + neutral exchange system

  10. Action of cholera toxin in the intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    The primary event in the action of cholera toxin on the isolated chick intestinal epithelial cell is its interaction with a large number of high affinity binding sites in the cell membrane. Binding of 125 I-labeled toxin is rapid, temperature-dependent, reversible, and saturable over a wide range of concentrations and includes only a small contribution from nonspecific sites. A characteristic lag phase of 10 min occurs following the complete binding of toxin before any increase in cellular cAMP levels can be detected. The response (elevation of cellular cAMP) is linear with time for 40 to 50 min and causes a six- to eight-fold increase over control levels (10 to 15 picomole cAMP/mg cellular protein) at steady state. cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Cl - -independent Na + influx into the isolated enterocytes whereas chlorpromazine (CPZ) which completely abolishes toxin-induced elevation of cAMP both reverses and prevents the cAMP-mediated inhibition of Na + entry. Correlation between cellular cAMP levels and the magnitude of Na + influx provides evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal Na + uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT on Na + during induction of intestinal secretion. The effect of cAMP on Na + but not Cl - influx preparations can be partially explained in terms of a cAMP-regulated Na + /H + neutral exchange system. Data on the coupling relationship between Na + transport and the intra- and extracellular pH in the enterocytes show that an amiloride-sensitive electroneutral Na + /H + exchange process occurs. This coupling between Na + and H + is partially inhibited by CT and dbcAMP, suggesting that the Na + /H + exchange may be a cAMP-regulated process. 31 references, 32 figures, 5 tables

  11. Actin-interacting protein 1 controls assembly and permeability of intestinal epithelial apical junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Susana; Baranwal, Somesh; Ivanov, Andrei I

    2015-05-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and tight junctions (TJs) are crucial regulators of the integrity and restitution of the intestinal epithelial barrier. The structure and function of epithelial junctions depend on their association with the cortical actin cytoskeleton that, in polarized epithelial cells, is represented by a prominent perijunctional actomyosin belt. The assembly and stability of the perijunctional cytoskeleton is controlled by constant turnover (disassembly and reassembly) of actin filaments. Actin-interacting protein (Aip) 1 is an emerging regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, playing a critical role in filament disassembly. In this study, we examined the roles of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of AJs and TJs in human intestinal epithelium. Aip1 was enriched at apical junctions in polarized human intestinal epithelial cells and normal mouse colonic mucosa. Knockdown of Aip1 by RNA interference increased the paracellular permeability of epithelial cell monolayers, decreased recruitment of AJ/TJ proteins to steady-state intercellular contacts, and attenuated junctional reassembly in a calcium-switch model. The observed defects of AJ/TJ structure and functions were accompanied by abnormal organization and dynamics of the perijunctional F-actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, loss of Aip1 impaired the apico-basal polarity of intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and inhibited formation of polarized epithelial cysts in 3-D Matrigel. Our findings demonstrate a previously unanticipated role of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of intestinal epithelial junctions and early steps of epithelial morphogenesis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Food-grade TiO2 impairs intestinal and systemic immune homeostasis, initiates preneoplastic lesions and promotes aberrant crypt development in the rat colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettini, Sarah; Boutet-Robinet, Elisa; Cartier, Christel; Coméra, Christine; Gaultier, Eric; Dupuy, Jacques; Naud, Nathalie; Taché, Sylviane; Grysan, Patrick; Reguer, Solenn; Thieriet, Nathalie; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Thiaudière, Dominique; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Carrière, Marie; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Pierre, Fabrice H; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Houdeau, Eric

    2017-01-20

    Food-grade titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) containing a nanoscale particle fraction (TiO 2 -NPs) is approved as a white pigment (E171 in Europe) in common foodstuffs, including confectionary. There are growing concerns that daily oral TiO 2 -NP intake is associated with an increased risk of chronic intestinal inflammation and carcinogenesis. In rats orally exposed for one week to E171 at human relevant levels, titanium was detected in the immune cells of Peyer's patches (PP) as observed with the TiO 2 -NP model NM-105. Dendritic cell frequency increased in PP regardless of the TiO 2 treatment, while regulatory T cells involved in dampening inflammatory responses decreased with E171 only, an effect still observed after 100 days of treatment. In all TiO 2 -treated rats, stimulation of immune cells isolated from PP showed a decrease in Thelper (Th)-1 IFN-γ secretion, while splenic Th1/Th17 inflammatory responses sharply increased. E171 or NM-105 for one week did not initiate intestinal inflammation, while a 100-day E171 treatment promoted colon microinflammation and initiated preneoplastic lesions while also fostering the growth of aberrant crypt foci in a chemically induced carcinogenesis model. These data should be considered for risk assessments of the susceptibility to Th17-driven autoimmune diseases and to colorectal cancer in humans exposed to TiO 2 from dietary sources.

  13. Sucralfate protects intestinal epithelial cells from radiation-induced apoptosis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuu-Matsuyama, Mutsumi; Shichijo, Kazuko; Okaichi, Kumio

    2006-01-01

    Radiotherapy for malignant pelvic disease is often followed by acute radiation colitis (ARC). It has been reported that sucralfate treatment has a protective effect against ARC, though the mechanisms of action are unknown. The effects of sucralfate on X-ray radiation-induced apoptosis was studied at 4 Gy in the colonic crypt cells of rats. Sucralfate enemas given prior to radiation resulted in the following: reduction in number of apoptotic colonic crypt cells; reduction in number of caspase-3 positive cells; decreases in p53 accumulation and p21 expression; decreases of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. The protective effects of sucralfate against ARC may be partially due to the suppression of radiation-induced apoptosis by way of p53 in the colon and the protection of the colonic epithelial stem cell region. (author)

  14. Indian hedgehog regulates intestinal stem cell fate through epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosinski, C.; Stange, D.E.; Xu, C.; Chan, A.S.; Ho, C.; Yuen, S.T.; Mifflin, R.C.; Powell, D.W.; Clevers, H.; Leung, S.Y.; Chen, X.N.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are regulated by the mesenchymal environment via physical interaction and diffusible factors. We examined the role of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) in mesenchymal organization and the mechanisms by which perturbations in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions

  15. Development and Characterization of a Human and Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cell Monolayer Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Kozuka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: We describe the development and characterization of a mouse and human epithelial cell monolayer platform of the small and large intestines, with a broad range of potential applications including the discovery and development of minimally systemic drug candidates. Culture conditions for each intestinal segment were optimized by correlating monolayer global gene expression with the corresponding tissue segment. The monolayers polarized, formed tight junctions, and contained a diversity of intestinal epithelial cell lineages. Ion transport phenotypes of monolayers from the proximal and distal colon and small intestine matched the known and unique physiology of these intestinal segments. The cultures secreted serotonin, GLP-1, and FGF19 and upregulated the epithelial sodium channel in response to known biologically active agents, suggesting intact secretory and absorptive functions. A screen of over 2,000 pharmacologically active compounds for inhibition of potassium ion transport in the mouse distal colon cultures led to the identification of a tool compound. : Siegel and colleagues describe their development of a human and mouse intestinal epithelial cell monolayer platform that maintains the cellular, molecular, and functional characteristics of tissue for each intestinal segment. They demonstrate the platform's application to drug discovery by screening a library of over 2,000 compounds to identify an inhibitor of potassium ion transport in the mouse distal colon. Keywords: intestinal epithelium, organoids, monolayer, colon, small intestine, phenotype screening assays, enteroid, colonoid

  16. Intestinal epithelial cell-specific RARα depletion results in aberrant epithelial cell homeostasis and underdeveloped immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jijon, H B; Suarez-Lopez, L; Diaz, O E; Das, S; De Calisto, J; Yaffe, M B; Pittet, M J; Mora, J R; Belkaid, Y; Xavier, R J; Villablanca, E J

    2018-05-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), a dietary vitamin A metabolite, is crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. RA acts on intestinal leukocytes to modulate their lineage commitment and function. Although the role of RA has been characterized in immune cells, whether intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) rely on RA signaling to exert their immune-regulatory function has not been examined. Here we demonstrate that lack of RA receptor α (RARα) signaling in IECs results in deregulated epithelial lineage specification, leading to increased numbers of goblet cells and Paneth cells. Mechanistically, lack of RARα resulted in increased KLF4 + goblet cell precursors in the distal bowel, whereas RA treatment inhibited klf4 expression and goblet cell differentiation in zebrafish. These changes in secretory cells are associated with increased Reg3g, reduced luminal bacterial detection, and an underdeveloped intestinal immune system, as evidenced by an almost complete absence of lymphoid follicles and gut resident mononuclear phagocytes. This underdeveloped intestinal immune system shows a decreased ability to clear infection with Citrobacter rodentium. Collectively, our findings indicate that epithelial cell-intrinsic RARα signaling is critical to the global development of the intestinal immune system.

  17. Differential effect of IP- and IV-injected nitrogen mustard on subsequently-irradiated intestinal crypts: implications for 'dose-effect factors' predicted by experimental, combined modality therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    In experimental chemotherapy-radiotherapy, cytotoxic drugs are almost invariably injected by the intraperitoneal (IP) route. This contrasts with normal clinical practice, which is to employ the intravenous (IV) route. We have used a clonogenic assay of gastrointestinal (GI) injury in mice to show that a given administered dose of nitrogen mustard (HN 2 ), injected IP, results in a much greater reduction in the subsequent radiation dose required to achieve an isoeffect, than if the drug is injected IV. At an administered dose of 3.5 mg kg -1 of HN 2 (the animal LDsub(10/30) for IP injection), the radiation dose-reduction factor for 10% survival of intestinal crypts, was 1.94 for IP HN 2 and only 1.28 for IV HN 2 . Even the grossly-equitoxic (mouse LDsub(10/30)) dose of IV HN 2 resulted in a smaller predicted radiation dose reduction for GI injury, by a factor of 1.45. The validity of using the IP route in combined chemotherapy-radiotherapy studies designed to generate quantitative estimates of toxicity is discussed. (author)

  18. Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts support in vitro and in vivo growth of human small intestinal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Lahar

    Full Text Available The intestinal crypt-niche interaction is thought to be essential to the function, maintenance, and proliferation of progenitor stem cells found at the bases of intestinal crypts. These stem cells are constantly renewing the intestinal epithelium by sending differentiated cells from the base of the crypts of Lieberkühn to the villus tips where they slough off into the intestinal lumen. The intestinal niche consists of various cell types, extracellular matrix, and growth factors and surrounds the intestinal progenitor cells. There have recently been advances in the understanding of the interactions that regulate the behavior of the intestinal epithelium and there is great interest in methods for isolating and expanding viable intestinal epithelium. However, there is no method to maintain primary human small intestinal epithelium in culture over a prolonged period of time. Similarly no method has been published that describes isolation and support of human intestinal epithelium in an in vivo model. We describe a technique to isolate and maintain human small intestinal epithelium in vitro from surgical specimens. We also describe a novel method to maintain human intestinal epithelium subcutaneously in a mouse model for a prolonged period of time. Our methods require various growth factors and the intimate interaction between intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs and the intestinal epithelial cells to support the epithelial in vitro and in vivo growth. Absence of these myofibroblasts precluded successful maintenance of epithelial cell formation and proliferation beyond just a few days, even in the presence of supportive growth factors. We believe that the methods described here can be used to explore the molecular basis of human intestinal stem cell support, maintenance, and growth.

  19. Fermented soya bean (tempe) extracts reduce adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to intestinal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roubos-van den Hil, P.J.; Nout, M.J.R.; Beumer, R.R.; Meulen, van der J.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: This study aimed to investigate the effect of processed soya bean, during the successive stages of tempe fermentation and different fermentation times, on adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 to intestinal brush border cells as well as Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells; and

  20. Peroxisomes in intestinal and gallbladder epithelial cells of the stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus L. (Teleostei)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, A.J.H. de; Veenhuis, M.; Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    The occurrence of microbodies in the epithelial cells of the intestine and gallbladder of the stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus L., is described. In the intestine the organelles are predominantly located in the apical and perinuclear zone of the cells and may contain small crystalline cores. In

  1. Fusion of intestinal epithelial cells with bone marrow derived cells is dispensable for tissue homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Joan H.; Rodermond, Hans M.; Zimberlin, Cheryl D.; Lascano, Valeria; de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Richel, Dick J.; Medema, Jan Paul; Vermeulen, Louis

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the intestine is characterized by an immense cellular turn-over ascertaining an extensive regenerative capacity. Multiple reports suggest that besides the local intestinal stem cell pool, circulating cells of bone marrow origin (BMDCs) contribute to this process by fusing

  2. Rho-A prenylation and signaling link epithelial homeostasis to intestinal inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Posadas, Rocío; Becker, Christoph; Günther, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Although defects in intestinal barrier function are a key pathogenic factor in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), the molecular pathways driving disease-specific alterations of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) are largely unknown. Here, we addressed this issue by characterizing t...

  3. Radioprotective effects of miso (fermented soy bean paste) against radiation in B6C3F1 mice. Increased small intestinal crypt survival, crypt lengths and prolongation of average time to death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Masayuki; Lu, Huimei; Shiraki, Katsutomo; Ishimura, Yoshimasa; Uesaka, Toshihiro; Katoh, Osamu; Watanabe, Hiromitsu

    2001-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of miso, a fermentation product from soy bean, was investigated with reference to the survival time, crypt survival and jejunum crypt length in male B6C3F1 mice. Miso at three different fermentation stages (early-, medium- and long-term fermented miso) was mixed in MF diet into biscuits at 10% and was administered from 1 week before irradiation. Animal survival in the long-term fermented miso group was significantly prolonged as compared with the short-term fermented miso and MF cases after 8 Gy of 60 Co-γ-ray irradiation at a dose rate of 2 Gy min -1 . Delay in mortality was evident in all three miso groups, with significantly increased survival. At doses of 10 and 12 Gy X-irradiation at a dose rate of 4 Gy min -1 , the treatment with long-term fermented miso significantly increased crypt survival. Also the protective influence against irradiation in terms of crypt lengths in the long-term fermented miso group was significantly greater than in the short-term or medium-term fermented miso and MF diet groups. Thus, prolonged fermentation appears to be very important for protection against radiation effects. (author)

  4. Radioprotective effects of miso (fermented soy bean paste) against radiation in B6C3F1 mice: increased small intestinal crypt survival, crypt lengths and prolongation of average time to death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, M; Lu, H; Shiraki, K; Ishimura, Y; Uesaka, T; Katoh, O; Watanabe, H

    2001-12-01

    The radioprotective effect of miso, a fermentation product from soy bean, was investigated with reference to the survival time, crypt survival and jejunum crypt length in male B6C3F1 mice. Miso at three different fermentation stages (early-, medium- and long-term fermented miso) was mixed in MF diet into biscuits at 10% and was administered from 1 week before irradiation. Animal survival in the long-term fermented miso group was significantly prolonged as compared with the short-term fermented miso and MF cases after 8 Gy of 60Co-gamma-ray irradiation at a dose rate of 2Gy min(-1). Delay in mortality was evident in all three miso groups, with significantly increased survival. At doses of 10 and 12 Gy X-irradiation at a dose rate of 4 Gy min(-1), the treatment with long-term fermented miso significantly increased crypt survival. Also the protective influence against irradiation in terms of crypt lengths in the long-term fermented miso group was significantly greater than in the short-term or medium-term fermented miso and MF diet groups. Thus, prolonged fermentation appears to be very important for protection against radiation effects.

  5. The role of the Hes1 crosstalk hub in Notch-Wnt interactions of the intestinal crypt

    KAUST Repository

    Kay, Sophie K.; Harrington, Heather A.; Shepherd, Sarah; Brennan, Keith; Dale, Trevor; Osborne, James M.; Gavaghan, David J.; Byrne, Helen M.

    2017-01-01

    The Notch pathway plays a vital role in determining whether cells in the intestinal epithelium adopt a secretory or an absorptive phenotype. Cell fate specification is coordinated via Notch’s interaction with the canonical Wnt pathway. Here, we propose a new mathematical model of the Notch and Wnt pathways, in which the Hes1 promoter acts as a hub for pathway crosstalk. Computational simulations of the model can assist in understanding how healthy intestinal tissue is maintained, and predict the likely consequences of biochemical knockouts upon cell fate selection processes. Chemical reaction network theory (CRNT) is a powerful, generalised framework which assesses the capacity of our model for monostability or multistability, by analysing properties of the underlying network structure without recourse to specific parameter values or functional forms for reaction rates. CRNT highlights the role of β-catenin in stabilising the Notch pathway and damping oscillations, demonstrating that Wnt-mediated actions on the Hes1 promoter can induce dynamic transitions in the Notch system, from multistability to monostability. Time-dependent model simulations of cell pairs reveal the stabilising influence of Wnt upon the Notch pathway, in which β-catenin- and Dsh-mediated action on the Hes1 promoter are key in shaping the subcellular dynamics. Where Notch-mediated transcription of Hes1 dominates, there is Notch oscillation and maintenance of fate flexibility; Wnt-mediated transcription of Hes1 favours bistability akin to cell fate selection. Cells could therefore regulate the proportion of Wnt- and Notch-mediated control of the Hes1 promoter to coordinate the timing of cell fate selection as they migrate through the intestinal epithelium and are subject to reduced Wnt stimuli. Furthermore, mutant cells characterised by hyperstimulation of the Wnt pathway may, through coupling with Notch, invert cell fate in neighbouring healthy cells, enabling an aberrant cell to maintain

  6. The role of the Hes1 crosstalk hub in Notch-Wnt interactions of the intestinal crypt

    KAUST Repository

    Kay, Sophie K.

    2017-03-01

    The Notch pathway plays a vital role in determining whether cells in the intestinal epithelium adopt a secretory or an absorptive phenotype. Cell fate specification is coordinated via Notch’s interaction with the canonical Wnt pathway. Here, we propose a new mathematical model of the Notch and Wnt pathways, in which the Hes1 promoter acts as a hub for pathway crosstalk. Computational simulations of the model can assist in understanding how healthy intestinal tissue is maintained, and predict the likely consequences of biochemical knockouts upon cell fate selection processes. Chemical reaction network theory (CRNT) is a powerful, generalised framework which assesses the capacity of our model for monostability or multistability, by analysing properties of the underlying network structure without recourse to specific parameter values or functional forms for reaction rates. CRNT highlights the role of β-catenin in stabilising the Notch pathway and damping oscillations, demonstrating that Wnt-mediated actions on the Hes1 promoter can induce dynamic transitions in the Notch system, from multistability to monostability. Time-dependent model simulations of cell pairs reveal the stabilising influence of Wnt upon the Notch pathway, in which β-catenin- and Dsh-mediated action on the Hes1 promoter are key in shaping the subcellular dynamics. Where Notch-mediated transcription of Hes1 dominates, there is Notch oscillation and maintenance of fate flexibility; Wnt-mediated transcription of Hes1 favours bistability akin to cell fate selection. Cells could therefore regulate the proportion of Wnt- and Notch-mediated control of the Hes1 promoter to coordinate the timing of cell fate selection as they migrate through the intestinal epithelium and are subject to reduced Wnt stimuli. Furthermore, mutant cells characterised by hyperstimulation of the Wnt pathway may, through coupling with Notch, invert cell fate in neighbouring healthy cells, enabling an aberrant cell to maintain

  7. The role of the Hes1 crosstalk hub in Notch-Wnt interactions of the intestinal crypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie K Kay

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Notch pathway plays a vital role in determining whether cells in the intestinal epithelium adopt a secretory or an absorptive phenotype. Cell fate specification is coordinated via Notch's interaction with the canonical Wnt pathway. Here, we propose a new mathematical model of the Notch and Wnt pathways, in which the Hes1 promoter acts as a hub for pathway crosstalk. Computational simulations of the model can assist in understanding how healthy intestinal tissue is maintained, and predict the likely consequences of biochemical knockouts upon cell fate selection processes. Chemical reaction network theory (CRNT is a powerful, generalised framework which assesses the capacity of our model for monostability or multistability, by analysing properties of the underlying network structure without recourse to specific parameter values or functional forms for reaction rates. CRNT highlights the role of β-catenin in stabilising the Notch pathway and damping oscillations, demonstrating that Wnt-mediated actions on the Hes1 promoter can induce dynamic transitions in the Notch system, from multistability to monostability. Time-dependent model simulations of cell pairs reveal the stabilising influence of Wnt upon the Notch pathway, in which β-catenin- and Dsh-mediated action on the Hes1 promoter are key in shaping the subcellular dynamics. Where Notch-mediated transcription of Hes1 dominates, there is Notch oscillation and maintenance of fate flexibility; Wnt-mediated transcription of Hes1 favours bistability akin to cell fate selection. Cells could therefore regulate the proportion of Wnt- and Notch-mediated control of the Hes1 promoter to coordinate the timing of cell fate selection as they migrate through the intestinal epithelium and are subject to reduced Wnt stimuli. Furthermore, mutant cells characterised by hyperstimulation of the Wnt pathway may, through coupling with Notch, invert cell fate in neighbouring healthy cells, enabling an aberrant

  8. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Ray, Ramesh M.; Johnson, Leonard R.

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal epithelium is dependent upon a balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are well known for their role in cell proliferation. Previous studies from our group have shown that polyamine-depletion of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, increases p53 and p21Cip1 protein levels, induces G1 arrest, and protects cells from camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptosis. Although emerging evidence suggests that members of the Cdk family are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, their roles directing apoptosis of IEC-6 cells are not known. In this study, we report that inhibition of Cdk1, 2, and 9 (with the broad range Cdk inhibitor, AZD5438) in proliferating IEC-6 cells triggered DNA damage, activated p53 signaling, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis. By contrast, inhibition of Cdk2 (with NU6140) increased p53 protein and activity, inhibited proliferation, but had no effect on apoptosis. Notably, AZD5438 sensitized, whereas, NU6140 rescued proliferating IEC-6 cells from CPT-induced apoptosis. However, in colon carcinoma (Caco2) cells with mutant p53, treatment with either AZD5438 or NU6140 blocked proliferation, albeit more robustly with AZD5438. Both Cdk inhibitors induced apoptosis in Caco2 cells in a p53-independent manner. In serum starved quiescent IEC-6 cells, both AZD5438 and NU6140 decreased TNF- /CPT-induced activation of p53 and, consequently, rescued cells from apoptosis, indicating that sustained Cdk activity is required for apoptosis of quiescent cells. Furthermore, AZD5438 partially reversed the protective effect of polyamine depletion whereas NU6140 had no effect. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdks possess opposing roles in the control of apoptosis in quiescent and proliferating cells. In addition, Cdk inhibitors uncouple proliferation from apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:24242917

  9. Regulation of epithelial differentiation in rat intestine by intraluminal delivery of an adenoviral vector or silencing RNA coding for Schlafen 3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlo L Kovalenko

    Full Text Available Although we stimulate enterocytic proliferation to ameliorate short gut syndrome or mucosal atrophy, less effort has been directed at enterocytic differentiation. Schlafen 3 (Slfn3 is a poorly understood protein induced during IEC-6 enterocytic differentiation. We hypothesized that exogenous manipulation of Slfn3 would regulate enterocytic differentiation in vivo. Adenoviral vector coding for Slfn3 cDNA (Ad-GFP-Slfn3 or silencing RNA for Slfn3 (siSlfn3 was introduced intraluminally into rat intestine. We assessed Slfn3, villin, sucrase-isomaltase (SI, Dpp4, and Glut2 by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. We also studied Slfn3 and these differentiation markers in atrophic defunctionalized jejunal mucosa and the crypt-villus axis of normal jejunum. Ad-GFP-Slfn3 but not Ad-GFP increased Slfn3, villin and Dpp4 expression in human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. Injecting Ad-GFP-Slfn3 into rat jejunum in vivo increased mucosal Slfn3 mRNA three days later vs. intraluminal Ad-GFP. This Slfn3 overexpression was associated with increases in all four differentiation markers. Injecting siSlfn3 into rat jejunum in vivo substantially reduced Slfn3 and all four intestinal mucosal differentiation markers three days later, as well as Dpp4 specific activity. Endogenous Slfn3 was reduced in atrophic mucosa from a blind-end Roux-en-Y anastomosis in parallel with differentiation marker expression together with AKT and p38 signaling. Slfn3 was more highly expressed in the villi than the crypts, paralleling Glut2, SI and Dpp4. Slfn3 is a key intracellular regulator of rat enterocytic differentiation. Understanding how Slfn3 works may identify targets to promote enterocytic differentiation and maintain mucosal function in vivo, facilitating enteral nutrition and improving survival in patients with mucosal atrophy or short gut syndrome.

  10. Neutrophil Interactions with Epithelial Expressed ICAM-1 Enhances Intestinal Mucosal Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumagin, R; Brazil, JC; Nava, P; Nishio, H; Alam, A; Luissint, AC; Weber, DA; Neish, AS; Nusrat, A; Parkos, CA

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of gastrointestinal tract inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease, is polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) transepithelial migration (TEM) and accumulation in the gut lumen. PMN accumulation within the intestinal mucosa contributes to tissue injury. While epithelial infiltration by large numbers of PMNs results in mucosal injury, we found that PMN interactions with luminal epithelial membrane receptors may also play a role in wound healing. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a PMN ligand that is upregulated on apical surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells under inflammatory conditions. In our study, increased expression of ICAM-1 resulted in enhanced PMN binding to the apical epithelium, which was associated with reduced PMN apoptosis. Following TEM, PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 resulted in activation of Akt and β-catenin signaling, increased epithelial-cell proliferation, and wound healing. Such responses were ICAM-1 dependent as engagement of epithelial ICAM-1 by antibody-mediated cross-linking yielded similar results. Furthermore, using an in-vivo biopsy-based, colonic-mucosal-injury model, we demonstrated epithelial ICAM-1 plays an important role in activation of epithelial Akt and β-catenin signaling and wound healing. These findings suggest that post-migrated PMNs within the intestinal lumen can regulate epithelial homeostasis, thereby identifying ICAM-1 as a potential therapeutic target for promoting mucosal wound healing. PMID:26732677

  11. Neutrophil interactions with epithelial-expressed ICAM-1 enhances intestinal mucosal wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumagin, R; Brazil, J C; Nava, P; Nishio, H; Alam, A; Luissint, A C; Weber, D A; Neish, A S; Nusrat, A; Parkos, C A

    2016-09-01

    A characteristic feature of gastrointestinal tract inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease, is polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) transepithelial migration (TEM) and accumulation in the gut lumen. PMN accumulation within the intestinal mucosa contributes to tissue injury. Although epithelial infiltration by large numbers of PMNs results in mucosal injury, we found that PMN interactions with luminal epithelial membrane receptors may also play a role in wound healing. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a PMN ligand that is upregulated on apical surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells under inflammatory conditions. In our study, increased expression of ICAM-1 resulted in enhanced PMN binding to the apical epithelium, which was associated with reduced PMN apoptosis. Following TEM, PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 resulted in activation of Akt and β-catenin signaling, increased epithelial-cell proliferation, and wound healing. Such responses were ICAM-1 dependent as engagement of epithelial ICAM-1 by antibody-mediated cross-linking yielded similar results. Furthermore, using an in-vivo biopsy-based, colonic-mucosal-injury model, we demonstrated epithelial ICAM-1 has an important role in activation of epithelial Akt and β-catenin signaling and wound healing. These findings suggest that post-migrated PMNs within the intestinal lumen can regulate epithelial homeostasis, thereby identifying ICAM-1 as a potential therapeutic target for promoting mucosal wound healing.

  12. A hypermorphic epithelial β-catenin mutation facilitates intestinal tumorigenesis in mice in response to compounding WNT-pathway mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Buchert

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway occurs in the vast majority of colorectal cancers. However, the outcome of the disease varies markedly from individual to individual, even within the same tumor stage. This heterogeneity is governed to a great extent by the genetic make-up of individual tumors and the combination of oncogenic mutations. In order to express throughout the intestinal epithelium a degradation-resistant β-catenin (Ctnnb1, which lacks the first 131 amino acids, we inserted an epitope-tagged ΔN(1-131-β-catenin-encoding cDNA as a knock-in transgene into the endogenous gpA33 gene locus in mice. The resulting gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice showed an increase in the constitutive Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation that shifts the cell fate towards the Paneth cell lineage in pre-malignant intestinal epithelium. Furthermore, 19% of all heterozygous and 37% of all homozygous gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice spontaneously developed aberrant crypt foci and adenomatous polyps, at frequencies and latencies akin to those observed in sporadic colon cancer in humans. Consistent with this, the Wnt target genes, MMP7  and Tenascin-C, which are most highly expressed in benign human adenomas and early tumor stages, were upregulated in pre-malignant tissue of gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice, but those Wnt target genes associated with excessive proliferation (i.e. Cdnn1, myc were not. We also detected diminished expression of membrane-associated α-catenin and increased intestinal permeability in gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice in challenge conditions, providing a potential explanation for the observed mild chronic intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility to azoxymethane and mutant Apc-dependent tumorigenesis. Collectively, our data indicate that epithelial expression of ΔN(1-131-β-catenin in the intestine creates an inflammatory microenvironment and co-operates with other mutations in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway to facilitate and promote tumorigenesis.

  13. Adrenergic factors regulating cell division in the colonic crypt epithelium during carcinogenesis and in colonic adenoma and adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, M F; Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1985-09-01

    Evidence exists implicating adrenergic factors in the control of intestinal epithelial cell proliferation in both normal and diseased states. In this report, attention is focussed on changes in the amine requirements of proliferating cells during the chemical induction of tumours in the colon of mouse. Cell proliferation rates were measured stathmokinetically. Tumours were induced by s.c. injection of dimethylhydrazine (DMH). Results with a series of adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists suggest that there is an alpha 2-adrenoceptor mediated excitatory effect in normal colon but an alpha 2 adrenoceptor mediated inhibitory effect in adenoma and carcinoma. Alpha 1 adrenoceptors, on the other hand, have an inhibitory effect in normal crypts and in adenomas, and an excitatory effect in carcinomas. Beta adrenoceptors have an inhibitory effect in the normal and DMH-treated crypt, and in adenomas, but not in carcinomas. In the crypt epithelium of DMH-treated mice, two regions on cell proliferation, with differing regulatory factors, could be identified. In the upper region of the carcinogen-exposed crypt is a zone where cell proliferation is stimulated by an alpha 2 adrenergic mechanism, thus resembling the basal region of the normal crypt. By contrast, in the basal region of these crypts, cell proliferation is stimulated by an alpha 1 mechanism, thus resembling a malignant tumour.

  14. Lactobacillus frumenti Facilitates Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function Maintenance in Early-Weaned Piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Chen, Lingli; Zheng, Wenyong; Shi, Min; Liu, Liu; Xie, Chunlin; Wang, Xinkai; Niu, Yaorong; Hou, Qiliang; Xu, Xiaofan; Xu, Baoyang; Tang, Yimei; Zhou, Shuyi; Yan, Yiqin; Yang, Tao; Ma, Libao; Yan, Xianghua

    2018-01-01

    Increased intestinal epithelial barrier function damages caused by early weaning stress have adverse effects on swine health and feed utilization efficiency. Probiotics have emerged as the promising antibiotic alternatives used for intestinal barrier function damage prevention. Our previous data showed that Lactobacillus frumenti was identified as a predominant Lactobacillus in the intestinal microbiota of weaned piglets. However, whether the intestinal epithelial barrier function in piglets was regulated by L. frumenti is still unclear. Here, piglets received a PBS vehicle or PBS suspension (2 ml, 108 CFU/ml) containing the L. frumenti by oral gavage once a day during the period of 6–20 days of age prior to early weaning. Our data demonstrated that oral administration of L. frumenti significantly improved the intestinal mucosal integrity and decreased the serum endotoxin and D-lactic acid levels in early-weaned piglets (26 days of age). The intestinal tight junction proteins (including ZO-1, Occludin, and Claudin-1) were significantly up-regulated by L. frumenti administration. The serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels, intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) levels, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) levels were significantly increased by L. frumenti administration. Furthermore, our data revealed that oral administration of L. frumenti significantly increased the relative abundances of health-promoting microbes (including L. frumenti, Lactobacillus gasseri LA39, Parabacteroides distasonis, and Kazachstania telluris) and decreased the relative abundances of opportunistic pathogens (including Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Candida humilis). Functional alteration of the intestinal bacterial community by L. frumenti administration was characterized by the significantly increased fatty acids and protein metabolism and decreased diseases-associated metabolic pathways. These findings suggest that L. frumenti facilitates intestinal epithelial barrier function maintenance

  15. NOD-Like Receptors in Intestinal Homeostasis and Epithelial Tissue Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlato, Marianna; Yeretssian, Garabet

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium constitutes a dynamic physical barrier segregating the luminal content from the underlying mucosal tissue. Following injury, the epithelial integrity is restored by rapid migration of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) across the denuded area in a process known as wound healing. Hence, through a sequence of events involving restitution, proliferation and differentiation of IECs the gap is resealed and homeostasis reestablished. Relapsing damage followed by healing of the inflamed mucosa is a hallmark of several intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). While several regulatory peptides, growth factors and cytokines stimulate restitution of the epithelial layer after injury, recent evidence in the field underscores the contribution of innate immunity in controlling this process. In particular, nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs) play critical roles in sensing the commensal microbiota, maintaining homeostasis, and regulating intestinal inflammation. Here, we review the process of intestinal epithelial tissue repair and we specifically focus on the impact of NLR-mediated signaling mechanisms involved in governing epithelial wound healing during disease. PMID:24886810

  16. Bacterial Signaling at the Intestinal Epithelial Interface in Inflammation and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia I. Coleman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI tract provides a compartmentalized interface with an enormous repertoire of immune and metabolic activities, where the multicellular structure of the mucosa has acquired mechanisms to sense luminal factors, such as nutrients, microbes, and a variety of host-derived and microbial metabolites. The GI tract is colonized by a complex ecosystem of microorganisms, which have developed a highly coevolved relationship with the host’s cellular and immune system. Intestinal epithelial pattern recognition receptors (PRRs substantially contribute to tissue homeostasis and immune surveillance. The role of bacteria-derived signals in intestinal epithelial homeostasis and repair has been addressed in mouse models deficient in PRRs and signaling adaptors. While critical for host physiology and the fortification of barrier function, the intestinal microbiota poses a considerable health challenge. Accumulating evidence indicates that dysbiosis is associated with the pathogenesis of numerous GI tract diseases, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD and colorectal cancer (CRC. Aberrant signal integration at the epithelial cell level contributes to such diseases. An increased understanding of bacterial-specific structure recognition and signaling mechanisms at the intestinal epithelial interface is of great importance in the translation to future treatment strategies. In this review, we summarize the growing understanding of the regulation and function of the intestinal epithelial barrier, and discuss microbial signaling in the dynamic host–microbe mutualism in both health and disease.

  17. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J.; Jiang, Y. [Southern Medical University, Nanfang Hospital, Department of Anesthesia, Guangzhou, China, Department of Anesthesia, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Tang, Y.; Chen, B. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China); Sun, X. [Laboratory of Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndrome, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Su, L.; Liu, Z. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-06-25

    Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries.

  18. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, J.; Jiang, Y.; Tang, Y.; Chen, B.; Sun, X.; Su, L.; Liu, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries

  19. WNT signaling controls expression of pro-apoptotic BOK and BAX in intestinal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeilstra, Jurrit; Joosten, Sander P.J. [Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wensveen, Felix M. [Department of Experimental Immunology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dessing, Mark C.; Schuetze, Denise M. [Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Eldering, Eric [Department of Experimental Immunology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Spaargaren, Marcel [Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pals, Steven T., E-mail: s.t.pals@amc.uva.nl [Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Intestinal adenomas initiated by aberrant activation of the WNT pathway displayed an increased sensitivity to apoptosis. {yields} Expression profiling of apoptosis-related genes in Apc{sup Min/+} mice revealed the differential expression of pro-apoptotic Bok and Bax. {yields} APC-mutant adenomatous crypts in FAP patients showed strongly increased BAX immunoreactivity. {yields} Blocking of {beta}-catenin/TCF-4-mediated signaling in colon cancer cells reduced the expression of BOK and BAX. -- Abstract: In a majority of cases, colorectal cancer is initiated by aberrant activation of the WNT signaling pathway. Mutation of the genes encoding the WNT signaling components adenomatous polyposis coli or {beta}-catenin causes constitutively active {beta}-catenin/TCF-mediated transcription, driving the transformation of intestinal crypts to cancer precursor lesions, called dysplastic aberrant crypt foci. Deregulated apoptosis is a hallmark of adenomatous colon tissue. However, the contribution of WNT signaling to this process is not fully understood. We addressed this role by analyzing the rate of epithelial apoptosis in aberrant crypts and adenomas of the Apc{sup Min/+} mouse model. In comparison with normal crypts and adenomas, aberrant crypts displayed a dramatically increased rate of apoptotic cell death. Expression profiling of apoptosis-related genes along the crypt-villus axis and in Apc mutant adenomas revealed increased expression of two pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members in intestinal adenomas, Bok and Bax. Analysis of the colon of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients along the crypt-to-surface axis, and of dysplastic crypts, corroborated this expression pattern. Disruption of {beta}-catenin/TCF-4-mediated signaling in the colorectal cancer cell line Ls174T significantly decreased BOK and BAX expression, confirming WNT-dependent regulation in intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a feedback mechanism by which

  20. WNT signaling controls expression of pro-apoptotic BOK and BAX in intestinal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeilstra, Jurrit; Joosten, Sander P.J.; Wensveen, Felix M.; Dessing, Mark C.; Schuetze, Denise M.; Eldering, Eric; Spaargaren, Marcel; Pals, Steven T.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Intestinal adenomas initiated by aberrant activation of the WNT pathway displayed an increased sensitivity to apoptosis. → Expression profiling of apoptosis-related genes in Apc Min/+ mice revealed the differential expression of pro-apoptotic Bok and Bax. → APC-mutant adenomatous crypts in FAP patients showed strongly increased BAX immunoreactivity. → Blocking of β-catenin/TCF-4-mediated signaling in colon cancer cells reduced the expression of BOK and BAX. -- Abstract: In a majority of cases, colorectal cancer is initiated by aberrant activation of the WNT signaling pathway. Mutation of the genes encoding the WNT signaling components adenomatous polyposis coli or β-catenin causes constitutively active β-catenin/TCF-mediated transcription, driving the transformation of intestinal crypts to cancer precursor lesions, called dysplastic aberrant crypt foci. Deregulated apoptosis is a hallmark of adenomatous colon tissue. However, the contribution of WNT signaling to this process is not fully understood. We addressed this role by analyzing the rate of epithelial apoptosis in aberrant crypts and adenomas of the Apc Min/+ mouse model. In comparison with normal crypts and adenomas, aberrant crypts displayed a dramatically increased rate of apoptotic cell death. Expression profiling of apoptosis-related genes along the crypt-villus axis and in Apc mutant adenomas revealed increased expression of two pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members in intestinal adenomas, Bok and Bax. Analysis of the colon of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients along the crypt-to-surface axis, and of dysplastic crypts, corroborated this expression pattern. Disruption of β-catenin/TCF-4-mediated signaling in the colorectal cancer cell line Ls174T significantly decreased BOK and BAX expression, confirming WNT-dependent regulation in intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a feedback mechanism by which uncontrolled epithelial cell proliferation in the

  1. Hydrolysed inulin alleviates the azoxymethane-induced preneoplastic aberrant crypt foci by altering selected intestinal microbiota in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattananandecha, Thanawat; Sirilun, Sasithorn; Duangjitcharoen, Yodsawee; Sivamaruthi, Bhagavathi Sundaram; Suwannalert, Prasit; Peerajan, Sartjin; Chaiyasut, Chaiyavat

    2016-09-01

    Context Inulin, a non-digestible carbohydrate isolated from Helianthus tuberosus L. (Asteraceae), has been shown to alter the gut beneficial bacteria including Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacteria. Inulin also influences the activities of intestinal microbiota that could prevent the colon cancer development. Objective This study determines the effect of hydrolysed inulin with different degrees of polymerisation on alteration of intestinal microbiota and their activities on azoxymethane (AOM)-induced preneoplastic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. Materials and methods Seventy-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups (three control and three AOM-treated groups) and the animal were fed with either a normal diet or diet containing 10% of long-chain inulin (InuL) or short-chain inulin (InuS), respectively, for 17 weeks. Colon cancer was induced in rats by injecting AOM subcutaneously at the 8th and 9th week of the study period. At the end of the experiment, cecal contents of rats were examined for selected microbiota, organic acids, putrefactive compounds and microbial enzymes. ACF formation was microscopically examined. Results The inulin diets significantly increased the weight and decreased the pH of the caecal content. The rats fed with InuL-supplemented diet showed approximately 2.9- and 6.8-fold increases in the biomass of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacteria, respectively. Naive and AOM-treated rats fed with inulin-supplemented diet showed ∼1.3- and ∼2.2-fold decreases in the biomass of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, respectively. Inulins significantly decreased the colonic concentration of phenol, p-cresol and indole. Reduction in the activity of microbial enzymes such as β-glucuronidase, azoreductase and nitroreductase were observed in inulin-treated animals. Reduction in the ACF formation has been observed in inulin-treated groups. Discussion and conclusion The present study demonstrates that dietary

  2. Element concentrations in the intestinal mucosa of the mouse as measured by X-ray microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zglinicki, T. von; Roomans, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    Subcellular ion distribution in villus, crypt, Paneth and smooth muscle cells of the mouse small intestine under resting conditions was investigated by X-ray microanalysis of ultrathin cryosections. In addition, the mass distribution was estimated by measuring the optical transmission of the compartments in transmission electron micrographs. Each cell type is characterized by a special composition in terms of the major monovalent ions Na, K, and Cl. In particular, among crypt epithelial cells, those cells containing small secretion granula (termed crypt A cells) also display cytoplasmic ion concentrations significantly different from crypt epithelial cells lacking secretion granula (crypt B cells). Monovalent ion concentrations in the cytoplasm of Paneth cells, muscle cells, and crypt epithelial cells lacking secretion granula are higher than expected from osmotic considerations. Hence, significant binding of ions to cytoplasmic polyelectrolytes is assumed in these cells. There are gradients of dry mass and K concentration from the luminal to the basal side of the cell, both in crypt and in villus cells. The terminal web in these cells is rich in Na and Cl. The elemental composition of the large, dark secretion granula in Paneth cells is similar to that of the small dark granula in crypt cells. However, the two morphologically different types of granula within the Paneth cells have a significantly different elemental composition, which might reflect maturation of secretion granula

  3. Circadian regulation of epithelial functions in the intestine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pácha, Jiří; Sumová, Alena

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 208, č. 1 (2013), s. 11-24 ISSN 1748-1708 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0969; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0668 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : circadian rhythms * intestine * colon * proliferation * digestion * intestinal transport Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.251, year: 2013

  4. Epithelial-derived IL-33 promotes intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc Min/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhengxiang; Chen, Lili; Souto, Fabricio O; Canasto-Chibuque, Claudia; Bongers, Gerold; Deshpande, Madhura; Harpaz, Noam; Ko, Huaibin M; Kelley, Kevin; Furtado, Glaucia C; Lira, Sergio A

    2017-07-14

    Increased expression of Interleukin (IL)-33 has been detected in intestinal samples of patients with ulcerative colitis, a condition associated with increased risk for colon cancer, but its role in the development of colorectal cancer has yet to be fully examined. Here, we investigated the role of epithelial expressed IL-33 during development of intestinal tumors. IL-33 expression was detected in epithelial cells in colorectal cancer specimens and in the Apc Min/+ mice. To better understand the role of epithelial-derived IL-33 in the intestinal tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice expressing IL-33 in intestinal epithelial cells (V33 mice). V33 Apc Min/+ mice, resulting from the cross of V33 with Apc Min/+ mice, had increased intestinal tumor burden compared with littermate Apc Min/+ mice. Consistently, Apc Min/+ mice deficient for IL-33 receptor (ST2), had reduced polyp burden. Mechanistically, overexpression of IL-33 promoted expansion of ST2 + regulatory T cells, increased Th2 cytokine milieu, and induced alternatively activated macrophages in the gut. IL-33 promoted marked changes in the expression of antimicrobial peptides, and antibiotic treatment of V33 Apc Min/+ mice abrogated the tumor promoting-effects of IL-33 in the colon. In conclusion, elevated IL-33 signaling increases tumor development in the Apc Min/+ mice.

  5. Protecting intestinal epithelial integrity by galacto-oligosaccharides: Keeping it tight

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari, P.

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal barrier serves as a first line of host defense against potentially harmful stressors from the environment ingested with food, and is primarily formed by epithelial cells connected by tight junctions. Oligosaccharides have been identified as components in milk, particularly in colostrum, that support the development of intestinal microbiota in the early phase of life and contribute to the maturation of the immune system in infants. Currently, galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) are u...

  6. Gut microbiota regulates NKG2D ligand expression on intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Holm, Thomas L.; Krych, Lukasz

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) are one of a few cell types in the body with constitutive surface expression of natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) ligands, although the magnitude of ligand expression by IECs varies. Here, we investigated whether the gut microbiota regulates the NKG2D ligand...... expression is kept in check by an intestinal regulatory immune milieu induced by members of the gut microbiota, for example A. muciniphila....

  7. Nlrp9b inflammasome restricts rotavirus infection in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shu; Ding, Siyuan; Wang, Penghua; Wei, Zheng; Pan, Wen; Palm, Noah W; Yang, Yi; Yu, Hua; Li, Hua-Bing; Wang, Geng; Lei, Xuqiu; de Zoete, Marcel R; Zhao, Jun; Zheng, Yunjiang; Chen, Haiwei; Zhao, Yujiao; Jurado, Kellie A; Feng, Ningguo; Shan, Liang; Kluger, Yuval; Lu, Jun; Abraham, Clara; Fikrig, Erol; Greenberg, Harry B; Flavell, Richard A

    2017-06-29

    Rotavirus, a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis and diarrhoea in young children, accounts for around 215,000 deaths annually worldwide. Rotavirus specifically infects the intestinal epithelial cells in the host small intestine and has evolved strategies to antagonize interferon and NF-κB signalling, raising the question as to whether other host factors participate in antiviral responses in intestinal mucosa. The mechanism by which enteric viruses are sensed and restricted in vivo, especially by NOD-like receptor (NLR) inflammasomes, is largely unknown. Here we uncover and mechanistically characterize the NLR Nlrp9b that is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells and restricts rotavirus infection. Our data show that, via RNA helicase Dhx9, Nlrp9b recognizes short double-stranded RNA stretches and forms inflammasome complexes with the adaptor proteins Asc and caspase-1 to promote the maturation of interleukin (Il)-18 and gasdermin D (Gsdmd)-induced pyroptosis. Conditional depletion of Nlrp9b or other inflammasome components in the intestine in vivo resulted in enhanced susceptibility of mice to rotavirus replication. Our study highlights an important innate immune signalling pathway that functions in intestinal epithelial cells and may present useful targets in the modulation of host defences against viral pathogens.

  8. Nlrp9b inflammasome restricts rotavirus infection in intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shu; Ding, Siyuan; Wang, Penghua; Wei, Zheng; Pan, Wen; Palm, Noah W; Yang, Yi; Yu, Hua; Li, Hua-Bing; Wang, Geng; Lei, Xuqiu; de Zoete, Marcel R.; Zhao, Jun; Zheng, Yunjiang; Chen, Haiwei; Zhao, Yujiao; Jurado, Kellie A.; Feng, Ningguo; Shan, Liang; Kluger, Yuval; Lu, Jun; Abraham, Clara; Fikrig, Erol; Greenberg, Harry B.; Flavell, Richard A.

    2018-01-01

    Rotavirus, a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis and diarrhoea in young children, accounts for around 215,000 deaths annually worldwide1. Rotavirus specifically infects the intestinal epithelial cells in the host small intestine and has evolved strategies to antagonize interferon and NF-κB signalling2–5, raising the question as to whether other host factors participate in antiviral responses in intestinal mucosa. The mechanism by which enteric viruses are sensed and restricted in vivo, especially by NOD-like receptor (NLR) inflammasomes, is largely unknown. Here we uncover and mechanistically characterize the NLR Nlrp9b that is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells and restricts rotavirus infection. Our data show that, via RNA helicase Dhx9, Nlrp9b recognizes short double-stranded RNA stretches and forms inflammasome complexes with the adaptor proteins Asc and caspase-1 to promote the maturation of interleukin (Il)-18 and gasdermin D (Gsdmd)-induced pyroptosis. Conditional depletion of Nlrp9b or other inflammasome components in the intestine in vivo resulted in enhanced susceptibility of mice to rotavirus replication. Our study highlights an important innate immune signalling pathway that functions in intestinal epithelial cells and may present useful targets in the modulation of host defences against viral pathogens. PMID:28636595

  9. The jagged-2/notch-1/hes-1 pathway is involved in intestinal epithelium regeneration after intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Chen

    Full Text Available Notch signaling plays a critical role in the maintenance of intestinal crypt epithelial cell proliferation. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Notch signaling in the proliferation and regeneration of intestinal epithelium after intestinal ischemia reperfusion (I/R injury.Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to sham operation or I/R by occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA for 20 min. Intestinal tissue samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 4, and 6 h after reperfusion. Proliferation of the intestinal epithelium was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining of proliferating nuclear antigen (PCNA. The mRNA and protein expression levels of Notch signaling components were examined using Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses. Immunofluorescence was also performed to detect the expression and location of Jagged-2, cleaved Notch-1, and Hes-1 in the intestine. Finally, the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT and the siRNA for Jagged-2 and Hes-1 were applied to investigate the functional role of Notch signaling in the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells in an in vitro IEC-6 culture system.I/R injury caused increased intestinal crypt epithelial cell proliferation and increased mRNA and protein expression of Jagged-2, Notch-1, and Hes-1. The immunofluorescence results further confirmed increased protein expression of Jagged-2, cleaved Notch-1, and Hes-1 in the intestinal crypts. The inhibition of Notch signaling with DAPT and the suppression of Jagged-2 and Hes-1 expression using siRNA both significantly inhibited the proliferation of IEC-6 cells.The Jagged-2/Notch-1/Hes-1 signaling pathway is involved in intestinal epithelium regeneration early after I/R injury by increasing crypt epithelial cell proliferation.

  10. Physiology and pathophysiology of apoptosis in epithelial cells of the liver, pancreas, and intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B A; Gores, G J

    1997-12-01

    Cell death of gastrointestinal epithelial cells occurs by a process referred to as apoptosis. In this review, we succinctly define apoptosis and summarize the role of apoptosis in the physiology and pathophysiology of epithelial cells in the liver, pancreas, and small and large intestine. The physiological mediators regulating apoptosis in gastrointestinal epithelial cells, when known, are discussed. Selected pathophysiological consequences of excessive apoptosis and inhibition of apoptosis are used to illustrate the significance of apoptosis in disease processes. These examples demonstrate that excessive apoptosis may result in epithelial cell atrophy, injury, and dysfunction, whereas inhibition of apoptosis results in hyperplasia and promotes malignant transformation. The specific cellular mechanisms responsible for dysregulation of epithelial cell apoptosis during pathophysiological disturbances are emphasized. Potential future areas of physiological research regarding apoptosis in gastrointestinal epithelia are highlighted when appropriate.

  11. Gut microbial colonization orchestrates TLR2 expression, signaling and epithelial proliferation in the small intestinal mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nives Hörmann

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota is an environmental factor that determines renewal of the intestinal epithelium and remodeling of the intestinal mucosa. At present, it is not resolved if components of the gut microbiota can augment innate immune sensing in the intestinal epithelium via the up-regulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs. Here, we report that colonization of germ-free (GF Swiss Webster mice with a complex gut microbiota augments expression of TLR2. The microbiota-dependent up-regulation of components of the TLR2 signaling complex could be reversed by a 7 day broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment. TLR2 downstream signaling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2 and protein-kinase B (AKT induced by bacterial TLR2 agonists resulted in increased proliferation of the small intestinal epithelial cell line MODE-K. Mice that were colonized from birth with a normal gut microbiota (conventionally-raised; CONV-R showed signs of increased small intestinal renewal and apoptosis compared with GF controls as indicated by elevated mRNA levels of the proliferation markers Ki67 and Cyclin D1, elevated transcripts of the apoptosis marker Caspase-3 and increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cells per intestinal villus structure. In accordance, TLR2-deficient mice showed reduced proliferation and reduced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that a tuned proliferation response of epithelial cells following microbial colonization could aid to protect the host from its microbial colonizers and increase intestinal surface area.

  12. A pSMAD/CDX2 Complex Is Essential for the Intestinalization of Epithelial Metaplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Mari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms leading to epithelial metaplasias are poorly understood. Barrett's esophagus is a premalignant metaplastic change of the esophageal epithelium into columnar epithelium, occurring in patients suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease. Mechanisms behind the development of the intestinal subtype, which is associated with the highest cancer risk, are unclear. In humans, it has been suggested that a nonspecialized columnar metaplasia precedes the development of intestinal metaplasia. Here, we propose that a complex made up of at least two factors needs to be activated simultaneously to drive the expression of intestinal type of genes. Using unique animal models and robust in vitro assays, we show that the nonspecialized columnar metaplasia is a precursor of intestinal metaplasia and that pSMAD/CDX2 interaction is essential for the switch toward an intestinal phenotype.

  13. Intestinal epithelial organoids fuse to form self-organizing tubes in floating collagen gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sachs, Norman; Tsukamoto, Yoshiyuki; Kujala, Pekka; Peters, Peter J; Clevers, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Multiple recent examples highlight how stem cells can self-organize in vitro to establish organoids that closely resemble their in vivo counterparts. Single Lgr5+ mouse intestinal stem cells can be cultured under defined conditions forming ever-expanding epithelial organoids that retain cell

  14. Protecting intestinal epithelial integrity by galacto-oligosaccharides: Keeping it tight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari, P.

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal barrier serves as a first line of host defense against potentially harmful stressors from the environment ingested with food, and is primarily formed by epithelial cells connected by tight junctions. Oligosaccharides have been identified as components in milk, particularly in

  15. Characterizing microbiota-independent effects of oligosaccharides on intestinal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari, Peyman; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna; Willems, Rianne H.A.M.; Difilippo, Elisabetta; Schols, Henk A.; Schoterman, Margriet H.C.; Garssen, Johan; Braber, Saskia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The direct effects of galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), including Vivinal® GOS syrup (VGOS) and purified Vivinal® GOS (PGOS), on the epithelial integrity and corresponding interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8) release were examined in a Caco-2 cell model for intestinal barrier dysfunction. To

  16. Fermented soya bean (tempe) extracts reduce adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubos-van den Hil, P J; Nout, M J R; Beumer, R R; van der Meulen, J; Zwietering, M H

    2009-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of processed soya bean, during the successive stages of tempe fermentation and different fermentation times, on adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 to intestinal brush border cells as well as Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells; and to clarify the mechanism of action. Tempe was prepared at controlled laboratory scale using Rhizopus microsporus var. microsporus as the inoculum. Extracts of raw, soaked and cooked soya beans reduced ETEC adhesion to brush border cells by 40%. Tempe extracts reduced adhesion by 80% or more. ETEC adhesion to Caco-2 cells reduced by 50% in the presence of tempe extracts. ETEC K88 bacteria were found to interact with soya bean extracts, and this may contribute to the observed decrease of ETEC adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells. Fermented soya beans (tempe) reduce the adhesion of ETEC to intestinal epithelial cells of pig and human origin. This reduced adhesion is caused by an interaction between ETEC K88 bacteria and soya bean compounds. The results strengthen previous observations on the anti-diarrhoeal effect of tempe. This effect indicates that soya-derived compounds may reduce adhesion of ETEC to intestinal cells in pigs as well as in humans and prevent against diarrhoeal diseases.

  17. A20 restricts wnt signaling in intestinal epithelial cells and suppresses colon carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Shao

    Full Text Available Colon carcinogenesis consists of a multistep process during which a series of genetic and epigenetic adaptations occur that lead to malignant transformation. Here, we have studied the role of A20 (also known as TNFAIP3, a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that restricts NFκB and cell death signaling, in intestinal homeostasis and tumorigenesis. We have found that A20 expression is consistently reduced in human colonic adenomas than in normal colonic tissues. To further investigate A20's potential roles in regulating colon carcinogenesis, we have generated mice lacking A20 specifically in intestinal epithelial cells and interbred these with mice harboring a mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC(min. While A20(FL/FL villin-Cre mice exhibit uninflamed intestines without polyps, A20(FL/FL villin-Cre APC(min/+ mice contain far greater numbers and larger colonic polyps than control APC(min mice. We find that A20 binds to the β-catenin destruction complex and restricts canonical wnt signaling by supporting ubiquitination and degradation of β-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, acute deletion of A20 from intestinal epithelial cells in vivo leads to enhanced expression of the β-catenin dependent genes cyclinD1 and c-myc, known promoters of colon cancer. Taken together, these findings demonstrate new roles for A20 in restricting β-catenin signaling and preventing colon tumorigenesis.

  18. Epithelial structure and function in the hen lower intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laverty, G.; Elbrønd, Vibeke Sødring; Árnason, Sigvatur S.

    2006-01-01

    In birds, transport processes in the lower intestine mediate absorption of ions, water and a variety of organic substrates, including significant amounts of glucose, amino acids derived from protein associated with urate spheres, and short-chain fatty acids derived from fermentation processes...

  19. Osmoregulation and epithelial water transport: lessons from the intestine of marine teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittamore, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    For teleost fish living in seawater, drinking the surrounding medium is necessary to avoid dehydration. This is a key component of their osmoregulatory strategy presenting the challenge of excreting excess salts while achieving a net retention of water. The intestine has an established role in osmoregulation, and its ability to effectively absorb fluid is crucial to compensating for water losses to the hyperosmotic environment. Despite this, the potential for the teleost intestine to serve as a comparative model for detailed, integrative experimental studies on epithelial water transport has so far gone largely untapped. The following review aims to present an assessment of the teleost intestine as a fluid-transporting epithelium. Beginning with a brief overview of marine teleost osmoregulation, emphasis shifts to the processing of ingested seawater by the gastrointestinal tract and the characteristics of intestinal ion and fluid transport. Particular attention is given to acid-base transfers by the intestine, specifically bicarbonate secretion, which creates the distinctly alkaline gut fluids responsible for the formation of solid calcium carbonate precipitates. The respective contributions of these unique features to intestinal fluid absorption, alongside other recognised ion transport processes, are then subsequently considered within the wider context of the classic physiological problem of epithelial water transport.

  20. Gastrointestinal Epithelial Organoid Cultures from Postsurgical Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Soojung; Yoo, Jongman

    2017-08-17

    An organoid is a cellular structure three-dimensionally (3D) cultured from self-organizing stem cells in vitro, which has a cell population, architectures, and organ specific functions like the originating organs. Recent advances in the 3D culture of isolated intestinal crypts or gastric glands have enabled the generation of human gastrointestinal epithelial organoids. Gastrointestinal organoids recapitulate the human in vivo physiology because of all the intestinal epithelial cell types that differentiated and proliferated from tissue resident stem cells. Thus far, gastrointestinal organoids have been extensively used for generating gastrointestinal disease models. This protocol describes the method of isolating a gland or crypt using stomach or colon tissue after surgery and establishing them into gastroids or colonoids.

  1. Steroid hormones as regulators of the proliferative activity of normal and neoplastic intestinal epithelial cells (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1988-01-01

    Glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors are present in normal epithelial cells of both the small and large intestine and there have also been contentious reports of androgen, oestrogen and progesterone receptors in the epithelium of the normal large intestine. The majority of reports suggest that stimulation of the intestinal glucocorticoid receptors results in increased proliferation of epithelial cells in the small bowel, as does stimulation of androgen receptors and possibly mineralocorticoid receptors. The proliferative response of the normal intestine to oestrogens is difficult to evaluate and that to progestigens appears not to have been reported. Epidemiological studies reveal a higher incidence of bowel cancer in premenopausal women than in men of the same age and yet there is a lower incidence of these tumors in women of higher parity. These findings have been atributted to a variety of non-epithelial gender characteristic such as differences in bile metabolism, colonic bacterial and fecal transit times. In experimental animals, androgens have also been shown to influence carcinogenesis and this could well be attributed to changes in food intake etc. However, many studies have now revealed steroid hormone receptors on colorectal tumor cells and thus a direct effect of the steroid hormones on the epithelium during and after malignant transformation must now be considered.

  2. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4{sup +} intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru, E-mail: atotuka@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4{sup +} IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4{sup +} IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4{sup +} IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} LPLs and primed splenic CD4{sup +} T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4{sup +} IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo.

  3. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4 + IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4 + IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4 + IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4 + IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4 + LPLs and primed splenic CD4 + T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4 + IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo

  4. Loss of Sonic hedgehog leads to alterations in intestinal secretory cell maturation and autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Gagné-Sansfaçon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intestinal epithelial cells express the Sonic and Indian hedgehog ligands. Despite the strong interest in gut hedgehog signaling in GI diseases, no studies have specifically addressed the singular role of intestinal epithelial cell Sonic hedgehog signaling. The aim of this study was to investigate the specific role of Sonic hedgehog in adult ileal epithelial homeostasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A Sonic hedgehog intestinal epithelial conditional knockout mouse model was generated. Assessment of ileal histological abnormalities, crypt epithelial cell proliferation, epithelial cell fate, junctional proteins, signaling pathways, as well as ultrastructural analysis of intracellular organelles were performed in control and mutant mice. Mice lacking intestinal epithelial Sonic Hedgehog displayed decreased ileal crypt/villus length, decreased crypt proliferation as well as a decrease in the number of ileal mucin-secreting goblet cells and antimicrobial peptide-secreting Paneth cells during adult life. These secretory cells also exhibited disruption of their secretory products in mutant mice. Ultrastructural microscopy analysis revealed a dilated ER lumen in secretory cells. This phenotype was also associated with a decrease in autophagy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether, these findings indicate that the loss of Sonic hedgehog can lead to ileal secretory cell modifications indicative of endoplasmic reticulum stress, accompanied by a significant reduction in autophagy.

  5. Effect of Psychoneural Factors on Intestinal Epithelial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Cecilia Berin

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress has been associated with abnormal gastrointestinal function, including diarrhea and abdominal pain, and stress-associated gastric ulceration has frequently been documented. Stress can also exacerbate ongoing pathophysiology and often precedes relapses in patients with inflammatory bowel disease or irritable bowel syndrome. The relatively new field of psychoneuroimmunology is involved with the elucidation of mechanisms that explain the link between the central nervous system and immune-mediated pathophysiology. Recent progress examining the interaction among the nervous system, the immune system and the epithelium of the intestine is discussed, and the evidence for central nervous sysytem control of this interaction is examined.

  6. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pathogenesis: An Update Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoshi Ma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelial cells serve essential roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, which relies on appropriate endoplasmic reticulum (ER function for proper protein folding, modification, and secretion. Exogenous or endogenous risk factors with an ability to disturb the ER function can impair the intestinal barrier function and activate inflammatory responses in the host. The last decade has witnessed considerable progress in the understanding of the functional role of ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR in the gut homeostasis and its significant contribution to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Herein, we review recent evidence supporting the viewpoint that deregulation of ER stress and UPR signaling in the intestinal epithelium, including the absorptive cells, Paneth cells, goblet cells, and enteroendocrine cells, mediates the action of genetic or environmental factors driving colitis in experimental animals and IBD patients. In addition, we highlight pharmacologic application of chaperones or small molecules that enhance protein folding and modification capacity or improve the function of the ER. These molecules represent potential therapeutic strategies in the prevention or treatment of IBD through restoring ER homeostasis in intestinal epithelial cells.

  7. Establishment of primary bovine intestinal epithelial cell culture and clone method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Kang; Lin, Miao; Liu, Ming-Mei; Sui, Yang-Nan; Zhao, Guo-Qi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish bovine intestinal epithelial cell (BIEC) line and provide a novel clone cell method. Although various strategies of bovine cell culture and clone techniques have been reported, these methods remain not established. Here, we culture successfully primary BIECs and establish a novel clone cell method. Our result showed that BIECs could be successfully cultured and passaged about generation 5. These cellular aggregates and clusters were adherent loosely at day 2 of culture. Cell aggregates and clusters start to proliferate after approximately 4 d. The BIECs showed positive reaction against cytokeratin 18, E-cadherin, and characteristics of epithelial-like morphology. In addition, the fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs), villin, and intestinal peptidase (IP) band were positive in BIECs. Our results suggest that the establishment of culturing and clone BIEC methods will apply to isolate and clone other primary cells. These BIECs could therefore contribute to the study of bovine intestinal nutrient absorption and regulation, immune regulation, and the pathogenesis of the bovine intestinal disease, which will provide intestinal cell model in vitro.

  8. Epithelial Cell Damage Activates Bactericidal/Permeability Increasing-Protein (BPI Expression in Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Balakrishnan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available As the first line of defense against invading pathogen, intestinal epithelium produces various antimicrobial proteins (AMP that help in clearance of pathogen. Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI is a 55 kDa AMP that is expressed in intestinal epithelium. Dysregulation of BPI in intestinal epithelium is associated with various inflammatory diseases like Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative colitis, and Infectious enteritis’s. In this paper, we report a direct correlation between intestinal damage and BPI expression. In Caco-2 cells, we see a significant increase in BPI levels upon membrane damage mediated by S. aureus infection and pore-forming toxins (Streptolysin and Listeriolysin. Cells detect changes in potassium level as a Danger-associated molecular pattern associated with cell damage and induce BPI expression in a p38 dependent manner. These results are further supported by in vivo findings that the BPI expression in murine intestinal epithelium is induced upon infection with bacteria which cause intestinal damage (Salmonella Typhimurium and Shigella flexneri whereas mutants that do not cause intestinal damage (STM ΔfliC and STM ΔinvC did not induce BPI expression. Our results suggest that epithelial damage associated with infection act as a signal to induce BPI expression.

  9. On factors modifying reparative regeneration of epithelial tissue of small intestine in the presence of intestinal syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryavtsev, V.D.

    1980-01-01

    In experiments on Wistar rats irradiated in dosages of 1000 and 1200 rad, the possibility of reparative regeneration of cryptae was demonstrated in the case when ''intestinal death'' was prevented by therapeutic means (kanamycin mixed with Ringer-Lock's solution). Shielding of part of the abdomen and extensive bone marrow region, and transplantation of homologous bone marrow elicit a stimulatory effect on postradiation recovery of small intestine epithelial tissue. When radiation dose increases up to 1400 rad reepithelization of the exposed region occurs only with the protection of 50-60% of the abdomen. The regenerating cryptae do not appear after irradiation of the whole body or whole abdomen though life expectancy of rats increases up to 6-7 days due to the therapeutic cure

  10. Distinct Roles for Intestinal Epithelial Cell-Specific Hdac1 and Hdac2 in the Regulation of Murine Intestinal Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonneaud, Alexis; Turgeon, Naomie; Boudreau, François; Perreault, Nathalie; Rivard, Nathalie; Asselin, Claude

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium responds to and transmits signals from the microbiota and the mucosal immune system to insure intestinal homeostasis. These interactions are in part conveyed by epigenetic modifications, which respond to environmental changes. Protein acetylation is an epigenetic signal regulated by histone deacetylases, including Hdac1 and Hdac2. We have previously shown that villin-Cre-inducible intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific Hdac1 and Hdac2 deletions disturb intestinal homeostasis. To determine the role of Hdac1 and Hdac2 in the regulation of IEC function and the establishment of the dual knockout phenotype, we have generated villin-Cre murine models expressing one Hdac1 allele without Hdac2, or one Hdac2 allele without Hdac1. We have also investigated the effect of short-term deletion of both genes in naphtoflavone-inducible Ah-Cre and tamoxifen-inducible villin-Cre(ER) mice. Mice with one Hdac1 allele displayed normal tissue architecture, but increased sensitivity to DSS-induced colitis. In contrast, mice with one Hdac2 allele displayed intestinal architecture defects, increased proliferation, decreased goblet cell numbers as opposed to Paneth cells, increased immune cell infiltration associated with fibrosis, and increased sensitivity to DSS-induced colitis. In comparison to dual knockout mice, intermediary activation of Notch, mTOR, and Stat3 signaling pathways was observed. While villin-Cre(ER) Hdac1 and Hdac2 deletions led to an impaired epithelium and differentiation defects, Ah-Cre-mediated deletion resulted in blunted proliferation associated with the induction of a DNA damage response. Our results suggest that IEC determination and intestinal homeostasis are highly dependent on Hdac1 and Hdac2 activity levels, and that changes in the IEC acetylome may alter the mucosal environment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Evaluation of preparation methods for MS-based analysis of intestinal epithelial cell proteomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselager, Marianne Overgaard; Codrea, Marius Cosmin; Bendixen, Emøke

    2015-01-01

    analyzed by LC and electrospray QTOF-MS. The methods were evaluated according to efficiency, purity, transmembrane protein recovery, as well as for suitability to large-scale preparations. Our data clearly demonstrate that mucosal shaving is by far the best-suited method for in-depth MS analysis in terms...... are low in abundance, and large amounts of sample is needed for their preparation and for undertaking MS-based analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate three different methods for isolation and preparation of pig intestinal epithelial cells for MS-based analysis of the proteome. Samples were...... of ease and speed of sample preparation, as well as protein recovery. In comparison, more gentle methods where intestinal epithelial cells are harvested by shaking are more time consuming, result in lower protein yield, and are prone to increased technical variation due to multiple steps involved....

  12. Bile acid receptor TGR5 overexpression is associated with decreased intestinal mucosal injury and epithelial cell proliferation in obstructive jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chen-Guang; Xie, Xiao-Li; Yin, Jie; Qi, Wei; Chen, Lei; Bai, Yun; Wang, Na; Zhao, Dong-Qiang; Jiang, Xiao-Yu; Jiang, Hui-Qing

    2017-04-01

    Bile acids stimulate intestinal epithelial proliferation in vitro. We sought to investigate the role of the bile acid receptor TGR5 in the protection of intestinal epithelial proliferation in obstructive jaundice. Intestinal tissues and serum samples were obtained from patients with malignant obstructive jaundice and from bile duct ligation (BDL) rats. Intestinal permeability and morphological changes in the intestinal mucosa were observed. The functions of TGR5 in cell proliferation in intestinal epithelial injury were determined by overexpression or knockdown studies in Caco-2 and FHs 74 Int cells pretreated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Internal biliary drainage was superior to external biliary drainage in recovering intestinal permeability and mucosal histology in patients with obstructive jaundice. In BDL rats, feeding of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) decreased intestinal mucosa injury. The levels of PCNA, a marker of proliferation, increased in response to CDCA feeding and were paralleled by elevated TGR5 expression. CDCA upregulated TGR5 expression and promoted proliferation in Caco-2 and FHs 74 Int cells pretreated with LPS. Overexpression of TGR5 resulted in increased PCNA, cell viability, EdU incorporation, and the proportion of cells in S phase, whereas knockdown of TGR5 had the opposite effect. Our data indicate that bile acids promote intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and decrease mucosal injury by upregulating TGR5 expression in obstructive jaundice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Precision-cut intestinal slices as a culture system to analyze the infection of differentiated intestinal epithelial cells by avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punyadarsaniya, Darsaniya; Winter, Christine; Mork, Ann-Kathrin; Amiri, Mahdi; Naim, Hassan Y; Rautenschlein, Silke; Herrler, Georg

    2015-02-01

    Many viruses infect and replicate in their host via the intestinal tract, e.g. many picornaviruses, several coronaviruses and avian influenza viruses of waterfowl. To analyze infection of enterocytes is a challenging task as culture systems for differentiated intestinal epithelial cells are not readily available and often have a life span that is too short for infection studies. Precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) from chicken embryos were prepared and shown that the epithelial cells lining the lumen of the intestine are viable for up to 4 days. Using lectin staining, it was demonstrated that α2,3-linked sialic acids, the preferred receptor determinants of avian influenza viruses, are present on the apical side of the epithelial cells. Furthermore, the epithelial cells (at the tips) of the villi were shown to be susceptible to infection by an avian influenza virus of the H9N2 subtype. This culture system will be useful to analyze virus infection of intestinal epithelial cells and it should be applicable also to the intestine of other species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Exogenous HIV-1 Nef upsets the IFN-γ-induced impairment of human intestinal epithelial integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giovanna Quaranta

    Full Text Available The mucosal tissues play a central role in the transmission of HIV-1 infection as well as in the pathogenesis of AIDS. Despite several clinical studies reported intestinal dysfunction during HIV infection, the mechanisms underlying HIV-induced impairments of mucosal epithelial barrier are still unclear. It has been postulated that HIV-1 alters enterocytic function and HIV-1 proteins have been detected in several cell types of the intestinal mucosa. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of the accessory HIV-1 Nef protein on human epithelial cell line.We used unstimulated or IFN-γ-stimulated Caco-2 cells, as a model for homeostatic and inflamed gastrointestinal tracts, respectively. We investigated the effect of exogenous recombinant Nef on monolayer integrity analyzing its uptake, transepithelial electrical resistance, permeability to FITC-dextran and the expression of tight junction proteins. Moreover, we measured the induction of proinflammatory mediators. Exogenous Nef was taken up by Caco-2 cells, increased intestinal epithelial permeability and upset the IFN-γ-induced reduction of transepithelial resistance, interfering with tight junction protein expression. Moreover, Nef inhibited IFN-γ-induced apoptosis and up-regulated TNF-α, IL-6 and MIP-3α production by Caco-2 cells while down-regulated IL-10 production. The simultaneous exposure of Caco-2 cells to Nef and IFN-γ did not affect cytokine secretion respect to untreated cells. Finally, we found that Nef counteracted the IFN-γ induced arachidonic acid cascade.Our findings suggest that exogenous Nef, perturbing the IFN-γ-induced impairment of intestinal epithelial cells, could prolong cell survival, thus allowing for accumulation of viral particles. Our results may improve the understanding of AIDS pathogenesis, supporting the discovery of new therapeutic interventions.

  15. Primary human polarized small intestinal epithelial barriers respond differently to a hazardous and an innocuous protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, A D; Zimmermann, C; Delaney, B; Hurley, B P

    2017-08-01

    An experimental platform employing human derived intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line monolayers grown on permeable Transwell ® filters was previously investigated to differentiate between hazardous and innocuous proteins. This approach was effective at distinguishing these types of proteins and perturbation of monolayer integrity, particularly transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), was the most sensitive indicator. In the current report, in vitro indicators of monolayer integrity, cytotoxicity, and inflammation were evaluated using primary (non-transformed) human polarized small intestinal epithelial barriers cultured on Transwell ® filters to compare effects of a hazardous protein (Clostridium difficile Toxin A [ToxA]) and an innocuous protein (bovine serum albumin [BSA]). ToxA exerted a reproducible decrease on barrier integrity at doses comparable to those producing effects observed from cell line-derived IEC monolayers, with TEER being the most sensitive indicator. In contrast, BSA, tested at concentrations substantially higher than ToxA, did not cause changes in any of the tested variables. These results demonstrate a similarity in response to certain proteins between cell line-derived polarized IEC models and a primary human polarized small intestinal epithelial barrier model, thereby reinforcing the potential usefulness of cell line-derived polarized IECs as a valid experimental platform to differentiate between hazardous and non-hazardous proteins. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. MicroRNA-122a Regulates Zonulin by Targeting EGFR in Intestinal Epithelial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to investigate the role of microRNA (miR-122a in regulating zonulin during the modulation of intestinal barrier. Methods: Zonulin proteins and their target gene expression were analyzed in miR-122a-overexpressing cell lines and in the target gene of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. An mmu-miR-122a intestinal epithelial conditional transgenic (miR-122a-TG mouse model was established to investigate EGFR and zonulin expression. MiR-122a was also detected in the clinical specimens of inflammatory bowel disease. Results: EGFR was identified as a target gene of miR-122a. The expression level of miR-122a was positively correlated with that of zonulin. The expression level of zonulin was significantly increased, whereas the expression level of EGFR was significantly decreased in the miR-122a-TG mice and in the corresponding primary epithelial culture (P < 0.05. These results were consistent with the data of the clinical specimens. Conclusions: miR-122a could be a positive factor of zonulin by targeting EGFR, which increased the intestinal epithelial permeability in vivo and in vitro.

  17. MicroRNA-122a Regulates Zonulin by Targeting EGFR in Intestinal Epithelial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Tian, Yinghai; Jiang, Ping; Jiang, Yanqiong; Li, Chao; Liu, Ting; Zhou, Rujian; Yang, Ning; Zhou, Xinke; Liu, Zhihua

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of microRNA (miR)-122a in regulating zonulin during the modulation of intestinal barrier. Zonulin proteins and their target gene expression were analyzed in miR-122a-overexpressing cell lines and in the target gene of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). An mmu-miR-122a intestinal epithelial conditional transgenic (miR-122a-TG) mouse model was established to investigate EGFR and zonulin expression. MiR-122a was also detected in the clinical specimens of inflammatory bowel disease. EGFR was identified as a target gene of miR-122a. The expression level of miR-122a was positively correlated with that of zonulin. The expression level of zonulin was significantly increased, whereas the expression level of EGFR was significantly decreased in the miR-122a-TG mice and in the corresponding primary epithelial culture (P zonulin by targeting EGFR, which increased the intestinal epithelial permeability in vivo and in vitro. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Giardia duodenalis Surface Cysteine Proteases Induce Cleavage of the Intestinal Epithelial Cytoskeletal Protein Villin via Myosin Light Chain Kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Bhargava

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis infections are among the most common causes of waterborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. At the height of infection, G. duodenalis trophozoites induce multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells that contribute to the development of diarrhoeal disease. To date, our understanding of pathophysiological processes in giardiasis remains incompletely understood. The present study reveals a previously unappreciated role for G. duodenalis cathepsin cysteine proteases in intestinal epithelial pathophysiological processes that occur during giardiasis. Experiments first established that Giardia trophozoites indeed produce cathepsin B and L in strain-dependent fashion. Co-incubation of G. duodenalis with human enterocytes enhanced cathepsin production by Assemblage A (NF and S2 isolates trophozoites, but not when epithelial cells were exposed to Assemblage B (GSM isolate trophozoites. Direct contact between G. duodenalis parasites and human intestinal epithelial monolayers resulted in the degradation and redistribution of the intestinal epithelial cytoskeletal protein villin; these effects were abolished when parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases were inhibited. Interestingly, inhibition of parasite proteases did not prevent degradation of the intestinal tight junction-associated protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1, suggesting that G. duodenalis induces multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells. Finally, this study demonstrates that G. duodenalis-mediated disruption of villin is, at least, in part dependent on activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK. Taken together, this study indicates a novel role for parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases in the pathophysiology of G. duodenalis infections.

  19. Lentiviral-Mediated Transgene Expression Can Potentiate Intestinal Mesenchymal-Epithelial Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohn Aimee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesenchymal-epithelial signaling is essential for the development of many organs and is often disrupted in disease. In this study, we demonstrate the use of lentiviral-mediated transgene delivery as an effective approach for ectopic transgene expression and an alternative to generation of transgenic animals. One benefit to this approach is that it can be used independently or in conjunction with established transgenic or knockout animals for studying modulation of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions. To display the power of this approach, we explored ectopic expression of a Wnt ligand in the mouse intestinal mesenchyme and demonstrate its functional influence on the adjacent epithelium. Our findings highlight the efficient use of lentiviral-mediated transgene expression for modulating mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in vivo.

  20. Lentiviral-Mediated Transgene Expression Can Potentiate Intestinal Mesenchymal-Epithelial Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dismuke Adria D

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesenchymal-epithelial signaling is essential for the development of many organs and is often disrupted in disease. In this study, we demonstrate the use of lentiviral-mediated transgene delivery as an effective approach for ectopic transgene expression and an alternative to generation of transgenic animals. One benefit to this approach is that it can be used independently or in conjunction with established transgenic or knockout animals for studying modulation of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions. To display the power of this approach, we explored ectopic expression of a Wnt ligand in the mouse intestinal mesenchyme and demonstrate its functional influence on the adjacent epithelium. Our findings highlight the efficient use of lentiviral-mediated transgene expression for modulating mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in vivo.

  1. Curcumin Anti-Apoptotic Action in a Model of Intestinal Epithelial Inflammatory Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganes, Claudia; Lega, Sara; Bramuzzo, Matteo; Vecchi Brumatti, Liza; Piscianz, Elisa; Valencic, Erica; Tommasini, Alberto; Marcuzzi, Annalisa

    2017-06-06

    The purpose of this study is to determine if a preventive treatment with curcumin can protect intestinal epithelial cells from inflammatory damage induced by IFNγ. To achieve this goal we have used a human intestinal epithelial cell line (HT29) treated with IFNγ to undergo apoptotic changes that can reproduce the damage of intestinal epithelia exposed to inflammatory cytokines. In this model, we measured the effect of curcumin (curcuminoid from Curcuma Longa ) added as a pre-treatment at different time intervals before stimulation with IFNγ. Curcumin administration to HT29 culture before the inflammatory stimulus IFNγ reduced the cell apoptosis rate. This effect gradually declined with the reduction of the curcumin pre-incubation time. This anti-apoptotic action by curcumin pre-treatment was paralleled by a reduction of secreted IL7 in the HT29 culture media, while there was no relevant change in the other cytokine levels. Even though curcumin pre-administration did not impact the activation of the NF-κB pathway, a slight effect on the phosphorylation of proteins in this inflammatory signaling pathway was observed. In conclusion, curcumin pre-treatment can protect intestinal cells from inflammatory damage. These results can be the basis for studying the preventive role of curcumin in inflammatory bowel diseases.

  2. ER Stress Causes Rapid Loss of Intestinal Epithelial Stemness through Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarom Heijmans

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells generate rapidly dividing transit-amplifying cells that have lost the capacity for self-renewal but cycle for a number of times until they exit the cell cycle and undergo terminal differentiation. We know very little of the type of signals that trigger the earliest steps of stem cell differentiation and mediate a stem cell to transit-amplifying cell transition. We show that in normal intestinal epithelium, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and activity of the unfolded protein response (UPR are induced at the transition from stem cell to transit-amplifying cell. Induction of ER stress causes loss of stemness in a Perk-eIF2α-dependent manner. Inhibition of Perk-eIF2α signaling results in stem cell accumulation in organoid culture of primary intestinal epithelium. Our findings show that the UPR plays an important role in the regulation of intestinal epithelial stem cell differentiation.

  3. The influence of androgens, anti-androgens, and castration on cell proliferation in the jejunal and colonic crypt epithelia, and in dimethylhydrazine-induced adenocarcinoma of rat colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1982-01-01

    Androgenic hormones have previously been shown to promote cell proliferation in the small intestine of rat and androgen receptors have been demonstrated in carcinomata of the large intestine of rat. In this study the influence of testosterone and of castration on epithelial cell proliferation in the small intestine, the large intestine and in dimethylhydrazine-induced colonic tumours is compared. Cell proliferation in the small intestine and in colonic tumours was accelerated by testosterone treatment, and cell proliferation in colonic tumours, but not in the small intestine, was retarded following castration. Cell proliferation in colonic tumours was also inhibited by the anti-androgenic drug, Flutamide. Testosterone and castration each failed to influence cell proliferation in the colonic crypt epithelium of both normal and carcinogen-treated animals.

  4. Influence of adhesion and bacteriocin production by Lactobacillus salivarius on the intestinal epithelial cell transcriptional response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, John; Buttó, Ludovica F; MacSharry, John; Nally, Kenneth; O'Toole, Paul W

    2012-08-01

    Lactobacillus salivarius strain UCC118 is a human intestinal isolate that has been extensively studied for its potential probiotic effects in human and animal models. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of L. salivarius UCC118 on gene expression responses in the Caco-2 cell line to improve understanding of how the strain might modulate intestinal epithelial cell phenotypes. Exposure of Caco-2 cells to UCC118 led to the induction of several human genes (TNFAIP3, NFKBIA, and BIRC3) that are negative regulators of inflammatory signaling pathways. Induction of chemokines (CCL20, CXCL-1, and CXCL-2) with antimicrobial functions was also observed. Disruption of the UCC118 sortase gene srtA causes reduced bacterial adhesion to epithelial cells. Transcription of three mucin genes was reduced significantly when Caco-2 cells were stimulated with the ΔsrtA derivative of UCC118 compared to cells stimulated with the wild type, but there was no significant change in the transcription levels of the anti-inflammatory genes. UCC118 genes that were significantly upregulated upon exposure to Caco-2 cells were identified by bacterial genome microarray and consisted primarily of two groups of genes connected with purine metabolism and the operon for synthesis of the Abp118 bacteriocin. Following incubation with Caco-2 cells, the bacteriocin synthesis genes were transcribed at higher levels in the wild type than in the ΔsrtA derivative. These data indicate that L. salivarius UCC118 influences epithelial cells both through modulation of the inflammatory response and by modulation of intestinal cell mucin production. Sortase-anchored cell surface proteins of L. salivarius UCC118 have a central role in promoting the interaction between the bacterium and epithelial cells.

  5. Impaired Growth of Small Intestinal Epithelium by Adrenalectomy in Weaning Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Tohru; Minai, Yuji; Haga, Minoru

    2008-01-01

    Functional maturation of the small intestine occurs during the weaning period in rats. It is known that this development is facilitated by glucocorticoid. However, the effect of glucocorticoid on morphological development of small intestine has yet to be clarified. The present study evaluated the morphological development and cell proliferation of the small intestine in adrenalectomized (ADX) rat pups. To further understand the mechanism of glucocorticoid effects on intestinal development, we examined the localization of the glucocorticoid receptor in the small intestine. Microscopic analysis showed that growth of villi and crypts is age-dependent, and is significantly attenuated in ADX rats compared with sham-operated rats. BrdU-positive cells, i.e. proliferating cells, were primarily observed in crypt compartments and rapidly increased in number during the early weaning period. The increase in BrdU-positive cells could be attenuated by adrenalectomy. The morphological development of small intestine may be associated with increased proliferation of epithelial cells. On the other hand, glucocorticoid receptors were found in epithelial cells of the mid- and lower villi and not in crypts where BrdU-positive cells were localized. These results indicate that the growth of small intestine is attenuated by adrenalectomy, and that glucocorticoid indirectly acts on proliferation of epithelial cells during the weaning period

  6. Deoxynivalenol affects in vitro intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity through inhibition of protein synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van De Walle, Jacqueline; Sergent, Therese; Piront, Neil; Toussaint, Olivier; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Larondelle, Yvan

    2010-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common mycotoxin contaminants of raw and processed cereal food, adversely affects the gastrointestinal tract. Since DON acts as a protein synthesis inhibitor, the constantly renewing intestinal epithelium could be particularly sensitive to DON. We analyzed the toxicological effects of DON on intestinal epithelial protein synthesis and barrier integrity. Differentiated Caco-2 cells, as a widely used model of the human intestinal barrier, were exposed to realistic intestinal concentrations of DON (50, 500 and 5000 ng/ml) during 24 h. DON caused a concentration-dependent decrease in total protein content associated with a reduction in the incorporation of [ 3 H]-leucine, demonstrating its inhibitory effect on protein synthesis. DON simultaneously increased the paracellular permeability of the monolayer as reflected through a decreased transepithelial electrical resistance associated with an increased paracellular flux of the tracer [ 3 H]-mannitol. A concentration-dependent reduction in the expression level of the tight junction constituent claudin-4 was demonstrated by Western blot, which was not due to diminished transcription, increased degradation, or NF-κB, ERK or JNK activation, and was also observed for a tight junction independent protein, i.e. intestinal alkaline phosphatase. These results demonstrate a dual toxicological effect of DON on differentiated Caco-2 cells consisting in an inhibition of protein synthesis as well as an increase in monolayer permeability, and moreover suggest a possible link between them through diminished synthesis of the tight junction constituent claudin-4.

  7. A Refined Culture System for Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Intestinal Epithelial Organoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Takahashi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gut epithelial organoids are routinely used to investigate intestinal biology; however, current culture methods are not amenable to genetic manipulation, and it is difficult to generate sufficient numbers for high-throughput studies. Here, we present an improved culture system of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived intestinal organoids involving four methodological advances. (1 We adopted a lentiviral vector to readily establish and optimize conditioned medium for human intestinal organoid culture. (2 We obtained intestinal organoids from human iPSCs more efficiently by supplementing WNT3A and fibroblast growth factor 2 to induce differentiation into definitive endoderm. (3 Using 2D culture, followed by re-establishment of organoids, we achieved an efficient transduction of exogenous genes in organoids. (4 We investigated suspension organoid culture without scaffolds for easier harvesting and assays. These techniques enable us to develop, maintain, and expand intestinal organoids readily and quickly at low cost, facilitating high-throughput screening of pathogenic factors and candidate treatments for gastrointestinal diseases.

  8. Long-term expansion of epithelial organoids from human colon, adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and Barrett's epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toshiro; Stange, Daniel E; Ferrante, Marc; Vries, Robert G J; Van Es, Johan H; Van den Brink, Stieneke; Van Houdt, Winan J; Pronk, Apollo; Van Gorp, Joost; Siersema, Peter D; Clevers, Hans

    2011-11-01

    We previously established long-term culture conditions under which single crypts or stem cells derived from mouse small intestine expand over long periods. The expanding crypts undergo multiple crypt fission events, simultaneously generating villus-like epithelial domains that contain all differentiated types of cells. We have adapted the culture conditions to grow similar epithelial organoids from mouse colon and human small intestine and colon. Based on the mouse small intestinal culture system, we optimized the mouse and human colon culture systems. Addition of Wnt3A to the combination of growth factors applied to mouse colon crypts allowed them to expand indefinitely. Addition of nicotinamide, along with a small molecule inhibitor of Alk and an inhibitor of p38, were required for long-term culture of human small intestine and colon tissues. The culture system also allowed growth of mouse Apc-deficient adenomas, human colorectal cancer cells, and human metaplastic epithelia from regions of Barrett's esophagus. We developed a technology that can be used to study infected, inflammatory, or neoplastic tissues from the human gastrointestinal tract. These tools might have applications in regenerative biology through ex vivo expansion of the intestinal epithelia. Studies of these cultures indicate that there is no inherent restriction in the replicative potential of adult stem cells (or a Hayflick limit) ex vivo. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanisms of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia-induced intestinal epithelial apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Erin E; Jung, Enjae; Breed, Elise; Dominguez, Jessica A; Liang, Zhe; Clark, Andrew T; Dunne, W Michael; Burd, Eileen M; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2012-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia-induced sepsis is a common cause of morbidity in the intensive care unit. Although pneumonia is initiated in the lungs, extrapulmonary manifestations occur commonly. In light of the key role the intestine plays in the pathophysiology of sepsis, we sought to determine whether MRSA pneumonia induces intestinal injury. FVB/N mice were subjected to MRSA or sham pneumonia and killed 24 h later. Septic animals had a marked increase in intestinal epithelial apoptosis by both hematoxylin-eosin and active caspase 3 staining. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus-induced intestinal apoptosis was associated with an increase in the expression of the proapoptotic proteins Bid and Bax and the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL in the mitochondrial pathway. In the receptor-mediated pathway, MRSA pneumonia induced an increase in Fas ligand but decreased protein levels of Fas, FADD, pFADD, TNF-R1, and TRADD. To assess the functional significance of these changes, MRSA pneumonia was induced in mice with genetic manipulations in proteins in either the mitochondrial or receptor-mediated pathways. Both Bid-/- mice and animals with intestine-specific overexpression of Bcl-2 had decreased intestinal apoptosis compared with wild-type animals. In contrast, Fas ligand-/- mice had no alterations in apoptosis. To determine if these findings were organism-specific, similar experiments were performed in mice subjected to Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced gut apoptosis, but unlike MRSA, this was associated with increased Bcl-2 and TNF-R1 and decreased Fas. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus pneumonia thus induces organism-specific changes in intestinal apoptosis via changes in both the mitochondrial and receptor-mediated pathways, although the former may be more functionally significant.

  10. Disruption of the epithelial barrier during intestinal inflammation: Quest for new molecules and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Susana; Ivanov, Andrei I

    2017-07-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms a key protective barrier that separates internal organs from the harmful environment of the gut lumen. Increased permeability of the gut barrier is a common manifestation of different inflammatory disorders contributing to the severity of disease. Barrier permeability is controlled by epithelial adherens junctions and tight junctions. Junctional assembly and integrity depend on fundamental homeostatic processes such as cell differentiation, rearrangements of the cytoskeleton, and vesicle trafficking. Alterations of intestinal epithelial homeostasis during mucosal inflammation may impair structure and remodeling of apical junctions, resulting in increased permeability of the gut barrier. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of how altered epithelial homeostasis affects the structure and function of adherens junctions and tight junctions in the inflamed gut. Specifically, we focus on the transcription reprogramming of the cell, alterations in the actin cytoskeleton, and junctional endocytosis and exocytosis. We pay special attention to knockout mouse model studies and discuss the relevance of these mechanisms to human gastrointestinal disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Lactobacillus reuteri glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase functions in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Ming; Wang, Hai-Feng; Gao, Kan; Wang, Cong; Liu, Li; Liu, Jian-Xin

    2015-05-01

    This study was aimed to identify key surface proteins mediating the adhesion of lactobacilli to intestinal epithelial cells. By using Caco-2 and IPEC-J2 cells labeled with sulfo-NHS-biotin in the western blotting, a protein band of an approximately 37 kDa was detected on the surface layer of Lactobacillus reuteri strains ZJ616, ZJ617, ZJ621, and ZJ623 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Mass spectrometry analysis using the adhesion-related protein from L. reuteri ZJ617 showed that it was 100% homologous to the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) of L. reuteri JCM 1112 (GenBank: YP_001841377). The ability of L. reuteri ZJ617 to adhere to epithelial cells decreased significantly by treatment with LiCl or by blocking with an anti-GAPDH antibody, in comparison with the untreated strain (p reuteri ZJ617. The results indicated that the GAPDH protein of L. reuteri ZJ617 acts as an adhesion component that plays an important role in binding to the intestinal epithelial cells.

  12. Protective effect of NSA on intestinal epithelial cells in a necroptosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wei; Zhang, Min; Zhu, Yaxi; Chen, Yuanhan; Zhao, Xingchen; Li, Ruizhao; Zhang, Li; Ye, Zhiming; Liang, Xingling

    2017-10-17

    This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of the necroptosis inhibitor necrosulfonamide (NSA) on intestinal epithelial cells using a novel in vitro necroptosis model that mimics inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) was perfused into the rectum of BALB/c mice to established a colitis model. Pathologic injury and cell death were evaluated. A novel in vitro model of necroptosis was established in Caco-2 cells using TNF- α and Z-VAD-fmk, and the cells were treated with or without NSA. Morphologic changes, manner of cell death and the levels of phosphorylation of receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (p-RIPK3) and mixed-lineage kinase domain-like (p-MLKL) were detected. In the TNBS-induced colitis in mice, TUNEL-positive and caspase-3-negative cells were observed in the intestinal mucosa, and p-RIPK3 was found to be elevated. Under the stimulation of TNF- α and Z-VAD-fmk, the morphologic damage in the Caco-2 cells was aggravated, the proportion of necrosis was increased, and the level of p-RIPK3 and p-MLKL were increased, confirming that the regulated cell death was necroptosis. NSA reversed the morphological abnormalities and reduced necrotic cell death induced by TNF- α and Z-VAD-fmk. NSA can inhibit necroptosis in intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and might confer a potential protective effect against IBD.

  13. Scanning electron microscopy of mouse intestinal mucosa after cobalt 60 and D-T neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlet, R.; Carr, K.R.; Toner, P.G.; Nias, A.H.W.

    1976-01-01

    The stem-cell population of the intestinal crypt is an important model system in experimental radiobiology. Standardized techniques have been developed to allow quantitation of the response of crypt cells to radiation injury following doses of 0 to 2 krad of D-T neutrons or 60 Co γ rays. These techniques rely on the identification of regenerating crypt cells three-and-a-half days after irradiation. The results were expressed as the number of regenerating crypts per circumference of small intestine, as determined by conventional histological examination; the more profound the injury, the smaller the the crypt count. The practical relevance of crypt-counting techniques to clinical radiotherapy is limited by their relative insensitivity; the dose levels commonly used in fractionated radiotherapy produced no detectable response. Scanning electron microscopy of the mucosal surface provided a more sensitive measure of radiation injury. The earliest detectable changes occurred at the level of 300 rad of γ radiation, well below the threshold of the crypt-counting technique. At around 1,000 rad, where the first drop in crypt counts occurred, there were well-marked morphological changes which became more severe with increasing dose levels. Some differences have been observed between the morphological effects of γ and neutron irradiation at points of radiobiological equivalence in terms of crypt counts (using RBE value of about 2). The changes observed may reflect more than the disruption of epithelial cell kinetics. Mucosal morphology is the total expression of many different biological parameters of which the regenerative ability of the crypt cells is only one. The surface microanatomy of the gut may be the most sensitive indicator of radiation injury which is conveniently available for study. (author)

  14. Scanning electron microscopy of mouse intestinal mucosa after cobalt 60 and D-T neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, R [Belvidere Hospital, Glasgow (UK). Institute of Radiotherapeutics and Oncology; Carr, K R; Toner, P G; Nias, A H.W.

    1976-07-01

    The stem-cell population of the intestinal crypt is an important model system in experimental radiobiology. Standardized techniques have been developed to allow quantitation of the response of crypt cells to radiation injury following doses of 0 to 2 krad of D-T neutrons or /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays. These techniques rely on the identification of regenerating crypt cells three-and-a-half days after irradiation. The results were expressed as the number of regenerating crypts per circumference of small intestine, as determined by conventional histological examination; the more profound the injury, the smaller the the crypt count. The practical relevance of crypt-counting techniques to clinical radiotherapy is limited by their relative insensitivity; the dose levels commonly used in fractionated radiotherapy produced no detectable response. Scanning electron microscopy of the mucosal surface provided a more sensitive measure of radiation injury. The earliest detectable changes occurred at the level of 300 rad of ..gamma.. radiation, well below the threshold of the crypt-counting technique. At around 1,000 rad, where the first drop in crypt counts occurred, there were well-marked morphological changes which became more severe with increasing dose levels. Some differences have been observed between the morphological effects of ..gamma.. and neutron irradiation at points of radiobiological equivalence in terms ofCrypt counts (using RBE value of about 2). The changes observed may reflect more than the disruption of epithelial cell kinetics. Mucosal morphology is the total expression of many different biological parameters of which the regenerative ability of the crypt cells is only one. The surface microanatomy of the gut may be the most sensitive indicator of radiation injury which is conveniently available for study.

  15. GATA4 Regulates Epithelial Cell Proliferation to Control Intestinal Growth and Development in MiceSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget M. Kohlnhofer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: The embryonic small intestinal epithelium is highly proliferative, and although much is known about mechanisms regulating proliferation in the adult intestine, the mechanisms controlling epithelial cell proliferation in the developing intestine are less clear. GATA4, a transcription factor that regulates proliferation in other developing tissues, is first expressed early in the developing gut in midgut endoderm. GATA4 function within midgut endoderm and the early intestinal epithelium is unknown. Methods: By using Sonic Hedgehog Cre to eliminate GATA4 in the midgut endoderm of mouse embryos, we determined the impact of loss of GATA4 on intestinal development, including epithelial cell proliferation, between embryonic day (E9.5 and E18.5. Results: We found that intestinal length and width were decreased in GATA4 mutants compared with controls. GATA4-deficient intestinal epithelium contained fewer cells, and epithelial girth was decreased. We further observed a decreased proportion of proliferating epithelial cells at E10.5 and E11.5 in GATA4 mutants. We showed that GATA4 binds to chromatin containing GATA4 consensus binding sites within cyclin D2 (Ccnd2, cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (Cdk6, and frizzled 5 (Fzd5. Moreover, Ccnd2, Cdk6, and Fzd5 transcripts were reduced at E11.5 in GATA4 mutant tissue. Villus morphogenesis was delayed, and villus structure was abnormal in GATA4 mutant intestine. Conclusions: Our data identify GATA4 as an essential regulator of early intestinal epithelial cell proliferation. We propose that GATA4 controls proliferation in part by directly regulating transcription of cell-cycle mediators. Our data further suggest that GATA4 affects proliferation through transcriptional regulation of Fzd5, perhaps by influencing the response of the epithelium to WNT signaling. Keywords: Transcriptional Regulation, WNT Signaling, Villus Morphogenesis

  16. Primary culture of cat intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and the cDNA library construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gui Hua; Liu, Ye; Cheng, Yun Tang; Zhao, Qing Song; Qiu, Xiao; Xu, Chao; Xiao, Ting; Zhu, Song; Liu, Gong Zhen; Yin, Kun

    2018-06-26

    Felids are the only definitive hosts of Toxoplasma gondii. To lay a foundation for screening the T. gondii-felids interaction factors, we have developed a reproducible primary culture method for cat intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). The primary IECs were isolated from a new born cat's small intestine jejunum region without food ingress, and respectively in vitro cultured by tissue cultivation and combined digestion method with collagenase XI and dispase I, then purified by trypsinization. After identification, the ds cDNA of cat IECs was synthesized for constructing pGADT7 homogenization three-frame plasmid, and transformed into the yeast Y187 for generating the cDNA library. Our results indicated that cultivation of primary cat IECs relays on combined digestion to form polarized and confluent monolayers within 3 days with typical features of normal epithelial cells. The purified cells cultured by digestion method were identified to be nature intestinal epithelial cells using immunohistochemical analysis and were able to maintain viability for at least 15 passages. The homogenizable ds cDNA, which is synthesized from the total RNA extracted from our cultured IECs, distributed among 0.5-2.0 kb, and generated satisfying three-frame cDNA library with the capacity of 1.2 × 106 and the titer of 5.2 × 107 pfu/mL. Our results established an optimal method for the culturing and passage of cat IECs model in vitro, and laid a cDNA library foundation for the subsequent interaction factors screening by yeast two-hybrid.

  17. Identification of multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates that are highly disruptive to the intestinal epithelial barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchenko Olga

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial infections are increasingly recognized worldwide. In this study, we focused on the virulence of multi-drug resistant clinical strains P. aeruginosa against the intestinal epithelial barrier, since P. aeruginosa can cause lethal sepsis from within the intestinal tract of critically ill and immuno-compromised patients via mechanisms involving disruption of epithelial barrier function. Methods We screened consecutively isolated multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa clinical strains for their ability to disrupt the integrity of human cultured intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2 and correlated these finding to related virulence phenotypes such as adhesiveness, motility, biofilm formation, and cytotoxicity. Results Results demonstrated that the majority of the multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa clinical strains were attenuated in their ability to disrupt the barrier function of cultured intestinal epithelial cells. Three distinct genotypes were found that displayed an extreme epithelial barrier-disrupting phenotype. These strains were characterized and found to harbor the exoU gene and to display high swimming motility and adhesiveness. Conclusion These data suggest that detailed phenotypic analysis of the behavior of multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa against the intestinal epithelium has the potential to identify strains most likely to place patients at risk for lethal gut-derived sepsis. Surveillance of colonizing strains of P. aeruginosa in critically ill patients beyond antibiotic sensitivity is warranted.

  18. Synbiotic promotion of epithelial proliferation by orally ingested encapsulated Bifidobacterium breve and raffinose in the small intestine of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Satoshi; Iwama, Ami; Dinoto, Achmad; Suksomcheep, Akarat; Maeta, Kohshi; Kasai, Takanori; Hara, Hiroshi; Yokota, Atsushi

    2009-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of Bifidobacterium breve JCM1192(T )and/or raffinose on epithelial proliferation in the rat small and large intestines. WKAH/Hkm Slc rats (4 wk old) were fed a control diet, a diet supplemented with either encapsulated B. breve (30 g/kg diet, 1.5 x 10(7) colony-forming unit/g capsule) or raffinose (30 g/kg diet), or a diet supplemented with both encapsulated B. breve and raffinose, for 3 wk. Epithelial proliferation in the small intestine, as assessed by bromodeoxyuridine immunohistochemistry, was increased only in the B. breve plus raffinose-fed group. We determined the number of bifidobacteria in cecal contents using fluorescence in situ hybridization and confirmed the presence of ingested B. breve only in the B. breve plus raffinose-fed group. This suggests that the ingested B. breve cells used raffinose and were activated in the small intestine, where they subsequently influenced epithelial proliferation. In conclusion, we found a prominent synbiotic effect of encapsulated B. breve in combination with raffinose on epithelial proliferation in rat small intestine but not in large intestine. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a synbiotic that affects epithelial proliferation.

  19. Intestinal Epithelial Cells Modulate Antigen-Presenting Cell Responses to Bacterial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeau, J. L.; Salim, S. Y.; Albert, E. J.; Hotte, N.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells and antigen-presenting cells orchestrate mucosal innate immunity. This study investigated the role of bacterial DNA in modulating epithelial and bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting cells (BM-APCs) and subsequent T-lymphocyte responses. Murine MODE-K epithelial cells and BM-APCs were treated with DNA from either Bifidobacterium breve or Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin directly and under coculture conditions with CD4+ T cells. Apical stimulation of MODE-K cells with S. Dublin DNA enhanced secretion of cytokines from underlying BM-APCs and induced interleukin-17 (IL-17) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) secretion from CD4+ T cells. Bacterial DNA isolated from either strain induced maturation and increased cytokine secretion from BM-APCs. Conditioned medium from S. Dublin-treated MODE-K cells elicited an increase in cytokine secretion similar to that seen for S. Dublin DNA. Treatment of conditioned medium from MODE-K cells with RNase and protease prevented the S. Dublin-induced increased cytokine secretion. Oral feeding of mice with B. breve DNA resulted in enhanced levels of colonic IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) compared with what was seen for mice treated with S. Dublin DNA. In contrast, feeding mice with S. Dublin DNA increased levels of colonic IL-17 and IL-12p70. T cells from S. Dublin DNA-treated mice secreted high levels of IL-12 and IFN-γ compared to controls and B. breve DNA-treated mice. These results demonstrate that intestinal epithelial cells are able to modulate subsequent antigen-presenting and T-cell responses to bacterial DNA with pathogenic but not commensal bacterial DNA inducing effector CD4+ T lymphocytes. PMID:22615241

  20. Mapping of HNF4alpha target genes in intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Mette; Bressendorff, Simon; Moller, Jette

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The role of HNF4alpha has been extensively studied in hepatocytes and pancreatic beta-cells, and HNF4alpha is also regarded as key regulator of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation as well. The aim of the present work is to identify novel HNF4alpha target genes....... The HNF4alpha ChIP-chip data was matched with gene expression and histone H3 acetylation status of the promoters in order to identify HNF4alpha binding to actively transcribed genes with an open chromatin structure. RESULTS: 1,541 genes were identified as potential HNF4alpha targets, many of which have...

  1. Analysis of interactions of Salmonella type three secretion mutants with 3-D intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L Radtke

    Full Text Available The prevailing paradigm of Salmonella enteropathogenesis based on monolayers asserts that Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 Type Three Secretion System (SPI-1 T3SS is required for bacterial invasion into intestinal epithelium. However, little is known about the role of SPI-1 in mediating gastrointestinal disease in humans. Recently, SPI-1 deficient nontyphoidal Salmonella strains were isolated from infected humans and animals, indicating that SPI-1 is not required to cause enteropathogenesis and demonstrating the need for more in vivo-like models. Here, we utilized a previously characterized 3-D organotypic model of human intestinal epithelium to elucidate the role of all characterized Salmonella enterica T3SSs. Similar to in vivo reports, the Salmonella SPI-1 T3SS was not required to invade 3-D intestinal cells. Additionally, Salmonella strains carrying single (SPI-1 or SPI-2, double (SPI-1/2 and complete T3SS knockout (SPI-1/SPI-2: flhDC also invaded 3-D intestinal cells to wildtype levels. Invasion of wildtype and TTSS mutants was a Salmonella active process, whereas non-invasive bacterial strains, bacterial size beads, and heat-killed Salmonella did not invade 3-D cells. Wildtype and T3SS mutants did not preferentially target different cell types identified within the 3-D intestinal aggregates, including M-cells/M-like cells, enterocytes, or Paneth cells. Moreover, each T3SS was necessary for substantial intracellular bacterial replication within 3-D cells. Collectively, these results indicate that T3SSs are dispensable for Salmonella invasion into highly differentiated 3-D models of human intestinal epithelial cells, but are required for intracellular bacterial growth, paralleling in vivo infection observations and demonstrating the utility of these models in predicting in vivo-like pathogenic mechanisms.

  2. The DNA Sensor AIM2 Maintains Intestinal Homeostasis via Regulation of Epithelial Antimicrobial Host Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuiqing Hu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial pattern molecules in the intestine play immunoregulatory roles via diverse pattern recognition receptors. However, the role of the cytosolic DNA sensor AIM2 in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis is unknown. Here, we show that Aim2−/− mice are highly susceptible to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis that is associated with microbial dysbiosis as represented by higher colonic burden of commensal Escherichia coli. Colonization of germ-free mice with Aim2−/− mouse microbiota leads to higher colitis susceptibility. In-depth investigation of AIM2-mediated host defense responses reveals that caspase-1 activation and IL-1β and IL-18 production are compromised in Aim2−/− mouse colons, consistent with defective inflammasome function. Moreover, IL-18 infusion reduces E. coli burden as well as colitis susceptibility in Aim2−/− mice. Altered microbiota in inflammasome-defective mice correlate with reduced expression of several antimicrobial peptides in intestinal epithelial cells. Together, these findings implicate DNA sensing by AIM2 as a regulatory mechanism for maintaining intestinal homeostasis.

  3. Th17 Cell Induction by Adhesion of Microbes to Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atarashi, Koji; Tanoue, Takeshi; Ando, Minoru; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Nagano, Yuji; Narushima, Seiko; Suda, Wataru; Imaoka, Akemi; Setoyama, Hiromi; Nagamori, Takashi; Ishikawa, Eiji; Shima, Tatsuichiro; Hara, Taeko; Kado, Shoichi; Jinnohara, Toshi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Kondo, Takashi; Toyooka, Kiminori; Watanabe, Eiichiro; Yokoyama, Shin-Ichiro; Tokoro, Shunji; Mori, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Yurika; Morita, Hidetoshi; Ivanov, Ivaylo I; Sugiyama, Tsuyoshi; Nuñez, Gabriel; Camp, J Gray; Hattori, Masahira; Umesaki, Yoshinori; Honda, Kenya

    2015-10-08

    Intestinal Th17 cells are induced and accumulate in response to colonization with a subgroup of intestinal microbes such as segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) and certain extracellular pathogens. Here, we show that adhesion of microbes to intestinal epithelial cells (ECs) is a critical cue for Th17 induction. Upon monocolonization of germ-free mice or rats with SFB indigenous to mice (M-SFB) or rats (R-SFB), M-SFB and R-SFB showed host-specific adhesion to small intestinal ECs, accompanied by host-specific induction of Th17 cells. Citrobacter rodentium and Escherichia coli O157 triggered similar Th17 responses, whereas adhesion-defective mutants of these microbes failed to do so. Moreover, a mixture of 20 bacterial strains, which were selected and isolated from fecal samples of a patient with ulcerative colitis on the basis of their ability to cause a robust induction of Th17 cells in the mouse colon, also exhibited EC-adhesive characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Live Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in an apical anaerobic model of the intestinal epithelial barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulluwishewa, Dulantha; Anderson, Rachel C; Young, Wayne; McNabb, Warren C; van Baarlen, Peter; Moughan, Paul J; Wells, Jerry M; Roy, Nicole C

    2015-02-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, an abundant member of the human commensal microbiota, has been proposed to have a protective role in the intestine. However, it is an obligate anaerobe, difficult to co-culture in viable form with oxygen-requiring intestinal cells. To overcome this limitation, a unique apical anaerobic model of the intestinal barrier, which enabled co-culture of live obligate anaerobes with the human intestinal cell line Caco-2, was developed. Caco-2 cells remained viable and maintained an intact barrier for at least 12 h, consistent with gene expression data, which suggested Caco-2 cells had adapted to survive in an oxygen-reduced atmosphere. Live F. prausnitzii cells, but not ultraviolet (UV)-killed F. prausnitzii, increased the permeability of mannitol across the epithelial barrier. Gene expression analysis showed inflammatory mediators to be expressed at lower amounts in Caco-2 cells exposed to live F. prausnitzii than UV-killed F. prausnitzii, This, consistent with previous reports, implies that live F. prausnitzii produces an anti-inflammatory compound in the culture supernatant, demonstrating the value of a physiologically relevant co-culture system that allows obligate anaerobic bacteria to remain viable. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Boswellia serrata Preserves Intestinal Epithelial Barrier from Oxidative and Inflammatory Damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Catanzaro

    Full Text Available Aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants are currently the therapeutic choices in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, however, with limited remission and often serious side effects. Meanwhile complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use is increasing, particularly herbal medicine. Boswellia serrata is a traditional Ayurvedic remedy with anti-inflammatory properties, of interest for its usefulness in IBDs. The mechanism of this pharmacological potential of Boswellia serrata was investigated in colonic epithelial cell monolayers exposed to H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α, chosen as in vitro experimental model of intestinal inflammation. The barrier function was evaluated by the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER and paracellular permeability assay, and by the tight junction proteins (zonula occludens-1, ZO-1 and occludin immunofluorescence. The expression of phosphorylated NF-κB and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation were determined by immunoblot and cytofluorimetric assay, respectively. Boswellia serrata oleo-gum extract (BSE and its pure derivative acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA, were tested at 0.1-10 μg/ml and 0.027 μg/ml, respectively. BSE and AKBA safety was demonstrated by no alteration of intestinal cell viability and barrier function and integrity biomarkers. H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α treatment of Caco-2 cell monolayers significantly reduced TEER, increased paracellular permeability and caused the disassembly of tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1. BSE and AKBA pretreatment significantly prevented functional and morphological alterations and also the NF-κB phosphorylation induced by the inflammatory stimuli. At the same concentrations BSE and AKBA counteracted the increase of ROS caused by H2O2 exposure. Data showed the positive correlation of the antioxidant activity with the mechanism involved in the physiologic maintenance of the integrity and function of the intestinal epithelium. This study

  6. Total intermittent Pringle maneuver during liver resection can induce intestinal epithelial cell damage and endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon A W G Dello

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The intermittent Pringle maneuver (IPM is frequently applied to minimize blood loss during liver transection. Clamping the hepatoduodenal ligament blocks the hepatic inflow, which leads to a non circulating (hepatosplanchnic outflow. Also, IPM blocks the mesenteric venous drainage (as well as the splenic drainage with raising pressure in the microvascular network of the intestinal structures. It is unknown whether the IPM is harmful to the gut. The aim was to investigate intestinal epithelial cell damage reflected by circulating intestinal fatty acid binding protein levels (I-FABP in patients undergoing liver resection with IPM. METHODS: Patients who underwent liver surgery received total IPM (total-IPM or selective IPM (sel-IPM. A selective IPM was performed by selectively clamping the right portal pedicle. Patients without IPM served as controls (no-IPM. Arterial blood samples were taken immediately after incision, ischemia and reperfusion of the liver, transection, 8 hours after start of surgery and on the first post-operative day. RESULTS: 24 patients (13 males were included. 7 patients received cycles of 15 minutes and 5 patients received cycles of 30 minutes of hepatic inflow occlusion. 6 patients received cycles of 15 minutes selective hepatic occlusion and 6 patients underwent surgery without inflow occlusion. Application of total-IPM resulted in a significant increase in I-FABP 8 hours after start of surgery compared to baseline (p<0.005. In the no-IPM group and sel-IPM group no significant increase in I-FABP at any time point compared to baseline was observed. CONCLUSION: Total-IPM in patients undergoing liver resection is associated with a substantial increase in arterial I-FABP, pointing to intestinal epithelial injury during liver surgery. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01099475.

  7. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Couvigny

    Full Text Available The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health.

  8. Mucosal pathobiology and molecular signature of epithelial barrier dysfunction in the small intestine in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Castro, Ana M; Martínez, Cristina; Salvo-Romero, Eloísa; Fortea, Marina; Pardo-Camacho, Cristina; Pérez-Berezo, Teresa; Alonso-Cotoner, Carmen; Santos, Javier; Vicario, María

    2017-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders in developed countries. Its etiology remains unknown; however, a common finding, regardless of IBS subtype, is the presence of altered intestinal barrier. In fact, signaling and location of cell-to-cell adhesion proteins, in connection with increased immune activity, seem abnormal in the intestinal epithelium of IBS patients. Despite that most research is performed on distal segments of the intestine, altered permeability has been reported in both, the small and the large bowel of all IBS subtypes. The small intestine carries out digestion and nutrient absorption and is also the site where the majority of immune responses to luminal antigens takes place. In fact, the upper intestine is more exposed to environmental antigens than the colon and is also a site of symptom generation. Recent studies have revealed small intestinal structural alterations of the epithelial barrier and mucosal immune activation in association with intestinal dysfunction, suggesting the commitment of the intestine as a whole in the pathogenesis of IBS. This review summarizes the most recent findings on mucosal barrier alterations and its relationship to symptoms arising from the small intestine in IBS, including epithelial structural abnormalities, mucosal immune activation, and microbial dysbiosis, further supporting the hypothesis of an organic origin of IBS. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Angiotensin II induces apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells through the AT2 receptor, GATA-6 and the Bax pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Lihua; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Weidong; Liang, Hongyin; Yang, Yang; Yang, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ang II-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cell through AT2 receptor. ► The apoptosis process involves in the Bax/Bcl-2 intrinsic pathway. ► GATA-6 short hairpin RNA reduced Bax expression, but not Bcl-2. ► GATA-6 may play a critical role in apoptosis in response to the Ang II challenge. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II (Ang II) has been shown to play an important role in cell apoptosis. However, the mechanisms of Ang-II-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells are not fully understood. GATA-6 is a zinc finger transcription factor expressed in the colorectal epithelium, which directs cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In the present study we investigated the underlying mechanism of which GATA-6 affects Ang-II induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells. The in vitro intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis model was established by co-culturing Caco-2 cells with Ang II. Pretreatment with Angiotensin type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist, PD123319, significantly reduced the expression of Bax and prevented the Caco-2 cells apoptosis induced by Ang II. In addition, Ang II up-regulated the expression of GATA-6. Interestingly, GATA-6 short hairpin RNA prevented Ang II-induced intestinal epithelial cells apoptosis and reduced the expression of Bax, but not Bcl-2. Taken together, the present study suggests that Angiotensin II promotes apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells through GATA-6 and the Bax pathway in an AT2 receptor-dependent manner.

  10. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Tyrosine Kinase 2 Transduces IL-22 Signals To Protect from Acute Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainzl, Eva; Stockinger, Silvia; Rauch, Isabella; Heider, Susanne; Berry, David; Lassnig, Caroline; Schwab, Clarissa; Rosebrock, Felix; Milinovich, Gabriel; Schlederer, Michaela; Wagner, Michael; Schleper, Christa; Loy, Alexander; Urich, Tim; Kenner, Lukas; Han, Xiaonan; Decker, Thomas; Strobl, Birgit; Müller, Mathias

    2015-11-15

    In the intestinal tract, IL-22 activates STAT3 to promote intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) homeostasis and tissue healing. The mechanism has remained obscure, but we demonstrate that IL-22 acts via tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2), a member of the Jak family. Using a mouse model for colitis, we show that Tyk2 deficiency is associated with an altered composition of the gut microbiota and exacerbates inflammatory bowel disease. Colitic Tyk2(-/-) mice have less p-STAT3 in colon tissue and their IECs proliferate less efficiently. Tyk2-deficient primary IECs show reduced p-STAT3 in response to IL-22 stimulation, and expression of IL-22-STAT3 target genes is reduced in IECs from healthy and colitic Tyk2(-/-) mice. Experiments with conditional Tyk2(-/-) mice reveal that IEC-specific depletion of Tyk2 aggravates colitis. Disease symptoms can be alleviated by administering high doses of rIL-22-Fc, indicating that Tyk2 deficiency can be rescued via the IL-22 receptor complex. The pivotal function of Tyk2 in IL-22-dependent colitis was confirmed in Citrobacter rodentium-induced disease. Thus, Tyk2 protects against acute colitis in part by amplifying inflammation-induced epithelial IL-22 signaling to STAT3. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Lactobacillus protects the integrity of intestinal epithelial barrier damaged by pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua eYu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens invade intestinal mucosal barrier through phagocytosis of antigen presenting cells (dendritic cell, microfold cells, or through the invasion into the intestinal epithelial directly. Some pathogens could damage the cell junction between epithelial cells and use the paracellular pathway as an entrance to invade. Moreover, some Lactobacillus could inhibit the adhesion of the pathogens and protect the integrity of the cell junction and mucosal barrier. This research focused on the potential therapeutic effect of Lactobacillus fructosus (L. fructosus C2 to attenuate ETEC K88 or S. typhimurium SL1344 induced changes to mucosal barrier. The results demonstrated that treatment of polarized Caco-2 cells with L. fructosus C2 reduced the permeation of dextran, and expression of IL-8, p-ERK and p-JNK when cells were infected with pathogenic bacteria. The findings indicated that L. fructosus C2 exerted a protective effect against the damage to the integrity of Caco-2 cells by ETEC or S. typhimurium infection.

  12. Desmoglein 2 regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungewiß, Hanna; Vielmuth, Franziska; Suzuki, Shintaro T; Maiser, Andreas; Harz, Hartmann; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Kugelmann, Daniela; Schlegel, Nicolas; Waschke, Jens

    2017-07-24

    Intestinal epithelial barrier properties are maintained by a junctional complex consisting of tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ) and desmosomes. Desmoglein 2 (Dsg2), an adhesion molecule of desmosomes and the only Dsg isoform expressed in enterocytes, is required for epithelial barrier properties and may contribute to barrier defects in Crohn's disease. Here, we identified extradesmosomal Dsg2 on the surface of polarized enterocytes by Triton extraction, confocal microscopy, SIM and STED. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed Dsg2-specific binding events along the cell border on the surface of enterocytes with a mean unbinding force of around 30pN. Binding events were blocked by an inhibitory antibody targeting Dsg2 which under same conditions activated p38MAPK but did not reduce cell cohesion. In enterocytes deficient for Dsg2, p38MAPK activity was reduced and both barrier integrity and reformation were impaired. Dsc2 rescue did not restore p38MAPK activity indicating that Dsg2 is required. Accordingly, direct activation of p38MAPK in Dsg2-deficient cells enhanced barrier reformation demonstrating that Dsg2-mediated activation of p38MAPK is crucial for barrier function. Collectively, our data show that Dsg2, beside its adhesion function, regulates intestinal barrier function via p38MAPK signalling. This is in contrast to keratinocytes and points towards tissue-specific signalling functions of desmosomal cadherins.

  13. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Regno, Marisanta; Adesso, Simona; Popolo, Ada [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Quaroni, Andrea [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cornell University, Veterinary Research Tower, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853–6401 (United States); Autore, Giuseppina [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Severino, Lorella [Department of Pathology and Animal Health, Division of Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Naples “Federico II”, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Marzocco, Stefania, E-mail: smarzocco@unisa.it [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy)

    2015-06-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern. - Highlights: • Nivalenol induces oxidative stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). • Nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effects in IECs. • Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol trigger antioxidant response IECs. • These results indicate the importance of mycotoxins co-contamination.

  14. Imbalance of gut microbiome and intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction in patients with high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungbum; Goel, Ruby; Kumar, Ashok; Qi, Yanfei; Lobaton, Gil; Hosaka, Koji; Mohammed, Mohammed; Handberg, Eileen M; Richards, Elaine M; Pepine, Carl J; Raizada, Mohan K

    2018-03-30

    Recent evidence indicates a link between gut pathology and microbiome with hypertension (HTN) in animal models. However, whether this association exists in humans is unknown. Thus, our objectives in the present study were to test the hypotheses that high blood pressure (BP) patients have distinct gut microbiomes and that gut-epithelial barrier function markers and microbiome composition could predict systolic BP (SBP). Fecal samples, analyzed by shotgun metagenomics, displayed taxonomic and functional changes, including altered butyrate production between patients with high BP and reference subjects. Significant increases in plasma of intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and augmented gut-targetting proinflammatory T helper 17 (Th17) cells in high BP patients demonstrated increased intestinal inflammation and permeability. Zonulin, a gut epithelial tight junction protein regulator, was markedly elevated, further supporting gut barrier dysfunction in high BP. Zonulin strongly correlated with SBP (R 2 = 0.5301, P <0.0001). Two models predicting SBP were built using stepwise linear regression analysis of microbiome data and circulating markers of gut health, and validated in a separate cohort by prediction of SBP from zonulin in plasma (R 2 = 0.4608, P <0.0001). The mouse model of HTN, chronic angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion, was used to confirm the effects of butyrate and gut barrier function on the cardiovascular system and BP. These results support our conclusion that intestinal barrier dysfunction and microbiome function are linked to HTN in humans. They suggest that manipulation of gut microbiome and its barrier functions could be the new therapeutic and diagnostic avenues for HTN. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  15. Epithelial apoptosis in mechanistically distinct methods of injury in the murine small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Dinesh; Robertson, Charles M; Stromberg, Paul E; Martin, James R.; Dunne, W. Michael; Houchen, Courtney W; Barrett, Terrence A; Ayala, Alfred; Perl, Mario; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2007-01-01

    Gut epithelial apoptosis is involved in the pathophysiology of multiple diseases. This study characterized intestinal apoptosis in three mechanistically distinct injuries with different kinetics of cell death. FVB/N mice were subjected to gamma radiation, Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia or injection of monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody and sacrificed 4, 12, or 24 hours post-injury (n=10/time point). Apoptosis was quantified in the jejunum by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), active caspase-3, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP-mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL), in situ oligoligation reaction (ISOL,) cytokeratin 18, and annexin V staining. Reproducible results were obtained only for H&E, active caspase-3, TUNEL and ISOL, which were quantified and compared against each other for each injury at each time point. Kinetics of injury were different with early apoptosis highest following radiation, late apoptosis highest following anti CD3, and more consistent levels following pneumonia. ISOL was the most consistent stain and was always statistically indistinguishable from at least 2 stains. In contrast, active caspase-3 demonstrated lower levels of apoptosis, while the TUNEL assay had higher levels of apoptosis in the most severely injured intestine regardless of mechanism of injury. H&E was a statistical outlier more commonly than any other stain. This suggests that regardless of mechanism or kinetics of injury, ISOL correlates to other quantification methods of detecting gut epithelial apoptosis more than any other method studied and compares favorably to other commonly accepted techniques of quantifying apoptosis in a large intestinal cross sectional by balancing sensitivity and specificity across a range of times and levels of death. PMID:17357092

  16. Reciprocal Inflammatory Signaling Between Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Adipocytes in the Absence of Immune Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Takahashi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Visceral fat accumulation as observed in Crohn's disease and obesity is linked to chronic gut inflammation, suggesting that accumulation of gut adipocytes can trigger local inflammatory signaling. However, direct interactions between intestinal epithelial cells (IECs and adipocytes have not been investigated, in part because IEC physiology is difficult to replicate in culture. In this study, we originally prepared intact, polarized, and cytokine responsive IEC monolayers from primary or induced pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal organoids by simple and repeatable methods. When these physiological IECs were co-cultured with differentiated adipocytes in Transwell, pro-inflammatory genes were induced in both cell types, suggesting reciprocal inflammatory activation in the absence of immunocompetent cells. These inflammatory responses were blocked by nuclear factor-κB or signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 inhibition and by anti-tumor necrosis factor- or anti-interleukin-6-neutralizing antibodies. Our results highlight the utility of these monolayers for investigating IEC biology. Furthermore, this system recapitulates the intestinal epithelium–mesenteric fat signals that potentially trigger or worsen inflammatory disorders such as Crohn's disease and obesity-related enterocolitis.

  17. Starfruit Leaves as Glucose Absorption Inhibitor in Mice’s Small Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifqi Y Muhammad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Starfruit (Averrhoa carambola leaves contain flavone derivatives that exhibit anti-hyperglycemic effects. This study aims to determine the effect of starfruit leaves in reducing glucose absorption in intestinal epithelial cells of mice. Methods: This study was done by performing perfusion on the small intestines of mice. The mice that were used in this study were divided into four groups. The control group was given glucose solution without infused starfruit leaves whereas, the remaining 3 groups were given 3 mmol (540 mg/dL glucose solution with infused starfruit leaves of varying concentrations; 200, 400, and 600 mg/kg. Samples were collected at 0, 15th, 30th, 45th, and 60th minute. The sample was tested for glucose levels using spectrophotometry. Results: Test of significance showed a significant difference between the control group and the test group with p < 0.05. Conclusions: Starfruit leaves have a reduction effect towards glucose absorption in the small intestines in Wistar strains where the group using 600 mg/kg of infused starfruit leaves have the most significant effect as compared to other groups.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus induces IL-8 expression through its lipoproteins in the human intestinal epithelial cell, Caco-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seok-Seong; Noh, Su Young; Park, Ok-Jin; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause the intestinal inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of S. aureus infection in the intestine. In the present study, we investigated whether S. aureus could stimulate human intestinal epithelial cells triggering inflammation. When the human intestinal epithelial cell-line, Caco-2, and the primary colon cells were stimulated with ethanol-inactivated S. aureus, IL-8 expression was induced in a dose-dependent manner. The inactivated S. aureus preferentially stimulated Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 rather than TLR4. Lipoproteins, lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and peptidoglycan (PGN) are considered as potential TLR2 ligands of S. aureus. Interestingly, S aureus lipoproteins and Pam2CSK4 mimicking Gram-positive bacterial lipoproteins, but not LTA and PGN of S. aureus, significantly induced IL-8 expression in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, lipoprotein-deficient S. aureus mutant strain failed to induce IL-8 production. Collectively, these results suggest that S. aureus stimulates the human intestinal epithelial cells to induce the chemokine IL-8 production through its lipoproteins, potentially contributing the development of intestinal inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Changes of Tight Junction Protein Claudins in Small Intestine and Kidney Tissues of Mice Fed a DDC Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiko, Yukie; Kojima, Takashi; Murata, Masaki; Tsujiwaki, Mitsuhiro; Takeuchi, Masaya; Sawada, Norimasa; Mori, Michio

    2013-12-01

    DDC (3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine)-fed mice are widely used as a model for cholestatic liver disease. We examined the expression of tight junction protein claudin subspecies by immunofluorescent histochemistry in small intestine and kidney tissues of mice fed a DDC diet for 12 weeks. In the small intestine, decreases in claudin-3, claudin-7 and claudin-15 were observed in villous epithelial cells corresponding to the severity of histological changes while leaving the abundance of these claudin subspecies unchanged in crypt cells. Nevertheless, the proliferative activity of intestinal crypt cells measured by immunohistochemistry for Ki-67 decreased in the mice fed the DDC diet compared with that of control mice. These results suggest the possibility that DDC feeding affects the barrier function of villous epithelial cells and thus inhibits the proliferative activity of crypt epithelial cells. On the other hand, in the kidney, remarkable changes were found in the subcellular localization of claudin subspecies in a segment-specific manner, although histological changes of renal epithelial cells were quite minimal. These results indicate that immunohistochemistry for claudin subspecies can serve as a useful tool for detecting minute functional alterations of intestinal and renal epithelial cells.

  20. Crowns and Crypts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 6. Crowns and Crypts - A Fascinating Group of Multidentate Macrocyclic Ligands. Debasis Bandyopadhyay. General Article Volume 6 Issue 6 June 2001 pp 71-79. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Enteral peptide formulas inhibit radiation induced enteritis and apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells and suppress the expression and function of Alzheimer's and cell division control gene products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cope, F.O.; Issinger, O.G.; McArdle, A.H.; Shapiro, J.; Tomei, L.D.

    1991-01-01

    Studies have shown that patients receiving enteral peptide formulas prior to irradiation have a significantly reduced incidence of enteritis and express a profound increase in intestinal cellularity. Two conceptual approaches were taken to describe this response. First was the evaluation in changes in programmed intestinal cell death and secondly the evaluation of a gene product controlling cell division cycling. This study provided a relationship between the ratio of cell death to cell formulations. The results indicate that in the canine and murine models, irradiation induces expression of the Alzheimer's gene in intestinal crypt cells, while the incidence of apoptosis in apical cells is significantly increased. The use of peptide enteral formulations suppresses the expression of the Alzheimer's gene in crypt cells, while apoptosis is eliminated in the apical cells of the intestine. Concomitantly, enteral peptide formulations suppress the function of the CK-II gene product in the basal and baso-lateral cells of the intestine. These data indicate that although the mitotic index is significantly reduced in enterocytes, this phenomenon alone is not sufficient to account for the peptide-induced radio-resistance of the intestine. The data also indicate a significant reduction of normal apoptosis in the upper lateral and apical cells of the intestinal villi. Thus, the ratio of cell death to cell replacement is significantly decreased resulting in an increase in villus height and hypertrophy of the apical villus cells. Thus, peptide solutions should be considered as an adjunct treatment both in radio- and chemotherapy

  2. The proliferative status of intestinal epithelial clonogenic cells: sensitivity to S phase specific cytotoxic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boarder, T A; Blackett, N M

    1976-11-01

    High concentrations of tritiated thymidine and cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) have been used to selectively kill cells in the crypts of Lieberkuhn that are synthesizing DNA. The effect of these agents on the number of regenerating microcolonies seen 3 1/2 days after a range of radiation doses indicates that a majority of the clonogenic cells are proliferating rapidly and that the slowly proliferating cells at the base of the crypt do not represent the whole clonogenic population.

  3. Three-Dimensional Organotypic Co-Culture Model of Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Macrophages to Study "Salmonella Enterica" Colonization Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Mark; Yang, J; Barilla, J.; Crabbe, A.; Sarker, S. F.; Liu, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional/3-D organotypic models of human intestinal epithelium mimic the differentiated form and function of parental tissues often not exhibited by 2-D monolayers and respond to Salmonella in ways that reflect in vivo infections. To further enhance the physiological relevance of 3-D models to more closely approximate in vivo intestinal microenvironments during infection, we developed and validated a novel 3-D intestinal co-culture model containing multiple epithelial cell types and phagocytic macrophages, and applied to study enteric infection by different Salmonella pathovars.

  4. Functional modulation of human intestinal epithelial cell responses by Bifidobacterium infantis and Lactobacillus salivarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Ann M; O'Regan, Padraig; Fanning, Áine; O'Mahony, Caitlin; MacSharry, John; Lyons, Anne; Bienenstock, John; O'Mahony, Liam; Shanahan, Fergus

    2006-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in antigen sampling and the maintenance of gut homeostasis. However, the interaction of commensal bacteria with the intestinal surface remains incompletely understood. Here we investigated immune cell responses to commensal and pathogenic bacteria. HT-29 human IECs were incubated with Bifidobacterium infantis 35624, Lactobacillus salivarius UCC118 or Salmonella typhimurium UK1 for varying times, or were pretreated with a probiotic for 2 hr prior to stimulation with S. typhimurium or flagellin. Gene arrays were used to examine inflammatory gene expression. Nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation, interleukin (IL)-8 secretion, pathogen adherence to IECs, and mucin-3 (MUC3) and E-cadherin gene expression were assayed by TransAM assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), fluorescence, and real-time reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. IL-10 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion by bacteria-treated peripheral blood-derived DCs were measured using ELISA. S. typhimurium increased expression of 36 of the 847 immune-related genes assayed, including NF-κB and IL-8. The commensal bacteria did not alter expression levels of any of the 847 genes. However, B. infantis and L. salivarius attenuated both IL-8 secretion at baseline and S. typhimurium-induced pro-inflammatory responses. B. infantis also limited flagellin-induced IL-8 protein secretion. The commensal bacteria did not increase MUC3 or E-cadherin expression, or interfere with pathogen binding to HT-29 cells, but they did stimulate IL-10 and TNF-α secretion by DCs. The data demonstrate that, although the intestinal epithelium is immunologically quiescent when it encounters B. infantis or L. salivarius, these commensal bacteria exert immunomodulatory effects on intestinal immune cells that mediate host responses to flagellin and enteric pathogens. PMID:16771855

  5. Coating with luminal gut-constituents alters adherence of nanoparticles to intestinal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Sinnecker

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anthropogenic nanoparticles (NPs have found their way into many goods of everyday life. Inhalation, ingestion and skin contact are potential routes for NPs to enter the body. In particular the digestive tract with its huge absorptive surface area provides a prime gateway for NP uptake. Considering that NPs are covered by luminal gut-constituents en route through the gastrointestinal tract, we wanted to know if such modifications have an influence on the interaction between NPs and enterocytes.Results: We investigated the consequences of a treatment with various luminal gut-constituents on the adherence of nanoparticles to intestinal epithelial cells. Carboxylated polystyrene particles 20, 100 and 200 nm in size represented our anthropogenic NPs, and differentiated Caco-2 cells served as model for mature enterocytes of the small intestine. Pretreatment with the proteins BSA and casein consistently reduced the adherence of all NPs to the cultured enterocytes, while incubation of NPs with meat extract had no obvious effect on particle adherence. In contrast, contact with intestinal fluid appeared to increase the particle-cell interaction of 20 and 100 nm NPs.Conclusion: Luminal gut-constituents may both attenuate and augment the adherence of NPs to cell surfaces. These effects appear to be dependent on the particle size as well as on the type of interacting protein. While some proteins will rather passivate particles towards cell attachment, possibly by increasing colloid stability or camouflaging attachment sites, certain components of intestinal fluid are capable to modify particle surfaces in such a way that interactions with cellular surface structures result in an increased binding.

  6. Activated STAT5 Confers Resistance to Intestinal Injury by Increasing Intestinal Stem Cell Proliferation and Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shila Gilbert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal epithelial stem cells (IESCs control the intestinal homeostatic response to inflammation and regeneration. The underlying mechanisms are unclear. Cytokine-STAT5 signaling regulates intestinal epithelial homeostasis and responses to injury. We link STAT5 signaling to IESC replenishment upon injury by depletion or activation of Stat5 transcription factor. We found that depletion of Stat5 led to deregulation of IESC marker expression and decreased LGR5+ IESC proliferation. STAT5-deficient mice exhibited worse intestinal histology and impaired crypt regeneration after γ-irradiation. We generated a transgenic mouse model with inducible expression of constitutively active Stat5. In contrast to Stat5 depletion, activation of STAT5 increased IESC proliferation, accelerated crypt regeneration, and conferred resistance to intestinal injury. Furthermore, ectopic activation of STAT5 in mouse or human stem cells promoted LGR5+ IESC self-renewal. Accordingly, STAT5 promotes IESC proliferation and regeneration to mitigate intestinal inflammation. STAT5 is a functional therapeutic target to improve the IESC regenerative response to gut injury.

  7. Regulation of the epithelial Ca2+ channels in small intestine as studied by quantitative mRNA detection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abel, M. van; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Kemp, J.W.C.M. van der; Leeuwen, J.P.P.M. van; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The epithelial Ca2+ channels TRPV5 and TRPV6 are localized to the brush border membrane of intestinal cells and constitute the postulated rate-limiting entry step of active Ca2+ absorption. The aim of the present study was to investigate the hormonal regulation of these channels. To this end, the

  8. Analysis of the human intestinal epithelial cell transcriptional response to Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus salivarius, Bifidobacterium lactis and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putaala, H; Barrangou, R; Leyer, G J

    2010-01-01

    a comparative analysis of the global in vitro transcriptional response of human intestinal epithelial cells to Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™, Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis 420, and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). Interestingly, L. salivarius Ls-33...

  9. St. John's wort attenuates irinotecan-induced diarrhea via down-regulation of intestinal pro-inflammatory cytokines and inhibition of intestinal epithelial apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Zeping; Yang Xiaoxia; Chan Suiyung; Xu Anlong; Duan Wei; Zhu Yizhun; Sheu, F.-S.; Boelsterli, Urs Alex; Chan, Eli; Zhang Qiang; Wang, J.-C.; Ee, Pui Lai Rachel; Koh, H.L.; Huang Min; Zhou Shufeng

    2006-01-01

    Diarrhea is a common dose-limiting toxicity associated with cancer chemotherapy, in particular for drugs such as irinotecan (CPT-11), 5-fluouracil, oxaliplatin, capecitabine and raltitrexed. St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum, SJW) has anti-inflammatory activity, and our preliminary study in the rat and a pilot study in cancer patients found that treatment of SJW alleviated irinotecan-induced diarrhea. In the present study, we investigated whether SJW modulated various pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukins (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6), interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and intestinal epithelium apoptosis in rats. The rats were treated with irinotecan at 60 mg/kg for 4 days in combination with oral SJW or SJW-free control vehicle at 400 mg/kg for 8 days. Diarrhea, tissue damage, body weight loss, various cytokines including IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IFN-γ and TNF-α and intestinal epithelial apoptosis were monitored over 11 days. Our studies demonstrated that combined SJW markedly reduced CPT-11-induced diarrhea and intestinal lesions. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IFN-γ and TNF-α was significantly up-regulated in intestine. In the mean time, combined SJW significantly suppressed the intestinal epithelial apoptosis induced by CPT-11 over days 5-11. In particular, combination of SJW significantly inhibited the expression of TNF-α mRNA in the intestine over days 5-11. In conclusion, inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines and intestinal epithelium apoptosis partly explained the protective effect of SJW against the intestinal toxicities induced by irinotecan. Further studies are warranted to explore the potential for STW as an agent in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs to lower their dose-limiting toxicities

  10. Intestinal infection with Giardia spp. reduces epithelial barrier function in a myosin light chain kinase-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kevin G-E; Meddings, Jonathon B; Kirk, David R; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Buret, André G

    2002-10-01

    Giardiasis causes malabsorptive diarrhea, and symptoms can be present in the absence of any significant morphologic injury to the intestinal mucosa. The effects of giardiasis on epithelial permeability in vivo remain unknown, and the role of T cells and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in altered intestinal barrier function is unclear. This study was conducted to determine whether Giardia spp. alters intestinal permeability in vivo, to assess whether these abnormalities are dependent on T cells, and to assess the role of MLCK in altered epithelial barrier function. Immunocompetent and isogenic athymic mice were inoculated with axenic Giardia muris trophozoites or sterile vehicle (control), then assessed for trophozoite colonization and gastrointestinal permeability. Mechanistic studies using nontransformed human duodenal epithelial monolayers (SCBN) determined the effects of Giardia on myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, transepithelial fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran fluxes, cytoskeletal F-actin, tight junctional zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), and MLCK. Giardia infection caused a significant increase in small intestinal, but not gastric or colonic, permeability that correlated with trophozoite colonization in both immunocompetent and athymic mice. In vitro, Giardia increased permeability and phosphorylation of MLC and reorganized F-actin and ZO-1. These alterations were abolished with an MLCK inhibitor. Disruption of small intestinal barrier function is T cell independent, disappears on parasite clearance, and correlates with reorganization of cytoskeletal F-actin and tight junctional ZO-1 in an MLCK-dependent fashion.

  11. Reversible effect of dextran sodium sulfate on mucus secreting intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ditte Søvsø Gundelund; Fredborg, Marlene; Andersen, V

    2016-01-01

    provide valuable insight into a possible mechanism for dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)–induced colitis of importance for the design of subsequent in vivo studies. To develop a new in vitro IBD model with DSS-induced inflammation in human mucus-secreting intestinal epithelial cells (HT29-MTX-E12), we first...... differentiated in trans-well inserts and DSS solutions were added for 6 d before measuring integrity by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)–dextran. Then, medium with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) was added and TEER and FITC-dextran permeability...... were measured after 8 d of treatment. A biphasic response in cell viability was observed with increased viability at low doses and decreased viability at high doses of DSS. Viability was decreased to 29% at the highest dose of DSS (10% vol/wt) for 48 h (P Dextran sodium sulfate significantly...

  12. Bacillus subtilis and surfactin inhibit the transmissible gastroenteritis virus from entering the intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Hu, Weiwei; Zhu, Liqi; Yang, Qian

    2017-04-28

    Intestinal epithelial cells are the targets for transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) virus (TGEV) infection. It is urgent to develop a novel candidate against TGEV entry. Bacillus subtilis is a probiotic with excellent anti-microorganism properties and one of its secretions, surfactin, has been regarded as a versatile weapon for most plant pathogens, especially for the enveloped virus. We demonstrate for the first time that B. subtilis OKB105 and its surfactin can effectively inhibit one animal coronavirus, TGEV, entering the intestinal porcine epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2). Then, several different experiments were performed to seek the might mechanisms. The plaque assays showed that surfactant could reduce the plaque generation of TGEV in a dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, after incubation with TGEV for 1.5 h, B. subtilis could attach TGEV particles to their surface so that the number of virus to bind to the host cells was declined. Furthermore, our data showed that the inhibition of B. subtilis was closely related to the competition with TGEV for the viral entry receptors, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and aminopeptidase N (APN) protein. In addition, Western blotting and apoptosis analysis indicated that B. subtilis could enhance the resistance of IPEC-J2 cells by up-regulating the expression of toll-like receptor (TLR)-6 and reducing the percentage of apoptotic cells. Taken together, our results suggest that B. subtilis OKB105 and its surfactin can antagonize TGEV entry in vitro and may serve as promising new candidates for TGEV prevention. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Establishment of feline intestinal epithelial cell cultures for the propagation and study of feline enteric coronaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is the most feared infectious cause of death in cats, induced by feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). This coronavirus is a virulent mutant of the harmless, ubiquitous feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). To date, feline coronavirus (FCoV) research has been hampered by the lack of susceptible cell lines for the propagation of serotype I FCoVs. In this study, long-term feline intestinal epithelial cell cultures were established from primary ileocytes and colonocytes by simian virus 40 (SV40) T-antigen- and human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT)-induced immortalization. Subsequently, these cultures were evaluated for their usability in FCoV research. Firstly, the replication capacity of the serotype II strains WSU 79–1683 and WSU 79–1146 was studied in the continuous cultures as was done for the primary cultures. In accordance with the results obtained in primary cultures, FCoV WSU 79–1683 still replicated significantly more efficient compared to FCoV WSU 79–1146 in both continuous cultures. In addition, the cultures were inoculated with faecal suspensions from healthy cats and with faecal or tissue suspensions from FIP cats. The cultures were susceptible to infection with different serotype I enteric strains and two of these strains were further propagated. No infection was seen in cultures inoculated with FIPV tissue homogenates. In conclusion, a new reliable model for FCoV investigation and growth of enteric field strains was established. In contrast to FIPV strains, FECVs showed a clear tropism for intestinal epithelial cells, giving an explanation for the observation that FECV is the main pathotype circulating among cats. PMID:23964891

  14. Fusion between Intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages in a cancer context results in nuclear reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Anne E; Anderson, Eric C; Davies, Paige S; Silk, Alain D; Pelz, Carl; Impey, Soren; Wong, Melissa H

    2011-02-15

    The most deadly phase in cancer progression is attributed to the inappropriate acquisition of molecular machinery leading to metastatic transformation and spread of disease to distant organs. Although it is appreciated that metastasis involves epithelial-mesenchymal interplay, the underlying mechanism defining this process is poorly understood. Specifically, how cancer cells evade immune surveillance and gain the ability to navigate the circulatory system remains a focus. One possible mechanism underlying metastatic conversion is fusion between blood-derived immune cells and cancer cells. While this notion is a century old, in vivo evidence that cell fusion occurs within tumors and imparts genetic or physiologic changes remains controversial. We have previously demonstrated in vivo cell fusion between blood cells and intestinal epithelial cells in an injury setting. Here, we hypothesize that immune cells, such as macrophages, fuse with tumor cells imparting metastatic capabilities by transferring their cellular identity. We used parabiosis to introduce fluorescent-labeled bone marrow-derived cells to mice with intestinal tumors, finding that fusion between circulating blood-derived cells and tumor epithelium occurs during the natural course of tumorigenesis. Moreover, we identify the macrophage as a key cellular partner for this process. Interestingly, cell fusion hybrids retain a transcriptome identity characteristic of both parental derivatives, while also expressing a unique subset of transcripts. Our data supports the novel possibility that tumorigenic cell fusion may impart physical behavior attributed to migratory macrophages, including navigation of circulation and immune evasion. As such, cell fusion may represent a promising novel mechanism underlying the metastatic conversion of cancer cells. ©2011 AACR.

  15. Sensitization to epithelial antigens in chronic mucosal inflammatory disease. Characterization of human intestinal mucosa-derived mononuclear cells reactive with purified epithelial cell-associated components in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Roche, J K; Fiocchi, C; Youngman, K

    1985-01-01

    To explore the auto-reactive potential of cells infiltrating the gut mucosa in idiopathic chronic inflammatory bowel disease, intestinal lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) were isolated, characterized morphologically and phenotypically, and evaluated for antigen-specific reactivity. The last was assessed by quantitating LPMC cytotoxic capabilities against purified, aqueous-soluble, organ-specific epithelial cell-associated components (ECAC) characterized previously. Enzyme-isolated infla...

  16. Recent Advances in Intestinal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Laura R; Parameswaran, Narayanan

    2017-09-01

    The intestine is a dynamic organ with rapid stem cell division generating epithelial cells that mature and apoptose in 3-5 days. Rapid turnover maintains the epithelial barrier and homeostasis. Current insights on intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and their regulation are discussed here. The Lgr5+ ISCs maintain intestinal homeostasis by dividing asymmetrically, but also divide symmetrically to extinguish or replace ISCs. Following radiation or mucosal injury, reserve BMI1+ ISCs as well as other crypt cells can de-differentiate into Lgr5+ ISCs. ISC niche cells, including Paneth, immune and myofibroblast cells secrete factors that regulate ISC proliferation. Finally, several studies indicate that the microbiome metabolites regulate ISC growth. ISC cells can be plastic and integrate a complexity of environmental/niche cues to trigger or suppress proliferation as needed.

  17. E. coli Nissle 1917 Affects Salmonella adhesion to porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schierack

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN has been shown to interfere in a human in vitro model with the invasion of several bacterial pathogens into epithelial cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of EcN on Salmonella Typhimurium invasion of porcine intestinal epithelial cells, focusing on EcN effects on the various stages of Salmonella infection including intracellular and extracellular Salmonella growth rates, virulence gene regulation, and adhesion. We show that EcN affects the initial Salmonella invasion steps by modulating Salmonella virulence gene regulation and Salmonella SiiE-mediated adhesion, but not extra- and intracellular Salmonella growth. However, the inhibitory activity of EcN against Salmonella invasion always correlated with EcN adhesion capacities. EcN mutants defective in the expression of F1C fimbriae and flagellae were less adherent and less inhibitory toward Salmonella invasion. Another E. coli strain expressing F1C fimbriae was also adherent to IPEC-J2 cells, and was similarly inhibitory against Salmonella invasion like EcN. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that EcN affects Salmonella adhesion through secretory components. This mechanism appears to be common to many E. coli strains, with strong adherence being a prerequisite for an effective reduction of SiiE-mediated Salmonella adhesion.

  18. Osteopontin attenuates acute gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease by preventing apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Kentaro; Minami, Naoki; Matsuura, Minoru; Iida, Tomoya; Toyonaga, Takahiko; Nagaishi, Kanna; Arimura, Yoshiaki; Fujimiya, Mineko; Uede, Toshimitsu; Nakase, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    osteopontin affected intestinal inflammation of GVHD. • Donor cells lacking osteopontin increased apoptotic epithelial cells in GVHD. • Osteopontin plays an anti-inflammatory role in acute gastrointestinal GVHD.

  19. Intestinal epithelial cell surface glycosylation in mice. I. Effect of high-protein diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R; Jaswal, V M; Meenu Mahmood, A

    1992-01-01

    The effects of variation in dietary protein content have been investigated on brush border glycosylation and enzyme activities in mice small intestine. The comparison of different parameters was made between the mice fed 30% (high protein, HP) and 18% protein (pair-fed, PF, and ad libitum-fed) for 21 days. The activities of brush border sucrase, lactase, p-nitrophenyl (PNP)-beta-D-glucosidase and PNP-beta-D-galactosidase were reduced in the HP diet-fed mice compared to PF and ad libitum-fed controls. Alkaline phosphatase and leucine amino-peptidase activities were significantly enhanced while gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity was unaltered under these conditions. Total hexoses and sialic acid content in the brush borders were reduced significantly in the test group compared to the controls while hexosamine and fucose contents remained essentially similar in different groups. The results on the binding of wheat germ agglutinin and Ulex europaeus agglutininI to microvillus membranes corroborated the chemical analysis data on sialic acid and fucose contents of the membranes. Peanut agglutinin binding was enhanced in mice from the HP group. Incorporation of (14C)-mannose into membranes was significantly less in HP diet-fed mice. These results indicate that the feeding of HP diet to mice brings about marked alterations in small intestinal epithelial cell surface glycosylation and enzyme functions.

  20. Processing of whey modulates proliferative and immune functions in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Sangild, Per T; Li, Yanqi; Bering, Stine B; Chatterton, Dereck E W

    2016-02-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is often subjected to heat treatment during industrial processing, resulting in protein denaturation and loss of protein bioactivity. We hypothesized that WPC samples subjected to different degrees of thermal processing are associated with different levels of bioactive proteins and effects on proliferation and immune response in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). The results showed that low-heat-treated WPC had elevated levels of lactoferrin and transforming growth factor-β2 compared with that of standard WPC. The level of aggregates depended on the source of whey, with the lowest level being found in WPC derived from acid whey. Following acid activation, WPC from acid whey enhanced IEC proliferation compared with WPC from sweet whey or nonactivated WPC. Low-heat-treated WPC from acid whey induced greater secretion of IL-8 in IEC than either standard WPC from acid whey or low-heat-treated WPC from sweet whey. Following acid activation (to activate growth factors), low-heat-treated WPC from sweet whey induced higher IL-8 levels in IEC compared with standard WPC from sweet whey. In conclusion, higher levels of bioactive proteins in low-heat-treated WPC, especially from acid whey, may enhance proliferation and cytokine responses of IEC. These considerations could be important to maintain optimal bioactivity of infant formulas, including their maturational and immunological effects on the developing intestine. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Celiac anti-type 2 transglutaminase antibodies induce phosphoproteome modification in intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetana Paolella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is an inflammatory condition of the small intestine that affects genetically predisposed individuals after dietary wheat gliadin ingestion. Type 2-transglutaminase (TG2 activity seems to be responsible for a strong autoimmune response in celiac disease, TG2 being the main autoantigen. Several studies support the concept that celiac anti-TG2 antibodies may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our recent findings on the ability of anti-TG2 antibodies to induce a rapid intracellular mobilization of calcium ions, as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, suggest that they potentially act as signaling molecules. In line with this concept, we have investigated whether anti-TG2 antibodies can induce phosphoproteome modification in an intestinal epithelial cell line. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied phosphoproteome modification in Caco-2 cells treated with recombinant celiac anti-TG2 antibodies. We performed a two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by specific staining of phosphoproteins and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially phosphorylated proteins. Of 14 identified proteins (excluding two uncharacterized proteins, three were hypophosphorylated and nine were hyperphosphorylated. Bioinformatics analyses confirmed the presence of phosphorylation sites in all the identified proteins and highlighted their involvement in several fundamental biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, cell stress response, cytoskeletal organization and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Identification of differentially phosphorylated proteins downstream of TG2-antibody stimulation suggests that in Caco-2 cells these antibodies perturb cell homeostasis by behaving as signaling molecules. We hypothesize that anti-TG2 autoantibodies may destabilize the integrity of the intestinal mucosa in celiac individuals, thus contributing to celiac disease establishment and progression. Since several proteins here

  2. Visualization of probiotic-mediated Ca2+ signaling in intestinal epithelial cells in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Adachi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics, such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB and Bacillus subtilis var. natto, have been shown to modulate immune responses. It is important to understand how probiotic bacteria impact intestinal epithelial cells (IECs, because IECs are the first line of defense at the mucosal surface barrier and their activities substantially affect the gut microenvironment and immunity. However, to date, their precise mechanism remains unknown due to a lack of analytical systems available for live animal models. Recently, we generated a conditional Ca2+ biosensor Yellow Cameleon (YC3.60 transgenic mouse line and established 5D (x, y, z, time, and Ca2+ intravital imaging systems of lymphoid tissues including those in Peyer’s patches and bone marrow. In the present study, we further advance our intravital imaging system for intestinal tracts to visualize IEC responses against orally administrated food compounds in real time. Using this system, heat-killed Bacillus subtilis natto, a probiotic TTCC012 strain, is shown to directly induce Ca2+ signaling in IECs in mice housed under specific pathogen-free conditions. In contrast, this activation is not observed in the Lactococcus lactis strain C60; however, when we generate germ-free YC3.60 mice and observe the LAB stimulation of IECs in the absence of gut microbiota, C60 is capable of inducing Ca2+ signaling. This is the first study to successfully visualize the direct effect of probiotics on IECs in live animals. These data strongly suggest that probiotic strains stimulate IECs under physiological conditions, and that their activity is affected by the microenvironment of the small intestine, such as commensal bacteria.

  3. Long chain poly-unsaturated fatty acids attenuate the IL-1?-induced pro-inflammatory response in human fetal intestinal epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wijendran, Vasuki; Brenna, JT; Wang, Dong Hao; Zhu, Weishu; Meng, Di; Ganguli, Kriston; Kothapalli, Kumar SD; Requena, Pilar; Innis, Sheila; Walker, WA

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that excessive inflammation of the immature intestine may predispose premature infants to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). We investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) in human fetal and adult intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) in primary culture. Methods Human fetal IEC in culture were derived from a healthy fetal small intestine (H4) or resected small intestine of a neonate wit...

  4. Bioengineered Systems and Designer Matrices That Recapitulate the Intestinal Stem Cell Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between intestinal stem cells (ISCs and the surrounding niche environment is complex and dynamic. Key factors localized at the base of the crypt are necessary to promote ISC self-renewal and proliferation, to ultimately provide a constant stream of differentiated cells to maintain the epithelial barrier. These factors diminish as epithelial cells divide, migrate away from the crypt base, differentiate into the postmitotic lineages, and end their life span in approximately 7 days when they are sloughed into the intestinal lumen. To facilitate the rapid and complex physiology of ISC-driven epithelial renewal, in vivo gradients of growth factors, extracellular matrix, bacterial products, gases, and stiffness are formed along the crypt-villus axis. New bioengineered tools and platforms are available to recapitulate various gradients and support the stereotypical cellular responses associated with these gradients. Many of these technologies have been paired with primary small intestinal and colonic epithelial cells to re-create select aspects of normal physiology or disease states. These biomimetic platforms are becoming increasingly sophisticated with the rapid discovery of new niche factors and gradients. These advancements are contributing to the development of high-fidelity tissue constructs for basic science applications, drug screening, and personalized medicine applications. Here, we discuss the direct and indirect evidence for many of the important gradients found in vivo and their successful application to date in bioengineered in vitro models, including organ-on-chip and microfluidic culture devices.

  5. Effect of selenium nanoparticles with different sizes in primary cultured intestinal epithelial cells of crucian carp, Carassius auratus gibelio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang YB

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Yanbo Wang, Xuxia Yan, Linglin Fu Marine Resources and Nutrition Biology Research Center, Food Quality and Safety Department, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China Abstract: Nano-selenium (Se, with its high bioavailability and low toxicity, has attracted wide attention for its potential application in the prevention of oxidative damage in animal tissues. However, the effect of nano-Se of different sizes on the intestinal epithelial cells of the crucian carp (Carassius auratus gibelio is poorly understood. Our study showed that different sizes and doses of nano-Se have varied effects on the cellular protein contents and the enzyme activities of secreted lactate dehydrogenase, intracellular sodium potassium adenosine triphosphatase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase. It was also indicated that nano-Se had a size-dependent effect on the primary intestinal epithelial cells of the crucian carp. Thus, these findings may bring us a step closer to understanding the size effect and the bioavailability of nano-Se on the intestinal tract of the crucian carp. Keywords: selenium nanoparticle, intestinal epithelial cell, crucian carp, primary culture

  6. Severe Burn-Induced Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction Is Associated With Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yalan; Feng, Yanhai; Wang, Yu; Wang, Pei; Wang, Fengjun; Ren, Hui

    2018-01-01

    The disruption of intestinal barrier plays a vital role in the pathophysiological changes after severe burn injury, however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Severe burn causes the disruption of intestinal tight junction (TJ) barrier. Previous studies have shown that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy are closely associated with the impairment of intestinal mucosa. Thus, we hypothesize that ER stress and autophagy are likely involved in burn injury-induced intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction. Mice received a 30% total body surface area (TBSA) full-thickness burn, and were sacrificed at 0, 1, 2, 6, 12 and 24 h postburn. The results showed that intestinal permeability was increased significantly after burn injury, accompanied by the damage of mucosa and the alteration of TJ proteins. Severe burn induced ER stress, as indicated by increased intraluminal chaperone binding protein (BIP), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) and inositol-requiring enzyme 1(IRE1)/X-box binding protein 1 splicing (XBP1). Autophagy was activated after burn injury, as evidenced by the increase of autophagy related protein 5 (ATG5), Beclin 1 and LC3II/LC3I ratio and the decrease of p62. Besides, the number of autophagosomes was also increased after burn injury. The levels of p-PI3K(Ser191), p-PI3K(Ser262), p-AKT(Ser473), and p-mTOR were decreased postburn, suggesting that autophagy-related PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is involved in the intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction following severe burn. In summary, severe burn injury induces the ER stress and autophagy in intestinal epithelia, leading to the disruption of intestinal barrier. PMID:29740349

  7. Using crypts as iris minutiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Feng; Flynn, Patrick J.

    2013-05-01

    Iris recognition is one of the most reliable biometric technologies for identity recognition and verification, but it has not been used in a forensic context because the representation and matching of iris features are not straightforward for traditional iris recognition techniques. In this paper we concentrate on the iris crypt as a visible feature used to represent the characteristics of irises in a similar way to fingerprint minutiae. The matching of crypts is based on their appearances and locations. The number of matching crypt pairs found between two irises can be used for identity verification and the convenience of manual inspection makes iris crypts a potential candidate for forensic applications.

  8. Adrenergic factors involved in the control of crypt cell proliferation in jejunum and descending colon of mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, M F; Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1983-01-01

    The mitotic rates in the crypts of Lieberkühn of the proximal jejunum and descending colon of mouse, following different treatments, were measured using a stathmokinetic technique. Regression coefficients, representing mitotic rates, were then calculated by the method of least squares. Treatment with adrenaline, isoprenaline, phenylephrine, phentolamine, and yohimbine all resulted in decreased mitotic rate of jejunal and colonic crypt cells. Chemical sympathectomy and cryosympathectomy had a similar effect, and chemical sympathectomy was followed by a supersensitivity to clonidine. Intraperitoneal injection of metaraminol, clonidine, propranolol, prazosin, labetolol and simultaneous injection of propranolol and adrenaline all resulted in an increased rate of crypt cell proliferation in both jejunum and colon. A significant increase in mitotic rate was observed in both tissues at night. The amplitude of this diurnal variation was decreased in both jejunum and colon following chemical sympathectomy. In addition, the amplitude of this variation in jejunum was decreased after treatment with yohimbine or phentolamine. The results of the study suggest that the sympathetic nervous system stimulates epithelial cell proliferation in both the small and large intestine and that this effect is mediated by an alpha 2-adrenoceptor. By contrast, stimulation of alpha 1- and beta-adrenoceptors is inhibitory to cell proliferation in these tissues.

  9. Platelet-activating factor induces TLR4 expression in intestinal epithelial cells: implication for the pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Soliman

    Full Text Available Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in neonatal intensive care units, however its pathogenesis is not completely understood. We have previously shown that platelet activating factor (PAF, bacteria and TLR4 are all important factors in the development of NEC. Given that Toll-like receptors (TLRs are expressed at low levels in enterocytes of the mature gastrointestinal tract, but were shown to be aberrantly over-expressed in enterocytes in experimental NEC, we examined the regulation of TLR4 expression and signaling by PAF in intestinal epithelial cells using human and mouse in vitro cell lines, and the ex vivo rat intestinal loop model. In intestinal epithelial cell (IEC lines, PAF stimulation yielded upregulation of both TLR4 mRNA and protein expression and led to increased IL-8 secretion following stimulation with LPS (in an otherwise LPS minimally responsive cell line. PAF stimulation resulted in increased human TLR4 promoter activation in a dose dependent manner. Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis showed PAF induced STAT3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation in IEC, and PAF-induced TLR4 expression was inhibited by STAT3 and NFκB Inhibitors. Our findings provide evidence for a mechanism by which PAF augments inflammation in the intestinal epithelium through abnormal TLR4 upregulation, thereby contributing to the intestinal injury of NEC.

  10. Persistent Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus Infection Enhances Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 Adhesion by Promoting Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lu; Dai, Lei; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2017-11-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) is a coronavirus characterized by diarrhea and high morbidity rates, and the mortality rate is 100% in piglets less than 2 weeks old. Pigs infected with TGEV often suffer secondary infection by other pathogens, which aggravates the severity of diarrhea, but the mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we hypothesized that persistent TGEV infection stimulates the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and thus enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) can more easily adhere to generating cells. Intestinal epithelial cells are the primary targets of TGEV and ETEC infections. We found that TGEV can persistently infect porcine intestinal columnar epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and cause EMT, consistent with multiple changes in key cell characteristics. Infected cells display fibroblast-like shapes; exhibit increases in levels of mesenchymal markers with a corresponding loss of epithelial markers; have enhanced expression levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNAs; and demonstrate increases in migratory and invasive behaviors. Additional experiments showed that the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways via TGF-β is critical for the TGEV-mediated EMT process. Cellular uptake is also modified in cells that have undergone EMT. TGEV-infected cells have higher levels of integrin α5 and fibronectin and exhibit enhanced ETEC K88 adhesion. Reversal of EMT reduces ETEC K88 adhesion and inhibits the expression of integrin α5 and fibronectin. Overall, these results suggest that TGEV infection induces EMT in IPEC-J2 cells, increasing the adhesion of ETEC K88 in the intestine and facilitating dual infection. IMPORTANCE Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) causes pig diarrhea and is often followed by secondary infection by other pathogens. In this study, we showed

  11. Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz stimulates intestinal epithelial cell migration through a polyamine dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hou-Pan; Li, Ru-Liu; Zhou, Chi; Cai, Xiong; Huang, Hui-Yong

    2015-01-15

    Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz (AMK), a valuable traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has been widely used in clinical practice for treating patients with disorders of the digestive system. AMK has shown noteworthy promoting effect on improving gastrointestinal function and immunity, which might represent a promising candidate for the treatment of intestinal mucosa injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of AMK on intestinal mucosal restitution and the underlying mechanisms via intestinal epithelial (IEC-6) cell migration model. A cell migration model of IEC-6 cells was induced by a single-edge razor blade along the diameter of the cell layers in six-well polystyrene plates. After wounding, the cells were grown in control cultures and in cultures containing spermidine (5μM, SPD, reference drug), alpha-difluoromethylornithine (2.5mM, DFMO, polyamine inhibitor), AMK (50, 100, and 200mg/L), DFMO plus SPD and DFMO plus AMK for 12h. The polyamines content was detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with pre-column derivatization. The Rho mRNAs expression levels were assessed by Q-RT-PCR. The Rho and non-muscle myosin II proteins expression levels were analyzed by Western blot. The formation and distribution of non-muscle myosin II stress fibers were monitored with immunostaining techniques using specific antibodies and observed by confocal microscopy. Cell migration assay was carried out using inverted microscope and the Image-Pro Plus software. All of these indexes were used to evaluate the effectiveness of AMK. (1) Treatment with AMK caused significant increases in cellular polyamines content and Rho mRNAs and proteins expression levels, as compared to control group. Furthermore, AMK exposure increased non-muscle myosin II protein expression levels and formation of non-muscle myosin II stress fibers, and resulted in an acceleration of cell migration in IEC-6 cells. (2) Depletion of cellular polyamines by DFMO resulted in a

  12. Effects of the ionising radiations on the structure and the function of the intestinal epithelial cell; Effets des rayonnements ionisants sur la structure et la fonction de la cellule epitheliale intestinale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haton, C

    2005-06-15

    The intestinal mucosa is a particularly radio-sensitive tissue and damage may occur following either accidental or therapeutic exposure. the deleterious actions of ionizing radiation are linked to the formation of sometimes overwhelming quantities of reactive oxygen species (R.O.S.). Production of R.O.S. is both direct and indirect from the secondary effects of irradiation. A better comprehension of the underlying mechanisms of injury will lead to more adapted therapeutic approaches to limit the harmful effects of irradiation. The homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium is regulated by three factors: proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. these three factors were studied using the cell model, HT29, in order to analyze modulations of this balance after irradiation. our results, in agreement with other data, showed the establishment of mitotic delay. This arrest of proliferation was followed by apoptosis to be the major mechanism leading to cell death in this model. thus, for the first time, we have shown that irradiated intestinal epithelial cells preserve their capacity to differentiate. This indicates, although indirectly, that intestinal cells have and preserve an intrinsic capacity restore a functional epithelium. R.O.S. are considered as intermediates between the physical nature of radiations and biological responses. It seems essential to understand anti-oxidant mechanisms used by the cell for defence against the deleterious effects of R.O.S post exposure. This study of several anti-oxidant defence mechanisms of intestinal mucosa, was carried out in vivo in the mouse at different times following abdominal irradiation. We observed an early mitochondrial response in the hours following irradiation revealing this organelle as a particular target. We demonstrated a strong alteration of anti-oxidant capacity as revealed by a decrease in S.O.D.s, catalase and an increase of the G.P.X.s and M.T.s. A part of these modifications appeared to depend on an

  13. The Nucleotide Synthesis Enzyme CAD Inhibits NOD2 Antibacterial Function in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Amy L.; Kabi, Amrita; Homer, Craig R.; García, Noemí Marina; Nickerson, Kourtney P.; NesvizhskiI, Alexey I.; Sreekumar, Arun; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Nuñez, Gabriel; McDonald, Christine

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Polymorphisms that reduce the function of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)2, a bacterial sensor, have been associated with Crohn’s disease (CD). No proteins that regulate NOD2 activity have been identified as selective pharmacologic targets. We sought to discover regulators of NOD2 that might be pharmacologic targets for CD therapies. METHODS Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase/ aspartate transcarbamylase/dihydroorotase (CAD) is an enzyme required for de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis; it was identified as a NOD2-interacting protein by immunoprecipitation-coupled mass spectrometry. CAD expression was assessed in colon tissues from individuals with and without inflammatory bowel disease by immunohistochemistry. The interaction between CAD and NOD2 was assessed in human HCT116 intestinal epithelial cells by immunoprecipitation, immunoblot, reporter gene, and gentamicin protection assays. We also analyzed human cell lines that express variants of NOD2 and the effects of RNA interference, overexpression and CAD inhibitors. RESULTS CAD was identified as a NOD2-interacting protein expressed at increased levels in the intestinal epithelium of patients with CD compared with controls. Overexpression of CAD inhibited NOD2-dependent activation of nuclear factor κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, as well as intracellular killing of Salmonella. Reduction of CAD expression or administration of CAD inhibitors increased NOD2-dependent signaling and antibacterial functions of NOD2 variants that are and are not associated with CD. CONCLUSIONS The nucleotide synthesis enzyme CAD is a negative regulator of NOD2. The antibacterial function of NOD2 variants that have been associated with CD increased in response to pharmacologic inhibition of CAD. CAD is a potential therapeutic target for CD. PMID:22387394

  14. Orexins control intestinal glucose transport by distinct neuronal, endocrine, and direct epithelial pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducroc, Robert; Voisin, Thierry; El Firar, Aadil; Laburthe, Marc

    2007-10-01

    Orexins are neuropeptides involved in energy homeostasis. We investigated the effect of orexin A (OxA) and orexin B (OxB) on intestinal glucose transport in the rat. Injection of orexins led to a decrease in the blood glucose level in oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs). Effects of orexins on glucose entry were analyzed in Ussing chambers using the Na(+)-dependent increase in short-circuit current (Isc) to quantify jejunal glucose transport. The rapid and marked increase in Isc induced by luminal glucose was inhibited by 10 nmol/l OxA or OxB (53 and 59%, respectively). Response curves to OxA and OxB were not significantly different with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations at 0.9 and 0.4 nmol/l, respectively. On the one hand, OxA-induced inhibition of Isc was reduced by the neuronal blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX) and by a cholecystokinin (CCK) 2R antagonist, indicating involvement of neuronal and endocrine CCK-releasing cells. The OX(1)R antagonist SB334867 had no effect on OxA-induced inhibition, which is likely to occur via a neuronal and/or endocrine OX(2)R. On the other hand, SB334867 induced a significant right shift of the concentration-effect curve for OxB. This OxB-preferring OX(1)R pathway was not sensitive to TTX or to CCKR antagonists, suggesting that OxB may act directly on enterocytic OX(1)R. These distinct effects of OxA and OxB are consistent with the expression of OX(1)R and OX(2)R mRNA in the epithelial and nonepithelial tissues, respectively. Our data delineate a new function for orexins as inhibitors of intestinal glucose absorption and provide a new basis for orexin-induced short-term control of energy homeostasis.

  15. Bax and Bak Do Not Exhibit Functional Redundancy in Mediating Radiation-Induced Endothelial Apoptosis in the Intestinal Mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotolo, Jimmy A.; Maj, Jerzy G.; Feldman, Regina; Ren, Decheng; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Cheng, Emily H.-Y.; Kolesnick, Richard; Fuks, Zvi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To address in vivo the issue of whether Bax and Bak are functionally redundant in signaling apoptosis, capable of substituting for each other. Methods and Materials: Mice were exposed to whole-body radiation, and endothelial cell apoptosis was quantified using double immunostaining with TUNEL and anti-CD31 antibody. Crypt survival was determined at 3.5 days after whole-body radiation by the microcolony survival assay. Actuarial animal survival was calculated by the product-limit Kaplan-Meier method, and autopsies were performed to establish cause of death. Results: Radiation exposure of Bax- and Bak-deficient mice, both expressing a wild-type acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) phenotype, indicated that Bax and Bak are both mandatory, though mutually independent, for the intestinal endothelial apoptotic response. However, neither affected epithelial apoptosis at crypt positions 4-5, indicating specificity toward endothelium. Furthermore, Bax deficiency and Bak deficiency each individually mimicked ASMase deficiency in inhibiting crypt lethality in the microcolony assay and in rescuing mice from the lethal gastrointestinal syndrome. Conclusions: The data indicate that Bax and Bak have nonredundant functional roles in the apoptotic response of the irradiated intestinal endothelium. The observation that Bax deficiency and Bak deficiency also protect crypts in the microcolony assay provides strong evidence that the microvascular apoptotic component is germane to the mechanism of radiation-induced damage to mouse intestines, regulating reproductive cell death of crypt stem cell clonogens

  16. Excreted/secreted Trichuris suis products reduce barrier function and suppress inflammatory cytokine production of intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiemstra, I. H.; Klaver, E. J.; Vrijland, K.

    2014-01-01

    The administration of helminths is considered a promising strategy for the treatment of autoimmune diseases due to their immunomodulatory properties. Currently, the application of the helminth Trichuris suis as a treatment for Crohn's disease is being studied in large multi-center clinical trials....... The intestinal epithelium forms an efficient barrier between the intestinal lumen containing the microbial flora and helminths, and dendritic cells (DCs) present in the lamina propria that determine the TH response. Here, we investigated how excreted/secreted (E/S) products of T. suis affect the barrier function...... of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) in order to reach the DCs and modulate the immune response. We show that T. suis E/S products reduce the barrier function and the expression of the tight junction proteins EMP-1 and claudin-4 in IEC CMT93/69 monolayers in a glycan-dependent manner. This resulted...

  17. ADAM10 regulates Notch function in intestinal stem cells of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Hwai; VanDussen, Kelli L; Sawey, Eric T; Wade, Alex W; Kasper, Chelsea; Rakshit, Sabita; Bhatt, Riha G; Stoeck, Alex; Maillard, Ivan; Crawford, Howard C; Samuelson, Linda C; Dempsey, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10 (ADAM10) is a cell surface sheddase that regulates physiologic processes, including Notch signaling. ADAM10 is expressed in all intestinal epithelial cell types, but the requirement for ADAM10 signaling in crypt homeostasis is not well defined. We analyzed intestinal tissues from mice with constitutive (Vil-Cre;Adam10(f/f) mice) and conditional (Vil-CreER;Adam10(f/f) and Leucine-rich repeat-containing GPCR5 [Lgr5]-CreER;Adam10(f/f) mice) deletion of ADAM10. We performed cell lineage-tracing experiments in mice that expressed a gain-of-function allele of Notch in the intestine (Rosa26(NICD)), or mice with intestine-specific disruption of Notch (Rosa26(DN-MAML)), to examine the effects of ADAM10 deletion on cell fate specification and intestinal stem cell maintenance. Loss of ADAM10 from developing and adult intestine caused lethality associated with altered intestinal morphology, reduced progenitor cell proliferation, and increased secretory cell differentiation. ADAM10 deletion led to the replacement of intestinal cell progenitors with 2 distinct, post-mitotic, secretory cell lineages: intermediate-like (Paneth/goblet) and enteroendocrine cells. Based on analysis of Rosa26(NICD) and Rosa26(DN-MAML) mice, we determined that ADAM10 controls these cell fate decisions by regulating Notch signaling. Cell lineage-tracing experiments showed that ADAM10 is required for survival of Lgr5(+) crypt-based columnar cells. Our findings indicate that Notch-activated stem cells have a competitive advantage for occupation of the stem cell niche. ADAM10 acts in a cell autonomous manner within the intestinal crypt compartment to regulate Notch signaling. This process is required for progenitor cell lineage specification and crypt-based columnar cell maintenance. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Influência da suplementação de glutamina sobre o desempenho e o desenvolvimento de vilos e criptas do intestino delgado de frangos Influence of glutamine supplementation on performance and intestinal villous and crypt development in broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Maiorka

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigou-se o efeito da suplementação de glutamina na dieta sobre o consumo de ração, ganho de peso e conversão alimentar e sobre a estrutura da mucosa intestinal de frangos. Foram utilizados 320 pintos de corte machos distribuídos em um delineamento inteiramente ao acaso com dois tratamentos e quatro repetições, sendo T1 suplementado com 1% de L-glutamina na dieta e T2 controle. Os índices de desempenho foram analisados aos 7, 21 e 49 dias de idade das aves. Aos 7 e 14 dias de idade oito aves foram sacrificadas para colheita de fragmentos de cada porção do intestino delgado para avaliação da morfometria intestinal em microscopia de luz em sistema analisador de imagens "Video Plan". As variáveis estudadas foram altura dos vilos, profundidade de cripta e relação vilo: cripta. A adição de 1% de glutamina à dieta de frangos não influenciou (P>0,05 o seu desempenho zootécnico. Entretanto, 1% de glutamina na ração foi capaz de alterar (PThis investigation was carried out in order to study the influence of glutamine supplementation in the ration on performance and on the intestinal structure development of broiler chickens. Three hundred and twenty day-old broiler chickens were used in a completely randomized experiment with two treatments and four repetitions, being T1 supplemented with 1% L-glutamine and T2 - control (not supplemented. The performance was evaluated (feed intake, body weight gain and feed conversion at 7, 21 and 49 days of age. At the same ages birds were sacrificed and samples from different parts of the intestine were collected (duodenum, jejunum and ileum to be submitted to morphometric studies under light microscopy using an image analysis system (Video Plan. The variables studied were villous height, crypt depth and villous:crypt ratio. It was demonstrated that 1% glutamine supplementation in the ration did not influence the broiler chicken performance (P>0.05 during the different phases of growth

  19. A lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived soluble protein, p40, stimulates ligand release from intestinal epithelial cells to transactivate epidermal growth factor receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived soluble protein, ameliorates intestinal injury and colitis, reduces apoptosis and preserves barrier function by activation of EGF receptor (EGFR) in intestinal epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms by which p40...

  20. Interferon-γ induces expression of MHC class II on intestinal epithelial cells and protects mice from colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Thelemann

    Full Text Available Immune responses against intestinal microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD and involve CD4(+ T cells, which are activated by major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII molecules on antigen-presenting cells (APCs. However, it is largely unexplored how inflammation-induced MHCII expression by intestinal epithelial cells (IEC affects CD4(+ T cell-mediated immunity or tolerance induction in vivo. Here, we investigated how epithelial MHCII expression is induced and how a deficiency in inducible epithelial MHCII expression alters susceptibility to colitis and the outcome of colon-specific immune responses. Colitis was induced in mice that lacked inducible expression of MHCII molecules on all nonhematopoietic cells, or specifically on IECs, by continuous infection with Helicobacter hepaticus and administration of interleukin (IL-10 receptor-blocking antibodies (anti-IL10R mAb. To assess the role of interferon (IFN-γ in inducing epithelial MHCII expression, the T cell adoptive transfer model of colitis was used. Abrogation of MHCII expression by nonhematopoietic cells or IECs induces colitis associated with increased colonic frequencies of innate immune cells and expression of proinflammatory cytokines. CD4(+ T-helper type (Th1 cells - but not group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs or Th17 cells - are elevated, resulting in an unfavourably altered ratio between CD4(+ T cells and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3(+ regulatory T (Treg cells. IFN-γ produced mainly by CD4(+ T cells is required to upregulate MHCII expression by IECs. These results suggest that, in addition to its proinflammatory roles, IFN-γ exerts a critical anti-inflammatory function in the intestine which protects against colitis by inducing MHCII expression on IECs. This may explain the failure of anti-IFN-γ treatment to induce remission in IBD patients, despite the association of elevated IFN-γ and IBD.

  1. Transformation by Oncogenic Ras Expands the Early Genomic Response to Transforming Growth Factor β in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl E. Allen

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A substantial body of evidence implicates TGFβ as a tumor promoter in epithelial cells that have become resistant to its tumor suppressor activity. To better understand early, genome-wide TGFβ responses in cells resistant to growth inhibition by TGFβ, we used microarray analysis in a well-defined cell culture system of sensitive and resistant intestinal epithelial cells. TGFβ-regulated gene expression in TGFβ-growth-sensitive, nontransformed rat intestinal epithelial cells (RIE-1 was compared to expression in TGFβ-growth-resistant RIE cells stably transformed by oncogenic Ras(12V. Treatment of RIE-1 cells with 2 ng/ml TGFβ1 for 1 hour increased the expression of eight gene sequences by 2.6-fold or more, whereas eight were down regulated 2.6-fold. In RIE-Ras(12V cells, 42 gene sequences were upregulated and only 3 were down-regulated. Comparison of RIE and RIE-Ras(12V identified 37 gene sequences as unique, Ras-dependent genomic targets of TGFβ1. TGFβ-regulation of connective tissue growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor, two genes up-regulated in RIE-Ras cells and previously implicated in tumor promotion, was independently confirmed and further characterized by Northern analysis. Our data indicate that overexpression of oncogenic Ras in intestinal epithelial cells confers a significantly expanded repertoire of robust, early transcriptional responses to TGFβ via signaling pathways yet to be fully elucidated but including the canonical Raf-1/MAPK/Erk pathway. Loss of sensitivity to growth inhibition by TGFβ does not abrogate TGFβ signaling and actually expands the early transcriptional response to TGFβ1. Expression of some of these genes may confer to Ras-transformed cells characteristics favorable for tumor promotion.

  2. Cytochemical localization of small intestinal glycoconjugates by lectin histochemistry in controls and subjects with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, L R; De Fontes, D; Cox, K L

    1983-05-01

    Human mucosal glycoconjugates were examined in normal small intestinal biopsies from five control subjects using six different fluorescein-conjugated lectins: Triticum vulgare agglutinin (WGA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA1), Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA1), glycin max-soy bean agglutinin (SBA), Dolichus biflorus agglutinin (DBA), and Arachis hypogaea peanut agglutinin (PNA). These plant agglutinins bind to specific nonreducing end-terminal carbohydrate residues. Only the lectins derived from WGA, which produced the strongest staining, and UEA1 consistently bound to both intestinal goblet cell mucin and epithelial cell microvillar membranes. The intensity of lectin binding was greatest in the upper villus and diminished down towards the crypt, being weakest in the crypt base. Similar histochemical studies carried out on small bowel biopsies from five patients with cystic fibrosis revealed no major qualitative differences between the intestinal glycoconjugates in normal subjects and those with cystic fibrosis. These results suggest that glycoconjugate biosynthesis of human intestinal goblet cell mucin and epithelial cell membranes may be complete and hence full differentiation achieved only when these cells have migrated out of the crypt and onto the villus.

  3. New Neonatal Porcine Diarrhea Syndrome in Denmark Characterization of the intestinal lesions and identification of the etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonach, Beata Renata; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Boye, Mette

    of various degrees with concomitant crypt hyperplasia in the jejunum and ileum (Chapter 4.1). Villus atrophy is a common pathological feature seen in numerous infectious intestinal conditions and is associated with malabsorptive diarrhea due to insufficient absorption of water and nutrients from the small...... with enlargement of the proliferative compartment in the crypts and that epithelial cell turnover was enhanced in the diarrheic piglets.Potentially pathogenic bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile have been proposed to be involved in NNPDS. In order...... that adherent E. coli and Enterococcus spp. were involved in NNPDS. These bacteria were present in 37% of the diarrheic piglets and were associated with villus atrophy and epithelial lesions in the small intestine. No clear association between the presence of C. perfringens and C. difficile and diarrhea...

  4. Effects of biodegradable Mg–6Zn alloy extracts on apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhanhui; Yan Jun; Li Jianan; Zheng Qi; Wang Zhigang; Zhang Xiaonong; Zhang Shaoxiang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We evaluated the effects of Mg–6Zn alloys on apoptosis of IEC-6 cells. ► The apoptosis was evaluated by investigating the expression of caspase-1 and Bcl-2. ► The IEC-6 cells displayed better cell functions in 60% or 20% extract. ► The conspicuous alkaline environment is disadvantageous to apoptosis of IEC cells. ► The excessive Mg concentration is disadvantageous to apoptosis of IEC-6 cells. - Abstract: In this study, intestinal epithelial cells (IEC)-6 were cultured in different concentration extracts of Mg–6Zn alloys for different time periods. To achieve a total of three concentrations (100%, 60% and 20% concentration), the extracts were serially diluted with Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium High Glucose to observe a dose–response relationship. We studied the indirect effects of Mg–6Zn alloys on IEC-6 cells apoptosis. The apoptosis of IEC-6 cells was measured using flow cytometry. And the apoptosis of IEC-6 cells was evaluated by investigating the expression of caspase-1and Bcl-2 using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting tests. It was found that the levels of apoptosis in IEC-6 cells cultured in 100% Mg–6Zn alloy extracts were significantly higher than those in 60% and 20% extracts; the 100% extract can down-regulate expression of Bcl-2 after culture. The in vitro results indicated that the conspicuous alkaline environment and excessive Mg concentration, even Zn concentration caused by rapid corrosion of Mg–6Zn alloys promote IEC-6 cells apoptosis, although further experiments will be necessary to formally prove our conclusions. Therefore, the adjustment of the degradation rate is needed for using Mg–Zn alloy as a surgical suture material.

  5. [Primary culture of cat intestinal epithelial cell and construction of its cDNA library].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, L; Gui-Hua, Z; Kun, Y; Hong-Fa, W; Ting, X; Gong-Zhen, L; Wei-Xia, Z; Yong, C

    2017-04-12

    Objective To establish the primary cat intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) culture methods and construct the cDNA library for the following yeast two-hybrid experiment, so as to screen the virulence interaction factors among the final host. Methods The primary cat IECs were cultured by the tissue cultivation and combined digestion with collagenase XI and dispase I separately. Then the cat IECs cultured was identified with the morphological observation and cyto-keratin detection, by using goat anti-cyto-keratin monoclonal antibodies. The mRNA of cat IECs was isolated and used as the template to synthesize the first strand cDNA by SMART™ technology, and then the double-strand cDNAs were acquired by LD-PCR, which were subsequently cloned into the plasmid PGADT7-Rec to construct yeast two-hybrid cDNA library in the yeast strain Y187 by homologous recombination. Matchmaker™ Insert Check PCR was used to detect the size distribution of cDNA fragments after the capacity calculation of the cDNA library. Results The comparison of the two cultivation methods indicated that the combined digestion of collagenase XI and dispase I was more effective than the tissue cultivation. The cat IECs system of continuous culture was established and the cat IECs with high purity were harvested for constructing the yeast two-hybrid cDNA library. The library contained 1.1×10 6 independent clones. The titer was 2.8×10 9 cfu/ml. The size of inserted fragments was among 0.5-2.0 kb. Conclusion The yeast two-hybrid cDNA library of cat IECs meets the requirements of further screen research, and this study lays the foundation of screening the Toxoplasma gondii virulence interaction factors among the cDNA libraries of its final hosts.

  6. Effect of heme oxygenase-1 transduced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on damaged intestinal epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yi; Wu, Ben-Juan; Zheng, Wei-Ping; Yin, Ming-Li; Liu, Tao; Song, Hong-Li

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we explored the effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from bone marrow overexpressing heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) on the damaged human intestinal epithelial barrier in vitro. Rat MSCs were isolated from bone marrow and transduced with rat HO-1 recombinant adenovirus (HO-MSCs) for stable expression of HO-1. Colorectal adenocarinoma 2 (Caco2) cells were treated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) to establish a damaged colon epithelial model. Damaged Caco2 were cocultured with MSCs, Ad-MSCs, Ad-HO + MSCs or HO-MSCs. mRNA and protein expression of Zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) and human HO-1 and the release of cytokines were measured. ZO-1 and human HO-1 in Caco2 were significantly decreased after treatment with TNF-α; and this effect was reduced when coculture with MSCs from bone marrow. Expression of ZO-1 was not significantly affected by Caco2 treatment with TNF-α, Ad-HO, and MSCs. In contrast, ZO-1 and human HO-1 increased significantly when the damaged Caco2 was treated with HO-MSCs. HO-MSCs showed the strongest effect on the expression of ZO-1 in colon epithelial cells. Coculture with HO-MSCs showed the most significant effects on reducing the expression of IL-2, IL-6, IFN-γ and increasing the expression of IL-10. HO-MSCs protected the intestinal epithelial barrier, in which endogenous HO-1 was involved. HO-MSCs play an important role in the repair process by reducing the release of inflammatory cytokines and increasing the release of anti-inflammatory factors. These results suggested that HO-MSCs from bone marrow were more effective in repairing the damaged intestinal epithelial barrier, and the effectiveness of MSCs was improved by HO-1 gene transduction, which provides favorable support for the application of stem cell therapy in the intestinal diseases. © 2017 The Authors. Cell Biology International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Federation of Cell Biology.

  7. TNFα/IFNγ Mediated Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction Is Attenuated by MicroRNA-93 Downregulation of PTK6 in Mouse Colonic Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricci J Haines

    /IFNγ imposed decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER, as well as excluded FoxO1 from the nucleus. Our results indicate that PTK6 may act as a novel mediator of intestinal epithelial permeability during inflammatory injury, and miR-93 may protect intestinal epithelial barrier function, at least in part, by targeting PTK6.

  8. Cell-permeable intrinsic cellular inhibitors of apoptosis protect and rescue intestinal epithelial cells from radiation-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki-Horibuchi, Shiori; Yasuda, Takeshi; Sakaguchi, Nagako; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Akashi, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    One of the important mechanisms for gastrointestinal (GI) injury following high-dose radiation exposure is apoptosis of epithelial cells. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) and cellular IAP2 (cIAP2) are intrinsic cellular inhibitors of apoptosis. In order to study the effects of exogenously added IAPs on apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells, we constructed bacterial expression plasmids containing genes of XIAP (full-length, BIR2 domain and BIR3-RING domain with and without mutations of auto-ubiquitylation sites) and cIAP2 proteins fused to a protein-transduction domain (PTD) derived from HIV-1 Tat protein (TAT) and purified these cell-permeable recombinant proteins. When the TAT-conjugated IAPs were added to rat intestinal epithelial cells IEC6, these proteins were effectively delivered into the cells and inhibited apoptosis, even when added after irradiation. Our results suggest that PTD-mediated delivery of IAPs may have clinical potential, not only for radioprotection but also for rescuing the GI system from radiation injuries. (author)

  9. Radiation, an ideal cytotoxic for the study of cell biology in the small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potten, C.

    2003-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are highly polarised with the proliferative compartment sometimes subdivided into units of proliferation in many instances. My interests have been in trying to understand how many cellular constituents exist, what their function is and intercommunicants are that ensure appropriate steady state cell replacement rates. Radiation has proved to be a valuable tool to induce cell death, reproductive sterilisation, and regenerative proliferation in these systems, the responses to which can provide information on the number of regenerative cells (a function associated with stem cells). Such studies have helped define the epidermal proliferative units and the structurally similar units on the dorsal surface of the tongue. The radiation responses considered in conjunction with a wide range of cell kinetic lineage tracking and somatic mutation studies with complex mathematical modelling, provide insights into the functioning of the poliferative units (crypts) of the small intestine. Comparative studies have then been undertaken with the crypts in the large bowel. In the small intestine, which rarely develops cancer, various protective mechanisms have evolved to ensure the genetic integrity of the stem cell compartment. Stem cells in the small intestinal crypts have an intolerance of genotoxic damage (including that induced by very low doses of radiation), they do not undergo cell cycle arrest and repair but commit an altruistic p53 dependent cell suicide (apoptosis). This process is compromised in the large bowel by bcl-2 expression. Recent studies have suggested a second genome protection mechanism operating in the stem cells of the small intestinal crypts that may also have a p53 dependence. Such studies have allowed the cell lineages and genome protection mechanisms operating in the small intestinal crypts to be defined

  10. Cyclical DNA Methylation and Histone Changes Are Induced by LPS to Activate COX-2 in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Angrisano

    Full Text Available Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS induces release of inflammatory mediators both in immune and epithelial cells. We investigated whether changes of epigenetic marks, including selected histone modification and DNA methylation, may drive or accompany the activation of COX-2 gene in HT-29 human intestinal epithelial cells upon exposure to LPS. Here we describe cyclical histone acetylation (H3, methylation (H3K4, H3K9, H3K27 and DNA methylation changes occurring at COX-2 gene promoter overtime after LPS stimulation. Histone K27 methylation changes are carried out by the H3 demethylase JMJD3 and are essential for COX-2 induction by LPS. The changes of the histone code are associated with cyclical methylation signatures at the promoter and gene body of COX-2 gene.

  11. Suppressive effect of nobiletin and epicatechin gallate on fructose uptake in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satsu, Hideo; Awara, Sohei; Unno, Tomonori; Shimizu, Makoto

    2018-04-01

    Inhibition of excessive fructose intake in the small intestine could alleviate fructose-induced diseases such as hypertension and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. We examined the effect of phytochemicals on fructose uptake using human intestinal epithelial-like Caco-2 cells which express the fructose transporter, GLUT5. Among 35 phytochemicals tested, five, including nobiletin and epicatechin gallate (ECg), markedly inhibited fructose uptake. Nobiletin and ECg also inhibited the uptake of glucose but not of L-leucine or Gly-Sar, suggesting an inhibitory effect specific to monosaccharide transporters. Kinetic analysis further suggested that this reduction in fructose uptake was associated with a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface GLUT5 molecules, and not with a change in the affinity of GLUT5 for fructose. Lastly, nobiletin and ECg suppressed the permeation of fructose across Caco-2 cell monolayers. These findings suggest that nobiletin and ECg are good candidates for preventing diseases caused by excessive fructose intake.

  12. Alanyl-glutamine attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.V. Araújo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein E (APOE=gene, apoE=protein is a known factor regulating the inflammatory response that may have regenerative effects during tissue recovery from injury. We investigated whether apoE deficiency reduces the healing effect of alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln treatment, a recognized gut-trophic nutrient, during tissue recovery after 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. APOE-knockout (APOE-/- and wild-type (APOE+/+ C57BL6J male and female mice (N=86 were given either Ala-Gln (100 mM or phosphate buffered saline (PBS by gavage 3 days before and 5 days after a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU challenge (450 mg/kg, via intraperitoneal injection. Mouse body weight was monitored daily. The 5-FU cytotoxic effect was evaluated by leukometry. Intestinal villus height, villus/crypt ratio, and villin expression were monitored to assess recovery of the intestinal absorptive surface area. Crypt length, mitotic, apoptotic, and necrotic crypt indexes, and quantitative real-time PCR for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 intestinal mRNA transcripts were used to evaluate intestinal epithelial cell turnover. 5-FU challenge caused significant weight loss and leukopenia (P<0.001 in both mouse strains, which was not improved by Ala-Gln. Villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, and reduced villus/crypt ratio (P<0.05 were found in all 5-FU-challenged mice but not in PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus/crypt ratio, crypt length and mitotic index in all challenged mice, compared with PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus height only in APOE-/- mice. Crypt cell apoptosis and necrotic scores were increased in all mice challenged by 5-FU, compared with untreated controls. Those scores were significantly lower in Ala-Gln-treated APOE+/+ mice than in controls. Bcl-2 and IGF-1 mRNA transcripts were reduced only in the APOE-/--challenged mice. Altogether our findings suggest APOE-independent Ala-Gln regenerative effects after 5-FU challenge.

  13. Alanyl-glutamine attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araújo, C.V.; Lazzarotto, C.R.; Aquino, C.C.; Figueiredo, I.L.; Costa, T.B.; Oliveira Alves, L.A. de; Ribeiro, R.A.; Bertolini, L.R.; Lima, A.A.M.; Brito, G.A.C.; Oriá, R.B.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE=gene, apoE=protein) is a known factor regulating the inflammatory response that may have regenerative effects during tissue recovery from injury. We investigated whether apoE deficiency reduces the healing effect of alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln) treatment, a recognized gut-trophic nutrient, during tissue recovery after 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. APOE-knockout (APOE -/- ) and wild-type (APOE +/+ ) C57BL6J male and female mice (N=86) were given either Ala-Gln (100 mM) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) by gavage 3 days before and 5 days after a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) challenge (450 mg/kg, via intraperitoneal injection). Mouse body weight was monitored daily. The 5-FU cytotoxic effect was evaluated by leukometry. Intestinal villus height, villus/crypt ratio, and villin expression were monitored to assess recovery of the intestinal absorptive surface area. Crypt length, mitotic, apoptotic, and necrotic crypt indexes, and quantitative real-time PCR for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) intestinal mRNA transcripts were used to evaluate intestinal epithelial cell turnover. 5-FU challenge caused significant weight loss and leukopenia (P<0.001) in both mouse strains, which was not improved by Ala-Gln. Villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, and reduced villus/crypt ratio (P<0.05) were found in all 5-FU-challenged mice but not in PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus/crypt ratio, crypt length and mitotic index in all challenged mice, compared with PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus height only in APOE -/- mice. Crypt cell apoptosis and necrotic scores were increased in all mice challenged by 5-FU, compared with untreated controls. Those scores were significantly lower in Ala-Gln-treated APOE +/+ mice than in controls. Bcl-2 and IGF-1 mRNA transcripts were reduced only in the APOE -/- -challenged mice. Altogether our findings suggest APOE-independent Ala-Gln regenerative effects after 5-FU challenge

  14. Alanyl-glutamine attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araújo, C.V. [Laboratório da Biologia da Cicatrização, Ontogenia e Nutrição de Tecidos, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Lazzarotto, C.R. [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular e do Desenvolvimento, Universidade de Fortaleza, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Aquino, C.C.; Figueiredo, I.L.; Costa, T.B.; Oliveira Alves, L.A. de [Laboratório da Biologia da Cicatrização, Ontogenia e Nutrição de Tecidos, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Ribeiro, R.A. [Laboratório da Inflamação e Câncer, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Bertolini, L.R. [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular e do Desenvolvimento, Universidade de Fortaleza, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Lima, A.A.M. [Laboratório de Doenças Infecciosas, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Brito, G.A.C. [Laboratório da Inflamação e Câncer, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Oriá, R.B. [Laboratório da Biologia da Cicatrização, Ontogenia e Nutrição de Tecidos, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2015-04-28

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE=gene, apoE=protein) is a known factor regulating the inflammatory response that may have regenerative effects during tissue recovery from injury. We investigated whether apoE deficiency reduces the healing effect of alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln) treatment, a recognized gut-trophic nutrient, during tissue recovery after 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. APOE-knockout (APOE{sup -/-}) and wild-type (APOE{sup +/+}) C57BL6J male and female mice (N=86) were given either Ala-Gln (100 mM) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) by gavage 3 days before and 5 days after a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) challenge (450 mg/kg, via intraperitoneal injection). Mouse body weight was monitored daily. The 5-FU cytotoxic effect was evaluated by leukometry. Intestinal villus height, villus/crypt ratio, and villin expression were monitored to assess recovery of the intestinal absorptive surface area. Crypt length, mitotic, apoptotic, and necrotic crypt indexes, and quantitative real-time PCR for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) intestinal mRNA transcripts were used to evaluate intestinal epithelial cell turnover. 5-FU challenge caused significant weight loss and leukopenia (P<0.001) in both mouse strains, which was not improved by Ala-Gln. Villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, and reduced villus/crypt ratio (P<0.05) were found in all 5-FU-challenged mice but not in PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus/crypt ratio, crypt length and mitotic index in all challenged mice, compared with PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus height only in APOE{sup -/-} mice. Crypt cell apoptosis and necrotic scores were increased in all mice challenged by 5-FU, compared with untreated controls. Those scores were significantly lower in Ala-Gln-treated APOE{sup +/+} mice than in controls. Bcl-2 and IGF-1 mRNA transcripts were reduced only in the APOE{sup -/-}-challenged mice. Altogether our findings suggest APOE-independent Ala-Gln regenerative effects after 5-FU

  15. Cyanidin-3-O-Glucoside Modulates the In Vitro Inflammatory Crosstalk between Intestinal Epithelial and Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Ferrari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal epithelium represents a protective physical barrier and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. Polarized basolateral intestinal secretion of inflammatory mediators, followed by activation of NF-κB signaling and inflammatory pathways in endothelial cells, efficiently triggers extravasation of neutrophils from the vasculature, therefore contributing to the development and maintenance of intestinal inflammation. Proper regulation of NF-κB activation at the epithelial interface is crucial for the maintenance of physiological tissue homeostasis. Many papers reported that anthocyanins, a group of compounds belonging to flavonoids, possess anti-inflammatory effects and modulate NF-κB activity. In this study, by using a coculture in vitro system, we aimed to evaluate the effects of TNF-α-stimulated intestinal cells on endothelial cells activation, as well as the protective effects of cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G. In this model, TNF-α induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and TNF-α and IL-8 gene expression in Caco-2 cells, whereas C3G pretreatment dose-dependently reduced these effects. Furthermore, TNF-α-stimulated Caco-2 cells induced endothelial cells activation with increased E-selectin and VCAM-1 mRNA, leukocyte adhesion, and NF-κB levels in HUVECs, which were inhibited by C3G. We demonstrated that selective inhibition of the NF-κB pathway in epithelial cells represents the main mechanism by which C3G exerts these protective effects. Thus, anthocyanins could contribute to the management of chronic gut inflammatory diseases.

  16. A theoretical investigation of the effect of proliferation and adhesion on monoclonal conversion in the colonic crypt

    KAUST Repository

    Mirams, Gary R.; Fletcher, Alexander G.; Maini, Philip K.; Byrne, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    The surface epithelium lining the intestinal tract renews itself rapidly by a coordinated programme of cell proliferation, migration and differentiation events that is initiated in the crypts of Lieberkühn. It is generally believed that colorectal

  17. Diurnal variations in proliferation and crypt survival suggest a small target cell population in mouse colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbin, J.; Hamilton, E.

    1986-01-01

    Male C57BLasup(t) mice of two ages, 3-5 months (young) and 14-15 months (old) were given 11 or 15Gy whole body irradiation at different times through the day. The mice were killed after 4.5 days and the number of surviving crypts per circumference of jejunum, ileum, transverse colon and descending colon were scored. These results show crypt survival in the small and large intestine of 15-month-old mice. In the ileum the maximum crypt survival was found at 04.00 h and the minimum at 08.00 h. In the jejunum and both regions of the colon the maximum crypt survival occurred at 16.00 h. The nadir of crypt survival after 15 Gy was at 04.00 h in the jejunum and at 20.00 and 24.00 h in the transverse and descending colon, respectively. In young mice, crypt survival levels were similar to those found in old animals except at 04.00 h. when survival in the jejunum and ileum fell to 0.0004+-0.0002 and 0.0007+-0.0004, respectively. The lowest crypt survival in the colon of young mice also occurred at 04.00 h and in all four tissues the greatest number of crypts survived irradiation at 24.00 h. (author)

  18. The formation of intestinal organoids in a hanging drop culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, Malgorzata; Grabacka, Maja; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata

    2018-01-25

    Recently organoids have become widely used in vitro models of many tissue and organs. These type of structures, originated from embryonic or adult mammalian intestines, are called "mini guts". They organize spontaneously when intestinal crypts or stem cells are embedded in the extracellular matrix proteins preparation scaffold (Matrigel). This approach has some disadvantages, as Matrigel is undefined (the concentrations of growth factors and other biologically active components in it may vary from batch to batch), difficult to handle and expensive. Here we show that the organoids derived from chicken embryo intestine are formed in a hanging drop without embedding, providing an attractive alternative for currently used protocols. Using this technique we obtained compact structures composed of contiguous organoids, which were generally similar to chicken organoids cultured in Matrigel in terms of morphology and expression of intestinal epithelial markers. Due to the simplicity, high reproducibility and throughput capacity of hanging drop technique our model may be applied in various studies concerning the gut biology.

  19. Orexins control intestinal glucose transport by distinct neuronal, endocrine and direct epithelial pathways. : Orexins regulate intestinal glucose absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Ducroc, Robert; Voisin, Thierry; El Firar, Aadil; Laburthe, Marc

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Objective : Orexins are neuropeptides involved in energy homeostasis. We investigated the effect of orexin A (OxA) and OxB on intestinal glucose transport in the rat. Research Design and Methods : Injection of orexins led to a decrease in the blood glucose level in OGTT. Effects of orexins on glucose entry were analysed in Ussing chamber using the Na+-dependent increase in short-circuit current to quantify jejunal glucose transport. Results & Conclusions : The rapid an...

  20. Morphological and Functional Characterization of IL-12Rβ2 Chain on Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Implications for Local and Systemic Immunoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regoli, Mari; Man, Angela; Gicheva, Nadhezda; Dumont, Antonio; Ivory, Kamal; Pacini, Alessandra; Morucci, Gabriele; Branca, Jacopo J V; Lucattelli, Monica; Santosuosso, Ugo; Narbad, Arjan; Gulisano, Massimo; Bertelli, Eugenio; Nicoletti, Claudio

    2018-01-01

    Interaction between intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and the underlying immune systems is critical for maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis and mounting appropriate immune responses. We have previously showed that the T helper type 1 (T H 1) cytokine IL-12 plays a key role in the delicate immunological balance in the gut and the lack of appropriate levels of IL-12 had important consequences for health and disease, particularly with regard to food allergy. Here, we sought to understand the role of IL-12 in the regulation of lymphoepithelial cross talk and how this interaction affects immune responses locally and systemically. Using a combination of microscopy and flow cytometry techniques we observed that freshly isolated IECs expressed an incomplete, yet functional IL-12 receptor (IL-12R) formed solely by the IL-12Rβ2 chain that albeit the lack of the complementary IL-12β1 chain responded to ex vivo challenge with IL-12. Furthermore, the expression of IL-12Rβ2 on IECs is strategically located at the interface between epithelial and immune cells of the lamina propria and using in vitro coculture models and primary intestinal organoids we showed that immune-derived signals were required for the expression of IL-12Rβ2 on IECs. The biological relevance of the IEC-associated IL-12Rβ2 was assessed in vivo in a mouse model of food allergy characterized by allergy-associated diminished intestinal levels of IL-12 and in chimeric mice that lack the IL-12Rβ2 chain on IECs. These experimental models enabled us to show that the antiallergic properties of orally delivered recombinant Lactococcus lactis secreting bioactive IL-12 (rLc-IL12) were reduced in mice lacking the IL-12β2 chain on IECs. Finally, we observed that the oral delivery of IL-12 was accompanied by the downregulation of the production of the IEC-derived proallergic cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). However, further analysis of intestinal levels of TSLP in IL-12Rβ2 -/- mice suggested

  1. Inhibition of Epithelial TNF-α Receptors by Purified Fruit Bromelain Ameliorates Intestinal Inflammation and Barrier Dysfunction in Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zijuan; Wang, Liang; Feng, Panpan; Yin, Lianhong; Wang, Chen; Zhi, Shengxu; Dong, Jianyi; Wang, Jingyu; Lin, Yuan; Chen, Dapeng; Xiong, Yongjian; Peng, Jinyong

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the TNF-α receptor (TNFR) leads to an inflammatory response, and anti-TNF therapy has been administered to reduce inflammation symptoms and heal mucosal ulcers in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Bromelain, a complex natural mixture of proteolytic enzymes, has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects. This study aimed to investigate the effect of purified fruit bromelain (PFB)-induced inhibition of epithelial TNFR in a rat colitis model. Colitis was established by intracolonic administration of 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. Expression of TNFR1 and TNFR2 was measured by quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting. The effect of PFB on colitis was evaluated by examining the inflammatory response and intestinal epithelial barrier function. Our results showed that both TNFR1 and TNFR2 expression were significantly increased in a colitis model, and the increase was significantly reversed by PFB. Colitis symptoms, including infiltration of inflammatory cells, cytokine profiles, epithelial cell apoptosis, and epithelial tight junction barrier dysfunction were significantly ameliorated by PFB. Compared with fruit bromelain and stem bromelain complex, the inhibition of TNFR2 induced by PFB was stronger than that exhibited on TNFR1. These results indicate that PFB showed a stronger selective inhibitory effect on TNFR2 than TNFR1. In other words, purification of fruit bromelain increases its selectivity on TNFR2 inhibition. High expression of epithelial TNFRs in colitis was significantly counteracted by PFB, and PFB-induced TNFR inhibition ameliorated colitis symptoms. These results supply novel insights into potential IBD treatment by PFB.

  2. Live Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in an apical anaerobic model of the intestinal epithelial barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulluwishewa, D.; Anderson, R.C.; Young, W.; McNabb, W.C.; Baarlen, van P.; Moughan, P.J.; Wells, J.M.; Roy, N.C.

    2015-01-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, an abundant member of the human commensal microbiota, has been proposed to have a protective role in the intestine. However, it is an obligate anaerobe, difficult to co-culture in viable form with oxygen-requiring intestinal cells. To overcome this limitation, a unique

  3. Interleukin-17 is a potent immuno-modulator and regulator of normal human intestinal epithelial cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, S [Children' s Hospital, Mucosal Immunology Laboratory, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Beaulieu, J F [Department of Cell Biology/Anatomy, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke (Canada); Ruemmele, F M [Children' s Hospital, Mucosal Immunology Laboratory, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany) and INSERM EMI0212, Faculte de Medecine Necker, University Paris V, Paediatric Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Assistance-Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France)

    2005-11-18

    Upregulation of the T-cell derived cytokine interleukin (IL-17) was reported in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disorders. In this study, we analyzed the effect of IL-17 on human intestinal epithelial cell (HIEC) turnover and functions. Proliferation and apoptosis in response to IL-17 was monitored in HIEC (cell counts, [{sup 3}H]thymidine incorporation method, and annexinV-PI-apoptosis assay). Signalling pathways were analyzed by Western blots, electromobility shift assay, and immunofluorescence studies. IL-17 proved to be a potent inhibitor of HIEC proliferation without any pro-apoptotic/necrotic effect. The growth inhibitory effect of IL-17 was mediated via the p38 stress kinase. Consequently, the p38-SAPkinase-inhibitor SB203580 abrogated this anti-mitotic effect. In parallel, IL-17 provoked the degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, allowing nuclear translocation of the p65 NF-{kappa}B subunit and induction of the NF-{kappa}B-controlled genes IL-6 and -8. IL-17 potently blocks epithelial cell turnover while at the same time amplifying an inflammatory response in a positive feedback manner.

  4. Lipoteichoic Acid of Probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum Attenuates Poly I:C-Induced IL-8 Production in Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Whun Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics in livestock feed supplements are considered a replacement for antibiotics that enhance gastrointestinal immunity. Although bacterial cell wall components have been proposed to be associated with probiotic function, little evidence demonstrates that they are responsible for probiotic functions in livestock. The present study demonstrated that lipoteichoic acid (LTA of Lactobacillus plantarum (Lp.LTA confers anti-inflammatory responses in porcine intestinal epithelial cell line, IPEC-J2. A synthetic analog of viral double-stranded RNA, poly I:C, dose-dependently induced IL-8 production at the mRNA and protein levels in IPEC-J2 cells. Lp.LTA, but not lipoprotein or peptidoglycan from L. plantarum, exclusively suppressed poly I:C-induced IL-8 production. Compared with LTAs from other probiotic Lactobacillus strains including L. delbrueckii, L. sakei, and L. rhamnosus GG, Lp.LTA had higher potential to suppress poly I:C-induced IL-8 production. Dealanylated or deacylated Lp.LTA did not suppress poly I:C-induced IL-8 production, suggesting that D-alanine and lipid moieties in the Lp.LTA structure were responsible for the inhibition. Furthermore, Lp.LTA attenuated the phosphorylation of ERK and p38 kinase as well as the activation of NF-κB, resulting in decreased IL-8 production. Taken together, these results suggest that Lp.LTA acts as an effector molecule to inhibit viral pathogen-induced inflammatory responses in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

  5. Receptor-like Molecules on Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells Interact with an Adhesion Factor from Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yosuke; Miyoshi, Yukihiro; Okada, Sanae; Satoh, Eiichi

    2012-01-01

    A surface protein of Lactobacillus reuteri, mucus adhesion-promoting protein (MapA), is considered to be an adhesion factor. MapA is expressed in L. reuteri strains and adheres to piglet gastric mucus, collagen type I, and human intestinal epithelial cells such as Caco-2. The aim of this study was to identify molecules that mediate the attachment of MapA from L. reuteri to the intestinal epithelial cell surface by investigating the adhesion of MapA to receptor-like molecules on Caco-2 cells. MapA-binding receptor-like molecules were detected in Caco-2 cell lysates by 2D-PAGE. Two proteins, annexin A13 (ANXA13) and paralemmin (PALM), were identified by MALDI TOF-MS. The results of a pull-down assay showed that MapA bound directly to ANXA13 and PALM. Fluorescence microscopy studies confirmed that MapA binding to ANXA13 and PALM was colocalized on the Caco-2 cell membrane. To evaluate whether ANXA13 and PALM are important for MapA adhesion, ANXA13 and PALM knockdown cell lines were established. The adhesion of MapA to the abovementioned cell lines was reduced compared with that to wild-type Caco-2 cells. These knockdown experiments established the importance of these receptor-like molecules in MapA adhesion.

  6. Transcriptional regulation of the human Na+/H+ exchanger NHE3 by serotonin in intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Md Ruhul; Ghannad, Leda; Othman, Ahmad; Gill, Ravinder K.; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Ramaswamy, Krishnamurthy; Malakooti, Jaleh

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) decreases NHE2 and NHE3 activities under acute conditions in human intestinal epithelial cells. Here, we have investigated the effects of 5-HT on expression of the human NHE3 gene and the mechanisms underlying its transcriptional regulation in differentiated C2BBe1 cells. Treatment of the human intestinal epithelial cell line, C2BBe1, with 5-HT (20 μM) resulted in a significant decrease in NHE3 mRNA and protein expression. In transient transfection studies, 5-HT repressed the NHE3 promoter activity by ∼55%. The repression of the NHE3 promoter activity in response to 5-HT was accompanied by reduced DNA-binding activity of transcription factors Sp1 and Sp3 to the NHE3 promoter without alteration in their nuclear levels. Pharmacological inhibitors of protein kinase C reversed the inhibitory effect of 5-HT on the promoter activity. Our data indicate that 5-HT suppresses the transcriptional activity of the NHE3 promoter and this effect may be mediated by PKCα and modulation of DNA-binding affinities of Sp1 and Sp3.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of CDX2 binding in intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Mette; Hansen, Morten; Jensen, Tine G K

    2010-01-01

    The CDX2 transcription factor is known to play a crucial role in inhibiting proliferation, promoting differentiation and the expression of intestinal specific genes in intestinal cells. The overall effect of CDX2 in intestinal cells has previously been investigated in conditional knock-out mice......, revealing a critical role of CDX2 in the formation of the normal intestinal identity. The identification of direct targets of transcription factors is a key problem in the study of gene regulatory networks. The ChIP-seq technique combines chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with next generation sequencing...... resulting in a high throughput experimental method of identifying direct targets of specific transcription factors. The method was applied to CDX2, leading to the identification of the direct binding of CDX2 to several known and novel target genes in the intestinal cell. Examination of the transcript levels...

  8. Acrolein Disrupts Tight Junction Proteins and Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Epithelial Cell Death Leading to Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction and Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Yang; Wang, Min; Zhang, Jingwen; Barve, Shirish S; McClain, Craig J; Joshi-Barve, Swati

    2017-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that environmental and dietary factors can affect intestinal epithelial integrity leading to gut permeability and bacterial translocation. Intestinal barrier dysfunction is a pathogenic process associated with many chronic disorders. Acrolein is an environmental and dietary pollutant and a lipid-derived endogenous metabolite. The impact of acrolein on the intestine has not been investigated before and is evaluated in this study, both in vitro and in vivo. Our data demonstrate that oral acrolein exposure in mice caused damage to the intestinal epithelial barrier, resulting in increased permeability and subsequently translocation of bacterial endotoxin-lipopolysaccharide into the blood. Similar results were seen in vitro using established Caco-2 cell monolayers wherein acrolein decreased barrier function and increased permeability. Acrolein also caused the down-regulation and/or redistribution of three representative tight junction proteins (ie, zonula occludens-1, Occludin, Claudin-1) that critically regulate epithelial paracellular permeability. In addition, acrolein induced endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated death of epithelial cells, which is an important mechanism contributing to intestinal barrier damage/dysfunction, and gut permeability. Overall, we demonstrate that exposure to acrolein affects the intestinal epithelium by decrease/redistribution of tight junction proteins and endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated epithelial cell death, thereby resulting in loss of barrier integrity and function. Our findings highlight the adverse consequences of environmental and dietary pollutants on intestinal barrier integrity/function with relevance to gut permeability and the development of disease. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantification of Crypt and Stem Cell Evolution in the Normal and Neoplastic Human Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Marie Baker

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Human intestinal stem cell and crypt dynamics remain poorly characterized because transgenic lineage-tracing methods are impractical in humans. Here, we have circumvented this problem by quantitatively using somatic mtDNA mutations to trace clonal lineages. By analyzing clonal imprints on the walls of colonic crypts, we show that human intestinal stem cells conform to one-dimensional neutral drift dynamics with a “functional” stem cell number of five to six in both normal patients and individuals with familial adenomatous polyposis (germline APC−/+. Furthermore, we show that, in adenomatous crypts (APC−/−, there is a proportionate increase in both functional stem cell number and the loss/replacement rate. Finally, by analyzing fields of mtDNA mutant crypts, we show that a normal colon crypt divides around once every 30–40 years, and the division rate is increased in adenomas by at least an order of magnitude. These data provide in vivo quantification of human intestinal stem cell and crypt dynamics.

  10. Alpha-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Protects against Cytokine-Induced Barrier Damage in Caco-2 Intestinal Epithelial Monolayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Váradi

    Full Text Available Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH is a potent anti-inflammatory peptide with cytoprotective effect in various tissues. The present investigation demonstrates the ability of α-MSH to interact with intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and mitigate inflammatory processes of the epithelial barrier. The protective effect of α-MSH was studied on Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial monolayers, which were disrupted by exposure to tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. The barrier integrity was assessed by measuring transepithelial electric resistance (TEER and permeability for marker molecules. Caco-2 monolayers were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for expression of melanocortin-1 receptor and tight junction proteins ZO-1 and claudin-4. The activation of nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-κB was detected by fluorescence microscopy and inflammatory cytokine expression was assessed by flow cytometric bead array cytokine assay. Exposure of Caco-2 monolayers to proinflammatory cytokines lowered TEER and increased permeability for fluorescein and albumin, which was accompanied by changes in ZO-1 and claudin-4 immunostaining. α-MSH was able to prevent inflammation-associated decrease of TEER in a dose-dependent manner and reduce the increased permeability for paracellular marker fluorescein. Further immunohistochemistry analysis revealed proinflammatory cytokine induced translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit into Caco-2 cell nuclei, which was inhibited by α-MSH. As a result the IL-6 and IL-8 production of Caco-2 monolayers were also decreased with different patterns by the addition of α-MSH to the culture medium. In conclusion, Caco-2 cells showed a positive immunostaining for melanocortin-1 receptor and α-MSH protected Caco-2 cells against inflammatory barrier dysfunction and inflammatory activation induced by tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β cytokines.

  11. Knockout of MIMP protein in lactobacillus plantarum lost its regulation of intestinal permeability on NCM460 epithelial cells through the zonulin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihua; Kang, Liang; Li, Chao; Tong, Chao; Huang, Meijin; Zhang, Xingwei; Huang, Nanqi; Moyer, Mary Pat; Qin, Huanlong; Wang, Jianping

    2014-10-03

    Previous studies indicated that the micro integral membrane protein located within the media place of the integral membrane protein of Lactobacillus plantarum CGMCC 1258 had protective effects against the intestinal epithelial injury. In our study, we mean to establish micro integral membrane protein -knockout Lactobacillus plantarum (LPKM) to investigate the change of its protective effects and verify the role of micro integral membrane protein on protection of normal intestinal barrier function. Binding assay and intestinal permeability were performed to verify the protective effects of micro integral membrane protein on intestinal permeability in vitro and in vivo. Molecular mechanism was also determined as the zonulin pathway. Clinical data were also collected for further verification of relationship between zonulin level and postoperative septicemia. LPKM got decreased inhibition of EPEC adhesion to NCM460 cells. LPKM had lower ability to alleviate the decrease of intestinal permeability induced by enteropathogenic-e.coli, and prevent enteropathogenic-e.coli -induced increase of zonulin expression. Overexpression of zonulin lowered the intestinal permeability regulated by Lactobacillus plantarum. There was a positive correlation between zonulin level and postoperative septicemia. Therefore, micro integral membrane protein could be necessary for the protective effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on intestinal barrier. MIMP might be a positive factor for Lactobacillus plantarum to protect the intestinal epithelial cells from injury, which could be related to the zonulin pathway.

  12. Oligomannose-Rich Membranes of Dying Intestinal Epithelial Cells Promote Host Colonization by Adherent-Invasive E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Dumych

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel mechanism is revealed by which clinical isolates of adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC penetrate into the epithelial cell layer, replicate, and establish biofilms in Crohn's disease. AIEC uses the FimH fimbrial adhesin to bind to oligomannose glycans on the surface of host cells. Oligomannose glycans exposed on early apoptotic cells are the preferred binding targets of AIEC, so apoptotic cells serve as potential entry points for bacteria into the epithelial cell layer. Thereafter, the bacteria propagate laterally in the epithelial intercellular spaces. We demonstrate oligomannosylation at two distinct sites of a glycoprotein receptor for AIEC, carcinoembryonic antigen related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6 or CD66c, on human intestinal epithelia. After bacterial binding, FimH interacts with CEACAM6, which then clusters. The presence of the highest-affinity epitope for FimH, oligomannose-5, on CEACAM6 is demonstrated using LC-MS/MS. As mannose-dependent infections are abundant, this mechanism might also be used by other adherent-invasive pathogens.

  13. The Bacterial Species Campylobacter jejuni Induce Diverse Innate Immune Responses in Human and Avian Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. John

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter remain the major cause of human gastroenteritis in the Developed World causing a significant burden to health services. Campylobacter are pathogens in humans and chickens, although differences in mechanistic understanding are incomplete, in part because phenotypic strain diversity creates inconsistent findings. Here, we took Campylobacter jejuni isolates (n = 100 from multi-locus sequence typed collections to assess their pathogenic diversity, through their inflammatory, cytotoxicity, adhesion, invasion and signaling responses in a high-throughput model using avian and human intestinal epithelial cells. C. jejuni induced IL-8 and CXCLi1/2 in human and avian epithelial cells, respectively, in a MAP kinase-dependent manner. In contrast, IL-10 responses in both cell types were PI 3-kinase/Akt-dependent. C. jejuni strains showed diverse levels of invasion with high invasion dependent on MAP kinase signaling in both cell lines. C. jejuni induced diverse cytotoxic responses in both cell lines with cdt-positive isolates showing significantly higher toxicity. Blockade of endocytic pathways suggested that invasion by C. jejuni was clathrin- and dynamin-dependent but caveolae- independent in both cells. In contrast, IL-8 (and CXCLi1/2 production was dependent on clathrin, dynamin, and caveolae. This study is important because of its scale, and the data produced, suggesting that avian and human epithelial cells use similar innate immune pathways where the magnitude of the response is determined by the phenotypic diversity of the Campylobacter species.

  14. Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCMI-4317 Modulates Fiaf/Angptl4 in Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Circulating Level in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacouton, Elsa; Mach, Núria; Cadiou, Julie; Lapaque, Nicolas; Clément, Karine; Doré, Joël; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E T; Smokvina, Tamara; Blottière, Hervé M

    2015-01-01

    Identification of new targets for metabolic diseases treatment or prevention is required. In this context, FIAF/ANGPTL4 appears as a crucial regulator of energy homeostasis. Lactobacilli are often considered to display beneficial effect for their hosts, acting on different regulatory pathways. The aim of the present work was to study the effect of several lactobacilli strains on Fiaf gene expression in human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and on mice tissues to decipher the underlying mechanisms. Nineteen lactobacilli strains have been tested on HT-29 human intestinal epithelial cells for their ability to regulate Fiaf gene expression by RT-qPCR. In order to determine regulated pathways, we analysed the whole genome transcriptome of IECs. We then validated in vivo bacterial effects using C57BL/6 mono-colonized mice fed with normal chow. We identified one strain (Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCMI-4317) that modulated Fiaf expression in IECs. This regulation relied potentially on bacterial surface-exposed molecules and seemed to be PPAR-γ independent but PPAR-α dependent. Transcriptome functional analysis revealed that multiple pathways including cellular function and maintenance, lymphoid tissue structure and development, as well as lipid metabolism were regulated by this strain. The regulation of immune system and lipid and carbohydrate metabolism was also confirmed by overrepresentation of Gene Ontology terms analysis. In vivo, circulating FIAF protein was increased by the strain but this phenomenon was not correlated with modulation Fiaf expression in tissues (except a trend in distal small intestine). We showed that Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCMI-4317 induced Fiaf expression in human IECs, and increased circulating FIAF protein level in mice. Moreover, this effect was accompanied by transcriptome modulation of several pathways including immune response and metabolism in vitro.

  15. Small intestine epithelial barrier function is compromised in pigs with low feed intake at weaning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreeuwenberg, M.A.; Verdonk, J.M.; Gaskins, H.R.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2001-01-01

    Compromising alterations in gastrointestinal architecture are common during the weaning transition of pigs. The relation between villous atrophy and epithelial barrier function at weaning is not well understood. This study evaluated in vitro transepithelial transport by Ussing metabolic chambers,

  16. Correlation between oral drug absorption in humans and apparent drug permeability coefficients in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artursson, P.; Karlsson, J.

    1991-01-01

    Monolayers of a well differentiated human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2, were used as a model to study passive drug absorption across the intestinal epithelium. Absorption rate constants (expressed as apparent permeability coefficients) were determined for 20 drugs and peptides with different structural properties. The permeability coefficients ranged from approximately 5 x 10 - 8 to 5 x 10 - 5 cm/s. A good correlation was obtained between data on oral absorption in humans and the results in the Caco-2 model. Drugs that are completely absorbed in humans had permeability coefficients greater than 1 x 10 - 6 cm/s. Drugs that are absorbed to greater than 1% but less than 100% had permeability coefficients of 0.1-1.0 x 10 - 6 cm/s while drugs and peptides that are absorbed to less than 1% had permeability coefficients of less than or equal to 1 x 10 - 7 cm/s. The results indicate that Caco-2 monolayers can be used as a model for studies on intestinal drug absorption

  17. Outer Membrane Vesicles From Probiotic and Commensal Escherichia coli Activate NOD1-Mediated Immune Responses in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Alexandra Cañas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota plays a critical role in maintaining human intestinal homeostasis and host health. Bacterial extracellular vesicles are key players in bacteria–host communication, as they allow delivery of effector molecules into the host cells. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs released by Gram-negative bacteria carry many ligands of pattern recognition receptors that are key components of innate immunity. NOD1 and NOD2 cytosolic receptors specifically recognize peptidoglycans present within the bacterial cell wall. These intracellular immune receptors are essential in host defense against bacterial infections and in the regulation of inflammatory responses. Recent contributions show that NODs are also fundamental to maintain intestinal homeostasis and microbiota balance. Peptidoglycan from non-invasive pathogens is delivered to cytosolic NODs through OMVs, which are internalized via endocytosis. Whether this pathway could be used by microbiota to activate NOD receptors remains unexplored. Here, we report that OMVs isolated from the probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and the commensal ECOR12 activate NOD1 signaling pathways in intestinal epithelial cells. NOD1 silencing and RIP2 inhibition significantly abolished OMV-mediated activation of NF-κB and subsequent IL-6 and IL-8 expression. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis confirmed that endocytosed OMVs colocalize with NOD1, trigger the formation of NOD1 aggregates, and promote NOD1 association with early endosomes. This study shows for the first time the activation of NOD1-signaling pathways by extracellular vesicles released by gut microbiota.

  18. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis and transcytosis of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli F4 fimbriae in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasschaert, Kristien; Devriendt, Bert; Favoreel, Herman; Goddeeris, Bruno M; Cox, Eric

    2010-10-15

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) cause severe diarrhea in neonatal and recently weaned piglets. Previously, we demonstrated that oral immunization of F4 receptor positive piglets with purified F4 fimbriae induces a protective F4-specific intestinal immune response. However, in F4 receptor negative animals no F4-specific immune response can be elicited, indicating that the induction of an F4-specific mucosal immune response upon oral immunisation is receptor-dependent. Although F4 fimbriae undergo transcytosis across the intestinal epithelium in vivo, the endocytosis pathways used remain unknown. In the present study, we characterized the internalization of F4 fimbriae in the porcine intestinal epithelial cell line IPEC-J2. The results in the present study demonstrate that F4 fimbriae are internalized through a clathrin-dependent pathway. Furthermore, our results suggest that F4 fimbriae are transcytosed across differentiated IPEC-J2 cells. This receptor-dependent transcytosis of F4 fimbriae may explain the immunogenicity of these fimbriae upon oral administration in vivo. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluorescently labeled methyl-beta-cyclodextrin enters intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells by fluid-phase endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc Fenyvesi

    Full Text Available Cyclodextrins are widely used excipients for increasing the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Their effect on drug absorption in the gastrointestinal tract is explained by their solubility- and permeability-enhancement. The aims of this study were to investigate penetration properties of fluorescently labeled randomly methylated-beta-cyclodextrin (FITC-RAMEB on Caco-2 cell layer and examine the cellular entry of cyclodextrins on intestinal cells. The permeability of FITC-RAMEB through Caco-2 monolayers was very limited. Using this compound in 0.05 mM concentration the permeability coefficient was 3.35±1.29×10(-8 cm/s and its permeability did not change in the presence of 5 mM randomly methylated-beta-cyclodextrin. Despite of the low permeability, cellular accumulation of FITC-RAMEB in cytoplasmic vesicles was significant and showed strong time and concentration dependence, similar to the characteristics of the macropinocytosis marker Lucifer Yellow. The internalization process was fully inhibited at 0°C and it was drastically reduced at 37°C applying rottlerin, an inhibitor of macropinocytosis. Notably, FITC-RAMEB colocalized with the early endosome organizer Rab5a. These results have revealed that FITC-RAMEB is able to enter intestinal epithelial cells by fluid-phase endocytosis from the apical side. This mechanism can be an additional process which helps to overcome the intestinal barrier and contributes to the bioavailability enhancement of cyclodextrins.

  20. Cellular mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effect of flufenamic acid on chloride secretion in human intestinal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawin Pongkorpsakol

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal Cl− secretion is involved in the pathogenesis of secretory diarrheas including cholera. We recently demonstrated that flufenamic acid (FFA suppressed Vibrio cholerae El Tor variant-induced intestinal fluid secretion via mechanisms involving AMPK activation and NF-κB-suppression. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of FFA on transepithelial Cl− secretion in human intestinal epithelial (T84 cells. FFA inhibited cAMP-dependent Cl− secretion in T84 cell monolayers with IC50 of ∼8 μM. Other fenamate drugs including tolfenamic acid, meclofenamic acid and mefenamic acid exhibited the same effect albeit with lower potency. FFA also inhibited activities of CFTR, a cAMP-activated apical Cl− channel, and KCNQ1/KCNE3, a cAMP-activated basolateral K+ channel. Mechanisms of CFTR inhibition by FFA did not involve activation of its negative regulators. Interestingly, FFA inhibited Ca2+-dependent Cl− secretion with IC50 of ∼10 μM. FFA inhibited activities of Ca2+-activated Cl− channels and KCa3.1, a Ca2+-activated basolateral K+ channels, but had no effect on activities of Na+–K+–Cl− cotransporters and Na+–K+ ATPases. These results indicate that FFA inhibits both cAMP and Ca2+-dependent Cl− secretion by suppressing activities of both apical Cl− channels and basolateral K+ channels. FFA and other fenamate drugs may be useful in the treatment of secretory diarrheas.

  1. Transplantation of Expanded Fetal Intestinal Progenitors Contributes to Colon Regeneration after Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fordham, Robert P; Yui, Shiro; Hannan, Nicholas R F

    2013-01-01

    Regeneration and homeostasis in the adult intestinal epithelium is driven by proliferative resident stem cells, whose functional properties during organismal development are largely unknown. Here, we show that human and mouse fetal intestine contains proliferative, immature progenitors, which can...... be expanded in vitro as Fetal Enterospheres (FEnS). A highly similar progenitor population can be established during intestinal differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells. Established cultures of mouse fetal intestinal progenitors express lower levels of Lgr5 than mature progenitors and propagate...... in the presence of the Wnt antagonist Dkk1, and new cultures can be induced to form mature intestinal organoids by exposure to Wnt3a. Following transplantation in a colonic injury model, FEnS contribute to regeneration of colonic epithelium by forming epithelial crypt-like structures expressing region...

  2. Mitochondrial DNA polymerase editing mutation, PolgD257A, disturbs stem-progenitor cell cycling in the small intestine and restricts excess fat absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Raymond G; Magness, Scott; Kujoth, Gregory C; Prolla, Tomas A; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2012-05-01

    Changes in intestinal absorption of nutrients are important aspects of the aging process. To address this issue, we investigated the impact of accelerated mitochondrial DNA mutations on the stem/progenitor cells in the crypts of Lieberkühn in mice homozygous for a mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma mutation, Polg(D257A), that exhibit accelerated aging phenotype. As early as 3-7 mo of age, the small intestine was significantly enlarged in the PolgD257A mice. The crypts of the PolgD257A mice contained 20% more cells than those of their wild-type littermates and exhibited a 10-fold increase in cellular apoptosis primarily in the stem/progenitor cell zones. Actively dividing cells were proportionally increased, yet a significantly smaller proportion of cells was in the S phase of the cell cycle. Stem cell-derived organoids from PolgD257A mice failed to develop fully in culture and exhibited fewer crypt units, indicating an impact of the mutation on the intestinal epithelial stem/progenitor cell maintenance. In addition, epithelial cell migration along the crypt-villus axis was slowed and less organized, and the ATP content in the villi was significantly reduced. On a high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet, PolgD257A mice showed significantly restricted absorption of excess lipids accompanied by an increase in fecal steatocrits. We conclude that the PolgD257A mutation causes cell cycle dysregulation in the crypts leading to the age-associated changes in the morphology of the small intestine and contributes to the restricted absorption of dietary lipids.

  3. Exopolysaccharides from Lactobacillus delbrueckii OLL1073R-1 modulate innate antiviral immune response in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanmani, Paulraj; Albarracin, Leonardo; Kobayashi, Hisakazu; Iida, Hikaru; Komatsu, Ryoya; Humayun Kober, A K M; Ikeda-Ohtsubo, Wakako; Suda, Yoshihito; Aso, Hisashi; Makino, Seiya; Kano, Hiroshi; Saito, Tadao; Villena, Julio; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that the extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) produced by Lactobacillus delbrueckii OLL1073R-1 (LDR-1) improve antiviral immunity, especially in the systemic and respiratory compartments. However, it was not studied before whether those EPSs are able to beneficially modulate intestinal antiviral immunity. In addition, LDR-1-host interaction has been evaluated mainly with immune cells while its interaction with intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) was not addressed before. In this work, we investigated the capacity of EPSs from LDR-1 to modulate the response of porcine IECs (PIE cells) to the stimulation with the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-3 agonist poly(I:C) and the role of TLR2, TLR4, and TLR negative regulators in the immunoregulatory effect. We showed that innate immune response triggered by TLR3 activation in porcine IECs was differentially modulated by EPS from LDR-1. EPSs treatment induced an increment in the expression of interferon (IFN)-α and IFN-β in PIE cells after the stimulation with poly(I:C) as well as the expression of the antiviral factors MxA and RNase L. Those effects were related to the reduced expression of A20 in EPS-treated PIE cells. EPS from LDR-1 was also able to reduce the expression of IL-6 and proinflammatory chemokines. Although further in vivo studies are needed, our results suggest that these EPSs or a yogurt fermented with LDR-1 have potential to improve intestinal innate antiviral response and protect against intestinal viruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Celiac Disease: Role of the Epithelial BarrierSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schumann

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In celiac disease (CD a T-cell–mediated response to gluten is mounted in genetically predisposed individuals, resulting in a malabsorptive enteropathy histologically highlighted by villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia. Recent data point to the epithelial layer as an under-rated hot spot in celiac pathophysiology to date. This overview summarizes current functional and genetic evidence on the role of the epithelial barrier in CD, consisting of the cell membranes and the apical junctional complex comprising sealing as well as ion and water channel-forming tight junction proteins and the adherens junction. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms are discussed, including apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells, biology of intestinal stem cells, alterations in the apical junctional complex, transcytotic uptake of gluten peptides, and possible implications of a defective epithelial polarity. Current research is directed toward new treatment options for CD that are alternatives or complementary therapeutics to a gluten-free diet. Thus, strategies to target an altered epithelial barrier therapeutically also are discussed. Keywords: Celiac Sprue, Gluten-Sensitive Enteropathy, Tight Junction, Epithelial Polarity, Partitioning-Defective Proteins, α-Gliadin 33mer

  5. A study of the effects of pinealectomy on intestinal cell proliferation in infant newborn rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalio Marcelo Belini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Study the proliferation rate of jejunum and large intestine crypt epithelial cells, in rats pinealectomized immediately after borning. METHODS: Twenty-four male Wistar rats were distributed into two groups: Acute group (n=12 and Chronic group (n=12. Six animals of each group were operated for removal of the pineal gland (pinealectomy-PnX, and other six were controls (sham pinealectomy-C. Animals from acute and chronic group were sacrificed 15 and 90 days after the surgery, respectively. RESULTS: In acute group, pinealectomy of new-born rats has not caused significant alteration in cell proliferation (PnX=58,77?1,77 and C=60,88?1,10 in the descending colon/ PnX=31,56?0,45 and C=31,73?0,47 in the proximal jejunum and in crypt cell population (PnX=24,92?4,82 and C=23,60?2,48 in the descending colon/ PnX=39,92?3,49 and C=44,32?5,56 in the proximal jejunum. However, in chronic group there was an uprising crypt cell production per crypt in the proximal jejunum (PnX=57,54?2,19 and C=47,19?7,3and in the descending colon (PnX=37,78?2,22 and C=17,92?2,28. CONCLUSION: As the increase of intestinal crypts epithelial cells in chronic group is a carcinogenesis predetermining factor, the understanding of the interaction between pineal gland and this event has great importance.

  6. Toll-Like Receptor 2 Activation by beta 2 -> 1-Fructans Protects Barrier Function of T84 Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells in a Chain Length-Dependent Manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, Leonie M.; Meyer, Diederick; Pullens, Gerdie; Faas, Marijke M.; Venema, Koen; Ramasamy, Uttara; Schols, Henk A.; de Vos, Paul

    Dietary fiber intake is associated with lower incidence and mortality from disease, but the underlying mechanisms of these protective effects are unclear. We hypothesized that beta 2 -> 1-fructan dietary fibers confer protection on intestinal epithelial cell barrier function via Toll-like receptor 2

  7. Novel polyfucosylated N-linked glycopeptides with blood group A, H, X and Y determinants from human small intestinal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Finne, J.; Breimer, M.E.; Hansson, G.C.; Karlsson, K.-A.; Leffler, H.; Halbeek, H. van

    1989-01-01

    A novel type of N-linked glycopeptides representing a major part of the glycans in human small intestinal epithelial cells from blood group A and O individuals were isolated by gel filtrations and affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-Sepharose and Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin I-Sepharose.

  8. G protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) transcription in intestinal epithelial cells is significantly affected by bacteria belonging to the Bacteroides, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes phyla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, Marlene; Theil, Peter Kappel; Jensen, Bent Borg

    2012-01-01

    RNA abundance. Supernatants of the 12 bacteria were added to differentiated Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells cultured on filter inserts in concentrations corresponding to a cell:bacteria ratio of 1:200. After 4 h of incubation, changes in cellular mRNA of GLP-1 and GPR120 by bacterial supernatant were...

  9. Conjugated primary bile salts reduce permeability of endotoxin through bacteria-stimulated intestinal epithelial cells and synergize with lecithin in suppression of inflammatory cytokine production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Schaeckeler, Simone; Moser, Lydia

    2007-01-01

    : The effect of CPBS (0.5 mM and 1.5 mM), phosphatidylcholine(0.38 mM), and human bile (0.5% vol/vol) on the barrier function was assessed by the measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance, by endotoxin permeability through the intestinal epithelial cell layer, and by basolateral cytokine enzyme...

  10. A method for high purity intestinal epithelial cell culture from adult human and murine tissues for the investigation of innate immune function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christina L; Harden, Scott W; LaPato, Melissa; Nelson, Michael; Amador, Byron; Sorenson, Heather; Frazier, Charles J; Wallet, Shannon M

    2014-12-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) serve as an important physiologic barrier between environmental antigens and the host intestinal immune system. Thus, IECs serve as a first line of defense and may act as sentinel cells during inflammatory insults. Despite recent renewed interest in IEC contributions to host immune function, the study of primary IEC has been hindered by lack of a robust culture technique, particularly for small intestinal and adult tissues. Here, a novel adaptation for culture of primary IEC is described for human duodenal organ donor tissue as well as duodenum and colon of adult mice. These epithelial cell cultures display characteristic phenotypes and are of high purity. In addition, the innate immune function of human primary IEC, specifically with regard to Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression and microbial ligand responsiveness, is contrasted with a commonly used intestinal epithelial cell line (HT-29). Specifically, TLR expression at the mRNA level and production of cytokine (IFNγ and TNFα) in response to TLR agonist stimulation is assessed. Differential expression of TLRs as well as innate immune responses to ligand stimulation is observed in human-derived cultures compared to that of HT-29. Thus, use of this adapted method to culture primary epithelial cells from adult human donors and from adult mice will allow for more appropriate studies of IECs as innate immune effectors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. The Development of M Cells in Peyer’s Patches Is Restricted to Specialized Dome-Associated Crypts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebert, Andreas; Fassbender, Susanne; Werner, Kerstin; Weissferdt, Annikka

    1999-01-01

    It is controversial whether the membranous (M) cells of the Peyer’s patches represent a separate cell line or develop from enterocytes under the influence of lymphocytes on the domes. To answer this question, the crypts that produce the dome epithelial cells were studied and the distribution of M cells over the domes was determined in mice. The Ulex europaeus agglutinin was used to detect M cells in mouse Peyer’s patches. Confocal microscopy with lectin-gold labeling on ultrathin sections, scanning electron microscopy, and laminin immuno-histochemistry were combined to characterize the cellular composition and the structure of the dome-associated crypts and the dome epithelium. In addition, the sites of lymphocyte invasion into the dome epithelium were studied after removal of the epithelium using scanning electron microscopy. The domes of Peyer’s patches were supplied with epithelial cells that derived from two types of crypt: specialized dome-associated crypts and ordinary crypts differing not only in shape, size, and cellular composition but also in the presence of M cell precursors. When epithelial cells derived from ordinary crypts entered the domes, they formed converging radial strips devoid of M cells. In contrast to the M cells, the sites where lymphocytes invaded the dome epithelium were not arranged in radial strips, but randomly distributed over the domes. M cell development is restricted to specialized dome-associated crypts. Only dome epithelial cells that derive from these specialized crypts differentiate into M cells. It is concluded that M cells represent a separate cell line that is induced in the dome-associated crypts by still unknown, probably diffusible lymphoid factors. PMID:10329609

  12. Hes1 promotes the IL-22-mediated antimicrobial response by enhancing STAT3-dependent transcription in human intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murano, Tatsuro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Okamoto, Ryuichi, E-mail: rokamoto.gast@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Advanced GI Therapeutics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Go; Nakata, Toru; Hibiya, Shuji; Shimizu, Hiromichi; Fujii, Satoru; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Yui, Shiro; Akiyama-Morio, Junko; Nemoto, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Advanced GI Therapeutics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Watanabe, Mamoru [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Hes1 enhances IL-22-STAT3 signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells. •Hes1 enhances REG family gene induction by IL-22-STAT3 signaling. •Protein level of Hes1 restricts the response to IL-22. •Present regulation of a cytokine signal represents a new mode of Hes1 function. -- Abstract: Notch signaling plays an essential role in the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We have previously shown that Notch signaling is up-regulated in the inflamed mucosa of ulcerative colitis (UC) and thereby plays an indispensable role in tissue regeneration. Here we show that in addition to Notch signaling, STAT3 signaling is highly activated in the inflamed mucosa of UC. Forced expression of the Notch target gene Hes1 dramatically enhanced the IL-22-mediated STAT3-dependent transcription in human IECs. This enhancement of STAT3-dependent transcription was achieved by the extended phosphorylation of STAT3 by Hes1. Microarray analysis revealed that Hes1-mediated enhancement of IL-22-STAT3 signaling significantly increased the induction of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, such as REG1A, REG3A and REG3G, in human IECs. Conversely, the reduction of Hes1 protein levels with a γ-secretase inhibitor significantly down-regulated the induction of those genes in IECs, resulting in a markedly poor response to IL-22. Our present findings identify a new role for the molecular function of Hes1 in which the protein can interact with cytokine signals and regulate the immune response of IECs.

  13. New insights into mycotoxin mixtures: The toxicity of low doses of Type B trichothecenes on intestinal epithelial cells is synergistic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alassane-Kpembi, Imourana [INRA, UMR 1331 Toxalim, Research Center in Food Toxicology, F-31027 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, ENVT, INP, UMR 1331 Toxalim, F-31076 Toulouse (France); Institut des Sciences Biomédicales Appliquées, Cotonou, Bénin (Benin); Kolf-Clauw, Martine; Gauthier, Thierry; Abrami, Roberta [INRA, UMR 1331 Toxalim, Research Center in Food Toxicology, F-31027 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, ENVT, INP, UMR 1331 Toxalim, F-31076 Toulouse (France); Abiola, François A. [Institut des Sciences Biomédicales Appliquées, Cotonou, Bénin (Benin); Oswald, Isabelle P., E-mail: Isabelle.Oswald@toulouse.inra.fr [INRA, UMR 1331 Toxalim, Research Center in Food Toxicology, F-31027 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, ENVT, INP, UMR 1331 Toxalim, F-31076 Toulouse (France); Puel, Olivier [INRA, UMR 1331 Toxalim, Research Center in Food Toxicology, F-31027 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, ENVT, INP, UMR 1331 Toxalim, F-31076 Toulouse (France)

    2013-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is the most prevalent trichothecene mycotoxin in crops in Europe and North America. DON is often present with other type B trichothecenes such as 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), nivalenol (NIV) and fusarenon-X (FX). Although the cytotoxicity of individual mycotoxins has been widely studied, data on the toxicity of mycotoxin mixtures are limited. The aim of this study was to assess interactions caused by co-exposure to Type B trichothecenes on intestinal epithelial cells. Proliferating Caco-2 cells were exposed to increasing doses of Type B trichothecenes, alone or in binary or ternary mixtures. The MTT test and neutral red uptake, respectively linked to mitochondrial and lysosomal functions, were used to measure intestinal epithelial cytotoxicity. The five tested mycotoxins had a dose-dependent effect on proliferating enterocytes and could be classified in increasing order of toxicity: 3-ADON < 15-ADON ≈ DON < NIV ≪ FX. Binary or ternary mixtures also showed a dose-dependent effect. At low concentrations (cytotoxic effect between 10 and 30–40%), mycotoxin combinations were synergistic; however DON–NIV–FX mixture showed antagonism. At higher concentrations (cytotoxic effect around 50%), the combinations had an additive or nearly additive effect. These results indicate that the simultaneous presence of low doses of mycotoxins in food commodities and diet may be more toxic than predicted from the mycotoxins alone. Considering the frequent co-occurrence of trichothecenes in the diet and the concentrations of toxins to which consumers are exposed, this synergy should be taken into account. - Highlights: • We assessed the individual and combined cytotoxicity of five trichothecenes. • The tested concentrations correspond to the French consumer exposure levels. • The type of interaction in combined cytotoxicity varied with the effect level. • Low doses of Type B trichothecenes induced synergistic

  14. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Interactions in Urinary Bladder and Small Intestine and How to Apply Them in Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerman, Urška Dragin; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Veranič, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Reciprocal interactions between the epithelium and mesenchyme are essential for the establishment of proper tissue morphology during organogenesis and tissue regeneration as well as for the maintenance of cell differentiation. With this review, we highlight the importance of epithelial-mesenchymal cross talk in healthy tissue and further discuss its significance in engineering functional tissues in vitro. We focus on the urinary bladder and small intestine, organs that are often compromised by disease and are as such in need of research that would advance effective treatment or tissue replacement. To date, the understanding of epithelial-mesenchymal reciprocal interactions has enabled the development of in vitro biomimetic tissue equivalents that have provided many possibilities in treating defective, damaged, or even cancerous tissues. Although research of the past several years has advanced the field of bladder and small intestine tissue engineering, one must be aware of its current limitations in successfully and above all safely introducing tissue-engineered constructs into clinical practice. Special attention is in particular needed when treating cancerous tissues, as initially successful tumor excision and tissue reconstruction may later on result in cancer recurrence due to oncogenic signals originating from an altered stroma. Recent rather poor outcomes in pioneering clinical trials of bladder reconstructions should serve as a reminder that recreating a functional organ to replace a dysfunctional one is an objective far more difficult to reach than initially foreseen. When considering effective tissue engineering approaches for diseased tissues in humans, it is imperative to introduce animal models with dysfunctional or, even more importantly, cancerous organs, which would greatly contribute to predicting possible complications and, hence, reducing risks when translating to the clinic.

  15. Water transport through the intestinal epithelial barrier under different osmotic conditions is dependent on LI-cadherin trans-interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weth, Agnes; Dippl, Carsten; Striedner, Yasmin; Tiemann-Boege, Irene; Vereshchaga, Yana; Golenhofen, Nikola; Bartelt-Kirbach, Britta; Baumgartner, Werner

    2017-04-03

    In the intestine water has to be reabsorbed from the chymus across the intestinal epithelium. The osmolarity within the lumen is subjected to high variations meaning that water transport often has to take place against osmotic gradients. It has been hypothesized that LI-cadherin is important in this process by keeping the intercellular cleft narrow facilitating the buildup of an osmotic gradient allowing water reabsorption. LI-cadherin is exceptional among the cadherin superfamily with respect to its localization along the lateral plasma membrane of epithelial cells being excluded from adherens junction. Furthermore it has 7 but not 5 extracellular cadherin repeats (EC1-EC7) and a small cytosolic domain. In this study we identified the peptide VAALD as an inhibitor of LI-cadherin trans-interaction by modeling the structure of LI-cadherin and comparison with the known adhesive interfaces of E-cadherin. This inhibitory peptide was used to measure LI-cadherin dependency of water transport through a monolayer of epithelial CACO2 cells under various osmotic conditions. If LI-cadherin trans-interaction was inhibited by use of the peptide, water transport from the luminal to the basolateral side was impaired and even reversed in the case of hypertonic conditions whereas no effect could be observed at isotonic conditions. These data are in line with a recently published model predicting LI-cadherin to keep the width of the lateral intercellular cleft small. In this narrow cleft a high osmolarity can be achieved due to ion pumps yielding a standing osmotic gradient allowing water absorption from the gut even if the faeces is highly hypertonic.

  16. CD34+ mesenchymal cells are a major component of the intestinal stem cells niche at homeostasis and after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stzepourginski, Igor; Nigro, Giulia; Jacob, Jean-Marie; Dulauroy, Sophie; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Eberl, Gérard; Peduto, Lucie

    2017-01-24

    The intestinal epithelium is continuously renewed by intestinal epithelial stem cells (IESCs) positioned at the base of each crypt. Mesenchymal-derived factors are essential to maintain IESCs; however, the cellular composition and development of such mesenchymal niche remains unclear. Here, we identify pericryptal CD34 + Gp38 + αSMA - mesenchymal cells closely associated with Lgr5 + IESCs. We demonstrate that CD34 + Gp38 + cells are the major intestinal producers of the niche factors Wnt2b, Gremlin1, and R-spondin1, and are sufficient to promote maintenance of Lgr5 + IESCs in intestinal organoids, an effect mainly mediated by Gremlin1. CD34 + Gp38 + cells develop after birth in the intestinal submucosa and expand around the crypts during the third week of life in mice, independently of the microbiota. We further show that pericryptal CD34 + gp38 + cells are rapidly activated by intestinal injury, up-regulating niche factors Gremlin1 and R-spondin1 as well as chemokines, proinflammatory cytokines, and growth factors with key roles in gut immunity and tissue repair, including IL-7, Ccl2, Ptgs2, and Amphiregulin. Our results indicate that CD34 + Gp38 + mesenchymal cells are programmed to develop in the intestine after birth to constitute a specialized microenvironment that maintains IESCs at homeostasis and contribute to intestinal inflammation and repair after injury.

  17. Modelling the structure of a ceRNA-theoretical, bipartite microRNA-mRNA interaction network regulating intestinal epithelial cellular pathways using R programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J M; Henderson, W A

    2018-01-12

    We report a method using functional-molecular databases and network modelling to identify hypothetical mRNA-miRNA interaction networks regulating intestinal epithelial barrier function. The model forms a data-analysis component of our cell culture experiments, which produce RNA expression data from Nanostring Technologies nCounter ® system. The epithelial tight-junction (TJ) and actin cytoskeleton interact as molecular components of the intestinal epithelial barrier. Upstream regulation of TJ-cytoskeleton interaction is effected by the Rac/Rock/Rho signaling pathway and other associated pathways which may be activated or suppressed by extracellular signaling from growth factors, hormones, and immune receptors. Pathway activations affect epithelial homeostasis, contributing to degradation of the epithelial barrier associated with osmotic dysregulation, inflammation, and tumor development. The complexity underlying miRNA-mRNA interaction networks represents a roadblock for prediction and validation of competing-endogenous RNA network function. We developed a network model to identify hypothetical co-regulatory motifs in a miRNA-mRNA interaction network related to epithelial function. A mRNA-miRNA interaction list was generated using KEGG and miRWalk2.0 databases. R-code was developed to quantify and visualize inherent network structures. We identified a sub-network with a high number of shared, targeting miRNAs, of genes associated with cellular proliferation and cancer, including c-MYC and Cyclin D.

  18. Low uptake of silica nanoparticles in Caco-2 intestinal epithelial barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Dong; Bramini, Mattia; Hristov, Delyan R.; Wan, Sha; Salvati, Anna; Åberg, Christoffer; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    Cellular barriers, such as the skin, the lung epithelium or the intestinal epithelium, constitute one of the first obstacles facing nanomedicines or other nanoparticles entering organisms. It is thus important to assess the capacity of nanoparticles to enter and transport across such barriers. In

  19. Sucralfate prevents the delay of wound repair in intestinal epithelial cells by hydrogen peroxide through NF-kappaB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, Kenichi; Iizuka, Masahiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Konno, Shiho; Itou, Hiroaki; Horie, Yasuo; Watanabe, Sumio

    2006-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that sucralfate (SF) has therapeutic effects on colonic inflammation in ulcerative colitis. The aim of this study was to clarify the function of SF for wound repair in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). (1) Activation of signal proteins [ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), IkappaB-alpha] in IEC-6 cells after stimulation with 10(-4) M potassium sucrose octasulfate (SOS), which is the functional element of SF, was assessed by Western blot. (2) Induction of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, TGF-alpha, EGF, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA after stimulation of IEC-6 cells with SOS was assessed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. (3) IEC-6 cells were wounded and cultured for 24 h with various concentrations of SOS in the absence or presence of 20 microM H(2)O(2). Epithelial migration or proliferation was assessed by counting migrating cells or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells across the wound border. (1) SOS activated IkappaB-alpha, but it did not activate ERK1/2 MAPK. (2) SOS enhanced the expression of COX-2 mRNA, but it did not change the mRNA expression of other growth factors. (3) SOS did not enhance wound repair in IEC-6 cells, but it decreased the number of dead cells (maximum, 74%) (P < 0.01) in a dose-dependent manner and prevented the diminishment of epithelial migration (maximum, 61%) (P < 0.01) and proliferation (maximum, 37%) (P < 0.05) induced by H(2)O(2). These functions of SOS were suppressed by the NF-kappaB and COX-2 inhibitors. SOS prevented the delay of wound repair in IEC-6 cells induced by H(2)O(2), probably through induction of COX-2 and an anti-apoptotic mechanism. These effects of SOS might be given through the activation of the NF-kappaB pathway.

  20. The Food Contaminants Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol Induce Inflammation in Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Regulating Reactive Oxygen Species Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Adesso

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium mycotoxins are fungal metabolites whose ability to affect cereal grains as multi-contaminants is progressively increasing. The trichothecene mycotoxins nivalenol (NIV and deoxynivalenol (DON are often found in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide. They are able to affect animal and human health, including at the intestinal level. In this study, NIV, both alone and in combination with DON, induced inflammation and increased the inflammatory response induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS plus Interferon-γ (IFN in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6. The inflammatory response induced by NIV and DON involves tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α production, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 expression, nitrotyrosine formation, reactive oxygen species (ROS release, Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB, Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2 and inflammasome activation. The pro-inflammatory effect was strongly induced by NIV and by the mycotoxin mixture, when compared to DON alone. Mechanistic studies indicate a pivotal role for ROS in the observed pro-inflammatory effects induced by mycotoxins. In this study, the interactions between NIV and DON point out the importance of their food co-contamination, further highlighting the risk assessment process that is of growing concern.

  1. The Food Contaminants Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol Induce Inflammation in Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Regulating Reactive Oxygen Species Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesso, Simona; Autore, Giuseppina; Quaroni, Andrea; Popolo, Ada; Severino, Lorella; Marzocco, Stefania

    2017-12-11

    Fusarium mycotoxins are fungal metabolites whose ability to affect cereal grains as multi-contaminants is progressively increasing. The trichothecene mycotoxins nivalenol (NIV) and deoxynivalenol (DON) are often found in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide. They are able to affect animal and human health, including at the intestinal level. In this study, NIV, both alone and in combination with DON, induced inflammation and increased the inflammatory response induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus Interferon-γ (IFN) in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6). The inflammatory response induced by NIV and DON involves tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, nitrotyrosine formation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) release, Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB), Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and inflammasome activation. The pro-inflammatory effect was strongly induced by NIV and by the mycotoxin mixture, when compared to DON alone. Mechanistic studies indicate a pivotal role for ROS in the observed pro-inflammatory effects induced by mycotoxins. In this study, the interactions between NIV and DON point out the importance of their food co-contamination, further highlighting the risk assessment process that is of growing concern.

  2. Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 Modulates Epithelial Integrity, Heat Shock Protein, and Proinflammatory Cytokine Response in Intestinal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanti Klingspor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics have shown positive effects on gastrointestinal diseases; they have barrier-modulating effects and change the inflammatory response towards pathogens in studies in vitro. The aim of this investigation has been to examine the response of intestinal epithelial cells to Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 (E. faecium, a probiotic positively affecting diarrhea incidence in piglets, and two pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli strains, with specific focus on the probiotic modulation of the response to the pathogenic challenge. Porcine (IPEC-J2 and human (Caco-2 intestinal cells were incubated without bacteria (control, with E. faecium, with enteropathogenic (EPEC or enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC each alone or in combination with E. faecium. The ETEC strain decreased transepithelial resistance (TER and increased IL-8 mRNA and protein expression in both cell lines compared with control cells, an effect that could be prevented by pre- and coincubation with E. faecium. Similar effects were observed for the increased expression of heat shock protein 70 in Caco-2 cells. When the cells were challenged by the EPEC strain, no such pattern of changes could be observed. The reduced decrease in TER and the reduction of the proinflammatory and stress response of enterocytes following pathogenic challenge indicate the protective effect of the probiotic.

  3. Functional Analysis of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Pili in Relation to Adhesion and Immunomodulatory Interactions with Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Ingmar; Tytgat, Hanne L. P.; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Marien, Eyra; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Reunanen, Justus; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M.; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C. J.; Vanderleyden, Jos

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, a probiotic with good survival capacity in the human gut, has well-documented adhesion properties and health effects. Recently, spaCBA-encoded pili that bind to human intestinal mucus were identified on its cell surface. Here, we report on the phenotypic analysis of a spaCBA pilus knockout mutant in comparison with the wild type and other adhesin mutants. The SpaCBA pilus of L. rhamnosus GG showed to be key for efficient adherence to the Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line and biofilm formation. Moreover, the spaCBA mutant induces an elevated level of interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA in Caco-2 cells compared to the wild type, possibly involving an interaction of lipoteichoic acid with Toll-like receptor 2. In contrast, an L. rhamnosus GG mutant without exopolysaccharides but with an increased exposure of pili leads to the reduced expression of IL-8. Using Transwells to partition bacteria from Caco-2 cells, IL-8 induction is blocked completely regardless of whether wild-type or mutant L. rhamnosus GG cells are used. Taken together, our data suggest that L. rhamnosus GG SpaCBA pili, while promoting strong adhesive interactions with IECs, have a functional role in balancing IL-8 mRNA expression induced by surface molecules such as lipoteichoic acid. PMID:22020518

  4. Immunobiotics for the Bovine Host: Their Interaction with Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Their Effect on Antiviral Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Villena

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The scientific community has reported several cases of microbes that exhibit elevated rates of antibiotic resistance in different regions of the planet. Due to this emergence of antimicrobial resistant microorganisms, the use of antibiotics as promoters of livestock animals’ growth is being banned in most countries around the world. One of the challenges of agricultural immunology therefore is to find alternatives by modulating the immune system of animals in drug-independent safe food production systems. In this regard, in an effort to supplant antibiotics from bovine feeds, several alternatives were proposed including the use of immunomodulatory probiotics (immunobiotics. The purpose of this review is to provide an update of the status of the modulation of intestinal antiviral innate immunity of the bovine host by immunobiotics, and the beneficial impact of immunobiotics on viral infections, focused on intestinal epithelial cells (IECs. The results of our group, which demonstrate the capacity of immunobiotic strains to beneficially modulate Toll-like receptor 3-triggered immune responses in bovine IECs and improve the resistance to viral infections, are highlighted. This review provides comprehensive information on the innate immune response of bovine IECs against virus, which can be further investigated for the development of strategies aimed to improve defenses in the bovine host.

  5. Cellular chloride and bicarbonate retention alters intracellular pH regulation in Cftr KO crypt epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Nancy M.; Liu, Jinghua; Stein, Sydney R.; Stefanski, Casey D.; Strubberg, Ashlee M.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel providing a major pathway for Cl− and HCO3− efflux across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the intestine, CF manifests as obstructive syndromes, dysbiosis, inflammation, and an increased risk for gastrointestinal cancer. Cftr knockout (KO) mice recapitulate CF intestinal disease, including intestinal hyperproliferation. Previous studies using Cftr KO intestinal organoids (enteroids) indicate that crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline intracellular pH (pHi). We hypothesized that Cftr has a cell-autonomous role in downregulating pHi that is incompletely compensated by acid-base regulation in its absence. Here, 2′,7′-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein microfluorimetry of enteroids showed that Cftr KO crypt epithelium sustains an alkaline pHi and resistance to cell acidification relative to wild-type. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Cftr KO enteroids exhibit downregulated transcription of base (HCO3−)-loading proteins and upregulation of the basolateral membrane HCO3−-unloader anion exchanger 2 (Ae2). Although Cftr KO crypt epithelium had increased Ae2 expression and Ae2-mediated Cl−/HCO3− exchange with maximized gradients, it also had increased intracellular Cl− concentration relative to wild-type. Pharmacological reduction of intracellular Cl− concentration in Cftr KO crypt epithelium normalized pHi, which was largely Ae2-dependent. We conclude that Cftr KO crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline pHi as a consequence of losing both Cl− and HCO3− efflux, which impairs pHi regulation by Ae2. Retention of Cl− and an alkaline pHi in crypt epithelium may alter several cellular processes in the proliferative compartment of Cftr KO intestine. PMID:26542396

  6. Cellular chloride and bicarbonate retention alters intracellular pH regulation in Cftr KO crypt epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Nancy M; Liu, Jinghua; Stein, Sydney R; Stefanski, Casey D; Strubberg, Ashlee M; Clarke, Lane L

    2016-01-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel providing a major pathway for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the intestine, CF manifests as obstructive syndromes, dysbiosis, inflammation, and an increased risk for gastrointestinal cancer. Cftr knockout (KO) mice recapitulate CF intestinal disease, including intestinal hyperproliferation. Previous studies using Cftr KO intestinal organoids (enteroids) indicate that crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline intracellular pH (pHi). We hypothesized that Cftr has a cell-autonomous role in downregulating pHi that is incompletely compensated by acid-base regulation in its absence. Here, 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein microfluorimetry of enteroids showed that Cftr KO crypt epithelium sustains an alkaline pHi and resistance to cell acidification relative to wild-type. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Cftr KO enteroids exhibit downregulated transcription of base (HCO3 (-))-loading proteins and upregulation of the basolateral membrane HCO3 (-)-unloader anion exchanger 2 (Ae2). Although Cftr KO crypt epithelium had increased Ae2 expression and Ae2-mediated Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange with maximized gradients, it also had increased intracellular Cl(-) concentration relative to wild-type. Pharmacological reduction of intracellular Cl(-) concentration in Cftr KO crypt epithelium normalized pHi, which was largely Ae2-dependent. We conclude that Cftr KO crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline pHi as a consequence of losing both Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux, which impairs pHi regulation by Ae2. Retention of Cl(-) and an alkaline pHi in crypt epithelium may alter several cellular processes in the proliferative compartment of Cftr KO intestine. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Saccharomyces boulardii improves intestinal epithelial cell restitution by inhibiting αvβ5 integrin activation state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Canonici

    Full Text Available Intestinal epithelial cell damage is frequently seen in the mucosal lesions of infectious or inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. Complete remission of these diseases requires both the disappearance of inflammation and the repair of damaged epithelium. Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb, Biocodex is a non-pathogenic yeast widely used as a preventive and therapeutic probiotic for the prevention and treatment of diarrhea and other gastrointestinal disorders. We recently showed that it enhances the repair of intestinal epithelium through activation of α2β1 integrin collagen receptors. In the present study, we demonstrated that α2β1 integrin is not the sole cell-extracellular matrix receptor involved during Sb-mediated intestinal restitution. Indeed, by using cell adhesion assays, we showed that Sb supernatant contains heat sensitive molecule(s, with a molecular weight higher than 9 kDa, which decreased αvβ5 integrin-mediated adhesion to vitronectin by competing with the integrin. Moreover, Sb-mediated changes in cell adhesion to vitronectin resulted in a reduction of the αvβ5signaling pathway. We used a monolayer wounding assay that mimics in vivo cell restitution to demonstrate that down-modulation of the αvβ5 integrin-vitronectin interaction is related to Sb-induced cell migration. We therefore postulated that Sb supernatant contains motogenic factors that enhance cell restitution through multiple pathways, including the dynamic fine regulation of αvβ5 integrin binding activity. This could be of major importance in diseases characterized by severe mucosal injury, such as inflammatory and infectious bowel diseases.

  8. Effects of Lactobacillus johnsonii and Lactobacillus reuteri on gut barrier function and heat shock proteins in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao-Yu; Roos, Stefan; Jonsson, Hans; Ahl, David; Dicksved, Johan; Lindberg, Jan Erik; Lundh, Torbjörn

    2015-04-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a set of highly conserved proteins that can serve as intestinal gate keepers in gut homeostasis. Here, effects of a probiotic, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), and two novel porcine isolates, Lactobacillus johnsonii strain P47-HY and Lactobacillus reuteri strain P43-HUV, on cytoprotective HSP expression and gut barrier function, were investigated in a porcine IPEC-J2 intestinal epithelial cell line model. The IPEC-J2 cells polarized on a permeable filter exhibited villus-like cell phenotype with development of apical microvilli. Western blot analysis detected HSP expression in IPEC-J2 and revealed that L. johnsonii and L. reuteri strains were able to significantly induce HSP27, despite high basal expression in IPEC-J2, whereas LGG did not. For HSP72, only the supernatant of L. reuteri induced the expression, which was comparable to the heat shock treatment, which indicated that HSP72 expression was more stimulus specific. The protective effect of lactobacilli was further studied in IPEC-J2 under an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) challenge. ETEC caused intestinal barrier destruction, as reflected by loss of cell-cell contact, reduced IPEC-J2 cell viability and transepithelial electrical resistance, and disruption of tight junction protein zonula occludens-1. In contrast, the L. reuteri treatment substantially counteracted these detrimental effects and preserved the barrier function. L. johnsonii and LGG also achieved barrier protection, partly by directly inhibiting ETEC attachment. Together, the results indicate that specific strains of Lactobacillus can enhance gut barrier function through cytoprotective HSP induction and fortify the cell protection against ETEC challenge through tight junction protein modulation and direct interaction with pathogens. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  9. The H2 receptor antagonist nizatidine is a P-glycoprotein substrate: characterization of its intestinal epithelial cell efflux transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Sabit, Hairat; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the intestinal epithelial cell efflux transport processes that are involved in the intestinal transport of the H(2) receptor antagonist nizatidine. The intestinal epithelial efflux transport mechanisms of nizatidine were investigated and characterized across Caco-2 cell monolayers, in the concentration range 0.05-10 mM in both apical-basolateral (AP-BL) and BL-AP directions, and the transport constants of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux activity were calculated. The concentration-dependent effects of various P-gp (verapamil, quinidine, erythromycin, ketoconazole, and cyclosporine A), multidrug resistant-associated protein 2 (MRP2; MK-571, probenecid, indomethacin, and p-aminohipuric acid), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; Fumitremorgin C) inhibitors on nizatidine bidirectional transport were examined. Nizatidine exhibited 7.7-fold higher BL-AP than AP-BL Caco-2 permeability, indicative of net mucosal secretion. All P-gp inhibitors investigated displayed concentration-dependent inhibition on nizatidine secretion in both directions. The IC(50) of verapamil on nizatidine P-gp secretion was 1.2 x 10(-2) mM. In the absence of inhibitors, nizatidine displayed concentration-dependent secretion, with one saturable (J(max) = 5.7 x 10(-3) nmol cm(-2) s(-1) and K(m) = 2.2 mM) and one nonsaturable component (K(d) = 7 x 10(-4) microL cm(-2) s(-1)). Under complete P-gp inhibition, nizatidine exhibited linear secretory flux, with a slope similar to the nonsaturable component. V(max) and K(m) estimated for nizatidine P-gp-mediated secretion were 4 x 10(-3) nmol cm(-2) s(-1) and 1.2 mM, respectively. No effect was obtained with the MRP2 or the BCRP inhibitors. Being a drug commonly used in pediatrics, adults, and elderly, nizatidine susceptibility to efflux transport by P-gp revealed in this paper may be of significance in its absorption, distribution, and clearance, as well as possible drug-drug interactions.

  10. HOXB4 Gene Expression Is Regulated by CDX2 in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Steffen; Coshun, Mehmet; Mikkelsen Homburg, Keld

    2016-01-01

    analysis and expression data from Caco2 cells also suggests a role for CDX2 in the regulation of HOXB4 gene expression in the intestinal epithelium. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether HOXB4 gene expression is regulated by CDX2 in the intestinal epithelium. We demonstrated binding of CDX......The mammalian Caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) plays a key role in the homeobox regulatory network and is essential in regulating the expression of several homeobox (HOX) genes during embryonic development, particularly in the gut. Genome-wide CDX2 chromatin immunoprecipitation......2 to four different CDX2 binding sites in an enhancer region located upstream of the HOXB4 transcription start site. Mutations in the CDX2 binding sites reduced HOXB4 gene activity, and knock down of endogenous CDX2 expression by shRNA reduced HOXB4 gene expression. This is the first report...

  11. A comparison of mode of attachment and histopathogenicity of four tapeworm species representing two orders infecting the spiral intestine of the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borucinska, J; Caira, J N

    1993-04-01

    This study was undertaken to compare 2 species of Tetraphyllidea and 2 species of Trypanorhyncha with regard to the relationship between attachment structure morphology, mode of attachment, and tapeworm size, to damage at the sites of attachment in the Atlantic nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum. Regions of the spiral intestine with worms attached were removed from 8 nurse sharks and sectioned according to conventional techniques. Sections of 5-50 specimens of each tapeworm species were examined. Regions of the spiral intestine devoid of worms were processed for characterization of the normal mucosa. The normal mucosa was found to consist of a folded surface covered with round-to-oval primary mucosal crypts. In the first 7 or 8 chambers of the spiral intestine the mucosal surface was thrown into secondary folds, forming ridges and secondary crypts. The primary mucosal crypts were lined with a single layer of columnar epithelium resting on a basement membrane. A highly cellular lamina propria and submucosa were found between the crypts and the muscularis mucosa. The small tetraphyllidean Pedibothrium brevispine was found with its scolex lying within the primary mucosal crypts with its hooks embedded in the basement membrane. Epithelial denudation was evident. The large tetraphyllidean Pedibothrium globicephalum was found with its bothridia engulfing large portions of the mucosa and its hooks embedded into the lamina propria. It was associated with moderate to severe mucosal necrosis. The small trypanorhynch Prochristianella tenuispine was found lying between the mucosal ridges in the secondary crypts with its tentacles either penetrating the epithelium, or occasionally, the lamina propria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Dclk1+ small intestinal epithelial tuft cells display the hallmarks of quiescence and self-renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Weygant, Nathaniel; Taylor, Vivian E.; Li, James D.; Ali, Naushad; Sureban, Sripathi M.; Qante, Michael; Wang, Timothy C.; Bronze, Michael S.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2015-01-01

    To date, no discrete genetic signature has been defined for isolated Dclk1+ tuft cells within the small intestine. Furthermore, recent reports on the functional significance of Dclk1+ cells in the small intestine have been inconsistent. These cells have been proposed to be fully differentiated cells, reserve stem cells, and tumor stem cells. In order to elucidate the potential function of Dclk1+ cells, we FACS-sorted Dclk1+ cells from mouse small intestinal epithelium using transgenic mice expressing YFP under the control of the Dclk1 promoter (Dclk1-CreER;Rosa26-YFP). Analysis of sorted YFP+ cells demonstrated marked enrichment (~6000 fold) for Dclk1 mRNA compared with YFP− cells. Dclk1+ population display ~6 fold enrichment for the putative quiescent stem cell marker Bmi1. We observed significantly greater expression of pluripotency genes, pro-survival genes, and quiescence markers in the Dclk1+ population. A significant increase in self-renewal capability (14-fold) was observed in in vitro isolated Dclk1+ cells. The unique genetic report presented in this manuscript suggests that Dclk1+ cells may maintain quiescence, pluripotency, and metabolic activity for survival/longevity. Functionally, these reserve characteristics manifest in vitro, with Dclk1+ cells exhibiting greater ability to self-renew. These findings indicate that quiescent stem-like functionality is a feature of Dclk1-expressing tuft cells. PMID:26362399

  13. Involvement of Cryptosporidium parvum Cdg7_FLc_1000 RNA in the Attenuation of Intestinal Epithelial Cell Migration via Trans-Suppression of Host Cell SMPD3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Zhenping; Gong, Ai-Yu; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xin-Tian; Li, Min; Mathy, Nicholas W; Strauss-Soukup, Juliane K; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2017-12-27

    Intestinal infection by Cryptosporidium parvum causes inhibition of epithelial turnover, but underlying mechanisms are unclear. Previous studies demonstrate that a panel of parasite RNA transcripts of low protein-coding potential are delivered into infected epithelial cells. Using in vitro and in vivo models of intestinal cryptosporidiosis, we report here that host delivery of parasite Cdg7_FLc_1000 RNA results in inhibition of epithelial cell migration through suppression of the gene encoding sphingomyelinase 3 (SMPD3). Delivery of Cdg7_FLc_1000 into infected cells promotes the histone methyltransferase G9a-mediated H3K9 methylation in the SMPD3 locus. The DNA-binding transcriptional repressor, PR domain zinc finger protein 1, is required for the assembly of Cdg7_FLc_1000 into the G9a complex and associated with the enrichment of H3K9 methylation at the gene locus. Pathologically, nuclear transfer of Cryptosporidium parvum Cdg7_FLc_1000 RNA is involved in the attenuation of intestinal epithelial cell migration via trans-suppression of host cell SMPD3. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. The transcriptional corepressor MTGR1 regulates intestinal secretory lineage allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parang, Bobak; Rosenblatt, Daniel; Williams, Amanda D; Washington, Mary K; Revetta, Frank; Short, Sarah P; Reddy, Vishruth K; Hunt, Aubrey; Shroyer, Noah F; Engel, Michael E; Hiebert, Scott W; Williams, Christopher S

    2015-03-01

    Notch signaling largely determines intestinal epithelial cell fate. High Notch activity drives progenitors toward absorptive enterocytes by repressing secretory differentiation programs, whereas low Notch permits secretory cell assignment. Myeloid translocation gene-related 1 (MTGR1) is a transcriptional corepressor in the myeloid translocation gene/Eight-Twenty-One family. Given that Mtgr1(-/-) mice have a dramatic reduction of intestinal epithelial secretory cells, we hypothesized that MTGR1 is a key repressor of Notch signaling. In support of this, transcriptome analysis of laser capture microdissected Mtgr1(-/-) intestinal crypts revealed Notch activation, and secretory markers Mucin2, Chromogranin A, and Growth factor-independent 1 (Gfi1) were down-regulated in Mtgr1(-/-) whole intestines and Mtgr1(-/-) enteroids. We demonstrate that MTGR1 is in a complex with Suppressor of Hairless Homolog, a key Notch effector, and represses Notch-induced Hairy/Enhancer of Split 1 activity. Moreover, pharmacologic Notch inhibition using a γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) rescued the hyperproliferative baseline phenotype in the Mtgr1(-/-) intestine and increased production of goblet and enteroendocrine lineages in Mtgr1(-/-) mice. GSI increased Paneth cell production in wild-type mice but failed to do so in Mtgr1(-/-) mice. We determined that MTGR1 can interact with GFI1, a transcriptional corepressor required for Paneth cell differentiation, and repress GFI1 targets. Overall, the data suggest that MTGR1, a transcriptional corepressor well characterized in hematopoiesis, plays a critical role in intestinal lineage allocation. © FASEB.

  15. SAM pointed domain ETS factor (SPDEF) regulates terminal differentiation and maturation of intestinal goblet cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noah, Taeko K.; Kazanjian, Avedis [Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Whitsett, Jeffrey [Developmental Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Neonatology and Pulmonary Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Shroyer, Noah F., E-mail: noah.shroyer@cchmc.org [Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Developmental Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Background and Aims: SPDEF (also termed PDEF or PSE) is an ETS family transcription factor that regulates gene expression in the prostate and goblet cell hyperplasia in the lung. Spdef has been reported to be expressed in the intestine. In this paper, we identify an important role for Spdef in regulating intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis and differentiation. Methods: SPDEF expression was inhibited in colon cancer cells to determine its ability to control goblet cell gene activation. The effects of transgenic expression of Spdef on intestinal differentiation and homeostasis were determined. Results: In LS174T colon cancer cells treated with Notch/{gamma}-secretase inhibitor to activate goblet cell gene expression, shRNAs that inhibited SPDEF also repressed expression of goblet cell genes AGR2, MUC2, RETLNB, and SPINK4. Transgenic expression of Spdef caused the expansion of intestinal goblet cells and corresponding reduction in Paneth, enteroendocrine, and absorptive enterocytes. Spdef inhibited proliferation of intestinal crypt cells without induction of apoptosis. Prolonged expression of the Spdef transgene caused a progressive reduction in the number of crypts that expressed Spdef, consistent with its inhibitory effects on cell proliferation. Conclusions: Spdef was sufficient to inhibit proliferation of intestinal progenitors and induce differentiation into goblet cells; SPDEF was required for activation of goblet cell associated genes in vitro. These data support a model in which Spdef promotes terminal differentiation into goblet cells of a common goblet/Paneth progenitor.

  16. Intestinal Stem Cell Niche Insights Gathered from Both In Vivo and Novel In Vitro Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolce Gjorevski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal stem cells are located at the base of the crypts and are surrounded by a complex structure called niche. This environment is composed mainly of epithelial cells and stroma which provides signals that govern cell maintenance, proliferation, and differentiation. Understanding how the niche regulates stem cell fate by controlling developmental signaling pathways will help us to define how stem cells choose between self-renewal and differentiation and how they maintain their undifferentiated state. Tractable in vitro assay systems, which reflect the complexity of the in vivo situation but provide higher level of control, would likely be crucial in identifying new players and mechanisms controlling stem cell function. Knowledge of the intestinal stem cell niche gathered from both in vivo and novel in vitro models may help us improve therapies for tumorigenesis and intestinal damage and make autologous intestinal transplants a feasible clinical practice.

  17. Administration of Protein kinase D1 induce an immunomodulatory effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal inflammation in a co-culture model of intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ditte Søvsø Gundelund; Fredborg, Marlene; Andersen, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    the effects of human PKD1 in relation to intestinal inflammation, using a co-culture model of intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and RAW264.7 macrophages. An inflammatory response was induced in the macrophages by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), upregulating the expression of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF......-α), interleukin- (IL-) 1β, and IL-6 besides increasing the secretion of TNF-α protein. The effect of administering PKD1 to Caco-2 was evaluated in relation to both amelioration of inflammation and the ability to suppress inflammation initiation. Administration of PKD1 (10–100 ng/ml) following induction...

  18. Sugars increase non-heme iron bioavailability in human epithelial intestinal and liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Christides

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that sugars enhance iron bioavailability, possibly through either chelation or altering the oxidation state of the metal, however, results have been inconclusive. Sugar intake in the last 20 years has increased dramatically, and iron status disorders are significant public health problems worldwide; therefore understanding the nutritional implications of iron-sugar interactions is particularly relevant. In this study we measured the effects of sugars on non-heme iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and HepG2 hepatoma cells using ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. The effect of sugars on iron oxidation state was examined by measuring ferrous iron formation in different sugar-iron solutions with a ferrozine-based assay. Fructose significantly increased iron-induced ferritin formation in both Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. In addition, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS-55 increased Caco-2 cell iron-induced ferritin; these effects were negated by the addition of either tannic acid or phytic acid. Fructose combined with FeCl3 increased ferrozine-chelatable ferrous iron levels by approximately 300%. In conclusion, fructose increases iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. Given the large amount of simple and rapidly digestible sugars in the modern diet their effects on iron bioavailability may have important patho-physiological consequences. Further studies are warranted to characterize these interactions.

  19. Protease-activated receptor-2 stimulates intestinal epithelial chloride transport through activation of PLC and selective PKC isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, Jacques Q; Moreau, France; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2009-06-01

    Serine proteases play important physiological roles through their activity at G protein-coupled protease-activated receptors (PARs). We examined the roles that specific phospholipase (PL) C and protein kinase (PK) C (PKC) isoforms play in the regulation of PAR(2)-stimulated chloride secretion in intestinal epithelial cells. Confluent SCBN epithelial monolayers were grown on Snapwell supports and mounted in modified Ussing chambers. Short-circuit current (I(sc)) responses to basolateral application of the selective PAR(2) activating peptide, SLIGRL-NH(2), were monitored as a measure of net electrogenic ion transport caused by PAR(2) activation. SLIGRL-NH(2) induced a transient I(sc) response that was significantly reduced by inhibitors of PLC (U73122), phosphoinositol-PLC (ET-18), phosphatidylcholine-PLC (D609), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K; LY294002). Immunoblot analysis revealed the phosphorylation of both PLCbeta and PLCgamma following PAR(2) activation. Pretreatment of the cells with inhibitors of PKC (GF 109203X), PKCalpha/betaI (Gö6976), and PKCdelta (rottlerin), but not PKCzeta (selective pseudosubstrate inhibitor), also attenuated this response. Cellular fractionation and immunoblot analysis, as well as confocal immunocytochemistry, revealed increases of PKCbetaI, PKCdelta, and PKCepsilon, but not PKCalpha or PKCzeta, in membrane fractions following PAR(2) activation. Pretreatment of the cells with U73122, ET-18, or D609 inhibited PKC activation. Inhibition of PI3K activity only prevented PKCdelta translocation. Immunoblots revealed that PAR(2) activation induced phosphorylation of both cRaf and ERK1/2 via PKCdelta. Inhibition of PKCbetaI and PI3K had only a partial effect on this response. We conclude that basolateral PAR(2)-induced chloride secretion involves activation of PKCbetaI and PKCdelta via a PLC-dependent mechanism resulting in the stimulation of cRaf and ERK1/2 signaling.

  20. Kefir-isolated bacteria and yeasts inhibit Shigella flexneri invasion and modulate pro-inflammatory response on intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, P A; Abraham, A G; Pérez, P F; de Los Angeles Serradell, M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of a kefir-isolated microbial mixture containing three bacterial and two yeast strains (MM) to protect intestinal epithelial cells against Shigella flexneri invasion, as well as to analyse the effect on pro-inflammatory response elicited by this pathogen. A significant decrease in S. flexneri strain 72 invasion was observed on both HT-29 and Caco-2 cells pre-incubated with MM. Pre-incubation with the individual strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae CIDCA 8112 or Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CIDCA 8221 also reduced the internalisation of S. flexneri into HT-29 cells although in a lesser extent than MM. Interestingly, Lactobacillus plantarum CIDCA 83114 exerted a protective effect on the invasion of Caco-2 and HT-29 cells by S. flexneri. Regarding the pro-inflammatory response on HT-29 cells, S. flexneri infection induced a significant activation of the expression of interleukin 8 (IL-8), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) encoding genes (P<0.05), whereas incubation of cells with MM did not induce the expression of any of the mediators assessed. Interestingly, pre-incubation of HT-29 monolayer with MM produced an inhibition of S. flexneri-induced IL-8, CCL20 and TNF-α mRNA expression. In order to gain insight on the effect of MM (or the individual strains) on this pro-inflammatory response, a series of experiments using a HT-29-NF-κB-hrGFP reporter system were performed. Pre-incubation of HT-29-NF-κB-hrGFP cells with MM significantly dampened Shigella-induced activation. Our results showed that the contribution of yeast strain Kluyveromyces marxianus CIDCA 8154 seems to be crucial in the observed effect. In conclusion, results presented in this study demonstrate that pre-treatment with a microbial mixture containing bacteria and yeasts isolated from kefir, resulted in inhibition of S. flexneri internalisation into human intestinal epithelial cells, along with the

  1. Quantification of crypt and stem cell evolution in the normal and neoplastic human colon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, Ann-Marie; Cereser, Biancastella; Melton, Samuel; Fletcher, Alexander G.; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Tadrous, Paul J.; Humphries, Adam; Elia, George; McDonald, Stuart A. C.; Wright, Nicholas A.; Simons, Benjamin D.; Jansen, Marnix; Graham, Trevor A.

    2014-01-01

    Human intestinal stem cell and crypt dynamics remain poorly characterized because transgenic lineage-tracing methods are impractical in humans. Here, we have circumvented this problem by quantitatively using somatic mtDNA mutations to trace clonal lineages. By analyzing clonal imprints on the walls

  2. Computational models reveal a passive mechanism for cell migration in the crypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara-Jane Dunn

    Full Text Available Cell migration in the intestinal crypt is essential for the regular renewal of the epithelium, and the continued upward movement of cells is a key characteristic of healthy crypt dynamics. However, the driving force behind this migration is unknown. Possibilities include mitotic pressure, active movement driven by motility cues, or negative pressure arising from cell loss at the crypt collar. It is possible that a combination of factors together coordinate migration. Here, three different computational models are used to provide insight into the mechanisms that underpin cell movement in the crypt, by examining the consequence of eliminating cell division on cell movement. Computational simulations agree with existing experimental results, confirming that migration can continue in the absence of mitosis. Importantly, however, simulations allow us to infer mechanisms that are sufficient to generate cell movement, which is not possible through experimental observation alone. The results produced by the three models agree and suggest that cell loss due to apoptosis and extrusion at the crypt collar relieves cell compression below, allowing cells to expand and move upwards. This finding suggests that future experiments should focus on the role of apoptosis and cell extrusion in controlling cell migration in the crypt.

  3. Intestinal cell proliferation following hyperthermia-radiation combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burholt, D.R.; Wilkinson, D.A.; Shrivastava, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    The present work is an investigation of the extent to which hyperthermia enhances x-ray induced inhibition of intestinal epithelial cell proliferation in mice. Hyperthermia was achieved by whole body immersion of anesthetized ice in a temperature controlled water bath (+-0.1 0 C). Post-treatment proliferative activity was monitored by determining the incorporation of /sup 3/H-TdR into intestinal crypt cells and by the counting of epithelial cell mitotic figures. Initial levels of cell kill were assessed by the microcolony crypt survival technique. All heat treatments were 41.5 0 C for 0.5h. Heat alone reduced the /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation to 50% of the control value by 2h post-treatment. This was followed by a return to control value by 10h and a slight hyperplasia at 24h. Heat either immediately before or after 2Gy abdominal field x-irradiation produced a prolonged period of depressed cell proliferation: /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation remained below control value for the first 24h. As the heat and radiation were separated in time from each other (up to 4h) the interaction between the two decreased. The development of thermotolerance was observed following the second and third treatment during either a heat-only or a heat-radiation multifraction treatments schedule with the treatment spaced 24h apart

  4. Fasting protects mice from lethal DNA damage by promoting small intestinal epithelial stem cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkum, Kelsey L; Stemler, Kristina M; White, Lynn S; Loza, Andrew J; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Michalski, Basia M; Kuzmicki, Catherine; Pless, Robert; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2015-12-22

    Short-term fasting protects mice from lethal doses of chemotherapy through undetermined mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that fasting preserves small intestinal (SI) architecture by maintaining SI stem cell viability and SI barrier function following exposure to high-dose etoposide. Nearly all SI stem cells were lost in fed mice, whereas fasting promoted sufficient SI stem cell survival to preserve SI integrity after etoposide treatment. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple SI stem cell populations, marked by Lgr5, Bmi1, or HopX expression, contributed to fasting-induced survival. DNA repair and DNA damage response genes were elevated in SI stem/progenitor cells of fasted etoposide-treated mice, which importantly correlated with faster resolution of DNA double-strand breaks and less apoptosis. Thus, fasting preserved SI stem cell viability as well as SI architecture and barrier function suggesting that fasting may reduce host toxicity in patients undergoing dose intensive chemotherapy.

  5. Inhibition of intestinal epithelial apoptosis improves survival in a murine model of radiation combined injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enjae Jung

    Full Text Available World conditions place large populations at risk from ionizing radiation (IR from detonation of dirty bombs or nuclear devices. In a subgroup of patients, ionizing radiation exposure would be followed by a secondary infection. The effects of radiation combined injury are potentially more lethal than either insult in isolation. The purpose of this study was to determine mechanisms of mortality and possible therapeutic targets in radiation combined injury. Mice were exposed to IR with 2.5 Gray (Gy followed four days later by intratracheal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. While either IR or MRSA alone yielded 100% survival, animals with radiation combined injury had 53% survival (p = 0.01. Compared to IR or MRSA alone, mice with radiation combined injury had increased gut apoptosis, local and systemic bacterial burden, decreased splenic CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, B cells, NK cells, and dendritic cells, and increased BAL and systemic IL-6 and G-CSF. In contrast, radiation combined injury did not alter lymphocyte apoptosis, pulmonary injury, or intestinal proliferation compared to IR or MRSA alone. In light of the synergistic increase in gut apoptosis following radiation combined injury, transgenic mice that overexpress Bcl-2 in their intestine and wild type mice were subjected to IR followed by MRSA. Bcl-2 mice had decreased gut apoptosis and improved survival compared to WT mice (92% vs. 42%; p<0.01. These data demonstrate that radiation combined injury results in significantly higher mortality than could be predicted based upon either IR or MRSA infection alone, and that preventing gut apoptosis may be a potential therapeutic target.

  6. Inhibition of intestinal epithelial apoptosis improves survival in a murine model of radiation combined injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Enjae; Perrone, Erin E; Brahmamdan, Pavan; McDonough, Jacquelyn S; Leathersich, Ann M; Dominguez, Jessica A; Clark, Andrew T; Fox, Amy C; Dunne, W Michael; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2013-01-01

    World conditions place large populations at risk from ionizing radiation (IR) from detonation of dirty bombs or nuclear devices. In a subgroup of patients, ionizing radiation exposure would be followed by a secondary infection. The effects of radiation combined injury are potentially more lethal than either insult in isolation. The purpose of this study was to determine mechanisms of mortality and possible therapeutic targets in radiation combined injury. Mice were exposed to IR with 2.5 Gray (Gy) followed four days later by intratracheal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). While either IR or MRSA alone yielded 100% survival, animals with radiation combined injury had 53% survival (p = 0.01). Compared to IR or MRSA alone, mice with radiation combined injury had increased gut apoptosis, local and systemic bacterial burden, decreased splenic CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, B cells, NK cells, and dendritic cells, and increased BAL and systemic IL-6 and G-CSF. In contrast, radiation combined injury did not alter lymphocyte apoptosis, pulmonary injury, or intestinal proliferation compared to IR or MRSA alone. In light of the synergistic increase in gut apoptosis following radiation combined injury, transgenic mice that overexpress Bcl-2 in their intestine and wild type mice were subjected to IR followed by MRSA. Bcl-2 mice had decreased gut apoptosis and improved survival compared to WT mice (92% vs. 42%; p<0.01). These data demonstrate that radiation combined injury results in significantly higher mortality than could be predicted based upon either IR or MRSA infection alone, and that preventing gut apoptosis may be a potential therapeutic target.

  7. Vibrio cholerae cytolysin causes an inflammatory response in human intestinal epithelial cells that is modulated by the PrtV protease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangwei Ou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vibrio cholerae is the causal intestinal pathogen of the diarrheal disease cholera. It secretes the protease PrtV, which protects the bacterium from invertebrate predators but reduces the ability of Vibrio-secreted factor(s to induce interleukin-8 (IL-8 production by human intestinal epithelial cells. The aim was to identify the secreted component(s of V. cholerae that induces an epithelial inflammatory response and to define whether it is a substrate for PrtV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Culture supernatants of wild type V. cholerae O1 strain C6706, its derivatives and pure V. cholerae cytolysin (VCC were analyzed for the capacity to induce changes in cytokine mRNA expression levels, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha secretion, permeability and cell viability when added to the apical side of polarized tight monolayer T84 cells used as an in vitro model for human intestinal epithelium. Culture supernatants were also analyzed for hemolytic activity and for the presence of PrtV and VCC by immunoblot analysis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest that VCC is capable of causing an inflammatory response characterized by increased permeability and production of IL-8 and TNF-alpha in tight monolayers. Pure VCC at a concentration of 160 ng/ml caused an inflammatory response that reached the magnitude of that caused by Vibrio-secreted factors, while higher concentrations caused epithelial cell death. The inflammatory response was totally abolished by treatment with PrtV. The findings suggest that low doses of VCC initiate a local immune defense reaction while high doses lead to intestinal epithelial lesions. Furthermore, VCC is indeed a substrate for PrtV and PrtV seems to execute an environment-dependent modulation of the activity of VCC that may be the cause of V. cholerae reactogenicity.

  8. DNA mismatch repair protein deficient non-neoplastic colonic crypts: a novel indicator of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Rish K; Dudley, Beth; Karloski, Eve; Brand, Randall E; O'Callaghan, Neil; Rosty, Christophe; Buchanan, Daniel D; Jenkins, Mark A; Thibodeau, Stephen N; French, Amy J; Lindor, Noralane M; Pai, Reetesh K

    2018-06-08

    Lynch syndrome is the most common form of hereditary colorectal carcinoma. However, establishing the diagnosis of Lynch syndrome is challenging, and ancillary studies that distinguish between sporadic DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein deficiency and Lynch syndrome are needed, particularly when germline mutation studies are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to determine if MMR protein-deficient non-neoplastic intestinal crypts can help distinguish between patients with and without Lynch syndrome. We evaluated the expression of MMR proteins in non-neoplastic intestinal mucosa obtained from colorectal surgical resection specimens from patients with Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal carcinoma (n = 52) and patients with colorectal carcinoma without evidence of Lynch syndrome (n = 70), including sporadic MMR protein-deficient colorectal carcinoma (n = 30), MMR protein proficient colorectal carcinoma (n = 30), and "Lynch-like" syndrome (n = 10). MMR protein-deficient non-neoplastic colonic crypts were identified in 19 of 122 (16%) patients. MMR protein-deficient colonic crypts were identified in 18 of 52 (35%) patients with Lynch syndrome compared to only 1 of 70 (1%) patients without Lynch syndrome (p Lynch-like" syndrome and harbored two MSH2-deficient non-neoplastic colonic crypts. MMR protein-deficient non-neoplastic colonic crypts were not identified in patients with sporadic MMR protein-deficient or MMR protein proficient colorectal carcinoma. Our findings suggest that MMR protein-deficient colonic crypts are a novel indicator of Lynch syndrome, and evaluation for MMR protein-deficient crypts may be a helpful addition to Lynch syndrome diagnostics.

  9. Development of Functional Microfold (M Cells from Intestinal Stem Cells in Primary Human Enteroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D Rouch

    Full Text Available Intestinal microfold (M cells are specialized epithelial cells that act as gatekeepers of luminal antigens in the intestinal tract. They play a critical role in the intestinal mucosal immune response through transport of viruses, bacteria and other particles and antigens across the epithelium to immune cells within Peyer's patch regions and other mucosal sites. Recent studies in mice have demonstrated that M cells are generated from Lgr5+ intestinal stem cells (ISCs, and that infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium increases M cell formation. However, it is not known whether and how these findings apply to primary human small intestinal epithelium propagated in an in vitro setting.Human intestinal crypts were grown as monolayers with growth factors and treated with recombinant RANKL, and assessed for mRNA transcripts, immunofluorescence and uptake of microparticles and S. Typhimurium.Functional M cells were generated by short-term culture of freshly isolated human intestinal crypts in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. RANKL stimulation of the monolayer cultures caused dramatic induction of the M cell-specific markers, SPIB, and Glycoprotein-2 (GP2 in a process primed by canonical WNT signaling. Confocal microscopy demonstrated a pseudopod phenotype of GP2-positive M cells that preferentially take up microparticles. Furthermore, infection of the M cell-enriched cultures with the M cell-tropic enteric pathogen, S. Typhimurium, led to preferential association of the bacteria with M cells, particularly at lower inoculum sizes. Larger inocula caused rapid induction of M cells.Human intestinal crypts containing ISCs can be cultured and differentiate into an epithelial layer with functional M cells with characteristic morphological and functional properties. This study is the first to demonstrate that M cells can be induced to form from primary human intestinal epithelium, and that S. Typhimurium preferentially infect these cells in an

  10. Expression of an Intestine-Specific Transcription Factor (CDX1) in Intestinal Metaplasia and in Subsequently Developed Intestinal Type of Cholangiocarcinoma in Rat Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ping; Silberg, Debra G.; Sirica, Alphonse E.

    2000-01-01

    CDX1 is a caudal-type homeobox intestine-specific transcription factor that has been shown to be selectively expressed in epithelial cells in intestinal metaplasia of the human stomach and esophagus and variably expressed in human gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas (Silberg DG, Furth EE, Taylor JK, Schuck T, Chiou T, Traber PG: Gastroenterology 1997, 113: 478–486). Through the use of immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, we investigated whether CDX1 is also uniquely associated with the intestinal metaplasia associated with putative precancerous cholangiofibrosis induced in rat liver during furan cholangiocarcinogenesis, as well as expressed in neoplastic glands in a subsequently developed intestinal type of cholangiocarcinoma. In normal, control adult rat small intestine, specific nuclear immunoreactivity for CDX1 was most prominent in enterocytes lining the crypts. In comparison, epithelium from intestinal metaplastic glands within furan-induced hepatic cholangiofibrosis and neoplastic epithelium from later developed primary intestinal-type cholangiocarcinoma each demonstrated strong nuclear immunoreactivity for CDX1. CDX1-positive cells were detected in hepatic cholangiofibrotic tissue as early as 3 weeks after the start of chronic furan treatment. We further determined that the percentages of CDX1-positive neoplastic glands and glandular nuclei are significantly higher in primary tumors than in a derived, transplantable cholangiocarcinoma serially-propagated in vivo. Western blotting confirmed our immunohistochemical results, and no CDX1 immunoreactivity was detected in normal adult rat liver or in hyperplastic biliary epithelial cells. These findings indicate that CDX1 is specifically associated with early intestinal metaplasia and a later developed intestinal-type of cholangiocarcinoma induced in the liver of furan-treated rats. PMID:10666391

  11. The Adhesion of Lactobacillus salivarius REN to a Human Intestinal Epithelial Cell Line Requires S-layer Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Jiang, Lun; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Liang; Hao, Yanling; Guo, Huiyuan; Sang, Yue; Zhang, Hao; Ren, Fazheng

    2017-03-10

    Lactobacillus salivarius REN, a novel probiotic isolated from Chinese centenarians, can adhere to intestinal epithelial cells and subsequently colonize the host. We show here that the surface-layer protein choline-binding protein A (CbpA) of L. salivarius REN was involved in adherence to the human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29. Adhesion of a cbpA deletion mutant was significantly reduced compared with that of wild-type, suggesting that CbpA acts as an adhesin that mediates the interaction between the bacterium and its host. To identify the molecular mechanism of adhesion, we determined the crystal structure of a truncated form of CbpA that is likely involved in binding to its cell-surface receptor. The crystal structure identified CbpA as a peptidase of the M23 family whose members harbor a zinc-dependent catalytic site. Therefore, we propose that CbpA acts as a multifunctional surface protein that cleaves the host extracellular matrix and participates in adherence. Moreover, we identified enolase as the CbpA receptor on the surface of HT-29 cells. The present study reveals a new class of surface-layer proteins as well as the molecular mechanism that may contribute to the ability of L. salivarius REN to colonize the human gut.

  12. In vitro study of biological activities of anthocyanin-rich berry extracts on porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kšonžeková, Petra; Mariychuk, Ruslan; Eliašová, Adriana; Mudroňová, Dagmar; Csank, Tomáš; Király, Ján; Marcinčáková, Dana; Pistl, Juraj; Tkáčiková, L'udmila

    2016-03-15

    Anthocyanins, compounds that represent the major group of flavonoids in berries, are one of the most powerful natural antioxidants. The aim of this study was to evaluate biological activities and comparison of anthocyanin-rich extracts prepared from chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa), elderberry (Sambucus nigra), bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) and blueberry (V. corymbosum) on the porcine intestinal epithelial IPEC-1 cell line. The IC50 values calculated in the antioxidant cell-based dichlorofluorescein assay (DCF assay) were 1.129 mg L(-1) for chokeberry, 1.081 mg L(-1) for elderberry, 2.561 mg L(-1) for bilberry and 2.965 mg L(-1) for blueberry, respectively. We found a significant negative correlation (P < 0.001) between cyanidin glycosides content and IC50 values. Moreover, extracts rich in cyanidin glycosides stimulated proliferation of IPEC-1 cells and did not have cytotoxic effect on cells at an equivalent in vivo concentration. We found that the chokeberry and elderberry extracts rich in cyanidin glycosides possess better antioxidant and anticytotoxic activities in comparison to blueberry or bilberry extracts with complex anthocyanin profiles. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Binding of Candida albicans to Human CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 Modulates the Inflammatory Response of Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Klaile

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans colonizes human mucosa, including the gastrointestinal tract, as a commensal. In immunocompromised patients, C. albicans can breach the intestinal epithelial barrier and cause fatal invasive infections. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1; CD66a, CEACAM5 (CEA, and CEACAM6 (CD66c are immunomodulatory receptors expressed on human mucosa and are recruited by bacterial and viral pathogens. Here we show for the first time that a fungal pathogen (i.e., C. albicans also binds directly to the extracellular domain of human CEACAM1, CEACAM3, CEACAM5, and CEACAM6. Binding was specific for human CEACAMs and mediated by the N-terminal IgV-like domain. In enterocytic C2BBe1 cells, C. albicans caused a transient tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM1 and induced higher expression of membrane-bound CEACAM1 and soluble CEACAM6. Lack of the CEACAM1 receptor after short hairpin RNA (shRNA knockdown abolished CXCL8 (interleukin-8 secretion by C2BBe1 cells in response to C. albicans. In CEACAM1-competent cells, the addition of recombinant soluble CEACAM6 reduced the C. albicans-induced CXCL8 secretion.

  14. Effect of carrageenans alone and in combination with casein or lipopolysaccharide on human epithelial intestinal HT-29 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, E V; Kuz'mich, A S; Byankina, A O; Yermak, I M

    2017-10-01

    The research described here was focused on the effect on human intestinal epithelial cell monolayers of sulfated red algal polysaccharides (κ-, λ-, and κ/β-carrageenans) alone and in combination with casein or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). HT-29 cells were investigated under normal and stress conditions; stress was induced by exposure to ethanol. Cell viability was monitored with a real-time system. The change in binding properties of negatively sulfated red algal polysaccharides assessed by the measurement of free carrageenans in mixtures with casein or McCoy's 5 A culture medium by means of toluidine blue O. Low sulfate content and the presence of 3,6-anhydogalactose are prerequisites for the recovery of ethanol-exposed HT-29 cells by carrageenans. Analysis of carrageenan binding ability confirmed that casein and LPS should affect carrageenan activity. Whether the combined action of the mucin-containing layer and carrageenans or the action of carrageenans alone was responsible for enhanced cell viability under stress conditions induced by ethanol is a subject for further research. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2843-2850, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The prevention of radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in human intestinal epithelial cells by salvianic acid A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The topic of radiation always provokes public debate, and the uses of radiation for therapeutic and other purposes have always been associated with some anxiety. Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge has been widely used for the treatment of various diseases including cerebrovascular diseases, coronary artery diseases, and myocardial infarction. Salvianolic acid A (SAA d (+-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl lactic acid is the principal effective, watersoluble constituent of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. In our present study, radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC in the presence and absence of SAA were examined. We investigated the effects of SAA on ROS formation and the activity of enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, the lipid peroxidative index and the levels of non-enzymatic antioxidant (GSH. Finally, we investigated whether the reduction of radiation-induced cell death caused by SAA might be related to mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Present findings indicate that SAA is a promising radioprotective agent with a strong antioxidant activity. SAA exerted its protective action on the proliferative activity of HIEC cells as evidenced by decreased cytotoxicity after exposure to γ-radiation. It is possible that SAA achieved its radioprotective action, at least in part, by enhancing DNA repair and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, by scavenging ROS and by inhibiting the mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway.

  16. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation causes loss of intestinal epithelial barrier in the newborn piglet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurundkar, Ashish R; Killingsworth, Cheryl R; McIlwain, R Britt; Timpa, Joseph G; Hartman, Yolanda E; He, Dongning; Karnatak, Rajendra K; Neel, Mary L; Clancy, John P; Anantharamaiah, G M; Maheshwari, Akhil

    2010-08-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is an important life-support system used in neonates and young children with intractable cardiorespiratory failure. In this study, we used our porcine neonatal model of venoarterial ECMO to investigate whether ECMO causes gut barrier dysfunction. We subjected 3-wk-old previously healthy piglets to venoarterial ECMO for up to 8 h and evaluated gut mucosal permeability, bacterial translocation, plasma levels of bacterial products, and ultrastructural changes in gut epithelium. We also measured plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels in a small cohort of human neonates receiving ECMO. In our porcine model, ECMO caused a rapid increase in gut mucosal permeability within the first 2 h of treatment, leading to a 6- to 10-fold rise in circulating bacterial products. These changes in barrier function were associated with cytoskeletal condensation in epithelial cells, which was explained by phosphorylation of a myosin II regulatory light chain. In support of these findings, we also detected elevated plasma LPS levels in human neonates receiving ECMO, indicating a similar loss of gut barrier function in these infants. On the basis of these data, we conclude that ECMO is an independent cause of gut barrier dysfunction and bacterial translocation may be an important contributor to ECMO-related inflammation.

  17. Structural Stability of Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 Is Essential for Protective Effects Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.jp [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Umeda, Sachiko [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Yasuda, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro; Motomura, Kaori; Suzuki, Masashi [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Zakrzewska, Malgorzata [Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw (Poland); Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Imai, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Human fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF1) has radioprotective effects on the intestine, although its structural instability limits its potential for practical use. Several stable FGF1 mutants were created increasing stability in the order, wild-type FGF1, single mutants (Q40P, S47I, and H93G), Q40P/S47I, and Q40P/S47I/H93G. This study evaluated the contribution of the structural stability of FGF1 to its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Each FGF1 mutant was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 h before or after total body irradiation (TBI) with {gamma}-rays at 8-12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Q40P/S47I/H93G could activate all subtypes of FGF receptors in vitro much more strongly than the wild-type without endogenous or exogenous heparin. Preirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G significantly increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1 after TBI at 10 or 12 Gy, and postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G was effective in promoting crypt survival after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. In addition, crypt cell proliferation, crypt depth, and epithelial differentiation were significantly promoted by postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G. The level of stability of FGF1 mutants correlated with their mitogenic activities in vitro in the absence of heparin; however, preirradiation treatment with the mutants increased the crypt number to almost the same level as Q40P/S47I/H93G. When given 24 h after TBI at 10 Gy, all FGF1 mutants increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1, and Q40P/S47I/H93G had the strongest mitogenic effects in intestinal epithelial cells after radiation damage. Moreover, Q40P/S47I/H93G prolonged mouse survival after TBI because of the repair of intestinal damage. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the structural stability of FGF1 can contribute to the enhancement of protective effects against radiation-induced intestinal

  18. Modulation of Intestinal Epithelial Permeability in Differentiated Caco-2 Cells Exposed to Aflatoxin M1 and Ochratoxin A Individually or Collectively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Gao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1 and ochratoxin A (OTA are mycotoxins commonly found in milk; however, their effects on intestinal epithelial cells have not been reported. In the present study, we show that AFM1 (0.12 and 12 μM and OTA (0.2 and 20 μM individually or collectively increased the paracellular flux of lucifer yellow and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-dextrans (4 and 40 kDa and decreased transepithelial electrical resistance values in differentiated Caco-2 cells after 48 h of exposure, indicating increased epithelial permeability. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescent analysis revealed that AFM1, OTA, and their combination decreased the expression levels of tight junction (TJ proteins and disrupted their structures, namely, claudin-3, claudin-4, occludin, and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1, and p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK partially involved in the mycotoxins-induced disruption of intestinal barrier. The effects of a combination of AFM1 and OTA on intestinal barrier function were more significant (p < 0.05 than those of AFM1 and OTA alone, yielding additive or synergistic effects. The additive or synergistic effects of AFM1 and OTA on intestinal barrier function might affect human health, especially in children, and toxin risks should be considered.

  19. Astragalus membranaceus Extract Attenuates Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Intestinal Epithelial Cells via NF-κB Activation and Nrf2 Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Adesso

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Astragalus membranaceus, dried root extract, also known as Astragali radix, is used in traditional Chinese medicine as a tonic remedy. Moreover, it has been reported that Astragalus membranaceus could attenuate intestinal inflammation; however, the underlying mechanism for its anti-inflammatory activity in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated Astragalus membranaceus extract (5–100 µg/mL in a model of inflammation and oxidative stress for IECs. We showed that Astragalus membranaceus extract reduced the inflammatory response induced by lipopolysaccharide from E. coli (LPS plus interferon-γ (IFN, decreasing tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α release, cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression, nitrotyrosine formation, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation, and reactive oxygen species (ROS release in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6. The antioxidant potential of Astragalus membranaceus extract was also evaluated in a model of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced oxidative stress in IEC-6, indicating that this extract reduced ROS release and increased nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2 activation and the expression of antioxidant cytoprotective factors in these cells. The results contributed to clarify the mechanisms involved in Astragalus membranaceus extract-reduced inflammation and highlighted the potential use of this extract as an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant remedy for intestinal diseases.

  20. Studies on the age-dependent proliferation kinetics of the epithelium of the rat small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranz, D.; Dietze, F.; Laue, R.; Fuhrmann, I.

    1980-01-01

    The small intestine of 244 Wistar rats, aged 6 days, 6 weeks, 6, 12, 23, and 28 months, respectively. were investigated autoradiographically as to their age-dependent cell proliferation kinetics of the mucosal epithelial cells. There were age-dependent differences concerning the hourly regeneration ratio of the crypt cells and the migration velocity of the enterocytes. Both parameters became greater while the existing non growth fraction became smaller with increasing age. The non growth fraction seems to be a reserve being involved into the proliferating pool if required

  1. The Effector Domain Region of the Vibrio vulnificus MARTX Toxin Confers Biphasic Epithelial Barrier Disruption and Is Essential for Systemic Spread from the Intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah E Gavin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio vulnificus causes highly lethal bacterial infections in which the Multifunctional Autoprocessing Repeats-in-Toxins (MARTX toxin product of the rtxA1 gene is a key virulence factor. MARTX toxins are secreted proteins up to 5208 amino acids in size. Conserved MARTX N- and C-terminal repeat regions work in concert to form pores in eukaryotic cell membranes, through which the toxin's central region of modular effector domains is translocated. Upon inositol hexakisphosphate-induced activation of the of the MARTX cysteine protease domain (CPD in the eukaryotic cytosol, effector domains are released from the holotoxin by autoproteolytic activity. We previously reported that the native MARTX toxin effector domain repertoire is dispensable for epithelial cellular necrosis in vitro, but essential for cell rounding and apoptosis prior to necrotic cell death. Here we use an intragastric mouse model to demonstrate that the effector domain region is required for bacterial virulence during intragastric infection. The MARTX effector domain region is essential for bacterial dissemination from the intestine, but dissemination occurs in the absence of overt intestinal tissue pathology. We employ an in vitro model of V. vulnificus interaction with polarized colonic epithelial cells to show that the MARTX effector domain region induces rapid intestinal barrier dysfunction and increased paracellular permeability prior to onset of cell lysis. Together, these results negate the inherent assumption that observations of necrosis in vitro directly predict bacterial virulence, and indicate a paradigm shift in our conceptual understanding of MARTX toxin function during intestinal infection. Results implicate the MARTX effector domain region in mediating early bacterial dissemination from the intestine to distal organs-a key step in V. vulnificus foodborne pathogenesis-even before onset of overt intestinal pathology.

  2. Cell surface glycopeptides from human intestinal epithelial cell lines derived from normal colon and colon adenocarcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youakim, A.; Herscovics, A.

    1985-01-01

    The cell surface glycopeptides from an epithelial cell line (CCL 239) derived from normal human colon were compared with those from three cell lines (HCT-8R, HCT-15, and CaCo-2) derived independently from human colonic adenocarcinomas. Cells were incubated with D-[2- 3 H]mannose or L-[5,6- 3 H]fucose for 24 h and treated with trypsin to release cell surface components which were then digested exhaustively with Pronase and fractionated on Bio-Gel P-6 before and after treatment with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H. The most noticeable difference between the labeled glycopeptides from the tumor and CCL 239 cells was the presence in the former of an endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H-resistant high molecular weight glycopeptide fraction which was eluted in the void volume of Bio-Gel P-6. This fraction was obtained with both labeled mannose and fucose as precursors. However, acid hydrolysis of this fraction obtained after incubation with [2- 3 H]mannose revealed that as much as 60-90% of the radioactivity was recovered as fucose. Analysis of the total glycopeptides (cell surface and cell pellet) obtained after incubation with [2- 3 H]mannose showed that from 40-45% of the radioactivity in the tumor cells and less than 10% of the radioactivity in the CCL 239 cells was recovered as fucose. After incubation of the HCT-8R cells with D-[1,6- 3 H]glucosamine and L-[1- 14 C]fucose, strong acid hydrolysis of the labeled glycopeptide fraction excluded from Bio-Gel P-6 produced 3 H-labeled N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine

  3. Chemopreventive effect of myrtenal on bacterial enzyme activity and the development of 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine-induced aberrant crypt foci in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokesh Kumar Booupathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer remains as a serious health problem around the world despite advances in diagnosis and treatment. Dietary fibers are considered to reduce the risk of colon cancer as they are converted to short chain fatty acids by the presence of anaerobic bacteria in the intestine, but imbalanced diet and high fat consumption may promote tumor formation at different sites, including the large bowel via increased bacterial enzymes activity. The present study was conducted to characterize the inhibitory action of myrtenal on bacterial enzymes and aberrant crypt foci (ACF. Experimental colon carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine is histologically, morphologically, and anatomically similar to human colonic epithelial neoplasm. Discrete microscopic mucosal lesions such as ACF and malignant tumors function as important biomarkers in the diagnosis of colon cancer. Methylene blue staining was carried out to visualize the impact of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine and myrtenal. Myrtenal-treated animals showed decreased levels of bacterial enzymes such as β-glucuronidase, β-glucosidase, and mucinase. Characteristic changes in the colon were noticed by inhibiting ACF formation in the colon. In conclusion, treatment with myrtenal provided altered pathophysiological condition in colon cancer-bearing animals with evidence of decreased crypt multiplicity and tumor progression.

  4. A 3D intestinal tissue model supports Clostridioides difficile germination, colonization, toxin production and epithelial damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaban, Lamyaa; Chen, Ying; Fasciano, Alyssa C; Lin, Yinan; Kaplan, David L; Kumamoto, Carol A; Mecsas, Joan

    2018-04-01

    Endospore-forming Clostridioides difficile is a causative agent of antibiotic-induced diarrhea, a major nosocomial infection. Studies of its interactions with mammalian tissues have been hampered by the fact that C. difficile requires anaerobic conditions to survive after spore germination. We recently developed a bioengineered 3D human intestinal tissue model and found that low O 2 conditions are produced in the lumen of these tissues. Here, we compared the ability of C. difficile spores to germinate, produce toxin and cause tissue damage in our bioengineered 3D tissue model versus in a 2D transwell model in which human cells form a polarized monolayer. 3D tissue models or 2D polarized monolayers on transwell filters were challenged with the non-toxin producing C. difficile CCUG 37787 serotype X (ATCC 43603) and the toxin producing UK1 C. difficile spores in the presence of the germinant, taurocholate. Spores germinated in both the 3D tissue model as well as the 2D transwell system, however toxin activity was significantly higher in the 3D tissue models compared to the 2D transwells. Moreover, the epithelium damage in the 3D tissue model was significantly more severe than in 2D transwells and damage correlated significantly with the level of toxin activity detected but not with the amount of germinated spores. Combined, these results show that the bioengineered 3D tissue model provides a powerful system with which to study early events leading to toxin production and tissue damage of C. difficile with mammalian cells under anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, these systems may be useful for examining the effects of microbiota, novel drugs and other potential therapeutics directed towards C. difficile infections. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of the MUC2 Promoter as a Strong Promoter for Intestinal Gene Expression through Generation of Transgenic Quail Expressing GFP in Gut Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. Woodfint

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of tissue- and stage-specific gene promoters is valuable for delineating the functional roles of specific genes in genetically engineered animals. Here, through the comparison of gene expression in different tissues by analysis of a microarray database, the intestinal specificity of mucin 2 (MUC2 expression was identified in mice and humans, and further confirmed in chickens by RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR analysis. An analysis of cis-acting elements in avian MUC2 gene promoters revealed conservation of binding sites, within a 2.9 kb proximal promoter region, for transcription factors such as caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2, GATA binding protein 4 (GATA4, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 α (HNF4A, and transcription factor 4 (TCF4 that are important for maintaining intestinal homeostasis and functional integrity. By generating transgenic quail, we demonstrated that the 2.9 kb chicken MUC2 promoter could drive green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter expression exclusively in the small intestine, large intestine, and ceca. Fluorescence image analysis further revealed GFP expression in intestine epithelial cells. The GFP expression was barely detectable in the embryonic intestine, but increased during post-hatch development. The spatiotemporal expression pattern of the reporter gene confirmed that the 2.9 kb MUC2 promoter could retain the regulatory element to drive expression of target genes in intestinal tissues after hatching. This new transgene expression system, using the MUC2 promoter, will provide a new method of overexpressing target genes to study gene function in the avian intestine.

  6. Effects of ethanol and acetaldehyde on tight junction integrity: in vitro study in a three dimensional intestinal epithelial cell culture model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhaseen Elamin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intestinal barrier dysfunction and translocation of endotoxins are involved in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. Exposure to ethanol and its metabolite, acetaldehyde at relatively high concentrations have been shown to disrupt intestinal epithelial tight junctions in the conventional two dimensional cell culture models. The present study investigated quantitatively and qualitatively the effects of ethanol at concentrations detected in the blood after moderate ethanol consumption, of its metabolite acetaldehyde and of the combination of both compounds on intestinal barrier function in a three-dimensional cell culture model. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Caco-2 cells were grown in a basement membrane matrix (Matrigel™ to induce spheroid formation and were then exposed to the compounds at the basolateral side. Morphological differentiation of the spheroids was assessed by immunocytochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. The barrier function was assessed by the flux of FITC-labeled dextran from the basal side into the spheroids' luminal compartment using confocal microscopy. Caco-2 cells grown on Matrigel assembled into fully differentiated and polarized spheroids with a central lumen, closely resembling enterocytes in vivo and provide an excellent model to study epithelial barrier functionality. Exposure to ethanol (10-40 mM or acetaldehyde (25-200 µM for 3 h, dose-dependently and additively increased the paracellular permeability and induced redistribution of ZO-1 and occludin without affecting cell viability or tight junction-encoding gene expression. Furthermore, ethanol and acetaldehyde induced lysine residue and microtubules hyperacetylation. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that ethanol at concentrations found in the blood after moderate drinking and acetaldehyde, alone and in combination, can increase the intestinal epithelial permeability. The data also point to the involvement of protein hyperacetylation in

  7. Screening of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli able to antagonise the cytotoxic effect of Clostridium difficile upon intestinal epithelial HT29 monolayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena eValdés-Varela

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is an opportunistic pathogen inhabiting the human gut, often being the aetiological agent of infections after a microbiota dysbiosis following, for example, an antibiotic treatment. C. difficile infections (CDI constitute a growing health problem with increasing rates of morbidity and mortality at groups of risk, such as elderly and hospitalized patients, but also in populations traditionally considered low-risk. This could be related to the occurrence of virulent strains which, among other factors, have high-level of resistance to fluoroquinolones, more efficient sporulation and markedly high toxin production. Several novel intervention strategies against CDI are currently under study, such as the use of probiotics to counteract the growth and/or toxigenic activity of C. difficile.In this work, we have analysed the capability of twenty Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus strains, from human intestinal origin, to counteract the toxic effect of C. difficile LMG21717 upon the human intestinal epithelial cell line HT29. For this purpose, we incubated the bacteria together with toxigenic supernatants obtained from C. difficile. After this co-incubation new supernatants were collected in order to quantify the remnant A and B toxins, as well as to determine their residual toxic effect upon HT29 monolayers. To this end, the real time cell analyser (RTCA model, recently developed in our group to monitor C. difficile toxic effect, was used. Results obtained showed that strains of Bifidobacterium longum and Bifidobacterium breve were able to reduce the toxic effect of the pathogen upon HT29, the RTCA normalized cell-index values being inversely correlated with the amount of remnant toxin in the supernatant. The strain B. longum IPLA20022 showed the highest ability to counteract the cytotoxic effect of C. difficile acting directly against the toxin, also having the highest capability for removing the toxins from the clostridial

  8. Intestinal microbial dysbiosis and colonic epithelial cell hyperproliferation by dietary α-mangostin is independent of mouse strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Orozco, Fabiola; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Galley, Jeffrey D; Bailey, Michael T; Clinton, Steven K; Lesinski, Gregory B; Failla, Mark L

    2015-01-22

    Beverages and supplements prepared from mangosteen fruit are claimed to support gut health and immunity, despite the absence of supporting evidence from clinical trials. We recently reported that α-mangostin (α-MG), the most abundant xanthone in mangosteen fruit, altered the intestinal microbiome, promoted dysbiosis, and exacerbated colitis in C57BL/6J mice. The objective of this study was to determine whether induction of dysbiosis by dietary α-MG is limited to the C57BL/6J strain or represents a more generic response to chronic intake of the xanthone on the gut microbiota of mice. C3H, Balb/c, Nude FoxN1nu, and C57BL/6J mice, each demonstrating unique microbiomes, were fed standard diet or diet containing 0.1% α-MG for four weeks. Dietary α-MG significantly altered the cecal and colonic microbiota in all four strains of mice, promoting a reduction in generally assumed beneficial bacterial groups while increasing the abundance of pathogenic bacteria. Consumption of α-MG was associated with reduced abundance of Firmicutes and increased abundance of Proteobacteria. The abundance of Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Lactobacillaceae was reduced in α-MG-fed mice, while that of Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococcaceae was increased. Dietary α-MG also was associated with increased proliferation of colonic epithelial cells, infiltration of immune cells, infiltration of immune cells and increased fluid content in stool. These results suggest that ingestion of pharmacologic doses of xanthones in mangosteen-containing supplements may adversely alter the gut microbiota and should be used with caution.

  9. Modulation of pathogen-induced CCL20 secretion from HT-29 human intestinal epithelial cells by commensal bacteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sibartie, Shomik

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) secrete the chemokine CCL20 in response to infection by various enteropathogenic bacteria or exposure to bacterial flagellin. CCL20 recruits immature dendritic cells and lymphocytes to target sites. Here we investigated IEC responses to various pathogenic and commensal bacteria as well as the modulatory effects of commensal bacteria on pathogen-induced CCL20 secretion. HT-29 human IECs were incubated with commensal bacteria (Bifidobacterium infantis or Lactobacillus salivarius), or with Salmonella typhimurium, its flagellin, Clostridium difficile, Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, or Mycobacterium smegmatis for varying times. In some studies, HT-29 cells were pre-treated with a commensal strain for 2 hr prior to infection or flagellin stimulation. CCL20 and interleukin (IL)-8 secretion and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS: Compared to untreated cells, S. typhimurium, C. difficile, M. paratuberculosis, and flagellin activated NF-kappaB and stimulated significant secretion of CCL20 and IL-8 by HT-29 cells. Conversely, B. infantis, L. salivarius or M. smegmatis did not activate NF-kappaB or augment CCL20 or IL-8 production. Treatment with B. infantis, but not L. salivarius, dose-dependently inhibited the baseline secretion of CCL20. In cells pre-treated with B. infantis, C. difficile-, S. typhimurium-, and flagellin-induced CCL20 were significantly attenuated. B. infantis did not limit M. Paratuberculosis-induced CCL20 secretion. CONCLUSION: This study is the first to demonstrate that a commensal strain can attenuate CCL20 secretion in HT-29 IECs. Collectively, the data indicate that M. paratuberculosis may mediate mucosal damage and that B. infantis can exert immunomodulatory effects on IECs that mediate host responses to flagellin and flagellated enteric pathogens.

  10. Bifidobacterium breve MCC-117 Induces Tolerance in Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Study of the Mechanisms Involved in the Immunoregulatory Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    MURATA, Kozue; TOMOSADA, Yohsuke; VILLENA, Julio; CHIBA, Eriko; SHIMAZU, Tomoyuki; ASO, Hisashi; IWABUCHI, Noriyuki; XIAO, Jin-zhong; SAITO, Tadao; KITAZAWA, Haruki

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacterium breve MCC-117 is able to significantly reduce the expression of inflammatory cytokines in porcine intestinal epithelial (PIE) cells and to improve IL-10 levels in CD4+CD25high Foxp3+ lymphocytes in response to heat-stable enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), while the immunoregulatory effect of B. adolescentis ATCC15705 was significantly lower than that observed for the MCC-117 strain. Considering the different capacities of the two bifidobacterium strains to activate toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 and their differential immunoregulatory activities in PIE and immune cells, we hypothesized that comparative studies with both strains could provide important information regarding the molecular mechanism(s) involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of bifidobacteria. In this work, we demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effect of B. breve MCC-117 was achieved by a complex interaction of multiple negative regulators of TLRs as well as inhibition of multiple signaling pathways. We showed that B. breve MCC-117 reduced heat-stable ETEC PAMP-induced NF-κB, p38 MAPK and PI3 K activation and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in PIE cells. In addition, we demonstrated that B. breve MCC-117 may activate TLR2 synergistically and cooperatively with one or more other pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), and that interactions may result in a coordinated sum of signals that induce the upregulation of A20, Bcl-3, Tollip and SIGIRR. Upregulation of these negative regulators could have an important physiological impact on maintaining or reestablishing homeostatic TLR signals in PIE cells. Therefore, in the present study, we gained insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunoregulatory effect of B. breve MCC-117. PMID:24936377

  11. Intestinal Microbial Dysbiosis and Colonic Epithelial Cell Hyperproliferation by Dietary α-Mangostin is Independent of Mouse Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Gutierrez-Orozco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Beverages and supplements prepared from mangosteen fruit are claimed to support gut health and immunity, despite the absence of supporting evidence from clinical trials. We recently reported that α-mangostin (α-MG, the most abundant xanthone in mangosteen fruit, altered the intestinal microbiome, promoted dysbiosis, and exacerbated colitis in C57BL/6J mice. The objective of this study was to determine whether induction of dysbiosis by dietary α-MG is limited to the C57BL/6J strain or represents a more generic response to chronic intake of the xanthone on the gut microbiota of mice. C3H, Balb/c, Nude FoxN1nu, and C57BL/6J mice, each demonstrating unique microbiomes, were fed standard diet or diet containing 0.1% α-MG for four weeks. Dietary α-MG significantly altered the cecal and colonic microbiota in all four strains of mice, promoting a reduction in generally assumed beneficial bacterial groups while increasing the abundance of pathogenic bacteria. Consumption of α-MG was associated with reduced abundance of Firmicutes and increased abundance of Proteobacteria. The abundance of Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Lactobacillaceae was reduced in α-MG-fed mice, while that of Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococcaceae was increased. Dietary α-MG also was associated with increased proliferation of colonic epithelial cells, infiltration of immune cells, infiltration of immune cells and increased fluid content in stool. These results suggest that ingestion of pharmacologic doses of xanthones in mangosteen-containing supplements may adversely alter the gut microbiota and should be used with caution.

  12. Trans-suppression of defense DEFB1 gene in intestinal epithelial cells following Cryptosporidium parvum infection is associated with host delivery of parasite Cdg7_FLc_1000 RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Zhenping; Gong, Ai-Yu; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xin-Tian; Li, Min; Dolata, Courtney E; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2018-03-01

    To counteract host immunity, Cryptosporidium parvum has evolved multiple strategies to suppress host antimicrobial defense. One such strategy is to reduce the production of the antimicrobial peptide beta-defensin 1 (DEFB1) by host epithelial cells but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Recent studies demonstrate that a panel of parasite RNA transcripts of low protein-coding potential are delivered into infected host cells and may modulate host gene transcription. Using in vitro models of intestinal cryptosporidiosis, in this study, we analyzed the expression profile of host beta-defensin genes in host cells following infection. We found that C. parvum infection caused a significant downregulation of the DEFB1 gene. Interestingly, downregulation of DEFB1 gene was associated with host delivery of Cdg7_FLc_1000 RNA transcript, a C. parvum RNA that has previously demonstrated to be delivered into the nuclei of infected host cells. Knockdown of Cdg7_FLc_1000 in host cells could attenuate the trans-suppression of host DEFB1 gene and decreased the parasite burden. Therefore, our data suggest that trans-suppression of DEFB1 gene in intestinal epithelial cells following C. parvum infection involves host delivery of parasite Cdg7_FLc_1000 RNA, a process that may be relevant to the epithelial defense evasion by C. parvum at the early stage of infection.

  13. Optical coherence tomography imaging of colonic crypts in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welge, Weston A.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2016-03-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) are abnormal epithelial lesions that precede development of colonic polyps. As the earliest morphological change in the development of colorectal cancer, ACF is a highly studied phenomenon. The most common method of imaging ACF is chromoendoscopy using methylene blue as a contrast agent. Narrow- band imaging is a contrast-agent-free modality for imaging the colonic crypts. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an attractive alternative to chromoendoscopy and narrow-band imaging because it can resolve the crypt structure at sufficiently high sampling while simultaneously providing depth-resolved data. We imaged in vivo the distal 15 mm of colon in the azoxymethane (AOM) mouse model of colorectal cancer using a commercial swept-source OCT system and a miniature endoscope designed and built in-house. We present en face images of the colonic crypts and demonstrate that different patterns in healthy and adenoma tissue can be seen. These patterns correspond to those reported in the literature. We have previously demonstrated early detection of colon adenoma using OCT by detecting minute thickening of the mucosa. By combining mucosal thickness measurement with imaging of the crypt structure, OCT can be used to correlate ACF and adenoma development in space and time. These results suggest that OCT may be a superior imaging modality for studying the connection between ACF and colorectal cancer.

  14. Live Faecalibacterium prausnitzii Does Not Enhance Epithelial Barrier Integrity in an Apical Anaerobic Co-Culture Model of the Large Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maier

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate intestinal barrier maturation during infancy largely depends on colonization with commensal bacteria. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is an abundant obligate anaerobe that colonizes during weaning and is thought to maintain colonic health throughout life. We previously showed that F. prausnitzii induced Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 activation, which is linked to enhanced tight junction formation. Therefore, we hypothesized that F. prausnitzii enhances barrier integrity, an important factor in appropriate intestinal barrier maturation. In order to test metabolically active bacteria, we used a novel apical anaerobic co-culture system that allows the survival of both obligate anaerobic bacteria and oxygen-requiring intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2. The first aim was to optimize the culture medium to enable growth and active metabolism of F. prausnitzii while maintaining the viability and barrier integrity, as measured by trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER, of the Caco-2 cells. This was achieved by supplementing the apical cell culture medium with bacterial culture medium. The second aim was to test the effect of F. prausnitzii on TEER across Caco-2 cell layers. Live F. prausnitzii did not improve TEER, which indicates that its benefits are not via altering tight junction integrity. The optimization of the novel dual-environment co-culturing system performed in this research will enable the investigation of new probiotics originating from indigenous beneficial bacteria.

  15. Live Faecalibacterium prausnitzii Does Not Enhance Epithelial Barrier Integrity in an Apical Anaerobic Co-Culture Model of the Large Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Eva; Anderson, Rachel C; Roy, Nicole C

    2017-12-12

    Appropriate intestinal barrier maturation during infancy largely depends on colonization with commensal bacteria. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is an abundant obligate anaerobe that colonizes during weaning and is thought to maintain colonic health throughout life. We previously showed that F. prausnitzii induced Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) activation, which is linked to enhanced tight junction formation. Therefore, we hypothesized that F. prausnitzii enhances barrier integrity, an important factor in appropriate intestinal barrier maturation. In order to test metabolically active bacteria, we used a novel apical anaerobic co-culture system that allows the survival of both obligate anaerobic bacteria and oxygen-requiring intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2). The first aim was to optimize the culture medium to enable growth and active metabolism of F. prausnitzii while maintaining the viability and barrier integrity, as measured by trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER), of the Caco-2 cells. This was achieved by supplementing the apical cell culture medium with bacterial culture medium. The second aim was to test the effect of F. prausnitzii on TEER across Caco-2 cell layers. Live F. prausnitzii did not improve TEER, which indicates that its benefits are not via altering tight junction integrity. The optimization of the novel dual-environment co-culturing system performed in this research will enable the investigation of new probiotics originating from indigenous beneficial bacteria.

  16. A theoretical investigation of the effect of proliferation and adhesion on monoclonal conversion in the colonic crypt

    KAUST Repository

    Mirams, Gary R.

    2012-11-01

    The surface epithelium lining the intestinal tract renews itself rapidly by a coordinated programme of cell proliferation, migration and differentiation events that is initiated in the crypts of Lieberkühn. It is generally believed that colorectal cancer arises due to mutations that disrupt the normal cellular dynamics of the crypts. Using a spatially structured cell-based model of a colonic crypt, we investigate the likelihood that the progeny of a mutated cell will dominate, or be sloughed out of, a crypt. Our approach is to perform multiple simulations, varying the spatial location of the initial mutation, and the proliferative and adhesive properties of the mutant cells, to obtain statistical distributions for the probability of their domination. Our simulations lead us to make a number of predictions. The process of monoclonal conversion always occurs, and does not require that the cell which initially gave rise to the population remains in the crypt. Mutations occurring more than one to two cells from the base of the crypt are unlikely to become the dominant clone. The probability of a mutant clone persisting in the crypt is sensitive to dysregulation of adhesion. By comparing simulation results with those from a simple one-dimensional stochastic model of population dynamics at the base of the crypt, we infer that this sensitivity is due to direct competition between wild-type and mutant cells at the base of the crypt. We also predict that increases in the extent of the spatial domain in which the mutant cells proliferate can give rise to counter-intuitive, non-linear changes to the probability of their fixation, due to effects that cannot be captured in simpler models. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. A mucus adhesion promoting protein, MapA, mediates the adhesion of Lactobacillus reuteri to Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Yukihiro; Okada, Sanae; Uchimura, Tai; Satoh, Eiichi

    2006-07-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri is one of the dominant lactobacilli found in the gastrointestinal tract of various animals. A surface protein of L. reuteri 104R, mucus adhesion promoting protein (MapA), is considered to be an adhesion factor of this strain. We investigated the relation between MapA and adhesion of L. reuteri to human intestinal (Caco-2) cells. Quantitative analysis of the adhesion of L. reuteri strains to Caco-2 cells showed that various L. reuteri strains bind not only to mucus but also to intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, purified MapA bound to Caco-2 cells, and this binding inhibited the adhesion of L. reuteri in a concentration-dependent manner. Based on these observations, the adhesion of L. reuteri appears due to the binding of MapA to receptor-like molecules on Caco-2 cells. Further, far-western analysis indicated the existence of multiple receptor-like molecules in Caco-2 cells.

  18. Activation of MEK1 or MEK2 isoform is sufficient to fully transform intestinal epithelial cells and induce the formation of metastatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voisin, Laure; Basik, Mark; Meloche, Sylvain; Julien, Catherine; Duhamel, Stéphanie; Gopalbhai, Kailesh; Claveau, Isabelle; Saba-El-Leil, Marc K; Rodrigue-Gervais, Ian Gaël; Gaboury, Louis; Lamarre, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The Ras-dependent ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling pathway plays a central role in cell proliferation control and is frequently activated in human colorectal cancer. Small-molecule inhibitors of MEK1/MEK2 are therefore viewed as attractive drug candidates for the targeted therapy of this malignancy. However, the exact contribution of MEK1 and MEK2 to the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer remains to be established. Wild type and constitutively active forms of MEK1 and MEK2 were ectopically expressed by retroviral gene transfer in the normal intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. We studied the impact of MEK1 and MEK2 activation on cellular morphology, cell proliferation, survival, migration, invasiveness, and tumorigenesis in mice. RNA interference was used to test the requirement for MEK1 and MEK2 function in maintaining the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cells. We found that expression of activated MEK1 or MEK2 is sufficient to morphologically transform intestinal epithelial cells, dysregulate cell proliferation and induce the formation of high-grade adenocarcinomas after orthotopic transplantation in mice. A large proportion of these intestinal tumors metastasize to the liver and lung. Mechanistically, activation of MEK1 or MEK2 up-regulates the expression of matrix metalloproteinases, promotes invasiveness and protects cells from undergoing anoikis. Importantly, we show that silencing of MEK2 expression completely suppresses the proliferation of human colon carcinoma cell lines, whereas inactivation of MEK1 has a much weaker effect. MEK1 and MEK2 isoforms have similar transforming properties and are able to induce the formation of metastatic intestinal tumors in mice. Our results suggest that MEK2 plays a more important role than MEK1 in sustaining the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cells

  19. Surface Proteome Analysis of a Natural Isolate of Lactococcus lactis Reveals the Presence of Pili Able to Bind Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyrand, Mickael; Guillot, Alain; Goin, Mélodie; Furlan, Sylviane; Armalyte, Julija; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Cortes-Perez, Naima G.; Thomas, Ginette; Chat, Sophie; Péchoux, Christine; Dupres, Vincent; Hols, Pascal; Dufrêne, Yves F.; Trugnan, Germain; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Surface proteins of Gram-positive bacteria play crucial roles in bacterial adhesion to host tissues. Regarding commensal or probiotic bacteria, adhesion to intestinal mucosa may promote their persistence in the gastro-intestinal tract and their beneficial effects to the host. In this study, seven Lactococcus lactis strains exhibiting variable surface physico-chemical properties were compared for their adhesion to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. In this test, only one vegetal isolate TIL448 expressed a high-adhesion phenotype. A nonadhesive derivative was obtained by plasmid curing from TIL448, indicating that the adhesion determinants were plasmid-encoded. Surface-exposed proteins in TIL448 were analyzed by a proteomic approach consisting in shaving of the bacterial surface with trypsin and analysis of the released peptides by LC-MS/MS. As the TIL448 complete genome sequence was not available, the tryptic peptides were identified by a mass matching approach against a database including all Lactococcus protein sequences and the sequences deduced from partial DNA sequences of the TIL448 plasmids. Two surface proteins, encoded by plasmids in TIL448, were identified as candidate adhesins, the first one displaying pilin characteristics and the second one containing two mucus-binding domains. Inactivation of the pilin gene abolished adhesion to Caco-2 cells whereas inactivation of the mucus-binding protein gene had no effect on adhesion. The pilin gene is located inside a cluster of four genes encoding two other pilin-like proteins and one class-C sortase. Synthesis of pili was confirmed by immunoblotting detection of high molecular weight forms of pilins associated to the cell wall as well as by electron and atomic force microscopy observations. As a conclusion, surface proteome analysis allowed us to detect pilins at the surface of L. lactis TIL448. Moreover we showed that pili appendages are formed and involved in adhesion to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells

  20. miR-122 targets NOD2 to decrease intestinal epithelial cell injury in Crohn’s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Chengxiao; Liu, Ying; Tang, Liwei; Zheng, Mingxia [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China); Xu, Chundi [Department of Pediatrics, Ruijin affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025 (China); Song, Jian, E-mail: jiansongkxy@126.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China); Meng, Xiaochun [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •NOD2 is a target gene of miR-122. •miR-122 inhibits LPS-induced apoptosis by suppressing NOD2 in HT-29 cells. •miR-122 reduces the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IFN-γ). •miR-122 promotes the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). •NF-κB signaling pathway is involved in inflammatory response induced by LPS. -- Abstract: Crohn’s disease (CD) is one of the two major types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) thought to be caused by genetic and environmental factors. Recently, miR-122 was found to be deregulated in association with CD progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the gene nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2/CARD15), which is strongly associated with susceptibility to CD, was identified as a functional target of miR-122. MiR-122 inhibited LPS-induced apoptosis by suppressing NOD2 in HT-29 cells. NOD2 interaction with LPS initiates signal transduction mechanisms resulting in the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and the stimulation of downstream pro-inflammatory events. The activation of NF-κB was inhibited in LPS-stimulated HT-29 cells pretreated with miR-122 precursor or NOD2 shRNA. The expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ was significantly decreased, whereas therelease of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 was increased in LPS-stimulated HT-29 cells pretreated with miR-122 precursor, NOD2 shRNA or the NF-κB inhibitor QNZ. Taken together, these results indicate that miR-122 and its target gene NOD2 may play an important role in the injury of intestinal epithelial cells induced by LPS.

  1. Response of intestinal cells of differing topographical and hierarchical status to ten cytotoxic drugs and five sources of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, K.; Potter, C.S.

    1983-01-01

    The spatial distribution of cell death among the epithelial cells lining the adult mouse small intestinal mucosa at various times after a range of doses of 10 different drugs as well as after internal or external irradiation (#betta# particles from tritium, #betta#- and X-rays and neutrons) has been recorded. Cell death, expressed as pycnosis or apoptosis, has been recorded for each cell position up the side of the crypts of the small intestine. Adriamycin and the various forms of radiation tend to kill cells preferentially at cell position 4-5 i.e. on cells very early in the lineage, probably stem cells. Isopropyl-methane-sulphonate, nitrogen mustard and possibly Actinomycin-D act on cell position 6-7, while 5-fluorouracil, Myleran, cyclophosphamide, and cycloheximide tend to kill cells at cell position 7-9. Vincristine and hydroxyurea are the 2 agents that exhibit a specificity for cells highest up the crypt, i.e. latest in transit population of the cell lineage by acting on cell positions 10 or 11. The data also suggest that normal healthy cells continue to migrate up the crypt and onto the villus in spite of considerable cell death and reduced cell production. (author)

  2. Morphological differences in the response of mouse small intestine to radiobiologically equivalent doses of X and neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, K.E.; Hamlet, R.; Nias, A.H.; Watt, C.

    1984-01-01

    A scale has been developed to describe the effects of radiation on small intestinal villi. The scale has been used to compare the damage done to the villi in the period 0-5 days after irradiation by X-irradiation or neutron irradiation, using 10 Gy X-rays and 5 Gy neutrons, doses which are radiobiologically equivalent when assessed by the microcolony assay method. Use of the scale indicates that the damage done to the villi by neutrons is greater than that produced by X-rays. This has implications for the interpretation of radiobiological equivalent doses (R.B.E.). Resin light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (T.E.M.) have also been used to examine small intestinal damage after 10 Gy X-irradiation and 5 Gy neutron irradiation. Differences include variations in crypt shape, mitotic activity and the proportion of crypts which are heavily parasitised. As well as the differences in villous shape which have been reflected in the different values on the scoring system, there are also variations in the response of the constituent cells of the epithelial compartment of the villi. In general, the effect of the neutron irradiation is more severe than that of the X-rays, particularly as would be suggested by a simple quantitation of crypt regeneration

  3. Response of intestinal cells of differing topographical and hierarchical status to ten cytotoxic drugs and five sources of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ijiri, K; Potter, C S [Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (UK). Paterson Labs.

    1983-02-01

    The spatial distribution of cell death among the epithelial cells lining the adult mouse small intestinal mucosa at various times after a range of doses of 10 different drugs as well as after internal or external irradiation (..beta.. particles from tritium, ..gamma..- and X-rays and neutrons) has been recorded. Cell death, expressed as pycnosis or apoptosis, has been recorded for each cell position up the side of the crypts of the small intestine. Adriamycin and the various forms of radiation tend to kill cells preferentially at cell position 4-5 i.e. on cells very early in the lineage, probably stem cells. Isopropyl-methane-sulphonate, nitrogen mustard and possibly Actinomycin-D act on cell position 6-7, while 5-fluorouracil, Myleran, cyclophosphamide, and cycloheximide tend to kill cells at cell position 7-9. Vincristine and hydroxyurea are the 2 agents that exhibit a specificity for cells highest up the crypt, i.e. latest in transit population of the cell lineage by acting on cell positions 10 or 11. The data also suggest that normal healthy cells continue to migrate up the crypt and onto the villus in spite of considerable cell death and reduced cell production.

  4. Excessive L-cysteine induces vacuole-like cell death by activating endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yun; Wu, Zhenlong; Dai, Zhaolai; Sun, Kaiji; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    High intake of dietary cysteine is extremely toxic to animals and the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that excessive L-cysteine induces cell death by activating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in intestinal porcine epithelial cells. Jejunal enterocytes were cultured in the presence of 0-10 mmol/L L-cysteine. Cell viability, morphologic alterations, mRNA levels for genes involved in ER stress, protein abundances for glucose-regulated protein 78, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF2α), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), p38 MAPK, and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK1/2) were determined. The results showed that L-cysteine (5-10 mmol/L) reduced cell viability (P L-cysteine were not affected by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. The protein abundances for CHOP, phosphorylated (p)-eIF2α, p-JNK1/2, p-p38 MAPK, and the spliced form of XBP-1 mRNA were enhanced (P L-cysteine induces vacuole-like cell death via the activation of ER stress and MAPK signaling in small intestinal epithelial cells. These signaling pathways may be potential targets for developing effective strategies to prevent the toxicity of dietary cysteine.

  5. Cholesterol trafficking and raft-like membrane domain composition mediate scavenger receptor class B type 1-dependent lipid sensing in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Etienne; Ghezzal, Sara; Lucchi, Géraldine; Truntzer, Caroline; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Demignot, Sylvie; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W; Leturque, Armelle; Rousset, Monique; Carrière, Véronique

    2018-02-01

    Scavenger receptor Class B type 1 (SR-B1) is a lipid transporter and sensor. In intestinal epithelial cells, SR-B1-dependent lipid sensing is associated with SR-B1 recruitment in raft-like/ detergent-resistant membrane domains and interaction of its C-terminal transmembrane domain with plasma membrane cholesterol. To clarify the initiating events occurring during lipid sensing by SR-B1, we analyzed cholesterol trafficking and raft-like domain composition in intestinal epithelial cells expressing wild-type SR-B1 or the mutated form SR-B1-Q445A, defective in membrane cholesterol binding and signal initiation. These features of SR-B1 were found to influence both apical cholesterol efflux and intracellular cholesterol trafficking from plasma membrane to lipid droplets, and the lipid composition of raft-like domains. Lipidomic analysis revealed likely participation of d18:0/16:0 sphingomyelin and 16:0/0:0 lysophosphatidylethanolamine in lipid sensing by SR-B1. Proteomic analysis identified proteins, whose abundance changed in raft-like domains during lipid sensing, and these included molecules linked to lipid raft dynamics and signal transduction. These findings provide new insights into the role of SR-B1 in cellular cholesterol homeostasis and suggest molecular links between SR-B1-dependent lipid sensing and cell cholesterol and lipid droplet dynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Killed Whole-Cell Oral Cholera Vaccine Induces CCL20 Secretion by Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells in the Presence of the Short-Chain Fatty Acid, Butyrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Ri Sim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs, such as acetate, butyrate, and propionate, modulate immune responses in the gut. However, the effect of SCFAs on mucosal vaccine-induced immune cell migration is poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether SCFAs modulate chemokine expression induced by the killed whole-cell oral cholera vaccine, Shanchol™, in human intestinal epithelial cells. Shanchol™ induced expression of CCL2, CCL5, CCL20, and CXCL10 at the mRNA level, but not at the protein level. Interestingly, CCL20 secretion was substantially increased by co-stimulation with Shanchol™ and butyrate, while neither acetate nor propionate showed such effect. Enhanced CCL20 secretion was associated with GPR109A activation, and histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibition. In addition, co-treatment with Shanchol™ and butyrate synergistically increased the secretion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Moreover, CCL20 secretion was decreased by inhibiting the extracellular ATP receptor P2X7. However, neither inflammasomes nor caspases were involved in CCL20 production. The culture supernatant of cells treated with Shanchol™ and butyrate augmented human immature dendritic cell migration. Collectively, these results suggest that butyrate enhances Shanchol™-induced CCL20 production in human intestinal epithelial cells via HDAC inhibition and ATP-P2X7 signaling by activating GPR109A. These effects potentially enhance the mucosal immune responses in the gut induced by this oral cholera vaccine.

  7. Effect of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. Boulardii and β-galactomannan oligosaccharide on porcine intestinal epithelial and dendritic cells challenged in vitro with Escherichia coli F4 (K88

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badia Roger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Probiotic and prebiotics, often called "immune-enhancing" feed additives, are believed to deal with pathogens, preventing the need of an immune response and reducing tissue damage. In this study, we investigated if a recently developed β-galactomannan (βGM had a similar protective role compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. Boulardii (Scb, a proven probiotic, in the context of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC infection. ETEC causes inflammation, diarrhea and intestinal damage in piglets, resulting in large economic loses worldwide. We observed that Scb and βGM products inhibited in vitro adhesion of ETEC on cell surface of porcine intestinal IPI-2I cells. Our data showed that Scb and βGM decreased the mRNA ETEC-induced gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, GM-CSF and chemokines CCL2, CCL20 and CXCL8 on intestinal IPI-2I. Furthermore, we investigated the putative immunomodulatory role of Scb and βGM on porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs per se and under infection conditions. We observed a slight up-regulation of mRNA for TNF-α and CCR7 receptor after co-incubation of DC with Scb and βGM. However, no differences were found in DC activation upon ETEC infection and Scb or βGM co-culture. Therefore, our results indicate that, similar to probiotic Scb, prebiotic βGM may protect intestinal epithelial cells against intestinal pathogens. Finally, although these products may modulate DC activation, their effect under ETEC challenge conditions remains to be elucidated.

  8. Probiotic-derived polyphosphate enhances the epithelial barrier function and maintains intestinal homeostasis through integrin-p38 MAPK pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Segawa

    Full Text Available Probiotics exhibit beneficial effects on human health, particularly in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis in a complex manner notwithstanding the diversity of an intestinal flora between individuals. Thus, it is highly probable that some common molecules secreted by probiotic and/or commensal bacteria contribute to the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and protect the intestinal epithelium from injurious stimuli. To address this question, we aimed to isolate the cytoprotective compound from a lactobacillus strain, Lactobacillus brevis SBC8803 which possess the ability to induce cytoprotective heat shock proteins in mouse small intestine. L. brevis was incubated in MRS broth and the supernatant was passed through with a 0.2-µm filter. Caco2/bbe cells were treated with the culture supernatant, and HSP27 expression was evaluated by Western blotting. HSP27-inducible components were separated by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE anion exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and HPLC. Finally, we identified that the HSP27-inducible fraction was polyphosphate (poly P, a simple repeated structure of phosphates, which is a common product of lactobacilli and other bacteria associated with intestinal microflora without any definitive physiological functions. Then, poly P was synthesized by poly P-synthesizing enzyme polyphosphate kinase. The synthesized poly P significantly induced HSP27 from Caco2/BBE cells. In addition, Poly P suppressed the oxidant-induced intestinal permeability in the mouse small intestine and pharmacological inhibitors of p38 MAPK and integrins counteract its protective effect. Daily intrarectal administration of poly P (10 µg improved the inflammation grade and survival rate in 4% sodium dextran sulfate-administered mice. This study, for the first time, demonstrated that poly P is the molecule responsible for maintaining intestinal barrier actions which are mediated through the intestinal integrin β1-p38 MAPK.

  9. CDX2 Stimulates the Proliferation of Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Activating the mTORC1 and Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hong-Bo; Zhai, Zhen-Ya; Li, Xiang-Guang; Gao, Chun-Qi; Yan, Hui-Chao; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Wang, Xiu-Qi

    2017-11-18

    Caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2) is expressed in intestinal epithelial cells and plays a role in gut development and homeostasis by regulating cell proliferation. However, whether CDX2 cooperates with the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways to stimulate cell proliferation remains unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of CDX2 on the proliferation of porcine jejunum epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and the correlation between CDX2, the mTORC1 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. CDX2 overexpression and knockdown cell culture models were established to explore the regulation of CDX2 on both pathways. Pathway-specific antagonists were used to verify the effects. The results showed that CDX2 overexpression increased IPEC-J2 cell proliferation and activated both the mTORC1 and Wnt/β-catenin pathways, and that CDX2 knockdown decreased cell proliferation and inhibited both pathways. Furthermore, the mTORC1 and Wnt/β-catenin pathway-specific antagonist rapamycin and XAV939 (3,5,7,8-tetrahydro-2-[4-(trifluoromethyl)]-4H -thiopyrano[4,3-d]pyrimidin-4-one) both suppressed the proliferation of IPEC-J2 cells overexpressing CDX2, and that the combination of rapamycin and XAV939 had an additive effect. Regardless of whether the cells were treated with rapamycin or XAV939 alone or in combination, both mTORC1 and Wnt/β-catenin pathways were down-regulated, accompanied by a decrease in CDX2 expression. Taken together, our data indicate that CDX2 stimulates porcine intestinal epithelial cell proliferation by activating the mTORC1 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways.

  10. Polysaccharide-Containing Macromolecules in a Kampo (Traditional Japanese Herbal Medicine, Hochuekkito: Dual Active Ingredients for Modulation of Immune Functions on Intestinal Peyer's Patches and Epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Kiyohara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A traditional Japanese herbal (Kampo medicine, Hochuekkito (Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang in Chinese, TJ-41 is a well-known Kampo formula, and has been found to enhance antigen-specific antibody response in not only local mucosal immune system in upper respiratory tract, but also systemic immune system through upper respiratory mucosal immune system. Although this immunopharmacological effect has been proposed to express by modulation of intestinal immune system including Peyer's patches and intestinal epithelial cells, active ingredients are not known. TJ-41 directly affected the production of bone marrow cell-proliferative growth factors from murine Peyer's patch immunocompetent cells in vitro. Among low molecular, intermediate size and macromolecular weight fractions prepared from TJ-41, only fraction containing macromolecular weight ingredients showed Peyer's patch-mediated bone marrow cell-proliferation enhancing activity. Anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration gave 17 subfractions comprising polysaccharides and lignins from the macromolecular weight fraction of TJ-41, and some of the subfractions showed significant enhancing activities having different degrees. Some of the subfractions also expressed stimulating activity on G-CSF-production from colonic epithelial cells, and statistically significant positive correlation was observed among enhancing activities of the subfractions against Peyer's patch immunocompetent cells and epithelial cells. Among the fractions from TJ-41 oral administration of macromolecular weight ingredient fraction to mice succeeded to enhance antigen-specific antibody response in systemic immune system through upper respiratory mucosal immune system, but all the separated fractions failed to enhance the in vivo antibody response in upper respiratory tract.

  11. Optimization of micro-fabricated porous membranes for intestinal epithelial cell culture and in vitro modeling of the human intestinal barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair Gourikutty Sajay, Bhuvanendran; Yin, Chiam Su; Ramadan, Qasem

    2017-12-01

    In vitro modeling of organs could provide a controlled platform for studying physiological events and has great potential in the field of pharmaceutical development. Here, we describe the characterization of in vitro modeling of the human intestinal barrier mimicked using silicon porous membranes as a substrate. To mimic an intestinal in vivo setup as closely as possible, a porous substrate is required in a dynamic environment for the cells to grow rather than a static setup with an impermeable surface such as a petri dish. In this study, we focus on the detailed characterization of Caco-2 cells cultured on a silicon membrane with different pore sizes as well as the effect of dynamic fluid flow on the model. The porous silicon membrane together with continuous perfusion of liquid applying shear stress on the cells enhances the differentiation of polarized cells by providing access to the both their basal and apical surfaces. Membranes with pore sizes of 0.5-3 µm were used and a shear stress of ~0.03 dyne cm-2 was created by applying a low flow rate of 20 nl s-1. By providing these optimized conditions, cells were able to differentiate with columnar morphology, which developed microvilli structures on their apical side and tight junctions between adjacent cells like those in a healthy human intestinal barrier. In this setup, it is possible to study the important cellular functions of the intestine such as transport, absorption and secretion, and thus this model has great potential in drug screening.

  12. CLMP Is Essential for Intestinal Development, but Does Not Play a Key Role in Cellular Processes Involved in Intestinal Epithelial Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Christine S.; Hsiao, Nai-Hua; Conroy, Siobhan; Paredes, Joana; Ribeiro, Ana S.; Sribudiani, Yunia; Seruca, Raquel; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Westers, Helga; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in CLMP have been found in patients with Congenital Short Bowel Syndrome (CSBS), suggesting that its encoded protein plays a major role in intestinal development. CLMP is a membrane protein that co-localizes with tight junction proteins, but its function is largely

  13. BMP signaling inhibits intestinal stem cell self-renewal through suppression of Wnt-beta-catenin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xi C; Zhang, Jiwang; Tong, Wei-Gang; Tawfik, Ossama; Ross, Jason; Scoville, David H; Tian, Qiang; Zeng, Xin; He, Xi; Wiedemann, Leanne M; Mishina, Yuji; Li, Linheng

    2004-10-01

    In humans, mutations in BMPR1A, SMAD4 and PTEN are responsible for juvenile polyposis syndrome, juvenile intestinal polyposis and Cowden disease, respectively. The development of polyposis is a common feature of these diseases, suggesting that there is an association between BMP and PTEN pathways. The mechanistic link between BMP and PTEN pathways and the related etiology of juvenile polyposis is unresolved. Here we show that conditional inactivation of Bmpr1a in mice disturbs homeostasis of intestinal epithelial regeneration with an expansion of the stem and progenitor cell populations, eventually leading to intestinal polyposis resembling human juvenile polyposis syndrome. We show that BMP signaling suppresses Wnt signaling to ensure a balanced control of stem cell self-renewal. Mechanistically, PTEN, through phosphatidylinosital-3 kinase-Akt, mediates the convergence of the BMP and Wnt pathways on control of beta-catenin. Thus, BMP signaling may control the duplication of intestinal stem cells, thereby preventing crypt fission and the subsequent increase in crypt number.

  14. Human mini-guts: new insights into intestinal physiology and host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Julie G; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; Estes, Mary K; Zachos, Nicholas C; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Donowitz, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The development of indefinitely propagating human 'mini-guts' has led to a rapid advance in gastrointestinal research related to transport physiology, developmental biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology. These mini-guts, also called enteroids or colonoids, are derived from LGR5 + intestinal stem cells isolated from the small intestine or colon. Addition of WNT3A and other growth factors promotes stemness and results in viable, physiologically functional human intestinal or colonic cultures that develop a crypt-villus axis and can be differentiated into all intestinal epithelial cell types. The success of research using human enteroids has highlighted the limitations of using animals or in vitro, cancer-derived cell lines to model transport physiology and pathophysiology. For example, curative or preventive therapies for acute enteric infections have been limited, mostly due to the lack of a physiological human intestinal model. However, the human enteroid model enables specific functional studies of secretion and absorption in each intestinal segment as well as observations of the earliest molecular events that occur during enteric infections. This Review describes studies characterizing these human mini-guts as a physiological model to investigate intestinal transport and host-pathogen interactions.

  15. Update on small intestinal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tesori, Valentina; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Lattanzi, Wanda; Gasbarrini, Giovanni Battista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Among somatic stem cells, those residing in the intestine represent a fascinating and poorly explored research field. Particularly, somatic stem cells reside in the small intestine at the level of the crypt base, in a constant balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Aim of the present review is to delve into the mechanisms that regulate the delicate equilibrium through which intestinal stem cells orchestrate intestinal architecture. To this aim, special focus will be addressed to id...

  16. [Changes in expression of Slingshot protein in hypoxic human intestinal epithelial cell and its relation with barrier function of the cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Wang, Pei; He, Wen; Wang, Fengjun

    2016-04-01

    To study the effect of hypoxia on Slingshot protein expression in human intestinal epithelial cell and its relation with changes in barrier function of the cells. The human intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2 was used to reproduce monolayer-cells. One portion of the monolayer-cell specimens were divided into six parts according to the random number table, and they were respectively exposed to hypoxia for 0 (without hypoxia), 1, 2, 6, 12, and 24 h. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) was determined with an ohmmeter. Another portion of the monolayer-cell specimens were exposed to hypoxia as above. Western blotting was used to detect the protein expressions of zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1), occludin, claudin-1, Slingshot-1, Slingshot-2, and Slingshot-3. The remaining portion of the monolayer-cell specimens were also exposed to hypoxia as above. The content of fibrous actin (F-actin) and globular actin (G-actin) was determined by fluorescence method. The sample number of above-mentioned 3 experiments was respectively 10, 10, and 18 at each time point. Data were processed with one-way analysis of variance and Dunnett test. (1) Compared with that of cells exposed to hypoxia for 0 h, TER of cells exposed to hypoxia for 1 to 24 h was significantly reduced (P values below 0.01). (2) Compared with those of cells exposed to hypoxia for 0 h (all were 1.00), the protein expressions of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 of cells exposed to hypoxia for 1 to 24 h were generally lower, especially those of cells exposed to hypoxia for 12 h or 24 h (respectively 0.69 ± 0.20, 0.47 ± 0.15, and 0.47 ± 0.22, Pprotein expressions of Slingshot-1 and Slingshot-3 of cells exposed to hypoxia for 1 to 24 h were not obviously changed (P values above 0.05). The protein expression of Slingshot-2 of cells was decreased at first and then gradually increased from hypoxia hour 1 to 24. The protein expression of Slingshot-2 of cells exposed to hypoxia for 24 h (1.54 ± 0.57) was significantly

  17. Duodenal crypt health following exposure to Cr(VI): Micronucleus scoring, γ-H2AX immunostaining, and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Chad M.; Wolf, Jeffrey C.; Elbekai, Reem H.; Paranjpe, Madhav G.; Seiter, Jennifer M.; Chappell, Mark A.; Tappero, Ryan V.; Suh, Mina; Proctor, Deborah M.; Bichteler, Anne; Haws, Laurie C.; Harris, Mark A.

    2015-08-01

    Lifetime exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water results in intestinal damage and an increase in duodenal tumors in B6C3F1 mice. To assess whether these tumors could be the result of a direct mutagenic or genotoxic mode of action, we conducted a GLP-compliant 7-day drinking water study to assess crypt health along the entire length of the duodenum. Mice were exposed to water (vehicle control), 1.4, 21, or 180 ppm Cr(VI) via drinking water for 7 consecutive days. Crypt enterocytes in Swiss roll sections were scored as normal, mitotic, apoptotic, karyorrhectic, or as having micronuclei. A single oral gavage of 50 mg/kg cyclophosphamide served as a positive control for micronucleus induction. Exposure to 21 and 180 ppm Cr(VI) significantly increased the number of crypt enterocytes. Micronuclei and γ-H2AX immunostaining were not elevated in the crypts of Cr(VI)-treated mice. In contrast, treatment with cyclophosphamide significantly increased numbers of crypt micronuclei and qualitatively increased γ-H2AX immunostaining. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy revealed the presence of strong Cr fluorescence in duodenal villi, but negligible Cr fluorescence in the crypt compartment. Together, these data indicate that Cr(VI) does not adversely effect the crypt compartment where intestinal stem cells reside, and provide additional evidence that the mode of action for Cr(VI)-induced intestinal cancer in B6C3F1 mice involves chronic villous wounding resulting in compensatory crypt enterocyte hyperplasia.

  18. Complete genome sequence of bacteriocin-producing Lactobacillus plantarum KLDS1.0391, a probiotic strain with gastrointestinal tract resistance and adhesion to the intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Lu-Ji; Pang, Xue-Hui; Gu, Xin-Xi; Abdelazez, Amro; Liang, Yu; Sun, Si-Rui; Meng, Xiang-Chen

    2017-10-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum KLDS1.0391 is a probiotic strain isolated from the traditional fermented dairy products and identified to produce bacteriocin against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Previous studies showed that the strain has a high resistance to gastrointestinal stress and has a high adhesion ability to the intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2). We reported the entire genome sequence of this strain, which contains a circular 2,886,607-bp chromosome and three circular plasmids. Genes, which are related to the biosynthesis of bacteriocins, the stress resistance to gastrointestinal tract environment and adhesive performance, were identified. Whole genome sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum KLDS1.0391 will be helpful for its applications in food industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanism for radiation-induced damage via TLR3 on the intestinal epithelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemura, Naoki; Uematsu, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    When the small-intestinal epithelium is injured due to high-dose radiation exposure, radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (GIS) such as absorption inhibition and intestinal bacterial infection occurs, and lead to subacute death. The authors immunologically analyzed the disease onset mechanism of GIS. In the small-intestinal mucosal epithelium, the intestinal epithelial stem cells of crypt structure and their daughter cells are renewed through proliferation and differentiation in the cycle of 3 or 4 days. When DNA is damaged by radiation, although p53 gene stops cell cycle and repairs DNA, cell death is induced if the repair is impossible. When stem cells perish, cell supply stops resulting in epithelial breakdown and fatal GIS. The authors analyzed the involvement in GIS of toll-like receptor (TLR) with the function of natural immunity, based on lethal γ-ray irradiation on KO mice and other methods. The authors found the mechanism, in which RNA that was leaked due to cell death caused by p53 gene elicits inflammation by activating TLR3, and leads to GIS through a wide range of cell death induction and stem cell extinction. The administration of a TLR3/RNA binding inhibitor before the irradiation of mice decreased crypt cell death and greatly improved survival rate. The administration one hour after the irradiation also showed improvement. The administration of the TLR3 specific inhibitor within a fixed time after the exposure is hopeful for the prevention of GIS, without affecting the DNA repair function of p53 gene. (A.O.)

  20. Regulation of DMBT1 via NOD2 and TLR4 in intestinal epithelial cells modulates bacterial recognition and invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstiel, Philip; Sina, Christian; End, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    Mucosal epithelial cell layers are constantly exposed to a complex resident microflora. Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) belongs to the group of secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich proteins and is considered to be involved in host defense by pathogen binding. This report describe...

  1. Characterizing microbiota-independent effects of oligosaccharides on intestinal epithelial cells: insight into the role of structure and size : Structure-activity relationships of non-digestible oligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Peyman; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna; Willems, Rianne H A M; Difilippo, Elisabetta; Schols, Henk A; Schoterman, Margriet H C; Garssen, Johan; Braber, Saskia

    2017-08-01

    The direct effects of galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), including Vivinal ® GOS syrup (VGOS) and purified Vivinal ® GOS (PGOS), on the epithelial integrity and corresponding interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8) release were examined in a Caco-2 cell model for intestinal barrier dysfunction. To investigate structure-activity relationships, the effects of individual DP fractions of VGOS were evaluated. Moreover, the obtained results with GOS were compared with Caco-2 monolayers incubated with fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) and inulin. Caco-2 monolayers were pretreated (24 h) with or without specific oligosaccharides or DP fractions of VGOS (DP2 to DP6) before being exposed for 12 or 24 h to the fungal toxin deoxynivalenol (DON). Transepithelial electrical resistance and lucifer yellow permeability were measured to investigate barrier integrity. A calcium switch assay was used to study the reassembly of tight junction proteins. Release of CXCL8, a typical marker for inflammation, was quantified by ELISA. In comparison with PGOS, FOS and inulin, VGOS showed the most pronounced protective effect on the DON-induced impairment of the monolayer integrity, acceleration of the tight junction reassembly and the subsequent CXCL8 release. DP2 and DP3 in concentrations occurring in VGOS prevented the DON-induced epithelial barrier disruption, which could be related to their high prevalence in VGOS. However, no effects of the separate DP GOS fractions were observed on CXCL8 release. This comparative study demonstrates the direct, microbiota-independent effects of oligosaccharides on the intestinal barrier function and shows the differences between individual galacto- and fructo-oligosaccharides. This microbiota-independent effect of oligosaccharides depends on the oligosaccharide structure, DP length and concentration.

  2. Continuous in vitro exposure of intestinal epithelial cells to E171 food additive causes oxidative stress, inducing oxidation of DNA bases but no endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorier, Marie; Béal, David; Marie-Desvergne, Caroline; Dubosson, Muriel; Barreau, Frédérick; Houdeau, Eric; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Carriere, Marie

    2017-08-01

    The whitening and opacifying properties of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) are commonly exploited when it is used as a food additive (E171). However, the safety of this additive can be questioned as TiO 2 nanoparticles (TiO 2 -NPs) have been classed at potentially toxic. This study aimed to shed some light on the mechanisms behind the potential toxicity of E171 on epithelial intestinal cells, using two in vitro models: (i) a monoculture of differentiated Caco-2 cells and (ii) a coculture of Caco-2 with HT29-MTX mucus-secreting cells. Cells were exposed to E171 and two different types of TiO 2 -NPs, either acutely (6-48 h) or repeatedly (three times a week for 3 weeks). Our results confirm that E171 damaged these cells, and that the main mechanism of toxicity was oxidation effects. Responses of the two models to E171 were similar, with a moderate, but significant, accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and concomitant downregulation of the expression of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase. Oxidative damage to DNA was detected in exposed cells, proving that E171 effectively induces oxidative stress; however, no endoplasmic reticulum stress was detected. E171 effects were less intense after acute exposure compared to repeated exposure, which correlated with higher Ti accumulation. The effects were also more intense in cells exposed to E171 than in cells exposed to TiO 2 -NPs. Taken together, these data show that E171 induces only moderate toxicity in epithelial intestinal cells, via oxidation.

  3. Constitutively active RAS signaling reduces 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D-mediated gene transcription in intestinal epithelial cells by reducing vitamin D receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSmet, Marsha L; Fleet, James C

    2017-10-01

    High vitamin D status is associated with reduced colon cancer risk but these studies ignore the diversity in the molecular etiology of colon cancer. RAS activating mutations are common in colon cancer and they activate pro-proliferative signaling pathways. We examined the impact of RAS activating mutations on 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH) 2 D)-mediated gene expression in cultured colon and intestinal cell lines. Transient transfection of Caco-2 cells with a constitutively active mutant K-RAS (G12 V) significantly reduced 1,25(OH) 2 D-induced activity of both a human 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 24 hydroxyase (CYP24A1) promoter-luciferase and an artificial 3X vitamin D response element (VDRE) promoter-luciferase reporter gene. Young Adult Mouse Colon (YAMC) and Rat Intestinal Epithelial (RIE) cell lines with stable expression of mutant H-RAS had suppressed 1,25(OH) 2 D-mediated induction of CYP24A1 mRNA. The RAS effects were associated with lower Vitamin D receptor (VDR) mRNA and protein levels in YAMC and RIE cells and they could be partially reversed by VDR overexpression. RAS-mediated suppression of VDR levels was not due to either reduced VDR mRNA stability or increased VDR gene methylation. However, chromatin accessibility to the VDR gene at the proximal promoter (-300bp), an enhancer region at -6kb, and an enhancer region located in exon 3 was significantly reduced in RAS transformed YAMC cells (YAMC-RAS). These data show that constitutively active RAS signaling suppresses 1,25(OH) 2 D-mediated gene transcription in colon epithelial cells by reducing VDR gene transcription but the mechanism for this suppression is not yet known. These data suggest that cancers with RAS-activating mutations may be less responsive to vitamin D mediated treatment or chemoprevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genome-Wide Immune Modulation of TLR3-Mediated Inflammation in Intestinal Epithelial Cells Differs between Single and Multi-Strain Probiotic Combination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad W MacPherson

    Full Text Available Genome-wide transcriptional analysis in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC can aid in elucidating the impact of single versus multi-strain probiotic combinations on immunological and cellular mechanisms of action. In this study we used human expression microarray chips in an in vitro intestinal epithelial cell model to investigate the impact of three probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus helveticus R0052 (Lh-R0052, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis R0033 (Bl-R0033 and Bifidobacterium bifidum R0071 (Bb-R0071 individually and in combination, and of a surface-layer protein (SLP purified from Lh-R0052, on HT-29 cells' transcriptional profile to poly(I:C-induced inflammation. Hierarchical heat map clustering, Set Distiller and String analyses revealed that the effects of Lh-R0052 and Bb-R0071 diverged from those of Bl-R0033 and Lh-R0052-SLP. It was evident from the global analyses with respect to the immune, cellular and homeostasis related pathways that the co-challenge with probiotic combination (PC vastly differed in its effect from the single strains and Lh-R0052-SLP treatments. The multi-strain PC resulted in a greater reduction of modulated genes, found through functional connections between immune and cellular pathways. Cytokine and chemokine analyses based on specific outcomes from the TNF-α and NF-κB signaling pathways revealed single, multi-strain and Lh-R0052-SLP specific attenuation of the majority of proteins measured (TNF-α, IL-8, CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL10, indicating potentially different mechanisms. These findings indicate a synergistic effect of the bacterial combinations relative to the single strain and Lh-R0052-SLP treatments in resolving toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3-induced inflammation in IEC and maintaining cellular homeostasis, reinforcing the rationale for using multi-strain formulations as a probiotic.

  5. Prior lactose glycation of caseinate via the Maillard reaction affects in vitro activities of the pepsin-trypsin digest toward intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X P; Zhao, X H

    2017-07-01

    The well-known Maillard reaction in milk occurs between lactose and milk proteins during thermal treatment, and its effects on milk nutrition and safety have been well studied. A lactose-glycated caseinate was prepared via this reaction and digested using 2 digestive proteases, pepsin and trypsin. The glycated caseinate digest was assessed for its in vitro activities on rat intestinal epithelial cells in terms of growth proliferation, anti-apoptotic effect, and differentiation induction using caseinate digest as reference, to verify potential effects of the Maillard reaction on these activities of caseinate digest to the cells. Two digests had proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects, and reached the highest effects at 0.02 g/L of digest concentration with treatment time of 24 h. In comparison with caseinate digest, glycated caseinate digest always showed weaker proliferative (5.3-14.2%) and anti-apoptotic (5.9-39.0%) effects, and was more toxic to the cells at 0.5 g/L of digest concentration with treatment time of 48 h. However, glycated caseinate digest at 2 incubation times of 4 to 7 d showed differentiation induction higher than caseinate digest, as it could confer the cells with increased activities in lactase (16.3-26.6%), sucrase (22.4-31.2%), and alkaline phosphatase (17.4-24.8%). Transmission electron microscopy observation results also confirmed higher differentiation induction of glycated caseinate digest. Amino acid loss and lactose glycation partially contributed to these decreased and enhanced activities of glycated caseinate digest, respectively. The Maillard reaction of caseinate and lactose is thus shown in this study to have effects on the activities of caseinate digest to intestinal epithelial cells. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Functional Analysis of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Pili in Relation to Adhesion and Immunomodulatory Interactions with Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebeer, S.; Claes, I.J.; Tytgat, H.L.P.; Verhoeven, T.L.A.; Marien, E.; Ossowski, von I.; Reunanen, J.; Palva, A.; Vos, de W.M.; Keersmaecker, de S.C.; Vanderleyden, J.

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, a probiotic with good survival capacity in the human gut, has well-documented adhesion properties and health effects. Recently, spaCBA-encoded pili that bind to human intestinal mucus were identified on its cell surface. Here, we report on the phenotypic analysis of a

  7. Cellular cross talk in the small intestinal mucosa: postnatal lymphocytic immigration elicits a specific epithelial transcriptional response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram; Maltesen, Henrik R; Balmer, Sophie

    2008-01-01

    -PCR analysis. The DNA microarray data were analyzed bioinformatically by using a combination of projections to latent structures analysis and functional annotation analysis. The results show that infiltrating lymphocytes appear in the mouse small intestine in the late postweaning period and give rise...

  8. Glycoprotein A33 deficiency: a new mouse model of impaired intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin B. Williams

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The cells of the intestinal epithelium provide a selectively permeable barrier between the external environment and internal tissues. The integrity of this barrier is maintained by tight junctions, specialised cell-cell contacts that permit the absorption of water and nutrients while excluding microbes, toxins and dietary antigens. Impairment of intestinal barrier function contributes to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, including food hypersensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and colitis-associated cancer (CAC. Glycoprotein A33 (GPA33 is an intestinal epithelium-specific cell surface marker and member of the CTX group of transmembrane proteins. Roles in cell-cell adhesion have been demonstrated for multiple CTX family members, suggesting a similar function for GPA33 within the gastrointestinal tract. To test a potential requirement for GPA33 in intestinal barrier function, we generated Gpa33−/− mice and subjected them to experimental regimens designed to produce food hypersensitivity, colitis and CAC. Gpa33−/− mice exhibited impaired intestinal barrier function. This was shown by elevated steady-state immunosurveillance in the colonic mucosa and leakiness to oral TRITC-labelled dextran after short-term exposure to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS to injure the intestinal epithelium. Gpa33−/− mice also exhibited rapid onset and reduced resolution of DSS-induced colitis, and a striking increase in the number of colitis-associated tumours produced by treatment with the colon-specific mutagen azoxymethane (AOM followed by two cycles of DSS. In contrast, Gpa33−/− mice treated with AOM alone showed no increase in sporadic tumour formation, indicating that their increased tumour susceptibility is dependent on inflammatory stimuli. Finally, Gpa33−/− mice displayed hypersensitivity to food allergens, a common co-morbidity in humans with IBD. We propose that Gpa33−/− mice provide a valuable model to study the mechanisms

  9. Escherichia coli LF82 differentially regulates ROS production and mucin expression in intestinal epithelial T84 cells: implication of NOX1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elatrech, Imen; Marzaioli, Viviana; Boukemara, Hanane; Bournier, Odile; Neut, Christel; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Luis, José; Dubuquoy, Laurent; El-Benna, Jamel; My-Chan Dang, Pham; Marie, Jean-Claude

    2015-05-01

    Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is associated with inflamed ileal lesions in Crohn's disease colonized by pathogenic adherent-invasive Escherichia coli LF82. We investigated whether such ileal bacteria can modulate ROS production by epithelial cells, thus impacting on inflammation and mucin expression. Ileal bacteria from patients with Crohn's disease were incubated with cultured epithelial T84 cells, and ROS production was assayed using the luminol-amplified chemiluminescence method. The gentamicin protection assay was used for bacterial invasion of T84 cell. The expression of NADPH oxidase (NOX) subunits, mucin, and IL-8 was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blots. Involvement of NOX and ROS was analyzed using diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Among different bacteria tested, only LF82 induced an increase of ROS production by T84 cells in a dose-dependent manner. This response was inhibited by DPI and NAC. Heat- or ethanol-attenuated LF82 bacteria and the mutant LF82ΔFimA, which does not express pili type 1 and poorly adheres to epithelial cells, did not induce the oxidative response. The LF82-induced oxidative response coincides with its invasion in T84 cells, and both processes were inhibited by DPI. Also, we observed an increased expression of NOX1 and NOXO1 in response to LF82 bacteria versus the mutant LF82ΔFimA. Furthermore, LF82 inhibited mucin gene expression (MUC2 and MUC5AC) in T84 cells while increasing the chemotactic IL-8 expression, both in a DPI-sensitive manner. Adherent-invasive E. coli LF82 induced ROS production by intestinal NADPH oxidase and altered mucin and IL-8 expression, leading to perpetuation of inflammatory lesions in Crohn's disease.

  10. Anthrax lethal toxin disrupts intestinal barrier function and causes systemic infections with enteric bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Sun

    Full Text Available A variety of intestinal pathogens have virulence factors that target mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways, including Bacillus anthracis. Anthrax lethal toxin (LT has specific proteolytic activity against the upstream regulators of MAPKs, the MAPK kinases (MKKs. Using a murine model of intoxication, we show that LT causes the dose-dependent disruption of intestinal epithelial integrity, characterized by mucosal erosion, ulceration, and bleeding. This pathology correlates with an LT-dependent blockade of intestinal crypt cell proliferation, accompanied by marked apoptosis in the villus tips. C57BL/6J mice treated with intravenous LT nearly uniformly develop systemic infections with commensal enteric organisms within 72 hours of administration. LT-dependent intestinal pathology depends upon its proteolytic activity and is partially attenuated by co-administration of broad spectrum antibiotics, indicating that it is both a cause and an effect of infection. These findings indicate that targeting of MAPK signaling pathways by anthrax LT compromises the structural integrity of the mucosal layer, serving to undermine the effectiveness of the intestinal barrier. Combined with the well-described immunosuppressive effects of LT, this disruption of the intestinal barrier provides a potential mechanism for host invasion via the enteric route, a common portal of entry during the natural infection cycle of Bacillus anthracis.

  11. Intestinal tumorigenesis is not affected by progesterone signaling in rodent models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarom Heijmans

    Full Text Available Clinical data suggest that progestins have chemopreventive properties in the development of colorectal cancer. We set out to examine a potential protective effect of progestins and progesterone signaling on colon cancer development. In normal and neoplastic intestinal tissue, we found that the progesterone receptor (PR is not expressed. Expression was confined to sporadic mesenchymal cells. To analyze the influence of systemic progesterone receptor signaling, we crossed mice that lacked the progesterone receptor (PRKO to the Apc(Min/+ mouse, a model for spontaneous intestinal polyposis. PRKO-Apc(Min/+ mice exhibited no change in polyp number, size or localization compared to Apc(Min/+. To examine effects of progestins on the intestinal epithelium that are independent of the PR, we treated mice with MPA. We found no effects of either progesterone or MPA on gross intestinal morphology or epithelial proliferation. Also, in rats treated with MPA, injection with the carcinogen azoxymethane did not result in a difference in the number or size of aberrant crypt foci, a surrogate end-point for adenoma development. We conclude that expression of the progesterone receptor is limited to cells in the intestinal mesenchyme. We did not observe any effect of progesterone receptor signaling or of progestin treatment in rodent models of intestinal tumorigenesis.

  12. Inhibition of Epithelial TNF-α Receptors by Purified Fruit Bromelain Ameliorates Intestinal Inflammation and Barrier Dysfunction in Colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Zijuan; Wang, Liang; Feng, Panpan; Yin, Lianhong; Wang, Chen; Zhi, Shengxu; Dong, Jianyi; Wang, Jingyu; Lin, Yuan; Chen, Dapeng; Xiong, Yongjian; Peng, Jinyong

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the TNF-α receptor (TNFR) leads to an inflammatory response, and anti-TNF therapy has been administered to reduce inflammation symptoms and heal mucosal ulcers in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Bromelain, a complex natural mixture of proteolytic enzymes, has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects. This study aimed to investigate the effect of purified fruit bromelain (PFB)-induced inhibition of epithelial TNFR in a rat colitis model. Colitis was established by intracol...

  13. Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte-enterocyte crosstalk regulates production of bactericidal angiogenin 4 by Paneth cells upon microbial challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine R Walker

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial proteins influence intestinal microbial ecology and limit proliferation of pathogens, yet the regulation of their expression has only been partially elucidated. Here, we have identified a putative pathway involving epithelial cells and intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (iIELs that leads to antimicrobial protein (AMP production by Paneth cells. Mice lacking γδ iIELs (TCRδ(-/- express significantly reduced levels of the AMP angiogenin 4 (Ang4. These mice were also unable to up-regulate Ang4 production following oral challenge by Salmonella, leading to higher levels of mucosal invasion compared to their wild type counterparts during the first 2 hours post-challenge. The transfer of γδ iIELs from wild type (WT mice to TCRδ(-/- mice restored Ang4 production and Salmonella invasion levels were reduced to those obtained in WT mice. The ability to restore Ang4 production in TCRδ(-/- mice was shown to be restricted to γδ iIELs expressing Vγ7-encoded TCRs. Using a novel intestinal crypt co-culture system we identified a putative pathway of Ang4 production initiated by exposure to Salmonella, intestinal commensals or microbial antigens that induced intestinal epithelial cells to produce cytokines including IL‑23 in a TLR-mediated manner. Exposure of TCR-Vγ7(+ γδ iIELs to IL-23 promoted IL‑22 production, which triggered Paneth cells to secrete Ang4. These findings identify a novel role for γδ iIELs in mucosal defence through sensing immediate epithelial cell cytokine responses and influencing AMP production. This in turn can contribute to the maintenance of intestinal microbial homeostasis and epithelial barrier function, and limit pathogen invasion.

  14. Novel aspects of live intestinal epithelial cell function revealed using a custom time-lapse video microscopy apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papetti, Michael; Kozlowski, Piotr

    2018-04-01

    Many aspects of cell physiology, including migration, membrane function, and cell division, are best understood by observing live cell dynamics over time using video microscopy. To probe these phenomena in colon epithelial cells using simple components with a limited budget, we have constructed an inexpensive (PID (proportional-integrative-derivative) controller contained within a 0.077 m 3 insulated acrylic box. Temperature, humidity, pH, and proliferative capacity of colon epithelial cells in this system mimic those in a standard tissue culture incubator for over four days. Our system offers significant advantages over existing cost-prohibitive commercially available and custom-made devices because of its very low cost, use of PID temperature control, lack of reliance on constant infusion of external humidified, heated air or carbon dioxide, ability to directly measure cell culture medium temperature, and combination of exquisite cellular detail with minimal focus drift under physiological conditions for extended periods of time. Using this apparatus, coupled with an inverted microscope equipped with phase contrast optics and a programmable digital camera, we have observed many events in colon epithelial cells not visible by static imaging, including kinetics of normal and abnormal mitoses, dynamic membrane structures, intracellular vesicle movements, and cell migration. © 2018 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2018 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  15. The POZ-ZF transcription factor Kaiso (ZBTB33 induces inflammation and progenitor cell differentiation in the murine intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopali Chaudhary

    Full Text Available Since its discovery, several studies have implicated the POZ-ZF protein Kaiso in both developmental and tumorigenic processes. However, most of the information regarding Kaiso's function to date has been gleaned from studies in Xenopus laevis embryos and mammalian cultured cells. To examine Kaiso's role in a relevant, mammalian organ-specific context, we generated and characterized a Kaiso transgenic mouse expressing a murine Kaiso transgene under the control of the intestine-specific villin promoter. Kaiso transgenic mice were viable and fertile but pathological examination of the small intestine revealed distinct morphological changes. Kaiso transgenics (Kaiso(Tg/+ exhibited a crypt expansion phenotype that was accompanied by increased differentiation of epithelial progenitor cells into secretory cell lineages; this was evidenced by increased cell populations expressing Goblet, Paneth and enteroendocrine markers. Paradoxically however, enhanced differentiation in Kaiso(Tg/+ was accompanied by reduced proliferation, a phenotype reminiscent of Notch inhibition. Indeed, expression of the Notch signalling target HES-1 was decreased in Kaiso(Tg/+ animals. Finally, our Kaiso transgenics exhibited several hallmarks of inflammation, including increased neutrophil infiltration and activation, villi fusion and crypt hyperplasia. Interestingly, the Kaiso binding partner and emerging anti-inflammatory mediator p120(ctn is recruited to the nucleus in Kaiso(Tg/+ mice intestinal cells suggesting that Kaiso may elicit inflammation by antagonizing p120(ctn function.

  16. Polarized secretion of IL-18 by IEC-18 intestinal epithelial cells: effect of probiotic Lactobacillus casei/paracasei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolínská, Jiřina; Zákostelecká, Marie; Lisá, Věra; Kozáková, Hana; Dvorak, B.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 4 (2008), s. 338-338 ISSN 1138-7548. [Meeting European Intestinal Transport Group /22./. 07.09.2008-10.09.2008, Pamplona] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1P05ME783 Grant - others:NIH(US) HD-47237 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpo1 * cytokine IL-18 * probiotic Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  17. Effect of cholera toxin on cAMP levels and Na+ influx in isolated intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, C.S.; Kimmich, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Freshly isolated chicken intestinal cells contain approximately 20 pmol adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)/mg cellular protein. Incubation with 3 μg/ml cholera toxin (CT) at 37 0 C induces an elevation of cellular cAMP beginning 10-15 min after initial exposure. The response is linear with time for 40-50 min and causes a six- to eightfold increase over control levels at steady state. Dibutyryl cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Na + influx into the isolated enterocytes. Chlorpromazine completely abolishes the toxin-induced elevation of cAMP in the isolated cells and also reverses the effect on Na + entry. The data provide evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal cell Na + uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT on Na + during induction of intestinal secretory activity. Studies on the time-dependent effects of chlorpromazine on both intracellular cAMP concentration and Na + influx suggest that the reactivation of the Na + transport system after cAMP-induced inhibition is slow relative to the disappearance of cAMP

  18. Farnesoid X Receptor Activation Attenuates Intestinal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurens J Ceulemans

    Full Text Available The farnesoid X receptor (FXR is abundantly expressed in the ileum, where it exerts an enteroprotective role as a key regulator of intestinal innate immunity and homeostasis, as shown in pre-clinical models of inflammatory bowel disease. Since intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI is characterized by hyperpermeability, bacterial translocation and inflammation, we aimed to investigate, for the first time, if the FXR-agonist obeticholic acid (OCA could attenuate intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury.In a validated rat model of intestinal IRI (laparotomy + temporary mesenteric artery clamping, 3 conditions were tested (n = 16/group: laparotomy only (sham group; ischemia 60min+ reperfusion 60min + vehicle pretreatment (IR group; ischemia 60min + reperfusion 60min + OCA pretreatment (IR+OCA group. Vehicle or OCA (INT-747, 2*30mg/kg was administered by gavage 24h and 4h prior to IRI. The following end-points were analyzed: 7-day survival; biomarkers of enterocyte viability (L-lactate, I-FABP; histology (morphologic injury to villi/crypts and villus length; intestinal permeability (Ussing chamber; endotoxin translocation (Lipopolysaccharide assay; cytokines (IL-6, IL-1-β, TNFα, IFN-γ IL-10, IL-13; apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3; and autophagy (LC3, p62.It was found that intestinal IRI was associated with high mortality (90%; loss of intestinal integrity (structurally and functionally; increased endotoxin translocation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production; and inhibition of autophagy. Conversely, OCA-pretreatment improved 7-day survival up to 50% which was associated with prevention of epithelial injury, preserved intestinal architecture and permeability. Additionally, FXR-agonism led to decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine release and alleviated autophagy inhibition.Pretreatment with OCA, an FXR-agonist, improves survival in a rodent model of intestinal IRI, preserves the gut barrier function and suppresses inflammation. These results turn

  19. Regulation of early and delayed radiation responses in rat small intestine by capsaicin-sensitive nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junru; Zheng Huaien; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Ou Xuemei; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Mast cells protect against the early manifestations of intestinal radiation toxicity, but promote chronic intestinal wall fibrosis. Intestinal sensory nerves are closely associated with mast cells, both anatomically and functionally, and serve an important role in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis. This study examined the effect of sensory nerve ablation on the intestinal radiation response in an established rat model. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent sensory nerve ablation with capsaicin or sham ablation. Two weeks later, a localized segment of ileum was X-irradiated or sham irradiated. Structural, cellular, and molecular changes were examined 2 weeks (early injury) and 26 weeks (chronic injury) after irradiation. The mast cell dependence of the effect of sensory nerve ablation on intestinal radiation injury was assessed using c-kit mutant (Ws/Ws) mast cell-deficient rats. Results: Capsaicin treatment caused a baseline reduction in mucosal mast cell density, crypt cell proliferation, and expression of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, two neuropeptides released by sensory neurons. Sensory nerve ablation strikingly exacerbated early intestinal radiation toxicity (loss of mucosal surface area, inflammation, intestinal wall thickening), but attenuated the development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis (collagen I accumulation and transforming growth factor β immunoreactivity). In mast cell-deficient rats, capsaicin treatment exacerbated postradiation epithelial injury (loss of mucosal surface area), but none of the other aspects of radiation injury were affected by capsaicin treatment. Conclusions: Ablation of capsaicin-sensitive enteric neurons exacerbates early intestinal radiation toxicity, but attenuates development of chronic fibroproliferative changes. The effect of capsaicin treatment on the intestinal radiation response is partly mast cell dependent

  20. Murine P-glycoprotein deficiency alters intestinal injury repair and blunts lipopolysaccharide-induced radioprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Elizabeth M; Yarbrough, Vanisha R; Schoeb, Trenton R; Daft, Joseph G; Tanner, Scott M; Steverson, Dennis; Lorenz, Robin G

    2012-09-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has been reported to increase stem cell proliferation and regulate apoptosis. Absence of P-gp results in decreased repair of intestinal epithelial cells after chemical injury. To further explore the mechanisms involved in the effects of P-gp on intestinal injury and repair, we used the well-characterized radiation injury model. In this model, injury repair is mediated by production of prostaglandins (PGE(2)) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been shown to confer radioprotection. B6.mdr1a(-/-) mice and wild-type controls were subjected to 12 Gy total body X-ray irradiation and surviving crypts in the proximal jejunum and distal colon were evaluated 3.5 days after irradiation. B6.mdr1a(-/-) mice exhibited normal baseline stem cell proliferation and COX dependent crypt regeneration after irradiation. However, radiation induced apoptosis was increased and LPS-induced radioprotection was blunted in the C57BL6.mdr1a(-/-) distal colon, compared to B6 wild-type controls. The LPS treatment induced gene expression of the radioprotective cytokine IL-1α, in B6 wild-type controls but not in B6.mdr1a(-/-) animals. Lipopolysaccharid-induced radioprotection was absent in IL-1R1(-/-) animals, indicating a role for IL-1α in radioprotection, and demonstrating that P-gp deficiency interferes with IL-1α gene expression in response to systemic exposure to LPS.

  1. Probiotic Bifidobacterium species stimulate human SLC26A3 gene function and expression in intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anoop; Hecht, Cameron; Priyamvada, Shubha; Anbazhagan, Arivarasu N.; Alakkam, Anas; Borthakur, Alip; Alrefai, Waddah A.; Gill, Ravinder K.

    2014-01-01

    SLC26A3, or downregulated in adenoma (DRA), plays a major role in mediating Cl− absorption in the mammalian intestine. Disturbances in DRA function and expression have been implicated in intestinal disorders such as congenital Cl− diarrhea and gut inflammation. We previously showed that an increase in DRA function and expression by Lactobacillus acidophilus and its culture supernatant (CS) might underlie antidiarrheal effects of this probiotic strain. However, the effects of Bifidobacterium species, important inhabitants of the human colon, on intestinal Cl−/HCO3− exchange activity are not known. Our current results demonstrate that CS derived from Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium infantis, and Bifidobacterium bifidum increased anion exchange activity in Caco-2 cells (∼1.8- to 2.4-fold). Consistent with the increase in DRA function, CS also increased the protein, as well as the mRNA, level of DRA (but not putative anion transporter 1). CS of all three Bifidobacterium sp. increased DRA promoter activity (−1,183/+114 bp) in Caco-2 cells (1.5- to 1.8-fold). Furthermore, the increase in DRA mRNA expression by CS of B. breve and B. infantis was blocked in the presence of the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D (5 μM) and the ERK1/2 MAPK pathway inhibitor U0126 (10 μM). Administration of live B. breve, B. infantis, and B. bifidum by oral gavage to mice for 24 h increased DRA mRNA and protein levels in the colon. These data demonstrate an upregulation of DRA via activation of the ERK1/2 pathway that may underlie potential antidiarrheal effects of Bifidobacterium sp. PMID:25143346

  2. Human-derived probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri strains differentially reduce intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuying; Fatheree, Nicole Y; Mangalat, Nisha; Rhoads, Jon Marc

    2010-11-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri (L. reuteri) is a probiotic that inhibits the severity of enteric infections and modulates the immune system. Human-derived L. reuteri strains DSM17938, ATCC PTA4659, ATCC PTA 5289, and ATCC PTA 6475 have demonstrated strain-specific immunomodulation in cultured monocytoid cells, but information about how these strains affect inflammation in intestinal epithelium is limited. We determined the effects of the four different L. reuteri strains on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in small intestinal epithelial cells and in the ileum of newborn rats. IPEC-J2 cells (derived from the jejunal epithelium of a neonatal piglet) and IEC-6 cells (derived from the rat crypt) were treated with L. reuteri. Newborn rat pups were gavaged cow milk formula supplemented with L. reuteri strains in the presence or absence of LPS. Protein and mRNA levels of cytokines and histological changes were measured. We demonstrate that even though one L. reuteri strain (DSM 17938) did not inhibit LPS-induced IL-8 production in cultured intestinal cells, all strains significantly reduced intestinal mucosal levels of KC/GRO (∼IL-8) and IFN-γ when newborn rat pups were fed formula containing LPS ± L. reuteri. Intestinal histological damage produced by LPS plus cow milk formula was also significantly reduced by all four strains. Cow milk formula feeding (without LPS) produced mild gut inflammation, evidenced by elevated mucosal IFN-γ and IL-13 levels, a process that could be suppressed by strain 17938. Other cytokines and chemokines were variably affected by the different strains, and there was no toxic effect of L. reuteri on intestinal cells or mucosa. In conclusion, L. reuteri strains differentially modulate LPS-induced inflammation. Probiotic interactions with both epithelial and nonepithelial cells in vivo must be instrumental in modulating intrinsic anti-inflammatory effects in the intestine. We suggest that the terms anti- and proinflammatory be used only

  3. Protection of the Peyer's patch-associated crypt and villus epithelium against methotrexate-induced damage is based on its distinct regulation of proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renes, Ingrid B.; Verburg, Melissa; Bulsing, Nathalie P.; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Büller, Hans A.; Dekker, Jan; Einerhand, Alexandra W. C.

    2002-01-01

    The crypt and villus epithelium associated with Peyer's patches (PPs) is largely spared from methotrexate (MTX)-induced damage, compared with the non-patch (NP) epithelium. To assess the mechanism(s) preventing damage to the PP epithelium after MTX treatment, epithelial proliferation, apoptosis, and

  4. Bioaccessibility, Cellular Uptake, and Transport of Astaxanthin Isomers and their Antioxidative Effects in Human Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Ronghua; Zhu, Honghui; Zhang, Lianfu; Tsao, Rong

    2017-11-29

    The bioaccessibility, bioavailability, and antioxidative activities of three astaxanthin geometric isomers were investigated using an in vitro digestion model and human intestinal Caco-2 cells. This study demonstrated that the trans-cis isomerization of all-E-astaxanthin and the cis-trans isomerization of Z-astaxanthins could happen both during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion and cellular uptake processes. 13Z-Astaxanthin showed higher bioaccessibility than 9Z- and all-E-astaxanthins during in vitro digestion, and 9Z-astaxanthin exhibited higher transport efficiency than all-E- and 13Z-astaxanthins. These might explain why 13Z- and 9Z-astaxanthins are found at higher concentrations in human plasma than all-E-astaxanthin in reported studies. All three astaxanthin isomers were effective in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis as seen in the antioxidant enzyme (CAT, SOD) activities ; 9Z- and 13Z- astaxanthins exhibited a higher protective effect than all-E-astaxanthin against oxidative stress as demonstrated by the lower cellular uptake of Z-astaxanthins and lower secretion and gene expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 in Caco-2 cells treated with H 2 O 2 . We conclude, for the first time, that Z-astaxanthin isomers may play a more important role in preventing oxidative stress induced intestinal diseases.

  5. Salmosan, a β-galactomannan-rich product, in combination with Lactobacillus plantarum contributes to restore intestinal epithelial barrier function by modulation of cytokine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brufau, M Teresa; Campo-Sabariz, Joan; Carné, Sergi; Ferrer, Ruth; Martín-Venegas, Raquel

    2017-03-01

    Mannan-oligosaccharides (MOSs) are mannose-rich substrates with several intestinal health-promoting properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential capacity of Salmosan (S-βGM), a β-galactomannan-rich MOS product, to restore epithelial barrier function independently from its capacity to reduce bacterial invasion. In addition, the combination of S-βGM with the proven probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum (LP) was also tested. Paracellular permeability was assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) in co-cultures of Caco-2 cells and macrophages (differentiated from THP-1 cells) stimulated with LPS of Salmonella Enteritidis and in Caco-2 cell cultures stimulated with TNF-α in the absence or presence of 500 μg/ml S-βGM, LP (MOI 10) or a combination of both. In both culture models, TER was significantly reduced up to 25% by LPS or TNF-α stimulation, and the addition of S-βGM or LP alone did not modify TER, whereas the combination of both restored TER to values of nonstimulated cells. Under LPS stimulation, TNF-α production was significantly increased by 10-fold, whereas IL-10 and IL-6 levels were not modified. The combination of S-βGM and LP reduced TNF-α production to nonstimulated cell values and significantly increased IL-10 and IL-6 levels (5- and 7.5-fold, respectively). Moreover, S-βGM has the capacity to induce an increase of fivefold in LP growth. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that S-βGM in combination with LP protects epithelial barrier function by modulation of cytokine secretion, thus giving an additional value to this MOS as a potential symbiotic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Oral and fecal Campylobacter concisus strains perturb barrier function by apoptosis induction in HT-29/B6 intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Linde Nielsen

    Full Text Available Campylobacter concisus infections of the gastrointestinal tract can be accompanied by diarrhea and inflammation, whereas colonization of the human oral cavity might have a commensal nature. We focus on the pathophysiology of C. concisus and the effects of different clinical oral and fecal C. concisus strains on human HT-29/B6 colon cells. Six oral and eight fecal strains of C. concisus were isolated. Mucus-producing HT-29/B6 epithelial monolayers were infected with the C. concisus strains. Transepithelial electrical resistance (R(t and tracer fluxes of different molecule size were measured in Ussing chambers. Tight junction (TJ protein expression was determined by Western blotting, and subcellular TJ distribution was analyzed by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Apoptosis induction was examined by TUNEL-staining and Western blot of caspase-3 activation. All strains invaded confluent HT-29/B6 cells and impaired epithelial barrier function, characterized by a time- and dose-dependent decrease in R(t either after infection from the apical side but even more from the basolateral compartment. TJ protein expression changes were sparse, only in apoptotic areas of infected monolayers TJ proteins were redistributed. Solely the barrier-forming TJ protein claudin-5 showed a reduced expression level to 66±8% (P<0.05, by expression regulation from the gene. Concomitantly, Lactate dehydrogenase release was elevated to 3.1±0.3% versus 0.7±0.1% in control (P<0.001, suggesting cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, oral and fecal C. concisus strains elevated apoptotic events to 5-fold. C. concisus-infected monolayers revealed an increased permeability for 332 Da fluorescein (1.74±0.13 vs. 0.56±0.17 10(-6 cm/s in control, P<0.05 but showed no difference in permeability for 4 kDa FITC-dextran (FD-4. The same was true in camptothecin-exposed monolayers, where camptothecin was used for apoptosis induction.In conclusion, epithelial barrier dysfunction by oral and

  7. Impact of diet-induced obesity on intestinal stem cells: hyperproliferation but impaired intrinsic function that requires insulin/IGF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Amanda T; Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Gavin, Hannah E; Magness, Scott T; Lund, P Kay

    2014-09-01

    Nutrient intake regulates intestinal epithelial mass and crypt proliferation. Recent findings in model organisms and rodents indicate nutrient restriction impacts intestinal stem cells (ISC). Little is known about the impact of diet-induced obesity (DIO), a model of excess nutrient intake on ISC. We used a Sox9-EGFP reporter mouse to test the hypothesis that an adaptive response to DIO or associated hyperinsulinemia involves expansion and hyperproliferation of ISC. The Sox9-EGFP reporter mouse allows study and isolation of ISC, progenitors, and differentiated lineages based on different Sox9-EGFP expression levels. Sox9-EGFP mice were fed a high-fat diet for 20 weeks to induce DIO and compared with littermates fed low-fat rodent chow. Histology, fluorescence activated cell sorting, and mRNA analyses measured impact of DIO on jejunal crypt-villus morphometry, numbers, and proliferation of different Sox9-EGFP cell populations and gene expression. An in vitro culture assay directly assessed functional capacity of isolated ISC. DIO mice exhibited significant increases in body weight, plasma glucose, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) levels and intestinal Igf1 mRNA. DIO mice had increased villus height and crypt density but decreased intestinal length and decreased numbers of Paneth and goblet cells. In vivo, DIO resulted in a selective expansion of Sox9-EGFP(Low) ISC and percentage of ISC in S-phase. ISC expansion significantly correlated with plasma insulin levels. In vitro, isolated ISC from DIO mice formed fewer enteroids in standard 3D Matrigel culture compared to controls, indicating impaired ISC function. This decreased enteroid formation in isolated ISC from DIO mice was rescued by exogenous insulin, IGF1, or both. We conclude that DIO induces specific increases in ISC and ISC hyperproliferation in vivo. However, isolated ISC from DIO mice have impaired intrinsic survival and growth in vitro that can be rescued by exogenous insulin or IGF1.

  8. In vitro evaluation of Lactobacillus crispatus K313 and K243: high-adhesion activity and anti-inflammatory effect on Salmonella braenderup infected intestinal epithelial cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhilan; Huang, Lihua; Kong, Jian; Hu, Shumin; Zhang, Xiaowei; Kong, Wentao

    2012-09-14

    Currently, there is an increasing interest in the use of probiotics as an alternative strategy to antimicrobial compounds. In this study, two high adhesive strains Lactobacillus crispatus K313 adhering to HT-29 cells as well as Lb. crispatus K243 adhering to collagen type IV were isolated from chicken intestines. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed the presence of the potential S-proteins SlpA and SlpB in Lb. crispatus K243 and K313. SlpA and SlpB, rich in hydrophobic amino acids, were proved to be involved in adhering to collagen type IV and HT-29 cells, respectively, based on the LiCl treatment assay. After removal of S-proteins, the viability and tolerance of the two Lb. crispatus strains to simulated gastric and small intestinal juice were reduced, indicating the protective role of S-proteins against the hostile environments. Lb. crispatus K313 exhibited the stronger autoaggregation ability and inhibitive activity against Salmonella braenderup H9812 adhesion to HT-29 cells than the strain K243. To elucidate the inhibitive mechanism, cultured epithelial cells were exposed with Lb. crispatus strains, and followed by a challenge with S. braenderup H9812. The pro-inflammatory signaling factors (IL-8, CXCL1 and CCL20) from HT-29 were detected by real-time PCR technology. The results showed that both of Lb. crispatus strains down-regulated the transcription level of those pro-inflammatory genes induced by S. braenderup H9812 by 36.2-58.8%. ELISA analysis was further confirmed that Lb. crispatus K243 and K313 inhibited the IL-8 secretion triggered by S. braenderup H9812 by 32.8% and 47.0%, indicating that the two isolates could attenuate the pro-inflammatory signaling induced by S. braenderup H9812, and have the potential application in clinical practice to prevent diarrhea. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Arsenic downregulates tight junction claudin proteins through p38 and NF-κB in intestinal epithelial cell line, HT-29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Chang Hee; Seok, Jin Sil; Petriello, Michael C.; Han, Sung Gu

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring metalloid that often is found in foods and drinking water. Human exposure to arsenic is associated with the development of gastrointestinal problems such as fluid loss, diarrhea and gastritis. Arsenic is also known to induce toxic responses including oxidative stress in cells of the gastrointestinal track. Tight junctions (TJs) regulate paracellular permeability and play a barrier role by inhibiting the movement of water, solutes and microorganisms in the paracellular space. Since oxidative stress and TJ damage are known to be associated, we examined whether arsenic produces TJ damage such as downregulation of claudins in the human colorectal cell line, HT-29. To confirm the importance of oxidative stress in arsenic-induced TJ damage, effects of the antioxidant compound (e.g., N-acetylcysteine (NAC)) were also determined in cells. HT-29 cells were treated with arsenic trioxide (40 μM, 12 h) to observe the modified expression of TJ proteins. Arsenic decreased expression of TJ proteins (i.e., claudin-1 and claudin-5) and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) whereas pretreatment of NAC (5–10 mM, 1 h) attenuated the observed claudins downregulation and TEER. Arsenic treatment produced cellular oxidative stress via superoxide generation and lowering glutathione (GSH) levels, while NAC restored cellular GSH levels and decreased oxidative stress. Arsenic increased phosphorylation of p38 and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, while NAC attenuated these intracellular events. Results demonstrated that arsenic can damage intestinal epithelial cells by proinflammatory process (oxidative stress, p38 and NF-κB) which resulted in the downregulation of claudins and NAC can protect intestinal TJs from arsenic toxicity.

  10. β-Galactomannan and Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii modulate the immune response against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in porcine intestinal epithelial and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Roger; Brufau, M Teresa; Guerrero-Zamora, Ana Maria; Lizardo, Rosil; Dobrescu, Irina; Martin-Venegas, Raquel; Ferrer, Ruth; Salmon, Henri; Martínez, Paz; Brufau, Joaquim

    2012-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes inflammation, necrosis, and diarrhea in pigs, as well as being an important source of food-borne diseases in humans. Probiotics and prebiotics are promising alternatives to antibiotics to control and prevent intestinal infections. The present work investigated a recently developed β-galactomannan (βGM) prebiotic compared to the proven probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii on porcine ileum intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) of the IPI-2I line and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) cocultured in vitro with Salmonella. We observed that both S. cerevisiae var. boulardii and βGM inhibited the association of Salmonella with IECs in vitro. Our data indicated that βGM has a higher ability than S. cerevisiae var. boulardii to inhibit Salmonella-induced proinflammatory mRNA (cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-1α [IL-1α], IL-6, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF] and chemokines CCL2, CCL20, and CXCL8) and at protein levels (IL-6 and CXCL8). Additionally, βGM and S. cerevisiae var. boulardii induced some effects on DCs that were not observed on IECs: βGM and S. cerevisiae var. boulardii showed slight upregulation of mRNA for TNF-α, GM-CSF, and CCR7 receptor on porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Indeed, the addition of βGM or S. cerevisiae var. boulardii on DCs cocultured with Salmonella showed higher gene expression (mRNA) for TNF-α, GM-CSF, and CXCL8 compared to that of the control with Salmonella. In conclusion, the addition of βGM inhibits Salmonella-induced proinflammatory profiles in IECs but may promote DC activation, although associated molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated.

  11. Protective effects of transforming growth factor β2 in intestinal epithelial cells by regulation of proteins associated with stress and endotoxin responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc Ninh Nguyen

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor (TGF-β2 is an important anti-inflammatory protein in milk and colostrum. TGF-β2 supplementation appears to reduce gut inflammatory diseases in early life, such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC in young mice. However, the molecular mechanisms by which TGF-β2 protects immature intestinal epithelial cells (IECs remain to be more clearly elucidated before interventions in infants can be considered. Porcine IECs PsIc1 were treated with TGF-β2 and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, and changes in the cellular proteome were subsequently analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-MS and LC-MS-based proteomics. TGF-β2 alone induced the differential expression of 13 proteins and the majority of the identified proteins were associated with stress responses, TGF-β and Toll-like receptor 4 signaling cascades. In particular, a series of heat shock proteins had similar differential trends as previously shown in the intestine of NEC-resistant preterm pigs and young mice. Furthermore, LC-MS-based proteomics and Western blot analyses revealed 20 differentially expressed proteins following treatment with TGF-β2 in LPS-challenged IECs. Thirteen of these proteins were associated with stress response pathways, among which five proteins were altered by LPS and restored by TGF-β2, whereas six were differentially expressed only by TGF-β2 in LPS-challenged IECs. Based on previously reported biological functions, these patterns indicate the anti-stress and anti-inflammatory effects of TGF-β2 in IECs. We conclude that TGF-β2 of dietary or endogenous origin may regulate the IEC responses against LPS stimuli, thereby supporting cellular homeostasis and innate immunity in response to bacterial colonization, and the first enteral feeding in early life.

  12. Wnt target gene analysis in colorectal cancer and intestinal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Flier, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is a specialized simple epithelium that lines the gut and performs primary functions of digestion, absorption and forms a barrier against luminal pathogens. It is organized in invaginations called crypts and finger-like protrusions called villi. The crypts harbor

  13. The Lgr5 intestinal stem cell signature: robust expression of proposed quiescent '+4' cell markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muñoz, Javier; Stange, Daniel E.; Schepers, Arnout G.; van de Wetering, Marc; Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Volckmann, Richard; Kung, Kevin S.; Koster, Jan; Radulescu, Sorina; Myant, Kevin; Versteeg, Rogier; Sansom, Owen J.; van Es, Johan H.; Barker, Nick; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J. R.; Clevers, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Two types of stem cells are currently defined in small intestinal crypts: cycling crypt base columnar (CBC) cells and quiescent '+4' cells. Here, we combine transcriptomics with proteomics to define a definitive molecular signature for Lgr5(+) CBC cells. Transcriptional profiling of FACS-sorted

  14. Lactobacillus bulgaricus Prevents Intestinal Epithelial Cell Injury Caused by Enterobacter sakazakii-Induced Nitric Oxide both In Vitro and in the Newborn Rat Model of Necrotizing Enterocolitis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Catherine J.; Williams, Monica; Petrosyan, Mikael; Guner, Yigit; Mittal, Rahul; Mock, Dennis; Upperman, Jeffrey S.; Ford, Henri R.; Prasadarao, Nemani V.

    2009-01-01

    Enterobacter sakazakii is an emerging pathogen that has been associated with outbreaks of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) as well as infant sepsis and meningitis. Our previous studies demonstrated that E. sakazakii induces NEC in a newborn rat model by inducing enterocyte apoptosis. However, the mechanisms responsible for enterocyte apoptosis are not known. Here we demonstrate that E. sakazakii induces significant production of nitric oxide (NO) in rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) upon infection. The elevated production of NO, which is due to increased expression of inducible NO synthase, is responsible for apoptosis of IEC-6 cells. Notably, pretreatment of IEC-6 cells with Lactobacillus bulgaricus (ATCC 12278) attenuated the upregulation of NO production and thereby protected the cells from E. sakazakii-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, pretreatment with L. bulgaricus promoted the integrity of enterocytes both in vitro and in the infant rat model of NEC, even after challenge with E. sakazakii. Infection of IEC-6 cells with E. sakazakii upregulated several genes related to apoptosis, cytokine production, and various signaling pathways, as demonstrated by rat gene array analysis, and this upregulation was subdued by pretreatment with L. bulgaricus. In agreement with these data, L. bulgaricus pretreatment protected newborn rats infected with E. sakazakii from developing NEC, resulting in improved survival. PMID:19075027

  15. Oral Treatment with Extract of Agaricus blazei Murill Enhanced Th1 Response through Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Suppressed OVA-Sensitized Allergy in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Bouike

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the mechanism of the antiallergic activity of Agaricus blazei Murill extract (ABME, the present paper used an in vivo allergy model and an in vitro intestinal gut model. During OVA sensitization, the serum IgE levels decreased significantly in ABME group. Interleukin (IL-4 and -5 produced from OVA-restimulated splenocytes was significantly decreased, and anti-CD3ε/CD28 antibody treatment also reduced IL-10, -4, and -5 production and increased IFN-γ production in ABME group. These results suggest that oral administration of ABME improves Th1/Th2 balance. Moreover, a coculture system constructed of Caco-2 cells and splenocytes from OT-II mice or RAW 264.7 cells indicated that the significant increases in IFN-γ production by ABME treatment. Therefore, it was concluded that the antiallergic activity of ABME was due to the activation of macrophages by epithelial cells and the promotion of the differentiation of naïve T cells into Th1 cells in the immune.

  16. In Vitro Evaluation of Swine-Derived Lactobacillus reuteri: Probiotic Properties and Effects on Intestinal Porcine Epithelial Cells Challenged with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhilin; Wang, Li; Chen, Zhuang; Ma, Xianyong; Yang, Xuefen; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-06-28

    Probiotics are considered as the best effective alternatives to antibiotics. The aim of this study was to characterize the probiotic potential of lactobacilli for use in swine farming by using in vitro evaluation methods. A total of 106 lactic acid bacterial isolates, originating from porcine feces, were first screened for the capacity to survive stresses considered important for putative probiotic strains. Sixteen isolates showed notable acid and bile resistance, antibacterial activity, and adherence to intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-1). One isolate, LR1, identified as Lactobacillus reuteri, was selected for extensive study of its probiotic and functional properties in IPEC-1 cell models. L. reuteri LR1 exhibited good adhesion to IPEC-1 cells and could inhibit the adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) to IPEC-1 cells. L. reuteri LR1 could also modulate transcript and protein expression of cytokines involved in inflammation in IPEC-1 cells; the Lactobacillus strain inhibited the ETEC-induced expression of proinflammatory transcripts (IL-6 and TNF-α) and protein (IL-6), and increased the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10). Measurement of the permeation of FD-4 showed that L. reuteri LR1 could maintain barrier integrity in monolayer IPEC-1 cells exposed to ETEC. Immunolocalization experiments showed L. reuteri LR1 could also prevent ETEC-induced tight junction ZO-1 disruption. Together, these results indicate that L. reuteri LR1 exhibits desirable probiotic properties and could be a potential probiotic for use in swine production.

  17. Preventive Effect of TU-100 on a Type-2 Model of Colitis in Mice: Possible Involvement of Enhancing Adrenomedullin in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kaneko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, have histopathologically and immunologically different characteristics. We previously reported that a traditional Japanese medicine, daikenchuto (TU-100, ameliorated a trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid- (TNBS- induced type-1 model colitis exhibiting histopathological features of CD through adrenomedullin (ADM enhancement. Our current aims were to examine whether TU-100 ameliorates a type-2 model colitis that histologically resembles UC and identify the active ingredients. Methods. TU-100 was administered orally to mice with oxazolone- (OXN- induced type-2 model colitis. The morbidity was evaluated by body weight loss and the macroscopic score of colonic lesions. ADM was quantified using an EIA kit. Results. TU-100 prevented weight loss and colon ulceration. ADM production by intestinal epithelial cells was increased by TU-100 addition. Screening to identify active ingredients showed that [6]-shogaol and hydroxy α-sanshool enhanced ADM production. Conclusions. TU-100 exerted a protective effect in OXN-induced type-2 model colitis, indicating that TU-100 may be a beneficial agent for treatment of UC.

  18. Aminopeptidase-N-independent entry of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus into Vero or porcine small intestine epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chun-Miao; Wang, Bin; Zhou, Jiyong; Huang, Yao-Wei

    2018-04-01

    A monkey cell line Vero (ATCC CCL-81) is commonly used for porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) propagation in vitro. However, it is still controversial whether the porcine aminopeptidase N (pAPN) counterpart on Vero cells (Vero-APN) confers PEDV entry. We found that endogenous expression of Vero-APN was undetectable in the mRNA and the protein levels in Vero cells. We cloned the partial Vero-APN gene (3340-bp) containing exons 1 to 9 from cellular DNA and subsequently generated two APN-knockout Vero cell lines by CRISPR/Cas9 approach. PEDV infection of two APN-knockout Vero cells had the same efficiency as the Vero cells with or without neuraminidase treatment. A Vero cells stably expressing pAPN did not increase PEDV production. SiRNA-knockdown of pAPN in porcine jejunum epithelial cells had no effects on PEDV infection. The results suggest that there exists an additional cellular receptor on Vero or porcine jejunal cells independent of APN for PEDV entry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid on mRNA expression of tight junction protein ZO-1 in intestinal epithelial cells after Escherichia coli LF82 infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Li-Jun; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Tian, Jiao; Wang, Ya; Chen, Peng-De; Hu, Chong-Kang; Zeng, Ling-Chao; Yang, Jie; Wang, Bao-Xi; Jiang, Xun

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the change in the expression of tight junction protein ZO-1 in intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2 cells) and the protective effect of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) after adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (E.coli) LF82 infection. The Caco-2 cell line was used to establish an in vitro model of tight junction of intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells were divided into EPA treatment groups (0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 μmol/L EPA) and EPA (0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 μmol/L EPA)+E.coli LF82 treatment (0, 6, and 12 hours) groups. A microscope was used to observe the morphological characteristics of the cells. MTT assay was used to determine the cell growth curve. The activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) at both sides of the cell membrane was compared to evaluate the Caco-2 cell model. MTT assay and flow cytometry were used to investigate the effects of different concentrations of EPA on the survival rate and apoptosis rate of Caco-2 cells. RT-qPCR was used to measure the mRNA expression of ZO-1 in Caco-2 cells after EPA and/or E.coli LF82 treatment. ELISA was used to measure the change in the level of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in culture supernatant. After EPA treatment (25 and 50 μmol/L), the proliferation of Caco-2 cells was induced in a dose-dependent manner. The survival rates of the cells were significantly higher than those in the control group (PE.coli LF82 treatment groups had decreasing mRNA expression of ZO-1 in Caco-2 cells over the time of treatment and had significantly lower mRNA expression of ZO-1 than the untreated group (PE.coli LF82 and 25 or 50 μmol/L EPA for 6 or 12 hours showed an increase in the mRNA expression of ZO-1 with the increasing concentration of EPA, as well as significantly higher mRNA expression of ZO-1 than the Caco-2 cells treated with E.coli LF82 alone (PE.coli LF82 alone for 6 or 12 hours had increasing secretion of TNF-α over the time of treatment and had significantly higher secretion than the untreated

  20. NoxO1 Controls Proliferation of Colon Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Moll

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available AimReactive oxygen species (ROS produced by enzymes of the NADPH oxidase family serve as second messengers for cellular signaling. Processes such as differentiation and proliferation are regulated by NADPH oxidases. In the intestine, due to the exceedingly fast and constant renewal of the epithelium both processes have to be highly controlled and balanced. Nox1 is the major NADPH oxidase expressed in the gut, and its function is regulated by cytosolic subunits such as NoxO1. We hypothesize that the NoxO1-controlled activity of Nox1 contributes to a proper epithelial homeostasis and renewal in the gut.ResultsNoxO1 is highly expressed in the colon. Knockout of NoxO1 reduces the production of superoxide in colon crypts and is not subsidized by an elevated expression of its homolog p47phox. Knockout of NoxO1 increases the proliferative capacity and prevents apoptosis of colon epithelial cells. In mouse models of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis and azoxymethane/DSS ind