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Sample records for interventional radiology procedures

  1. Glove Perforations During Interventional Radiological Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leena, R. V.; Shyamkumar, N. K.

    2010-01-01

    Intact surgical gloves are essential to avoid contact with blood and other body fluids. The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of glove perforations during interventional radiological procedures. In this study, a total of 758 gloves used in 94 interventional radiological procedures were examined for perforations. Eleven perforations were encountered, only one of which was of occult type. No significant difference in the frequency of glove perforation was found between the categories with varying time duration.

  2. Occupational exposures from selected interventional radiological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeczek, J.; Beal, A.; James, D.

    2001-01-01

    The number of radiology and cardiology interventional procedures has significantly increased in recent years due to better diagnostic equipment resulting in an increase in radiation dose to the staff and patients. The assessment of staff doses was performed for cardiac catheterization and for three other non-cardiac procedures. The scattered radiation distribution resulting from the cardiac catheterization procedure was measured prior to the staff dose measurements. Staff dose measurements included those of the left shoulder, eye, thyroid and hand doses of the cardiologist. In non-cardiac procedures doses to the hands of the radiologist were measured for nephrostomy, fistulogram and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty procedures. Doses to the radiologist or cardiologist were found to be relatively high if correct protection was not observed. (author)

  3. Deterministic effects of interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shope, Thomas B.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe deterministic radiation injuries reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that resulted from therapeutic, interventional procedures performed under fluoroscopic guidance, and to investigate the procedure or equipment-related factors that may have contributed to the injury. Reports submitted to the FDA under both mandatory and voluntary reporting requirements which described radiation-induced skin injuries from fluoroscopy were investigated. Serious skin injuries, including moist desquamation and tissues necrosis, have occurred since 1992. These injuries have resulted from a variety of interventional procedures which have required extended periods of fluoroscopy compared to typical diagnostic procedures. Facilities conducting therapeutic interventional procedures need to be aware of the potential for patient radiation injury and take appropriate steps to limit the potential for injury. (author)

  4. Evaluation of medical radiation exposure in pediatric interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Valeria Coelho Costa; Navarro, Marcus Vinicius Teixeira; Oliveira, Aline da Silva Pacheco, E-mail: vccnavarro@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia (IFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil); Maia, Ana Figueiredo [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil); Oliveira, Adriano Dias Dourado [Sociedade Brasileira de Hemodinamica e Cardiologia Intervencionista, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate pediatric radiation exposure in procedures of interventional radiology in two hospitals in the Bahia state, aiming at contributing to delineate the scenario at the state and national levels. The knowledge of exposure levels will allow an evaluation of the necessity of doses optimization, considering that peculiarities of radiology and pediatrics become even more significant in interventional radiology procedures which involve exposure to higher radiation doses. Materials and Methods: A total of 32 procedures were evaluated in four rooms of the two main hospitals performing pediatric interventional radiology procedures in the Bahia state. Air kerma rate and kerma-area product were evaluated in 27 interventional cardiac and 5 interventional brain procedures. Results: Maximum values for air kerma rate and kerma-area product and air kerma obtained in cardiac procedures were, respectively, 129.9 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 947.0 mGy; and, for brain procedures were 83.3 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 961.0 mGy. Conclusion: The present study results showed exposure values up to 14 times higher than those found in other foreign studies, and approximating those found for procedures in adults. Such results demonstrate excessive exposure to radiation, indicating the need for constant procedures optimization and evaluation of exposure rates. (author)

  5. Assessments of medical exposures during interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, V. C. C.; Navarro, M. V. T.; Maia, A. F.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to contribute to the construction of a scenario regarding patient radiation exposure in Brazilian interventional radiology, aiming to provide data for the future drafting of specific legislation on interventional radiology because there is currently a lack of safety regulations for haemodynamics services in this country. Fourteen haemodynamics services in the states of Santa Catarina and Bahia were evaluated. The radiological devices were characterised through measurements of air kerma-area product, entrance surface air kerma (Ke), exposure time, spatial resolution (SR), low-contrast resolution and half value layer. During the evaluation of instrument parameters, several non-conformities were found according to current Brazilian regulations, with SR presenting the most critical situation. The results of the present study indicate the need for the optimisation of clinical practices in complex radiological procedures, although the overall results for the dose scenario in the present study revealed values similar to those reported in international publications. (authors)

  6. Radiological interventional procedures for the acute abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trumm, C.; Hoffmann, R.T.; Reiser, M.F.

    2010-01-01

    In patients with acute thrombo-embolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery, catheter-assisted thrombolytic therapy represents a procedure of increasing importance in addition to surgery and intensive care treatment. The thrombolytic drugs utilized for this purpose are urokinase, streptokinase and recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA). Therapeutic embolization is predominantly used in the treatment of arterial bleeding from the gastro-intestinal tract, the liver, the intestines (due to an aneurysm or vascular malformation) and in bleeding from intestinal anastomoses. Polyvinyl alcohol particles, embospheres, gelfoam and microcoils can be utilized as embolic agents. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage and stent implantation are applied in patients with biliary obstructions caused by inoperable tumors of the gall bladder or bile ducts, of the pancreatic head or duodenum and by metastases located in the liver parenchyma or hepatic hilum. Image-guided percutaneous drainage is a valuable option in the management of abscesses in the peritoneal cavity; less common indications are lymphoceles, biliomas, urinomas, hematomas, necrosis and pseudocysts. (orig.) [de

  7. Entrance surface dose in cerebral interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera-Rico, M.; López-Rendón, X.; Vega-Montesino, S.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.

    2014-01-01

    During interventional radiology procedures patients receive doses which exceed thresholds for non-stochastic effects on the skin, such as erythema (2 Gy) and epilation (3 Gy), so the entrance surface dose imparted during these proceedings should be monitored. The aim of this work was to determine the entrance surface dose (ESD) in patients who undergo diagnostic or therapeutic procedures at the Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (INNN). The procedures were performed using two systems for neuroradiology, an Axiom Artis and an Artis Zeego from Siemens. The ESD was measured, for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, using 15 × 15 cm 2 of Gafchromic XR-RV3 film and/or 25 TLD-100 chips that were attached in a holder of 15 × 15 cm 2 in the posteroanterior and left and right lateral positions during all the procedures. The results show that the maximum ESD measured was lower than 1 Gy for the nine diagnostic procedures evaluated whereas four of the ten therapeutic procedures were greater than 2 Gy in at least one position. Seven patients were monitored, three of which have presented epilation and one erythema. - Highlights: • We measured the entrance surface dose in cerebral interventional radiology. • Entrance surface doses were lower than 1 Gy for diagnostic procedures. • In four therapeutic procedures entrance surface doses were greater than 2 Gy. • Three patients presented epilation and one erythema

  8. Organ doses in interventional radiology procedures: Evaluation of software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tort, I.; Ruiz-Cruces, R.; Perez-Martinez, M.; Carrera, F.; Ojeda, C.; Diez de los Rios, A.

    2001-01-01

    Interventional Radiology (IR) procedures require large fluoroscopy times and important number of radiological images, so the levels of radiation to patient are high, which leads us to calculate the organ doses. The objective of this work is to estimate and make a comparison of the results given by the different software that we have to do the calculation of organ doses in complex procedures of IR. To do this, 28 patients have been selected, distributed in the 3 procedures with highest doses. The determination of organ doses and effective doses has been made using the projections utilized and different software based on Monte Carlo Methods: Eff-dose, PCXMC and Diasoft. We have obtained very high dispersion in the average organ dose between the 3 programs. In many cases, it is higher than 25% and in some particular cases, it is greater than 100%. Dispersion obtained in effective doses is not so high, being under 20% in all cases. This shows that a better solution is needed to solve the problem of the organ doses calculation; a more accurate method is necessary that brings us to a trustworthy approach to reality, and, at the moment, that we do not dispose of it. (author)

  9. Entrance surface dose in cerebral interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera-Rico, M.; López-Rendón, X.; Rivera-Ordóñez, C. E.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.

    2012-01-01

    At the Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (INNN) diagnostic as well as therapeutic procedures of interventional radiology are carried out. Since the procedures can last from some minutes to several hours, the absorbed dose for the patient could increase dangerously. An investigation had begun in order to determine the entrance surface dose (ESD) using 25 thermoluminiscent dosimeters TLD-100 and 8 strips of 15 ×1 cm 2 of Gafchromic XR-QA2 film bound in a holder of 15×15 cm 2 in the posteroanterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) positions during all the procedure. The results show that maximum ESD could be from 0.9 to 2.9 Gy for the PA position and between 1.6 and 2.5 Gy for the lateral position. The average ESD was between 0.7 and 1.3 Gy for the PA position, and from 0.44 to 1.1 Gy for the lateral position in a therapeutic procedure.

  10. Entrance surface dose in cerebral interventional radiology procedures

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    Barrera-Rico, M.; Lopez-Rendon, X.; Rivera-Ordonez, C. E.; Gamboa-deBuen, I. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia Manuel Velasco Suarez, 14269 DF (Mexico); Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 DF (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    At the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia (INNN) diagnostic as well as therapeutic procedures of interventional radiology are carried out. Since the procedures can last from some minutes to several hours, the absorbed dose for the patient could increase dangerously. An investigation had begun in order to determine the entrance surface dose (ESD) using 25 thermoluminiscent dosimeters TLD-100 and 8 strips of 15 Multiplication-Sign 1 cm{sup 2} of Gafchromic XR-QA2 film bound in a holder of 15 Multiplication-Sign 15 cm{sup 2} in the posteroanterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) positions during all the procedure. The results show that maximum ESD could be from 0.9 to 2.9 Gy for the PA position and between 1.6 and 2.5 Gy for the lateral position. The average ESD was between 0.7 and 1.3 Gy for the PA position, and from 0.44 to 1.1 Gy for the lateral position in a therapeutic procedure.

  11. A pilot study of radiation exposures arising from interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellet, S.; Giczi, F.; Gaspardy, G.; Temesi, A.; Ballay, L.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the past 25 years, considerable number of new therapeutic procedures have been worked out and adopted in radiology. These interventional procedures are mainly based on angiographic methods. During these procedures the exposure of patients and staff are usually greater than of conventional radiography and fluoroscopy as a consequence of longer fluoroscopy times and great number of cine-radiography. In the latest years radiation-induced skin injuries occurred in some patients. Injuries to physicians and staff performing interventional procedures have also been observed. In our days interventional procedures are widely used and more sophisticated procedures are worked out and adopted. Consequently, there is a need for the protection of the patient and the staff on a higher level. Radiation protection of intervention radiology deserves a distinguish attention. In Hungary interventional radiology were performed in 36 laboratories in 2003. According to statistical data the gross number of interventional radiological procedures were 19442. The most frequently performed procedures were the P.T.C.A., the coronary and ilio-femoral stent implantation and chemo-embolization. In 2004, the National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radio-hygiene and the National Patient Dose Evaluation Program started a pilot study of radiation exposures arising from interventional radiology procedures. During the study the patient exposure were measured by D.A.P.-meters. The patient skin dose and the staff dose were performed by thermoluminescent chips. In their presentation the authors present the most important results of the study. (authors)

  12. An observation study of radiation exposure to nurses during interventional radiology procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komemushi, Atsushi; Tanigawa, Noboru; Aoki, Atsuko

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively measure the level of radiation exposure among nursing staff during interventional radiology procedures. All interventional radiology procedures performed at our institution between April 20 and June 19, 2009 were included in this study. Radiation exposure was measured as the equivalent dose penetrating tissue to a depth of 10 mm using electronic personal dosimeters attached outside (Ha) and inside (Hb) lead aprons. Effective dose (HE) was estimated by calculating from Ha and Hb. In total, data from 68 procedures were included in this study. Four nurses performed 71 nursing cares. The mean Ha was 0.70±1.0 μSv, while the mean Hb was 0.06±0.2 μSv. The mean HE was 0.14±0.3 μSv. The present findings indicate that during interventional radiology procedures, nurses were exposed to very low levels of radiation. (author)

  13. Radiological protection in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padovani, R.

    2001-01-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) reduces the need for many traditional interventions, particularly surgery, so reducing the discomfort and risk for patients compared with traditional systems. IR procedures are frequently performed by non-radiologist physicians, often without the proper radiological equipment and sufficient knowledge of radiation protection. Levels of doses to patients and staff in IR vary enormously. A poor correlation exists between patient and staff dose, and large variations of dose are reported for the same procedure. The occurrence of deterministic effects in patients is another peculiar aspect of IR owing to the potentially high skin doses of some procedures. The paper reviews the use of IR and the radiological protection of patients and staff, and examines the need for new standards for IR equipment and the training of personnel. (author)

  14. Patient dose in interventional radiology: a multicentre study of the most frequent procedures in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etard, Cecile; Bigand, Emeline; Salvat, Cecile; Vidal, Vincent; Beregi, Jean Paul; Hornbeck, Amaury; Greffier, Joel

    2017-01-01

    A national retrospective survey on patient doses was performed by the French Society of Medical physicists to assess reference levels (RLs) in interventional radiology as required by the European Directive 2013/59/Euratom. Fifteen interventional procedures in neuroradiology, vascular radiology and osteoarticular procedures were analysed. Kerma area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (FT), reference air kerma and number of images were recorded for 10 to 30 patients per procedure. RLs were calculated as the 3rd quartiles of the distributions. Results on 4600 procedures from 36 departments confirmed the large variability in patient dose for the same procedure. RLs were proposed for the four dosimetric estimators and the 15 procedures. RLs in terms of KAP and FT were 90 Gm.cm 2 and 11 mins for cerebral angiography, 35 Gy.cm 2 and 16 mins for biliary drainage, 75 Gy.cm 2 and 6 mins for lower limbs arteriography and 70 Gy.cm 2 and 11 mins for vertebroplasty. For these four procedures, RLs were defined according to the complexity of the procedure. For all the procedures, the results were lower than most of those already published. This study reports RLs in interventional radiology based on a national survey. Continual evolution of practices and technologies requires regular updates of RLs. (orig.)

  15. Patient dose in interventional radiology: a multicentre study of the most frequent procedures in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etard, Cecile [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); French Society of Medical Physicists (SFPM), Paris (France); Bigand, Emeline [French Society of Medical Physicists (SFPM), Paris (France); La Timone University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Marseille Cedex (France); Salvat, Cecile [French Society of Medical Physicists (SFPM), Paris (France); Lariboisiere Hospital, Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Paris (France); Vidal, Vincent [La Timone University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Marseille Cedex (France); French Society of Radiology (SFR) - Interventional Radiology Federation (FRI), Paris (France); Beregi, Jean Paul [French Society of Radiology (SFR) - Interventional Radiology Federation (FRI), Paris (France); Nimes University Hospital, Medical Imaging Group Nimes, Department of Radiology, Nimes (France); Hornbeck, Amaury [French Society of Medical Physicists (SFPM), Paris (France); Trousseau University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Greffier, Joel [French Society of Medical Physicists (SFPM), Paris (France); Nimes University Hospital, Medical Imaging Group Nimes, Department of Radiology, Nimes (France)

    2017-10-15

    A national retrospective survey on patient doses was performed by the French Society of Medical physicists to assess reference levels (RLs) in interventional radiology as required by the European Directive 2013/59/Euratom. Fifteen interventional procedures in neuroradiology, vascular radiology and osteoarticular procedures were analysed. Kerma area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (FT), reference air kerma and number of images were recorded for 10 to 30 patients per procedure. RLs were calculated as the 3rd quartiles of the distributions. Results on 4600 procedures from 36 departments confirmed the large variability in patient dose for the same procedure. RLs were proposed for the four dosimetric estimators and the 15 procedures. RLs in terms of KAP and FT were 90 Gm.cm{sup 2} and 11 mins for cerebral angiography, 35 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 16 mins for biliary drainage, 75 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 6 mins for lower limbs arteriography and 70 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 11 mins for vertebroplasty. For these four procedures, RLs were defined according to the complexity of the procedure. For all the procedures, the results were lower than most of those already published. This study reports RLs in interventional radiology based on a national survey. Continual evolution of practices and technologies requires regular updates of RLs. (orig.)

  16. Education and training in radiological protection for diagnostic and interventional procedures ICRP 113 in brief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, S.; Gomaa, M. A.; Alshoufi, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    The international commission on radiological protection (ICRP) is the primary body in protection against ionizing radiation. Among its latest publication is ICRP publication 113 e ducation and training in radiological protection for diagnostic and interventional procedures . This document introduces diagnostic and interventional medical procedures using ionizing radiations in deep details. The document is approved by the commission in October 2010 and translated into Arabic at December 2011. This work is a continuation of the efforts series to translate some of the most important of the radiological protection references into the Arabic; aiming to maximize the benefit. The previous translation include WHO handbook on indoor radon: a public health perspective, issued by world health organization 2009 and Radiation Protection in Medicine, ICRP Publication 105 2007 that translated into Arabic with support of Arab atomic energy authority at 2011.

  17. Estimation of staff lens doses during interventional procedures. Comparing cardiology, neuroradiology and interventional radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, E; Sanchez, R M; Fernandez, J M

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to estimate lens doses using over apron active personal dosemeters in interventional catheterisation laboratories (cardiology IC, neuroradiology IN and radiology IR) and to investigate correlations between occupational lens doses and patient doses. Active electronic personal dosemeters placed over the lead apron were used on a sample of 204 IC procedures, 274 IN and 220 IR (all performed at the same university hospital). Patient dose values (kerma area product) were also recorded to evaluate correlations with occupational doses. Operators used the ceiling-suspended screen in most cases. The median and third quartile values of equivalent dose Hp(10) per procedure measured over the apron for IC, IN and IR resulted, respectively, in 21/67, 19/44 and 24/54 µSv. Patient dose values (median/third quartile) were 75/128, 83/176 and 61/159 Gy cm(2), respectively. The median ratios for dosemeters worn over the apron by operators (protected by the ceiling-suspended screen) and patient doses were 0.36; 0.21 and 0.46 µSv Gy(-1) cm(-2), respectively. With the conservative approach used (lens doses estimated from the over apron chest dosemeter) we came to the conclusion that more than 800 procedures y(-1) and per operator were necessary to reach the new lens dose limit for the three interventional specialties. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Evaluation of patient radiation doses using DAP meter in interventional radiology procedures

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    Kang, Byung Sam [Dept. of Radiological Technology. Shingu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Yong Su [Dept. of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu Univeristy, Kyushu (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    The author investigated interventional radiology patient doses in several other countries, assessed accuracy of DAP meters embedded in intervention equipment in domestic country, conducted measurement of patient doses for 13 major interventional procedures with use of Dose Area Product(DAP) meters from 23 hospitals in Korea, and referred to 8,415 cases of domestic data related to interventional procedures by radiation exposure after evaluation the actual effective of dose reduction variables through phantom test. Finally, dose reference level for major interventional procedures was suggested. In this study, guidelines for patient doses were 237.7 Gy·cm{sup 2} in TACE, 17.3 Gy·cm{sup 2} in AVF, 114.1 Gy·cm{sup 2} in LE PTA and STENT, 188.5 Gy·cm{sup 2} in TFCA, 383.5 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Aneurysm Coil, 64.6 Gy·cm{sup 2} in PTBD, 64.6 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Biliary Stent, 22.4 Gy·cm{sup 2} in PCN, 4.3 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Hickman, 2.8 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Chemo-port, 4.4 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Perm-Cather, 17.1 Gy·cm{sup 2} in PCD, and 357.9 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Vis, EMB. Dose reference level acquired in this study is considered to be able to use as minimal guidelines for reducing patient dose in the interventional radiology procedures. For the changes and advances of materials and development of equipment and procedures in the interventional radiology procedures, further studies and monitoring are needed on dose reference level Korean DAP dose conversion factor for the domestic procedures.

  19. Anesthesia for interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Sonnenberg, E.; Casola, G.; Varney, R.R.; D'Agostino, H.B.; Zornow, M.; Mazzie, W.

    1989-01-01

    We recognized that the complexity and surgical nature of many interventional radiology procedures dictate essential radiologic involvement into traditional anesthesiologic areas. They reviewed our experience with a variety of interventional procedures to document complications and problems related to anesthetic use (or misuse) and compile recommendations for rational monitoring and control for these procedures. In particular, the authors have studied complications of drug therapies and the treatment of these complications; use of complex anesthesia procedures (e.g., epidural anesthesia, succinylcholine blockage); reasons for choice of drugs (e.g., fentanyl vs meperidine vs morphine); and medico-legal aspects of radiologist performing traditional anesthesiology-type procedures

  20. Cost analysis of radiological interventional procedures and reimbursement within a clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strotzer, M.; Voelk, M.; Lenhart, M.; Fruend, R.; Feuerbach, S.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of costs for vascular radiological interventions on a per patient basis and comparison with reimbursement based on GOAe(Gebuehrenordnung fuer Aerzte) and DKG-NT (Deutsche Krankenhausgesellschaft-Nebenkostentarif). Material and Methods: The ten procedures most frequently performed within 12 months were evaluated. Personnel costs were derived from precise costs per hour and estimated procedure time for each intervention. Costs for medical devices were included. Reimbursement based on GOAewas calculated using the official conversion factor of 0.114 DM for each specific relative value unit and a multiplication factor of 1.0. The corresponding conversion factor for DKG-NT, determined by the DKG, was 0.168 DM. Results: A total of 832 interventional procedures were included. Marked differences between calculated costs and reimbursement rates were found. Regarding the ten most frequently performed procedures, there was a deficit of 1.06 million DM according GOAedata (factor 1.0) and 0.787 million DM according DKG-NT. The percentage of reimbursement was only 34.2 (GOAe; factor 1.0) and 51.3 (DKG-NT), respectively. Conclusion: Reimbursement of radiological interventional procedures based on GOAeand DKG-NT data is of limited value for economic controlling purposes within a hospital. (orig.) [de

  1. Diagnostic and interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, Thomas J. [Klinikum der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Reith, Wolfgang [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie; Rummeny, Ernst J. (ed.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2016-08-01

    This exceptional book covers all aspects of diagnostic and interventional radiology within one volume, at a level appropriate for the specialist. From the basics through diagnosis to intervention: the reader will find a complete overview of all areas of radiology. The clear, uniform structure, with chapters organized according to organ system, facilitates the rapid retrieval of information. Features include: Presentation of the normal radiological anatomy Classification of the different imaging procedures according to their diagnostic relevance Imaging diagnosis with many reference images Precise description of the interventional options The inclusion of many instructive aids will be of particular value to novices in decision making: Important take home messages and summaries of key radiological findings smooth the path through the jungle of facts Numerous tables on differential diagnosis and typical findings in the most common diseases offer a rapid overview and orientation Diagnostic flow charts outline the sequence of diagnostic evaluation All standard procedures within the field of interventional radiology are presented in a clinically relevant and readily understandable way, with an abundance of illustrations. This is a textbook, atlas, and reference in one: with more than 2500 images for comparison with the reader's own findings. This comprehensive and totally up-to-date book provides a superb overview of everything that the radiology specialist of today needs to know.

  2. Risk of bleeding associated with interventional musculoskeletal radiology procedures. A comprehensive review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foremny, Gregory B.; Jose, Jean; Subhawong, Ty K. [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Pretell-Mazzini, Juan [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery-Division of Musculoskeletal Oncology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This review compiles the current literature on the bleeding risks in common musculoskeletal interventional procedures and attempts to provide guidance for practicing radiologists in making decisions regarding the periprocedural management of patients on antithrombotic therapy. The practitioner must weigh the risk of bleeding if therapy is continued against the possibility a thromboembolic occurring if anticoagulation therapy is withheld or reversed. Unfortunately, there is little empirical data to guide evidence-based decisions for many musculoskeletal interventions. However, a review of the literature shows that for low-risk procedures, such as arthrograms/arthrocenteses or muscle/tendon sheath injections, bleeding risks are sufficiently small that anticoagulants and antiplatelet therapies need not be withheld. Additionally, relatively higher-risk procedures, such as needle biopsies of bone and soft tissue, may be safely performed without holding antithrombotic therapy, provided pre-procedural INR is within therapeutic range. Thus, while a patient's particular clinical circumstances should dictate optimal individualized management, anticoagulation alone is not a general contraindication to most interventional musculoskeletal radiology procedures. (orig.)

  3. Risk of bleeding associated with interventional musculoskeletal radiology procedures. A comprehensive review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foremny, Gregory B.; Jose, Jean; Subhawong, Ty K.; Pretell-Mazzini, Juan

    2015-01-01

    This review compiles the current literature on the bleeding risks in common musculoskeletal interventional procedures and attempts to provide guidance for practicing radiologists in making decisions regarding the periprocedural management of patients on antithrombotic therapy. The practitioner must weigh the risk of bleeding if therapy is continued against the possibility a thromboembolic occurring if anticoagulation therapy is withheld or reversed. Unfortunately, there is little empirical data to guide evidence-based decisions for many musculoskeletal interventions. However, a review of the literature shows that for low-risk procedures, such as arthrograms/arthrocenteses or muscle/tendon sheath injections, bleeding risks are sufficiently small that anticoagulants and antiplatelet therapies need not be withheld. Additionally, relatively higher-risk procedures, such as needle biopsies of bone and soft tissue, may be safely performed without holding antithrombotic therapy, provided pre-procedural INR is within therapeutic range. Thus, while a patient's particular clinical circumstances should dictate optimal individualized management, anticoagulation alone is not a general contraindication to most interventional musculoskeletal radiology procedures. (orig.)

  4. Radiation load of the extremities and eye lenses of the staff during selected interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, Denisa; Trosanova, Dominika

    2010-01-01

    The Slovak Medical University in Bratislava is involved in the ORAMED (Optimization of Radiation Protection for Medical Staff) research project, aimed at developing a unified methodology for a more accurate assessment of professional exposure of interventional radiology staff, with focus on extremity and eye lens dosimetry in selected procedures. Three cardiac procedures and 5 angiography examinations were selected: all technical parameters were monitored and the dose equivalent levels were measured by TL dosimetry at 9 anatomic sites of the body. Preliminary results were obtained for the radiation burden of the eyes and extremities during digital subtraction angiography of the lower limbs, collected from 7 hospital departments in partner EU states. Correlations between the evaluated data and the influence of some parameters are shown

  5. Attention for pediatric interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ming; Cheng Yongde

    2005-01-01

    Radiological interventions possess wide utilization in the diagnosis and treatment for pediatric patients. Pediatric interventional radiology is an important branch of interventional radiology and also an important branch of pediatric radiology. Pediatric interventional radiology has grown substantially over the last 30 years, radiologists closely cooperation with surgeons and other physicians providing a new horizon in the management of pediatric diseases in western countries. It includes pediatric cardiac interventional radiology, pediatric neuro-interventional radiology, pediatric vascular interventional radiology, pediatric nonvascular interventional radiology, pediatric tumor interventional radiology and others. In the United States, every children hospital which owns two hundred beds has to have special trained interventional radiologists in radiologic department installing with advanced digital subtraction angiographic equipment. Interventional therapeutic procedures and diagnostic angiography have been proceeding more and more for the congenital and acquired diseases of children. The promising results give use uprising and interventional therapy as an alternative or a replacement or supplement to surgical operation. Pediatric interventional radiology is rather underdeveloped in China with a few special pediatric interventional radiologist, lack of digital subtraction angiography equipment. Pediatric radiologists have no enough field for interventional procedures such as pediatric neuro-interventional radiology and pediatric vascular interventional radiology. In the contrary adult interventional radiologists do have better interventional jobs in China and Pediatric cardiologists also share the same trend. They perform angiocardiography for congenital heart diseases and treat congenital heart disease with interventional procedures including balloon dilation of valves and vessels, coil embolization of collaterals, patent ducts and other arterial fistulae

  6. Patient dose assessment in various Interventional radiology and cardiology procedures in Algeria (IAEA regional project results)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia; Merad, Ahmed; Toutaoui, A.E.K.; Bairi, Souad

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: To evaluate patient doses in Interventional Radiology (IR) and Cardiology (IC) procedures in Algeria, within the framework of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) regional project on radiation protection of patients and medical exposure control (RAF 9033). Materials and Methods: Three public hospitals (CHU Bab el Oued, CHU Parnet and CHU Mustapha) and one specialised Cardiology Service (Clinique Maouche) were chosen for the study. For Maximum Skin Dose (MSD) evaluation, gafchromic films XR type R were used, placed on patient's back before the procedure. The Dose Area Product (DAP) and MSD were measured in 57 IR and IC procedures, either diagnostic or therapeutic. Results: The results revealed large variations in MSD (0.06-3.3 Gy) and DAP (5.5-332 mGycm 2 ). Mean MSD was 0.227 Gy in cerebral angiography, 0.202 Gy in coronary angiography, 1.162 Gy in Percutaneus Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (PTCA) and 0.128 in abdominal angiography. The correlation of DAP and MSD was significant (r = 0.7). The correlation was DAP and fluoroscopy time was also significant (r = 0.8). Conclusion: The highest MSD values were found in PTCA which is a therapeutic procedure. Two PTCAs out of the 57 procedures measured in total had MSD over the threshold of 2 Gy for deterministic effects (MSD 1 = 3.0 Gy and MSD 2 3.3 Gy). The large variations in MSD reveal the need to continuously monitor patient doses in IR and IC procedures with special emphasis in PTCA procedure. (author)

  7. Interventional Radiology: Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Government affairs Global outreach Publications Annual Report IR Quarterly Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology Newsletters Practice Resources Quality Improvement Clinical practice MACRA Matters Health Policy, Economics, Coding Toolkits Society of Interventional Radiology 3975 Fair ...

  8. Post-procedural Care in Interventional Radiology: What Every Interventional Radiologist Should Know-Part II: Catheter Care and Management of Common Systemic Post-procedural Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taslakian, Bedros; Sridhar, Divya

    2017-09-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) has evolved into a full-fledged clinical specialty with attendant comprehensive patient care responsibilities. Providing excellent and thorough clinical care is as essential to the practice of IR as achieving technical success in procedures. Basic clinical skills that every interventional radiologist should learn include routine management of percutaneously inserted drainage and vascular catheters and rapid effective management of common systemic post-procedural complications. A structured approach to post-procedural care, including routine follow-up and early identification and management of complications, facilitates efficient and thorough management with an emphasis on quality and patient safety. The aim of this second part, in conjunction with part 1, is to complete the comprehensive review of post-procedural care in patients undergoing interventional radiology procedures. We discuss common problems encountered after insertion of drainage and vascular catheters and describe effective methods of troubleshooting these problems. Commonly encountered systemic complications in IR are described, and ways for immediate identification and management of these complications are provided.

  9. [Vascular interventional radiology: a fundamental procedure for the management of paediatric trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordón Cabrera, E; Laín, A; Gander, R; Pérez Lafuente, M; Díez Miranda, I; Fontecha, C G; Seidler, L; Delgado, I; Cañadas Palazón, S; Lloret, J

    2016-01-25

    The management of active bleeding with haemodinamic lability in the paediatric trauma patient is difficult and generally leads to damage control surgery. Vascular Interventional Radiology (VIR) techniques are useful for the diagnosis as for the definitive treatment. The aim of our study was to describe our experience and evaluate effectiveness of VIR in the management of the paediatric trauma patient with active bleeding signs. Retrospective analysis (2003-2014) of politraumatic patients who showed contrast blush on computed tomography and then treated by VIR techniques. In the reported study period 16 patients underwent VIR procedures. Medium age was 13 years (5-17). The most frequent lesion mechanism was traffic accident (8 out of 17) and 93,75% were blunt traumas. Findings on initial Computed Tomography were 12 contrast blushes and 2 absences of arterial flow. In 2 cases the contrast blush appeared 48 hours after the accident. Arteriography allowed us to localize the bleeding vessels in all the cases, performing selective or supraselective renal (7), pelvic (5), hepatic (3), splenic (1) and intercostal (1) embolization. One patient required an endoprothesis for renal revascularization. Two cases needed additional surgical procedures (2 nephrectomies) because of complete section of the renal artery (1) and disruption of the ureteropelvic junction (1). One case required hemofiltration in relation to rhabdomyolysis. In our experience VIR is a valuable diagnostic and therapeutic procedure for the management of paediatric trauma patients, with high effectiveness and a low complication rate.

  10. Comparison of patient doses in interventional radiology procedures performed in two large hospitals in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papageorgiou, E.; Tsapaki, V.; Tsalafoutas, I. A.; Maurikou, E.; Kottou, S.; Orfanos, A.; Karidas, G.; Fidanis, T.; Zafiriadou, E.; Neofotistou, V.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose of the study was to determine patient doses in the most common interventional radiology (IR) procedures performed in two large Greek hospitals. A total of 164 patients who underwent 4 types of IR procedures were studied. Fluoroscopy time, total exposure time, number of frames, number of runs, radiation field size, and cumulative dose-area product (DAP) were recorded. The median DAP values for carotid arteriography and lower limb arteriography were 66 and 123 Gy cm 2 for hospital 'A' and 21 and 49 Gy cm 2 for hospital 'B'. For the cerebral arteriographies performed in hospital 'A', the median DAP was 116 Gy cm 2 while for the hepatic embolizations performed in hospital 'B', it was 104 Gy cm 2 . The DAP values observed in hospital 'A' for carotid arteriography and lower limb arteriography were almost three times than those of hospital 'B'. From the data analysis, it is evident that dose optimization in hospital 'A' should be pursued through revision of the techniques used. (authors)

  11. Anesthesia for radiologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forestner, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Anesthetic techniques for neurodiagnostic studies and radiation therapy have been recently reviewed, but anesthetic involvement in thoracic and abdominal radiology has received little attention. Patient reactions to radiologic contrast media may be of concern to the anesthesiologist, who is often responsible for injecting these agents during diagnostic procedures, and thus is included in this discussion. Finally, the difficulties of administering anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are outlined, in an effort to help anesthesiologist to anticipate problems with this new technologic development. Although there are very few indications for the use of general anesthesia for diagnostic radiologic studies in adults, most procedures performed with children, the mentally retarded, or the combative adult require either heavy sedation or general anesthesia. In selecting an anesthetic technique for a specific procedure, both the patient's disease process and the requirements of the radiologist must be carefully balanced

  12. Entrance skin dose measured with MOSFETs in children undergoing interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glennie, Diana; Connolly, Bairbre L.; Gordon, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Interventional procedures frequently employ fluoroscopy or digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Few studies have documented radiation doses received by children during these procedures. To measure skin entrance dose received during common pediatric interventional procedures. MOSFET dosimeters were placed to record skin doses in 143 children undergoing any of five procedures: 30 PICC insertions, 34 CVL/port insertions, 30 G/GJ tube insertions, 25 sclerotherapy/vascular anomaly procedures, 24 cerebral angiography procedures. The highest recorded dose (HRD) from the five MOSFET probes was assumed to be the peak skin dose per child. HRD values were averaged for children within each group and correlated with patient weight, fluoroscopy time and number of DSA frames. Average HRD was 1.8 mGy for PICC insertions, 1.4 mGy for CVL/port insertions, 3.9 mGy for G/GJ tube insertions, 39.1 mGy for sclerotherapy/vascular anomaly procedures, and 149.9 and 101.6 mGy for frontal and lateral portions of cerebral angiography procedures. These entrance doses corresponded to effective dose estimates in the range 0.4-3 mSv. There were only modest correlations between peak skin dose and fluoroscopy time, patient weight and DSA frames (r 2 <0.4, P<0.01). Pediatric interventional procedures are associated with a wide range of doses; those at the higher end require careful monitoring. (orig.)

  13. Entrance skin dose measured with MOSFETs in children undergoing interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glennie, Diana [McMaster University, Medical and Health Physics Department, Hamilton (Canada); Connolly, Bairbre L. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Image-Guided Therapy, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Gordon, Christopher [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada)

    2008-11-15

    Interventional procedures frequently employ fluoroscopy or digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Few studies have documented radiation doses received by children during these procedures. To measure skin entrance dose received during common pediatric interventional procedures. MOSFET dosimeters were placed to record skin doses in 143 children undergoing any of five procedures: 30 PICC insertions, 34 CVL/port insertions, 30 G/GJ tube insertions, 25 sclerotherapy/vascular anomaly procedures, 24 cerebral angiography procedures. The highest recorded dose (HRD) from the five MOSFET probes was assumed to be the peak skin dose per child. HRD values were averaged for children within each group and correlated with patient weight, fluoroscopy time and number of DSA frames. Average HRD was 1.8 mGy for PICC insertions, 1.4 mGy for CVL/port insertions, 3.9 mGy for G/GJ tube insertions, 39.1 mGy for sclerotherapy/vascular anomaly procedures, and 149.9 and 101.6 mGy for frontal and lateral portions of cerebral angiography procedures. These entrance doses corresponded to effective dose estimates in the range 0.4-3 mSv. There were only modest correlations between peak skin dose and fluoroscopy time, patient weight and DSA frames (r{sup 2}<0.4, P<0.01). Pediatric interventional procedures are associated with a wide range of doses; those at the higher end require careful monitoring. (orig.)

  14. Interventional vascular radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yune, H.Y.

    1984-01-01

    The papers published during this past year in the area of interventional vascular radiology presented some useful modifications and further experiences both in the area of thromboembolic therapy and in dilation and thrombolysis, but no new techniques. As an introductory subject, an excellent monograph reviewing the current spectrum of pharmacoangiography was presented in Radiographics. Although the presented material is primarily in diagnostic application of various pharmacologic agents used today to facilitate demonstration of certain diagnostic criteria of various disease processes, both vasodilatory and vasoconstrictive reaction to these agents are widely used in various therapeutic vascular procedures. This monograph should be reviewed by every angiographer whether or not he or she performs interventional procedures, and it would be very convenient to have this table available in the angiography suite. In a related subject, Bookstein and co-workers have written an excellent review concerning pharmacologic manipulations of various blood coagulative parameters during angiography. Understanding the proper method of manipulation of the bloodclotting factors during angiography, and especially during interventional angiography, is extremely important. Particularly, the method of manipulating the coagulation with the use of heparin and protamine and modification of the platelet activity by using aspirin and dipyridamole are succinctly reviewed. The systemic and selective thrombolytic activities of streptokianse are also discussed

  15. Gadopentetate di-meglumine as contrast agent for arteriography and interventional radiologic procedures: preliminary application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhongpu; Wang Maoqiang; Sun Yongguang; Liu Xiaojun

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of gadopentetate di-meglumine as contrast agent for arteriography and interventional procedures. Methods: Nine patients received gadopentetate di-meglumine as contrast agent during interventional procedures. Gadopentetate di-meglumine wa used in 2 patients with contraindications to iodinated contrast media. In addition to the standard injection sequences with iodinated contrast media, arteriograms were obtained after administration of gadopentetate di-meglumine in seven patients. Diagnostic arteriography were performed in thoracic aorta, common carotid artery, bronchial artery, intercostal artery, hepatic artery, iliac artery and uterine artery. The doses of gadopentetate di-meglumine used in this series were ≤0.3 mmol/kg. Vital signs and arterial oxygen saturation were monitored during the procedures. The blood and urine routine examinations, the hepatic and renal functions tests were done after the procedure. Results: There were no significant differences between the gadopentetate di-meglumine and the iodinated contrast media examinations for illustrating the main trunk of these arteries. Angiograms obtained with the iodinated contrast media appeared to be better than that of with gadopentetate di-meglumine for visualizing the distal branches of these arteries and the tumor stain. The interventional procedure was completed successfully in the two patients using gadopentetate di-meglumine alone. No patient suffered from complication related to the use of gadopentetate di-meglumine, and also no worsened renal function was shown after the procedure. Conclusions: Diagnostic arteriograms can be achieved safely and successfully by using gadopentetate di-meglumine, especially in patients with allergy to iodinate contrast media and chronic renal insufficiency

  16. Practical interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, J.; Schreyer, H.

    1991-01-01

    The book is intended as a practical guide and manual for interventional radiology applications. Main emphasis is placed on the performance of the various techniques, with explanations of the various steps to be taken, illustrated by drawings or pictures. Indications, contra-indications and clinical achievements are given in brief. There is one chapter each for the following techniques: angioplasty - intra-arterial fibrinolysis - vascular stents - neuroembolisation - embolisation of other vessels - biliary interventions - abscess drainage - nephrostomy and ureteral manipulations -percutaneous fine-needle biopsy - vena cava filters - interventional radiology in infants. (orig.)

  17. Interventional neuroradiology techniques in interventional radiology

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Kieran; Robertson, Fergus; Watkinson, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This book provides accessible technique-specific information on interventional radiology procedures, in a format suitable for reference in the IR treatment room or as a carry-around guide. Offers step-by-step points, key point summaries and illustrations.

  18. Early experience using an online reporting system for interventional radiology procedure-related complications integrated with a digital dictation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanjay; Patel, Jay; McEnery, Kevin; Wallace, Michael J; Ahrar, Kamran; Suitor, Chuck; Hicks, Marshall E

    2011-08-01

    The absence of user-friendly systems for reporting complications is a major barrier to improving quality assurance (QA) programs in interventional radiology (IR) services. We describe the implementation of a QA application that is completely integrated with the radiology dictation system. We implemented an IR QA process as a module within the electronic medical record and radiologist dictation system applications used at our institution. After a radiologist completes a dictation, he or she must select from a drop-down list of complications before proceeding to the next case. Delayed QA events can be entered using the same applications. All complication entries are sent to a database, which is queried to run reports. During the study period, all the 20,034 interventional procedures were entered in the QA database, 1,144 complications were reported, 110 (9.6%) of which were classified as major. Although majority of the complications (996) were entered at the time of dictation, 148 complications (12.9%) were entered afterwards. All major complications were referred to the IR peer review committee, and 30 of these were discussed in the morbidity and mortality meetings. We studied post-lung-biopsy pneumothorax and chest tube rates and initiated a quality improvement process based on the results.The integration of the IR QA reporting system into the workflow process and the mandatory requirements for completion has the potential to minimize the work effort required to enter complication data, and improve participation in the QA process.

  19. Post-procedural Care in Interventional Radiology: What Every Interventional Radiologist Should Know—Part I: Standard Post-procedural Instructions and Follow-Up Care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taslakian, Bedros, E-mail: Bedros.Taslakian@nyumc.org; Sridhar, Divya [NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Section (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Interventional radiology (IR) has evolved into a full-fledged clinical specialty with attendant patient care responsibilities. Success in IR now requires development of a full clinical practice, including consultations, inpatient admitting privileges, and an outpatient clinic. In addition to technical excellence and innovation, maintaining a comprehensive practice is imperative for interventional radiologists to compete successfully for patients and referral bases. A structured approach to periprocedural care, including routine follow-up and early identification and management of complications, facilitates efficient and thorough management with an emphasis on quality and patient safety.

  20. [Radiation protection in interventional radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamus, R; Loose, R; Wucherer, M; Uder, M; Galster, M

    2016-03-01

    The application of ionizing radiation in medicine seems to be a safe procedure for patients as well as for occupational exposition to personnel. The developments in interventional radiology with fluoroscopy and dose-intensive interventions require intensified radiation protection. It is recommended that all available tools should be used for this purpose. Besides the options for instruments, x‑ray protection at the intervention table must be intensively practiced with lead aprons and mounted lead glass. A special focus on eye protection to prevent cataracts is also recommended. The development of cataracts might no longer be deterministic, as confirmed by new data; therefore, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has lowered the threshold dose value for eyes from 150 mSv/year to 20 mSv/year. Measurements show that the new values can be achieved by applying all X‑ray protection measures plus lead-containing eyeglasses.

  1. Dose evaluation in medical staff during diagnostics procedures in interventional radiology; Avaliacao da dose na equipe medica durante procedimentos diagnoticos de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchim Neto, Fernando A.; Alves, Allan F.F.; Rosa, Maria E.D.; Miranda, Jose R.A. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Biociencias. Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica; Moura, Regina [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Cirurgia e Ortopedia; Pina, Diana R., E-mail: bacchim@ibb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2014-08-15

    Studies show that personal dosimeters may underestimate the dose values in interventional physicians, especially in extremities and crystalline. The objective of this work was to study the radiation exposure levels of medical staff in diagnostic interventional radiology procedures. For this purpose LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) dosimeters were placed in different regions of the physician body. When comparing with reference dose levels, the maximum numbers of annual procedures were found. This information is essential to ensure the radiological protection of those professionals. (author)

  2. Optimizing Travel Time to Outpatient Interventional Radiology Procedures in a Multi-Site Hospital System Using a Google Maps Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jacob E; Morel-Ovalle, Louis; Boas, Franz E; Ziv, Etay; Yarmohammadi, Hooman; Deipolyi, Amy; Mohabir, Heeralall R; Erinjeri, Joseph P

    2018-02-20

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether a custom Google Maps application can optimize site selection when scheduling outpatient interventional radiology (IR) procedures within a multi-site hospital system. The Google Maps for Business Application Programming Interface (API) was used to develop an internal web application that uses real-time traffic data to determine estimated travel time (ETT; minutes) and estimated travel distance (ETD; miles) from a patient's home to each a nearby IR facility in our hospital system. Hypothetical patient home addresses based on the 33 cities comprising our institution's catchment area were used to determine the optimal IR site for hypothetical patients traveling from each city based on real-time traffic conditions. For 10/33 (30%) cities, there was discordance between the optimal IR site based on ETT and the optimal IR site based on ETD at non-rush hour time or rush hour time. By choosing to travel to an IR site based on ETT rather than ETD, patients from discordant cities were predicted to save an average of 7.29 min during non-rush hour (p = 0.03), and 28.80 min during rush hour (p Google Maps application to schedule outpatients for IR procedures can effectively reduce patient travel time when more than one location providing IR procedures is available within the same hospital system.

  3. Poul Erik Andersen's radiological work on Osteochondrodysplasias and interventional radiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Erik

    2011-01-01

    Hospital. His significant experience and extensive scientific work has led to many posts in the Danish Society of Interventional Radiology, the European Society of Radiology and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe, where he is a fellow and has passed the European Board...... of Interventional Radiology - The European qualification in Interventional Radiology....

  4. Sedoanalgesia in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsenmaier, U.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Reiser, M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Development of a save and effective protocol for analgosedation of patients undergoing painful interventional procedures. Material and Methods: In a prospective trial a consecutive series of 72 adult patients underwent analgosedation during painful interventions. A radiologist performed the analgosedation, the patients received a combination of a shortly effective piperidine derivative (Alfentanil [Rapifen trademark ]; 7.5-15 μg/kg body weight) and Benzodiazepine (midazolam [Dormicum trademark ]; 20 μg/kg body weight). After pre-procedure oxygenation patients were continuously monitored. Pain and discomfort were scored using an established visual-analog pain score (0-10). A control group (n=24) had received midazolam, pentazocine or fentanyl according to the study protocol. Results: All procedures could be carried out by an interventional radiologist and a nurse and/or technologist only. In 69/72 cases adequate analgosedation could be achieved. Injection of alfentanil was titrated, with a rapid onset and short acting effect of the analgesia. Patients reported an average pain score of 2.6 vs. 4.5 in the control group. Over 55% experienced no or mild pain (score 0-3), in the control group only 8% reached this level. Conclusion: A combination of shortly effective alfentanil and midazolam allows interventional radiologists to perform major procedures alone under effective analgosedation. This medication scheme is superior to the medication upon demand. (orig.) [de

  5. Patient dose in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Bordes, M.; Berenguer, R.; Gomez, P.; Bejar, M.J.; Gonzalez, S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the estimation of dose-area product (DAP) received by 128 patients during different interventional radiological procedures in the Hospital Universitario de Salamanca, analyzing the differences between procedures classified as either vascular, non vascular, diagnostic or therapeutic. These differences can be assessed and reference dose levels can be established as a function of the variation of those parameters. Comparisons between dose-area product values obtained from this study are made with the data from nine other patient dose surveys, although explanations for some of the differences could not be obtained in some cases. The reference values in these procedures in our centre are very high due to a great number of images, so the clinical protocol should be changed to avoid this problem. (author)

  6. Radiological interventional procedures for the acute abdomen; Radiologisch-interventionelle Massnahmen beim akuten Abdomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumm, C.; Hoffmann, R.T.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    In patients with acute thrombo-embolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery, catheter-assisted thrombolytic therapy represents a procedure of increasing importance in addition to surgery and intensive care treatment. The thrombolytic drugs utilized for this purpose are urokinase, streptokinase and recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA). Therapeutic embolization is predominantly used in the treatment of arterial bleeding from the gastro-intestinal tract, the liver, the intestines (due to an aneurysm or vascular malformation) and in bleeding from intestinal anastomoses. Polyvinyl alcohol particles, embospheres, gelfoam and microcoils can be utilized as embolic agents. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage and stent implantation are applied in patients with biliary obstructions caused by inoperable tumors of the gall bladder or bile ducts, of the pancreatic head or duodenum and by metastases located in the liver parenchyma or hepatic hilum. Image-guided percutaneous drainage is a valuable option in the management of abscesses in the peritoneal cavity; less common indications are lymphoceles, biliomas, urinomas, hematomas, necrosis and pseudocysts. (orig.) [German] Die kathetergestuetzte thrombolytische Therapie stellt im Kontext einer chirurgischen und intensivmedizinischen Versorgung von Patienten mit thrombembolisch bedingter mesenterialer Ischaemie ein unterstuetzendes Behandlungsverfahren von zunehmender Bedeutung dar. Als thrombolytische Agenzien werden Urokinase, Streptokinase und der rekombinante Gewebeplasminogenaktivator (rtPA) verwendet. Die therapeutische Embolisation kommt neben der endoskopischen und chirurgischen Blutungsstillung bei arteriellen Blutungen im Gastrointestinaltrakt, aus der Leber, im Darm (als Folge eines Aneurysmas oder einer vaskulaeren Malformation) sowie bei blutenden intestinalen Anastomosen zum Einsatz. Zur Embolisation koennen Polyvinylalkoholpartikel, Embosphaeren, Gelfoam oder Mikrocoils verwendet werden. Die

  7. Radiation dose to patients from the coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty in interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Jun-Zheng; Bai, Mei; Liu, Bin

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To survey and assess radiation dose to patients from coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) in Beijing Xuanwu Hospital of Capital University of Medical Sciences. Methods: The dose-area product (DAP) values to the patient and cumulative dose (CD) were recorded from 84 coronary angiographies and 51 percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. A Monte-Carlo based program PCXMC was used to calculate the effective dose from DAP values for each patient. Organ doses were also measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) using a human-shaped phantom to compare the calculated organ dose from DAP. Results: The difference between the organ doses measured by TLDs and those from PCXMC software (P>0.05) were tolerable. The DAP value ranged from 7611∼60538 mGy·cm 2 for CA and 16423∼161973 mGy·cm 2 for PTCA. The effective dose for all procedures was determined to be in the range of 1.1∼6.9 mSv for CA and 2.3∼20.1 mSv for PTCA. CD ranged from 120.0 to 1016.0 mGy for CA and 287 to 2883 mGy for PTCA. Conversion factors between effective dose and DAP were 0.114∼0.139 mSv·Gy - 1·cm -2 for CA and 0.124∼0.142 mSv·Gy -1 ·cm -2 for PTCA; Conversion factors between organ dose and CD were derived for CA and PTCA, respectively. Conclusions: DAP and CD can be used as the dose indicator to calculate the organ dose and effective dose of patient based on Monte Carlo simulation. Using this method can provide important information of patient absorbed dose and enhance the radiation protection of patient in interventional radiology procedures. (author)

  8. Radiological Work Planning and Procedures

    CERN Document Server

    Kurtz, J E

    2000-01-01

    Each facility is tasked with maintaining personnel radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A continued effort is required to meet this goal by developing and implementing improvements to technical work documents (TWDs) and work performance. A review of selected TWDs from most facilities shows there is a need to incorporate more radiological control requirements into the TWD. The Radioactive Work Permit (RWP) provides a mechanism to place some of the requirements but does not provide all the information needed by the worker as he/she is accomplishing the steps of the TWD. Requiring the engineers, planners and procedure writers to put the radiological control requirements in the work steps would be very easy if all personnel had a strong background in radiological work planning and radiological controls. Unfortunately, many of these personnel do not have the background necessary to include these requirements without assistance by the Radiological Control organization at each facility. In add...

  9. Patient dosimetry in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Mauro Wilson O. da; Canevaro, Lucia V.; Rodrigues, Barbara Beatriz D.

    2009-01-01

    Mapping skin doses in interventional radiology is useful to determine the probability of a possible injury, to detect areas of overlapping field and to obtain a permanent register of the most exposed skin areas. A method for the evaluation of patient doses in interventional radiology procedures is the slow film, Kodak EDR2 (Extended Dose Range). Kodak EDR 2 film was calibrated in the range of 50 kVp to 120 kVp beam qualities. Its dose-response curve was plotted up to the saturation point of 1000 mGy. Dose responses are a function of facility dependent factors including processing conditions the density sampling, and exposure monitoring equipment. The distribution and the form of all the irradiation fields have been registered in the Kodak EDR 2 films. The Dosimetric analysis was performed in a sample of 37 patients submitted the procedures coronariography and angioplasty. The film has a threshold of saturation around 1 Gy, the applied methodology is efficient to quantify the doses and to identify the distribution of the fields. (author)

  10. Radiologic intervention: patient anxiety, fear of pain, understanding of the procedure and satisfaction with the medication-a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hoon

    2006-01-01

    I wanted to prospectively assess patients' anxiety, their understanding of the procedure being performed, the perception of the pain level and the satisfaction with the administered medication for interventional procedures. I investigated 78 patients before and after they underwent 93 interventional procedures. The patients responded to a series of questions by using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Two different procedures were performed on 15 patients at different times. Based on the patient's body weight, a combination of sedative and analgesic was intravenously administered. The mean anxiety VAS score for the interventional procedures was about 5.3. The mean anxiety score of the experienced patients was about 3.8 and that of the inexperienced patients was about 5.5 (ρ < .001). The mean score for the understanding of the procedure, which was recorded both before and after the procedure, was about 4.1 and 7.1, respectively. The mean scores for the understanding of the procedure were about 7.0 in the experienced patients and about 3.6 in the inexperienced patients (ρ < .001). The anticipated level of pain recorded before the procedure was about 5.2 and the level of pain during the procedure was 2.9, and the latter was recorded after the procedure (ρ < .001). The level of satisfaction with the medication provided during the procedure was about 8.0 on the VAS score. The patients had a moderate amount of anxiety about the interventional procedures. Most patients had a high level of satisfaction with the medication despite the amount of pain they experienced during the procedure. The patients who were experienced with a procedure tended to have less anxiety and anticipated pain, and they had a greater understanding of the procedure

  11. Radiologic intervention: patient anxiety, fear of pain, understanding of the procedure and satisfaction with the medication-a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hoon [Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-10-15

    I wanted to prospectively assess patients' anxiety, their understanding of the procedure being performed, the perception of the pain level and the satisfaction with the administered medication for interventional procedures. I investigated 78 patients before and after they underwent 93 interventional procedures. The patients responded to a series of questions by using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Two different procedures were performed on 15 patients at different times. Based on the patient's body weight, a combination of sedative and analgesic was intravenously administered. The mean anxiety VAS score for the interventional procedures was about 5.3. The mean anxiety score of the experienced patients was about 3.8 and that of the inexperienced patients was about 5.5 ({rho} < .001). The mean score for the understanding of the procedure, which was recorded both before and after the procedure, was about 4.1 and 7.1, respectively. The mean scores for the understanding of the procedure were about 7.0 in the experienced patients and about 3.6 in the inexperienced patients ({rho} < .001). The anticipated level of pain recorded before the procedure was about 5.2 and the level of pain during the procedure was 2.9, and the latter was recorded after the procedure ({rho} < .001). The level of satisfaction with the medication provided during the procedure was about 8.0 on the VAS score. The patients had a moderate amount of anxiety about the interventional procedures. Most patients had a high level of satisfaction with the medication despite the amount of pain they experienced during the procedure. The patients who were experienced with a procedure tended to have less anxiety and anticipated pain, and they had a greater understanding of the procedure.

  12. Interventional radiology to treat severe obstetric hemorrhages

    OpenAIRE

    Lippi, Umberto Gazi

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The author discusses the recent role of interventional radiology to prevent postpartum hemorrhagic complications that represent an important cause of maternal morbidity and mortality all over the world. Hence, hemorrhage control is mandatory. Traditional management and recent minimally invasive radiological procedures by means of inserting occluding balloons into appropriate vessels are analyzed. It is advisable that maternity hospitals have protocols for the management of obstetric ...

  13. [Brief history of interventional radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenliang; Jia, Aiqin; Li, Luoyun; Li, Chunyu

    2014-05-01

    In 1923, angiography was first successively used for the human body. In 1953, a Swedish doctor Sven-Ivar Seldinger pioneered the Seldinger technique, which laid down the foundation of interventional radiology. In 1963, Charles Dotter first proposed the idea of interventional radiology. In 1964, Charles Dotter opened a new era of percutaneous angioplasty through accidental operation, marking the formation of interventional radiology. On this basis, the techniques of balloon catheter dilation and metal stent implantation was developed. Endovascular stent was proposed in 1969. In 1973, the percutaneous angioplasty has been a breakthrough with the emergence of soft double-lumen balloon catheter. Percutaneous coronary angioplasty is applied in 1977. Since the 1990s, balloon angioplasty relegated to secondary status with the emergence of metal stent. Currently, endovascular stent have entered a new stage with the emergence of temporary stent and stent grafts and biological stent. Transcatheter arterial embolization had been one of the most important basic techniques for interventional radiology since 1965, it had also been a corresponding development with the improvement of embolic agents and catheter technology for the treatment of diseases now. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent-shunt is a comprehensive interventional radiology technology since 1967, in which the biliary system can be reached through a jugular vein, and the improvement appeared with balloon expandable stent in 1986.Since 1972, non-vascular interventional techniques was another important branch of interventional radiology. Currently, it is applied in the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases of the internal organs like the pancreas, liver, kidney, spinal cord, Fallopian tubes, esophagus and other organs. In 1973, Chinese radiologist first conducted the angiography test. Interventional radiology was introduced into China in the 1980s, it was readily developed through the sponsoring of

  14. Radiological Work Planning and Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KURTZ, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Each facility is tasked with maintaining personnel radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A continued effort is required to meet this goal by developing and implementing improvements to technical work documents (TWDs) and work performance. A review of selected TWDs from most facilities shows there is a need to incorporate more radiological control requirements into the TWD. The Radioactive Work Permit (RWP) provides a mechanism to place some of the requirements but does not provide all the information needed by the worker as he/she is accomplishing the steps of the TWD. Requiring the engineers, planners and procedure writers to put the radiological control requirements in the work steps would be very easy if all personnel had a strong background in radiological work planning and radiological controls. Unfortunately, many of these personnel do not have the background necessary to include these requirements without assistance by the Radiological Control organization at each facility. In addition, there seems to be confusion as to what should be and what should not be included in the TWD

  15. Upgrade the intervention levels derived for water and foods, to be include in the PERE 607 procedure the external radiological emergency plan in the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llado Castillo, R.; Aguilar Pacheco, R.

    1998-01-01

    The work shows the results obtained in the upgrade the intervention levels derived for water and foods, to be include in the PERE 607 procedure the external radiological emergency plan in the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant

  16. Optimization approach within an interventional radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozziconacci, J.G.; Brot, A.M.; Jarrige, V.

    2009-01-01

    The authors present an approach aimed at optimizing working conditions and radioprotection for the different actors in interventional radiology. This approach comprises a monitoring of personnel dosimetry, a workstation analysis with risk assessment, and the taking into account of patient dosimetry. For each of these aspects, the authors discuss procedures and available devices (dosemeters and other detection or dose measurement equipment)

  17. Safety of Conscious Sedation In Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arepally, Aravind; Oechsle, Denise; Kirkwood, Sharon; Savader, Scott J.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To identify rates of adverse events associated with the use of conscious sedation in interventional radiology.Methods: In a 5-month period, prospective data were collected on patients undergoing conscious sedation for interventional radiology procedures (n = 594). Adverse events were categorized as respiratory, sedative, or major adverse events. Respiratory adverse events were those that required oral airway placement, ambu bag, or jaw thrust. Sedation adverse events were unresponsiveness, oxygen saturation less than 90%, use of flumazenil/naloxone, or agitation. Major adverse events were hypotension, intubation, CPR, or cardiac arrest. The frequency of adverse events for the five most common radiology procedures were determined.Results: The five most common procedures (total n = 541) were biliary tube placement/exchange (n = 182), tunneled catheter placement (n 135), diagnostic arteriography (n = 125), vascular interventions (n = 52), and other catheter insertions (n = 46). Rates for respiratory, sedation, and major adverse events were 4.7%, 4.2%, and 2.0%, respectively. The most frequent major adverse event was hypotension (2.0%). Biliary procedures had the highest rate of total adverse events (p < .05) and respiratory adverse events (p < .05).Conclusion: The frequency of adverse events is low with the use of conscious sedation during interventional procedures. The highest rates occurred during biliary interventions

  18. Radiation safety concerns during interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victor Raj, D.; Livingstone, Roshan Samuel

    2001-01-01

    Interventional radiological procedures are on the increase by virtue of the fact that these procedures replace highly invasive surgical and other procedures. Radiation dose to patients and hospital workers are of significance since these procedures tend to impart large dose to them. Moreover, long term risk from radiation absorbed by patients is of concern since the life expectancy of major fraction of patients is long after undergoing the procedure. This study intends to measure radiation dose imparted to patients as well as personnel- radiologists, technologists, nurses, etc. and estimate the risk factor involved

  19. Contrast media properties in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laerum, F.; Enge, I.

    1989-01-01

    Potential hazards of the use of contrast media (CM) in interventional radiology are analyzed by looking into each procedure regarding interactions of CM with pharmaceutical additives, with technical equipment possibly affecting CM stability, and special local or systemic demands related to the procedure. Also the impact of these factors upon the physiological mechanisms are taken into account. (H.W.). 32 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  20. [Measurement of effective energy and entrance surface dose using fluorescent glass dosimeter in interventional radiology procedures: make of half-value layer measurement instrument and IVR-phantom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Hiroji; Noto, Kimiya; Takata, Tadanori; Chabatake, Mitsuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki

    2010-05-20

    In interventional radiology (IVR) procedures, automatic brightness control (ABC) is helpful in maintaining good image quality by adjusting kV and/or mA based on the subject's thickness. However, it was difficult to measure effective energy using half-value layer (HVL). We investigated the usefulness of measuring effective energy and entrance surface dose using a fluorescent glass dosimeter in IVR procedures, and we made an HVL folder and IVR-phantom for that purpose. Effective energy measured using the HVL folder correlated well with reference ionization dosimeter (y=0.992x, r=0.963). The result indicated that the present method using an HVL folder and IVR-phantom provides accurate measurements of effective energy and entrance surface dose in IVR procedures. In conclusion, the present measurement method may be useful for quality control of IVR equipment. In addition, the development of this measurement technique may be useful for comparisons of exposure levels in different hospitals.

  1. White Paper: Curriculum in Interventional Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnken, Andreas H; Bücker, Arno; Hohl, Christian; Berlis, Ansgar

    2017-04-01

    Purpose  Scope and clinical importance of interventional radiology markedly evolved over the last decades. Consequently it was acknowledged as independent subspecialty by the "European Union of Medical Specialists" (UEMS). Based on radiological imaging techniques Interventional Radiology is an integral part of Radiology. Materials und Methods  In 2009 the German Society for Interventional Radiology and minimally-invasive therapy (DeGIR) developed a structured training in Interventional Radiology. In cooperation with the German Society of Neuroradiology (DGNR) this training was extended to also cover Interventional Neuroradiology in 2012. Tailored for this training in Interventional Radiology a structured curriculum was developed, covering the scope of this modular training. Results  The curriculum is based on the DeGIR/DGNR modular training concept in Interventional Radiology. There is also an European Curriculum and Syllabus for Interventional Radiology developed by the "Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe" (CIRSE). The presented curriculum in Interventional Radiology is designed to provide a uniform base for the training in Interventional Radiology in Germany, based on the competencies obtained during residency. Conclusion  This curriculum can be used as a basis for training in Interventional Radiology by all training sites. Key Points: · Interventional Radiology is an integral part of clinical radiology. · The German Society for Interventional Radiology and minimally-invasive therapy (DeGIR) developed a curriculum in Interventional Radiology. · This curriculum is an integrative basis for the training in interventional. Citation Format · Mahnken AH, Bücker A, Hohl C et al. White Paper: Curriculum in Interventional Radiology. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 189: 309 - 311. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Training in Radiation Protection for Interventional Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vano, E.; Guibelalde, E.

    2002-07-01

    Several potential problems have been detected in the safety aspects for the practice of interventional radiology procedures: a) An important increase in the number cases and their complexity and the corresponding increase of installations and specialists involved; b) New X ray systems more sophisticated, with advanced operational possibilities, requiring special skills in the operators to obtain the expected benefits;c) New medical specialists arriving to the interventional arena to profit the benefits of the interventional techniques without previous experience in radiation protection. For that reason, education and training is one of the basic areas in any optimisation programme in radiation protection (RP). the medical field and especially interventional radiology requires actions to promote and to profit the benefit of the new emerging technologies for training (Internet, electronic books, etc). The EC has recently sponsored the MARTIR programme (Multimedia and Audio-visual Radiation Protection Training in Interventional Radiology) with the production of two videos on basic aspects of RP and quality control and one interactive CD-ROM to allow tailored individual training programmes. those educational tools are being distributed cost free in the main European languages. To go ahead with these actions, the EC has decided to promote during 2002, a forum with the main Medical European Societies involved in these interventional procedures. (Author)

  3. Training in Radiation Protection for Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.; Guibelalde, E.

    2002-01-01

    Several potential problems have been detected in the safety aspects for the practice of interventional radiology procedures: a) An important increase in the number cases and their complexity and the corresponding increase of installations and specialists involved; b) New X ray systems more sophisticated, with advanced operational possibilities, requiring special skills in the operators to obtain the expected benefits;c) New medical specialists arriving to the interventional arena to profit the benefits of the interventional techniques without previous experience in radiation protection. For that reason, education and training is one of the basic areas in any optimisation programme in radiation protection (RP). the medical field and especially interventional radiology requires actions to promote and to profit the benefit of the new emerging technologies for training (Internet, electronic books, etc). The EC has recently sponsored the MARTIR programme (Multimedia and Audio-visual Radiation Protection Training in Interventional Radiology) with the production of two videos on basic aspects of RP and quality control and one interactive CD-ROM to allow tailored individual training programmes. those educational tools are being distributed cost free in the main European languages. To go ahead with these actions, the EC has decided to promote during 2002, a forum with the main Medical European Societies involved in these interventional procedures. (Author)

  4. Interventional Radiology of Male Varicocele: Current Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iaccarino, Vittorio, E-mail: vittorio.iaccarino@unina.it; Venetucci, Pietro [University of Naples ' Federico II' , Diagnostic Imaging Department-Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, School of Medicine (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Varicocele is a fairly common condition in male individuals. Although a minor disease, it may cause infertility and testicular pain. Consequently, it has high health and social impact. Here we review the current status of interventional radiology of male varicocele. We describe the radiological anatomy of gonadal veins and the clinical aspects of male varicocele, particularly the physical examination, which includes a new clinical and ultrasound Doppler maneuver. The surgical and radiological treatment options are also described with the focus on retrograde and antegrade sclerotherapy, together with our long experience with these procedures. Last, we compare the outcomes, recurrence and persistence rates, complications, procedure time and cost-effectiveness of each method. It clearly emerges from this analysis that there is a need for randomized multicentre trials designed to compare the various surgical and percutaneous techniques, all of which are aimed at occlusion of the anterior pampiniform plexus.

  5. Interventional Radiology of Male Varicocele: Current Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iaccarino, Vittorio; Venetucci, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Varicocele is a fairly common condition in male individuals. Although a minor disease, it may cause infertility and testicular pain. Consequently, it has high health and social impact. Here we review the current status of interventional radiology of male varicocele. We describe the radiological anatomy of gonadal veins and the clinical aspects of male varicocele, particularly the physical examination, which includes a new clinical and ultrasound Doppler maneuver. The surgical and radiological treatment options are also described with the focus on retrograde and antegrade sclerotherapy, together with our long experience with these procedures. Last, we compare the outcomes, recurrence and persistence rates, complications, procedure time and cost-effectiveness of each method. It clearly emerges from this analysis that there is a need for randomized multicentre trials designed to compare the various surgical and percutaneous techniques, all of which are aimed at occlusion of the anterior pampiniform plexus.

  6. Paediatric interventional radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-29

    Jun 29, 2016 ... performed by paediatric IR physicians, although the numbers of these procedures performed can vary significantly between institutions, particularly if traditionally performed by ..... sedation, a nurse practitioner and/or physician assistant and an anaesthesiologist comfortable with the particular demands of ...

  7. Computational radiology for orthopaedic interventions

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a cohesive overview of the current technological advances in computational radiology, and their applications in orthopaedic interventions. Contributed by the leading researchers in the field, this volume covers not only basic computational radiology techniques such as statistical shape modeling, CT/MRI segmentation, augmented reality and micro-CT image processing, but also the applications of these techniques to various orthopaedic interventional tasks. Details about following important state-of-the-art development are featured: 3D preoperative planning and patient-specific instrumentation for surgical treatment of long-bone deformities, computer assisted diagnosis and planning of periacetabular osteotomy and femoroacetabular impingement, 2D-3D reconstruction-based planning of total hip arthroplasty, image fusion for  computer-assisted bone tumor surgery, intra-operative three-dimensional imaging in fracture treatment, augmented reality based orthopaedic interventions and education, medica...

  8. Training for Radiation Protection in Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartal, G.; Sapoval, M.; Ben-Shlomo, A.

    1999-01-01

    Program in radiological equipment has incorporated more powerful x-ray sources into the standard Fluoroscopy and CT systems. Expanding use of interventional procedures carries extensive use of fluoroscopy and CT which are both associated with excessive radiation exposure to the patient and personnel. During cases of Intravenous CT Angiography and direct Intraarterial CT Angiography, one may substitute a substantial number of diagnostic angiography checks. Basic training in interventional radiology hardly includes some of the fundamentals of radiation protection. Radiation Protection in Interventional Radiology must be implemented in daily practice and become an integral part of procedure planning strategy in each and every case. Interventional radiological most master all modern imaging modalities in order to choose the most effective, but least hazardous one. In addition, one must be able to use various imaging techniques (Fluoroscopy, CTA, MM and US) as a stand-alone method, as well as combine two techniques or more. Training programs for fellows: K-based simulation of procedures and radiation protection. Special attention should be taken in the training institutions and a basic training in radiation protection is advised before the trainee is involved in the practical work. Amendment of techniques for balloon and stent deployment with minimal use of fluoroscopy. Attention to the differences between radiation protection in cardiovascular and nonvascular radiology with special measures that must be taken for each one of them (i.e., peripheral angiography vs. stenting, Endo luminal Aortic Stent Graft, or nonvascular procedures such as biliary or endo urological stenting or biliary intervention). A special emphasis should be put on the training techniques of Interventional Radiologists, both beginners and experienced. Patient dose monitoring by maintaining records of fluoroscopic time is better with non-reset timer, but is optional. Lee of automated systems that

  9. Relative frequencies of interventional radiology procedures. Type of procedure, modality, dose, patient's gender and age. Final report; Erfassung der relativen Haeufigkeiten verschiedener Massnahmen in der interventionellen Radiologie. Art der Untersuchung, Modalitaet, Dosis, Geschlecht und Alter der Patienten fuer den stationaeren und ambulanten Bereich. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuser, Lothar; Bode-Schnurbus, Lucas [Bochum Univ. Klinikum (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Interventionelle Radiologie, Neuroradiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2012-02-15

    The assessment of the relative frequencies of interventional radiology procedures in Germany includes the following chapters: (1) Introduction and scope. (2) Radiological interventions: diagnostics, pain therapy, liver and kidneys, vascular re-opening and extending measures, devascularization, special neuroradiologic therapies. (3) History of AGIR (workgroup vascular diseases and interventional radiology). (4) Software development. (5) Data pool. (6) Categorization of institutes. (7) Statistics: patients data; radiation protection relevant data; CT guided intervention, MR-guided interventions; ultrasound-guided interventions; process quality; retrospective analysis (2000-2003).

  10. Anesthesia Practices for Interventional Radiology in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vari, Alessandra, E-mail: alessandra.vari@uniroma1.it [University La Sapienza, Department of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine (Italy); Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Les Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Chef de Pôle, Imagerie (France)

    2017-06-15

    PurposeThe Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) prompted an initiative to frame the current European status of anesthetic practices for interventional radiology, in consideration of the current variability of IR suite settings, staffing and anesthetic practices reported in the literature and of the growing debate on sedation administered by non-anesthesiologists, in Europe.MethodsAnonymous online survey available to all European CIRSE members to assess IR setting, demographics, peri-procedural care, anesthetic management, resources and staffing, pain management, data collection, safety, management of emergencies and personal opinions on the role CIRSE should have in promoting anesthetic care for interventional radiology.ResultsPredictable differences between countries and national regulations were confirmed, showing how significantly many “local” factors (type and size of centers, the availability of dedicated inpatient bed, availability of anesthesia staff) can affect the routine practice and the expansion of IR as a subspecialty. In addition, the perception of the need for IR to acquire more sedation-related skills is definitely stronger for those who practice with the lowest availability of anesthesia care.ConclusionSignificant country variations and regulations along with a controversial position of the anesthesia community on the issue of sedation administered by non-anesthesiologists substantially represent the biggest drawbacks for the expansion of peri-procedural anesthetic care for IR and for potential initiatives at an European level.

  11. Anesthesia Practices for Interventional Radiology in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vari, Alessandra; Gangi, Afshin

    2017-01-01

    PurposeThe Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) prompted an initiative to frame the current European status of anesthetic practices for interventional radiology, in consideration of the current variability of IR suite settings, staffing and anesthetic practices reported in the literature and of the growing debate on sedation administered by non-anesthesiologists, in Europe.MethodsAnonymous online survey available to all European CIRSE members to assess IR setting, demographics, peri-procedural care, anesthetic management, resources and staffing, pain management, data collection, safety, management of emergencies and personal opinions on the role CIRSE should have in promoting anesthetic care for interventional radiology.ResultsPredictable differences between countries and national regulations were confirmed, showing how significantly many “local” factors (type and size of centers, the availability of dedicated inpatient bed, availability of anesthesia staff) can affect the routine practice and the expansion of IR as a subspecialty. In addition, the perception of the need for IR to acquire more sedation-related skills is definitely stronger for those who practice with the lowest availability of anesthesia care.ConclusionSignificant country variations and regulations along with a controversial position of the anesthesia community on the issue of sedation administered by non-anesthesiologists substantially represent the biggest drawbacks for the expansion of peri-procedural anesthetic care for IR and for potential initiatives at an European level.

  12. Analgosedation and monitoring in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girolami, Guido; Steinbrich, Roman; Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig

    2010-01-01

    This article deals with the change of treatment in interventional radiology during the last decade adding a wider margin of safety through automated monitoring and better patient comfort through a combination of sedation and analgetics. In this regard it is very important to ensure adherence to standard procedures that are as simple as possible, to provide adequate training of staff members and to keep a succinct procedure protocol to ensure a high quality of care. Guidelines and checklists for the safe performance of this 'comfort-therapy' are given. (orig.)

  13. Protection of staff in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melkamu, M. A.

    2013-04-01

    This project focuses on the interventional radiology. The main objective of this project work was to provide a guidance and advice for occupational exposure and hospital management to optimize radiation protection safety and endorse safety culture. It provides practical information on how to minimize occupational exposure in interventional radiology. In the literature review all considerable parameters to reduce dose to the occupationally exposed are well discussed. These parameters include dose limit, risk estimation, use of dosimeter, personal dose record keeping, analysis of surveillance of occupational dose, investigation levels, and proper use of radiation protection tools and finally about scatter radiation dose rate. In addition the project discusses the ways to reduce occupational exposure in interventional radiology. The methods for dose reduction are minimizing fluoroscopic time, minimizing the number of fluoroscopic image, use of patient dose reduction technologies, use of collimation, planning interventional procedures, positioning in low scattered areas, use of protective shielding, use of appropriate fluoroscopic imaging equipment, giving training for the staff, wearing the dosimeters and know their own dose regularly, and management commitment to quality assurance and quality control system and optimization of radiation protection of safety. (author)

  14. Physical and cognitive task analysis in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.; Healey, A.; Evans, J.; Murphy, M.; Crawshaw, M.; Gould, D.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To identify, describe and detail the cognitive thought processes, decision-making, and physical actions involved in the preparation and successful performance of core interventional radiology procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Five commonly performed core interventional radiology procedures were selected for cognitive task analysis. Several examples of each procedure being performed by consultant interventional radiologists were videoed. The videos of those procedures, and the steps required for successful outcome, were analysed by a psychologist and an interventional radiologist. Once a skeleton algorithm of the procedures was defined, further refinement was achieved using individual interview techniques with consultant interventional radiologists. Additionally a critique of each iteration of the established algorithm was sought from non-participating independent consultant interventional radiologists. RESULTS: Detailed task descriptions and decision protocols were developed for five interventional radiology procedures (arterial puncture, nephrostomy, venous access, biopsy-using both ultrasound and computed tomography, and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram). Identical tasks performed within these procedures were identified and standardized within the protocols. CONCLUSIONS: Complex procedures were broken down and their constituent processes identified. This might be suitable for use as a training protocol to provide a universally acceptable safe practice at the most fundamental level. It is envisaged that data collected in this way can be used as an educational resource for trainees and could provide the basis for a training curriculum in interventional radiology. It will direct trainees towards safe practice of the highest standard. It will also provide performance objectives of a simulator model

  15. Pediatric interventional radiology: Indications, techniques, and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towbin, R.B.; Ball, W.S. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This course develops a practical approach to pediatric interventional radiology. Radiologic intervention in the pediatricage group is possible by attending to the care and special needs of the child. The authors also emphasize their approach to patient preparation, sedation and anesthesia, nursing care, monitoring of the patient during the procedure, and follow-up care. The course is divided into nonvascular and vascular sections. The discussion of nonvascular procedures focus on the chest and the GU and GI systems. Biopsy techniques and drainage of effusions and abscesses within the chest are discussed. A variety of GU procedures are presented including insertion of a nephrostomy tube and percutaneous tract dilation for placement of internal stents, percutaneous stone removal, and percutaneous surgery for pyeloplasty. The authors approach to percutaneous pyeloplasty is briefly discussed. Intervention within the GI system includes percutaenous aspiration, drainage, and biopsies. Emphasis is placed on the selection of embolic agents and catheter delivery systems, techniques, and current treatment concepts. The authors describe experience with embolization of vascular malformations, renovascular disease, uncontrollable hemorrhage, and selected neoplastic processes. Comments on the indications for and techniques of transluminal angioplasty and fibrinolytic therapy in children conclude the lecture

  16. Dosimetry with slow films in Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten, J.I.; Guibelalde, E.; Fernandez, J.M.; Canevaro, L.; Ramirez, R.; Vano, E.

    1998-01-01

    In this work it is presented a method for evaluation of patients doses in Interventional Radiology (RI). The method proposed in this work allows the simultaneous valoration of the product dose-area (PDA), the dose in the patient skin (DES) and the distribution of the irradiated fields, all of they together with their corresponding dose levels. The latter sometimes can be essential since the possible damages in skin depend not only of the doses, but also the irradiated area. The method has been resulted adequate for to evaluate doses to patients in Interventional Radiology procedures. It was possible to apply it as a routine form seeing that its not interfering significantly in the normal development of the medical intervention. The fundamental advantages of this dosimetric method in relation with the unique PDA measure or with the utilization of TLD is that it provide information about the total irradiated area, distribution and length of fields, collimation and wedge used besides that allow to determine the most irradiated zone. The visualization of the irradiated regions and the length fields utilized suggest the possibility to optimize the realization protocols of the interventional procedure in the cases in which it is considered that the doses have been very elevated. (Author)

  17. A Checklist to Improve Patient Safety in Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koetser, Inge C. J.; Vries, Eefje N. de; Delden, Otto M. van; Smorenburg, Susanne M.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Lienden, Krijn P. van

    2013-01-01

    To develop a specific RADiological Patient Safety System (RADPASS) checklist for interventional radiology and to assess the effect of this checklist on health care processes of radiological interventions. On the basis of available literature and expert opinion, a prototype checklist was developed. The checklist was adapted on the basis of observation of daily practice in a tertiary referral centre and evaluation by users. To assess the effect of RADPASS, in a series of radiological interventions, all deviations from optimal care were registered before and after implementation of the checklist. In addition, the checklist and its use were evaluated by interviewing all users. The RADPASS checklist has two parts: A (Planning and Preparation) and B (Procedure). The latter part comprises checks just before starting a procedure (B1) and checks concerning the postprocedural care immediately after completion of the procedure (B2). Two cohorts of, respectively, 94 and 101 radiological interventions were observed; the mean percentage of deviations of the optimal process per intervention decreased from 24 % before implementation to 5 % after implementation (p < 0.001). Postponements and cancellations of interventions decreased from 10 % before implementation to 0 % after implementation. Most users agreed that the checklist was user-friendly and increased patient safety awareness and efficiency. The first validated patient safety checklist for interventional radiology was developed. The use of the RADPASS checklist reduced deviations from the optimal process by three quarters and was associated with less procedure postponements.

  18. [Evaluation of patient doses in interventional radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropolo, R; Rampado, O; Isoardi, P; Gandini, G; Rabbia, C; Righi, D

    2001-01-01

    To verify the suitability of indicative quantities to evaluate the risk related to patient exposure, in abdominal and vascular interventional radiology, by the study of correlations between dosimetric quantities and other indicators. We performed in vivo measurements of entrance skin dose (ESD) and dose area product (DAP) during 48 procedures to evaluate the correlation among dosimetric quantities, and an estimation of spatial distribution of exposure and effective dose (E). To measure DAP we used a transmission ionization chamber and to evaluate ESD and its spatial distribution we used radiographic film packed in a single envelope and placed near the patient's skin. E was estimated by a calculation software using data from film digitalisation. From the data derived for measurements in 27 interventional procedures on 48 patients we obtained a DAP to E conversion factor of 0.15 mSv / Gy cm2, with an excellent correlation (r=.99). We also found a good correlation between DAP and exposure parameters such as fluoroscopy time and number of images. The greatest effective dose was evaluated for a multiple procedure in the hepatic region, with a DAP value of 425 Gy cm2. The greatest ESD was about 550 mGy. For groups of patients undergoing similar interventional procedures the correlation between ESD and DAP had conversion factors from 6 to 12 mGy Gy-1 cm-2. The evaluation of ESD and E by slow films represents a valid method for patient dosimetry in interventional radiology. The good correlation between DAP and fluoroscopy time and number of images confirm the suitability of these indicators as basic dosimetric information. All the ESD values found are lower than threshold doses for deterministic effects.

  19. Value of levels of complexity in the estimation of the risk in interventional radiology procedures; Valor de los indices de complejidad en la estimacion del riesgo en procedimientos de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Cruces, R.; Vano, E.; Hernandez Armas, J.; Carrera Magarino, F.; Rosales, F.; Galan, P.; Solar, M. M.; Perez Martinez, M.; Sanchez Casanueva, R.; Moreno Saiz, C.; Caudepon, F.; Diaz, F.; Gallego Solar, J. J.; Martin-Palanca, A.; Ruiz Munoz-Canela, J. J.; Moreno Rodriguez, F.; Gonzalez de Garay, M.; Canis, M.; Lopez Medina, A.; Moreno Sachez, T.; Pastor Vega, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    The interventional Radiology (IR) refers to guided procedures with X rays, to develop a diagnostic and/or therapeutic action both in vascular diseases as non-vascular. The progressive increase in the complexity and diversity of interventional procedures make it difficult to objectify the criteria about the dosage provided to patients who are these techniques. Control of radiation doses administered to patients to limit the risks associated with the use of x-rays is not more than one way of improving procedures. For this reason, already completed the ERRAPRI project, we have developed complexity rates to better assess the radiological risk associated with the procedures carried out in a sample of Spanish hospitals. (Author)

  20. The interventional radiology business plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Michael V; Meek, Mary E; Kaufman, John A

    2012-09-01

    Strategic planning and business planning are processes commonly employed by organizations that exist in competitive environments. Although it is difficult to prove a causal relationship between formal strategic/business planning and positive organizational performance, there is broad agreement that formal strategic and business plans are components of successful organizations. The various elements of strategic plans and business plans are not common in the vernacular of practicing physicians. As health care becomes more competitive, familiarity with these tools may grow in importance. Herein we provide an overview of formal strategic and business planning, and offer a roadmap for an interventional radiology-specific plan that may be useful for organizations confronting competitive and financial threats. Copyright © 2012 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Study of radiation exposure profiles in interventional radiology professionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacchim Neto, Fernando A.; Alves, Allan F.F.; Alvarez, Matheus; Rosa, Maria E.D.; Miranda, Jose R.A.; Freitas, Carlos C.M. de; Moura, Regina; Pina, Diana R. de

    2014-01-01

    Interventional Radiology is the radiology area that provides the highest dose values to the medical staff. Recent surveys show that personal dosimeters may underestimate the radiation dose values in interventional physicians, especially in the extremities and crystalline. The objective of this work was to study the exposure levels to radiation from medical staff in different interventional radiology procedures. Therefore, thermoluminescent dosimeters type LiF: Mg, Ti (TLD-100) were used positioned in the main interventional physician and an assistant in the following locations: some inches below the crystalline, thyroid, chest, gonads, hand and foot. By comparing the values obtained with the annual reference dose levels in workers, maximum numbers of annual procedures were found. Altogether, there were 23 procedures evaluated: 10 diagnostics, 9 angioplasties and 4 stents. The maximum number of annual procedures were estimated by discounting the percentages of attenuation of radiological protection. For procedures of the type diagnosis, angioplasty and stent for the main interventionist, the maximum number of annual procedures were 641, 445 and 113 respectively, while for the interventionists assistants were 930, 1202 and 215 respectively. As each interventionist body region is subject to different levels of exposure, detailed studies of exposure in each region provide better conclusions about what actions are necessary to ensure radiological protection professionals

  2. Deepening the reform of interventional radiology education and speeding up the development of interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Chuan; Liu Linxiang; Cheng Yongde

    2010-01-01

    For recent years, although interventional radiology in China has achieved rapid development, it is still facing some rigorous challenges, such as the lack of personnel in interventional field and the flowing-away of certain patients who are definitely suitable for interventional therapy. This paper aims to discuss the reform of interventional radiology education for the undergraduates, postgraduates and clinical practitioners in the medical colleges in order to seek effective solutions to these issues the interventional radiology has confronted with. (authors)

  3. Generic procedures for assessment and response during a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    One of the most important aspects of managing a radiological emergency is the ability to promptly and adequately determine and take actions to protect members of the public and emergency workers. Radiological accident assessment must take account of all critical information available at any time and must be an iterative and dynamic process aimed at reviewing the response as more detailed and complete information becomes available. This manual provides the tools, generic procedures and data needed for an initial response to a non-reactor radiological accident. This manual is one out of a set of IAEA publications on emergency preparedness and response, including Method for the Development of Emergency Response Preparedness for Nuclear or Radiological Accidents (IAEA-TECDOC-953), Generic Assessment Procedures for Determining Protective Actions During a Reactor Accident (IAEA-TECDOC-955) and Intervention Criteria in a Nuclear or Radiation Emergency (Safety Series No. 109)

  4. Applying 'Evidence-Based Medicine' Theory to Interventional Radiology.Part 2: A Spreadsheet for Swift Assessment of Procedural Benefit and Harm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacEneaney, Peter M.; Malone, Dermot E.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To design a spreadsheet program to analyse interventional radiology (IR) data rapidly produced in local research or reported in the literature using 'evidence-based medicine' (EBM) parameters of treatment benefit and harm. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Microsoft Excel TM was used. The spreadsheet consists of three worksheets. The first shows the 'Levels of Evidence and Grades of Recommendations' that can be assigned to therapeutic studies as defined by the Oxford Centre for EBM. The second and third worksheets facilitate the EBM assessment of therapeutic benefit and harm. Validity criteria are described. These include the assessment of the adequacy of sample size in the detection of possible procedural complications. A contingency (2 x 2) table for raw data on comparative outcomes in treated patients and controls has been incorporated. Formulae for EBM calculations are related to these numerators and denominators in the spreadsheet. The parameters calculated are benefit -- relative risk reduction, absolute risk reduction, number needed to treat (NNT). Harm -- relative risk, relative odds, number needed to harm (NNH). Ninety-five per cent confidence intervals are calculated for all these indices. The results change automatically when the data in the therapeutic outcome cells are changed. A final section allows the user to correct the NNT or NNH in their application to individual patients. RESULTS: This spreadsheet can be used on desktop and palmtop computers. The MS Excel TM version can be downloaded via the Internet from the URL ftp://radiography.com/pub/TxHarm00.xls. CONCLUSION: A spreadsheet is useful for the rapid analysis of the clinical benefit and harm from IR procedures. MacEneaney, P.M. and Malone, D.E

  5. Radiation risk evaluation and reference doses in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Vano, E.; Padovani, R.; Zoetelief, J.

    2001-01-01

    In interventional radiology, there are two potential hazards to the patient. These are somatic risks and, for certain procedures, deterministic injuries. The task of radiation protection in interventional radiology is to minimise somatic risks and avoid deterministic injuries. Radiation protection tools and protocols must be developed to achieve these two objectives. Reference doses have been proposed as a method of identifying high dose centres and equipment. The role of reference doses in interventional radiology will be discussed. There are two approaches to reference doses in interventional radiology. These are the measurement of patient entrance skin dose or skin dose rate, or image intensifier input dose rate. Alternatively, dose area product or effective dose to the patient may be monitored. These two main approaches have their advantages and disadvantages. (author)

  6. Malpractice claims in interventional radiology: frequency, characteristics and protective measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnavita, N; Fileni, A; Mirk, P; Magnavita, G; Ricci, S; Cotroneo, A R

    2013-04-01

    The use of interventional radiology procedures has considerably increased in recent years, as has the number of related medicolegal litigations. This study aimed to highlight the problems underlying malpractice claims in interventional radiology and to assess the importance of the informed consent process. The authors examined all insurance claims relating to presumed errors in interventional radiology filed by radiologists over a period of 14 years after isolating them from the insurance database of all radiologists registered with the Italian Society of Medical Radiology (SIRM) between 1 January1993 and 31 December 2006. In the period considered, 98 malpractice claims were filed against radiologists who had performed interventional radiology procedures. In 21 cases (21.4%), the event had caused the patient's death. In >80% of cases, the event occurred in a public facility. The risk of a malpractice claim for a radiologist practising interventional procedures is 47 per 1,000, which corresponds to one malpractice claim for each 231 years of activity. Interventional radiology, a discipline with a biological risk profile similar to that of surgery, exposes practitioners to a high risk of medicolegal litigation both because of problems intrinsic to the techniques used and because of the need to operate on severely ill patients with compromised clinical status. Litigation prevention largely depends on both reducing the rate of medical error and providing the patient with correct and coherent information. Adopting good radiological practices, scrupulous review of procedures and efficiency of the instruments used and audit of organisational and management processes are all factors that can help reduce the likelihood of error. Improving communication techniques while safeguarding the patient's right to autonomy also implies adopting clear and rigorous processes for obtaining the patient's informed consent to the medical procedure.

  7. Determination of radiation dose to patient by biological dosimetry in interventional radiological procedures; Estimacion de la dosis de radiacion a paciente mediante dosimetria biologica en exploraciones complejas de radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna Berna, A.; Alcaraz, M.; Armero, D.; Navarro, J. L.; Morant, J. J.; Canteras, M.

    2006-07-01

    Interventional radiology is substituting complex surgical procedures. The requirements of high quality images and long fluoroscopy exposure times gives rise to high levels of radiation doses to patients. This topic is increasingly becoming of high concern. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the micronucleus assay (MN) in lymphocytes for the determination of the dose delivered to 15 patients who underwent interventional radiological procedures. The determination of a dose to patients supposing uniform irradiation was done with a dose-effect calibration curve previously determined for 120 keV X-rays. due to the low level of MN rate compared with background we used a bayesian approach to obtain the net MN counting rate, resulting and average counting rate of 3,2{+-}2,5 MN/500 bi nucleated cell. The group of coronariography patients resulted in higher MN rate 5,1 MN/500 BC vs 2,6 for the rest of patients. Average equivalent uniform dose for the total group of patients was 6,5{+-}2,6 cGy, while for the coronariography group was 8,8 {+-} 4,6 cGy. In conclusion, interventional radiology procedures deliver significant doses to patients and the MN assay as biological dosimeter is a good too to evaluate this range to doses. (Author)

  8. Interventional radiology in pain treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastler, B.

    2007-01-01

    Disease whether it is acute, chronic, or at end stage, is all too regularly accompanied by pain. Pain is often difficult to control, in malignant disease in particular, even by using appropriate medications. Anesthesiologists and pain therapists have developed new invasive therapies including nerve block, sympatholysis, and neurolysis useful for both diagnosis and pain management. To insure the efficiency and safety of these procedures, and furthermore for elaborate techniques such as vertebroplasty, cementoplasty, and radio frequency bone ablation, imaging guidance becomes mandatory. This state-of-the-art book describes the techniques elaborated by interventional radiologists in the treatment and palliation of a variety of benign and malignant painful conditions. Each chapter written by an expert in the field concentrates on a particular aspect of pain management, with emphasis on practical issues. This book will serve as an invaluable source of information for the radiologist willing to learn about new pain therapy techniques aimed at optimizing or replacing more invasive traditional methods. (orig.)

  9. Clinical dosimetry in diagnostic and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimcheva, M.; Sergieva, S.; Jovanovska, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Diagnostic and interventional procedures involving x-rays are the most significant contributor to total population dose form man made sources of ionizing radiation. Purpose and aim: X-ray imaging generally covers a diverse range of examination types, many of which are increasing in frequency and technical complexity. Materials and methods: The European Directives 96/29 and 97/43 EURATOM stress the importance of accurate dosimetry and require calibration of all measuring equipment related to application of ionizing radiation in medicine. Results: The paper gives and overview of current system of dosimetry of ionizing radiations that is relevant for metrology and clinical applications. It also reflects recently achieved international harmonization in the field promoted by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Discussion: Objectives of clinical dose measurements in diagnostic and interventional radiology are multiple, as assessment of equipment performance, or assessment of risk emerging from use of ionizing radiation Conclusion: Therefore, from the clinical point of view, the requirements for dosimeters and procedures to assess dose to standard dosimetry phantoms and patients in clinical diverse modalities, as computed tomography are presented

  10. Patient radiation doses and reference levels in pediatric interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib Geryes, Bouchra; Lachaux, Julie; Boddaert, Nathalie; Brunelle, Francis [Hopital Universitaire Necker Enfants Malades, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Bak, Adeline; Ozanne, Augustin; Saliou, Guillaume [Hopital Bicetre, Hopitaux Universitaires Paris-Sud, Department of Neuroradiology, Le Kremlin Bicetre (France); Naggara, Olivier [Hopital Universitaire Necker Enfants Malades, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Centre Hospitalier Sainte-Anne, Universite Paris Descartes Sorbonne Paris Cite, Centre de Psychiatrie et Neurosciences, INSERM S894, DHU Neurovasculaire, Paris (France); Centre Hospitalier Sainte-Anne, Department of Neuroradiology, Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, INSERM UMR894, Paris (France)

    2017-09-15

    To describe, in a multicentric paediatric population, reference levels (RLs) for three interventional radiological procedures. From January 2012 to March 2015, children scheduled for an interventional radiological procedure in two French tertiary centres were retrospectively included and divided into four groups according to age: children younger than 2 years (A1), aged 2-7 years (A5), 8-12 years (A10) and 13-18 years (A15). Three procedures were identified: cerebral digital subtraction angiography (DSA), brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) embolization, and head and neck superficial vascular malformation (SVM) percutaneous sclerotherapy. Demographic and dosimetric data, including dose area product (DAP), were collected. 550 procedures were included. For DSA (162 procedures), the proposed RL values in DAP were 4, 18, 12 and 32 Gy.cm{sup 2} in groups A1, A5, A10 and A15, respectively. For bAVM embolization (258 procedures), values were 33, 70, 105 and 88 Gy.cm{sup 2} in groups A1, A5, A10 and A15, respectively. For SVM sclerotherapy (130 procedures), values were 350, 790, 490 and 248 mGy.cm{sup 2} in groups A1, A5, A10 and A15, respectively. Consecutive data were available to permit a proposal of reference levels for three major paediatric interventional radiology procedures. (orig.)

  11. The current status of interventional radiology in Canada: results of a survey by the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millward, S.F.; Holley, M.L. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, Dept. of Radiology, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2001-04-01

    To evaluate the current status of interventional radiology in Canada. A questionnaire was sent to 28 Canadian interventional radiologists (defined as a physician who performs any type of interventional procedure, including biopsies, but excluding interventional neuroradiology) practising in both tertiary and community hospitals in the major centres in all provinces except Prince Edward Island. Twenty-two (79%) of 28 surveys were completed and returned, providing data about 86 interventional radiologists (IRs). IRs were performing almost all of the following procedures at their institutions: inferior vena cava filter placement, venous angioplasty, dialysis fistula angioplasty, diagnostic and therapeutic pulmonary and bronchial artery procedures, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures of the lower extremity and renal arteries, percutaneous abscess and biliary drainage procedures, percutaneous nephrostomy, and fibroid embolization. A second group of procedures, performed by both IRs and non-radiologists in most institutions, included: all types of central venous catheter placements, pleural drainage, and gastrostomy tube placement. Procedures not being performed by anyone in a number of institutions included: dialysis graft thrombolysis, varicocele embolization, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts, palliative stenting of the gastrointestinal tract, fallopian tube recannalization, and liver and prostate tumour treatments. The factors most often limiting the respondents' ability to provide a comprehensive interventional service were the interventional radiology inventory budget and the availability of interventional radiology rooms; 50% of respondents indicated the number of available nurses, technologists and IRs was also an important limiting factor. IRs in Canada still play a major role in many of the most commonly performed procedures. However, limited availability of resources and personnel in many institutions may be hampering the ability of IRs to

  12. New era of the relationship between Chinese interventional radiology sub-society and journal of interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Linsun

    2009-01-01

    The past decades have witnessed interventional radiology in China to go from a very initial clinical practice to an important medical player in modern medicine. Recently, a friendly collaboration has been successfully established between the Chinese Interventional Radiology Sub-society and the Journal of Interventional Radiology. The Chinese Interventional Radiology Sub-society will take the full responsibility for the academic governance of the Journal of Interventional Radiology and the Journal of Interventional Radiology will formally become the sole interventional academic periodical of the Chinese Interventional Radiology Sub-society in China. This collaboration will surely make Chinese interventional radiology to initiate a new era,promote the further development of interventional radiology at home and enable the Journal of Interventional Radiology to step into the international medical circle. (authors)

  13. Interventional radiology virtual simulator for liver biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villard, P F; Vidal, F P; ap Cenydd, L; Holbrey, R; Pisharody, S; Johnson, S; Bulpitt, A; John, N W; Bello, F; Gould, D

    2014-03-01

    Training in Interventional Radiology currently uses the apprenticeship model, where clinical and technical skills of invasive procedures are learnt during practice in patients. This apprenticeship training method is increasingly limited by regulatory restrictions on working hours, concerns over patient risk through trainees' inexperience and the variable exposure to case mix and emergencies during training. To address this, we have developed a computer-based simulation of visceral needle puncture procedures. A real-time framework has been built that includes: segmentation, physically based modelling, haptics rendering, pseudo-ultrasound generation and the concept of a physical mannequin. It is the result of a close collaboration between different universities, involving computer scientists, clinicians, clinical engineers and occupational psychologists. The technical implementation of the framework is a robust and real-time simulation environment combining a physical platform and an immersive computerized virtual environment. The face, content and construct validation have been previously assessed, showing the reliability and effectiveness of this framework, as well as its potential for teaching visceral needle puncture. A simulator for ultrasound-guided liver biopsy has been developed. It includes functionalities and metrics extracted from cognitive task analysis. This framework can be useful during training, particularly given the known difficulties in gaining significant practice of core skills in patients.

  14. Limitations Influencing Interventional Radiology in Canada: Results of a National Survey by the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association (CIRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, Jeremy; Baerlocher, Mark Otto; Asch, Murray R.; Hayeems, Eran; Kachura, John R.; Collingwood, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the current state and limitations to interventional radiology (IR) in Canada through a large, national survey of Canadian interventional radiologists. Methods. An anonymous online survey was offered to members of the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association (CIRA). Only staff radiologists were invited to participate. Results. Seventy-five (75) responses were received from a total of 247, giving a response rate of 30%. Respondents were split approximately equally between academic centers (47%) and community practice (53%), and the majority of interventional radiologists worked in hospitals with either 200-500 (49%) or 500-1,000 (39%) beds. Procedures listed by respondents as most commonly performed in their practice included PICC line insertion (83%), angiography and stenting (65%), and percutaneous biopsy (37%). Procedures listed as not currently performed but which interventional radiologists believed would benefit their patient population included radiofrequency ablation (36%), carotid stenting (34%), and aortic stenting (21%); the majority of respondents noted that a lack of support from referring services was the main reason for not performing these procedures (56%). Impediments to increasing scope and volume of practice in Canadian IR were most commonly related to room or equipment shortage (35%), radiologist shortage (33%), and a lack of funding or administrative support (28%). Conclusion. Interventional radiology in Canada is limited by a number of factors including funding, manpower, and referral support. A concerted effort should be undertaken by individual interventional radiologists and IR organizations to increase training capacity, funding, remuneration, and public exposure to IR in order to help advance the subspecialty

  15. Protection of the unborn child in diagnostic and interventional radiological procedures; Schutz des ungeborenen Lebens bei diagnostischen und interventionellen radiologischen Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojreh, A.; Prosch, H.; Karanikas, G.; Trattnig, S. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria); Homolka, P. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Zentrum fuer medizinische Physik und biomedizinische Technik, Wien (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    The radiation exposure of an unborn child should be principally avoided, whenever it is medically reasonably possible; therefore, the identification of pregnant patients is the first and the most important step in radiation protection of the unborn child. However, in cases of emergency saving the life of the patient has a higher priority than the radiation protection of the unborn child. In this review article, we present a longitudinal section through the national and international literature and guidelines as a basis for radiological management of a (possibly) pregnant patient. We also list some radiological procedures recommended in the literature for a series of maternal indications considering the contraindications of each method during pregnancy and radiation protection of the unborn child. (orig.) [German] Die Strahlenexposition eines ungeborenen Kindes ist prinzipiell, wann immer dieses medizinisch sinnvoll moeglich ist, zu vermeiden. Daher ist die Identifizierung der schwangeren Patientinnen der erste und wichtigste Schritt zum Strahlenschutz des ungeborenen Kindes. In einer Notfallsituation hat allerdings das Leben der Patientin hoechste Prioritaet. In dieser Uebersichtsarbeit praesentieren wir einen Laengsschnitt durch die nationale und internationale Literatur und Leitlinien, die als Grundlage fuer das radiologische Management einer (moeglicherweise) schwangeren Patientin angewendet werden kann. Wir stellen auch einige in der Literatur empfohlene radiologische Verfahren fuer eine Reihe von Indikationen in der Schwangerschaft vor. Dabei werden sowohl die Kontraindikationen der jeweiligen Methode waehrend der Schwangerschaft als auch der Strahlenschutz des ungeborenen Kindes beruecksichtigt. (orig.)

  16. Toward safe actuation for robotized interventional radiology

    OpenAIRE

    Esteveny, Laure

    2014-01-01

    In the context of interventional radiology, robotic-assisted surgery limits practitioners’ exposure to radiations and brings more accuracy to perform complex interventions. However, the presence of robot in the environment is a potential danger for the patient and the medical staff in case of unexpected interactions and manipulations.In this PhD thesis, we first focus on safety problems. An intrinsically safe mechanism is proposed. The achieved prototype allows to follow both planned trajecto...

  17. Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Drugs in Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altenburg, Alexander; Haage, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    In treating peripheral arterial disease, a profound knowledge of antiplatelet and anticoagulative drug therapy is helpful to assure a positive clinical outcome and to anticipate and avoid complications. Side effects and drug interactions may have fatal consequences for the patient, so interventionalists should be aware of these risks and able to control them. Aspirin remains the first-line agent for antiplatelet monotherapy, with clopidogrel added where dual antiplatelet therapy is required. In case of suspected antiplatelet drug resistance, the dose of clopidogrel may be doubled; prasugrel or ticagrelor may be used alternatively. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (abciximab or eptifibatide) may help in cases of hypercoagulability or acute embolic complications. Desmopressin, tranexamic acid, or platelet infusions may be used to decrease antiplatelet drug effects in case of bleeding. Intraprocedurally, anticoagulant therapy treatment with unfractionated heparin (UFH) still is the means of choice, although low molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) are suitable, particularly for postinterventional treatment. Adaption of LMWH dose is often required in renal insufficiency, which is frequently found in elderly patients. Protamine sulphate is an effective antagonist for UFH; however, this effect is less for LMWH. Newer antithrombotic drugs, such as direct thrombin inhibitors or factor X inhibitors, have limited importance in periprocedural treatment, with the exception of treating patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Nevertheless, knowing pharmacologic properties of the newer drugs facilitate correct bridging of patients treated with such drugs. This article provides a comprehensive overview of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs for use before, during, and after interventional radiological procedures.

  18. Interventional spinal procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreula, Cosma E-mail: cosmaandreula@tin.it; Muto, Mario; Leonardi, Marco

    2004-05-01

    The interventional procedures for disk herniation and protrusion by percutaneous techniques are decompressive such as chemodiscolysis with chimopapain, nucleo-discectomy introduced by Onik, LASER discectomy, and recently nucleoplasty, and decompressive and direct antinflammatory such as chemiodiscolysis with an Oxygen-ozone mixture. These techniques have minimized the invasive nature of surgery and avoid or decrease complications like infection linked to surgery. Reducing intervertebral disc size by mechanical aspiration of a part of the disc or partially dissolving the herniation by drying reduces the conic pressure on the torn annulus and creates the space necessary for retropulsion whenever the circular fibres of the annulus regain a minimum capacity to contain the disc under tension. The proposed suggestion in these techniques is that a small change in volume produces large change in pressure. The success rates reported in different studies vary from 65 to 80% of excellent or good results with chemonucleolysis and aspiration. Vertebroplasty (VP) is done by percutaneous injection of acrylic cement (polymethylmetacrylate-PMMA) into the vertebrae under fluoroscopic and/or CT control to achieve an antalgic effect and stabilize the vertebral body. VP has been used for vertebral collapses caused by osteoporosis, long-term steroid treatment, aggressive symptomatic angiomas and lytic metastasis. The reported figures in literature are 80-95% of pain relief, within 7 days after procedure, commonly on the same day.

  19. Active pixel as dosimetric device for interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servoli, L.; Baldaccini, F.; Biasini, M.; Checcucci, B.; Chiocchini, S.; Cicioni, R.; Conti, E.; Di Lorenzo, R.; Dipilato, A.C.; Esposito, A.; Fanó, L.; Paolucci, M.; Passeri, D.; Pentiricci, A.

    2013-01-01

    Interventional Radiology (IR) is a subspecialty of radiology comprehensive of all minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures performed using radiological devices to obtain image guidance. The interventional procedures are potentially harmful for interventional radiologists and medical staff due to the X-ray diffusion by the patient's body. The characteristic energy range of the diffused photons spans few tens of keV. In this work we will present a proposal for a new X-ray sensing element in the energy range of interest for IR procedures. The sensing element will then be assembled in a dosimeter prototype, capable of real-time measurement, packaged in a small form-factor, with wireless communication and no external power supply to be used for individual operators dosimetry for IR procedures. For the sensor, which is the heart of the system, we considered three different Active Pixel Sensors (APS). They have shown a good capability as single X-ray photon detectors, up to several tens keV photon energy. Two dosimetric quantities have been considered, the number of detected photons and the measured energy deposition. Both observables have a linear dependence with the dose, as measured by commercial dosimeters. The uncertainties in the measurement are dominated by statistic and can be pushed at ∼5% for all the sensors under test

  20. Interventional Radiology Readiness Assessment Tool for Global Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D. Kline

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Interventional Radiology Readiness Assessment Tool for Global Health is a new tool to methodically evaluate the environment of a medical institution for interventional radiology services given the existing infrastructure. Global health provides an exciting opportunity for interventional radiology to impact health outcomes in developing countries. A systematic and thoughtful approach to integrating interventional radiology services in the health care institutions of resource poor countries is needed in order to maximize global health efforts and outcomes.

  1. Exposure of Medical Staff during Interventional Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osvay, M.; Turak, O.

    2013-01-01

    The medical staff during interventional procedures receives significant doses on their hands, or parts of their body not covered with protective shielding equipment, as they are close to X-rays field. It can be stated, that interventional radiology and cardiology have one of the highest doses among the X-ray diagnostic procedures. The radiologist use X-ray machine directly in the interventional procedures. The occupational dose is measured only by one Kodak film badge worn under the lead apron for the estimation of the effective dose in Hungary. Our lecture presents the results of dose measurements on eye lens, hands, knees using LiF thermoluminescent dosemeters on the medical staff of two Hungarian hospitals. Results suggest that wearing only one film badge (or other dosemeter system) under the lead apron does not provide proper information on the real occupational dose of medical staff.(author)

  2. The Ethics for Justification of Radiological Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, R.H.

    2008-01-01

    There has been a steady and continuing interest in ethical issues in radiation protection for a number of years. The International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) has produced a Code of Ethics which was adopted at its last General assembly. Many RP Societies have similar Codes. However, the trend now is the application of ethics to more practical day to day matters. This paper will concentrate of the application of ethics in the field of Justification in Radiation Protection in Medicine. A description of basic ethical concepts will be given, together with some discussion of the application of ethics to the proposed new recommendations from the International Commission for Radiation Protection (ICRP). The paper will conclude with a more detailed discussion of the ethical process of requesting radiological procedures, particularly in line with European Commission Regulations (Directives) and how they can and should be applied locally. To assist participants, an extensive list of references is appended here

  3. Is hair loss a reality in neuro-interventional radiology?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gavagan, L

    2012-02-01

    Reports in the literature of radiation-induced hair loss are becoming increasingly common. This work describes a retrospective dose study of patients (n = 958) undergoing diagnostic (primarily cerebral angiograms) and therapeutic (primarily cerebral embolisation) procedures in a neuro-interventional suite. A comparison of patient doses as dose area product (DAP) readings from a single-plane image intensifier system (mean DAP value of 8772 cGy cm(2)) were compared with patient doses from a flat panel biplane system (mean DAP value of 7855 cGy cm(2)). Over 80 % of patients requiring neuro-interventional procedures were found to undergo two procedures or more. An estimated 7 % of therapeutic procedures were found to reach the International Commission on Radiological Protection threshold for temporary epilation.

  4. Patterns, incidence and predictive factors for pain after interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, A.; Tam, C.L.; Thacker, D.E.; Walker, A.L.; Parkinson, A.S.; DeMello, W.; Bradley, A.J.; Tuck, J.S.; Laasch, H.-U.; Butterfield, J.S.; Ashleigh, R.J.; England, R.E.; Martin, D.F.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate prospectively the pattern, severity and predictive factors of pain after interventional radiological procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients undergoing non-arterial radiological interventional procedures were assessed using a visual-analogue scale (VAS) for pain before and at regular intervals for 24 h after their procedure. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty patients (87 men, mean age 62 years, range 18-92 years) were entered into the study. Significant increases in VAS score occurred 8 h after percutaneous biliary procedures (+47.7 mm, SD 14.9 mm; p=0.001), 6 h after central venous access and gastrostomy insertion (+23.7 mm, SD 19.5 mm; p=0.001 and +28.4 mm, SD 9.7 mm; p=0.007, respectively) and 4 h after oesophageal stenting (+27.8 mm, SD 20.2 mm, p=0.001). Non-significant increases in VAS pain score were observed after duodenal and colonic stenting (duodenal: +5.13 mm, SD 7.47 mm; p=0.055, colonic: +23.3 mm, SD 13.10 mm, p=0.250) at a mean of 5 h (range 4-6 h). Patients reported a significant reduction in pain score for nephrostomy insertion (-28.4 mm, SD 7.11 mm, p=0.001). Post-procedural analgesia was required in 99 patients (69.2%), 40 (28.0%) requiring opiates. Maximum post-procedural VAS pain score was significantly higher in patients who had no pre-procedural analgesia (p=0.003). CONCLUSION: Post-procedural pain is common and the pattern and severity of pain between procedures is variable. Pain control after interventional procedures is often inadequate, and improvements in pain management are required

  5. Patient Safety in Interventional Radiology: A CIRSE IR Checklist.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) is an invasive speciality with the potential for complications as with other invasive specialities. The World Health Organization (WHO) produced a surgical safety checklist to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with surgery. The Cardiovascular and Interventional Society of Europe (CIRSE) set up a task force to produce a checklist for IR. Use of the checklist will, we hope, reduce the incidence of complications after IR procedures. It has been modified from the WHO surgical safety checklist and the RAD PASS from Holland.

  6. Radiation exposure of patients and operators during interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krahe, T.; Ewen, K.; Lackner, K.; Koester, O.; Nicolas, V.

    1986-08-01

    Surface doses received by patients and operators were measured during 30 interventional radiological procedures (ten percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainages, ten percutaneous nephrostomies, ten percutaneous transluminal angioplasties). In addition, organ doses to the patient were determined using an Alderson-Rando phantom. These served as a basis for calculating the so-called somatic dose indices. It was found that the somatic radiation risk to the patient is relatively small despite prolonged periods of fluoroscopy. However, exposure of the hands and lenses of the operator could easily reach the limits thought acceptable while carrying out these procedures with additional angiography. (orig).

  7. Physicians' liability in interventional radiology and endovascular therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavroforou, Anna E-mail: amavroforou@hotmail.com; Giannoukas, Athanasios; Mavrophoros, Dimitrios; Michalodimitrakis, Emmanuel

    2003-06-01

    Introduction/objective: Modern practice in Radiology has rapidly changed over the last decades incorporating invasive techniques. Additionally, litigation in medical practice has arisen as an important issue. This article aims to highlight issues related to malpractice in interventional radiology and endovascular therapy in order to point out the importance of the written informed consent. Methods and material: Search of relevant literature from the Pubmed. Results: The role of radiologist has been greatly transformed over the last decades. He is not only entitled to participate in the diagnosis but also he undertakes therapeutic procedures, either alone or as a member of a team. Thus the radiologist is now more exposed to actions that maximize litigation risk. Adequate communication and a written consent form seem to be mandatory before any invasive radiological procedure. Patient should know in detail the benefits and the risks of the scheduled procedure and whether the proposed therapy is a new form of treatment or part of a randomized trial. Discussions and conclusion: Interventional radiologist or physician is exposed to high litigation risk. This certainly requires an urgent adaptation of his practice and attitude to the new reality. Written patient's informed consent remains an integral part of the communication between physicians and patients, and importantly is offering professional protection along these lines.

  8. Physicians' liability in interventional radiology and endovascular therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavroforou, Anna; Giannoukas, Athanasios; Mavrophoros, Dimitrios; Michalodimitrakis, Emmanuel

    2003-01-01

    Introduction/objective: Modern practice in Radiology has rapidly changed over the last decades incorporating invasive techniques. Additionally, litigation in medical practice has arisen as an important issue. This article aims to highlight issues related to malpractice in interventional radiology and endovascular therapy in order to point out the importance of the written informed consent. Methods and material: Search of relevant literature from the Pubmed. Results: The role of radiologist has been greatly transformed over the last decades. He is not only entitled to participate in the diagnosis but also he undertakes therapeutic procedures, either alone or as a member of a team. Thus the radiologist is now more exposed to actions that maximize litigation risk. Adequate communication and a written consent form seem to be mandatory before any invasive radiological procedure. Patient should know in detail the benefits and the risks of the scheduled procedure and whether the proposed therapy is a new form of treatment or part of a randomized trial. Discussions and conclusion: Interventional radiologist or physician is exposed to high litigation risk. This certainly requires an urgent adaptation of his practice and attitude to the new reality. Written patient's informed consent remains an integral part of the communication between physicians and patients, and importantly is offering professional protection along these lines

  9. Optimization of Patient Doses in Interventional Radiology and Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, D.; Boehm, K.

    2011-01-01

    Interventional radiology and cardiology belongs to the imaging modalities connected with significantly higher radiation exposure of patients and medical staff, compared to the exposure during other diagnostic procedures. The objective of this presentation is to promote typical technical parameters and parameters related to the radiation policy, used during the most frequent endovascular and cardiology procedures, as well as the monitoring of the exposure of patients. The presented study reports the results of collecting the data of monitoring doses received by 318 patients undergoing interventional examinations in 3 various departments of the Slovak National Institute of Cardiology and Vascular Diseases. There were 9 different endovascular and cardiology procedures reviewed. The reported patient's radiation exposures were established by using the KAP values, directly shown on the display of the X-ray equipment. From the measured KAP values the entrance surface doses were calculated. Equivalent doses have been measured on hands, legs and other parts of medical staff body, by using electronic dosimeters or thermoluminescent dosimeters. The presented results have covered a wide range of the measured fluoroscopy time values, different number of acquisitions used in various interventional procedures, various cumulated KAP values and also a wide range of the cumulated entrance surface doses. The occupational doses of the operators, followed during dose measurements on their left hands, covered the range from 0.1 μSv to 1513 μSv for one examination performed. The important contribution of the presented results to the radiation protection policy in the Slovak Republic is the mapping of the current situation of the radiation exposure of patients undergoing the chosen interventional examinations and the professional radiation exposure level of interventional operators, providing the most significant interventional procedures in the Slovak interventional hospitals. The

  10. Interventional chest procedures in pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan, Ross K

    2012-02-01

    Interventional pulmonology encompasses diagnostic and therapeutic bronchoscopic procedures, and pleural interventions. In the last 10 years older techniques have been refined and exciting new technologies have extended the reach and application of the instruments used. The main areas within pulmonary medicine for which these interventions have a role are malignant and nonmalignant airway disease, pleural effusion, pneumothorax, and artificial airways. There are no data from well-designed prospective trials to guide recommendations for interventional pulmonary procedures in pregnancy. The recommendations provided in this article are based on critical review of reported case series, opinion from recognized experts, and personal observations.

  11. Interventional chest procedures in pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan, Ross K

    2011-03-01

    Interventional pulmonology encompasses diagnostic and therapeutic bronchoscopic procedures, and pleural interventions. In the last 10 years older techniques have been refined and exciting new technologies have extended the reach and application of the instruments used. The main areas within pulmonary medicine for which these interventions have a role are malignant and nonmalignant airway disease, pleural effusion, pneumothorax, and artificial airways. There are no data from well-designed prospective trials to guide recommendations for interventional pulmonary procedures in pregnancy. The recommendations provided in this article are based on critical review of reported case series, opinion from recognized experts, and personal observations.

  12. Radiology of non-spinal pain procedures. A guide for the interventionalist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, Mubin I.; Shaikh, Azin

    2011-01-01

    Most interventionalists are not radiologists and most radiologists do not understand interventional pain procedures. Nevertheless, interventionalists order extensive diagnostic imaging in the workup prior to any intervention. Against this background, this handy, well-illustrated manual has been designed to meet the major need of interventional pain physicians to understand the radiologic imaging involved in the performance of non-spinal pain procedures. It provides information on such topics as radiologic anatomy, the radiologic manifestations of indications and contraindications to interventional procedures, and the radiologic appearance of complications that may arise from these procedures. In addition, it will be useful for the diagnostic radiologist, who may be unaware of many of the interventional pain procedures. The chosen format will ensure that the reader is quickly able to reference any given procedure. Sections are devoted to the head and neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and the upper and lower extremities. As this is a guidebook, it does not encompass every single pathologic entity that may be encountered; however, the commonly performed non-spinal pain procedures are included. This text will prove essential for any interventionalist who does not have easy access to a radiologist and vice versa. (orig.)

  13. Preliminary characterization of dose in personnel of interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godolfim, Laura Larre; Anes, Mauricio; Bacelar, Alexandre; Lykawka, Rochelle

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to X-rays of Interventional Radiology professionals (IR) impacts in the high dose rate received by these individuals, and there are reports of biological effects of this professional activity. Therefore, it is fomented greater control over the doses received by these workers. This research intends to characterize the doses received by the professionals during IR procedures. We evaluated the doses of radiologists, anesthesiologists and nursing staff of the Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, through measures with dosimeters of the OSL type, distributed in up to six regions of the body of these professionals. Until now were accompanied 33 cholangiography procedures and 29 embolization procedures. As a preliminary result, it was possible to identify a wide variation between doses of the professionals of the same function in each procedure. In overview, the dose of the professionals presented in descending order as a radiologist 1> radiologist 2 > anesthetist > nursing. (author)

  14. Active electronic personal dosemeter in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prlic, I.; Suric Mihic, M.; Vucic, Z.

    2008-01-01

    A recently developed active electronic personal dosemeter (AEPD) was utilised in order to measure the levels and the structure of occupational exposure to scattered X-ray radiation of medical staff who performed percutaneous revascularisation therapy that involves interventional radiology (IR) on the pelvis and upper leg arteries. The AEPDs, placed on the operators' and assistants' chests, that is, above the protective apron, continuously measured and recorded the received doses and, as a novelty, dose rates as a function of time, thus yielding a unique record of occupational doses and dose rates pattern at the working place. This paper presents and discusses one typical daily pattern in which seven percutaneous interventions were performed. (authors)

  15. Radiological procedures: Quality criteria and dose optimisation: French status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, Ph.; Marshall-Depommier, E.; Bourguignon, M.; Beauvais-March, H.; Valero, M.; Lacronique, J.F.; Frijal, G.

    2001-01-01

    The Council Directive 97/43/Euratom of June 30 1997 on health protection of individuals against the dangers of ionising radiation in relation to medical exposure has come into force on May, 13 th 2000. French health directorate has entrusted the 'Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants (OPRI)' together with the 'Societe Francaise de Radiologie' (SFR) to implement article 6 related to radiological procedures, in order to bring into operation the principle of optimisation. The most frequent diagnostic radiology and interventional procedures (120 protocols) have been standardised in writing. Corresponding patient dosimetry has been determined from measurements on site, calculations and literature review. The criteria for optimisation have been highlighted for each protocols. With the help of the French Society of Medical Physicists (SFPM), measurements are being collected on a large scale in France. Then, knowing more precisely the patient dosimetry of each protocol, referral criteria will be reviewed and prioritised to implement the principle of justification. The authors will present and explain the chosen methodology (methodology of the Accreditation and Evaluation in Health Agency: ANAES) for completing this two years workload program, and will demonstrate clinical examples as well. (author)

  16. Fatal mediastinal biopsy: How interventional radiology saves the day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Yaacob

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This was a case of a 35-year-old man with mediastinal mass requiring computed tomography (CT-guided biopsy for tissue diagnosis. A posterior approach with an 18-gauge biopsy needle was used to obtain tissue sample. Post biopsy, patient condition deteriorated and multiphase CT study detected active bleeding in arterial phase at the biopsy site with massive hemothorax. Subsequent angiography showed arterial bleeder arising from the apical branch of the right pulmonary artery. Selective endovascular embolization with NBCA (n-Butyl cyanoacrylate was successful. Patient survived the complication. The case highlighted a rare complication in a common radiology procedure and the value of the interventional radiology unit in avoiding a fatal outcome.

  17. Basic interventional radiology in the abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero García, R; Garcia-Hidalgo Alonso, M I

    2016-05-01

    This article describes the different basic nonvascular interventional techniques in the abdomen that all general radiologists should be familiar with. It explains the indications and approaches for the different procedures (punctures, biopsies, drainage of collections, cholecystostomies, and nephrostomies). It also discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques that can be used to guide these procedures (ultrasound, CT, and fluoroscopy) as well as the possible complications that can develop from each procedure. Finally, it shows the importance of following up patients clinically and of taking care of catheters. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Vascular Closure Devices in Interventional Radiology Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Rafiuddin; Muller-Hulsbeck, Stefan; Morgan, Robert; Uberoi, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Manual compression (MC) is a well-established technique for haemostasis following percutaneous arterial intervention. However, MC is labour and time intensive with potential limitations, particularly for patients who are coagulopathic, unable to comply with bed rest or obese and when large sheaths or anti-coagulants are used. There are a variety of vascular closure devices (VCDs) available to overcome these limitations. This review gives an overview of current VCDs, their mechanism of action, individual strengths and weaknesses, evidence base and utility in interventional radiology (IR) practice. The majority of the published evidence on VCDs is derived from patients undergoing cardiac interventions, which should be borne in mind when considering the applicability and transfer of this data for general IR practice. Overall, the evidence suggests that most VCDs are effective in achieving haemostasis with a similar rate of complications to MC although the complication profile associated with VCDs is distinct to that of MC. There is insufficient evidence to comparatively analyse the different types of VCDs currently available or reliably judge their cost-effectiveness. The interventional radiologist should have a thorough understanding of the available techniques for haemostasis and be able to identify and utilise the most appropriate strategy and closure technique for the individual patient

  19. Current Trends in Heparin Use During Arterial Vascular Interventional Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durran, Alexandra C., E-mail: durranjobs@hotmail.com [Peninsula Radiology Academy, Plymouth International Business Park (United Kingdom); Watts, Christopher, E-mail: Christopher.watts@salisbury.nhs.uk [Salisbury District Hospital (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess the current use of heparinized saline and bolus doses of heparin in non-neurological interventional radiology and to determine whether consensus could be reached to produce guidance for heparin use during arterial vascular intervention. Methods: An interactive electronic questionnaire was distributed to members of the British Society of Interventional Radiology regarding their current practice in the use, dosage, and timing of heparin boluses and heparinized flushing solutions.ResultsA total of 108 completed questionnaires were received. More than 80% of respondents used heparinized saline with varying concentrations; the most prevalent was 1,000 IU/l (international units of heparin per liter) and 5,000 IU/l. Fifty-one percent of interventionalists use 3,000 IU as their standard bolus dose; however, the respondents were split regarding the timing of bolus dose with {approx}60% administering it after arterial access is obtained and 40% after crossing the lesion. There was no consensus on altering dose according to body weight, and only 4% monitored clotting parameters. Conclusions: There seems to be some coherence among practicing interventionalists regarding heparin administration. We hypothesize that heparinized saline should be used at a recognized standard concentration of 1,000 IU/l as a flushing concentration in all arterial vascular interventions and that 3,000 IU bolus is considered the standard dose for straightforward therapeutic procedures and 5000 IU for complex, crural, and endovascular aneurysm repair work. The bolus should be given after arterial access is obtained to allow time for optimal anticoagulation to be achieved by the time of active intervention and stenting. Further research into clotting abnormalities following such interventional procedures would be an interesting quantifiable follow-up to this initial survey of opinions and practice.

  20. Reconciling quality and cost: A case study in interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Li; Mahnken, Andreas [University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Philipps University of Marburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Baldinger Strasse, Marburg (Germany); Domroese, Sascha [University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Philipps University of Marburg, Division of Controlling, Baldinger Strasse, Marburg (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    To provide a method to calculate delay cost and examine the relationship between quality and total cost. The total cost including capacity, supply and delay cost for running an interventional radiology suite was calculated. The capacity cost, consisting of labour, lease and overhead costs, was derived based on expenses per unit time. The supply cost was calculated according to actual procedural material use. The delay cost and marginal delay cost derived from queueing models was calculated based on waiting times of inpatients for their procedures. Quality improvement increased patient safety and maintained the outcome. The average daily delay costs were reduced from 1275 EUR to 294 EUR, and marginal delay costs from approximately 2000 EUR to 500 EUR, respectively. The one-time annual cost saved from the transfer of surgical to radiological procedures was approximately 130,500 EUR. The yearly delay cost saved was approximately 150,000 EUR. With increased revenue of 10,000 EUR in project phase 2, the yearly total cost saved was approximately 290,000 EUR. Optimal daily capacity of 4.2 procedures was determined. An approach for calculating delay cost toward optimal capacity allocation was presented. An overall quality improvement was achieved at reduced costs. (orig.)

  1. Reconciling quality and cost: A case study in interventional radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Domröse, Sascha; Mahnken, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    To provide a method to calculate delay cost and examine the relationship between quality and total cost. The total cost including capacity, supply and delay cost for running an interventional radiology suite was calculated. The capacity cost, consisting of labour, lease and overhead costs, was derived based on expenses per unit time. The supply cost was calculated according to actual procedural material use. The delay cost and marginal delay cost derived from queueing models was calculated based on waiting times of inpatients for their procedures. Quality improvement increased patient safety and maintained the outcome. The average daily delay costs were reduced from 1275 € to 294 €, and marginal delay costs from approximately 2000 € to 500 €, respectively. The one-time annual cost saved from the transfer of surgical to radiological procedures was approximately 130,500 €. The yearly delay cost saved was approximately 150,000 €. With increased revenue of 10,000 € in project phase 2, the yearly total cost saved was approximately 290,000 €. Optimal daily capacity of 4.2 procedures was determined. An approach for calculating delay cost toward optimal capacity allocation was presented. An overall quality improvement was achieved at reduced costs. • Improving quality in terms of safety, outcome, efficiency and timeliness reduces cost. • Mismatch of demand and capacity is detrimental to quality and cost. • Full system utilization with random demand results in long waiting periods and increased cost.

  2. Reconciling quality and cost: A case study in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Li; Mahnken, Andreas; Domroese, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    To provide a method to calculate delay cost and examine the relationship between quality and total cost. The total cost including capacity, supply and delay cost for running an interventional radiology suite was calculated. The capacity cost, consisting of labour, lease and overhead costs, was derived based on expenses per unit time. The supply cost was calculated according to actual procedural material use. The delay cost and marginal delay cost derived from queueing models was calculated based on waiting times of inpatients for their procedures. Quality improvement increased patient safety and maintained the outcome. The average daily delay costs were reduced from 1275 EUR to 294 EUR, and marginal delay costs from approximately 2000 EUR to 500 EUR, respectively. The one-time annual cost saved from the transfer of surgical to radiological procedures was approximately 130,500 EUR. The yearly delay cost saved was approximately 150,000 EUR. With increased revenue of 10,000 EUR in project phase 2, the yearly total cost saved was approximately 290,000 EUR. Optimal daily capacity of 4.2 procedures was determined. An approach for calculating delay cost toward optimal capacity allocation was presented. An overall quality improvement was achieved at reduced costs. (orig.)

  3. Radiological protection of patients in diagnostic and interventional radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    An International Conference on the Radiological Protection of Patients in Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and co-sponsored by the European Commission, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization was held in Malaga, Spain, from 26 to 30 March 2001. The Government of Spain hosted this Conference through the Ministerio de Sanidad y Consumo, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, the Junta de Andalucia, the Universidad de Malaga and the Grupo de Investigacion en Proteccion Radiologica de la Universidad de Malaga (PRUMA). The Conference was organized in co-operation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the following professional societies: International Organization of Medical Physicists (IOMP), International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA), International Society of Radiation Oncology (ISRO), International Society of Radiology (ISR), International Society of Radiographers and Radiological Technologists (ISRRT) and World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB). This publication contains contributed papers submitted to the Conference Programme Committee. The papers are in one of the two working languages of this Conference, English and Spanish. The topics covered by the Conference are as follows: Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology (radiography), Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology (fluoroscopy), Radiological protection issues in specific uses of diagnostic radiology, such as mammography and computed tomography (with special consideration of the impact of digital techniques), Radiological protection in interventional radiology, including fluoroscopy not carried out by radiologists, Radiological protection of patients in nuclear medicine, Developing and

  4. Precaution of medical risk in intervention radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunyang

    2008-01-01

    The article introduces the denomination, desire of precaution and content of medical risks of interventional radiology in brief. To strengthen the management of medical risk is an effective way to decrease malpractice and improve the safety of patients. The medical risk of interventional radiology possesses distinct characteristics, therefore the management should be strictly executed according to the principles. (authors)

  5. Occupational Radiation Protection in Interventional Radiology: A Joint Guideline of the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology Society of Europe and the Society of Interventional Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    advised to use eye protection at all times [2, 15]. Leaded eyeglasses are an alternative to ceiling-suspended shields for this purpose. Leaded eye...glasses with large lenses and protective side shields pro- vide more protection than eyeglasses without these features. They help to minimize scatter...CIRSE GUIDELINES Occupational Radiation Protection in Interventional Radiology: A Joint Guideline of the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology

  6. Radiological protection in interventional cardiology in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.; Leyton, F.A.; Farias, E.; Silva, A.M.; Vano, E.; Oyarzun, C.; Gamarra, J.; Ortiz, P.

    2001-01-01

    In September 2000, an expert mission was assigned to Chile, under the regional project named 'International BBS in Medical Practices Radiation Protection and Quality Assurance In Interventional Radiology' (ARCAL XLIX). The objective of the mission was to evaluate the level of radiation protection (RP) and safety in interventional cardiology ( IC ) installations. A team of local cardiologists, medical physicists and technologists was created for this purpose and during one week, several cardiology laboratories were evaluated and some basic quality controls (QC) were carried out. A basic pilot training course in radiation protection was imparted at the Hospital of the University of Chile in Santiago de Chile and some of the key objectives for a future national quality assurance programme were presented during the national congress of IC. In addition, a national survey on radiation protection aspects was circulated and its results evaluated. These activities enabled the local team to become familiar with the methodology of assessment of the level of protection and the organization of a programme, which was illustrated with the examples of similar European programmes. As result of these actions, several proposals were made to both the local authorities and the IAEA. The most important were: a) to initiate a basic QC programme, b) to organize a training in RP for cardiologists in order to formalize their accreditation, c) to improve personal occupational dosimetry, d) to initiate a programme of patient dosimetry, e) to optimize the technical and clinical protocols, f) to create a national registry of incidents with skin injuries. (author)

  7. Symptomatic portal vein occlusion: treated by interventional radiological techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Maoqiang; Gu Xiaofang; Guan Jun; Wang Zhongpu; Liu Fengyong; Wang Zhiqiang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the interventional radiological techniques for management of symptomatic portal vein (PV) occlusion. Methods: Nine patients with PV trunk occlusion were treated using interventional procedures. Four patients presented with abdominal pain, distention, and malabsorption; five presented with portal hypertension and repeated bleeding from esophagogastric varices. The etiologic factors were identified in all 9 patients, including post-transplantation of the liver in 2, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) associated with PV tumor thrombus in 3, post abdominal operative state in 1, and PV thrombosis in 3 cases. The portal access was established via a percutaneous transhepatic route in 4, and via a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt ( TIPS) approach in 5 patients. The interventional procedures included stent placement in 4, balloon angioplasty in 6, and catheter directed pharmacologic and mechanical thrombolysis in 7 patients. Results: The technical success was achieved in all cases. No complications related to the procedure occurred. Portal flow was reestablished in all patients after the procedures. Clinical improvement was seen in 3 patients with symptomatic PV thrombosis, characterized by progressive reduction of abdominal pain, distention, and diarrhea. Follow-up time ranged from 4 to 36 months. One patient with HCC died of multiple organs metastases at 11 months after the treatment . One patient died of intraabdominal sepsis and multiple organs failure 12 days after the procedure even though the antegrade flow was re-established in the main trunk of the PV. Patency of the PV trunk was confirmed by follow-up color Doppler ultrasound scan in the rest 7 patients, without recurrence of variceal bleeding or PV thrombus. Conclusions: Interventional minimally invasive procedures, including balloon angioplasty, stent placement, catheter directed local pharmacologic and mechanical thrombolysis, are safe and effective in

  8. Interventional radiology in congenital and acquired cardiovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanitskij, A.V.

    2000-01-01

    Interventional cardiology is a part of interventional radiology applying in urology, neurology, gynecology and other branches of medicine. The present-day achievements in interventional radiology in cardiovascular diseases: balloon valvuloplasty in cardiac diseases (isolated pulmonary arterial stenosis, aortic and mitral stenosis), balloon vasodilatation (peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, aortic coarctation), embolization of the vessels and pathological communications, atrioseptostomy, transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects are presented. It is shown that the achievements in interventional radiology in cardiovascular diseases are intimately associated with the progress in cannulation of heart and angiography [ru

  9. Intravascular Ultrasound and its Use in Vascular Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepanec, A.; Vulev, I.; Vozar, M.; Balazs, T.; Madaric, J.; Holoman, M.

    2009-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound has become in invasive vascular radiology in the last decade the important part of diagnostic and also therapeutic procedures in management of vascular diseases. The basic possibilities for the use of IVUS include diagnostic procedures in vascular pathology assessment and therapeutic indications in the field of peripheral vascular interventions (PVI). Unlike other image modalities (CT, MRI, ultrasound) IVUS enables gather unique image in r eal time r ight from the vessel lumen, what helps to add important information regarding vessel wall, plate morphology, thrombi and cross-sectional vessel area. After initial use of intravascular ultrasound in coronary circulation, using IVUS is nowadays widely extended especially in aortic diseases, carotid and renal arteries and arteries of the lower extremities. This review article summarizes possibilities of intravascular ultrasound utilization in diagnostic process and therapy from peripheral vascular diseases up to thoracoabdominal aorta diseases and our experience with this new diagnostic modality. (author)

  10. Prostate embolization: A new acting field of interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisilevzky, N.; García Mónaco, R.; Peralta, O.; Rabelino, M.; Rosales Arroba, R.; Rodriguez, P.; Ocantos, J.; Martínez, P.F.; Damia, O.

    2014-01-01

    Purposes: To present the initial experience with prostatic embolization as an alternative treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) from a technical perspective to establish the contribution provided by diagnostic imaging. Materials and methods: Sixteen patients with lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia underwent prostatic embolization. All patients were evaluated with specific questionnaires to determine the severity of symptoms, impact on quality of life and erectile function, ultrasound and MRI of the pelvis, urinary flowmetry and PSA before and 30 days after the procedure. Results: Embolization was successful in all patients; in 10 cases the procedure was performed bilaterally and in six, only one side was embolized. The average time for completion of the procedure was 82 minutes and the average fluoroscopy time was 38.5 minutes. All procedures were performed on an outpatient basis with an average hospital stay of 6.4 hours. The mean contrast medium used was 175 ml. At 30 days there was a mean reduction on prostate volume of 21%. Clinical improvement was characterized by a mean 8-point improvement on IPSS, 2 points on QOL and 4 points on IIEF. The uroflowmetry improved 39% and PSA dropped 26%. No major complications that implied unscheduled hospitalization or performing additional surgical procedures were seen. Minor adverse events were verified in 9 patients. Conclusion: The initial results of prostatic embolization as an alternative treatment for BPH indicate that it is a safe and effective procedure to be consolidated as a new field of action of interventional radiology. (authors) [es

  11. Interventional procedures in the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer Torrubiano, I; Sánchez González, M

    2016-05-01

    Many thoracic conditions will require an interventional procedure for diagnosis and/or treatment. For this reason, radiologists need to know the indications and the technique for each procedure. In this article, we review the various interventional procedures that radiologists should know and the indications for each procedure. We place special emphasis on the potential differences in the diagnostic results and complications between fine-needle aspiration and biopsy. We also discuss the indications for radiofrequency ablation of lung tumors and review the concepts related to the drainage of pulmonary abscesses. We devote special attention to the management of pleural effusion, covering the indications for thoracocentesis and when to use imaging guidance, and to the protocol for pleural drainage. We also discuss the indications for percutaneous treatment of pericardial effusion and the possible complications of this treatment. Finally, we discuss the interventional management of mediastinal lesions and provide practical advice about how to approach these lesions to avoid serious complications. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Report by the work-group on radiation protection in interventional radiology. Recommendations related to the improvement of radiation protection in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This report aims at proposing recommendations for the improvement of the quality of radiation protection of workers and patients in the field of interventional radiology. These recommendations concern the training of health personnel, the application of the optimization principle to health professionals and patients, dosimetry and the definition of diagnosis reference levels. More particularly, these recommendations concern professions involved in interventional radiology, and take into account the experience of other European Union State members and recommendations made by the IAEA. The authors analyze the equipment, radiological actions, procedures and doses, practitioners, equipment used for radio-guided interventions. They discuss doses received by patients, patient monitoring and radio-induced lesions. Then, they address the role and training of the different interveners in radiation protection, the equipment maintenance issue, and personnel dosimetry and protection

  13. A model to determine payments associated with radiology procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabotuwana, Thusitha; Hall, Christopher S; Thomas, Shiby; Wald, Christoph

    2017-12-01

    Across the United States, there is a growing number of patients in Accountable Care Organizations and under risk contracts with commercial insurance. This is due to proliferation of new value-based payment models and care delivery reform efforts. In this context, the business model of radiology within a hospital or health system context is shifting from a primary profit-center to a cost-center with a goal of cost savings. Radiology departments need to increasingly understand how the transactional nature of the business relates to financial rewards. The main challenge with current reporting systems is that the information is presented only at an aggregated level, and often not broken down further, for instance, by type of exam. As such, the primary objective of this research is to provide better visibility into payments associated with individual radiology procedures in order to better calibrate expense/capital structure of the imaging enterprise to the actual revenue or value-add to the organization it belongs to. We propose a methodology that can be used to determine technical payments at a procedure level. We use a proportion based model to allocate payments to individual radiology procedures based on total charges (which also includes non-radiology related charges). Using a production dataset containing 424,250 radiology exams we calculated the overall average technical charge for Radiology to be $873.08 per procedure and the corresponding average payment to be $326.43 (range: $48.27 for XR and $2750.11 for PET/CT) resulting in an average payment percentage of 37.39% across all exams. We describe how charges associated with a procedure can be used to approximate technical payments at a more granular level with a focus on Radiology. The methodology is generalizable to approximate payment for other services as well. Understanding payments associated with each procedure can be useful during strategic practice planning. Charge-to-total charge ratio can be used to

  14. Optimization of cytogenetic procedures for radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Laurence; Voisin, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In case of accidental overexposure to ionizing radiation, the scoring of dicentrics in lymphocytes from blood is the current reference method to estimate the dose received. In the particular case of radiological emergency it will be necessary, first to sort highly exposed persons from the others, second to estimate as precisely as possible the doses received by all the exposed victims. When only few individuals are accidentally overexposed, at least 500 cells are scored to have a good estimation of the dose. But such a practice is too time consuming when many people are exposed such as in radiological emergency. To reduce the analysing time it is possible to have a dose estimation based on only 50 cells analyzed in an hour. Such rough dose estimation can be used to perform the population triage. In such case, the 95% confidence interval of the dose is 1 Gy. This strategy was tested in real accidental situation but also with emergency exercises and gave reasonable good results. However the capacity of an individual laboratory is limited to 200 samples. To increase the number of samples to be handled, international and national networks should be established. To be operational, such network must perform intercomparisons and population triage exercises. The methodology of the establishment of such network will be presented. This described strategy seems efficient for the first emergency step which is the population triage phase. Once the triage phase has been achieved it is required to estimate precisely the dose. This can be done by increasing the number of cells scored. But alternatively to the manual scoring image analysis systems can be used to automatically detect dicentrics. The system proposes to the operator some candidate dicentrics which are verified manually. The only commercially available system is proposed by METASYSTEMS (Germany) with a dicentric detection efficiency of more than fifty percent. By comparing the results obtained after the

  15. Patient Safety in Interventional Radiology: A CIRSE IR Checklist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, M. J.; Fanelli, F.; Haage, P.; Hausegger, K.; van Lienden, K. P.

    2012-01-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) is an invasive speciality with the potential for complications as with other invasive specialities. The World Health Organization (WHO) produced a surgical safety checklist to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with surgery. The Cardiovascular and

  16. Assessment of radiological properties of wastes from urban decontamination procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva, D.N.G.; Guimarães, J.R.D.; Rochedo, E.R.R.; Rochedo, P.R.R.; De Luca, C.

    2015-01-01

    One important activity associated to urban areas contaminated from accidental releases to the atmosphere of nuclear power plants is the management of radioactive wastes generated from decontamination procedures. This include the collection, conditioning, packing, transport and temporary/final disposition. The final destination is defined usually through a political decision. Thus, transport of packed radioactive wastes shall depend on decisions not just under the scope of radiological protection issues. However, the simulations performed to assess doses for the public and decontamination workers allows the estimate of radiological aspects related to the waste generated and these characteristics may be included in a multi-criteria decision tool aiming to support, under the radiological protection point of view, the decision-making process on post-emergency procedures. Important information to decision makers are the type, amount and activity concentration of wastes. This work describes the procedures to be included in the urban area model to account for the assessment of qualitative and quantitative description of wastes. The results will allow the classification of different procedures according to predefined criteria that shall then feed the multi-criteria assessment tool, currently under development, considering basic radiological protection aspects of wastes generated by the different available cleanup procedures on typical tropical urban environments. (authors)

  17. 42 CFR 413.122 - Payment for hospital outpatient radiology services and other diagnostic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of this section— (i) Radiology services include diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, nuclear medicine, CAT scan procedures, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and other imaging services; and (ii...

  18. Interventional radiology - Health at work references Nr 130

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machacek, C.; Menechal, P.; Megnigbeto, C.; Aubert, B.; Rehel, J.L.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Barret, C.; Donnarieix, D.; Gambini, D.; Guerin, C.; Marande, J.L.; Marelle, P.; Pierrat, N.

    2012-06-01

    After having noticed that interventional radiology is used in most of medical and surgical specialities, and indicated the factors influencing operator exposure, this sheet indicates the different types of personnel concerned by these practices, the hazards and risks associated with exposure to direct or scattered radiation, the way risk is assessed and exposure levels are determined (definition of controlled and surveyed areas, personnel classification, selection of a dosimetric control method), how a risk management strategy is defined and implemented (risk reduction methods, technical measures for the installation and for personnel, information and training actions, prevention measures, procedures in case of incident or dysfunction), how medical survey is performed for the personnel, in case of pregnancy, and by using a medical file and performing a post-professional follow-up, and by taking on anomalies and incidents. It also describes how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions some other risks

  19. Estimation of the effective doses for interventional employees in three common interventional diagnosis and treatment procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lin; Zhu Jianguo; Min Nan; Lu Feng; Chen Yue

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study and estimate the effective dose of interventional employees in the common cerebral vascular, cardiovascular and liver interventional diagnosis and treatment. Methods: The absorbed doses of tissue or organ of anthropomorphic phantom in these three procedures were estimated by the anthropomorphic phantom experiment. The effective doses were calculated by the tissue weight factor which was given by International Commission on Radiological Protection publication 103. Results: The effective doses to high, medium and low group were 24.0, 9.7, 6.8 μSv for cerebral vascular interventional diagnosis and treatment, and 36.3, 29.3, 17.8 μSv for cardiovascular interventional diagnosis and treatment, and 23.9, 11.3, 5.5 μ Sv for liver interventional diagnosis and treatment, respectively. Conclusions: The effective doses of high, medium and low group of interventional employees in cardiovascular interventional procedure are higher than those of cerebral vascular and liver interventional procedures. (authors)

  20. Radiation protection in interventional radiology; Strahlenschutz in der interventionellen Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamus, R.; Loose, R.; Galster, M. [Klinikum Nuernberg Nord, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Nuernberg (Germany); Wucherer, M. [Klinikum Nuernberg Nord, Institut fuer Medizinische Physik, Nuernberg (Germany); Uder, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Institut fuer Radiologie, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    The application of ionizing radiation in medicine seems to be a safe procedure for patients as well as for occupational exposition to personnel. The developments in interventional radiology with fluoroscopy and dose-intensive interventions require intensified radiation protection. It is recommended that all available tools should be used for this purpose. Besides the options for instruments, x-ray protection at the intervention table must be intensively practiced with lead aprons and mounted lead glass. A special focus on eye protection to prevent cataracts is also recommended. The development of cataracts might no longer be deterministic, as confirmed by new data; therefore, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has lowered the threshold dose value for eyes from 150 mSv/year to 20 mSv/year. Measurements show that the new values can be achieved by applying all X-ray protection measures plus lead-containing eyeglasses. (orig.) [German] Die Anwendung ionisierender Strahlung in der Medizin scheint sowohl fuer Patienten als auch fuer beruflich exponierte Personen sicher zu sein. Die interventionellen Entwicklungen der letzten Jahre mit sehr durchleuchtungs- und dosisintensiven Eingriffen erfordern allerdings eine Intensivierung des Strahlenschutzes. Es empfiehlt sich, die zur Verfuegung stehenden Moeglichkeiten auszuschoepfen. Neben den Geraeteoptionen muss der Strahlenschutz am Eingriffstisch durch Bleilamellenaufstecker und montiertes Bleiglas intensiv betrieben werden. Besonderen Fokus muss auf den Schutz der Augen zur Kataraktvermeidung gelegt werden. Da dessen Ausbildung nach neuen Erkenntnissen moeglicherweise nicht mehr deterministisch zu sehen ist, hat die Internationale Strahlenschutzkommission (IRCP) den Grenzwert von 150 auf 20 Mikrosievert (mSv)/Jahr erniedrigt. Messungen belegen, dass unter Einhaltung aller Strahlenschutzmassnahmen plus Bleiglasbrille dieser einzuhalten ist. (orig.)

  1. Interventional radiology (IVR). The history, status quo, and prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furui, Shigeru; Kohtake, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Interventional radiology (IVR) is a clinical practice that therapy and/or biopsy are performed under guidance by images obtainable by the contrast angiography, ultrasonography, CT, MRI and so on. This paper describes its history, present status and future prospect. Actual operation procedure, recent trend and progress as well are explained in the order of arterial embolization, IVR in hepatic tumors, PTA (percutaneous transluminal angiography) and MS (metallic stent indwelling), MS applied to others than artery, S-G (stent-graft), IVR in portal hypertension, development of IVR devices in Japan, and radiation exposure and its protection in IVR. Many IVR devices have been developed in Japan for as long as these 30 years, a part of which is marketed. Skin exposure in patients is unavoidable in IVR with X-ray and thereby regulations by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) are introduced for their benefit. Systems for dose estimation in patients and efforts to reduce the dose are mentioned to be important and radiologists themselves should make effort to decrease their own exposure in consideration of the dose limits defined in the law. Problems in Japan are expensiveness of IVR devices, and slow-paced approval of new devices by authority and by health insurance agent. The author recommends doctors to have expert radiologist's advice in IVR. (R.T.)

  2. Basic principles for intervention after a nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Per Hedemann Jensen

    1996-01-01

    The current status of internationally agreed principles for intervention after a nuclear accident or radiological emergency and the international development of intervention guidance since the Chernobyl accident are reviewed. The experience gained after the Chernobyl accident indicates that the international advice on intervention existing at the time of the Chernobyl accident was not fully understood by decision makers neither in Western Europe nor in the former USSR and that the guidance failed to address adequately the difficult social problems which can arise after a serious nuclear accident. The radiation protection philosophy of today distinguishes between practices and interventions. The radiological protection system of intervention includes justification of the protective action and optimization of the level of protection achieved by that action. Dose limits do not apply in intervention situations. The inputs to justification and optimization studies include factors that are related to radiological protection, whereas the final decisions on introduction of countermeasures would also depend on other factors. The basic principles for intervention as recommended by international organisations are discussed in detail and the application of the principles on a generic basis is illustrated for long-term protective actions. The concepts of intervention level, operational intervention level and action level are presented and the relation between these quantities is illustrated. The numerical guidance on intervention in a nuclear accident or radiological emergency or a chronic exposure situation given by ICRP, IAEA and in the Basic Safety Standards is presented. (author)

  3. Off label use of devices and drugs in interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zvavanjanja, R.C., E-mail: Rodrick.Zvavanjanja@rlbuht.nhs.uk [Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Odetoyinbo, T.O.; Rowlands, P.C.; Healey, A.; Abdelsalam, H.; Powell, S.; Evans, J.C.; Hughes, M.L.; Gould, D.A.; McWilliams, R.G. [Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    Aim: To establish how often off-label device and drug use occurs in interventional radiology (IR) in a UK tertiary referral hospital and consider the wider implications for the interventional radiologist. Materials and methods: Prospective data were collected during interventional procedures for 1 working week in a university hospital. Out-of-hours procedures and procedures outside the department were excluded. Operators were asked to record the drugs and devices used, the indication, and method of use. The instructions for use/summary of product characteristics were then studied for each device/drug used to assess if the use was on or off-label. Results: During the study period 52 cases were performed and data were available on 26 cases (50%). In 22 of the 26 cases (84%) there was evidence of off-label use of devices or drugs. Off-label use of drugs included treatment of venous malformations with Fibrovein{sup Copyright-Sign} (sodium tetradecyl sulphate), which is licensed for the treatment of varicose veins in the leg, and intra-arterial injection of heparin, which is licensed for intravenous and subcutaneous use. Off-label device use included placing vascular sheaths in the urinary tract, using angiographic catheters to guide wires in the urinary tract, using sheaths for thrombosuction, reshaping of the tip of most guidewires, and using angioplasty balloons to dislodge the arterial plug at fistula thrombectomy. Conclusion: Off-label device and drugs use is common in a UK tertiary hospital IR department and literature suggests this is common in the wider IR community. There are important clinical and legal implications for off-label use for patients and physicians.

  4. Interventional radiology as clinical specialty and how this affects the radiology specialty as a whole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsetis, D.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Interventional Radiologists (IRs) are medical doctors who are trained in imaging but have undergone additional specialist training in highly demanding image-guided techniques. For this reason they play an increasingly important clinical role which is expanding beyond IR/angiography suite. As IR practice is fundamentally different from diagnostic imaging, the Radiology departments should be adapted to facilitate this special task. Interventional Radiologists should be able to fulfil their task as patient’s primary doctor and exert direct clinical responsibility for the patient under their care. They should be able to clinically assess and counsel patients before a procedure, inform them about the risks of the procedure and possible alternative treatment options, obtain valid consent and follow-up them after the procedure. they should also effectively communicate with referring physicians and develop strategies to deal with complex clinical situations and difficult clinical scenarios. In this context it is imperative for IRs to participate regularly in multidisciplinary clinical meetings and multidisciplinary forums to ensure optimum care. As clinicians, IR’s must be involved with the day to day management of their patients’ care to ensure optimal outcomes for patients. This may involve shared care with a broad range of specialists, however IR’s should aim to have direct access to inpatients beds where they can admit and discharge patients as necessary, with sufficient time allocated for this activity. As the number and demand of IR day cases steadily increases, IR units should organize day case facilities staffed with nursing and clerical staff which can result in major cost savings to hospitals. In this context the Head of Radiology department should convince hospital authorities to establish outpatient clinic facilities with nursing and clerical support where referred patients can be counselled and reviewed in a quiet environment. In order to

  5. Reference levels in interventional radiology. S.F.P.M. report nr 32

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greffier, Joel; Bigand, Emeline; Etard, Cecile; Hornbeck, Amaury; Salvat, Cecile; Habib-Geryes, Bouchra; Goutain-Majorel, Cynthia; Waryn, Marie-Josephine

    2017-06-01

    Whereas interventional radiology is a medical imagery technique which displays a very large scope of application (cardiology, neurology, oncology, and so on), and as, because of the duration and complexity of some procedures, doses delivered to patients can be high and induce mainly cutaneous deterministic effects, this report aims at the elaboration of reference levels according to a EURATOM directive. It builds up a comprehensive guide which proposes reference levels in terms of scope, of total number of images, of air kerma at the reference point, and of dose-surface-product for 21 different interventional radiology acts in neuroradiology, vascular radiology and osteo-articular radiology such as arteriography embolisation, biliary drainage, vertebro-plasty, and so on. This multi-centric study is based on data gathered from 36 hospital centres. It can help teams to analyse and compare their practices, and to optimise protocols and the relationship between a minimal dose of ionizing radiations and a clinically acceptable image quality

  6. Interventional radiology in the cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, S.; Charnsangavej, C.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions of the interventional radiologist in the diagnosis and management of the cancer patient include angiography and intraarterial CT-angiography, intraarterial infusion therapy, embolization, chemoembolization, biopsy and drainage procedures, central venous catheter reposition and retrieval, and stent dilation of stenotic tubular structures in the following organ systems: (1) Kidney. Arterial embolization, therapeutic delay, enphrectomy, and medroxyprogesterone yield a response rate of 28% in patients with renal cell carcinoma and pulmonary parenchymal metastases. (2) Liver. The carcinoid syndrome secondary to hepatic metastases can be controlled by embolization in 87% of patients. Islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas with hepatic metastases is successfully managed in 75% of patients. Chemoembolization (Ivalon and cisplatin) has been effective in 60% of patients with hepatic metastases from ocular melanoma. (3) Bone. A 73% 3-year survival rate is now possible with the inraarterial infusion of cisplatin, while Adriamycin is given intravenously in patients with osteosarcoma. Limb salvage is now possible in 80% of cases. Cancers of the vulva, vagina, urethra, and penis have been successfully treated with intraarterial infusion of chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy. (5) An expansile metallic stent is available to alleviate obstructions of the vena cava, the aorta and its major branches, the tracheobronchial tree, and the common duct. These techniques are demonstrated and results discussed

  7. Determining procedures for simulation-based training in radiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayahangan, Leizl Joy; Nielsen, Kristina Rue; Albrecht-Beste, Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: New training modalities such as simulation are widely accepted in radiology; however, development of effective simulation-based training programs is challenging. They are often unstructured and based on convenience or coincidence. The study objective was to perform a nationwide needs...... assessment to identify and prioritize technical procedures that should be included in a simulation-based curriculum. METHODS: A needs assessment using the Delphi method was completed among 91 key leaders in radiology. Round 1 identified technical procedures that radiologists should learn. Round 2 explored......, and basic abdominal ultrasound. CONCLUSION: A needs assessment identified and prioritized 13 technical procedures to include in a simulation-based curriculum. The list may be used as guide for development of training programs. KEY POINTS: • Simulation-based training can supplement training on patients...

  8. How tracking radiologic procedures and dose helps: experience from Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuri, Raija; Rehani, Madan M; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to review the experience of tracking radiologic procedures and radiation dose for individual patients in terms of impact on justification and optimization. Examples were collected at the Hospital for Children and Adolescents in Helsinki, Finland, through a PACS system that covers 33 institutions in the Helsinki-Uusimaa Hospital District in which reviewing previous radiologic procedures or radiation doses helped in either avoiding the next procedure or provided insight that helped to strengthen dose optimization for CT. With the help of four case reports, our results show that availability of previous imaging studies and radiation dose figures helped to avoid additional new CT examinations by providing required information from previously performed CT examinations, indicate the need for imaging parameter optimization in one facility in view of a better situation detected in another facility, observe the need for further optimization with a specific CT unit and validate the outcome of successful optimization, and make a value judgment in a situation in which a patient has already undergone a number of CT examinations and a critical evaluation could avoid another one. Patient-specific optimization provides a more reliable and effective method than that of comparing average patient group values. Collective dose for a patient was not used in any situation in decision making. Patient-specific justification and optimization becomes possible using the tracking of radiologic procedures and radiation dose of individual patients.

  9. Diagnostic reference levels and complexity indices in interventional radiology: a national programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Cruces, R.; Perez-Martinez, M.; Pastor-Vega, J.M.; Canete, S. [University of Malaga, School of Medicine, Malaga (Spain); Vano, E.; Fernandez-Soto, J.M.; Sanchez-Casanueva, R.; Gallego-Beuter, J.J. [Complutense University, San Carlos Hospital, Medical School, Madrid (Spain); Carrera-Magarino, F.; Moreno-Rodriguez, F.; Moreno-Sanchez, T. [Juan Ramon Jimenez University Hospital, Huelva (Spain); Soler-Cantos, M.M.; Canis-Lopez, M. [Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain); Hernandez-Armas, J.; Diaz-Romero, F.J. [University Hospital of Canary Islands, Tenerife (Spain); Rosales-Espizua, F.; Lopez-Medina, A.; Gonzalez-de-Garay, M. [Basurto Hospital, Bilbao (Spain); Martin-Palanca, A. [Virgen de la Victoria University Hospital, Malaga (Spain); Gil-Agudo, A.; Zarca-Diaz, M.A.; Zapata-Jimenez, J.C. [General University Hospital, Ciudad Real (Spain); Parra-Osorio, V.; Munoz Ruiz-Canela, J.J.; Moreno-Saiz, C.; Galan-Montenegro, P. [Carlos Haya University Hospital, Malaga (Spain)

    2016-12-15

    To propose national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for interventional radiology and to evaluate the impact of the procedural complexity on patient doses. Eight interventional radiology units from Spanish hospitals were involved in this project. The participants agreed to undergo common quality control procedures for X-ray systems. Kerma area product (KAP) was collected from a sample of 1,649 procedures. A consensus document established the criteria to evaluate the complexity of seven types of procedures. DRLs were set as the 3rd quartile of KAP values. The KAP (3rd quartile) in Gy cm{sup 2} for the procedures included in the survey were: lower extremity arteriography (n = 784) 78; renal arteriography (n = 37) 107; transjugular hepatic biopsies (THB) (n = 30) 45; biliary drainage (BD) (n = 314) 30; uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) (n = 56) 214; colon endoprostheses (CE) (n = 31) 169; hepatic chemoembolization (HC) (n = 269) 303; femoropopliteal revascularization (FR) (n = 62) 119; and iliac stent (n = 66) 170. The complexity involved the increases in the following KAP factors from simple to complex procedures: THB x4; BD x13; UFE x3; CE x3; HC x5; FR x5 and IS x4. The evaluation of the procedure complexity in patient doses will allow the proper use of DRLs for the optimization of interventional radiology. (orig.)

  10. National radiology standards in X-ray diagnostic incl. interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valek, V.; Kratochvil, P.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004 the Ministry of Health care started within the frame of the program for support of quality in health care a project consisting of 4 separate tasks: creating of standards for medical irradiation in radiodiagnostics, in radiotherapy , in nuclear medicine and creating of standards for patients dose assessment in radiophysics. This document continues with description of a part of the project aimed on X-ray radiodiagnostics. The authors of the project were chosen based on their bids to the public grant issued by the Ministry of Health care. The authors used recommendations, guidelines and instructions of international professional societies and IAEA, as well as the already existing procedures and practices while considering possibilities and state of the praxis in the Czech Republic. The outcome of authors work is now an interim version of a document that will be published in the bulletin of the Ministry of Health care. The document contains a set of standards that cover the whole range o fall complimentarily performed ways of patients irradiation in X-ray diagnostics and interventional radiology . The standards are divided to several categories according to the requirement of the Ministry of Health care based on the diagnostic appliances used for diagnostic irradiation i.e. radiography , fluoroscopy, mammography, stomatology, computer tomography, angiography, interventional radiography and cardiography. (authors)

  11. The Importance of Curriculum-Based Training and Assessment in Interventional Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, Anna-Maria, E-mail: anna.belli@stgeorges.nhs.uk [St. George’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Reekers, Jim A., E-mail: j.a.reekers@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Lee, Michael, E-mail: mlee@rcsi.ie [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Radiology (Ireland)

    2013-10-30

    Physician performance and outcomes are being scrutinised by health care providers to improve patient safety and cost efficiency. Patients are best served by physicians who have undergone appropriate specialist training and assessment and perform large numbers of cases to maintain their skills. The Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe has put into place a curriculum for training in interventional radiology (IR) and a syllabus with an examination, the European Board of Interventional Radiology, providing evidence of attainment of an appropriate and satisfactory skill set for the safe practice of IR. This curriculum is appropriate for IR where there is a high volume of image-guided procedures in vascular and nonvascular organ systems with cross-use of minimally invasive techniques in patients with a variety of disease processes. Other specialties may require different, longer, and more focused training if their experience is “diluted” by the need to master a different skill set.

  12. Interventional radiology techniques for the diagnosis of lymphoma or leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, Kevin M.; Hoffer, Fredric A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, 332 North Lauderdale Street, Memphis, TN 38105-2794 (United States); Behm, Frederick G. [Department of Pathology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, 332 North Lauderdale Street, Memphis, TN 38105-2794 (United States); Gow, Kenneth W. [Department of Surgery, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, 332 North Lauderdale Street, Memphis, TN 38105-2794 (United States); Hudson, Melissa M.; Sandlund, John T. [Department of Hematology-Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, 332 North Lauderdale Street, Memphis, TN 38105-2794 (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Heading AbstractBackground. Fluid aspiration, percutaneous biopsy, and catheter drainage are standard minimally invasive methods of diagnosing lymphoma or leukemia in adults.Objective. To determine the effectiveness of interventional radiologic techniques in diagnosing specific hematologic malignancies in children.Methods. During a 4-year period, 22 patients (16 male, 6 female; median age, 13 years) underwent 25 percutaneous biopsies, 6 fluid aspirations, 3 catheter drainages, and 1 needle localization for diagnosing suspected hematologic malignancy.Results. For Hodgkin's disease, the procedures yielded 6 true-positive (TP) results, 2 true-negative (TN) results, and 2 false-negative (FN) results; for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), 14 TP results, 1 TN result, and 3 FN results; and for leukemia, 4 TP results and 3 FN results. Percutaneous biopsies yielded 16 TP results, 3 TN results, and 6 FN results. Aspirations and drainages yielded 8 TP results and 1 FN result. The one needle localization yielded a FN result. Overall sensitivity was 75%{+-}7.3%; specificity, 100%; and accuracy, 77%{+-}7.1%.Conclusion. Percutaneous biopsy of lymphoma is usually diagnostic. Drainage or aspiration of a fluid collection associated with NHL or leukemia is often diagnostic and is less invasive than biopsy. These procedures are minimally invasive and effective for diagnosing pediatric hematologic malignancies. (orig.)

  13. Interventional radiology techniques for the diagnosis of lymphoma or leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, Kevin M.; Hoffer, Fredric A.; Behm, Frederick G.; Gow, Kenneth W.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Sandlund, John T.

    2002-01-01

    Heading AbstractBackground. Fluid aspiration, percutaneous biopsy, and catheter drainage are standard minimally invasive methods of diagnosing lymphoma or leukemia in adults.Objective. To determine the effectiveness of interventional radiologic techniques in diagnosing specific hematologic malignancies in children.Methods. During a 4-year period, 22 patients (16 male, 6 female; median age, 13 years) underwent 25 percutaneous biopsies, 6 fluid aspirations, 3 catheter drainages, and 1 needle localization for diagnosing suspected hematologic malignancy.Results. For Hodgkin's disease, the procedures yielded 6 true-positive (TP) results, 2 true-negative (TN) results, and 2 false-negative (FN) results; for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), 14 TP results, 1 TN result, and 3 FN results; and for leukemia, 4 TP results and 3 FN results. Percutaneous biopsies yielded 16 TP results, 3 TN results, and 6 FN results. Aspirations and drainages yielded 8 TP results and 1 FN result. The one needle localization yielded a FN result. Overall sensitivity was 75%±7.3%; specificity, 100%; and accuracy, 77%±7.1%.Conclusion. Percutaneous biopsy of lymphoma is usually diagnostic. Drainage or aspiration of a fluid collection associated with NHL or leukemia is often diagnostic and is less invasive than biopsy. These procedures are minimally invasive and effective for diagnosing pediatric hematologic malignancies. (orig.)

  14. Performance of interventional procedures in a day-hospital system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Jae Ik; Park, Auh Whan; Cho, Hye Seon; Park, Eun Hee; Choi, Gap Suk; Lee, Seon Ju; Kim, Yong Woo; Juhn, Je Ryang

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to describe the practice and results of applying the day-hospital system in an interventional radiology clinic. From Oct. 2004 to Dec. 2005, the day-hospital system was applied to various interventional procedures with using a part of the recovery room of an angiography suite as a facility for hospital admission. The study included 91 cases in 73 patients. The source of the patient referral, the procedures, hospital courses and complications were analyzed and questionnaire surveys were conducted for the available 55 patients. Among the patients, 70% (n=64) were referred form other departments, 5% (n=5) from other hospitals, 5% (n=4) were new patients and 20% (n=18) were re-admissions. The procedures included gastrointestinal, biliary, urinary, hemodialysis related-and implantable port related interventions. 96% (n=87) of the patients were successfully discharged in a day and admission to the general ward was only 4% (n=4). Minor complications occurred after discharges in 3% (n=3). The questionnaire survey revealed that 96% (n=53) of the patients were satisfied with the service and they were not anxious after discharge. Most of common interventional procedures were safely done under the day-hospital system with the patients being highly satisfied. The day-hospital system can be a good tool for establishing admitting privileges for an interventional radiology clinic

  15. Nanotechnology and its Relationship to Interventional Radiology. Part I: Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, Sarah; Slattery, Michael M.; Lee, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology refers to the design, creation, and manipulation of structures on the nanometer scale. Interventional radiology stands to benefit greatly from advances in nanotechnology because much of the ongoing research is focused toward novel methods of imaging and delivery of therapy through minimally invasive means. Through the development of new techniques and therapies, nanotechnology has the potential to broaden the horizon of interventional radiology and ensure its continued success. This two-part review is intended to acquaint the interventionalist with the field of nanotechnology, and provide an overview of potential applications, while highlighting advances relevant to interventional radiology. Part I of the article deals with an introduction to some of the basic concepts of nanotechnology and outlines some of the potential imaging applications, concentrating mainly on advances in oncological and vascular imaging.

  16. Nanotechnology and its relationship to interventional radiology. Part I: imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Sarah

    2011-04-01

    Nanotechnology refers to the design, creation, and manipulation of structures on the nanometer scale. Interventional radiology stands to benefit greatly from advances in nanotechnology because much of the ongoing research is focused toward novel methods of imaging and delivery of therapy through minimally invasive means. Through the development of new techniques and therapies, nanotechnology has the potential to broaden the horizon of interventional radiology and ensure its continued success. This two-part review is intended to acquaint the interventionalist with the field of nanotechnology, and provide an overview of potential applications, while highlighting advances relevant to interventional radiology. Part I of the article deals with an introduction to some of the basic concepts of nanotechnology and outlines some of the potential imaging applications, concentrating mainly on advances in oncological and vascular imaging.

  17. Nanotechnology and its relationship to interventional radiology. Part I: imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Sarah

    2012-02-01

    Nanotechnology refers to the design, creation, and manipulation of structures on the nanometer scale. Interventional radiology stands to benefit greatly from advances in nanotechnology because much of the ongoing research is focused toward novel methods of imaging and delivery of therapy through minimally invasive means. Through the development of new techniques and therapies, nanotechnology has the potential to broaden the horizon of interventional radiology and ensure its continued success. This two-part review is intended to acquaint the interventionalist with the field of nanotechnology, and provide an overview of potential applications, while highlighting advances relevant to interventional radiology. Part I of the article deals with an introduction to some of the basic concepts of nanotechnology and outlines some of the potential imaging applications, concentrating mainly on advances in oncological and vascular imaging.

  18. Attention to the application of vein anaesthesia in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Zonggui; Cheng Yongde

    2006-01-01

    Interventional radiology is mostly carried out under local anesthesia with micro invasive characteristics. However, the questions of patient's pain, nerve intense, change of blood pressure and heart rate always influence the performance of operation. General anaesthesia in interventional radiology is a comparatively simple venous anaesthesia modality with a controlled dose of anesthetics injecting via periphery vein through persistent minimally injecting pump to keep the patient in dormancy under electrocardiographic monitoring. It doesn't require a tube insertion of trachea. The anaesthesia depth and time are under control. The half-life of the anaesthesia drugs is short with less side-effect. It is necessary to introduce the advanced anaesthesia into common interventional radiological therapy with attentions of promoting the development through new modalities. (authors)

  19. 100 classic papers of interventional radiology: A citation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Matthew T; Browne, Ronan Fj; MacMahon, Peter J; Lawler, Leo

    2015-04-28

    To define the 100 citation classic papers of interventional radiology. Using the database of Journal Citation Reports the 40 highest impact factor radiology journals were chosen. From these journals the 100 most cited interventional radiology papers were chosen and analysed. The top paper received 2497 citations and the 100(th) paper 200 citations. The average number of citations was 320. Dates of publication ranged from 1953 - 2005. Most papers originated in the United States (n = 67) followed by Italy (n = 20) and France (n = 10). Harvard University (n = 18) and Osped Civile (n = 11) were the most prolific institutions. Ten journals produced all of the top 100 papers with "Radiology" and "AJR" making up the majority. SN Goldberg and T Livraghi were the most prolific authors. Nearly two thirds of the papers (n = 61) were published after 1990. This analysis identifies many of the landmark interventional radiology papers and provides a fascinating insight into the changing discourse within the field. It also identifies topics, authors and institutions which have impacted greatly on the specialty.

  20. Activity-based cost analysis in catheter-based angiography and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautio, R.; Keski-Nisula, L.; Paakkala, T.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the costs of the interventional radiology unit and to identify the cost factors in the different activities of catheter-based angiographies and interventional radiology. In 1999 the number of procedures in the interventional radiological unit at Tampere University Hospital was 2968; 1601 of these were diagnostic angiographies, 526 endovascular and 841 nonvascular interventions. The costs were analysed by using Activity Based Cost (ABC) analysis. The budget of the interventional unit was approximately 1.8 million Euro. Material costs accounted for 67%, personnel costs for 17%, equipment costs for 14% and premises costs for 2% of this. The most expensive products were endografting of aortic aneurysms, with a mean price of 5291 Euro and embolizations of cerebral aneurysms (4472 Euro). Endografts formed 87.3% of the total costs in endografting and Guglielmi detachable coils accounted for 63.3% of the total costs in embolizations. The material costs formed the majority of the costs, especially in the newest and most complicated endovascular treatments. Despite the high cost of angiography equipment, its share of the costs is minor. In our experience ABC system is suitable for analysing costs in interventional radiology. (orig.)

  1. Procedures manual for the ORNL Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Cottrell, W.D.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1987-04-01

    The portion of the radiological survey program performed by ORNL is the subject of this Procedures Manual. The RASA group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at ORNL is responsible for the planning, conducting, and reporting of the results of radiological surveys at specified sites and associated vicinity properties. The results of these surveys are used by DOE in determining the need for and extent of remedial actions. Upon completion of the necessary remedial actions, the ORNL-RASA group or other OOS contractor may be called upon to verify the effectiveness of the remedial action. Information from these postremedial action surveys is included as part of the data base used by DOE in certifying a site for unrestricted use.

  2. Procedures manual for the ORNL Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Cottrell, W.D.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1987-04-01

    The portion of the radiological survey program performed by ORNL is the subject of this Procedures Manual. The RASA group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at ORNL is responsible for the planning, conducting, and reporting of the results of radiological surveys at specified sites and associated vicinity properties. The results of these surveys are used by DOE in determining the need for and extent of remedial actions. Upon completion of the necessary remedial actions, the ORNL-RASA group or other OOS contractor may be called upon to verify the effectiveness of the remedial action. Information from these postremedial action surveys is included as part of the data base used by DOE in certifying a site for unrestricted use

  3. Interventional radiological treatment in complications of pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memis, Ahmet E-mail: ahmemis@yahoo.com; Parildar, Mustafa

    2002-09-01

    Percutaneous interventional therapy plays an important role in treating complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis. With the development of cross-sectional imaging and advanced interventional techniques, percutaneous drainage has become the preferred treatment for pancreatic fluid collections such as acute collections, pseudocysts and abscesses. Abscess and pancreatic hemorrhage are the most life threatening complications of pancreatitis. Massive hemorrhage is rare but frequently lethal. As a rule, bleeding complications of pancreatitis require prompt diagnosis and an aggressive surgical approach. In unstable patients with a severely bleeding pseudoaneurysm, hemostasis can be obtained by occlusion with mechanical devices.

  4. Slovenian experience from diagnostic angiography to interventional radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavcnik Dusan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of writing this article is to document the important events and people in the first 50 years of diagnostic angiography and interventional radiology in Slovenia. During this period not only did the name of the institutions and departments change, but also its governance.

  5. Radiation Protection Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice (KAP in Interventional Radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Shabani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Due to increasing cardiac disease and its mortality rate, the frequency of cardiac imaging has grown and, as a result, interventional cardiologists potentially receive high radiation doses in cardiac examinations. This study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP level of radiation protection (RP among interventional radiology staff in Iranian health care centers across the country. Methods: We used a validated questionnaire survey consisting of 30 multiple-choice questions to perform a cross-sectional study. Participants were healthcare personnel working professionally with radiation at different levels (i.e., secretary, radiology technologists, nurse, and physician. The questionnaire was divided into three sections to assess KAP regarding RP. Results: Significant differences exist in RP KAP mean scores based on educational age (p 0.050. We found a significant difference between RP KAP mean scores and different regions (p < 0.050. Conclusions: Educational and practice age, sex, type of hospital, and geographical region affect he KAP of interventional radiology staff regarding RP. Since many of the subjective radiation harms for both medical team and patients, this can be easily controlled and prevented; a checkup for personnel of interventional radiology departments, considering samples from different parts of the country with different levels of education, continuous training, and practical courses may help map the status of KAP. The results of this study may also help authorized health physics officers design strategic plans to enhance the quality of such services in radiation departments.

  6. Diagnostic and interventional radiology in gynecologic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorvinger, B.

    1990-05-01

    The role and clinical value of the modern radiologic methods for evaluation of gynecologic tumors is not finally settled. The aims of our investigation were therefore to compare clinical examination with CT in patients with possible recurrence of cervical carcinoma; to evaluate the usefulness of CT in patients with fistulas following gynecologic tumors or their treatment; to evaluate the ability of transabdominal US and MR imaging in intrauterine staging including myometrial invasion on patients with endometrial carcinoma; to evaluate CT in the capacity of monitoring therapy response, probable recurrence or clinical remission in patients with ovarian carcinoma; and to evaluate the effect of intraarterial occlusion in facilitating surgery and in evaluating the role of the intraarterial infusion in gynecologic tumors otherwise refractory to all therapy given. CT was more accurate (91%) than clinical pelvic examination (78%) in revealing extensive disease after radiation and/ or surgical treatment. CT was also a most valuable tool in demonstrating genital fistulas following gynecologic malignancy or its treatment. Transabdominal US did not improve staging in early endometrila carcinoma while MR had potential for delineating intrauterine tumor growth (accuracy for myometrial invasion 95%). CT was most valuable in the evaluation of therapeutic response of ovarian malignancy. For possible recurrence or in clinical remission, only positive CT was of clinical significance. The potentials of transcatheter intraarterial management in order to facilitate operability are also discussed. (92 refs.)

  7. Eye dose to staff involved in interventional and procedural fluoroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, D.; Hadaya, D.; Tse, J.

    2016-03-01

    In 2011 the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) lowered the occupational eye dose limit from 150 to 20 mSv/yr [1]. While international jurisdictions are in a process of adopting these substantial changes, medical physicists at the clinical level have been advising medical colleagues on specific situations based on dose measurements. Commissioned and calibrated TLDs mounted in commercially available holders designed to simulate the measurement of Hp(3), were applied to staff involved in x-ray procedures for a one month period. During this period clinical procedure data was concurrently collected and subject to audit. The use or not of eye personal protective equipment (PPE) was noted for all staff. Audits were conducted in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory, the interventional angiography rooms and the procedural room where endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures are performed. Significant levels of occupational dose were recorded in the cardiac and interventional procedures, with maximum reading exceeding the new limit for some interventional radiologists. No significant eye doses were measured for staff performing ERCP procedures. One outcome of the studies was increased use of eye PPE for operators of interventional equipment with increased availability also to nursing staff, when standing in close proximity to the patient during procedures.

  8. Safety and effectiveness of moderate sedation for radiologic non-vascular intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae-Hoon

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively characterize the safety and effectiveness of moderate sedation/analgesia for performing radiologic non-vascular abdominal intervention. During a 3-month period, a total of 63 adult patients with a mean age of 64 years (range:27-82) underwent moderate sedation for 72 radiologic non-vascular interventional procedures. A combination of fentanyl citrate and midazolam hydrochloride, based on the patient's body weight, was intravenously administered until the patient was drowsy and tranquil. The adverse events associated with this moderate sedation were assessed. The visual analog scale format was used to measure the subjective feelings of the patient's pre-pro- cedural anxiety and intraprocedural pain. The mean total dose per kilogram of body weight of fentanyl used in PTBD was 1.148 μg. The mean total dose per kilogram of body weight of midazolam was 0.035 mg in PTBD, PTGBD, AD, PCN, DJS, GS and FRA, 0.039 mg in TDC, and 0.043 mg in BS. A temporary reduction of systolic blood pressure to less than 80 mmHg was observed during 5 procedures (6.9%), whereas a temporary elevation of systolic blood pressure above 150 mmHg was observed during 10 procedures (13.8%). A reduction of arterial oxygen saturation to less than 90% was observed during 14 procedures (19.4%). None of the patients required pharmacologic reversal agents or cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The mean anxiety score recorded before all procedures was 5.2 (distressing). The mean pain score during the procedure, which was recorded after all procedures, was 2.9 (mild). Moderate sedation allows performance of safe and effective radiologic non-vascular intervention, and it is also easy for an interventional radiologist to use. The patients should be continuously monitored to check their vital signs and arterial oxygen saturation during the procedures

  9. Safety and effectiveness of moderate sedation for radiologic non-vascular intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae-Hoon [Dankook University Hospital, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively characterize the safety and effectiveness of moderate sedation/analgesia for performing radiologic non-vascular abdominal intervention. During a 3-month period, a total of 63 adult patients with a mean age of 64 years (range:27-82) underwent moderate sedation for 72 radiologic non-vascular interventional procedures. A combination of fentanyl citrate and midazolam hydrochloride, based on the patient's body weight, was intravenously administered until the patient was drowsy and tranquil. The adverse events associated with this moderate sedation were assessed. The visual analog scale format was used to measure the subjective feelings of the patient's pre-pro- cedural anxiety and intraprocedural pain. The mean total dose per kilogram of body weight of fentanyl used in PTBD was 1.148 {mu}g. The mean total dose per kilogram of body weight of midazolam was 0.035 mg in PTBD, PTGBD, AD, PCN, DJS, GS and FRA, 0.039 mg in TDC, and 0.043 mg in BS. A temporary reduction of systolic blood pressure to less than 80 mmHg was observed during 5 procedures (6.9%), whereas a temporary elevation of systolic blood pressure above 150 mmHg was observed during 10 procedures (13.8%). A reduction of arterial oxygen saturation to less than 90% was observed during 14 procedures (19.4%). None of the patients required pharmacologic reversal agents or cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The mean anxiety score recorded before all procedures was 5.2 (distressing). The mean pain score during the procedure, which was recorded after all procedures, was 2.9 (mild). Moderate sedation allows performance of safe and effective radiologic non-vascular intervention, and it is also easy for an interventional radiologist to use. The patients should be continuously monitored to check their vital signs and arterial oxygen saturation during the procedures.

  10. Exposure of cardiologists from interventional procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Gerritjan; Velders, Xandra L.; Piek, Jan J.

    2010-01-01

    Data on the exposure of seven cardiologists and over 10 000 patients undergoing interventional procedures were collected. The data were collected in a study that was set up to evaluate differences in the exposure of seven cardiologists performing interventional procedures. The study revealed a

  11. Evaluation of Patient Radiation Dose during Cardiac Interventional Procedures: What Is the Most Effective Method?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, K.; Saito, H.; Ishibashi, T.; Zuguchi, M.; Kagaya, Y.; Takahashi, S.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac interventional radiology has lower risks than surgical procedures. This is despite the fact that radiation doses from cardiac intervention procedures are the highest of any commonly performed general X-ray examination. Maximum radiation skin doses (MSDs) should be determined to avoid radiation-associated skin injuries in patients undergoing cardiac intervention procedures. However, real-time evaluation of MSD is unavailable for many cardiac intervention procedures. This review describes methods of determining MSD during cardiac intervention procedures. Currently, in most cardiac intervention procedures, real-time measuring of MSD is not feasible. Thus, we recommend that physicians record the patient's total entrance skin dose, such as the dose at the interventional reference point when it can be monitored, in order to estimate MSD in intervention procedures

  12. Intervention radiology in postoperative recurrent goiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galkin, E.V.

    1995-01-01

    Roentgenoendovascular functional thyroidectomy was used to suppress the pathological activity of the thyroid in postoperative recurrent goiter. The method consists in vascular isolation of hyperplastic stump of the thyroid by catheterization of the left and right thyroid arteries, followed by their material occlusion. For embolization, a wide spectrum of nonlyzed synthetic, organic, and inorganic materials were used. The results of roentgenoendovascular functional thyroidectomy in 14 patients with postoperative recurrent goiter are analyzed. The advantages of roentgenoendovascular occlusion of the thyroid arteries before subtotal thyroidectomy are emphasized. A stabile clinical and hormonal remission and reduction of the thyroid in size to stage 1 were observed during three years following roentgenoendovascular intervention [ru

  13. Anesthesia Practice and Clinical Trends in Interventional Radiology: A European Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslam, Philip J.; Yap, Bernard; Mueller, Peter R.; Lee, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine current European practice in interventional radiology regarding nursing care, anesthesia, and clinical care trends.Methods: A survey was sent to 977 European interventional radiologists to assess the use of sedoanalgesia, nursing care, monitoring equipment, pre- and postprocedural care, and clinical trends in interventional radiology. Patterns of sedoanalgesia were recorded for both vascular and visceral interventional procedures. Responders rated their preferred level of sedoanalgesia for each procedure as follows: (a) awake/alert, (b) drowsy/arousable, (c) asleep/arousable, (d) deep sedation, and (e) general anesthesia. Sedoanalgesic drugs and patient care trends were also recorded. A comparison was performed with data derived from a similar survey of interventional practice in the United States.Results: Two hundred and forty-three of 977 radiologists responded (25%). The total number of procedures analyzed was 210,194. The majority (56%) of diagnostic and therapeutic vascular procedures were performed at the awake/alert level of sedation, 32% were performed at the drowsy/arousable level, and 12% at deeper levels of sedation. The majority of visceral interventional procedures were performed at the drowsy/arousable level of sedation (41%), 29% were performed at deeper levels of sedation, and 30% at the awake/alert level. In general, more sedoanalgesia is used in the United States. Eighty-three percent of respondents reported the use of a full-time radiology nurse, 67% used routine blood pressure/pulse oximetry monitoring, and 46% reported the presence of a dedicated recovery area. Forty-nine percent reported daily patient rounds, 30% had inpatient hospital beds, and 51% had day case beds.Conclusion: This survey shows clear differences in the use of sedation for vascular and visceral interventional procedures. Many, often complex, procedures are performed at the awake/alert level of sedation in Europe, whereas deeper levels of sedation are

  14. Quality control procedures of dental diagnostic radiology systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Paula Serra Sasaki

    2007-01-01

    This work presents quality control reference procedures for dental diagnostic radiology systems, following the recommendations of the Publication 453 of the Brazilian Health Ministry (PF453), to be applied in dental clinics, in order to achieve an improvement in the radiological image qualities and the patient dose reduction. All tests were applied in an intraoral X rays system, following the methodology developed and the requirements of the PF 453. In order to verify the best quality of the image in relation to the smaller exposition time an object test was also developed in this work. The use of this object allowed the reduction of the exposition time of 0.5 seconds, the maximum value of the linear region of the characteristic curve, for 0.2 seconds. The tested X rays system showed a very good agreement with the applied procedures, detaching the reduction of the skin entrance dose using the film-holding devices. However, the size of the field increased and exceeded the maximum value of 6 cm recommended in the standard. The importance of the quality control in dental diagnostic radiology systems is essential due to the constant use of X radiation in dental clinics. The PF453 recommends the frequency of at least two years for the constancy tests. However, it is suggested that the professional, surgeon-dentist, should be responsible for the internal control of the image quality obtained from the X rays device. This can be done through monthly exposures of the object test developed in this work. (author)

  15. Ballondacryocystoplasty: interventional radiological therapy of connatal dacryostenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huenerbein, R.; Grass, F.; Kuhn, F.P.; Leber, M.; Wilhelm, K.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of balloon dacryocystoplasty in the treatment of complicated development of connatal obstructed nasolacrimal duct system. Materials and Methods: Dacryocystography under general anaesthesia was performed on 46 children with epiphora from birth and recurrent infection of the nasolacrimal duct system. 54 nasolacrimal ducts (8 children bilaterally) were treated with balloon catheter dilatation and antibiotic irrigation of the nasolacrimal sac. In all cases previous conservative treatment with eye drops and superficial massage of the lacrimal sac had failed. 11 children without clinical improvement were irrigated before catheter dilatation by an ophthalmologist. The ages ranged from 6 weeks to 7.5 years (mean 23.5 months). 39 dilatations were carried out as an out-patient procedure. The clinical results were confirmed by a questionnaire filled in by the parents. Results: 15 incomplete obstructions and 39 occlusions of the Hasner valve (n=45) or of the nasolacrimal duct system (n=9) were demonstrated with dacryocystography. Dilatation with a 2.5 mm balloon was successfully performed in all cases and the mean radiation time was 2.1 minutes. No relevant complications occurred. The mean follow up time was 18.4 months (3-41 months). 39 of 46 children showed no symptoms, 6 children seldomly experienced onset of epiphora. The symptoms did not improve in only one child. The cumulative clinical success rate is 98%. (orig.)

  16. The Provision of Interventional Radiology Services in Europe: CIRSE Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsetis, Dimitrios; Uberoi, Raman; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Roberston, Iain; Krokidis, Miltiadis; Delden, Otto van; Radeleff, Boris; Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Szerbo-Trojanowska, Malgorzata; Lee, Michael; Morgan, Robert; Brountzos, Elias; Belli, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Interventional Radiology (IR) is an essential part of modern medicine, delivering minimally invasive patient-focused care, which has been proven to be safe and effective in both elective and emergency settings. The aim of this document is to outline the core requirements and standards for the provision of Interventional Radiological services, including training, certification, manpower, and accreditation. The ultimate challenge will be the adoption of these recommendations by different countries and health economies around the world, in turn ensuring equal access to IR treatments for all patients, the appropriate distribution of resources for IR service provision as well as the continued development of safe and high-quality IR services in Europe and beyond.

  17. Radiation Protection Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice (KAP) in Interventional Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Fatemeh; Hasanzadeh, Hadi; Emadi, Alireza; Mirmohammadkhani, Majid; Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad; Abedelahi, Ali; Bokharaeian, Mitra; Masoumi, Hamed; Seifi, Danial; Khani, Tahereh; Sanchooli, Mohamad; Moshfegh, Shima; Ziari, Abbas

    2018-03-01

    Due to increasing cardiac disease and its mortality rate, the frequency of cardiac imaging has grown and, as a result, interventional cardiologists potentially receive high radiation doses in cardiac examinations. This study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) level of radiation protection (RP) among interventional radiology staff in Iranian health care centers across the country. We used a validated questionnaire survey consisting of 30 multiple-choice questions to perform a cross-sectional study. Participants were healthcare personnel working professionally with radiation at different levels (i.e., secretary, radiology technologists, nurse, and physician). The questionnaire was divided into three sections to assess KAP regarding RP. Significant differences exist in RP KAP mean scores based on educational age (p 0.050). We found a significant difference between RP KAP mean scores and different regions (p physics officers design strategic plans to enhance the quality of such services in radiation departments.

  18. The Provision of Interventional Radiology Services in Europe: CIRSE Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsetis, Dimitrios, E-mail: tsetis@med.uoc.gr [University of Crete, Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiology, University Hospital Heraklion, Faculty of Medicine (Greece); Uberoi, Raman, E-mail: raman.uberoi@orh.nhs.uk [John Radcliff Hospital, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Fanelli, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.fanelli@uniroma1.it [Sapienza – University of Rome, Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiological Sciences (Italy); Roberston, Iain, E-mail: bsiriain@gmail.com [Gartnavel General Hospital, Interventional Radiology Unit (United Kingdom); Krokidis, Miltiadis, E-mail: mkrokidis@hotmail.com [Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Delden, Otto van, E-mail: o.m.vandelden@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Radeleff, Boris, E-mail: boris.radeleff@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan, E-mail: muehue@diako.de [Ev.-Luth. Diakonissenanstalt zu Flensburg – Zentrum für Gesundheit und Diakonie, Diagnostische u. Interventionelle Radiologie/Neuroradiologie (Germany); Szerbo-Trojanowska, Malgorzata, E-mail: m.trojanowska@umlub.pl [Medical University of Lublin, Interventional Radiology (Poland); Lee, Michael, E-mail: mlee@rcsi.ie [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Radiology (Ireland); Morgan, Robert, E-mail: robert.morgan@stgeorges.nhs.uk [St George’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Brountzos, Elias, E-mail: ebrountz@med.uoa.gr [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (Greece); Belli, Anna Maria, E-mail: Anna.belli@stgeorges.nhs.uk [St George’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    Interventional Radiology (IR) is an essential part of modern medicine, delivering minimally invasive patient-focused care, which has been proven to be safe and effective in both elective and emergency settings. The aim of this document is to outline the core requirements and standards for the provision of Interventional Radiological services, including training, certification, manpower, and accreditation. The ultimate challenge will be the adoption of these recommendations by different countries and health economies around the world, in turn ensuring equal access to IR treatments for all patients, the appropriate distribution of resources for IR service provision as well as the continued development of safe and high-quality IR services in Europe and beyond.

  19. The Role of Interventional Radiology in Obstetric Hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonsalves, M.; Belli, A.

    2010-01-01

    Obstetric hemorrhage remains a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Traditionally, in cases of obstetric hemorrhage refractory to conservative treatment, obstetricians have resorted to major surgery with the associated risks of general anesthesia, laparotomy, and, in the case of hysterectomy, loss of fertility. Over the past two decades, the role of pelvic arterial embolization has evolved from a novel treatment option to playing a key role in the management of obstetric hemorrhage. To date, interventional radiology offers a minimally invasive, fertility-preserving alternative to conventional surgical treatment. We review current literature regarding the role of interventional radiology in postpartum hemorrhage, abnormal placentation, abortion, and cervical ectopic pregnancy. We discuss techniques, success rates, and complications.

  20. Implementation of procedures of radiological protection in the section of Radiology of the emergency Hospital of Porto Alegre-Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzini, F.; Rizzati, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    The Emergency Hospital of Porto Alegre (HPS) is one of the main reference centers for the population in the attendance of medical emergencies/urgencies. The Section of Radiology, which informs the patients clinical conditions based on radiological images, is the most demanded section of the hospital (81.43 % of the medical cases request radiological exams) in the aid of the diagnosis, in which excels for the search of the quality in the health branch. In this work are presented the procedures to have been implemented about radiological protection according to effective norm, methods, ways and conditions to satisfy the radiation workers and the internal and external patients. (Author)

  1. Implementation of procedures of radiological protection in the section of Radiology of the emergency Hospital of Porto Alegre-Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzini, F.; Rizzati, M.R. [Emergency Hospital of Porto Alegre, HPS (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    The Emergency Hospital of Porto Alegre (HPS) is one of the main reference centers for the population in the attendance of medical emergencies/urgencies. The Section of Radiology, which informs the patients clinical conditions based on radiological images, is the most demanded section of the hospital (81.43 % of the medical cases request radiological exams) in the aid of the diagnosis, in which excels for the search of the quality in the health branch. In this work are presented the procedures to have been implemented about radiological protection according to effective norm, methods, ways and conditions to satisfy the radiation workers and the internal and external patients. (Author)

  2. Anesthetic considerations for interventional pulmonary procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, John

    2013-02-01

    To discuss the anesthetic considerations of various procedures now performed by the interventional pulmonologist. With recent technological advances, many of these procedures represent acceptable alternatives to the invasive surgical procedures. For example, the placement of endobronchial valves can substitute for lung reduction surgery and can greatly reduce the postoperative recovery period. However, many of these complex procedures require anesthesia services. The nature and indication for the procedure as well as the patient's overall health will have an impact on the anesthetic choice. New studies have documented common complications from interventional pulmonology procedures and recent ways to avoid these complications have been suggested. Strategies to avoid obstruction, bleeding, pneumothorax and air embolism are discussed in this article. Potential benefits of high frequency jet ventilation in reducing airway pressures and, perhaps, barotraumas are cited. Novel interventional pulmonary procedures are described. As the array of diagnostic and therapeutic pulmonary interventions is expanding, the types of anesthetic techniques and ventilatory modes are varying to fit the procedural requirements. Some pulmonary procedures are best accomplished in the lightly sedated patient, who is breathing spontaneously, whereas procedures that use the working channel of a rigid bronchoscope are better performed in the patient under general anesthesia and mechanical ventilation that often use jet ventilation to minimize respiratory movements.

  3. Radiological protection in the interventional techniques: experience in the Pain Clinic of the CIMEQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero C, M. C.; Benitez N, P. P.; Gonzalez G, Y.; Martinez G, A.; Gonzalez R, N.; Sanchez Z, L. R.

    2014-08-01

    The Pain Clinic of the CIMEQ offers treatment to patients with different pathologies, using interventional techniques as the radiology like visual guide to reach the target structure and to apply the election technique. The personnel that carry out these procedures are inserted in the program of radiological surveillance of the institution, reason for which a radiological event could be detected where the main physician responsible of the service was implied. In this work the results of an investigation are presented realized with the objective of to know the causes of the event and to determine the necessary measures to avoid that this repeats again. The investigation was oriented to three fundamental aspects: medical exam of the affected worker; evaluation of the operational procedures from the radiological protection view point; and dosimetric measurements simulating the real conditions of work for which were used ionization chamber, radiometer and PMMA mannequin. As a result of the medical exam was detected that the main physician of the service did not use during the execution of all the procedures the extremities dosimetry and that he presented a radio induced erythema in the right hand, reason for which he was separated of the activity with ionizing radiations, until the conclusion of the investigation. With relationship to the evaluation of the operational procedures from the radiological protection view point, was verified that the medical physician not carried out any collimation of the beam and he was located in the positions where the dose rate reached the maximum values, frequently introducing the hands in the direct beam; that which implied an overexposure of the superior extremities and a not optimized exposure for whole body. This result was proven with the realized experimental measurements, which gave dose estimated values in extremities of the order of the deterministic effects. The investigation facilitated to introduce modifications in the

  4. MR-Guided Interventional Procedures: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Sequeiros, R.; Ojala, R.; Kariniemi, J.; Peraelae, J.; Niinimaeki, J.; Reinikainen, H.; Tervonen, O.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a potential guidance tool for a variety of procedures. Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures using either open surgical or percutaneous access are performed. They span from simple lesion targeting and biopsy to complex applications requiring multiple tasks performed simultaneously or in rapid succession. These tasks include instrument guidance and therapy monitoring as well as procedural follow-up. The interventional use of MRI (IMRI) is increasing steadily. This article reviews the prerequisites, systems, and clinical interventional procedures of IMRI

  5. Radiological Interventions for Correction of Central Venous Port Catheter Migrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebauer, Bernhard; Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl; Podrabsky, Petr; Werk, Michael; Haenninen, Enrique Lopez; Felix, Roland

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate radiological-interventional central venous port catheter corrections in migrated/malpositioned catheter tips. Thirty patients with migrated/malpositioned port catheter tips were included in this retrospective analysis. To visualize the catheter patency, a contrast-enhanced port catheter series was performed, followed by transfemoral port catheter correction with various 5F angiographic catheters (pigtail, Sos Omni), goose-neck snare, or combinations thereof. One patient showed spontaneous reposition of the catheter tip. In 27 of 29 patients (93%), radiological-interventional port catheter correction was successful. In two patients, port catheter malposition correction was not possible because of the inability to catch either the catheter tip or the catheter in its course, possibly due to fibrin sheath formation with attachment of the catheter to the vessel wall. No disconnection or port catheter dysfunction was observed after correction. In migrated catheter tips, radiological-interventional port catheter correction is a minimally invasive alternative to port extraction and reimplantation. In patients with a fibrin sheath and/or thrombosis, port catheter correction is often more challenging

  6. Generic procedures for monitoring in a nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    One of the most important aspects of managing a radiological emergency is the ability to promptly and adequately assess the need for protective actions. Protective action accident management must make use of the key relevant information available. Decision-making and accident assessment will be an iterative and dynamic process aimed at refining the initial evaluation as more detailed and complete information becomes available. Emergency monitoring is one of the main sources for obtaining needed information. This publication is in the scope of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Legal Series No. 14) under which the IAEA is authorized to assist a State Party or a Member State among other matters in developing appropriate radiation monitoring programmes, procedures and standards (Article 5). The scope of this manual is restricted to practical guidance for environmental and source monitoring during a nuclear or other radiological emergency. It does not address emergency response preparedness, nor does it cover the emergency management aspects of accident assessment. This manual is organised into sections relating to measurements in order of priority of a major reactor accident, namely: ambient gamma/beta dose rates from plume, ground deposition or source; radionuclide concentrations in air; deposition maps for 131 I and 137 Cs and other important radionuclides; radionuclide mix in deposition and radionuclide concentrations in food, drinking water and other samples. The introductory section provides an overview of the design of emergency monitoring and sampling programmes, monitoring teams and their qualifications and training, monitoring equipment and instrumentation, protective actions for emergency monitoring teams and quality assurance and quality control checks

  7. Radiation dose reduction: comparative assessment of publication volume between interventional and diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansmann, Jan; Henzler, Thomas; Gaba, Ron C; Morelli, John N

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to quantify and compare awareness regarding radiation dose reduction within the interventional radiology and diagnostic radiology communities. Abstracts accepted to the annual meetings of the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR), the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE), the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), and the European Congress of Radiology (ECR) between 2005 and 2015 were analyzed using the search terms "interventional/computed tomography" and "radiation dose/radiation dose reduction." A PubMed query using the above-mentioned search terms for the years of 2005-2015 was performed. Between 2005 and 2015, a total of 14 520 abstracts (mean, 660±297 abstracts) and 80 614 abstracts (mean, 3664±1025 abstracts) were presented at interventional and diagnostic radiology meetings, respectively. Significantly fewer abstracts related to radiation dose were presented at the interventional radiology meetings compared with the diagnostic radiology meetings (162 abstracts [1% of total] vs. 2706 [3% of total]; P radiology abstracts (range, 6-27) and 246±105 diagnostic radiology abstracts (range, 112-389) pertaining to radiation dose were presented at each meeting. The PubMed query revealed an average of 124±39 publications (range, 79-187) and 1205±307 publications (range, 829-1672) related to interventional and diagnostic radiology dose reduction per year, respectively (P radiology community over the past 10 years has not mirrored the increased volume seen within diagnostic radiology, suggesting that increased education and discussion about this topic may be warranted.

  8. Dosimetry in medical specialist in procedures of interventionist radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.; Vazquez V, J. A.; Rivera M, T.; Izeta G, A. C.; Azorin V, J. C.; Arreola, M.

    2014-08-01

    In this work are presented the experimental results of determining the dose in different body parts, measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters, to medical specialists of implantation procedures of definitive cardiac pacemaker. The medical personnel in ten intervention procedures were controlled according to the procedure type, pathological indication, fluoroscopy time and machine generating estimates of the patient doses. The doses to the extremities of the cardiologist were measured by means of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The domains of first level in the hand are in the index finger of the left and the right hand. The medium doses of the skin in the eyes, a report of the dose received during each type of intervention procedure in the glandular thyroid and fingers of the cardiologists is made. The results represent the integrated dose to the cardiologist, received during the implantation procedures of definitive cardiac pacemaker in the same patient. By a half time of detection of 70 minutes for patient, the half dose of the skin, received for the right and left hand, ascended to 1,4 mSv, under the glove. In conclusion, the dose average for the dosimeters of the thyroid gland and forehead was varied from 0,41 up to 1,14 mSv for study. The exposure to the X-rays is a topic to consider, more important every time on the development of systematic procedures little invasive, including the angiography, catheter, worker and patient. (Author)

  9. A survey of nurse staffing levels in interventional radiology units throughout the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, A.; Robertson, I.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To supplement previous surveys analysing provision of interventional radiology (IR), in-hours (IH) and out-of-hours (OOH), by specifically surveying the level of nursing support provided. Materials and methods: A web-based questionnaire was distributed to all British Society of Interventional Radiology (BSIR) members. This addressed several aspects of radiology nursing support for IR procedures, both IH and OOH. Results: Sixty percent of respondents indicated that they have a formal OOH service. Of these, all have a dedicated nursing rota, with the vast majority operating with one nurse. IH, 77% of respondents always have a scrubbed nurse assistant, but this reduces to 40% OOH. IH, 4% never have a scrubbed radiology nurse assistant, which rises to 25% OOH. IH, 75% of respondents always have a radiology nurse dedicated to patient monitoring, but this reduces to 20% OOH. IH, 3% never have a radiology nurse dedicated to patient monitoring, which rises to 42% OOH. Conclusion: A significant disparity exists in the level of IR nursing support between IH and OOH. The majority of sites provide a single nurse with ad hoc additional support. This is potentially putting patients at increased risk. Radiology nurses are integral to the safe and sustainable provision of IR OOH services and a greater focus is required to ensure adequate and safe staffing levels for 24/7 IR services. - Highlights: • A significant disparity exists between the level of nursing support provided in-hours and OOH. • This applies to both the availability of a nurse to scrub and to monitor the patient. • Having a dedicated 24/7 nursing rota is mandatory to providing a deliverable OOH service.

  10. Generic procedures for monitoring in a nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book is a Japanese version of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) publication (Report No., IAEA-TECDOC-1092, published in Vienna, 1999) of the same title. The translation of the original English into Japanese was done by the Department of Dose Assessment, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Since the Department was organized in addition to the Emergency Medicine Dept. in the Center in 2003 to establish a system for rapid and accurate dose assessment at emergent radiation exposure, the translation is thus a result of the department works, and is published with permission by IAEA as one of a series of NIRS Report (NIRS-M--179) for use in the country. The book is essentially a manual for providing technical requirements and procedures for radiation monitoring, environmental sampling and laboratory analyses for a nuclear or other radiological emergency. The contents are: Introduction, Outline of monitoring, Monitoring of outdoor radiation and contamination, Outdoor sampling, Gross alpha/beta measurement, Gamma spectrometry, Activation analyses, Basic data assessment, Work-sheets, Check-list for measuring equipments, Appendices, References, and others. (S.I.)

  11. Status of radiation protection in interventional radiology. Assessment of inspections in 2009 by the ASN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This report first describes the organization of inspections performed in health institutions, indicates the inspected establishments, the types of fixed installations in interventional radiology, the use of imagery in the operating theatre, and discusses the regulatory arrangements applicable to interventional radiology (in the Public Health Code, in the Labour Code). Then, the report discusses the results of inspections regarding radiation protection in interventional radiology: application of public health code arrangements (justification, patient training in radiation protection, radiological procedures and protocols, patient dosimetry monitoring), application of Labour Code arrangements (designation of the person with expertise in radiation protection, risk assessment and delimitation of monitored and controlled areas, workstation analysis, workers' training in radiation protection, individual protection equipment, workers' dosimetric monitoring, workers' medical monitoring, radiation protection technical controls), significant events, radiation protection in operating theatre. Propositions are stated regarding the differences noticed within or between the health establishments, the methodological and organisational difficulties faced by persons with expertise in radiation protection (PCR), the need of an interdisciplinary team

  12. Radiological management of patients with urinary obstruction following urinary diversion procedures: technical factors, complications, long-term management and outcome. Experience with 378 procedures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maher, M M

    2012-02-03

    We aimed to assess management by interventional radiology techniques of patients with urinary diversion procedures (UD) complicated by urinary obstruction (UO). A 12-year electronic database of interventional cases was searched for urinary access in patients with UD. Patients\\' records were assessed for aetiology of obstruction, indication for procedure, types of interventional radiology, complications and outcome. Management issues included frequency of visits for catheter care, type of catheter placement and technical problems associated with catheter maintenance. Three hundred and seventy eight procedures were carried out in 25 patients (mean age 70 years; Male : Female ratio 13:12). Indications for UD were malignancy (n = 22) and neuropathic bladder (n = 3). UD included ileal conduits (n = 17), cutaneous ureterostomy (n = 3 (2 patients)) and sigmoid colon urinary conduit (n = 6). In most patients, catheters were placed antegradely through nephrostomy tract, but subsequent access was through the UD. Twenty of 25 patients had unilateral stents where as 5 had bilateral stents (8-10- Fr pigtail catheters (20-45 cm in length)). The mean number of procedures including catheter changes was 15 +\\/- 4 per patient and 331 of 378 procedures (87 %) were carried out as outpatients. Since catheter placement, 11 patients required hospital admission on 22 occasions for catheter-related complications. Ureteric strictures in patients with UD can be successfully managed by interventional radiology.

  13. Action research regarding the optimisation of radiological protection for nurses during vascular interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroshige

    2015-01-01

    The optimisation and decision-making processes for radiological protection have been broadened by the introduction of re-examination or feedback after introducing protective measures. In this study, action research was used to reduce the occupational exposure of vascular interventional radiology (IR) nurses. Four radiological protection improvement measures were continuously performed in cooperation with the researchers, nurses and stakeholders, and the nurses’ annual effective doses were compared before and after the improvements. First, the dosimetry equipment was changed from one electronic personal dosimeter (EPD) to two silver-activated phosphate glass dosimeters (PGDs). Second, the nurses were educated regarding maintaining a safe distance from the sources of scattered and leakage radiation. Third, portable radiation shielding screens were placed in the IR rooms. Fourth, the x-ray units’ pulse rates were reduced by half. On changing the dosimetry method, the two PGDs recorded a 4.4 fold greater dose than the single EPD. Educating nurses regarding radiological protection and reducing the pulse rates by half decreased their effective doses to one-third and two-fifths of the baseline dose, respectively. No significant difference in their doses was detected after the placement of the shielding screens. Therefore, the action research effectively decreased the occupational doses of the vascular IR nurses. (practical matter)

  14. Pilot study of the dose in crystalline lens in the interventional radiology practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.; Martinez, A.; Fernandez, A.; Molina, D.; Sanchez, L.; Diaz, A.

    2014-08-01

    The interventional radiology involves considerable exposure levels for the occupationally exposed personnel (OEP). The doses can encompass a wide range of values in dependence of the function that develops the personnel and the complexity of each procedure. In organs like the crystalline lens and skin values can be reached that imply the appearance of deterministic effects if is not fulfilled the appropriate measures of radiological protection. This has been demonstrated through multiple studies, among those that the retrospective study of damages in the crystalline lens and dose has been one of those most commented, known as RELID. The objective of that study was to examine the opacity prevalence in the crystalline lens in workers linked to the interventional cardiology and to correlate it with the occupational exposition. The obtained results contributed to that the ICRP recommend a new limit value of equivalent dose for crystalline lens of 20 mSv in one year. With the objective of analyzing the operational implications, in the radiological surveillance programs that they could originate with the new recommendations was developed a pilot study to evaluate the dose in crystalline lens in the OEP linked to the interventional radiology in a Cuban hospital. For this, an anthropomorphic mannequin RANDO-ALDERSON was used on which thermoluminescent dosimeters were placed below and above of the leaded apron and in different positions at level of the crystalline lens: above, below and to the sides of the leaded lenses that the personnel uses routinely. The mannequin was located on the same positions that occupy the main specialist that execute the procedure, as well as of the nurse to assist him. The measurements were made simulating the more representative procedures about complexity, duration time and exposure rate. The used dosimeters were RADOS model for whole body composed of two thermoluminescent detectors Gr-200 (LiF: Mg, Cu, P) to evaluate personal equivalent dose

  15. Experimental method for calculation of effective doses in interventional radiology; Metodo experimental para calculo de dosis efectivas en radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz Lblanca, M. D.; Diaz Romero, F.; Casares Magaz, O.; Garrido Breton, C.; Catalan Acosta, A.; Hernandez Armas, J.

    2013-07-01

    This paper proposes a method that allows you to calculate the effective dose in any interventional radiology procedure using an anthropomorphic mannequin Alderson RANDO and dosimeters TLD 100 chip. This method has been applied to an angio Radiology procedure: the biliary drainage. The objectives that have been proposed are: to) put together a method that, on an experimental basis, allows to know dosis en organs to calculate effective dose in complex procedures and b) apply the method to the calculation of the effective dose of biliary drainage. (Author)

  16. Relevant radiological anatomy of the pig as a training model in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dondelinger, R.F.; Ghysels, M.P.; Brisbois, D.; Donkers, E.; Snaps, F.R.; Saunders, J.; Deviere, J.

    1998-01-01

    The use of swine for teaching purposes in medicine and surgery has largely increased in recent years. Detailed knowledge of the porcine anatomy and physiology is a prerequisite for proper use of pigs as a teaching or an experimental model in interventional radiology. A systematic study of the radiological anatomy was undertaken in more than 100 female pigs aged 6-8 weeks. All studies were performed under general anesthesia in a single session. Animals were sacrificed at the end of the study. Selective angiographies were systematically obtained in all anatomical territories. In other animals CT and MRI examinations were performed and were correlated to anatomical sections and acrylic casts of the vascular structures. Endoscopical examinations of the upper gastrointestinal tract, including retrograde opacification of the biliary and pancreatic ducts, were added in selected animals. The main angiographic aspects of the brain, head and neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis were recorded. Similarities and differences in comparison with human anatomy are stressed. Potential applications in interventional radiology are indicated. (orig.)

  17. Sedation for pediatric radiological procedures: analysis of potential causes of sedation failure and paradoxical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karian, V.E.; Burrows, P.E.; Connor, L. [Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, D. [Dept. of Biostatistics, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Mason, K.P. [Dept. of Anesthesiology, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Background. Sedation for diagnostic imaging and interventional radiologic procedures in pediatrics has greatly increased over the past decade. With appropriate patient selection and monitoring, serious adverse effects are infrequent, but failure to sedate and paradoxical reactions do occur. Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine, among patients undergoing sedation for radiologic procedures, the incidence of sedation failure and paradoxical reaction to pentobarbital and to identify potentially correctable causes. Materials and methods. Records of 1665 patients who were sedated in the radiology department from 1 November 1997 to 1 July 1998 were reviewed. Patients failing sedation or experiencing paradoxical reaction were compared with respect to sex, age group, diagnosis, scan type, time of day, NPO status, use of IV contrast and type of sedation agent using the Fisher exact test, Pearson chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA), the Student t-test, and logistic regression. Results. Data analysis revealed a sedation failure rate of 1 % and paradoxical reaction rate of 1.2 %. Stepwise multiple logistic regression revealed that the only significant independent multivariate predictor of failure was the need for the administration of a combination of pentobarbital, fentanyl, and midazolam IV. Conclusion. The low rate of sedation failure and paradoxical reactions to pentobarbital was near optimal and probably cannot be improved with the currently available sedatives. (orig.)

  18. Sedation for pediatric radiological procedures: analysis of potential causes of sedation failure and paradoxical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karian, V.E.; Burrows, P.E.; Connor, L.; Zurakowski, D.; Mason, K.P.

    1999-01-01

    Background. Sedation for diagnostic imaging and interventional radiologic procedures in pediatrics has greatly increased over the past decade. With appropriate patient selection and monitoring, serious adverse effects are infrequent, but failure to sedate and paradoxical reactions do occur. Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine, among patients undergoing sedation for radiologic procedures, the incidence of sedation failure and paradoxical reaction to pentobarbital and to identify potentially correctable causes. Materials and methods. Records of 1665 patients who were sedated in the radiology department from 1 November 1997 to 1 July 1998 were reviewed. Patients failing sedation or experiencing paradoxical reaction were compared with respect to sex, age group, diagnosis, scan type, time of day, NPO status, use of IV contrast and type of sedation agent using the Fisher exact test, Pearson chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA), the Student t-test, and logistic regression. Results. Data analysis revealed a sedation failure rate of 1 % and paradoxical reaction rate of 1.2 %. Stepwise multiple logistic regression revealed that the only significant independent multivariate predictor of failure was the need for the administration of a combination of pentobarbital, fentanyl, and midazolam IV. Conclusion. The low rate of sedation failure and paradoxical reactions to pentobarbital was near optimal and probably cannot be improved with the currently available sedatives. (orig.)

  19. Estimated occupational dose in interventional procedures crystalline; Estimacion de la dosis ocupacional en el cristallino en procedimientos interveniconistas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portas Ferradas, B. C.; Chapel Gomez, M. L.; Jimenez Alarcon, J. I.

    2011-07-01

    This paper present the result of the estimated doses in the eyes of workers exposed for radiology procedures and interventional cardiology from measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeter placed near the lens.

  20. Surgical and interventional radiological management of adult epistaxis: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, C; Patel, A; Smith, M E; Williams, R J; Kuhn, I; Hopkins, C

    2017-12-01

    There is variation regarding the use of surgery and interventional radiological techniques in the management of epistaxis. This review evaluates the effectiveness of surgical artery ligation compared to direct treatments (nasal packing, cautery), and that of embolisation compared to direct treatments and surgery. A systematic review of the literature was performed using a standardised published methodology and custom database search strategy. Thirty-seven studies were identified relating to surgery, and 34 articles relating to interventional radiology. For patients with refractory epistaxis, endoscopic sphenopalatine artery ligation had the most favourable adverse effect profile and success rate compared to other forms of surgical artery ligation. Endoscopic sphenopalatine artery ligation and embolisation had similar success rates (73-100 per cent and 75-92 per cent, respectively), although embolisation was associated with more serious adverse effects (risk of stroke, 1.1-1.5 per cent). No articles directly compared the two techniques. Trials comparing endoscopic sphenopalatine artery ligation to embolisation are required to better evaluate the clinical and economic effects of intervention in epistaxis.

  1. Dosimetry in diagnostic and interventional radiology - ICRU and IAEA activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoetelief, J.; Pernicka, F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Main aims of patient dosimetry in diagnostic and interventional radiology are to determine dosimetric quantities for establishment and use of guidance levels or diagnostic reference levels and for comparative risk assessment. In the latter case, the average doses to the organs and tissues at risk should be assessed. Only limited number of measurements serve to potential risk assessment of the examination and intervention. An additional objective of dosimetry in diagnostic and interventional radiology is the assessment of equipment performance. Ionization chambers are the main devices used for dosimetric measurements in diagnostic and interventional radiology but other devices with special properties are also used. Important examples are thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) and semiconductor detectors. For most dosemeters used in x-ray medical imaging the desired quantity for calibration of dosemeters is the air kerma free-in-air. Calibrations should be made at appropriate radiation qualities, for which recommendations are available for conventional radiology. It is important that the calibrations are traceable to the international measurement system. The uncertainty of dose measurements in medical x-ray imaging, for comparative risk assessments as well as for quality assurance, should not exceed about 7 per cent in terms of the expanded uncertainty using a coverage factor of 2. The dosimetric approaches in general diagnostic radiology, mammography and computed tomography are slightly different, resulting in application specific dosimetric quantities. Consequently, different protocols for patient dosimetry are available for these different purposes. In general diagnostic radiology, various quantities and terminologies have been used for the specification of dose on the central beam axis at the point where the x-ray beam enters the patient (or a phantom representing the patient). These include the exposure at skin entrance (ESE), the input radiation exposure

  2. Exposure of interventional radiology practitioners: contribution of capillaroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauron, C.; Wild, P.; Grzebyk, M.; Derock, C.; Champion, K.; Cohen, P.; Fiessinger, J.N.; Menez, C.; Carpentier, P.; De Gaudemaris, R.; Tellart, A.S.; Sobaszek, A.; Thiel, H.; Chamoux, A.; Donnadille, L.; Pennarola, R.; Perdereau, B.; Choudat, D.

    2013-09-01

    The objectives of this survey are to confirm or invalidate results of a preliminary study which highlighted capillary anomalies on an exposed population of practitioners performing interventional radiology treatments, and to study the influence of exposure characteristics (duration, dose level, fractioning) on the occurrence of these capillary anomalies. The authors present the studied cohort, the study process (capillaroscopy, capillaroscope reading and studies parameters, definition of synthetic indexes), briefly present the exposure assessment, statistical analysis, and ethical aspects. Results are discussed in terms of population and exposure characteristics, of number of coded capillaroscopic parameters, of statistical analysis of synthetic indexes. The survey questionnaire is given in appendix

  3. Interventional radiology simulation and measurement of patient doses; Simulacion en radiologia intervencionista y medida de dosis a pacientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz Lablanca, M. d.; Diaz Romero, F.; Hernandez Armas, J.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we propose a method of work to calculate the effective dose in any interventional radiology procedure using an Alderson Rando anthropomorphic phantom and dosimeters TLD 100 chip. We applied this method in the case of biliary drainage and allowed us to establish the dose value corresponding reference in the Hospital Universitario de Canarias (HUC).

  4. The role of interventional radiology in the management of kidney transplant complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Lagana, Domenico; Mangini, Monica; Cafaro, Tamara; Recaldini, Chiara; Genovese, Eugenio; Fugazzola, Carlo; Cuffari, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the role and the effectiveness of interventional radiology in the treatment of renal transplant complications. Materials and methods. From 1996 to 2004 a total of 288 kidney transplants from cadavers were performed in our Institute. The kidney was always collocated in iliac fossa by creating a vascular anastomosis with the external iliac artery and vein; in all cases the ureter was implanted into the recipient bladder. During the follow-up, 34 complications were observed. Twenty-seven complications in 25 patients (20 males and 5 females; age 35-65 years) were treated by a radiologic procedure: 9 renal artery stenosis and 1 native external iliac artery stenosis (by PTA), 5 ureteral obstructions (by nephrostomy and ureteral stenting), 8 ureteral leaks (by nephrostomy, in 2 cases associated to ureteral stenting) and 4 limphoceles (by percutaneous ultrasound-guided catheter drainage). Results. Primary technical success was obtained in 20/27 cases (74%). Success was obtained with a second interventional procedure in 3/27 cases, 2 limphoceles and 1 ureteral fistula (secondary technical success: 85.2%), with a clinical final success in 23/27 cases (85.2%). We observed a peri-procedural complication rate of 3.7% (1 renal artery post-PTA dissection during a restenosis treatment). Four cases (1 renal arterial post-PTA dissection, 1 ureteral obstructions, 1 ureteral leak and llimphocele) needed a surgical correction (14.8%). Conclusions. Interventional radiology is the first therapeutic approach to treat renal transplant complications. It shows good technical and clinical results and a low complication rate. Surgery had to be considered only if minimally invasive procedures are infeasible or ineffective [it

  5. A pilot experience launching a national dose protocol for vascular and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.; Segarra, A.; Fernandez, J. M.; Ordiales, J. M.; Simon, R.; Gallego, J. J.; Del Cerro, J.; Casasola, E.; Verdu, J. F.; Ballester, T.; Sotil, J.; Aspiazu, A.; Garcia, M. A.; Moreno, F.; Carreras, F.; Canis, M.; Soler, M. M.; Palmero, J.; Ciudad, J.; Diaz, F.; Hernandez, J.; Gonzalez, M.; Rosales, P.

    2008-01-01

    The design of a national dose protocol for interventional radiology has been one of the tasks during the European SENTINEL Coordination Action. The present paper describes the pilot experience carried out in cooperation with the Spanish Society on Vascular and Interventional Radiology (SERVEI). A prospective sample of procedures was initially agreed. A common quality control of the X-ray systems was carried out, including calibration of the air kerma area product (KAP) meters. Occupational doses of the radiologists involved in the survey were also included in the survey. A total of 10 Spanish hospitals with interventional X-ray units were involved. Six hundred and sixty-four patient dose data were collected from 397 diagnostic and 267 therapeutic procedures. Occupational doses were evaluated in a sample of 635 values. The obtained KAP median/mean values (Gy.cm 2 ) for the gathered procedures were: biliary drainage (30.6/68.9), fistulography (4.5/9.8), lower limb arteriography (52.2/60.7), hepatic chemoembolisation (175.8/218.3), iliac stent (45.9/73.2) and renal arteriography (39.1/59.8). Occupational doses (mean monthly values, in mSv) were 1.9 (over apron); 0.3 (under apron) and 4.5 (on hands). With this National experience, a protocol was agreed among the SENTINEL partners to conduct future similar surveys in other European countries. (authors)

  6. Dosimetry with slow films in Interventional Radiology; Dosimetria con peliculas lentas en Radiologia Intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ten, J.I.; Guibelalde, E.; Fernandez, J.M.; Canevaro, L.; Ramirez, R.; Vano, E. [Grupo de Fisica Medica. Departamento de Radiologia. Facultad de Medicina. Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Martin Lagos s/n CP 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    1998-12-31

    In this work it is presented a method for evaluation of patients doses in Interventional Radiology (RI). The method proposed in this work allows the simultaneous valoration of the product dose-area (PDA), the dose in the patient skin (DES) and the distribution of the irradiated fields, all of they together with their corresponding dose levels. The latter sometimes can be essential since the possible damages in skin depend not only of the doses, but also the irradiated area. The method has been resulted adequate for to evaluate doses to patients in Interventional Radiology procedures. It was possible to apply it as a routine form seeing that its not interfering significantly in the normal development of the medical intervention. The fundamental advantages of this dosimetric method in relation with the unique PDA measure or with the utilization of TLD is that it provide information about the total irradiated area, distribution and length of fields, collimation and wedge used besides that allow to determine the most irradiated zone. The visualization of the irradiated regions and the length fields utilized suggest the possibility to optimize the realization protocols of the interventional procedure in the cases in which it is considered that the doses have been very elevated. (Author)

  7. A survey of interventional radiology awareness among final-year medical students in a European country.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leong, Sum

    2009-07-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) is a rapidly expanding specialty that is facing the challenges of turf wars and personnel shortages. Appropriate exposure of medical students to this field can be vital to recruitment of potential future trainees or referring physicians. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge and views of final-year medical students in a single EU country regarding various aspects of IR. An electronic survey was sent via e-mail to all final-year medical students in a European country. The students were given a month to respond to the questionnaire. A total of 234 students of 675 (34.5%) replied to the survey. Of the respondents, 35% had previously completed an attachment to the radiology department. The majority of students (63%) thought their knowledge in radiology in general was poor. The percentage of students who correctly identified procedures performed by interventional radiologists was 69% for Hickman line insertion, 79% for fibroid embolization, and 67.5% for lower limb angioplasty. Sixty percent, 30%, and 47% thought that interventional radiologists perform cardiac angioplasties, perform arterial bypasses, and create AV fistulas, respectively. Forty-nine percent felt that interventional radiologists are surgically trained. Eighty-three percent of students were first made aware of angioplasty by a cardiologist. Thirty-one percent thought that interventional radiologists do ward rounds, 24% thought that interventional radiologists have admitting rights, and 26% felt that interventional radiologists run an outpatient practice. A significant number of students (76%) thought that the job prospects in IR are good or excellent but only 40.5% were willing to consider a career in IR. In conclusion, this study indicates that IR remains a nascent but attractive specialty to the majority of medical students. Further development of the existing informal undergraduate curriculum to address shortcomings will ensure that IR continues to attract

  8. Interventional radiological therapy of benign low back pain syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huegli, R.W.; Jacob, A.L.; Steinbrich, W.

    2007-01-01

    Spinal affections belong to the most widespread sources of back pain. Beside medical history and clinical examination, the radiological investigation plays an important rote in the clinical workup especially with the modern Cross sectional imaging methods such as computed and magnetic resonance tomography. After exclusion of a malignant disease usually a conservative therapeutic approach is the first line treatment option. If the conservative treatment approach falls a minimalinvasive image guided diagnostic or therapeutic infiltration may be considered. Thereby the interventional radiologist should be a member of the team which decides the clinical strategy. This article describes epidemiology and pathophysiology, common pre-interventional diagnostic strategies, drugs, indications, possible complications and the impact of diagnostic and therapeutic minimally invasive image guided techniques in low back pain. In this context facet joint blockade, periradicular and peridural therapy as well as sacroiliac joint blockades are discussed

  9. Sensitivity of the diagnostic radiological index of protection to procedural factors in fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A Kyle; Pasciak, Alexander S; Wagner, Louis K

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity of the diagnostic radiological index of protection (DRIP), used to quantify the protective value of radioprotective garments, to procedural factors in fluoroscopy in an effort to determine an appropriate set of scatter-mimicking primary beams to be used in measuring the DRIP. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to determine the shape of the scattered x-ray spectra incident on the operator in different clinical fluoroscopy scenarios, including interventional radiology and interventional cardiology (IC). Two clinical simulations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle and patient size, while technical factors were varied according to measured automatic dose rate control (ADRC) data. Factorial simulations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle, field of view, patient size, and beam quality for constant technical factors. Average energy (Eavg) was the figure of merit used to condense fluence in each energy bin to a single numerical index. Beam quality had the strongest influence on the scattered spectrum in fluoroscopy. Many procedural factors affect the scattered spectrum indirectly through their effect on primary beam quality through ADRC, e.g., gantry angle and patient size. Lateral C-arm rotation, common in IC, increased the energy of the scattered spectrum, regardless of the direction of rotation. The effect of patient size on scattered radiation depended on ADRC characteristics, patient size, and procedure type. The scattered spectrum striking the operator in fluoroscopy is most strongly influenced by primary beam quality, particularly kV. Use cases for protective garments should be classified by typical procedural primary beam qualities, which are governed by the ADRC according to the impacts of patient size, anatomical location, and gantry angle.

  10. Radiation Doses in Patient Eye Lenses during Interventional Neuroradiology Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, R M; Vañó, E; Fernández, J M; Rosati, S; López-Ibor, L

    2016-03-01

    Eye lenses are among the most sensitive organs to x-ray radiation and may be considered at risk during neurointerventional radiology procedures. The threshold dose to produce eye lens opacities has been recently reduced to 500 mGy by the International Commission on Radiologic Protection. In this article, the authors investigated the radiation doses delivered to patients' eyes during interventional neuroradiology procedures at a university hospital. Small optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters were located over patients' eyes during 5 diagnostic and 31 therapeutic procedures performed in a biplane x-ray system. Phantom measurements were also made to determine the level of radiation to the eye during imaging runs with conebeam CT. The left eye (located toward the lateral C-arm x-ray source) received a 4.5 times greater dose than the right one. The average dose during embolization in the left eye was 300 mGy, with a maximum of 2000 mGy in a single procedure. The patient who received this maximum eye dose needed 6 embolization procedures to treat his high-volume AVM. If one took into account those 6 embolizations, the eye dose could be 2-fold. Sixteen percent of the embolizations resulted in eye doses of >500 mGy. A relevant fraction of patients received eye doses exceeding the threshold of 500 mGy. A careful optimization of the procedures and follow-up of these patients to evaluate potential lens opacities should be considered. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  11. Apparatus for simulating a vascular interventional procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Dobbelsteen, J.J.; Dankelman, J.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to an apparatus (1) for simulating a vascular interventional procedure, comprising a wire-like element (7) representing an instrument to be inserted into a vascular tree, which wire-like element can be received in a holder (3), and wherein a sensor (12, 13) is provided for

  12. Nordic Intervention Criteria for Nuclear or Radiological Emergencies. Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Recommendations of the Nordic radiation protection authorities on application of international criteria in a nuclear or radiological emergency in the Nordic countries are presented. The recommendations are focused on the generic intervention levels for various actions to protect members of the public and workers undertaking an intervention. Prompt precautionary actions for the near zones around the Finnish and Swedish nuclear power plants are defined. These actions are; preventive sheltering, iodine prophylaxis and precautionary evacuation. No special intervention levels for these precautionary actions have been set, because implementation of these actions is always based on very limited information about an accident. These actions can be initiated on a mere indication of possible release of radioactivity. The indication might be an alarm or any other predefined signal. Intervention level for actions to protect members of the public are based on the concept of avertable dose. They are in line with the international recommendations. With regard to iodine prophylaxis, a national approach is recommended due to different national policies of advance distribution of iodine tablets. The longer term intervention actions, temporary relocation and permanent resettlement, will be based not only on radiation protection factors but also on wider judgement of the overall situation. For that reason, no generic intervention levels, in terms of radiation dose, are recommended. The intervention levels for various protective actions are in the following table.Table 1. Generic intervention levels for actions to protect members of the public.Protective action. Generic intervention level as an avertable dose. Sheltering: 10 mSv within two days (effective dose); Iodine prophylaxis: National recommendations; Evacuation: 50 mSv within one week (effective dose); Temporary relocation: No predetermined intervention level; Permanent resettlement: No predetermined intervention level. Workers

  13. Work procedures and risk factors for high rdiation exposure among radiologic technologists in South Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Young; Choi, Yeong Chull [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won Jin; Cha, Eun Shil [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Radiologic technologists currently consist of 31.5% among diagnostic radiation workers in South Korea. Among diagnostic radiation workers, radiologic technologists receive the highest annual and collective doses in South Korea. Comprehensive assessment of the work practices and associated radiation doses from diagnostic radiology procedures should be undertaken for effective prevention for radiologic technologists. Using the national survey, this study aimed (1) to explore the distribution of the work procedures performed by gender, (2) to evaluate occupational radiation exposure by work characteristics and safety compliance, (3) to identify the primary factors influencing high radiation exposure among radiologic technologists in South Korea. This study provided detailed information on work practices, number of procedures performed on weekly basis, and occupational radiation doses among radiologic technologists in South Korea. Average radiation dose for radiologic technologists is higher than other countries, and type of facility, work safety, and wearing lead apron explained quite a portion of increased risk in the association between radiology procedures and radiation exposure among radiologic technologists.

  14. Work procedures and risk factors for high rdiation exposure among radiologic technologists in South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Young; Choi, Yeong Chull; Lee, Won Jin; Cha, Eun Shil

    2016-01-01

    Radiologic technologists currently consist of 31.5% among diagnostic radiation workers in South Korea. Among diagnostic radiation workers, radiologic technologists receive the highest annual and collective doses in South Korea. Comprehensive assessment of the work practices and associated radiation doses from diagnostic radiology procedures should be undertaken for effective prevention for radiologic technologists. Using the national survey, this study aimed (1) to explore the distribution of the work procedures performed by gender, (2) to evaluate occupational radiation exposure by work characteristics and safety compliance, (3) to identify the primary factors influencing high radiation exposure among radiologic technologists in South Korea. This study provided detailed information on work practices, number of procedures performed on weekly basis, and occupational radiation doses among radiologic technologists in South Korea. Average radiation dose for radiologic technologists is higher than other countries, and type of facility, work safety, and wearing lead apron explained quite a portion of increased risk in the association between radiology procedures and radiation exposure among radiologic technologists.

  15. Awareness of interventional radiology among patients referred to the interventional radiology department: a survey of patients in a large Canadian community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baerlocher, Mark O; Asch, Murray R; Puri, Gaurav; Vellahottam, Andrew; Myers, Andy; Andrews, Karen

    2007-05-01

    To quantify the level of knowledge about interventional radiology (IR) among patients referred for an IR procedure and to develop recommendations on how to increase public awareness of IR. Paper surveys were prospectively administered to consecutive patients scheduled to undergo an IR procedure at a community hospital. The study was terminated at the accrual of 100 completed surveys. Totals of 28% and 6% knew generally the job of a diagnostic radiologist and interventional radiologist, respectively, and 6% had heard of the field of IR before their referral (despite 21% having undergone a procedure previously). Before their arrival in the IR department, 87% had not received any information about IR. Three percent, 0%, 4%, 82%, and 82% had heard about uterine artery embolization, radiofrequency ablation, vertebroplasty, biopsy (any type), and angioplasty, respectively. After the procedures, 84% had a clearer view of what interventional radiologists do, but 98% believed that most others did not know what IR was. When asked how best to educate the public about IR, the responses were: unsure (39%), other (19%), pamphlets (12%), information from physicians (9%), television (8%), and Internet (7%). Overall, the mean satisfaction rate was 8.8 (with 0 representing the minimum and 10 representing the maximum), and 97% would choose IR over surgery for future treatments. These data quantify and strongly support the views that (1) even among patients specifically referred to IR for a procedure, the majority of people are unaware of what the field is or may offer; and (2) most patients were satisfied with their IR experience. Six results-based recommendations are made to increase public awareness about IR.

  16. The Value of Digital Personal Dosemeters in Angiography/Interventional Radiology: Preliminary Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, M.; Malone, D.E.

    2001-01-01

    New interventional procedures tend to involve longer screening times than were hitherto used in radiology. A careful audit of technique and shielding facilities needs to be performed to ensure that patient and operator doses are optimised. This paper explores the use of digital dosemeters to evaluate operator dose. Equipment related parameters, e.g. screening time, dose-area-product readings, were not found to be strongly correlated to operator dose. The real time display on the electronic dosemeter is a non-intrusive indicator of the efficacy of operator protection strategies. (author)

  17. Analysis of dose to crystalline in Interventional radiology: a purpose of one case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera M, F.; Moreno R, F.; Velazquez M, F.; Manzano M, F.J.; Moreno S, T.

    1998-01-01

    The present work shows the dose values to crystalline for the personnel which works in interventional radiology procedures. It was took data of 436 studies with a total of 2,133.4 minutes in fluoroscopy and 19,563 images. It was showed dose values to crystalline in three situations: without blinding, with blinding of 0.25 and 0.50 mm Pb and by type of study: fluoroscopy, graphie and total. The dose means and ranges to patient for each of these studies also are detailed. (Author)

  18. Needlestick Injuries in Interventional Radiology Are Common and Underreported.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deipolyi, Amy R; Prabhakar, Anand M; Naidu, Sailendra; Oklu, Rahmi

    2017-12-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for needlesticks in interventional radiology physicians, as well as the attitudes, behaviors, and conditions that promote or interfere with reporting of these injuries. Materials and Methods A total of 3889 interventional radiologists from academic and private practice in the United States were surveyed by emailing all interventional radiologist members of the Society of Interventional Radiology, including attending-level physicians and trainees (April-August 2016). The institutional review board waived the need for consent. Questions inquired about the nature, frequency, and type of needlestick and sharps injuries and whether and to whom these incidents were reported. Stepwise regression was used to determine variables predicting whether injuries were reported. Results In total, 908 (23%) interventional radiologists completed at least a portion of the survey. Eight hundred fourteen (91%) of 895 respondents reported a prior needlestick injury, 583 (35%) of 895 reported at least one injury while treating an HIV-positive patient, and 626 (71%) of 884 reported prior training regarding needlestick injury. There was, on average, one needlestick for every 5 years of practice. Most needlestick or sharps injuries were self inflicted (711 [87%] of 817) and involved a hollow-bore device (464 [56%] of 824). Only 566 (66%) of 850 injuries were reported. The most common reasons for not reporting included perceived lack of utility of reporting (79 [28%] of 282), perceived low risk for injury (56 [20%] of 282), noncontaminated needle (53 [19%] of 282), too-lengthy reporting process (37 [13%] of 282), and associated stigma (23 [8%] of 282). Only 156 (25%) of 624 respondents informed their significant other. Stepwise regression assessing variables affecting the likelihood of reporting showed that male sex (P = .009), low-risk patient (P < .0001), self injury (P = .010), trainee status (P < .0001), and the total number of prior

  19. Opportunity of interventional radiology: advantages and application of interventional technique in biological target therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng Gaojun; Lu Qin

    2007-01-01

    Interventional techniques not only provide opportunity of treatment for many diseases, but also alter the traditional therapeutic pattern. With the new century of wide application of biological therapies, interventional technique also shows extensive roles. The current biological therapy, including gene therapy, cell transplantation therapy, immunobiologic molecule therapy containing cell factors, tumor antibody or vaccine, recombined proteins, radioactive-particles and targeting materials therapy, can be locally administrated by interventional techniques. The combination of targeting biological therapies and high-targeted interventional technique holds advantages of minimal invasion, accurate delivery, vigorous local effect, and less systemic adverse reactions. Authors believe that the biological therapy may arise a great opportunity for interventional radiology, therefore interventional colleagues should grasp firmly and promptly for the development and extension in this field. (authors)

  20. Competitiveness of the match for interventional radiology and neuroradiology fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jim Y; Agarwal, Vikas; Orons, Philip D

    2014-11-01

    Overall resident interest in certain subspecialties changes with time. We sought to investigate the latest 6-year trend in interventional radiology (IR) and neuroradiology fellowship applications and how it has affected competitiveness in obtaining a position. We analyzed statistics published by the National Resident Matching Program in Results and Data: Specialties Matching Service from 2008 to 2013. From these data, we calculated the positions per IR applicant (PPIRA) and positions per neuroradiology applicant (PPNRA) for each year. The number of positions per applicant is one way to assess specialty competitiveness on a supply-and-demand basis. A lower PPIRA or PPNRA indicates a more competitive year. PPIRA has decreased every year, from 1.71 to the present 0.84, and contributed to 52 applicants being unmatched in 2013, up from 9 in 2008. Accordingly, the number of unfilled positions has decreased from 86 in 2008 to 8 in 2013. PPNRA waxed and waned from 2008 to 2010 but stabilized at around 1.15 thereafter. The number of unfilled positions has never dropped below 46. The number of unmatched applicants was consistently in the teens, except in 2011, when it increased to 23. Interest in IR fellowship has increased significantly over the past 6 years, whereas interest in neuroradiology fellowships has plateaued. IR fellowships have become increasingly competitive, leading to many unmatched residents. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Educational activities regarding exposure reduction in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Osamu; Yabe, Hitoshi; Katoh, Kyoichi; Ueki, Junko; Nakamura, Kimiyuki; Nakatani, Akira; Wakamatsu, Osamu; Satoh, Tsugio; Nakazawa, Yasuo

    2000-01-01

    As interventional radiology (IVR) has become widespread recently, skin injury caused by exposure to radiation have been reported in academic meetings, and are a major concern in academic circles. In 1986, The Japanese Society of Circulation Imaging Technology (CITEC)'s organized a group to engage in an actual condition survey on cineangiography. We have studied exposed doses to patients in the event of cardiac catheterization using ancate data available in Japan and made efforts to spread methods of reducing exposure doses through academic meetings and medical journal. In 1998, we set up the Radiation Exposure Control Committee. The committee's objectives were to reduce exposure doses to patients and operators during cardiovascular examinations, and establish concrete of technical methods and protection guidelines for exposed dose reduction. We have studied presentations at academic meetings and study meetings, etc., and classified the results into the following 5 categories: methods of reducing radiation by X-ray equipment, methods of reducing exposure using X-ray protection devices, exposure dosimetry, clinical cases of radiation exposure, and QC, QA. The committee issued a textbook based on the reports and have educated, guided and enlightened radiological technologists, nurses and ME by holding the 'Seminar for reduction technique of radiation exposure in circulator organs.' (author)

  2. Radiological intervention in postoperative complications following liver transplantation; Interventionelle radiologische Verfahren bei postoperativen Komplikationen nach Lebertransplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, H. [Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum Grosshadern, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Staebler, A. [Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum Grosshadern, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Kunzfeld, A. [Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum Grosshadern, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Zuelke, C. [Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum Grosshadern, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Anthuber, M. [Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum Grosshadern, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Kraemling, H.J. [Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum Grosshadern, Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    Purpose: Postoperative complications contribute significantly to the morbidity and mortality of liver transplant patients. The management of these complications requires a multidisciplinary approach in which interventional radiology plays an integral role. Indications, techniques, and results of radiological interventions in the management of the liver transplant patient are presented. Material and methods: During a 10-year period, 52 out of 420 liver transplant recipients underwent radiological interventions, including angioplasty (n=20), embolization (n=2), percutaneous drainage (n=11), and biliary interventions (n=19). Results: Nine out of ten arterial stenoses located at the anastomoses (n=8), within the liver (n=1) and in the coeliac trunk (n=1) were successfully treated by balloon dilatation. Angioplasty of supra- or infrahepatic anastomotic stenoses of the IVC (n=5) provided long-term success only in combination with stent implantation. Portal vein stenoses and chronic thrombosis were treated by balloon dilatation and stent insertion via transhepatic catheterization of the portal vein. Late strictures of bile-duct anastomoses can be managed by ante- or retrograde interventions. If biliary complications are related to inflammatory or septic problems, the prognosis of graft survival is poor. Conclusion: Interventional radiological procedures are very useful in the management of vascular and biliary complications after liver transplantation. These techniques provide a cure in many situations, and thus, surgical interventions may be avoided in selected cases. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die komplexe chirurgisch-technische Operation sowie immunologische und ischaemieverursachte Probleme tragen zur relativ hohen Komplikationsrate nach Lebertransplantation bei, die grundsaetzlich organ- bzw. lebensbedrohlich fuer den Patienten sind. Interventionelle radiologische Techniken sind aufgrund ihres minimal-invasiven Charakters in der klinischen Versorgung dieser Komplikationen

  3. Use of digital dosemeters for supporting staff radiation safety in paediatric interventional radiology suites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Sarah M; Lai, Priscilla; Connolly, Bairbre L; Gordon, Christopher L

    2013-12-01

    Modern-day interventional radiology (IR) procedures impart a wide range of occupational radiation doses to team members. Unlike thermoluminescent badges, digital dosemeters provide real-time dose readings, making them ideal for identifying different components during IR procedures, which influence staff radiation safety. This study focused solely on paediatric IR (PIR) cases. Digital dosemeters measured the impact of imaging modality, shielding, patient and operator specific factors, on the radiation dose received during various simulated and real live PIR procedures. They recorded potential dose reductions of 10- to 100-fold to each staff member with appropriate use of shielding, choice of imaging method, staff position in the room and complex interplay of other factors. The digital dosemeters were well tolerated by staff. Results highlight some unique radiation safety challenges in PIR that arise from dose increases with magnification use and close proximity of staff to the X-ray beam.

  4. Use of digital dosemeters for supporting staff radiation safety in paediatric interventional radiology suites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeil, S. M.; Lai, P.; Connolly, B. L.; Gordon, C. L.

    2013-01-01

    Modern-day interventional radiology (IR) procedures impart a wide range of occupational radiation doses to team members. Unlike thermoluminescent badges, digital dosemeters provide real-time dose readings, making them ideal for identifying different components during IR procedures, which influence staff radiation safety. This study focused solely on paediatric IR (PIR) cases. Digital dosemeters measured the impact of imaging modality, shielding, patient and operator specific factors, on the radiation dose received during various simulated and real live PIR procedures. They recorded potential dose reductions of 10-to 100-fold to each staff member with appropriate use of shielding, choice of imaging method, staff position in the room and complex interplay of other factors. The digital dosemeters were well tolerated by staff. Results highlight some unique radiation safety challenges in PIR that arise from dose increases with magnification use and close proximity of staff to the X-ray beam. (authors)

  5. Complications with Outpatient Angiography and Interventional Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Noel; Chi, Ka-Kit; Ajaka, Joe; McKay, Lesa; O'Neill, Diane; Wong, Kai Ping

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively identify the complications, and rates of complication, in outpatient angiography and interventional procedures. Methods: There were 1050 consecutive patients, 646 men and 404 women, aged 17-89 years, with a total of 1239 procedures studied in a 2-year period, 1997 to 1999. Results: There were 560 cases of aorto-femoral angiography,resulting in 124 complications (22%), with pain or hematoma in 110.There were 206 cases of neck and cerebral angiography, resulting in 51 complications (25%), with pain and hematoma in 34, transient ischemic attack in 2 and cerebrovascular accident in 1. There were 197 interfentional procedures, with 177 being balloon dilatations, resulting in 68 complications (35%), with 2 having hematomas and 1 having hematoma/abscess requiring active treatment. There were 276 cases having various 'other' procedures (e.g., renal angiography),resulting in 65 complications (24%), with pain and hematoma in 61. No procedure-related death occurred. Eighteen cases (1.5%) had significant complications, with contrast allergy in eight. Conclusion: Outpatient angiography and intervention are relatively safe, with low significant complication rates

  6. Celiac artery stenosis/occlusion treated by interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Osamu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 1-1-1, Honjo Kumamoto 860-8505 (Japan)], E-mail: osamu-3643ik@do9.enjoy.ne.jp; Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 1-1-1, Honjo Kumamoto 860-8505 (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    Severe stenosis/occlusion of the proximal celiac trunk due to median arcuate ligament compression (MALC), arteriosclerosis, pancreatitis, tumor invasion, and celiac axis agenesis has been reported. However, clinically significant ischemic bowel disease attributable to celiac axis stenosis/occlusion appears to be rare because the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) provides for rich collateral circulation. In patients with celiac axis stenosis/occlusion, the most important and frequently encountered collateral vessels from the SMA are the pancreaticoduodenal arcades. Patients with celiac artery stenosis/occlusion are treated by interventional radiology (IR) via dilation of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade. In patients with dilation of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade on SMA angiograms, IR through this artery may be successful. Here we provide several tips on surmounting these difficulties in IR including transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma, an implantable port system for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy to treat metastatic liver tumors, coil embolization of pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms, and arterial stimulation test with venous sampling for insulinomas.

  7. Manual of extravascular minimally invasive interventional procedures of the liver and biliary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda Mena, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    The use of interventional radiology and image-guided surgery has increased. Interventional radiologists are involved in patient treatment, well as in the diagnosis of the disease carrying his knowledge to the tumor treatment and procedures more invasive. Large amount of didactic material there are available, but the country lacks a manual to standardize interventional radiological techniques carried out. Also, those that could be instituted and adapted effectively in the management of hepatobiliary pathology of the Sistema de Salud Publica in Costa Rica, that covers the main procedures and adopt guidelines in a standardized way. A manual of procedures minimally invasive radiologic extravascular of the liver and biliary tract, is presented with broad bibliographic support that directs, standardizes and is adaptable to the needs and own resources of Costa Rica. Interventional radiology has been a non surgical alternative of a low index of complications, useful for the management of some health problems, avoids surgery and certainly lower costs. An alternative to surgical treatment of many conditions is offered, thereby reducing complications (morbidity) and can eliminate the need for hospitalization, in some cases. The development of new materials has allowed the most common working tools of the medical field are improved and become increasingly more efficient in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, improving the training of radiologists in the interventional field. (author) [es

  8. Benefits of an automatic patient dose registry system for interventional radiology and cardiology at five hospitals of the Madrid area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Soto, J.M.; Vano, E.; Sanchez, R.M.; Ten, J.I.; Espana, M.; Pifarre, X.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the results of connecting the interventional radiology and cardiology laboratories of five university hospitals to a unique server using an automatic patient dose registry system (Dose On Line for Interventional Radiology, DOLIR) developed in-house, and to evaluate its feasibility more than a year after its introduction. The system receives and stores demographic and dosimetric parameters included in the MPPS DICOM objects sent by the modalities to a database. A web service provides a graphical interface to analyse the information received. During 2013, the system processed 10 788 procedures (6874 cardiac, 2906 vascular and 1008 neuro interventional). The percentages of patients requiring clinical follow-up due to potential tissue reactions before and after the use of DOLIR are presented. The system allowed users to verify in real-time, if diagnostic (or interventional) reference levels are fulfilled. (authors)

  9. Acute Pancreatitis: The Role of Imaging and Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maher, Michael M.; Lucey, Brian C.; Gervais, Debra A.; Mueller, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis can manifest as a benign condition with minimal abdominal pain and hyperamylasemia or can have a fulminant course, which can be life-threatening usually due to the development of infected pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure. Fortunately, 70-80% of patients with acute pancreatitis have a benign self-limiting course. The initial 24-48 hours after the initial diagnosis is usually the period that determines the subsequent course, and for many of the 20-30% of patients who subsequently have a fulminant course, this becomes apparent within this time frame. With reference to long-term outcome following acute pancreatitis, most cases recover without long-term sequelae with only a minority of cases progressing to chronic pancreatitis. In the initial management of acute pancreatitis, assessment of metabolic disturbances and systemic organ dysfunction is critical. However, the advent and continued refinement of cross-sectional imaging modalities over the past two decades has led to a prominent role for diagnostic imaging in assessing acute pancreatitis. Furthermore, these cross-sectional imaging modalities have enabled the development of diagnostic and therapeutic interventional techniques in the hands of radiologists. In this article we review the diagnostic features of acute pancreatitis, the clinical staging systems, complications and the role of imaging. The role of interventional radiology techniques in the management of acute pancreatitis will be discussed as well as potential complications associated with these treatments

  10. Patient doses in interventional cardiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domienik, J.; Papierz, S.; Jankowski, J.; Peruga, J.Z.

    2008-01-01

    In most countries of European Union legislation requires the determination of the total skin dose to patient resulting from interventional procedures to assess the risk of deterministic effect. To this end, various dose indicators like dose area product (DAP), cumulative dose (CD) and entrance dose at the patient plane (EFD) are used in clinical practice. The study aims at relating those dose indicators with doses ascribe to the most irradiated areas of the patient skin usually expressed in terms of local maximal skin dose (MSD). For the study the local MSD and related to their areas are investigated and compared for coronary angiography CA and intervention (PCI). Two methods implying radiographic films Kodak EDR2 and matrixes of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are applied for direct measurements of dose distribution for selected procedures. Both methods are compared. Additionally, for patient dosimetry the following data: MSD, CD, EFD, fluoroscopy time (FT), number of acquired images, total DAP, fluoro-DAP and record-DAP were collected for randomly selected procedure. The statistical quantities like: median, 3 rd quartile, mean and standard deviation for all dosimetric parameters are determined. Preliminary study showed that the values of data collected for coronary procedures are in the ranges 0,7 - 27,3 min for fluoroscopy time, 50 - 350 Gy cm 2 for total DAP, 300 - 2000 mGy for CD, 140 - 2000 mGy for EFD and 100 - 1500 mGy for local maximal skin dose. For interventions the ranges are, accordingly 3,0 - 43,6 min , 25 - 450 Gy cm 2 , 270 - 6600 mGy, 80 - 2600 mGy and 80 - 1500 mGy. As a result of the study the correlations between dose indicators and local MSD are analyzed. The concentration of dose on irradiated films are going to be investigated in some detail as well. (author)

  11. Study of radiation exposure profiles in interventional radiology professionals; Estudo dos perfis de exposicao a radiacao em profissionais de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchim Neto, Fernando A.; Alves, Allan F.F.; Alvarez, Matheus; Rosa, Maria E.D.; Miranda, Jose R.A.; Freitas, Carlos C.M. de; Moura, Regina; Pina, Diana R. de, E-mail: fernando.bacchim@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Interventional Radiology is the radiology area that provides the highest dose values to the medical staff. Recent surveys show that personal dosimeters may underestimate the radiation dose values in interventional physicians, especially in the extremities and crystalline. The objective of this work was to study the exposure levels to radiation from medical staff in different interventional radiology procedures. Therefore, thermoluminescent dosimeters type LiF: Mg, Ti (TLD-100) were used positioned in the main interventional physician and an assistant in the following locations: some inches below the crystalline, thyroid, chest, gonads, hand and foot. By comparing the values obtained with the annual reference dose levels in workers, maximum numbers of annual procedures were found. Altogether, there were 23 procedures evaluated: 10 diagnostics, 9 angioplasties and 4 stents. The maximum number of annual procedures were estimated by discounting the percentages of attenuation of radiological protection. For procedures of the type diagnosis, angioplasty and stent for the main interventionist, the maximum number of annual procedures were 641, 445 and 113 respectively, while for the interventionists assistants were 930, 1202 and 215 respectively. As each interventionist body region is subject to different levels of exposure, detailed studies of exposure in each region provide better conclusions about what actions are necessary to ensure radiological protection professionals.

  12. Assessment of eye lens doses in interventional radiology: a simulation in laboratory conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cemusova, Z.; Ekendahl, D.; Judas, L.

    2016-01-01

    As workers in interventional radiology belong to one of the most occupationally exposed groups, methods for sufficiently accurate quantification of their external exposure are sought. The objective of the authors' experiment was to investigate the relations between eye lens dose and H p (10), H p (3) or H p (0.07) values measured with a conventional whole-body personal thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD). Conditions of occupational exposure during common interventional procedures were simulated in laboratory. An anthropomorphic phantom represented a physician. The TLDs were fixed to the phantom in different locations that are common for purposes of personal dosimetry. In order to monitor the dose at the eye lens level during the exposures, a special thermoluminescence eye dosemeter was fixed to the phantom's temple. Correlations between doses measured with the whole-body and the eye dosemeters were found. There are indications that personnel in interventional radiology do not need to be unconditionally equipped with additional eye dosemeters, especially if an appropriate whole-body dosimetry system has been already put into practice. (authors)

  13. Assessment of patients' skin dose during interventional cardiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapaki, V.; Vardalaki, E.; Kottou, S.; Molfetas, M.; Neofotistou, V.

    2002-01-01

    During the last 30 years the use of Interventional Cardiology (IC) procedures has increased significantly, mainly due to the benefits and advantages of the method that offers more accurate diagnosis and treatment along with less complications and hospitalization. However, IC procedures are based on the use of x-ray radiation, mostly localized at certain areas of patient's body and for extended periods of time. Consequently, patient may receive high radiation dose and deterministic effects, such as erythema, epilation or even dermal necrosis may be observed. Therefore, the need for reducing radiation dose is highly important. In order to achieve this, good knowledge of the dose levels delivered to the patient during IC procedures is essential since radiation effects are known to increase with dose. It is of great interest to know the point where the maximum skin dose (MSD) is noted since individual sensitivity may vary. MSDs greater than 1 Gy should be recorded. Patient dosimetry during IC procedures is a complex task since these type of procedures depend on various factors, such as complexity and severity of case, different specifications of x-ray equipment and patient's physical characteristics. Moreover, cardiologist's experience plays an important role. For these reasons, Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) as well as the World Health Organization (WHO), have published documents on radiation safety and ways to reduce skin injuries during IC procedures. Various methods have been proposed for measuring MSD such as the use of slow radiotherapy films, thermoluminescent detectors (TLD), scintillation detectors, Dose-Area Product (DAP) meter, as well as a combination of DAP and air kerma. A literature review on MSDs measured during IC procedures showed that doses ranged from 300 to 43000 mGy

  14. Recommendations for equipment requirements and specifications for digital and interventional radiology: Dosimetric aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suliman, I.I.; Zoetelief, J.

    2002-01-01

    The recognition of radiation induced injuries from fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures has resulted in the current demand for development of recommendations and standards to limit dose to both patients and staff. This paper outlines the recommendations drafted within the framework of European Project DIMOND III. The actual work involves survey and review of national and international documents as well as scientific publications in areas relevant to the digital and/or interventional radiology with an aim of developing recommendations for equipment requirements and specifications for digital and interventional radiology. A pilot study of experimental investigations in at least three hospitals will be conducted to test the requirements and the specifications, the result of which will be presented. The recommendations are expected to provide an effective means of dose reduction to both patients and staff while maintaining image quality adequate for the specific diagnosis or interventional procedure. Different components of x-ray systems that have direct impact on patient and staff doses have been considered. Where necessary a compromise between patient dose and image quality has been made. The dosimetric aspects of the recommendations propose detailed descriptions and limits to dosimetric information relevant to patient and staff doses. International recommendations on maximum patient entrance surface dose rate vary in the range from 25 to 65 mGy.min -1 for normal mode fluoroscopy. Maximum image intensifier or image receptor input dose rate around 0.1 Gy min -1 at a distance 30 cm from the image intensifier input surface has been generally recommended. Maximum fluoroscopic dose rate in air must not exceed 50 mGy.min -1 at a location depending on the configuration e.g. for undertable x-ray tube at 10 mm from the patient support on the patient side of the support. The use of pulsed fluoroscopy or low dose fluoroscopy is proposed as good options to minimize

  15. Staff extremity doses in interventional radiology. Results of the ORAMED measurement campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemová, D.; Brodecki, M.; Carinou, E.; Domienik, J.; Donadille, L.; Koukorava, C.; Krim, S.; Ruiz-López, N.; Sans-Merce, M.; Struelens, L.; Vanhavere, F.; Zaknoune, R.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of interventional radiology (IR) procedures in the 20th century has demonstrated significant advantages over surgery procedures. As a result, their number is continuously rising in diagnostic, as well as, in therapy field and is connected with progress in highly sophisticated equipment used for these purposes. Nowadays, in the European countries more than 400 fluoroscopically guided IR procedures were identified with a 10–12% increase in the number of IR examinations every year (). Depending on the complexity of the different types of the interventions large differences in the radiation doses of the staff are observed. The staff that carries out IR procedures is likely to receive relatively high radiation doses, because IR procedures require the operator to remain close to the patient and close to the primary radiation beam. In spite of the fact that the operator is shielded by protective apron, the hands, eyes and legs remain practically unshielded. For this reason, one of the aims of the ORAMED project was to provide a set of standardized data on extremity doses for the personnel that are involved in IR procedures and to optimize their protection by evaluating the various factors that affect the doses. In the framework of work package 1 of the ORAMED project the impact of protective equipment, tube configuration and access routes were analyzed for the selected IR procedures. The position of maximum dose measured is also investigated. The results of the extremity doses in IR workplaces are presented in this study together with the influence of the above mentioned parameters on the doses. -- Highlights: ► We present a set of data on extremity doses for staff in selected interventional radiology procedures. ► We studied the influence of different parameters. ► The measured doses are analyzed according to the operators skill,his position during work, tube configuration, etc. ► Maximum doses recorded for all types of embolisation, in all

  16. Pediatric patient doses in interventional cardiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, R.B.; Murata, C.H.; Moreira, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    The radiation doses from interventional procedures is relevant when treating children because of their greater radiosensitivity compared with adults. The purposes of this paper were to estimate the dose received by 18 pediatric patients who underwent cardiac interventional procedures and to correlate the maximum entrance surface air kerma (Ke,max), estimated with radiochromic films, with the cumulative air kerma values displayed at the end of procedures. This study was performed in children up to 6 years. The study was performed in two hospitals, one located in Recife and the other one in São Paulo. The x-ray imaging systems used were Phillips Allura 12 model with image intensifier system and a Phillips Allura FD10 flat panel system. To estimate the Ke,max on the patient’s skin radiochromic films(Gafchromic XR-RV2) were used. These values were estimated from the maximum optical density measured on film using a calibration curve. The results showed cumulative air kerma values ranging from 78.3- 500.0mGy, with a mean value of 242,3 mGy. The resulting Ke,max values ranged from 20.0-461.8 mGy, with a mean value of 208,8 mGy. The Ke,max values were correlated with the displayed cumulative air kerma values. The correlation factor R² was 0.78, meaning that the value displayed in the equipment’s console can be useful for monitoring the skin absorbed dose throughout the procedure. The routine fluoroscopy time records is not able by itself alert the physician about the risk of dose exceeding the threshold of adverse reactions, which can vary from an early erythema to serious harmful skin damage. (author)

  17. Radiological protection procedures for industrial applications of computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, Josilto Oliveira de

    2009-03-01

    Due to its very particular characteristics, industrial radiography is responsible for roughly half of the relevant accidents in nuclear industry, in developed as well as in developing countries, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Thus, safety and radiological protection in industrial gamma radiography have been receiving especial treatment by regulatory authorities of most Member States. The main objective of the present work was to evaluate, from the radioprotection point of view, the main advantages of computed radiography (CR) for filmless industrial radiography. In order to accomplish this, both techniques, i.e. conventional and filmless computed radiography were evaluated and compared through practical studies. After the studies performed at the present work it was concluded that computed radiography significantly reduces the inherent doses, reflecting in smaller restricted areas and costs, with consequent improvement in radiological protection and safety. (author)

  18. International Commission on Radiological Protection. History, policies, procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, Bo; Dunster, H.J.; Valentin, Jack; )

    2000-01-01

    This report briefly reviews the history, mode of operation, concepts, and current policies of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). It touches upon the objectives of the Commission's recommendations, the quantities used, the biological basis of the Commission's policy, the quantitative basis for its risk estimates, the structure of the system of protection, some problems of interpretation and application in that system, and the need for stability, consistency, and clarity in the Commission's recommendations. (author)

  19. Sedoanalgesia in interventional radiology; Analgosedierung in der interventionellen Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linsenmaier, U.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Reiser, M. [Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Wagner, P. [Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Anaesthesiologie und Intensivmedizin; Ambulantes Operationszentrum, Muenchen Pasing (Germany)

    2002-02-01

    Purpose: Development of a save and effective protocol for analgosedation of patients undergoing painful interventional procedures. Material and Methods: In a prospective trial a consecutive series of 72 adult patients underwent analgosedation during painful interventions. A radiologist performed the analgosedation, the patients received a combination of a shortly effective piperidine derivative (Alfentanil [Rapifen {sup trademark} ]; 7.5-15 {mu}g/kg body weight) and Benzodiazepine (midazolam [Dormicum {sup trademark} ]; 20 {mu}g/kg body weight). After pre-procedure oxygenation patients were continuously monitored. Pain and discomfort were scored using an established visual-analog pain score (0-10). A control group (n=24) had received midazolam, pentazocine or fentanyl according to the study protocol. Results: All procedures could be carried out by an interventional radiologist and a nurse and/or technologist only. In 69/72 cases adequate analgosedation could be achieved. Injection of alfentanil was titrated, with a rapid onset and short acting effect of the analgesia. Patients reported an average pain score of 2.6 vs. 4.5 in the control group. Over 55% experienced no or mild pain (score 0-3), in the control group only 8% reached this level. Conclusion: A combination of shortly effective alfentanil and midazolam allows interventional radiologists to perform major procedures alone under effective analgosedation. This medication scheme is superior to the medication upon demand. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Die Entwicklung eines einfach zu handhabenden Protokolls fuer Radiologen zur Analgosedierung bei schmerzhaften interventionellen Eingriffen. Methoden: Prospektiv wurden 72 konsekutive Patienten zusammengefasst, bei denen schmerzhafte interventionelle Eingriffe geplant waren. Die Anlagosedierung erfolgte mit einer Kombinationsmedikation aus kurzwirksamem Piperidinderivat (Alfentanil [Rapifen {sup trademark} ]; 7,5-15 {mu}g/kg KG) und Benzodiazepin (Midazolam [Dormicum {sup

  20. Pediatric interventional radiology with 3D rotational angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racadio, J.M. [Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Rotational angiography with three-dimensional reconstruction vastly improves spatial orientation, eliminating guesswork during interventions. The 3D images help to define the anatomy more accurately, particularly in the case of overlapping tortuous anatomy such as that encountered in genitourinary abnormalities. The procedures are performed on a Philips Integris Allura biplane system with two 12'' image intensifiers. Although radiologists are trained to assemble multiple oblique views in their minds, that vision is often hard to convey to a waiting surgeon. The 3D images give a much better impression of the spatial relationships, saving valuable time and giving added security. (orig.)

  1. Nanotechnology and its Relationship to Interventional Radiology. Part II: Drug Delivery, Thermotherapy, and Vascular Intervention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Sarah

    2010-09-16

    Nanotechnology can be defined as the design, creation, and manipulation of structures on the nanometer scale. This two-part review is intended to acquaint the interventionalist with the field of nanotechnology, and provide an overview of potential applications, while highlighting advances relevant to interventional radiology. Part 2 of the article concentrates on drug delivery, thermotherapy, and vascular intervention. In oncology, advances in drug delivery allow for improved efficacy, decreased toxicity, and greater potential for targeted therapy. Magnetic nanoparticles show potential for use in thermotherapy treatments of various tumours, and the effectiveness of radiofrequency ablation can be enhanced with nanoparticle chemotherapy agents. In vascular intervention, much work is focused on prevention of restenosis through developments in stent technology and systems for localised drug delivery to vessel walls. Further areas of interest include applications for thrombolysis and haemostasis.

  2. Nanotechnology and its relationship to interventional radiology. Part II: Drug Delivery, Thermotherapy, and Vascular Intervention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Sarah

    2012-02-01

    Nanotechnology can be defined as the design, creation, and manipulation of structures on the nanometer scale. This two-part review is intended to acquaint the interventionalist with the field of nanotechnology, and provide an overview of potential applications, while highlighting advances relevant to interventional radiology. Part 2 of the article concentrates on drug delivery, thermotherapy, and vascular intervention. In oncology, advances in drug delivery allow for improved efficacy, decreased toxicity, and greater potential for targeted therapy. Magnetic nanoparticles show potential for use in thermotherapy treatments of various tumours, and the effectiveness of radiofrequency ablation can be enhanced with nanoparticle chemotherapy agents. In vascular intervention, much work is focused on prevention of restenosis through developments in stent technology and systems for localised drug delivery to vessel walls. Further areas of interest include applications for thrombolysis and haemostasis.

  3. The role of interventional radiology and imaging in pancreatic islet cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, S.; Tapping, C.R.; Walker, J.N.; Bratby, M.; Anthony, S.; Boardman, P.; Phillips-Hughes, J.; Uberoi, R.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic islet cell transplantation (PICT) is a novel treatment for patients with insulin-dependent diabetes who have inadequate glycaemic control or hypoglycaemic unawareness, and who suffer from the microvascular/macrovascular complications of diabetes despite aggressive medical management. Islet transplantation primarily aims to improve the quality of life for type 1 diabetic patients by achieving insulin independence, preventing hypoglycaemic episodes, and reversing hypoglycaemic unawareness. The islet cells for transplantation are extracted and purified from the pancreas of brain-stem dead, heart-beating donors. They are infused into the recipient's portal vein, where they engraft into the liver to release insulin in order to restore euglycaemia. Initial strategies using surgical access to the portal vein have been superseded by percutaneous access using interventional radiology techniques, which are relatively straightforward to perform. It is important to be vigilant during the procedure in order to prevent major complications, such as haemorrhage, which can be potentially life-threatening. In this article we review the history of islet cell transplantation, present an illustrated review of our experience with islet cell transplantation by describing the role of imaging and interventional radiology, and discuss current research into imaging techniques for monitoring graft function.

  4. Should there be greater exposure to interventional radiology in the undergraduate curriculum?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojha U

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Utkarsh Ojha,1 Raihan Mohammed,2 Sayinthen Vivekanantham3 1Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, 2Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, 3University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK Abstract: Medical imaging has been one of the most revolutionary innovations in medicine. Today, as health care professionals shift their focus toward more sophisticated technology and minimally invasive procedures, interventional radiology (IR has become a rapidly expanding specialty. Despite these advances, there is a lack of doctors specializing in this field. A growing body of evidence suggests that the low number of applicants for posts may be due to poor exposure to the specialty at medical school. In this article, we outline the importance of IR in today’s health care system. Next, we evaluate the evidence that there is a lack of knowledge of IR not only among medical students in the UK but globally. We further discuss how a more effective incorporation of IR in the undergraduate curriculum can enhance medical students’ interest in the field and subsequently increase the number of doctors specializing in IR. Finally, we suggest alternative strategies to gauge medical students’ interest in IR, including teaching via e-learning and virtual reality. Keywords: interventional radiology, diagnostic imaging, innovation, medical education, e-learning, virtual reality

  5. Effective dose to patients in interventional vascular radiology in Malaga and Tenerife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Cruces, R.; Perez Martinez, M.; Diez de los Rios Delgado, A.; Hernandez Armas, J.; Garcia-Granados, J.; Diaz Romero, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the research is to estimate the effective dose that patients receive during the procedure of interventional vascular radiology screening using a digital system. The effective dose is the best indicator of radiological risks. A plane ionization camera is used to estimate dose per surface area (Gy/square cm). By means of the method described in the NRPB R-262 report, projections were selected which adjust to the field irradiated in each of the procedures analysed. The product values of the dose surface and effective dose has been 75.7 Gy/cm 2 and 10.5 mSv for abdominal angiography; 29.0 Gy/cm 2 and 7.6 mSv for arteriographic diagnosis of the inferior members; 104.5 Gy/cm 2 and 23.6 mSv for gall drainage; 90.5 Gy/cm 2 and 21.5 mSv for varicoceles, and 39.5 Gy/cm 2 and 9.6 mSv for nephrostomas

  6. PACS for surgery and interventional radiology: Features of a Therapy Imaging and Model Management System (TIMMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, Heinz U.; Berliner, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    Appropriate use of information and communication technology (ICT) and mechatronic (MT) systems is viewed by many experts as a means to improve workflow and quality of care in the operating room (OR). This will require a suitable information technology (IT) infrastructure, as well as communication and interface standards, such as specialized extensions of DICOM, to allow data interchange between surgical system components in the OR. A design of such an infrastructure, sometimes referred to as surgical PACS, but better defined as a Therapy Imaging and Model Management System (TIMMS), will be introduced in this article. A TIMMS should support the essential functions that enable and advance image guided therapy, and in the future, a more comprehensive form of patient-model guided therapy. Within this concept, the 'image-centric world view' of the classical PACS technology is complemented by an IT 'model-centric world view'. Such a view is founded in the special patient modelling needs of an increasing number of modern surgical interventions as compared to the imaging intensive working mode of diagnostic radiology, for which PACS was originally conceptualised and developed. The modelling aspects refer to both patient information and workflow modelling. Standards for creating and integrating information about patients, equipment, and procedures are vitally needed when planning for an efficient OR. The DICOM Working Group 24 (WG-24) has been established to develop DICOM objects and services related to image and model guided surgery. To determine these standards, it is important to define step-by-step surgical workflow practices and create interventional workflow models per procedures or per variable cases. As the boundaries between radiation therapy, surgery and interventional radiology are becoming less well-defined, precise patient models will become the greatest common denominator for all therapeutic disciplines. In addition to imaging, the focus of WG-24 is to serve

  7. Development of a calibration methodology for instruments used to interventional radiology quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Jurema Aparecida de

    2009-01-01

    Interventional radiology is the technique where X radiation images are used as a tool in the conduction of diagnostic or/and therapeutic procedures. The exposition times are long for both procedures, diagnostic and therapeutic, may cause serious injuries in the patient, and also contribute to the dose of the clinical staff. In Brazil there are not yet well established rules to determine the doses and to make the dosimetry in fluoroscopic beams. There is great interest in this study, in relation to the beam quality, the half-value-layer, and others parameters. In this work a Medicor Neo Diagnomax clinical X ray generator, fluoroscopy mode, was used to develop a calibration methodology for instruments used in interventional radiology quality control. One plane parallel ionization chamber PTW was used as monitor. The ionization chambers recommended for fluoroscopy measurements had been evaluated and calibrated in relation to the IPEN Calibration Laboratory reference ionization chamber. The RQR3, RQR5 and RQR7 radiation qualities and the specific ones for fluoroscopy, RQC3, RQC5 and RQC7, were established following the norm IEC 61267. All beams characteristics were determined. Ionization chambers positioning system and the acrylic phantoms to the entrance and exit doses determination were developed and constructed. The results obtained show air kerma rates of 4.5x10 -3 , 1.2x10 -2 and 1.9x10 -2 Gy/min for RQC3, RQC5 and RQC7 respectively. Tests with and without the collimation just after the monitor chamber, were carried out and the results showed a difference of +5.5%, +0.6% e + 0.8%, confirming the importance of the collimation use in these interventionist procedures. (author)

  8. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edholm, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report describing diagnostic techniques used in radiology. It describes the equipment necessary for, and the operation of a radiological department. Also is described the standard methods used in radiodiagnosis. (K.A.E.)

  9. Medical intervention in radiological emergencies, formation and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas H, J.

    2006-01-01

    The work exposes the national experience in the development of training programs in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies. Implemented after valuing the existent situation, identified the necessities and the reach of the training, additionally it was elaborated the content of the training program whose purpose is guided to the invigoration of the medical answer capacity in radiological emergencies The content of the modular program it approaches theoretical- practical aspects on preparation and medical answer in radiological emergencies. The program includes an exercise that simulates a radiological accident, to evaluate during the same one, the answer capacity before this situation. The training concludes with the design of a strategy for the preparation and answer in radiological emergencies in correspondence with the potential accidental scenarios that the participants can face. (Author)

  10. SU-D-209-03: Radiation Dose Reduction Using Real-Time Image Processing in Interventional Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanal, K; Moirano, J; Zamora, D; Stewart, B [University Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize changes in radiation dose after introducing a new real-time image processing technology in interventional radiology systems. Methods: Interventional radiology (IR) procedures are increasingly complex, at times requiring substantial time and radiation dose. The risk of inducing tissue reactions as well as long-term stochastic effects such as radiation-induced cancer is not trivial. To reduce this risk, IR systems are increasingly equipped with dose reduction technologies.Recently, ClarityIQ (Philips Healthcare) technology was installed in our existing neuroradiology IR (NIR) and vascular IR (VIR) suites respectively. ClarityIQ includes real-time image processing that reduces noise/artifacts, enhances images, and sharpens edges while also reducing radiation dose rates. We reviewed 412 NIR (175 pre- and 237 post-ClarityIQ) procedures and 329 VIR (156 preand 173 post-ClarityIQ) procedures performed at our institution pre- and post-ClarityIQ implementation. NIR procedures were primarily classified as interventional or diagnostic. VIR procedures included drain port, drain placement, tube change, mesenteric, and implanted venous procedures. Air Kerma (AK in units of mGy) was documented for all the cases using a commercial radiation exposure management system. Results: When considering all NIR procedures, median AK decreased from 1194 mGy to 561 mGy. When considering all VIR procedures, median AK decreased from 49 to 14 mGy. Both NIR and VIR exhibited a decrease in AK exceeding 50% after ClarityIQ implementation, a statistically significant (p<0.05) difference. Of the 5 most common VIR procedures, all median AK values decreased, but significance (p<0.05) was only reached in venous access (N=53), angio mesenteric (N=41), and drain placement procedures (N=31). Conclusion: ClarityIQ can reduce dose significantly for both NIR and VIR procedures. Image quality was not assessed in conjunction with the dose reduction.

  11. SU-D-209-03: Radiation Dose Reduction Using Real-Time Image Processing in Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanal, K; Moirano, J; Zamora, D; Stewart, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize changes in radiation dose after introducing a new real-time image processing technology in interventional radiology systems. Methods: Interventional radiology (IR) procedures are increasingly complex, at times requiring substantial time and radiation dose. The risk of inducing tissue reactions as well as long-term stochastic effects such as radiation-induced cancer is not trivial. To reduce this risk, IR systems are increasingly equipped with dose reduction technologies.Recently, ClarityIQ (Philips Healthcare) technology was installed in our existing neuroradiology IR (NIR) and vascular IR (VIR) suites respectively. ClarityIQ includes real-time image processing that reduces noise/artifacts, enhances images, and sharpens edges while also reducing radiation dose rates. We reviewed 412 NIR (175 pre- and 237 post-ClarityIQ) procedures and 329 VIR (156 preand 173 post-ClarityIQ) procedures performed at our institution pre- and post-ClarityIQ implementation. NIR procedures were primarily classified as interventional or diagnostic. VIR procedures included drain port, drain placement, tube change, mesenteric, and implanted venous procedures. Air Kerma (AK in units of mGy) was documented for all the cases using a commercial radiation exposure management system. Results: When considering all NIR procedures, median AK decreased from 1194 mGy to 561 mGy. When considering all VIR procedures, median AK decreased from 49 to 14 mGy. Both NIR and VIR exhibited a decrease in AK exceeding 50% after ClarityIQ implementation, a statistically significant (p<0.05) difference. Of the 5 most common VIR procedures, all median AK values decreased, but significance (p<0.05) was only reached in venous access (N=53), angio mesenteric (N=41), and drain placement procedures (N=31). Conclusion: ClarityIQ can reduce dose significantly for both NIR and VIR procedures. Image quality was not assessed in conjunction with the dose reduction.

  12. Assessment of the occupational eye lens dose for clinical staff in interventional radiology, cardiology and neuroradiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Artur; Kadesjö, Nils; Palmgren, Charlotta; Marteinsdottir, Maria; Segerdahl, Tony; Fransson, Annette

    2017-03-20

    In accordance with recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the current European Basic Safety Standards has adopted a reduced occupational eye lens dose limit of 20 mSv yr -1 . The radiation safety implications of this dose limit is of concern for clinical staff that work with relatively high dose x-ray angiography and interventional radiology. Presented in this work is a thorough assessment of the occupational eye lens dose based on clinical measurements with active personal dosimeters worn by staff during various types of procedures in interventional radiology, cardiology and neuroradiology. Results are presented in terms of the estimated equivalent eye lens dose for various medical professions. In order to compare the risk of exceeding the regulatory annual eye lens dose limit for the widely different clinical situations investigated in this work, the different medical professions were separated into categories based on their distinct work pattern: staff that work (a) regularly beside the patient, (b) in proximity to the patient and (c) typically at a distance from the patient. The results demonstrate that the risk of exceeding the annual eye lens dose limit is of concern for staff category (a), i.e. mainly the primary radiologist/cardiologist. However, the results also demonstrate that the risk can be greatly mitigated if radiation protection shields are used in the clinical routine. The results presented in this work cover a wide range of clinical situations, and can be used as a first indication of the risk of exceeding the annual eye lens dose limit for staff at other medical centres.

  13. Provision of out-of-hours interventional radiology services in Scotland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zealley, I.A.; Gordon, T.J.; Robertson, I.; Moss, J.G.; Gillespie, I.N.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the availability of out-of-hours (OOH) interventional radiology (IR) services in Scotland and discuss implications for service redesign. Materials and methods: Data were gathered via a survey conducted by telephone/e-mail interview. The setting was hospitals in Scotland with acute medical and/or surgical beds. The interviewees were consultant interventional radiologists representing each of the 14 geographical Health Boards in Scotland. Results: Three of the 14 geographical Health Boards provided a formal, prospectively planned OOH IR service in at least one hospital. Fourteen of the 34 acute hospitals provided an in-hours IR service, which includes endovascular haemorrhage control. Eight of the 34 acute hospitals had formal, prospectively planned on-call IR arrangements, 12 had an ad-hoc service, and 20 transferred patients to other facilities. Thirty-eight of the 223 consultant radiologists in Scotland were able to perform endovascular haemorrhage control procedures: only 18 of these 38 (47%) were included in on-call rotas. A further 42 radiologists were able to perform nephrostomy and a further 61 were able to perform abscess drainage. Eighty-two radiologists did not perform any interventional procedures. Conclusions: The provision of OOH IR services in Scotland is limited and available resources, both skills and equipment, are being underutilized. These data will be used to inform a process of OOH IR service redesign in Scotland.

  14. The consent process in interventional radiology: the role of specialist nurses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, L.; Laasch, H.-U.; Wilbraham, L.; Marriott, A.; England, R.E.; Martin, D.F.

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the impact of patient education by specialist nurses on patients' understanding of interventional procedures, their anxiety levels and satisfaction with the given information. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty patients attending the radiology department for gastrointestinal interventional procedures were interviewed. Patients were assessed using a combination of categorical and visual analogue scales. Parameters were assessed on admission and after additional information had been given by specialist nurses. After the procedure patients were asked to rate the quality of information given and their overall satisfaction. RESULTS: Four of the 60 patients were excluded due to a Mini Mental Test score of <7. Only 35 (62.5%) claimed to have been given information by the referring consultant. Fifty-three patients received additional information before formally giving consent, 50 (96.2%) from the specialist nurses. Patient anxiety before and after information did not significantly change (p=0.52), but there was significant improvement in levels of satisfaction (p=0.001) and perceived understanding (p<0.001). Patients rated overall quality of information at an average of 9.2/10 and overall satisfaction was high (median=9.1/10). CONCLUSION: The use of specialist nurses to educate patients greatly increases patient understanding. The process of informed consent is improved and patient satisfaction is increased

  15. Radiological protection optimization derived from radiation induced lesions in interventional cardiology finding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.; Arranz, L.; Sastre, J.M.; Ferrer, N.

    1997-01-01

    Interventional Cardiology is one of the specialties in which patients are submitted to the greatest radiation doses with x ray systems used for diagnostic purposes and then, it is also a specialty of high occupational radiation risk. In the last years, several cases of radiation induced lesions produced on patients derived of new complex interventional procedures have been described. As consequence, different rules for avoiding this kind of incidents have been recommended by International Organisations and regulatory Bodies. Nevertheless it has been devoted relatively few attention to the evaluation of the occupational risks that inevitably are also high in these facilities. In this work, some cases of radioinduced skin lesions produced on patients submitted to cardiac ablation procedures are described. Radiological protection considerations of interest for the regulatory Bodies are made, that permit to minimize the probability of these incidents, in what to the X-rays equipment is referred as well as to the operation procedures and level of radiation protection training of the medical specialists. (author)

  16. The consent process in interventional radiology: the role of specialist nurses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, L.; Laasch, H.-U.; Wilbraham, L.; Marriott, A.; England, R.E.; Martin, D.F. E-mail: derrick.martin@smtr.nhs.uk

    2004-03-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the impact of patient education by specialist nurses on patients' understanding of interventional procedures, their anxiety levels and satisfaction with the given information. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty patients attending the radiology department for gastrointestinal interventional procedures were interviewed. Patients were assessed using a combination of categorical and visual analogue scales. Parameters were assessed on admission and after additional information had been given by specialist nurses. After the procedure patients were asked to rate the quality of information given and their overall satisfaction. RESULTS: Four of the 60 patients were excluded due to a Mini Mental Test score of <7. Only 35 (62.5%) claimed to have been given information by the referring consultant. Fifty-three patients received additional information before formally giving consent, 50 (96.2%) from the specialist nurses. Patient anxiety before and after information did not significantly change (p=0.52), but there was significant improvement in levels of satisfaction (p=0.001) and perceived understanding (p<0.001). Patients rated overall quality of information at an average of 9.2/10 and overall satisfaction was high (median=9.1/10). CONCLUSION: The use of specialist nurses to educate patients greatly increases patient understanding. The process of informed consent is improved and patient satisfaction is increased.

  17. Guidelines on the facilities required for minor surgical procedures and minimal access interventions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphreys, H

    2012-02-01

    There have been many changes in healthcare provision in recent years, including the delivery of some surgical services in primary care or in day surgery centres, which were previously provided by acute hospitals. Developments in the fields of interventional radiology and cardiology have further expanded the range and complexity of procedures undertaken in these settings. In the face of these changes there is a need to define from an infection prevention and control perspective the basic physical requirements for facilities in which such surgical procedures may be carried out. Under the auspices of the Healthcare Infection Society, we have developed the following recommendations for those designing new facilities or upgrading existing facilities. These draw upon best practice, available evidence, other guidelines where appropriate, and expert consensus to provide sensible and feasible advice. An attempt is also made to define minimal access interventions and minor surgical procedures. For minimal access interventions, including interventional radiology, new facilities should be mechanically ventilated to achieve 15 air changes per hour but natural ventilation is satisfactory for minor procedures. All procedures should involve a checklist and operators should be appropriately trained. There is also a need for prospective surveillance to accurately determine the post-procedure infection rate. Finally, there is a requirement for appropriate applied research to develop the evidence base required to support subsequent iterations of this guidance.

  18. The clinical practice of interventional radiology: a European perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Aoife N

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current clinical environment in which interventional radiology (IR) is practiced throughout Europe. A survey, comprising 12 questions on IR clinical practice, was sent to 1800 CIRSE members. Members were asked to return one survey per department. Two hundred seventy-four departments returned completed questionnaires, 22% from the United Kingdom (n = 60), 11% from Germany (n = 30), 8% from Austria (n = 23), and the remainder spread over Europe. Experts, with more than 10 years of IR experience, comprised 74% of the survey group. Almost one-third of the radiologists dedicated more than 80% of their clinical sessions to IR alone (27%; n = 75), with two-thirds practicing in a university teaching hospital setting (66%; n = 179). Few institutions have dedicated IR inpatient hospital beds (17%; n = 46), however, to compensate, day case beds are available (31%), IR admitting rights are in place (64% overall, 86% for in-patients, and 89% for day cases), and elective IR admissions can be made through other clinicians (87%). IR outpatient clinics are run at 26% of departments, with an average of two sessions per week. Dedicated nurses staff the majority of IR suites (82%), but clinical junior doctors are lacking (46%). Hospital management\\'s refusing access to beds was the most commonly cited reason for not developing a clinical IR service (41%). In conclusion, there is marked variation across European centers in the current practice of IR. Half do not have dedicated junior doctors and only a small minority have inpatient hospital beds. If IR is to be maintained as a dedicated clinical specialty, these issues need to be addressed urgently.

  19. Identifying the Learning Curve for Uterine Artery Embolisation in an Interventional Radiological Training Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Raj, E-mail: rajdas@nhs.net, E-mail: raj.das@stgeorges.nhs.uk; Lucatelli, Pierleone, E-mail: pierleone.lucatelli@gmail.com; Wang, Haofan, E-mail: wwhhff123@gmail.com; Belli, Anna-Maria, E-mail: anna.belli@stgeorges.nhs.uk [St George’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    AimA clear understanding of operator experience is important in improving technical success whilst minimising patient risk undergoing endovascular procedures, and there is the need to ensure that trainees have the appropriate skills as primary operators. The aim of the study is to retrospectively analyse uterine artery embolisation (UAE) procedures performed by interventional radiology (IR) trainees at an IR training unit analysing fluoroscopy times and radiation dose as surrogate markers of technical skill.MethodsTen IR fellows were primary operator in 200 UAE procedures over a 5-year period. We compared fluoroscopy times, radiation dose and complications, after having them categorised according to three groups: Group 1, initial five, Group 2, >5 procedures and Group 3, penultimate five UAE procedures. We documented factors that may affect screening time (number of vials employed and use of microcatheters).ResultsMean fluoroscopy time was 18.4 (±8.1), 17.3 (±9.0), 16.3 (±8.4) min in Groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between these groups (p > 0.05) with respect to fluoroscopy time or radiation dose. Analysis after correction for confounding factors showed no statistical significance (p > 0.05). All procedures were technically successful, and total complication rate was 4 %.ConclusionUAE was chosen as a highly standardised procedure followed by IR practitioners. Although there is a non-significant trend for shorter screening times with experience, technical success and safety were not compromised with appropriate Consultant supervision, which illustrates a safe construct for IR training. This is important and reassuring information for patients undergoing a procedure in a training unit.

  20. Meeting Report: 2015 Scientific Meeting of the Pan Arab Interventional Radiology Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauqir A. Rana

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The second Annual Scientific Meeting of the Pan Arab Interventional Radiology Society (PAIRS, held March 12-14, 2015, was a step above the inaugural edition, and opened new concepts for development.

  1. Finger doses during interventional radiology: The value of flexible protective gloves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vehmas, T.

    1991-01-01

    Finger doses of radiologists and assistants during 19 interventional radiological procedures were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), and two types of flexible protective gloves were compared with each other. There were considerable differences in doses between different sites of TLDs on fingers. The exact site of TLDs on hands/fingers should thus be reported in papers. Both gloves were also irradiated through an Alderson phantom and the attenuation values were measured. The gloves with slightly greater attenuation proved to be significantly less comfortable to use. Wearing flexible protective gloves did not lengthen screening times as compared to a previous study in the same department. Various aspects of using such gloves are discussed. The attenuation values of gloves reported by the manufacturers may not apply under all clinical circumstances. (orig.) [de

  2. Monte Carlo calculations for reporting patient organ doses from interventional radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Wanli; Feng, Mang; Pi, Yifei; Chen, Zhi; Gao, Yiming; Xu, X. George

    2017-09-01

    This paper describes a project to generate organ dose data for the purposes of extending VirtualDose software from CT imaging to interventional radiology (IR) applications. A library of 23 mesh-based anthropometric patient phantoms were involved in Monte Carlo simulations for database calculations. Organ doses and effective doses of IR procedures with specific beam projection, filed of view (FOV) and beam quality for all parts of body were obtained. Comparing organ doses for different beam qualities, beam projections, patients' ages and patient's body mass indexes (BMIs) which generated by VirtualDose-IR, significant discrepancies were observed. For relatively long time exposure, IR doses depend on beam quality, beam direction and patient size. Therefore, VirtualDose-IR, which is based on the latest anatomically realistic patient phantoms, can generate accurate doses for IR treatment. It is suitable to apply this software in clinical IR dose management as an effective tool to estimate patient doses and optimize IR treatment plans.

  3. StarClose Vascular Closure Device: Prospective Study on 222 Deployments in an Interventional Radiology Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imam, Atique; Carter, Ranjana M. S.; Phillips-Hughes, Jane; Boardman, Philip; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-01-01

    The StarClose device (Abbott Vascular Devices; Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA) utilizes an externally placed Nitinol clip to achieve arterial closure following femoral artery puncture. The objectives of this study were to assess the efficacy and complications of the StarClose device in patients undergoing interventional radiological procedures. Preprocedural clotting status, pulse and blood pressure, severity of vessel calcification, sheath size, and time to deployment were recorded. Postdeployment complications immediately postprocedure, at 1 h, at 2 h, and at 1 week were recorded. A duplex scan was performed in the first 10 patients to assess any immediate vascular complications. Deployments were successful in 96% achieving immediate hemostasis. Mean deployment time was 48 s. There were no major complications. The StarClose device was found to have a high technical and clinical efficacy

  4. Interventional radiology of malignant biliary obstruction complication and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Renyou; Huang Qiang

    2007-01-01

    Intervetional therapy as an important therapeutic method for malignant biliary obstruction has been used extensively, but there still remain some problems worthy for our emphasis and research. We retrospectively reviewed more than 800 patients with malignant obstructive jaundice during 12 years. Indications, contraindications, complications and corresponding treatment methods were studied. Furthermore, discussion including methods of biliary drainage, proper time of stent implantation, methods of anesthesia, usage of antibiotics and haemostat were also carded out. Use of analgesics (pain-suppressal) pre- and post procedure, development of acute pancreatitis and its management, and peri-operative mortality were further investigated in detail. We hope our experiences and lessons would give interventional doctors some help in their career. (authors)

  5. Percutaneous transgastric interventional radiology-operated duodenoscopy for the identification of duodenal perforation and Graham patch dehiscence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Nara Srinivasa, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass may be challenging diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas for gastroenterologists and endoscopists due to anatomic considerations. Pancreaticobiliary limb pathology is particularly difficult to diagnose from standard endoscopic approaches as it often requires double balloon enteroscopy. Percutaneous access and gastrostomy placement into the gastric remnant, however, is a commonly performed procedure by interventional radiology. This report describes the identification of duodenal perforation and Graham patch dehiscence in the pancreaticobiliary limb of a patient with a prior Roux-en-Y gastric bypass who had failed traditional endoscopic measures, using transgastric remnant interventional duodenoscopy and confirmed with methylene blue injection into a periduodenal abscess.

  6. Determining procedures for simulation-based training in radiology: a nationwide needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayahangan, Leizl Joy; Nielsen, Kristina Rue; Albrecht-Beste, Elisabeth; Bachmann Nielsen, Michael; Paltved, Charlotte; Lindorff-Larsen, Karen Gilboe; Nielsen, Bjørn Ulrik; Konge, Lars

    2018-01-09

    New training modalities such as simulation are widely accepted in radiology; however, development of effective simulation-based training programs is challenging. They are often unstructured and based on convenience or coincidence. The study objective was to perform a nationwide needs assessment to identify and prioritize technical procedures that should be included in a simulation-based curriculum. A needs assessment using the Delphi method was completed among 91 key leaders in radiology. Round 1 identified technical procedures that radiologists should learn. Round 2 explored frequency of procedure, number of radiologists performing the procedure, risk and/or discomfort for patients, and feasibility for simulation. Round 3 was elimination and prioritization of procedures. Response rates were 67 %, 70 % and 66 %, respectively. In Round 1, 22 technical procedures were included. Round 2 resulted in pre-prioritization of procedures. In round 3, 13 procedures were included in the final prioritized list. The three highly prioritized procedures were ultrasound-guided (US) histological biopsy and fine-needle aspiration, US-guided needle puncture and catheter drainage, and basic abdominal ultrasound. A needs assessment identified and prioritized 13 technical procedures to include in a simulation-based curriculum. The list may be used as guide for development of training programs. • Simulation-based training can supplement training on patients in radiology. • Development of simulation-based training should follow a structured approach. • The CAMES Needs Assessment Formula explores needs for simulation training. • A national Delphi study identified and prioritized procedures suitable for simulation training. • The prioritized list serves as guide for development of courses in radiology.

  7. Using the Monte Carlo technique to calculate dose conversion coefficients for medical professionals in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, W.S.; Carvalho Jr, A.B.; Hunt, J.G.; Maia, A.F.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate doses in the physician and the nurse assistant at different positions during interventional radiology procedures. In this study, effective doses obtained for the physician and at points occupied by other workers were normalised by air kerma-area product (KAP). The simulations were performed for two X-ray spectra (70 kVp and 87 kVp) using the radiation transport code MCNPX (version 2.7.0), and a pair of anthropomorphic voxel phantoms (MASH/FASH) used to represent both the patient and the medical professional at positions from 7 cm to 47 cm from the patient. The X-ray tube was represented by a point source positioned in the anterior posterior (AP) and posterior anterior (PA) projections. The CC can be useful to calculate effective doses, which in turn are related to stochastic effects. With the knowledge of the values of CCs and KAP measured in an X-ray equipment, at a similar exposure, medical professionals will be able to know their own effective dose. - Highlights: ► This study presents a series of simulations to determine scatter-dose in IR. ► Irradiation of the worker is non-uniform and a part of his body is shielded. ► With the CCs it is possible to estimate the occupational doses in the CA examination. ► Protection of medical personnel in IR is an important issue of radiological protection

  8. Modern radiology in oncology and waiting lists for procedures: Breast cancer screening in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimiljan Kadivec

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Good and modern radiology equipment is needed for successful treatment of the oncologic patients. New Department of Radiology of the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana is entirely digital and can compete with the similar radiologic departments all over the world. It si possible to perform all the new modern procedures that the oncologic patients need. Important diagnostic modality is PET CT that fulfill the selection of the diagnostic procedures for cancer patients. The problem of Slovenian radiology is lack of the radiologists. This problem could be solved with telemedicine and properly awarded work that was performed. Waiting lists for procedures like CT, MR, US are short for oncologic patients in comparison with the other radiologic units in Slovenia.Conclusions: At the beginning of the year 2008 we will start the Breast Cancer Screening Program in Slovenia. It is organized by Institute of Oncology Ljubljana (DORA program. Breast cancer screening program will be centralized, in accordance with of the European guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis 2006 (fourth edition and supervision of reference breast screening center. The main goal of the breast cancer screening program in Slovenia is reduction of the breast cancer death for 25 % or more.

  9. 29 CFR 2700.73 - Procedure for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedure for intervention. 2700.73 Section 2700.73 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES Review by the Commission § 2700.73 Procedure for intervention. After the Commission has directed a case...

  10. Radiologic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judge, L.O.

    1987-01-01

    An increasing variety of imaging modalities as well as refinements of interventional techniques have led to a resurgence of radiologic interest and participation in urolithiasis management. Judicious selection of the diagnostic examination, close monitoring during the procedure, consultation with urologic colleagues, and a careful regard for radiation safety guidelines define the role of the radiologist in renal stone disease

  11. Interventional Radiological Treatment of Perihepatic Vascular Stenosis or Occlusion in Pediatric Patients After Liver Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uller, Wibke; Knoppke, Birgit; Schreyer, Andreas G.; Heiss, Peter; Schlitt, Hans J.; Melter, Michael; Stroszczynski, Christian; Zorger, Niels; Wohlgemuth, Walter A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of percutaneous treatment of vascular stenoses and occlusions in pediatric liver transplant recipients. Methods: Fifteen children (mean age 8.3 years) underwent interventional procedures for 18 vascular complications after liver transplantation. Patients had stenoses or occlusions of portal veins (n = 8), hepatic veins (n = 3), inferior vena cava (IVC; n = 2) or hepatic arteries (n = 5). Technical and clinical success rates were evaluated. Results: Stent angioplasty was performed in seven cases (portal vein, hepatic artery and IVC), and sole balloon angioplasty was performed in eight cases. One child underwent thrombolysis (hepatic artery). Clinical and technical success was achieved in 14 of 18 cases of vascular stenoses or occlusions (mean follow-up 710 days). Conclusion: Pediatric interventional radiology allows effective and safe treatment of vascular stenoses after pediatric liver transplantation (PLT). Individualized treatment with special concepts for each pediatric patient is necessary. The variety, the characteristics, and the individuality of interventional management of all kinds of possible vascular stenoses or occlusions after PLT are shown

  12. Diagnostic and interventional radiology workload in acute pancreatitis in an ITU/HDU setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Y.Y. [Department of Radiology, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester (United Kingdom); O' Shea, S. [Department of Radiology, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester (United Kingdom); Lee, S.H. [Department of Radiology, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: stephen.lee@cmmc.nhs.uk

    2006-01-15

    AIM: To determine the impact on diagnostic and interventional radiology services when imaging patients with severe pancreatitis on intensive therapy (ITU) and high-dependency units (HDU) in a tertiary referral centre. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred and sixty-nine patients admitted to ITU/HDU over a 9-year period (1996-2004) with severe acute pancreatitis were reviewed. There were 109 admissions to the ITU with length of stay of 0.2-81.6 days (mean 19.7 days) and 92 admissions to the HDU with length of stay of 0.4-12.8 days (mean 4.9 days). RESULTS: One hundred and seventy-nine computed tomography (CT) and 199 ultrasound (US) examinations were performed on the ITU patients in whom interventional procedures were required in 24% of patients undergoing CT examinations and in 32% of patients undergoing US. Sixty-two CT and 60 US examinations were performed in the HDU patients. The percentage of interventional procedures performed in HDU patients was similar to that in ITU patients, i.e., 18% CT-guided and 35% US-guided. The proportion of patients that underwent investigations and interventions has gradually increased over the period of the study. Inpatient mortalities were 29% and 5.4%, respectively, in ITU and HDU patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the huge input and increasing workload undertaken by radiologists when managing patients with severe acute pancreatitis in an ITU/HDU setting. We believe this is partly due to the implementation of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) guidelines on management of acute pancreatitis and partly due to the more intensive non-surgical management offered to patients being referred into a specialist tertiary referral unit.

  13. Manual of use and accounting of radioactive material and procedures of radiological protection for nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez, Miguel

    1997-03-01

    This manual of use and accounting of material radioactive and procedures of radiological safety tries to facilitate workings of protection of material radioactive in services of medicine nuclear, during diagnosis (examinations with x-rays, or those that are made in nuclear medicine), or during the processing of diseases, mainly of the carcinomas (x-ray)

  14. Monte Carlo simulations of scattered radiation fields in interventional radiology; Simulacion Monte Carlo de campos de radiacion dispersa en radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duch, M. A.; Zaragoza, F. J.; Sempau, J.; Ginjaume, M.; Vano, E.; Sanchez, R.; Fernandez, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    The study shows that the MC simulation is a useful tool to facilitate the assessment of the spatial distribution of the dose due to the radiation scattered in interventional radiology procedures, as well as to determine the influence of various operational parameters in the same , avoiding experimental measures that require much time of use the Cath Labs. (Author)

  15. complementary roles of interventional radiology and therapeutic endoscopy in gastroenterology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ray, David M; Srinivasan, Indu; Tang, Shou-Jiang

    2017-01-01

    radiology have resulted in the paradigm shift in the management of these conditions. In this paper, we discuss the patient's work up, indications, and complementary roles of endoscopic and angiographic management in the settings of gastrointestinal bleeding, enteral feeding, cecostomy tube placement...

  16. Implementation of Ray Safe i2 System for staff dose measuring in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershan, Vesna; Atsovska, Violeta

    2013-01-01

    Interventional radiology procedures usually delivered the highest radiation dose to the patients as well as to medical personal. Beside another factors like patient size, fluoroscopy time, machine calibration etc., a good clinical practice has strong effects to staff and patient’s radiation dose. Materials and methods: In August 2012, a Ray Safe i2 system was installed in a private hospital in Skopje. The main purpose of this dosimetry system is to provide real time indication for the current exposure level of the medical personal. Knowing that, the staff has prerequisites to adjust their behavior to minimize unnecessary exposure like changing distance from exposed volume, C-ram angulations, field of view etc. and on this way to develop a good clinical practice. The Ray Safe i2 system is consisted by ten digital dosimeters, two dock stations, real time display, dose viewer and dose manager software. During interventional procedures, each involved staff wears dosimeter which measures and records X-Ray exposure every second and transfer the data wirelessly to the real time display. Color indication bars (green, yellow, red) represents the intensity of the currently received exposure, whereas green zone indicates < 0.2 mSv/h, yellow zone from 0.2 to 2 mSv/h and red zone indications from 2 to 20 mSv/h. Additionally, accumulated dose per individual is displayed next to the color indication bars. By using the software, information about personal dose history, such as annual dose, dose per particular session, hour, day or week, can be viewed and analyzed. Results: In this work it was found that staff accumulated doses were constantly increased over time, but reported number of procedures does not correspond to this tendency. Our assumption is that there is a misleading between reported number and actual performed procedures. Doctor1 received 55 times more dose than Doctor2 and Nurse1 received 11 to 3 times more dose than another Nurses. It was found a correlation of R2

  17. Radiological procedures of the biliary tract and their complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, U.

    1986-01-01

    In order to assess the incidence and type of complications at PTC and transhepatic bile duct intubation three different patient populations were investigated retrospectively. Information form angiofraphy (n =83), CT (n =23), PTC examinations (n = 237) and medical records were analysed in order to detect complications caused by the transhepatic procedures. Complications were observed in 17-33 %, treatment was required in 4-6 % and procedure related mortality was 1-2 % in the different materials. A randomised prospective clinical investigation in 200 consecutive patients was performed to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of preoperative intravenous infusion cholangiography (PIC) with iotroxate as compared to that of operative cholangiography (OC) and to assess the incidence of complications. Bile duct calculus was underdiagnosed with PIC in 1/124 patients and overdiagnosed with OC in 3/124 patients examined with both methods. PIC was found to reduce operating time significantly. Only two minor (1 %) and no serve of fatal reactions to iotroxate were noted. An experimental model was set up to study the morphology of surgically created stenotic bile duct anastomoses in 13 pigs before and after transhepatic balloon catheter dilatation. In pigs not dilated by balloon catheter a fibrotic stenosis persisted during a follow-up period of 25 weeks. Transhepatic balloon catheter dilatation of the stenotic area caused a bile duct wall lesion which resulted in a fibrous healing that was almost complete after four weeks. An initial increase of the stricture diameter was followed by partial restenosis in the short-term follow-up. (author)

  18. Radiation field distribution within the room for three commonly-used interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Changcai; Zhang Lin; Min Nan; Lu Feng; Li Quantai; Deng Daping; Chen Yue; Zhu Jianguo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To detect the radiation field distribution within the room for three commonly-used interventional procedures, in order to provide basic data for the radiation protection and safe operation of staff involved in interventional radiology. Methods: The thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) were placed in different points on the horizontal plane around the interventional table and the vertical plane where the staff often stayed. Based on the selected experimental conditions, the TLDs were grouped to be irradiated. After the experiment, the TLDs were measured in the laboratory to calculate the doses of radiation field. Results: Data obtained at the same position followed basically as cardiovascular intervention > cerebrovascular intervention > liver intervention. Intervention of same type at the same position followed as high-dose group > mid-dose group > low-dose group. These results were consistent with the useful beam doses, and proportional to the fluoroscopy time. A few data with exception were due to measurement error or experimental error. Conclusions: Cerebrovascular and liver interventional procedures resulted in the relatively low radiation doses. The radiation doses at the distance of more than 3 m can be negligible. For cardiovascular interventional procedure, with the decrease of the distance from the X-ray tube, the dose decreased. In the radiation field,the operator, the first assistant and second assistant would exposed to higher dose on the standing points while patients receive lower doses in the head and feet direction. (authors)

  19. Influence of exposure and geometric parameters on absorbed doses associated with common neuro-interventional procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mohammad Javad; Wong, Jeannie Hsiu Ding; Jong, Wei Loong; Thorpe, Nathan; Cutajar, Dean; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of routine exposure parameters on patient's dose during neuro-interventional radiology procedures. We scrutinized the routine radiological exposure parameters during 58 clinical neuro-interventional procedures such as, exposure direction, magnification, frame rate, and distance between image receptor to patient's body and evaluate their effects on patient's dose using an anthropomorphic phantom. Radiation dose received by the occipital region, ears and eyes of the phantom were measured using MOSkin detectors. DSA imaging technique is a major contributor to patient's dose (80.9%) even though they are used sparingly (5.3% of total frame number). The occipital region of the brain received high dose largely from the frontal tube constantly placed under couch (73.7% of the total KAP). When rotating the frontal tube away from under the couch, the radiation dose to the occipital reduced by 40%. The use of magnification modes could increase radiation dose by 94%. Changing the image receptor to the phantom surface distance from 10 to 40cm doubled the radiation dose received by the patient's skin at the occipital region. Our findings provided important insights into the contribution of selected fluoroscopic exposure parameters and their impact on patient's dose during neuro-interventional radiology procedures. This study showed that the DSA imaging technique contributed to the highest patient's dose and judicial use of exposure parameters might assist interventional radiologists in effective skin and eye lens dose reduction for patients undergoing neuro-interventional procedures. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. All rights reserved.

  20. Economic evaluation of angiographic interventions including a whole-radiology in- and outpatient care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C.; Abel, K.; Krupski, G.; Lorenzen, J.; Adam, G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the economic efficiency of a whole-radiology in- and outpatient treatment with angiographic interventions performed as the main or sole therapy. Materials and Methods: The calculations represent the data of a university radiology department, including the following angiographic interventions (neuroradiology not considered): Vascular intervention (PTA, stent implantation) of kidneys and extremities, recanalization of hemodialysis access, chemoembolization, diagnostic arterioportal liver CT, port implantation, varicocele embolization, PTCD, percutaneous implantation of biliary stent. First, the different angiographic interventions are categorized with reference to the German DRG system 2005. Considering the example of a university hospital, the individual cost of each intervention is calculated and correlated with reimbursements by G-DRG2005 and so-called ''ambulant operation'' (EBM200plus). With these data, profits and losses are calculated for both in- and outpatient care. Results: Radiologic interventions of inpatients yield a profit in the majority of cases. With a base rate of 2900 Euro, the profits in our university hospital range between -872 Euro and +3411 Euro (mean: +1348 Euro). On the other hand, those angiographic interventions suitable for ''ambulant operation'' generate average profits of +372 Euro, if only direct costs are considered. The data of outpatient radiological interventions average between 381 Euro up to 1612 Euro lower than compared with profits obtained from in patient care. (orig.)

  1. National survey of patient and staff doses in interventional radiology - first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisova, R.; Vassileva, J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work, is to present the first results from the National study of patient and staff doses in interventional radiology. Up to the present moment, 6 X-ray units and 12 examinations have been included in the study - 6 diagnostic and 6 therapeutic. The following information was recorded for each examination: type and complexity of the procedure, patient data, procedure parameters (frame rate, fluoroscopy time), patient dose (kerma-area product, P KA ) and staff dose (dose of the eye lens of the operator). P KA was directly recorded from the X-ray unit reading, or measured with externally mounted kerma-area product meters DIAMENTOR E2 and DIAMENTOR M4 KDK (PTW, Freiburg). The eye lens dose was measured with an EDD-30 (UNFORS, Sweden) electronic dosimeters with a solid state detector. The mean values of the measured parameters for each of the procedures were compared with the European reference levels; the comparison revealed a great potential for patient dose reduction in clinical practice. Patient exposure is influenced by a series of factors such as the type, complexity and duration of the procedure, patient characteristics (weight, height, age and condition of blood vessels, etc.), skill and radiation protection knowledge of the operator, and the type, technical parameters and condition of the X-ray unit, ad well as the operation modes employed during the procedure. He contemporary digital X-ray units offer an opportunity for dose decrease provided that their various operation modes are known and optimally used by the physician. Additionally, the practical skills of the clinicians in the field of radiation protection, and their awareness with respect to the patient dose should be increased. (authors)

  2. Preliminary characterization of dose in personnel of interventional radiology; Caracterizacao preliminar da dose em profissionais de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godolfim, Laura Larre; Anes, Mauricio; Bacelar, Alexandre; Lykawka, Rochelle [Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to X-rays of Interventional Radiology professionals (IR) impacts in the high dose rate received by these individuals, and there are reports of biological effects of this professional activity. Therefore, it is fomented greater control over the doses received by these workers. This research intends to characterize the doses received by the professionals during IR procedures. We evaluated the doses of radiologists, anesthesiologists and nursing staff of the Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, through measures with dosimeters of the OSL type, distributed in up to six regions of the body of these professionals. Until now were accompanied 33 cholangiography procedures and 29 embolization procedures. As a preliminary result, it was possible to identify a wide variation between doses of the professionals of the same function in each procedure. In overview, the dose of the professionals presented in descending order as a radiologist 1> radiologist 2 > anesthetist > nursing. (author)

  3. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this text-book basic knowledge about radiology, biomedical diagnostic methods (radiography, computer tomography), nuclear medicine and safety and radiation protection of personnel on the radiodiagnostic place of work are presented

  4. Genitourinary radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClennan, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review of genitourinary radiology highlights new findings in the field that have occurred in the past year. The physiology of contrast media, and the occasional life-threatening contrast medial reaction are discussed. Common urologic problems such as stones, infection, and obstruction are examined in order to interpret static radiographs in a more meaningful way. The field of interventional uroradiology continues to expand, with new procedures being tried and new indications for old procedures being developed. (KRM)

  5. Fluoroscopy procedure and equipment changes to reduce staff radiation exposure in the interventional spine suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plastaras, Chris; Appasamy, Malathy; Sayeed, Yusef; McLaughlin, Coleen; Charles, Jeremy; Joshi, Anand; Macron, Donald; Pukenas, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Fluoroscopic guided percutaneous interventional spine procedures are increasingly performed in recent years as they have been shown to be target specific and enhance patient safety. However, ionizing radiation has been associated with stochastic effects such as cancer and genetic defects as well as deterministic effects such as cataracts, erythema, epilation, and even death. These are dose related, and hence, measures should be taken to minimize radiation exposure to patients and health care personnel to reduce these adverse effects. A risk reduction project was completed with the goal of reducing effective doses to the staff and patients in a university-based spinal interventional practice. Effective dose reduction to the staff and patients was hypothesized to occur with technique and equipment changes in the procedure suite. The goal of this study was to quantify effective dose rates to staff before and after interventions. Retrospective study comparing descriptive data of effective dose to the health care staff before and after implementation of a combination of technique and equipment changes. Technique changes from pre to post intervention period included continuous needle advancement under continuous fluoroscopic controlled by the interventional physician to intermittent needle advancement under pulsed fluoroscopic controlled by the radiology technician. Equipment changes included circumferential lead drape skirt around the procedure table and use of mobile transparent lead barriers on both sides of the procedure table.Effective dose exposure measured in Millirem (mrem) from the radiation dosimetry badges for pre-intervention (February 2009 through June 2009) and post-intervention (November 2009 through March 2010) periods were examined through monthly radiation dosimetry reports for the fluoroscopy suite staff. A total of 685 interventional procedures were performed in the pre-intervention period and 385 in the post-intervention period. The median cumulative

  6. The quality assessment of the interventional radiology publications in Chinese journal of radiology using the randomized controlled trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiangtao; Xu Guohui; He Hong; Yan Yaiying; Mao Bing

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the quality of reporting randomized controlled trials published in Chinese journal of radiology from 2000 to 2005. Methods: A manual search was performed and 22 checklists of CONSORT statements and other self-established criteria were applied. Results: Six volumes and 72 issues were investigated. There were total trials of 236 in 2186 literatures, and finally 3 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) (1.27%) were identified. In the 3 RCTs, there were 3 trials with methods of randomization, 1 with endpoints measurement, 1 with multi-centre, but without the prior calculation of sample size, blind methods, statistically probability, participant flow, compliance and negative results. Conclusion: The quality of reporting randomized controlled trials of interventional radiology has been improved, but it did not meet fully the CONSORT statement. (authors)

  7. Use of Low-Fidelity Simulation Laboratory Training for Teaching Radiology Residents CT-Guided Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Melissa; Nelson, Rachel; Roebel, John; Collins, Heather; Anderson, M Bret

    2016-11-01

    To determine the benefit of the addition of low-fidelity simulation-based training to the standard didactic-based training in teaching radiology residents common CT-guided procedures. This was a prospective study involving 24 radiology residents across all years in a university program. All residents underwent standard didactic lecture followed by low-fidelity simulation-based training on three common CT-guided procedures: random liver biopsy, lung nodule biopsy, and drain placement. Baseline knowledge, confidence, and performance assessments were obtained after the didactic session and before the simulation training session. Approximately 2 months later, all residents participated in a simulation-based training session covering all three of these procedures. Knowledge, confidence, and performance data were obtained afterward. These assessments covered topics related to preprocedure workup, intraprocedure steps, and postprocedure management. Knowledge data were collected based on a 15-question assessment. Confidence data were obtained based on a 5-point Likert-like scale. Performance data were obtained based on successful completion of predefined critical steps. There was significant improvement in knowledge (P = .005), confidence (P training to the standard didactic curriculum for all procedures. This study suggests that the addition of low-fidelity simulation-based training to a standard didactic-based curriculum is beneficial in improving resident knowledge, confidence, and tested performance of common CT-guided procedures. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Variability in the Use of Simulation for Procedural Training in Radiology Residency: Opportunities for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalon, Shanna A; Chikarmane, Sona A; Yeh, Eren D; Smith, Stacy E; Mayo-Smith, William W; Giess, Catherine S

    2018-03-19

    Increased attention to quality and safety has led to a re-evaluation of the classic apprenticeship model for procedural training. Many have proposed simulation as a supplementary teaching tool. The purpose of this study was to assess radiology resident exposure to procedural training and procedural simulation. An IRB-exempt online survey was distributed to current radiology residents in the United States by e-mail. Survey results were summarized using frequency and percentages. Chi-square tests were used for statistical analysis where appropriate. A total of 353 current residents completed the survey. 37% (n = 129/353) of respondents had never used procedure simulation. Of the residents who had used simulation, most did not do so until after having already performed procedures on patients (59%, n = 132/223). The presence of a dedicated simulation center was reported by over half of residents (56%, n = 196/353) and was associated with prior simulation experience (P = 0.007). Residents who had not had procedural simulation were somewhat likely or highly likely (3 and 4 on a 4-point Likert-scale) to participate if it were available (81%, n = 104/129). Simulation training was associated with higher comfort levels in performing procedures (P simulation training is associated with higher comfort levels when performing procedures, there is variable use in radiology resident training and its use is not currently optimized. Given the increased emphasis on patient safety, these results suggest the need to increase procedural simulation use during residency, including an earlier introduction to simulation before patient exposure. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Complication Rates and Patency of Radiologically Guided Mushroom Gastrostomy, Balloon Gastrostomy, and Gastrojejunostomy: A Review of 250 Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yip, Doris; Vanasco, Matthew; Funaki, Brian

    2004-01-01

    To compare complication rates and tube performance of percutaneous mushroom gastrostomy, balloon gastrostomy, and gastrojejunostomy. Between September 9, 1999 and April 23, 2001, 203 patients underwent 250 radiologically guided percutaneous gastrostomy and gastrojejunostomy procedures. Follow-up was conducted through chart reviews and review of our interventional radiology database. Procedural and catheter-related complications were recorded. Chi-square statistical analysis was performed. In patients receiving mushroom-retained gastrostomy catheters (n = 114), the major complication rate was 0.88% (n = 1), the minor complication rate was 5.3% (n = 6), and the tube complication rate was 4.4% (n = 5). In patients receiving balloon-retained gastrostomy tubes (n = 67), the major complication rate was 0, the minor complication rate was 4.5% (n = 3), and the tube complication rate was 34.3% (n = 23). In patients receiving gastrojejunostomy catheters (n = 69), the major complication rate was 1.4% (n = 1), the minor complication rate was 2.9% (n = 2), and the tube complication rate was 34.8% (n = 24). No statistically significant differences were found between procedural or peri-procedural complications among the different types of tubes. Mushroom-retained catheters had significantly fewer tube complications (p < 0.01). Percutaneous gastrostomy and gastrojejunostomy have similar procedural and peri-procedural complication rates. Mushroom gastrostomy catheters have fewer tube-related complications compared with balloon gastrostomy and gastrojejunostomy catheters. In addition, mushroom-retained catheters exhibit the best overall long-term tube patency and are therefore the gastrostomy catheter of choice

  10. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part II Diagnostic Ultrasound-Guided Interventional Procedures (Long Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidhu, P. S.; Brabrand, K.; Cantisani, V.

    2015-01-01

    This is the second part of the series on interventional ultrasound guidelines of the Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB). It deals with the diagnostic interventional procedure. General points are discussed which are pertinent to all patients, followed by organ......-specific imaging that will allow the correct pathway and planning for the interventional procedure. This will allow for the appropriate imaging workup for each individual interventional procedure (Long version)....

  11. The Changing Face of Vascular Interventional Radiology: The Future Role of Pharmacotherapies and Molecular Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapping, Charles R., E-mail: crtapping@doctors.org.uk; Bratby, Mark J., E-mail: mark.bratby@ouh.nhs.uk [Oxford University Hospitals, John Radcliffe Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01

    Interventional radiology has had to evolve constantly because there is the ever-present competition and threat from other specialties within medicine, surgery, and research. The development of new technologies, techniques, and therapies is vital to broaden the horizon of interventional radiology and to ensure its continued success in the future. In part, this change will be due to improved chronic disease prevention altering what we treat and in whom. The most important of these strategies are the therapeutic use of statins, Beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and substances that interfere with mast cell degeneration. Molecular imaging and therapeutic strategies will move away from conventional techniques and nano and microparticle molecular technology, tissue factor imaging, gene therapy, endothelial progenitor cells, and photodynamic therapy will become an important part of interventional radiology of the future. This review looks at these new and exciting technologies.

  12. The Changing Face of Vascular Interventional Radiology: The Future Role of Pharmacotherapies and Molecular Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapping, Charles R.; Bratby, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Interventional radiology has had to evolve constantly because there is the ever-present competition and threat from other specialties within medicine, surgery, and research. The development of new technologies, techniques, and therapies is vital to broaden the horizon of interventional radiology and to ensure its continued success in the future. In part, this change will be due to improved chronic disease prevention altering what we treat and in whom. The most important of these strategies are the therapeutic use of statins, Beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and substances that interfere with mast cell degeneration. Molecular imaging and therapeutic strategies will move away from conventional techniques and nano and microparticle molecular technology, tissue factor imaging, gene therapy, endothelial progenitor cells, and photodynamic therapy will become an important part of interventional radiology of the future. This review looks at these new and exciting technologies

  13. Development of a real-time extremity dose monitor for personnel in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Nobuhiko; Kusama, Tomoko; Adachi, Akiko

    2000-01-01

    Protection of personnel in interventional radiology is one of the most important issues of radiological protection in medicine. Fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures require the operation near X-ray beam, which brings a considerable hand exposure to the operators. For the purpose of effectual control of their extremity doses, we have developed a real-time extremity dose monitor which is worn on a strap around the wrist. The monitor consists of a silicon semiconductor detector, thin lithium battery and a waterproof frame with a four-digit LED display. Experiment was carried out to examine a response of the monitor to diagnostic X-rays. A practical test was also performed to evaluate usability in the actual interventional procedures. In the experiment, the extremity dose monitor was placed on an arm phantom and exposed to diagnostic X-rays. Readings of the monitor were compared to those of Capintec PS-033 shallow chamber. The monitor was highly sensitive to diagnostic X-rays. It showed a linear response down to doses of a few tens of microsieverts. For high dose-rate exposure, however, a slight decrease in the response was observed, about 10% of counting loss for 80 kV, 40 mA X-ray at one meter from the focus. With regard to energy dependence, variation was within 20% for 60 to 100 kV X-rays. The monitor showed a good angular response in general, except lateral geometry facing the far side from a detector center. In the practical test, hand exposures of medical staff were measured with the extremity dose monitor. They were also asked to fill in a questionnaire regarding size and weight of the monitor, clarity of the display and usefulness. The subjects consisted of physicians, technicians and nurses who engaged in angiography, PTCD, CT-biopsy, barium enema and so on. The readings of the monitor were less than 1 mSv in most cases while 93 mSv was recorded in an extreme case due to direct-beam exposure. In some cases, TLD rings were used together with the

  14. Avoidance of radiation injuries from medical interventional procedures, ICRP Publication 85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, J.

    2000-01-01

    Interventional radiology (fluoroscopically-guided) techniques are being used by an increasing number of clinicians not adequately trained in radiation safety or radiobiology. Many of these interventionists are not aware of the potential for injury from these procedures or the simple methods for decreasing their incidence. Many patients are not being counselled on the radiation risks, nor followed up when radiation doses from difficult procedures may lead to injury. Some patients are suffering radiation-induced skin injuries and younger patients may face an increased risk of future cancer. Interventionists are having their practice limited or suffering injury, and are exposing their staff to high doses. In some interventional procedures, skin doses to patients approach those experienced in some cancer radiotherapy fractions. Radiation-induced skin injuries are occurring in patients due to the use of inappropriate equipment and, more often, poor operational technique. Injuries to physicians and staff performing interventional procedures have also been observed. Acute radiation doses (to patients) may cause erythema at 2 Gy, cataract at 2 Gy, permanent epilation at 7 Gy, and delayed skin necrosis at 12 Gy. Protracted (occupational) exposures to the eye may cause cataract at 4 Gy if the dose is received in less than 3 months, at 5.5 Gy if received over a period exceeding 3 months. Practical actions to control dose to the patient and to the staff are listed. The absorbed dose to the patient in the area of skin that receives the maximum dose is of priority concern. Each local clinical protocol should include, for each type of interventional procedure, a statement on the cumulative skin doses and skin sites associated with the various parts of the procedure. Interventionists should be trained to use information on skin dose and on practical techniques to control dose. Maximum cumulative absorbed doses that appear to approach or exceed 1 Gy (for procedures that may be

  15. British Society of Interventional Radiology (BSIR) Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) Filter Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uberoi, Raman; Tapping, Charles Ross; Chalmers, Nicholas; Allgar, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The British Society of Interventional Radiology (BSIR) Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) Filter Registry was produced to provide an audit of current United Kingdom (UK) practice regarding placement and retrieval of IVC filters to address concerns regarding their safety. Methods: The IVC filter registry is a web-based registry, launched by the BSIR on behalf of its membership in October 2007. This report is based on prospectively collected data from October 2007 to March 2011. This report contains analysis of data on 1,434 IVC filter placements and 400 attempted retrievals performed at 68 UK centers. Data collected included patient demographics, insertion and retrieval data, and patient follow-up. Results: IVC filter use in the majority of patients in the UK follows accepted CIRSE guidelines. Filter placement is usually a low-risk procedure, with a low major complication rate ( 9 weeks versus those with a shorter dwell time. New lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and/or IVC thrombosis was reported in 88 patients following filter placement, there was no significant difference of incidence between filter types. Conclusions: This registry report provides interventional radiologists and clinicians with an improved understanding of the technical aspects of IVC filter placement to help improve practice, and the potential consequences of IVC filter placement so that we are better able to advise patients. There is a significant learning curve associated with IVC filter insertion, and when a filter is placed with the intention of removal, procedures should be in place to avoid the patient being lost to follow-up

  16. Occupational exposure assessment in procedures of portable digital veterinary radiology for small size animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canato, G.R.; Drumond, L.F.; Paschuk, S.A.; Asfora, V.K.; Andrade, M.E.A.; Denyak, V.; Schelin, H.R.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the dose received by veterinarians and assistants involved in portable digital veterinary radiology procedures and checks the dose reduction obtained with the use of individual protection equipment. For this evaluation measurements were made using thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD-100, positioned at different parts of the body: hands, thorax, thyroids, gonads, left and right eye corners and at the center of the eyes. The dose was evaluated through 65 procedures performed with 55 animals. The results showed that in the case of assistants the received dose is significantly larger than that of the veterinarian. The most likely reason of this effect is that they are closer to the primary beam and thus are exposed to higher level of primary radiation first of all in regions of eyes and thyroids. The doses received by various body parts of the assistant are close to the annual limit recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection. - Highlights: • The occupational dose in portable digital veterinary radiology was studied. • The dose was evaluated through 65 procedures performed with 55 animals. • The dose received by assistants is significantly larger than by the veterinarian. • The doses at various body parts of the assistant are close to the limit of ICRP

  17. Development of real-time radiation exposure dosimetry system using synthetic ruby for interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokai, Yoshiyuki; Win, Thet Pe; Muroi, Kenzo; Matsumoto, Kenki; Takahashi, Kaito; Usui, Akihito; Saito, Haruo; Kozakai, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    Interventional radiology (IVR) tends to involve long procedures, consequently delivering high radiation doses to the patient. Radiation-induced injuries that occur because of the effect of the high radiation doses are a considerable problem for those performing IVR. For example, skin injuries can include skin erythema if the skin is exposed to radiation doses beyond the threshold level of 2 Gy. One of the reasons for this type of injury is that the local skin dose cannot be monitored in real time. Although there are systems employed to measure the exposure dose, some do not work in real time (such as thermoluminescence dosimeters and fluorescent glass dosimeters), while certain real-time measurement systems that enter the field of view (such as patient skin dosimeters and dosimeters using a nontoxic phosphor) interfere with IVR. However, synthetic ruby has been shown to emit light in response to radiation. The luminous wavelength is 693 nm. It is possible to monitor the radiation dose by detecting the emitted light. However, small synthetic rubies emit a tiny amount of light that is difficult to detect using common systems such as photodiodes. A large enough synthetic ruby to increase the quantity of emitted light would however enter the field of view and interfere with the IVR procedure. Additionally, although a photodiode system could reduce the system size, the data is susceptible to effects from the X-rays and outside temperature. Therefore, use of a sensitive photon counting system as used in nuclear medicine could potentially have a beneficial effect in detecting the weak light signal. A real-time radiation exposure dosimetry system for use in IVR should be sufficiently sensitive, not interfere with the IVR procedure, and ideally have the possibility of development into a system that can provide simultaneous multipoint measurements. This article discusses the development of a realtime radiation exposure dosimetry system for use in IVR that employs a small

  18. Interventional radiological treatment of renal transplant complications: A pictorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lezzi, Roberto; La, Torre Michele fabio; Santoro, Marco; Dattesi, Robrta; Nestola, Massimiliano; Posa, Alessandro; Romagnoli, Jacopo; CItterio, Franco; Bonomo, Lorenzo [' A. Gemelli' Hospital - Catholic University, Rome (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with chronic renal failure, which produces a dramatic improvement in the quality of life and survival rates, in comparison to long-term dialysis. Nowadays, new imaging modalities allow early diagnosis of complications, and thanks to the recent developments of interventional techniques, surgery may be avoided in most cases. Knowledge in the types of renal transplant complications is fundamental for a correct pre-operative planning. In this article, we described the most common or clinically relevant renal transplant complications and explained their interventional management.

  19. Changes in the American Interventional Radiology Literature: Comparison over a 10-Year Time Period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Charles E.; Gupta, Rajan; Blackwell, John

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the changes that occurred regarding interventional radiologic research in the major American radiology journals between 1992-1993 and 2002-2003. Methods. Articles published in three major American radiology journals (Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, American Journal of Roentgenology, and Radiology) during two distinct 24-month time periods (1992-1993 and 2002-2003) were evaluated. All articles judged to be pertinent to the interventional radiologic community were included. Investigations included in journal subheadings other than 'interventional' or 'vascular radiology' were included if the emphasis of the article was on a vascular imaging modality or peripheral intervention. Exclusions included: case reports, technical reports, letters to the editor, breast interventions, and primary neurointerventions. Data were collected regarding the affiliations of the primary author (nationality, hospital type, department); primary category of interest of the investigation; funding information; and study design variables. Two-by-two chi-squared statistical analyses were performed comparing the variables from the early and late data sets. Results. A total of 405 articles met the inclusion criteria for the early data set (1992-1993); 488 articles met the inclusion criteria for the late data set (2002-2003). Variables that demonstrated a statistically significant decrease from the early data set to the late data set included: articles in which the primary author was from a department of radiology (91.1% vs. 86.3%; p < 0.025); articles written by a primary author who was American (69.4% vs. 44.6%; p < 0.001); and articles with a primary category of investigation that had a nonvascular intervention focus (22.7% vs. 11.9%; p < 0.001). Variables that demonstrated a statistically significant increase from the early data set to the late data set included primary authors from Western Europe (18.0% vs. 30.1%; p < 0.001) and Asia (6.6% vs. 18.4%; p

  20. Intervention of the army health service in the case of radiological accident in peace time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curet, P.M.; Croq, M.

    2001-01-01

    The Army Health Service has conceived an organisation and has at its disposal the means necessary to answer the consequences of an accident having a radiological type in peace time in the military field. Its intervention area can be extended to the civil medium at the public authorities demand to give assistance. (N.C.)

  1. Study on generic intervention levels for protecting the public in a nuclear accident or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Fabio Fumio

    2003-01-01

    After a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, several social and economical factors shall be considered for the actions to protect the public and to recover the environment. The application of the radiological protection principles on practices in intervention situations may lead to adoption of protective measures disproportional to the involved risk, compromising the resources available to more effective actions. This causes a negative impact on the population and may conduct to discredit about the protective measures and the lost of confidence on the authorities. In this context, the principles of radiological protection for interventions should be studied and analyzed for being adequately applied in accident situations or radiological emergencies that involves the country. These principles are constantly improved and the concept of generic intervention level plays an important role in the decision-making to protect the public. The costs involved to the protective measures for the public in Brazil were studied and cost benefit analysis techniques were applied to estimate the generic intervention levels for public protection applicable in the country. These results were compared to those values internationally recommended, as well to values obtained in a similar study accomplished for Japan. It was also performed a sensibility analysis of the results regarding a value and a simple analysis of the results considering the costs of the several protective measures. (author)

  2. Main problem impeding the development of interventional radiology in China and its countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang Yong; Ni Caifang

    2007-01-01

    Based on the review of development course of interventional radiology in China during the period of more than twenty years, to analyse emphatically the main problems impeding the continuous development of interventional radiology, included the branch position of 'Interventional Radiology' not be defined clearly in the medicines, the professional association not to do its best in the management and guidance, the professional quality of the personnel not to be properly trained, as well as the insufficiencies of foundation and experimental studies, etc. And in this paper, the corresponding countermeasures of solving those problems have been primarily explored by the authors, and pointed out as follows: to improve perfectly the branch construction of the 'Interventional Radiology' and the training system of special personnel; to raise the grade and function of the professional association and periodical; to lay stress on the foundation and experimental studies; to further deepen the clinical study and correctly deal with the relation between this branch and the other clinical departments, etc. (authors)

  3. Radiochromic film for dosimetric measurements in radiation shielding composites synthesized for applied in radiology procedures of high dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontainha, C. C. P. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Baptista N, A. T.; Faria, L. O., E-mail: crissia@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Medical radiology offers great benefit to patients. However, although specifics procedures of high dose, as fluoroscopy, Interventional Radiology, Computed Tomography (CT) make up a small percent of the imaging procedures, they contribute to significantly increase dose to population. The patients may suffer tissue damage. The probability of deterministic effects incidence depends on the type of procedure performed, exposure time, and the amount of applied dose at the irradiated area. Calibrated radiochromic films can identify size and distribution of the radiated fields and measure intensities of doses. Radiochromic films are sensitive for doses ranging from 0.1 to 20 c Gy and they have the same response for X-rays effective energies ranging from 20 to 100 keV. New radiation attenuators materials have been widely investigated resulting in dose reduction entrance skin dose. In this work, Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2}:8 % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites were obtained by mixing them with P(VDF-Tr Fe) copolymers matrix from casting method and then characterized by Ftir. Dosimetric measurements were obtained with Xr-Q A2 Gafchromic radiochromic films. In this setup, one radiochromic film is directly exposed to the X-rays beam and another one measures the attenuated beam were exposed to an absorbed dose of 10 mGy of RQR5 beam quality (70 kV X-ray beam). Under the same conditions, irradiated Xr-Q A2 films were stored and scanned measurement in order to obtain a more reliable result. The attenuation factors, evaluated by Xr-Q A2 radiochromic films, indicate that both composites are good candidates for use as patient radiation shielding in high dose medical procedures. (Author)

  4. The role of interventional radiology in complications after paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Liver transplantation has become an established treatment in both adults and children for end-stage liver disease, acute hepatic failure and certain liver tumours. There is a significant risk of complications after all forms of liver transplantation. The interventional radiologist plays a critical role in the diagnosis and treatment of ...

  5. Simulators in catheter-based interventional radiology: training or computer games?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, D.A.; Kessel, D.O.; Healey, A.E.; Johnson, S.J.; Lewandowski, W.E.

    2006-01-01

    Training in interventional radiology (IR) relies on a traditional apprenticeship; to protect patients, expert supervision is mandatory until knowledge, attitudes and practical skills have been certified as satisfactory. However, the current quality of IR training is threatened by reduced time for trainees to learn, as well as a loss of basic diagnostic, training cases to non-invasive imaging. At the same time, IR techniques are becoming a focus of interest to a range of other clinical specialities. To address this training shortfall there is a need to develop novel training alternatives such as simulator models. Few simulator models in any medical field have been successfully validated to show improved clinical skills in treating patients. To date no endovascular simulator has met this standard. A good simulator must be based around key performance measures (metrics) derived from careful analysis of the procedure to be replicated. Metrics can be determined by trained psychologists from a direct analysis of the content of the job or task to be tested. The identification of these critical measures of performance is a complex process which must be tailored to a training curriculum to be effective. Simulators based on flawed metrics will invariably lead to unsatisfactory assessment. It follows that simulator development must involve the statutory licensing authorities. Equally it is essential that we do not assume that training on a particular simulator will correlate with the ability to perform the task in the real world. This 'transfer of training' must be rigorously proven by validation studies

  6. Analysis and assessment of the detriment in interventional radiology using biological dosimetry methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoro, A.; Almonacid, M.; Villaescusa, J.I.; Barquinero, J.F.; Rodriguez, P.; Barrios, L.; Verdu, G.; Ramos, M.

    2006-01-01

    Interventional radiologist and staff members usually are exposed to high levels of scattered radiation. As a result, the exposition to radiation procedures can produce detrimental effects that we would have to know. Effective dose is the quantity that better estimates the radiation risk. For this study we have realized an estimation of the radiological detriment to exposed workers of the Hospital la Fe de Valencia. For it, have been used physical doses registered in detectors T.L.D., and doses estimated by biological dosimetry in lymphocytes of peripheral blood. There has been estimated for every case the probability of effect of skin cancer and of non-solid cancers (leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma), being compared with the baseline probability of natural effect. Biological doses were obtained by extrapolating the yield of dicentrics and translocations to their respective dose -effect curves. The discrepancies observed between physically recorded doses and biological estimated doses indicate that workers did not always wear their dosimeters or the dosimeters were not always in the radiation field. Cytogenetic studies should be extended to more workers to assess the risk derived from their occupational exposure. (authors)

  7. Analysis and assessment of the detriment in interventional radiology using biological dosimetry methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoro, A.; Almonacid, M.; Villaescusa, J.I. [Hospital Univ. la Fe de Valen cian, Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica, Valencia (Spain); Barquinero, J.F.; Rodriguez, P. [Universitat Autonom a de Barcelona, Servicio de Dosimetria Biologica, Unidad de Antropologia, Departamento de Biologia Animal, Vegetal y Ecologia., Barcelona (Spain); Barrios, L. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Dept. de Biologia Celular y Fisiologia. Unidad de Biologia Celular, Barcelona (Spain); Verdu, G.; Ramos, M. [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Valencia, (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Interventional radiologist and staff members usually are exposed to high levels of scattered radiation. As a result, the exposition to radiation procedures can produce detrimental effects that we would have to know. Effective dose is the quantity that better estimates the radiation risk. For this study we have realized an estimation of the radiological detriment to exposed workers of the Hospital la Fe de Valencia. For it, have been used physical doses registered in detectors T.L.D., and doses estimated by biological dosimetry in lymphocytes of peripheral blood. There has been estimated for every case the probability of effect of skin cancer and of non-solid cancers (leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma), being compared with the baseline probability of natural effect. Biological doses were obtained by extrapolating the yield of dicentrics and translocations to their respective dose -effect curves. The discrepancies observed between physically recorded doses and biological estimated doses indicate that workers did not always wear their dosimeters or the dosimeters were not always in the radiation field. Cytogenetic studies should be extended to more workers to assess the risk derived from their occupational exposure. (authors)

  8. Shoulder Structure and Function Following the Modified Latarjet Procedure: A Clinical and Radiological Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garewal, Devinder; Evans, Mathew; Taylor, David; Hoy, Gregory A.; Barwood, Shane; Connell, David

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes of the modified Latarjet procedure for traumatic, antero-inferior glenohumeral joint instability. Methods Case series were used with a mean follow-up of 21.3 months for clinical and radiological review and 47.2 months for recurrent instability. Shoulder function was evaluated by clinical examination and validated shoulder scales: Western Ontario Shoulder Stability Index (WOSI), Melbourne Instability Shoulder Score (MISS) and l'Insalata Shoulder Questionnaire. Shoulder structure was evaluated by computed tomography. Results Thirty-two cases were enrolled (mean age 27.0 years). One patient reported a redislocation during the follow-up period. Clinical examination revealed that the median external rotation (at 0° and 90° abduction) was reduced on the operative side by 7.5° (p 0.05). Radiological evaluation revealed a mean (SD) pre-operative glenoid surface area loss of 169.5 (48.5) mm2 reconstituted surgically by a bone block of 225.4 (73.8) mm2. Subscapularis muscle bulk was reduced on the operative side, above the level of the muscle split (p Latarjet procedure reliably restores lost glenoid surface area, shoulder stability, strength and function. A small loss of external rotation is expected and related to altered subscapularis anatomy. PMID:27582905

  9. Determining and managing fetal radiation dose from diagnostic radiology procedures in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozbayrak, Mustafa; Cavdar, Iffet; Seven, Mehmet; Uslu, Lebriz; Yeyin, Nami; Tanyildizi, Handan; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Acikgoz, A. Serdar; Tuten, Abdullah; Demir, Mustafa [Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkmenistan)

    2015-12-15

    We intended to calculate approximate fetal doses in pregnant women who underwent diagnostic radiology procedures and to evaluate the safety of their pregnancies. We contacted hospitals in different cities in Turkey where requests for fetal dose calculation are usually sent. Fetal radiation exposure was calculated for 304 cases in 218 pregnant women with gestational ages ranging from 5 days to 19 weeks, 2 days. FetDose software (ver. 4.0) was used in fetal dose calculations for radiographic and computed tomography (CT) procedures. The body was divided into three zones according to distance from the fetus. The first zone consisted of the head area, the lower extremities below the knee, and the upper extremities; the second consisted of the cervicothoracic region and upper thighs; and the third consisted of the abdominopelvic area. Fetal doses from radiologic procedures between zones were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test and a Bonferroni-corrected Mann-Whitney U-test. The average fetal doses from radiography and CT in the first zone were 0.05 ± 0.01 mGy and 0.81 ± 0.04 mGy, respectively; 0.21 ± 0.05 mGy and 1.77 ± 0.22 mGy, respectively, in the second zone; and 6.42 ± 0.82 mGy and 22.94 ± 1.28 mGy, respectively, in the third zone (p < 0.001). Our results showed that fetal radiation exposures in our group of pregnant women did not reach the level (50 mGy) that is known to increase risk for congenital anomalies. Fetal radiation exposure in the diagnostic radiology procedures in our study did not reach risk levels that might have indicated abortion.

  10. British Society of Interventional Radiology (BSIR) Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) Filter Registry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uberoi, Raman, E-mail: raman.Uberoi@orh.nhs.uk; Tapping, Charles Ross [Oxford University Hospitals, John Radcliffe Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Chalmers, Nicholas [Manchester Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Allgar, Victoria [University of York, Hull and York Medical School (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The British Society of Interventional Radiology (BSIR) Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) Filter Registry was produced to provide an audit of current United Kingdom (UK) practice regarding placement and retrieval of IVC filters to address concerns regarding their safety. Methods: The IVC filter registry is a web-based registry, launched by the BSIR on behalf of its membership in October 2007. This report is based on prospectively collected data from October 2007 to March 2011. This report contains analysis of data on 1,434 IVC filter placements and 400 attempted retrievals performed at 68 UK centers. Data collected included patient demographics, insertion and retrieval data, and patient follow-up. Results: IVC filter use in the majority of patients in the UK follows accepted CIRSE guidelines. Filter placement is usually a low-risk procedure, with a low major complication rate (<0.5 %). Cook Gunther Tulip (560 filters: 39 %) and Celect (359 filters: 25 %) filters constituted the majority of IVC filters inserted, with Bard G2, Recovery filters, Cordis Trapease, and OptEase constituting most of the remainder (445 filters: 31 %). More than 96 % of IVC filters deployed as intended. Operator inexperience (<25 procedure) was significantly associated with complications (p < 0.001). Of the IVC filters initially intended for temporary placement, retrieval was attempted in 78 %. Of these retrieval was technically successful in 83 %. Successful retrieval was significantly reduced for implants left in situ for >9 weeks versus those with a shorter dwell time. New lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and/or IVC thrombosis was reported in 88 patients following filter placement, there was no significant difference of incidence between filter types. Conclusions: This registry report provides interventional radiologists and clinicians with an improved understanding of the technical aspects of IVC filter placement to help improve practice, and the potential consequences of IVC filter

  11. The interplay of ultrasound and computed tomography in the planning and execution of interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stafford, S.; Mueller, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    Even in large academic and private settings, where subspecialists abound and diagnostic and interventional radiologists are divided, both physically and philosophically, the interventionalist has emerged from the fluoroscopic suite to participate in the imaging workup of patients referred for precutaneous procedures. This expanded imaging role for the interventionalist is a natural outgrowth of several developments in radiology training. Computed tomography and ultrasound no longer are obscure techniques, understood only by an elite group of academic radiologists in large centers with access to equipment. All residents receive extensive education in these modalities, as imaging is a major part of general radiology. In addition, fellowship programs have been expanded to emphasize organ system training as opposed to ''modality'' training alone. Armed with imaging skills, the interventionalist is able to evaluate the cross-sectional diagnostic images better and to address specific findings and issues with respect to the planned procedure. These specific issues, elucidated by cross-sectional imaging, impact on the planning of interventional procedures addressed in this chapter

  12. Radiologic management of haemoptysis. Diagnostic and interventional bronchial arterial embolisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ittrich, H.; Adam, G. [Univ. Medical Center Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Dept. and Clinic; Klose, H. [Univ. Medical Center Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany). Section Pneumology

    2015-04-15

    Hemoptysis can be a life-threatening pulmonary emergency with high mortality, is symptomatic of an underlying severe pulmonary disease and requires immediate diagnosis and treatment. Diagnostically, bronchoscopy, conventional chest x-ray and contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) with CT angiography (CTA) provide information regarding the underlying pulmonary disease, bleeding site, the vascular anatomy of the bronchial arteries (BA) and extrabronchial branches, as well a basis for planning of endovascular intervention. Therapeutically, bronchial artery embolization (BAE) is a safe and effective technique in the hands of an experienced interventionist with profound knowledge of the BA anatomy and possible pitfalls as well as experience with first-line therapy of recurrent and massive hemoptysis or as an intervention prior to elective surgery. Recurrent episodes of hemoptysis are not uncommon and require a prompt repeat BAE after exclusion of extrabronchial systemic and pulmonary artery bleeding sources. This review article should give an overview of the history, anatomical and pathophysiological basics and the clinical context of hemoptysis and diagnosis, as well as a survey of management, treatment and results of BAE.

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of implantable venous access device insertion using interventional radiologic versus conventional operating room methods in pediatric patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock-Howard, Rebecca; Connolly, Bairbre L; McMahon, Meghan; Menon, Anita; Woo, Gloria; Wales, Paul W; Aziza, Albert; Laporte, Audrey; Nauenberg, Eric; Ungar, Wendy J

    2010-05-01

    Percutaneous image-guided techniques are associated with less tissue trauma and morbidity than open surgical techniques. Interventional radiology has received significant health care investment. The purpose was to determine the cost effectiveness of inserting implantable venous access devices (IVADs) by interventional radiologic means versus conventional operating room surgery in pediatric patients with cancer. In a retrospective cohort analysis, patients presenting with a new tumor diagnosis and receiving a first-time IVAD in January to June 2000 (operative group; n = 30) and January to June 2004 (interventional group; n = 30) were included. A societal costing perspective was adopted. Costs included labor, materials, equipment, inpatient wards, parent travel, and parental productivity losses for 30 days after insertion. Severe complications related to IVAD insertion were microcosted. Costs related to cancer therapy were not included. Incremental cost-effectiveness analysis and sensitivity analysis were performed. Interventional patients were older (7.3 years vs 4.1 years; P = .01). There were no significant differences between groups in sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, or length of hospital stay. Interventional radiologic procedures were shorter (84.9 minutes vs 112.8 minutes; P = 0.01). Interventional radiologic insertion was slightly less costly than operative insertion (Can$622,860 and Can$627,005 per 30-patient group, respectively) and more effective in reducing the complication rate (two vs eight complications per group, respectively; P = .039). The results were sensitive to the cost of operating the operating room. Interventional radiology was slightly less costly than operative IVAD insertion and resulted in fewer serious complications. It should be considered for IVAD insertions in pediatric patients with cancer.

  14. Staff doses in intervention radiology in Portugal in 1999-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matins, Maria B.; Alves, Joao G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The annual effective doses received by the staff working in the field of interventional radiology in public hospitals and private clinics in Portugal in the period 1999-2006 was analysed and is presented in this paper. The work was carried out based on the occupational dose data reported to the Central Dose Registry of the Nuclear and Technological Institute (ITN) by the individual monitoring companies operating in the country. Previous studies have shown that the relative proportion of workers in each field of activity is approximately 80% for medicine, 13% for industry, 6% for research and 1% for mining, as there are no nuclear power plants in the country. The highest contribution to the total collective dose is due to the medical sector. Interventional radiology represents approximately 11% of the number of workers in the medical sector and the dose values associated to this type of activity are generally high. The aim of this work is to characterize the occupational exposure in interventional radiology, identifying the professions of the individuals working in this field and related doses. The annual whole body doses evaluated in the period 1999-2006 was used to derive the distribution of workers by effective dose intervals for every profession namely, medical doctors, nurses, radiology technicians, auxiliary and administrative staff. The respective annual average doses and collective doses as well as the total average and total collective doses for the interventional radiology field are presented. From the analysis of the data it can be inferred that medical doctors and nurses are more exposed than other staff categories. (author)

  15. Mortality reporting in interventional radiology: Experience of a pilot audit with the Scottish Audit of Surgical Mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.D.; Ingram, S.; Moss, J.G.; Pace, N.; Chakraverty, S.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To describe the initial pilot phase of the 2009 Scottish Audit of Surgical Mortality (SASM), which includes outcomes and difficulties that arose during any interventional radiology (IR) procedure performed on patients in this audit over an 18 month period. Materials and methods: Approximately 40 consultant interventional radiologists from all units in Scotland elected to participate in the audit. Each response was then peer reviewed after anonymisation of the patient and institution. If a relevant ACON (area for consideration or area of concern) was generated, this was checked by one of the other reviewers before communication with the original reporting radiologist and colleagues. There was then a right of reply by the reporting unit before formal documentation was sent out. Results: Initial results were analysed after 18 months period, during which time 95 forms relating to deaths of surgical inpatients were sent to interventional radiologists identified as having been involved in an IR procedure at some time during the patient’s admission. Seventy-one forms had been returned by July 2010, of which 46 had gone through the entire SASM process. From these, 10 ACONs were attributed. Anonymised case vignettes and reports from these were used as educational tools. Conclusion: Involvement with SASM is a useful process. Significant safety issues and learning points were identified in the pilot. The majority of ACONs identified by the audit were in patients who had undergone percutaneous biliary interventions

  16. Needs-Based Innovation in Interventional Radiology: The Biodesign Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, Jonathan D; Denend, Lyn; Azagury, Dan E; Brinton, Todd J; Makower, Josh; Yock, Paul G

    2017-06-01

    There are many possible mechanisms for innovation and bringing new technology into the marketplace. The Stanford Biodesign innovation process is based in a deep understanding of clinical unmet needs as the basis for focused ideation and development. By identifying and vetting a compelling unmet need, the aspiring innovator can "derisk" a project and maximize chances for successful development in an increasingly challenging regulatory and economic environment. As a specialty founded by tinkerers, with a history of disruptive innovation that has yielded countless new ways of delivering care with minimal invasiveness, lower morbidity, and lower cost, interventional radiologists are uniquely well positioned to identify unmet needs and develop novel solutions free of dogmatic convention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Interventional Pain Procedures in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sanjeev; Cicone, Caitlin; Chang, Philip

    2018-04-01

    Exposure to interventional pain procedures is now a required component of training in physical medicine and rehabilitation residencies as mandated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Data regarding resident exposure and competency in these procedures remain limited. Objectives were to determine the volume and type of exposure physical medicine and rehabilitation residents have to interventional pain procedures and to obtain faculty-perceived opinions regarding competency of incoming fellows as it pertains to interventional pain management. Online surveys were sent to program directors of physical medicine and rehabilitation residencies and fellowship directors of interventional spine, sports medicine, and pain medicine fellowships. Surveys inquired about educational methods, the volume of procedures in which residents actively participate, and faculty-perceived competency of trainees performing procedures. Thirty-nine residency programs and 27 fellowships responded to the surveys. Of the 39 residencies that responded, there was great variation in the exposure residents receive. Most programs reported that residents have moderate exposure to common procedures such as ultrasound-guided knee injections and lumbar epidural injections. In addition, while most residency program directors report graduates to be "fairly prepared" (33%) to "well prepared" (20.5%) with regard to spine procedures, most fellowship directors (63%) describe incoming fellows to be at the "beginner" level.

  18. Patient-oriented presentation of results of radiological procedures using DICOM-compliant DVD media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Aberle, Denise R.; Goldin, Jonathan G.; Lu, David S.; Dahlbom, Magdalena; McGill, D. Ric; McCoy, J. Michael

    2003-05-01

    Some institutions have adopted digital media such as CD ROMs to provide patients and referring physicians with results of radiological procedures. These systems require a computer to review the images and lack the supporting explanations and guidance for patients to properly understand the results. We developed a hybrid DVD encoding format that combines DICOM-compliant image storage format with video streams viewable on any consumer DVD players. The addition of the video material allows radiologists to provide explanations, disclaimers and guidance to the patients regarding the results of the study. The diagnostic report is also included on the DVD as a PDF file and as a set of video frames that can be viewed on a DVD player. The native high-resolution images are also included in DICOM format on the DVD and can be accessed by any workstation equipped with a DICOM viewer. The DVD that can be reviewed on any consumer DVD player overcomes the limitation of CD ROMS that require the use of a personal computer. The results of the radiological procedures become more accessible patients that could be reluctant or unable to use a computer. Also, live video clips add a more personalized note and allow radiologists to convey important messages to the patients. This is particularly useful for self-referred screening procedures where results should always be accompanied with education material and explanations of the findings.

  19. Placement of central venous port catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters in the routine clinical setting of a radiology department: analysis of costs and intervention duration learning curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotzinger, Roman; Gebauer, Bernhard; Schnapauff, Dirk; Streitparth, Florian; Wieners, Gero; Grieser, Christian; Freyhardt, Patrick; Hamm, Bernd; Maurer, Martin H

    2017-12-01

    Background Placement of central venous port catheters (CVPS) and peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) is an integral component of state-of-the-art patient care. In the era of increasing cost awareness, it is desirable to have more information to comprehensively assess both procedures. Purpose To perform a retrospective analysis of interventional radiologic implantation of CVPS and PICC lines in a large patient population including a cost analysis of both methods as well as an investigation the learning curve in terms of the interventions' durations. Material and Methods All CVPS and PICC line related interventions performed in an interventional radiology department during a three-year period from January 2011 to December 2013 were examined. Documented patient data included sex, venous access site, and indication for CVPS or PICC placement. A cost analysis including intervention times was performed based on the prorated costs of equipment use, staff costs, and expenditures for disposables. The decrease in intervention duration in the course of time conformed to the learning curve. Results In total, 2987 interventions were performed by 16 radiologists: 1777 CVPS and 791 PICC lines. An average implantation took 22.5 ± 0.6 min (CVPS) and 10.1 ± 0.9 min (PICC lines). For CVPS, this average time was achieved by seven radiologists newly learning the procedures after performing 20 CVPS implantations. Total costs per implantation were €242 (CVPS) and €201 (PICC lines). Conclusion Interventional radiologic implantations of CVPS and PICC lines are well-established procedures, easy to learn by residents, and can be implanted at low costs.

  20. Generic procedures for medical response during a nuclear or radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this publication is to serve as a practical resource for planning the medical response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. It fulfils in part functions assigned to the IAEA under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), namely, to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. Effective medical response is a necessary component of the overall response to nuclear or radiological (radiation) emergencies. In general, the medical response may represent a difficult challenge for the authorities due to the complexity of the situation, often requiring specialized expertise, and special organizational arrangements and materials. To be effective, adequate planning and preparedness are needed. This manual, if implemented, should help to contribute to coherent international response. The manual provides the practical tools and generic procedures for use by emergency medical personnel during an emergency situation. It also provides guidance to be used at the stage of preparedness for development of medical response capabilities. The manual also addresses mass casualty emergencies resulting from malicious acts involving radioactive material. This part was supported by the Nuclear Security Fund. The manual was developed based on a number of assumptions about national and local capabilities. Therefore, it must be reviewed and revised as part of the planning process to match the potential accidents, threats, local conditions and other unique characteristics of the facility where it may be used

  1. Radiological protection in the interventional techniques: experience in the Pain Clinic of the CIMEQ; Proteccion radiologica en las tecnicas intervencionistas: experiencia en la Clinica del Dolor del CIMEQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero C, M. C.; Benitez N, P. P.; Gonzalez G, Y. [Centro de Investigaciones Medico Quirurgicas, Av. 216 Esq. 11B, Playa Siboney, 6096 La Habana (Cuba); Martinez G, A.; Gonzalez R, N. [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Carretera de la Cantera, Victoria II, Km. 21.5 Guanabacoa, La Habana (Cuba); Sanchez Z, L. R., E-mail: mayka@infomed.sld.cu [Hospital C. Q. Hermanos Ameijeiras, San Lazaro 701, Centro Habana, La Habana (Cuba)

    2014-08-15

    The Pain Clinic of the CIMEQ offers treatment to patients with different pathologies, using interventional techniques as the radiology like visual guide to reach the target structure and to apply the election technique. The personnel that carry out these procedures are inserted in the program of radiological surveillance of the institution, reason for which a radiological event could be detected where the main physician responsible of the service was implied. In this work the results of an investigation are presented realized with the objective of to know the causes of the event and to determine the necessary measures to avoid that this repeats again. The investigation was oriented to three fundamental aspects: medical exam of the affected worker; evaluation of the operational procedures from the radiological protection view point; and dosimetric measurements simulating the real conditions of work for which were used ionization chamber, radiometer and PMMA mannequin. As a result of the medical exam was detected that the main physician of the service did not use during the execution of all the procedures the extremities dosimetry and that he presented a radio induced erythema in the right hand, reason for which he was separated of the activity with ionizing radiations, until the conclusion of the investigation. With relationship to the evaluation of the operational procedures from the radiological protection view point, was verified that the medical physician not carried out any collimation of the beam and he was located in the positions where the dose rate reached the maximum values, frequently introducing the hands in the direct beam; that which implied an overexposure of the superior extremities and a not optimized exposure for whole body. This result was proven with the realized experimental measurements, which gave dose estimated values in extremities of the order of the deterministic effects. The investigation facilitated to introduce modifications in the

  2. Interventional radiologic placement of tunneled central venous catheters : results and complications in 557 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Kyo; Do, Young Soo; Paik, Chul H. [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    1999-05-01

    To evaluate prospectively the results of interventional radiologic placement of tunneled central venous catheters, and subsequent complications. Between April 1997 and April 1998, a total of 557 tunneled central venous catheters were percutaneously placed in 517 consecutive patients in an interventional radiology suite. The indications were chemotherapy in 533 cases, total parenteral nutrition in 23 and transfusion in one. Complications were evaluated prospectively by means of a chart review, chest radiography, central vein angiography and blood/catheter culture. The technical success rate for tunneled central venous catheter placement was 100% (557/557 cases). The duration of catheter placement ranged from 4 to 356 (mean, 112{+-}4.6) days; Hickman catheters were removed in 252 cases during follow-up. Early complications included 3 cases of pneumothorax(0.5%), 4 cases of local bleeding/hematoma(0.7%), 2 cases of primary malposition(0.4%), and 1 case of catheter leakage(0.2%). Late complications included 42 cases of catheter-related infection(7.5%), 40 cases of venous thrombosis (7.2%), 18 cases of migration (3.2%), 5 cases of catheter / pericatheter of occlusion(0.8%), and 1 case of pseudoaneurysm(0.2%). The infection rate and thrombosis rate per 1000 days were 1.57 and 1.50, respectively. The technical success rate of interventional radiologic placement of tunneled central venous catheters was high. In comparison to conventional surgical placement, it is a more reliable method and leads to fewer complications.

  3. A novel combined interventional radiologic and hepatobiliary surgical approach to a complex traumatic hilar biliary stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. NeMoyer

    Full Text Available Introduction: Benign strictures of the biliary system are challenging and uncommon conditions requiring a multidisciplinary team for appropriate management. Presentation of case: The patient is a 32-year-old male that developed a hilar stricture as sequelae of a gunshot wound. Due to the complex nature of the stricture and scarring at the porta hepatis a combined interventional radiologic and surgical approach was carried out to approach the hilum of the right and left hepatic ducts. The location of this stricture was found by ultrasound guidance intraoperatively using a balloon tipped catheter placed under fluoroscopy in the interventional radiology suite prior to surgery. This allowed the surgeons to select the line of parenchymal transection for best visualization of the stricture. A left hepatectomy was performed, the internal stent located and the right hepatic duct opened tangentially to allow a side-to-side Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy (a Puestow-like anastomosis. Discussion: Injury to the intrahepatic biliary ductal confluence is rarely fatal, however, the associated injuries lead to severe morbidity as seen in this example. Management of these injuries poses a considerable challenge to the surgeon and treating physicians. Conclusion: Here we describe an innovative multi-disciplinary approach to the repair of this rare injury. Keywords: Combined approach, Interventional radiology, Hepatobiliary surgery, Complex traumatic hilar biliary stricture, Case report

  4. Technical note: A preliminary comparative study between classical and interventional radiological approaches for multi-phase post-mortem CT angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrane, Fatima-Zohra; Savall, Frederic; Dercle, Laurent; Crubezy, Eric; Telmon, Norbert; Rousseau, Hervé; Dedouit, Fabrice

    2017-02-01

    Multi-phase post-mortem computed tomography angiography (MPMCTA) is a new diagnostic tool, used in forensic pathology. On the one hand, this technique allows a better and direct visualization of vascular and solid organ lesions. On the other hand, the invasiveness of the procedure-which requires surgical denudation (inguinal and/or cervical) and the insertion of surgical cannulas-leads to many relatives refusing scientific autopsies. Our hypothesis states that a minimally-invasive procedure combining interventional radiological techniques with MPMCTA (replacement of surgical cannulas by radiological catheters) will improve the approval rate of scientific autopsies by families. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the minimally-invasive MPMCTA approach and to compare its performance to the current reference-standard (the conventional approach). We included consecutively 16 corpses divided in two groups according to the contrast enhancement approach: radiological catheters (n=8), and surgical cannulas (n=8). Corpses were chosen and assigned randomly from our local data. The quality of the imaging procedure was compared according to four items: global vascular opacification, cerebral venous opacification, and lower limbs opacification (arterial and venous). A minimally-invasive approach for scientific autopsies is feasible through a radiological catheter. Vascular opacification was optimal in 8 out of 8 cases and was no less effective than the control reference group using surgical cannula incision associated with their non-occlusive aspects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pilot study of the dose in crystalline lens in the interventional radiology practice; Estudio piloto de la dosis en cristalino en la practica de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, A.; Martinez, A.; Fernandez, A.; Molina, D. [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Carretera de la Cantera, Victoria II, Km. 21.5 Guanabacoa, La Habana (Cuba); Sanchez, L.; Diaz, A., E-mail: ailza@cphr.edu.cu [Hospital Clinico Quirurgico Hermanos Ameijeiras, San Lazaro 701, Centro Habana, La Habana (Cuba)

    2014-08-15

    The interventional radiology involves considerable exposure levels for the occupationally exposed personnel (OEP). The doses can encompass a wide range of values in dependence of the function that develops the personnel and the complexity of each procedure. In organs like the crystalline lens and skin values can be reached that imply the appearance of deterministic effects if is not fulfilled the appropriate measures of radiological protection. This has been demonstrated through multiple studies, among those that the retrospective study of damages in the crystalline lens and dose has been one of those most commented, known as RELID. The objective of that study was to examine the opacity prevalence in the crystalline lens in workers linked to the interventional cardiology and to correlate it with the occupational exposition. The obtained results contributed to that the ICRP recommend a new limit value of equivalent dose for crystalline lens of 20 mSv in one year. With the objective of analyzing the operational implications, in the radiological surveillance programs that they could originate with the new recommendations was developed a pilot study to evaluate the dose in crystalline lens in the OEP linked to the interventional radiology in a Cuban hospital. For this, an anthropomorphic mannequin RANDO-ALDERSON was used on which thermoluminescent dosimeters were placed below and above of the leaded apron and in different positions at level of the crystalline lens: above, below and to the sides of the leaded lenses that the personnel uses routinely. The mannequin was located on the same positions that occupy the main specialist that execute the procedure, as well as of the nurse to assist him. The measurements were made simulating the more representative procedures about complexity, duration time and exposure rate. The used dosimeters were RADOS model for whole body composed of two thermoluminescent detectors Gr-200 (LiF: Mg, Cu, P) to evaluate personal equivalent dose

  6. Radiological survey activities: uranium mill tailings remedial action project procedures manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, C.A.; Berven, B.A.; Carter, T.E.; Espegren, M.L.; O' Donnell, F.R.; Ramos, S.J.; Retolaza, C.D.; Rood, A.S.; Santos, F.A.; Witt, D.A.

    1986-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) was assigned the responsibility for conducting remedial action at 24 sites, which are located in one eastern and nine western states. The DOE's responsibilities are being met through its Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office (UMTRA-PO) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The purpose of this Procedures Manual is to provide a standardized set of procedures that document in an auditable manner the activities performed by the Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) group in the Dosimetry and Biophysical Transport Section (DABTS) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), in its role as the Inclusion Survey Contractor (ISC). Members of the RASA group assigned to the UMTRA Project are headquartered in the ORNL/RASA office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and report to the ORNL/RASA Project Manager. The Procedures Manual ensures that the organizational, administrative, and technical activities of the RASA/UMTRA group conform properly to those of the ISC as described in the Vicinity Properties Management and Implementation Manual and the Summary Protocol. This manual also ensures that the techniques and procedures used by the RASA/UMTRA group and contractor personnel meet the requirements of applicable governmental, scientific, and industrial standards.

  7. ERRAPRI Project: estimation of radiation risk to patients in interventional radiology, initial results and proposed levels of complexity; Proyecto ERRAPRI: estimacion del riesgo radiologico a los pacientes en radiologia intervencionista. Primeros resultados y propuestas de indices de complejidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Cruces, R.; Vano, E.; Hernandez-Armas, J.; Carrera, F.; Diaz, F.; Gallego Beuther, J. F.; Ruiz Munoz-Canela, J. P.; Sanchez Casanueva, R.; Perez Martinez, M.; Fernandez Soto, J. M.; Munoz, V.; Moreno, F.; Moreno, C.; Martin-Palanca, A.

    2011-07-01

    The project ERRAPRI (2009 - 2012) will assess the most relevant aspects of the radiological risk associated with interventional radiology techniques (IR) guided by fluoroscopy in a sample of Spanish hospitals of three autonomous regions. Specific objectives include: assessing procedural protocols, especially the parameters related to radiation dose and diagnostic information obtained to establish balances cost (radiation risk) benefit to the procedures evaluated, and propose an index of complex procedures on several levels, based on the difficulty of making the same, assessing its relationship with the radiation dose values.

  8. Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe Commentary on the Treatment of Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reekers, J. A.; Lee, M. J.; Belli, A. M.; Barkhof, F.

    2011-01-01

    , who are directly approached by MS patients, contact the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) for advice. Worldwide, several centres are actively promoting and performing balloon dilatation, with or without stenting, for CCSVI. Thus far, no trial data are available, and there is currently no randomized controlled trial (RCT) in progress Therefore, the basis for this new treatment rests on anecdotal evidence and successful testimonies by patients on the Internet. CIRSE believes that this is not a sound basis on which to offer a new treatment, which could have possible procedure-related complications, to an often desperate patient population.

  9. Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe commentary on the treatment of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reekers, J A

    2011-02-01

    , who are directly approached by MS patients, contact the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) for advice. Worldwide, several centres are actively promoting and performing balloon dilatation, with or without stenting, for CCSVI. Thus far, no trial data are available, and there is currently no randomized controlled trial (RCT) in progress Therefore, the basis for this new treatment rests on anecdotal evidence and successful testimonies by patients on the Internet. CIRSE believes that this is not a sound basis on which to offer a new treatment, which could have possible procedure-related complications, to an often desperate patient population.

  10. SU-D-209-05: Sensitivity of the Diagnostic Radiological Index of Protection (DRIP) to Procedural Factors in Fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pasciak, A [University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wagner, L [UT Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the sensitivity of the Diagnostic Radiological Index of Protection (DRIP) to procedural factors in fluoroscopy in an effort to determine an appropriate set of scatter-mimicking primary beams (SMPB) to be used in measuring the DRIP. Methods: A series of clinical and factorial Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to determine the shape of the scattered X-ray spectra incident on the operator in different clinical fluoroscopy scenarios. Two clinical evaluations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle and patient size while technical factors were varied according to measured automatic dose rate control (ADRC) data. Factorial evaluations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle, field of view, patient size and beam quality for constant technical factors. Average energy was the figure of merit used to condense fluence in each energy bin to a single numerical index. Results: Beam quality had the strongest influence on the scattered spectrum in fluoroscopy. Many procedural factors affected the scattered spectrum indirectly through their effects on primary beam quality through ADRC, e.g., gantry angle and patient size. Lateral C-arm rotation, common in interventional cardiology, increased the energy of the scattered spectrum, regardless of the direction of rotation. The effect of patient size on scattered radiation depended on ADRC characteristics, patient size, and procedure type. Conclusion: The scattered spectrum striking the operator in fluoroscopy, and therefore the DRIP, is most strongly influenced by primary beam quality, particularly kV. Use cases for protective garments should be classified by typical procedural primary beam qualities, which are governed by the ADRC according to the impacts of patient size, anatomical location, and gantry angle. These results will help determine an appropriate set of SMPB to be used for measuring the DRIP.

  11. Coefficients calculations of conversion of cancer risk for occupational exposure using Monte Carlo simulations in cardiac procedures of interventionist radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, William S.; Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P.; Caldas, Linda V.E.; Maia, Ana F.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac procedures are among the most common procedures in interventional radiology (IR), and can lead to high medical and occupational exposures, as in most cases are procedures complex and long lasting. In this work, conversion coefficients (CC) for the risk of cancer, normalized by kerma area product (KAP) to the patient, cardiologist and nurse were calculated using Monte Carlo simulation. The patient and the cardiologist were represented by anthropomorphic simulators MESH, and the nurse by anthropomorphic phantom FASH. Simulators were incorporated into the code of Monte Carlo MCNPX. Two scenarios were created: in the first (1), lead curtain and protective equipment suspended were not included, and in the second (2) these devices were inserted. The radiographic parameters employed in Monte Carlo simulations were: tube voltage of 60 kVp and 120 kVp; filtration of the beam and 3,5 mmAl beam area of 10 x 10 cm 2 . The average values of CCs to eight projections (in 10 -4 / Gy.cm 2 were 1,2 for the patient, 2,6E-03 (scenario 1) and 4,9E-04 (scenario 2) for cardiologist and 5,2E-04 (scenario 1) and 4,0E-04 (Scenario 2) to the nurse. The results show a significant reduction in CCs for professionals, when the lead curtain and protective equipment suspended are employed. The evaluation method used in this work can provide important information on the risk of cancer patient and professional, and thus improve the protection of workers in cardiac procedures of RI

  12. MOrtality and infectious complications of therapeutic EndoVAscular interventional radiology: a systematic and meta-analysis protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellouk Aid, Kaoutar; Tchala Vignon Zomahoun, Hervé; Soulaymani, Abdelmajid; Lebascle, Karin; Silvera, Stephane; Astagneau, Pascal; Misset, Benoit

    2017-04-24

    Endovascular interventional radiology (EIR) is an increasingly popular, mini invasive treatment option for patient with symptomatic vascular disease. The EIR practiced by qualified hands is an effective, well-tolerated procedure that offers relief of patient's symptoms with a low risk of complications. During acute post procedural period, immediate complications may relate to vascular access, restenosis, thromboembolic events, uterine ischemia, infection, necrosis, sepsis, ICU stay, surgical recovery, pain management, treatment failure, and death. Moreover, additional non-life-threatening complications exist, but they are not well described and represent disparate information. A range of databases will be screened consulted to identify the relevant studies: PubMed, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, NosoBase, and Google Scholar (to identify articles not yet indexed). Scientist librarian used Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and free terms to construct the search strategy in PubMed. This search strategy will be adapted in other databases. Two coauthors will independently select the relevant studies, extract the relevant data, and assess the risk of bias in the included studies. Any disagreements between the two authors will be solved by a third author. This systematic review will provide a synthesis of EIR complications. The spotlighted results will be analyzed in order to provide a state-of-knowledge synopsis of the current evidence base in relation to the epidemiology of the infectious complications after EIR. In the event of conclusive results, our findings will serve as a reference background to assess guidelines on reality of the problem of the infections linked to endovascular interventional radiology and to formulate of assumptions and propose preventive measures, based on the results of our investigations. These propositions will aim to reduce the risk and/or the severity of these complications in the concerned population in favor a positive medical economics

  13. Central venous catheter placement by an interventional radiology unit: an australian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M. K. S.; Mossop, P. J.; Vrazas, J. I.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse the outcomes of central venous catheter (CVC) placement carried out by an interventional radiology unit. A review of our hospital records identified 331 consecutive patients who underwent insertion of a tunnelled or non-tunnelled CVC between January 2000 and December 2004. Key outcome measures included the technical success rate of CVC insertion and the percentage of immediate ( 30 days) complications. A total of 462 CVCs were placed under radiological guidance, with an overall success rate of 98.9%. Immediate complications included one pneumothorax, which was diagnosed 7 days after subclavian CVC insertion, and eight episodes of significant haematoma or bleeding within 24 h of CVC insertion. No cases were complicated by arterial puncture or air embolus. Catheter-related sepsis occurred in 2% of non-tunnelled CVC and 8.9% of tunnelled CVC. The overall incidence of catheter-related sepsis was 0.17 per 100 catheter days. As the demand for chemotherapy and haemodialysis grows with our ageing population, interventional radiology suites are well placed to provide a safe and reliable service for the placement of central venous access devices

  14. Wireless Accelerometer for MRI-Guided Interventional Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn N.J. Paley

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available MRI-guidance is increasingly used for minimally-invasive procedures, such as biopsy, and requires real-time active tracking of surgical instruments. Although optical and MR-based fiducial tracking devices have been used, these systems rely on complex contact with the operator or line-of-sight access for effective operation. A more straight-forward and clinically robust method is required to allow interactive real-time slice positioning of MR scan planes during interventional procedures. This study evaluated the use of a wristwatch-mounted, low cost wireless interface device for real-time MRI guidance. The device was designed to interact with software for planning rather than instrument guidance. The wireless device was integrated with two novel, open interventional magnet systems operating at 0.17T and 0.5T and utilized a novel customized graphic user interface (GUI to assess interventional capability.

  15. Patient Dose Optimization in Fluoroscopically Guided Interventional Procedures. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, many surgical procedures have increasingly been replaced by interventional procedures that guide catheters into the arteries under X ray fluoroscopic guidance to perform a variety of operations such as ballooning, embolization, implantation of stents etc. The radiation exposure to patients and staff in such procedures is much higher than in simple radiographic examinations like X ray of chest or abdomen such that radiation induced skin injuries to patients and eye lens opacities among workers have been reported in the 1990's and after. Interventional procedures have grown both in frequency and importance during the last decade. This Coordinated Research Project (CRP) and TECDOC were developed within the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) framework of statutory responsibility to provide for the worldwide application of the standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation. The CRP took place between 2003 and 2005 in six countries, with a view of optimizing the radiation protection of patients undergoing interventional procedures. The Fundamental Safety Principles and the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation (BSS) issued by the IAEA and co-sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the World Health Organization (WHO), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), among others, require the radiation protection of patients undergoing medical exposures through justification of the procedures involved and through optimization. In keeping with its responsibility on the application of standards, the IAEA programme on Radiological Protection of Patients encourages the reduction of patient doses. To facilitate this, it has issued specific advice on the application of the BSS in the field of radiology in Safety Reports Series No. 39 and the three volumes on Radiation

  16. M2IRAGE: Management of measurements during radiological interventions geographically assisted in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerphagnon, O.; Roche, H.; Lelache, H.; Guelin, M.; Fauquant, J.M.; Kacenelen, Y.; Armand, Y.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the M 2 IRAGE software, a data processing tool designed to share radioactivity measurements and to give a schematised view of a radiological situation and of its evolution, while respecting different legal frameworks, notably the obligation to produce a radiological measurement programme. After a simplified recall of the crisis management organisation, the authors describe the M 2 IRAGE software and hardware architecture, the functions of its main modules (presentation of radioprotection information during field intervention, field mission management, data browsing, and data transmission to field teams). While giving some display examples, the authors describe how an event is managed and processed by this tool: event creation, measurement acquisition, aid to decision, team management. They report and discuss the results of a national exercise which took place in September 2009 in Saclay with a prototype version of M 2 IRAGE

  17. Auditing an Online Self-reported Interventional Radiology Adverse Event Database for Compliance and Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Ezra A; Shyn, Paul B; Chick, Jeffrey F; Chauhan, Nikunj R

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether auditing an online self-reported interventional radiology quality assurance database improves compliance with record entry or improves the accuracy of adverse event (AE) reporting and grading. Physicians were trained in using the database before the study began. An audit of all database entries for the first 3 months, or the first quarter, was performed, at which point physicians were informed of the audit process; entries for the subsequent 3 months, or the second quarter, were again audited. Results between quarters were compared. Compliance with record entry improved from the first to second quarter, but reminders were necessary to ensure 100% compliance with record entry. Knowledge of the audit process did not significantly improve self-reporting of AE or accuracy of AE grading. However, auditing significantly changed the final AE reporting rates and grades. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of radiation protection of patients and staff in interventional procedures in four Algerian hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelassi-Toutaoui, N.; Toutaoui, A.; Merad, A.; Sakhri-Brahimi, Z.; Baggoura, B.; Mansouri, B.

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to assess patient dosimetry in interventional cardiology (IC) and radiology (IR) and radiation safety of the medical operating staff. For this purpose, four major Algerian hospitals were investigated. The data collected cover radiation protection tools assigned to the operating staff and measured radiation doses to some selected patient populations. The analysis revealed that lead aprons are systematically worn by the staff but not lead eye glasses, and only a single personal monitoring badge is assigned to the operating staff. Measured doses to patients exhibited large variations in the maximum skin dose (MSD) and in the dose area product (DAP). The mean MSD registered values are as follows: 0.20, 0.14 and 1.28 Gy in endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP), coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) procedures, respectively. In PTCA, doses to 3 out of 22 patients (13.6 %) had even reached the threshold value of 2 Gy. The mean DAP recorded values are as follows: 21.6, 60.1 and 126 Gy cm 2 in ERCP, CA and PTCA procedures, respectively. Mean fluoroscopic times are 2.5, 5 and 15 min in ERCP, CA and PTCA procedures, respectively. The correlation between DAP and MSD is fair in CA (r = 0.62) and poor in PTCA (r = 0.28). Fluoroscopic time was moderately correlated with DAP in CA (r = 0.55) and PTCA (r = 0.61) procedures. Local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in CA and PTCA procedures have been proposed. In conclusion, this study stresses the need for a continuous patient dose monitoring in interventional procedures with a special emphasis in IC procedures. Common strategies must be undertaken to substantially reduce radiation doses to both patients and medical staff. (authors)

  19. Guidance of non-vascular interventional procedures with real-time CT-fluoroscopy. Early clinical experience with C.A.R.E. Vision CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froelich, J.J.; Ishaque, N.; Hoppe, M.; Saar, B.; Mauermann, F.; Klose, K.J.; Regn, J.

    1997-01-01

    We found that CT-fluoroscopy generally facilitates non-vascular interventional procedures. By providing real-time monitoring, a major disadvantage of CT-guided procedures has finally been overcome. Our initial clinical experience nicely demonstrates the apparent advantages of CT-fluoroscopy compared to conventional CT-guidance in drainage and biopsy procedures of the abdomen and the chest. CT-fluroscopy proves to be an efficient method for real-time monitoring of various interventional procedures at a reasonably high resolution. We believe that this innovative technology is generally applicable for true guidance of non-vascular interventions. A possible combination of CT-fluoroscopy with conventional C-Arm fluroscopy may offer even extended horizons for challenging future interventional radiological procedures like instant and precise placement of percutaneous biliary drainages, TIPSS or embolization procedures. (orig./AJ)

  20. Yttrium-90 hepatic radioembolization: clinical review and current techniques in interventional radiology and personalized dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Aaron K T; Kao, Yung Hsiang; Too, Chow Wei; Chin, Kenneth F W; Ng, David C E; Chow, Pierce K H

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, yttrium-90 ((90)Y) microsphere radioembolization has been establishing itself as a safe and efficacious treatment for both primary and metastatic liver cancers. This extends to both first-line therapies as well as in the salvage setting. In addition, radioembolization appears efficacious for patients with portal vein thrombosis, which is currently a contraindication for surgery, transplantation and transarterial chemoembolization. This article reviews the efficacy and expanding use of (90)Y microsphere radioembolization with an added emphasis on recent advances in personalized dosimetry and interventional radiology techniques. Directions for future research into combination therapies with radioembolization and expansion into sites other than the liver are also explored.

  1. Development of double dosimetry algorithm for assessment of effective dose to staff in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Young

    2011-02-01

    Medical staff involving interventional radiology(IR) procedures are significantly exposed to the scatter radiation because they stand in close proximity to the patient. Since modern IR techniques are often very complicated and require extended operation time, doses to IR workers tend to increase considerably. In general, the personal dose equivalent at 10 mm depth, H p (10), read from one dosimeter worn on the trunk of a radiation worker is assumed to be a good estimate of the effective dose and compared to the dose limits for regulatory compliance. This assumption is based on the exposure conditions that the radiation field is broad and rather homogeneous. However, IR workers usually wear protective clothing like lead aprons and thyroid shield which allow part of the body being exposed to much higher doses. To solve this problem, i.e. to adequately estimate the effective doses of IR workers, use of double dosimeters, one under the apron and one over the apron where unshielded part of the body exposed, was recommended. Several algorithms on the interpretation of the two dosimeter readings have been proposed. However, the dosimeter weighting factors applied to the algorithm differ significantly, which quests a question on the reliability of the algorithm. Moreover, there are some changes in the process of calculating the effective dose in the 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection(ICRP): changes in the radiation weighting factors, tissue weighting factors and the computational reference phantoms. Therefore, this study attempts to set a new algorithm for interpreting two dosimeter readings to provide a proper estimate of the effective dose for IR workers, incorporating those changes in definition of effective dose. The effective doses were estimated using Monte Carlo simulations for various practical conditions based on the vogel reference phantom and the new tissue weighting factors. A quasi-effective dose, which is

  2. Development of double dosimetry algorithm for assessment of effective dose to staff in interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Young

    2011-02-15

    Medical staff involving interventional radiology(IR) procedures are significantly exposed to the scatter radiation because they stand in close proximity to the patient. Since modern IR techniques are often very complicated and require extended operation time, doses to IR workers tend to increase considerably. In general, the personal dose equivalent at 10 mm depth, H{sub p}(10), read from one dosimeter worn on the trunk of a radiation worker is assumed to be a good estimate of the effective dose and compared to the dose limits for regulatory compliance. This assumption is based on the exposure conditions that the radiation field is broad and rather homogeneous. However, IR workers usually wear protective clothing like lead aprons and thyroid shield which allow part of the body being exposed to much higher doses. To solve this problem, i.e. to adequately estimate the effective doses of IR workers, use of double dosimeters, one under the apron and one over the apron where unshielded part of the body exposed, was recommended. Several algorithms on the interpretation of the two dosimeter readings have been proposed. However, the dosimeter weighting factors applied to the algorithm differ significantly, which quests a question on the reliability of the algorithm. Moreover, there are some changes in the process of calculating the effective dose in the 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection(ICRP): changes in the radiation weighting factors, tissue weighting factors and the computational reference phantoms. Therefore, this study attempts to set a new algorithm for interpreting two dosimeter readings to provide a proper estimate of the effective dose for IR workers, incorporating those changes in definition of effective dose. The effective doses were estimated using Monte Carlo simulations for various practical conditions based on the vogel reference phantom and the new tissue weighting factors. A quasi-effective dose, which is

  3. How can interventions for inhabitants be justified after a nuclear accident? An approach based on the radiological protection system of the international commission on radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahara, Shogo; Homma, Toshimitsu; Yoneda, Minoru; Shimada, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    Management of radiation-induced risks in areas contaminated by a nuclear accident is characterized by three ethical issues: (1) risk trade-off, (2) paternalistic intervention and (3) individualization of responsibilities. To deal with these issues and to clarify requirements of justification of interventions for the purpose of reduction in radiation-induced risks, we explored the ethical basis of the radiological protection system of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The ICRP's radiological protection system is established based on three normative ethics, i.e. utilitarianism, deontology and virtue ethics. The three ethical issues can be resolved based on the decision-making framework which is constructed in combination with these ethical theories. In addition, the interventions for inhabitants have the possibility to be justified in accordance with two ways. Firstly, when the dangers are severe and far-reaching, interventions could be justified with a sufficient explanation about the nature of harmful effects (or beneficial consequences). Secondly, if autonomy of intervened-individuals can be promoted, those interventions could be justified. (author)

  4. Thyroid Radiation Dose to Patients from Diagnostic Radiology Procedures over Eight Decades: 1930-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lienard A; Miller, Donald L; Lee, Choonsik; Melo, Dunstana R; Villoing, Daphnée; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Winters, Sarah J; Labrake, Michael; Myers, Charles F; Lim, Hyeyeun; Kitahara, Cari M; Linet, Martha S; Simon, Steven L

    2017-12-01

    This study summarizes and compares estimates of radiation absorbed dose to the thyroid gland for typical patients who underwent diagnostic radiology examinations in the years from 1930 to 2010. The authors estimated the thyroid dose for common examinations, including radiography, mammography, dental radiography, fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, and computed tomography (CT). For the most part, a clear downward trend in thyroid dose over time for each procedure was observed. Historically, the highest thyroid doses came from the nuclear medicine thyroid scans in the 1960s (630 mGy), full-mouth series dental radiography (390 mGy) in the early years of the use of x rays in dentistry (1930s), and the barium swallow (esophagram) fluoroscopic exam also in the 1930s (140 mGy). Thyroid uptake nuclear medicine examinations and pancreatic scans also gave relatively high doses to the thyroid (64 mGy and 21 mGy, respectively, in the 1960s). In the 21st century, the highest thyroid doses still result from nuclear medicine thyroid scans (130 mGy), but high thyroid doses are also associated with chest/abdomen/pelvis CT scans (18 and 19 mGy for males and females, respectively). Thyroid doses from CT scans did not exhibit the same downward trend as observed for other examinations. The largest thyroid doses from conventional radiography came from cervical spine and skull examinations. Thyroid doses from mammography (which began in the 1960s) were generally a fraction of 1 mGy. The highest average doses to the thyroid from mammography were about 0.42 mGy, with modestly larger doses associated with imaging of breasts with large compressed thicknesses. Thyroid doses from dental radiographic procedures have decreased markedly throughout the decades, from an average of 390 mGy for a full-mouth series in the 1930s to an average of 0.31 mGy today. Upper GI series fluoroscopy examinations resulted in up to two orders of magnitude lower thyroid doses than the barium swallow. There are

  5. Evaluating the maximum patient radiation dose in cardiac interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, M.; Chida, K.; Sato, T.; Oosaka, H.; Tosa, T.; Kadowaki, K.

    2011-01-01

    Many of the X-ray systems that are used for cardiac interventional radiology provide no way to evaluate the patient maximum skin dose (MSD). The authors report a new method for evaluating the MSD by using the cumulative patient entrance skin dose (ESD), which includes a back-scatter factor and the number of cine-angiography frames during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Four hundred consecutive PCI patients (315 men and 85 women) were studied. The correlation between the cumulative ESD and number of cine-angiography frames was investigated. The irradiation and overlapping fields were verified using dose-mapping software. A good correlation was found between the cumulative ESD and the number of cine-angiography frames. The MSD could be estimated using the proportion of cine-angiography frames used for the main angle of view relative to the total number of cine-angiography frames and multiplying this by the cumulative ESD. The average MSD (3.0±1.9 Gy) was lower than the average cumulative ESD (4.6±2.6 Gy). This method is an easy way to estimate the MSD during PCI. (authors)

  6. Study of the radiological procedures used in odontologic clinics of Boa Vista, Roraima, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Jaberson Luiz Leitao

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiological procedures used at the odontologic clinics of Boa Vista, Roraima-Brazil. The following parameters were recorded: field diameter, half value layer, total filtration, discrepancy between the preset and the applied kilovoltage and exposure time. Dose to the patient's skin from radiography of the upper molar tooth was also estimated. The results showed that 78% of the inspected units had field diameters larger than 6,0 cm, which is outside the limits recommended by the Brazilian Health Ministry. The results also showed that 14% of the equipment presented a discrepancy of more than 10% between preset and applied kilovoltage. On the other hand, the discrepancy between preset and applied exposure time is higher than 10% in 70% of the tested units. The total filtration of 77% units is lower than 1,5 mm of Al, a value recommended by the Brazilian Health Ministry for equipment that operates in the range of 50 kV to 70 kV. The survey also indicates that for 35% of the units the entrance dose in high than 3,5 mGy that is the reference value established by the Brazilian Health Ministry for dental radiography with film type. It was observed that the majority of the clinics use neither aprons nor collars for patients and that films are processed manually, without controlling temperature or processing time. Based on the results obtained it is strongly recommended that a quality control program be implemented in dental radiological clinics in Boa Vista, Roraima. (author)

  7. THE POTENTIAL OF RADIOLOGIC PROCEDURES IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Dubrova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, there is no "golden standard" of diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. Each and every individual case requires a thorough analysis of clinical symptoms in their association with endoscopic, histological, radiological and laboratory data. This review paper analyzes both conventional and novel methods of radiological investigations. Some of them have changed their significance from the "golden standard" to rare and limited application and from promising, then frequent and currently sporadic use of small bowel enema. Traditional ileocolonoscopy maintains its diagnostic potential, especially as a tool for follow up of patients with colonic and ileac disorders. The state-of-the-art non-invasive (ultrasound examination and limitedly non-invasive (computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging procedures are considered to be the most accurate methods for assessment of inflammatory bowel disorders in patient with already confirmed diagnosis and those with suspected cases of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The paper describes preparation of patient for each method, assessment technique, advantages and limitations for use, diagnostic criteria for intestinal wall thickness, accuracy of methods and discusses the perspectives of their use. The main sign of inflammatory bowel disease is thickening of intestinal wall. Usually its mean thickness in Crohn's disease (11 to 13 mm is higher than that in ulcerative colitis (7 to 8 mm. This may provide a diagnostic key during differential diagnosis of an isolated colon disease. The amount of the contrast cumulated by the intestinal wall directly correlates with inflammation activity. Intensive contract cumulation in the intestinal wall after intravenous contrast enhancement is a symptom of active inflammatory process. However, despite progression in the technologies, initial signs of inflammatory bowel diseases are quite superficial and remain hardly visible, being below the resolution

  8. Characteristics of the development of the radiological situation resulting from the accident, intervention levels and countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, S.T.; Demin, V.F.; Kutkov, V.A.; Bariakhtar, V.G.; Petriaev, E.P.

    1996-01-01

    Great efforts have been made in the frame of the national and international research programs to get complete data on the radioactive releases, environmental contamination and radiological situation resulted from the Chernobyl accident. Beginning from the first publication (IAEA meeting, August 1986) these data have been considerably improved and added. The most important change of them with their influence on the decision making in the mitigation activity and the current situation is described and analyzed. The national and international regulatory documents at the moment of the accident were neither complete nor perfect in some necessary aspects especially in respect to the countermeasures at the intermediate and long-term phases. New documents have been worked out during the intervention activity. From 1986 series of documents were developed on the national and international levels. These documents are considered and analyzed in the context of their practical implementation and by the modern experience and research results. The history of countermeasures adopted on the different intervention phases are described. These documents mainly establish intervention levels in terms of averted doses and regulate only radiation protection. They don't content any intervention levels in terms of residual doses and risk, which are necessary for regulation of social and health protection of population suffered from the accident. Other restriction for the optimal regulation comes from use of the effective dose for establishing intervention levels. These and other respective aspects are discussed

  9. Interventional radiology and endovascular surgery in the treatment of ectopic pregnancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornazari, Vinicius Adami Vayego; Szejnfeld, Denis; Elito, Julio Júnior; Goldman, Suzan Menasce

    2015-01-01

    The advent of interventional radiology enabled remarkable advances in diagnosis and treatment of several situations in obstetrics and gynecology. In the field of obstetrics, these advances include temporary occlusion of the iliac arteries to the management of placenta accreta and/or prior, arteriovenous fistulas after embolization of uterine curettage and management of ectopic uterine and extra-uterine pregnancies. The non-tubal ectopic pregnancy, either cervical, abdominal, ovarian or in a cesarean scar, often represents major therapeutic challenge, especially when exists a desire to maintain fertility. Despite the systemic methotrexate therapy and surgical resection of the ectopic gestational sac be the most used therapeutic options, the interventionist approach of non-tubal ectopic pregnancies, direct injection of methotrexate in the gestational sac and intra-arterial chemoembolization of uterine arteries constitute in the currently literature viable, safe, effective modalities with low morbidity, shorter hospital stay, and rapid clinical recovery. Because of little variety of materials used, and the increase in training of specialists in the area, the radiological intervention as a treatment option in ectopic pregnancies is financially viable and present considerable accessibility in the world and at most of Brazilian medical centers

  10. Interventional radiology and endovascular surgery in the treatment of ectopic pregnancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornazari, Vinicius Adami Vayego; Szejnfeld, Denis; Elito, Julio Júnior; Goldman, Suzan Menasce [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The advent of interventional radiology enabled remarkable advances in diagnosis and treatment of several situations in obstetrics and gynecology. In the field of obstetrics, these advances include temporary occlusion of the iliac arteries to the management of placenta accreta and/or prior, arteriovenous fistulas after embolization of uterine curettage and management of ectopic uterine and extra-uterine pregnancies. The non-tubal ectopic pregnancy, either cervical, abdominal, ovarian or in a cesarean scar, often represents major therapeutic challenge, especially when exists a desire to maintain fertility. Despite the systemic methotrexate therapy and surgical resection of the ectopic gestational sac be the most used therapeutic options, the interventionist approach of non-tubal ectopic pregnancies, direct injection of methotrexate in the gestational sac and intra-arterial chemoembolization of uterine arteries constitute in the currently literature viable, safe, effective modalities with low morbidity, shorter hospital stay, and rapid clinical recovery. Because of little variety of materials used, and the increase in training of specialists in the area, the radiological intervention as a treatment option in ectopic pregnancies is financially viable and present considerable accessibility in the world and at most of Brazilian medical centers.

  11. Minimally Invasive Radiologically Guided Intervention for the Treatment of Salivary Calculi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Jackie E.; Drage, Nicholas A.; Escudier, Michael P.; Wilson, Ron F.; McGurk, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the technique and examine the value of salivary stone extraction using a minimally invasive, radiologically guided approach as an alternative to salivary gland surgery for the treatment of benign salivary gland obstruction. Methods: Eighty-six cases of sialolithiasis (83 patients) were treated by stone removal using a Dormia basket under local anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance. Postoperative assessment was made clinically at review, by sialogram and by questionnaire. Results: Of 86 cases of sialolithiasis treated, in 55 (64%)it was possible to remove all stones. In 12 cases (14%) part of a stone or some of a number of calculi were removed and in 19 cases (22%) the procedure failed. The commonest reason for failure was fixation of the stone within the duct. Symptoms at review (range 1-49 months, mean 17 months) were relieved in 55 of 67 (82%) of cases where a stone or portion of stone was removed. Conclusions:Stone removal from the salivary duct system by radiologically guided,minimally invasive approach is a simple procedure with low morbidity and high patient acceptance when appropriate selection criteria are applied. These criteria are considered and recommendations made

  12. Radioprotection of patients and workers in interventional and operating block radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menechal, P.; Valero, M.; Megnigbeto, C.; Marchal, C.; Godet, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last ten years or so, extensive development in radiological and implantable equipment has generated significant growth in radio-guided procedures. The real benefit of these practices to patients explains their development. These procedures can be undertaken using not only dedicated, specific fixed installations and computed tomography scanners, but also mobile installations in facilities not designed for radiography, such as operating blocks. The complexity of these procedures and the times spent implementing the required radiation can lead to major detrimental effects on personnel and patients, if they are not fully controlled. Many specialist medical disciplines now perform invasive procedures guided by images. Optimisation of patient doses mainly depends on the training level of medical teams, the intrinsic performance characteristics of the equipment used, adjustment of the technical parameters and the presence or absence of qualified personnel. Optimisation of professional personnel exposure is complex and depends on the performance conditions of procedures, which can expose workers extensively and non-uniformly. Designation of personnel competent in radioprotection, assessment of risks and definition of controlled areas, analysis of workstations and dosimetric monitoring of operators (especially of body extremities) are difficult to implement. Use of collective and personal protective equipment must be improved. The general manager of the French nuclear safety authority (ASN) has referred the matter to the permanent group of radioprotection experts (GPMED) to ensure that recommendations are drawn up in the short term. (authors)

  13. Hospital Organization and Importance of an Interventional Radiology Inpatient Admitting Service: Italian Single-Center 3-Year Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonetti, Giovanni; Bollero, Enrico; Ciarrapico, Anna Micaela; Gandini, Roberto; Konda, Daniel; Bartolucci, Alberto; Di Primio, Massimiliano; Mammucari, Matteo; Chiocchi, Marcello; D'Alba, Fabrizio; Masala, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    In June 2005 a Complex Operating Unit of Interventional Radiology (COUIR), consisting of an outpatient visit service, an inpatient admitting service with four beds, and a day-hospital service with four beds was installed at our department. Between June 2005 and May 2008, 1772 and 861 well-screened elective patients were admitted to the inpatient ward of the COUIR and to the Internal Medicine Unit (IMU) or Surgery Unit (SU) of our hospital, respectively, and treated with IR procedures. For elective patients admitted to the COUIR's inpatient ward, hospital stays were significantly shorter and differences between reimbursements and costs were significantly higher for almost all IR procedures compared to those for patients admitted to the IMU and SU (Student's t-test for unpaired data, p < 0.05). The results of the 3-year activity show that the activation of a COUIR with an inpatient admitting service, and the better organization of the patient pathway that came with it, evidenced more efficient use of resources, with the possibility for the hospital to save money and obtain positive margins (differences between reimbursements and costs). During 3 years of activity, the inpatient admitting service of our COUIR yielded a positive difference between reimbursements and effective costs of Euro 1,009,095.35. The creation of an inpatient IR service and the admission of well-screened elective patients allowed short hospitalization times, reduction of waiting lists, and a positive economic outcome.

  14. WE-EF-BRD-04: MR in the OR: The Growth and Applications of MRI for Interventional Radiology and Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahrig, R. [Stanford University (United States)

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  15. Strengthening the technical research and clinical application for vertebral interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Chungen; Cheng Yongde

    2008-01-01

    Interventional diagnostic and therapeutic techniques have developed rapidly in recent years with more and more practically and widely utilization as time goes by. The diagnostic procedures consist of percutaneous biopsy, CT discography, pressure measurement of intervertebral disc; and the therapeutic measures include percutaneous periradicular and joint therapy, decompression of sacral cyst, vertebroplasty, kyphoplasty, decompression of intervertebral disc, transarterial chemotherapy and embolization in spinal tumor, and newly developed percutaneous posterior lumbar intervertebral fusion. All above mentioned interventional techniques for spinal column diseases are developing day by day with a promising future and will play an important role in the field of interventional radiologist research. (authors)

  16. Periprocedural Prophylactic Antithrombotic Strategies in Interventional Radiology: Current Practice in the Netherlands and Comparison with the United Kingdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersema, Arno M., E-mail: arno@wiersema.nu [Westfriesgasthuis, Hoorn, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Vos, Jan-Albert, E-mail: j.a.vos@antonius.net [St Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, Department of Radiology, Division of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands); Bruijninckx, Cornelis M. A., E-mail: cmabruijninckx@planet.nl [Equipe Zorg Bedrijven, Rotterdam, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Delden, Otto M. van, E-mail: o.m.vandelden@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Division of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands); Reijnen, Michel M. P. J., E-mail: mmpj.reijnen@gmail.com [Rijnstate Hospital, Arnhem, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Vahl, Anco, E-mail: a.c.vahl@olvg.nl [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Zeebregts, Clark J., E-mail: czeebregts@hotmail.com [University of Groningen, Department of Surgery, Division of Vascular Surgery, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Moll, Frans L., E-mail: F.L.Moll@umcutrecht.nl [University of Utrecht, Department of Surgery, Division of Vascular Surgery, University Medical Centre Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic antithrombotic drugs to prevent arterial thrombosis during the periprocedural period during (percutaneous) peripheral arterial interventions (PAIs) is still a matter of dispute, and clear evidence-based guidelines are lacking. To create those guidelines, a study group was formed in the Netherlands in cooperation with the Dutch Society of Vascular Surgery and the Society of Interventional Radiology. The study group is called 'Consensus on Arterial PeriProcedural Anticoagulation (CAPPA).' Materials and Methods: The CAPPA study group devised and distributed a comprehensive questionnaire amongst Dutch interventional radiologists (IRs). Results: One hundred forty-two IRs responded (68 %) to the questionnaire. Almost no IR stopped acetyl salicylic acid before interventions, and 40 % stopped clopidogrel before PAI but not before carotid artery stenting (CAS). A flushing solution on the sideport of the sheath was used routinely by 30 % of IRs in PAI and by 50 % of IRs during CAS. A minority of IRs used a heparinised flushing solution (28 %). Unfractionated heparin was used by 95 % of IRs as bolus; 5000 IU was the most used dosage. Timing of administration varied widely. A majority of IRs (75 %) repeated heparin administration after 1 h. Conclusion: A substantial variety exists amongst IRs in the Netherlands regarding the use of prophylactic periprocedural antithrombotic drugs to prevent arterial thrombosis during PAI. When compared with varying results regarding the use of heparin in the United Kingdom, the variety in the Netherlands showed a different pattern. The proven variety in these countries, and also between these countries, emphasises the need for authoritative studies to develop evidence-based practical guidelines.

  17. Optimization of Radiological Protection in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Common Conventional Radiological Procedures: Effectiveness of Increasing the Film to Focus Distance (FFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Karami

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Increasing the x-ray film to focus distance (FFD, has been recommended as a practical dose optimization tool for patients undergoing conventional radiological procedures. In the previous study, we demonstrated a 32% reduction in absorbed dose is achievable due to increasing the FFD from 100 to 130 cm during pediatric chest radiography. The aim of this study was to examine whether increasing the FFD from 100 to 130 cm is equally effective for other common radiological procedures and performing a literature review of published studies to address the feasibility and probable limitations against implementing this optimization tool in clinical practice. Materials and Methods Radiographic examination of the pelvis (AP view, abdomen (AP view, skull (AP and lateral view, and spine (AP and lateral view, were taken of pediatric patients. The radiation dose and image quality of a radiological procedure is measured in FFD of 100 cm (reference FFD and 130 cm (increased FFD. The thermo-luminescent dosimeters (TLD were used for radiation dose measurements and visual grading analysis (VGA for image quality assessments. Results: Statistically significant reduction in the ESD ranged from 21.91% for the lateral skull projection to 35.24% for the lateral spine projection was obtained, when the FFD was increased from 100 to 130 cm (P0.05. Conclusion Increasing the FFD from 100 to 130 cm has significantly reduced radiation exposure without affecting on image quality. Our findings are commensurate with the literatures and emphasized that radiographers should learn to use of an updated reference FFD of 130 cm in clinical practice.

  18. An audit of diagnostic reference levels in interventional cardiology and radiology: Are there differences between academic and non-academic centres?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samara, E. T.; Aroua, A.; De palma, R.; Stauffer, J. C.; Schmidt, S.; Trueb, P. R.; Stuessi, A.; Treier, R.; Bochud, F.; Verdun, F. R.

    2012-01-01

    A wide variation in patient exposure has been observed in interventional radiology and cardiology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the patient dose from fluoroscopy-guided procedures performed in non-academic centres when compared with academic centres. Four procedures (coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, angiography of the lower limbs and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of the lower limbs) were evaluated. Data on the dose-area product, fluoroscopy time and number of images for 1000 procedures were obtained from 23 non-academic centres and compared with data from 5 academic centres. No differences were found for cardiology procedures performed in non-academic centres versus academic ones. However, significantly lower doses were delivered to patients for procedures of the lower limbs when they were performed in non-academic centres. This may be due to more complex procedures performed in the academic centres. Comparison between the centres showed a great variation in the patient dose for these lower limb procedures. (authors)

  19. Analysis of dose to crystalline in Interventional radiology: a purpose of one case; Analisis de dosis a cristalino en Radiologia intervencionista: a proposito de un caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera M, F.; Moreno R, F.; Velazquez M, F.; Manzano M, F.J.; Moreno S, T. [Hospital `Juan Ramon Jimenez` Ronda Norte s/n 21005. Huelva, Espana (Spain)

    1998-12-31

    The present work shows the dose values to crystalline for the personnel which works in interventional radiology procedures. It was took data of 436 studies with a total of 2,133.4 minutes in fluoroscopy and 19,563 images. It was showed dose values to crystalline in three situations: without blinding, with blinding of 0.25 and 0.50 mm Pb and by type of study: fluoroscopy, graphie and total. The dose means and ranges to patient for each of these studies also are detailed. (Author)

  20. Medical interventional procedures--reducing the radiation risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cousins, C. E-mail: claire.cousins@addenbrookes.nhs.uk; Sharp, C

    2004-06-01

    Over the last 40 years, the number of percutaneous interventional procedures using radiation has increased significantly, with many secondary care clinicians using fluoroscopically guided techniques. Many procedures can deliver high radiation doses to patients and staff, with the potential to cause immediate and delayed radiation effects. The challenge for interventionists is to maximize benefit, whilst minimizing radiation risk to patients and staff. Non-radiologist clinicians are often inadequately trained in radiation safety and radiobiology. However, clinical governance and legislation now requires a more rigorous approach to protecting patients and staff. Protection can be ensured, and risks can be controlled, by appropriate design, procurement and commissioning of equipment; quality assurance; and optimal operational technique, backed by audit. Interventionists need knowledge and skills to reduce the risks. Appropriate training should include awareness of the potential for radiation injury, equipment operational parameters, doses measurement and recording methods and dose reduction techniques. Clinical governance requires informed consent, appropriate patient counselling and follow-up.

  1. Contributions to the genetic and mean bone-marrow doses of the Australian population from radiological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindon, T.N.; Morris, N.D.

    1980-06-01

    The results of a national survey of radiological procedures used for diagnosis and therapy in medicine, dentistry and chiropracty are reviewed. Statistical data for the distribution and frequency of various procedures in Australian hospitals and practices are summarised, together with their associated radiation doses. Annual genetically significant and mean bone-marrow doses to the Australian population arising from these procedures are derived for the survey year of 1970. Values of 176 microgray and 651 microgray for the annual (per capita) genetic and mean bone-marrow doses respectively are reported. These compare closely with corresponding estimates in other countries with similar medical practices to those in Australia

  2. Transthoracic echocardiographically-guided interventional cardiac procedures in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caivano, Domenico; Birettoni, Francesco; Fruganti, Alessandro; Rishniw, Mark; Knafelz, Patrizia; Moïse, N Sydney; Porciello, Francesco

    2012-09-01

    Interventional cardiac procedures are traditionally performed using fluoroscopy, or, more recently, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). Neither modality is widely available to practicing cardiologists worldwide. We examined whether balloon valvuloplasty of pulmonic stenosis (PS) and transarterial occlusion of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in dogs could be performed safely with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). A prospective consecutive case series of 26 client-owned dogs with PS (n = 10) and PDA (n = 16). The cardiovascular procedures were performed using TTE. Each dog was positioned on a standard echocardiography table in right lateral recumbency (dogs with PS) or left lateral recumbency (dogs with PDA). Guide wires, balloon catheters, Amplatz(®) Canine Ductal Occluder (ACDO) delivery sheaths, and ACDO were imaged by standard echocardiographic views optimized to allow visualization of the defects and devices. Procedures were performed successfully without major complications in 20 dogs. In 2 dogs (German shepherds) with Type III PDA, ACDO placement was unsuccessful; 2 other German Shepherds were excluded from the procedure because their ductal diameters, measured echocardiographically, exceeded the limits of the maximal ACDO size. Two dogs weighing ≤3.5 kg had suboptimal echocardiographic visualization of the PDA and were considered too small for safe ACDO deployment. All intravascular devices at the level of the heart and great vessels appeared hyperechoic on TTE image and could be clearly monitored and guided in real-time. We have demonstrated that TTE monitoring can guide each step of pulmonic balloon valvuloplasty and PDA occlusion without fluoroscopy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Correlações técnicas e ocupacionais da radiologia intervencionista Occupational and technical correlations of interventional radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvaldo de Souza

    2008-12-01

    emitted by fluoroscopy used by professionals dealing with interventional radiology in a hospital environment. An evaluation of protection methods adopted by professionals directly involved in procedures of interventional radiology was performed based on extensive literature review of textbooks and medical journals indexed on MEDLINE in Portuguese, English, French, and Spanish from 1966 to 2005. It is in accordance with the radiological protection security norms and regulations guided by Edict 453/98 of the Brazilian Department of Health and the National Commission of Nuclear Energy NN-3.01 of the Brazilian Department of Science and Technology.

  4. Transition in occupational radiation exposure monitoring methods in diagnostic and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loennroth, N.; Hirvonen-Kari, M.; Timonen, M.; Savolainen, S.; Kortesniemi, M.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation exposure monitoring is a traditional keystone of occupational radiation safety measures in medical imaging. The aim of this study was to review the data on occupational exposures in a large central university hospital radiology organisation and propose changes in the radiation worker categories and methods of exposure monitoring. An additional objective was to evaluate the development of electronic personal dosimeters and their potential in the digitised radiology environment. The personal equivalent dose of 267 radiation workers (116 radiologists and 151 radiographers) was monitored using personal dosimeters during the years 2006-2010. Accumulated exposure monitoring results exceeding the registration threshold were observed in the personal dosimeters of 73 workers (59 radiologists' doses ranged from 0.1 to 45.1 mSv; 14 radiographers' doses ranged from 0.1 to 1.3 mSv). The accumulated personal equivalent doses are generally very small, only a few angiography radiologists have doses >10 mSv per 5 y. The typical effective doses are -1 and the highest value was 0.3 mSv (single interventional radiologist). A revised categorisation of radiation workers based on the working profile of the radiologist and observed accumulated doses is justified. Occupational monitoring can be implemented mostly with group dosimeters. An active real-time dosimetry system is warranted to support radiation protection strategy where optimisation aspects, including improving working methods, are essential. (authors)

  5. Review the past and look forward the future: in celebration of 20 anniversary of(Chinese Society of Interventional Radiology)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Linsun

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to make a brief review of the Chinese Society of Interventional Radiology in the past 20 years since it was established and to put forward some personal suggestions. The article will mainly describe the following contents: (1) to make suggestions to set up a standard organization of Chinese Interventional Society; (2) to demand interventional radiologist to be a real clinical doctor, to take care of their own patients for full course, to practice all kinds of minimally-invasive therapy; (3) to improve the ability of scientific research work; (4) to perfect the system of education, training and promotion in interventional radiology field; (5) to strengthen the special team of interventional radiologists; (6) to raise the academic level and status of the 'Journal of Interventional Radiology'; (7) to heighten the quality of academic activity and to intensify the organization system of interventional discipline; (8) to correctly deal with the competition between different subjects; and (9) to improve and perfect our own interventional job.(authors)

  6. SU-C-18C-06: Radiation Dose Reduction in Body Interventional Radiology: Clinical Results Utilizing a New Imaging Acquisition and Processing Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohlbrenner, R; Kolli, KP; Taylor, A; Kohi, M; Fidelman, N; LaBerge, J; Kerlan, R; Gould, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the patient radiation dose reduction achieved during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) procedures performed in a body interventional radiology suite equipped with the Philips Allura Clarity imaging acquisition and processing platform, compared to TACE procedures performed in the same suite equipped with the Philips Allura Xper platform. Methods: Total fluoroscopy time, cumulative dose area product, and cumulative air kerma were recorded for the first 25 TACE procedures performed to treat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a Philips body interventional radiology suite equipped with Philips Allura Clarity. The same data were collected for the prior 85 TACE procedures performed to treat HCC in the same suite equipped with Philips Allura Xper. Mean values from these cohorts were compared using two-tailed t tests. Results: Following installation of the Philips Allura Clarity platform, a 42.8% reduction in mean cumulative dose area product (3033.2 versus 1733.6 mGycm∧2, p < 0.0001) and a 31.2% reduction in mean cumulative air kerma (1445.4 versus 994.2 mGy, p < 0.001) was achieved compared to similar procedures performed in the same suite equipped with the Philips Allura Xper platform. Mean total fluoroscopy time was not significantly different between the two cohorts (1679.3 versus 1791.3 seconds, p = 0.41). Conclusion: This study demonstrates a significant patient radiation dose reduction during TACE procedures performed to treat HCC after a body interventional radiology suite was converted to the Philips Allura Clarity platform from the Philips Allura Xper platform. Future work will focus on evaluation of patient dose reduction in a larger cohort of patients across a broader range of procedures and in specific populations, including obese patients and pediatric patients, and comparison of image quality between the two platforms. Funding for this study was provided by Philips Healthcare, with 5% salary support provided to authors K. Pallav

  7. Touchless interaction with software in interventional radiology and surgery: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, André; Hensen, Bennet; Wacker, Frank; Hansen, Christian

    2017-02-01

    In this article, we systematically examine the current state of research of systems that focus on touchless human-computer interaction in operating rooms and interventional radiology suites. We further discuss the drawbacks of current solutions and underline promising technologies for future development. A systematic literature search of scientific papers that deal with touchless control of medical software in the immediate environment of the operation room and interventional radiology suite was performed. This includes methods for touchless gesture interaction, voice control and eye tracking. Fifty-five research papers were identified and analyzed in detail including 33 journal publications. Most of the identified literature (62 %) deals with the control of medical image viewers. The others present interaction techniques for laparoscopic assistance (13 %), telerobotic assistance and operating room control (9 % each) as well as for robotic operating room assistance and intraoperative registration (3.5 % each). Only 8 systems (14.5 %) were tested in a real clinical environment, and 7 (12.7 %) were not evaluated at all. In the last 10 years, many advancements have led to robust touchless interaction approaches. However, only a few have been systematically evaluated in real operating room settings. Further research is required to cope with current limitations of touchless software interfaces in clinical environments. The main challenges for future research are the improvement and evaluation of usability and intuitiveness of touchless human-computer interaction and the full integration into productive systems as well as the reduction of necessary interaction steps and further development of hands-free interaction.

  8. Radiological diagnosis and intervention of cholangiocarcinomas (CC); Radiologische Diagnostik und Intervention von Cholangiokarzinomen (CC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Zangos, S.; Eichler, K.; Gruber-Rouh, T.; Hammerstingl, R.M.; Weisser, P. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Trojan, J. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik I: Gastroenterologie, Endokrinologie, Pneumologie/Allergologie

    2012-10-15

    To present current data on diagnosis, indication and different therapy options in patients with cholangiocarcinoma (CC) based on an analysis of the current literature and clinical experience. The diagnostic routine includes laboratory investigations with parameters of cholestasis and also serum tumor markers CA19 - 9 and CEA. After ultrasound for clarifying a tumor and/or dilated bile ducts, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should be performed with magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRCP). The accuracy (positive predictive value) for diagnosing a CC is 37 - 84 % (depending on the location) for ultrasound, 79 - 94 % for computed tomography (CT), and 95 % for MRI and MRCP. An endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) can then be planned, especially if biliary drainage or cytological or histological specimen sampling is intended. A curative approach can be achieved by surgical resection, rarely by liver transplantation. However, many patients are not eligible for surgery. In addition to systemic chemotherapy, locoregional therapies such as transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) - also known as chemoperfusion -, drug eluting beads-therapy (DEB) as well as thermoablative procedures, such as laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), microwave ablation (MWA) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can be provided with a palliative intention.

  9. Comparison between a digital scanning system and a conventional screen film system in the full spine radiological procedure in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espana, M. L.; Gomez, G.; Romero, A.; Minambres, A.; Albi, G.; Floriano, A.; Rodirguez, A.; Lopez Franco, P.

    2004-01-01

    To compare from both dosimetry and image quality standpoints, a digital scanning system with a conventional screen film system, in the full spine radiological procedure. The standard patient is considered to be 12 years old, and a sample of forty patients referred for full spine radiological procedure has been studied. Gonad shielding has been used in all the patients, and its efficiency has been evaluated. Dosimetric study includes Kerma-area product, and thorax and gonad entrance surface dose. Kerma area product has been measured using a transmission camera, and for entrance surface dose estimation both thermoluminescent dosemeter LiF: Mg, Cu, P and LiF: Mg, Ti have been utilized. Three radiologists have evaluated the image quality according to the degree of fulfilment of the image quality criteria. (Author) 22 refs

  10. Enhancing interventional radiology training in Canada: creating new choices for medical students and residents. Current training options in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baerlocher, M.O.; Collingwood, P.; Becker, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Vascular interventional radiology (VIR) faces both a current and even greater projected shortage of VIR specialists and VIR researchers. Three new residency programs were introduced in the United States within the past 6 years that may have a dramatic impact on the subspecialty: 1) the 6-year Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Enhanced Clinical Training and Certification (DIRECT) pathway, 2) the 6-year clinical pathway for Vascular and Interventional Radiology, and 3) the 5-year ABR Holman research pathway. In this paper, we introduce these 3 programs, the relevant issues they create and affect, and the relevancy for Canadian radiology training programs. (author)

  11. Influence of CT on the number of radiologic procedures and hospitalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binkhuysen, F.H.B.; Puijlaert, C.B.A.J.

    1987-01-01

    The research concerns the influence of body CT on medical efficiency in radiology and hospitalization in The Netherlands. General hospitals with body CT are compared with hospitals without CT. In radiology the substitution effect is investigated with use of the number of radiological performances per clinical patient as a parameter. From 1977 to 1984 this parameter proves to decrease in hospitals with body CT (9%) in contrast to the rise in hospitals without CT (10%). Concerning the average hospital in patient stay, it appears that this parameter shows a faster decrease in hospitals with body CT compared with hospitals without CT (5%-8%)

  12. Development and validation of a virtual reality simulator: human factors input to interventional radiology training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sheena Joanne; Guediri, Sara M; Kilkenny, Caroline; Clough, Peter J

    2011-12-01

    This study developed and validated a virtual reality (VR) simulator for use by interventional radiologists. Research in the area of skill acquisition reports practice as essential to become a task expert. Studies on simulation show skills learned in VR can be successfully transferred to a real-world task. Recently, with improvements in technology, VR simulators have been developed to allow complex medical procedures to be practiced without risking the patient. Three studies are reported. In Study I, 35 consultant interventional radiologists took part in a cognitive task analysis to empirically establish the key competencies of the Seldinger procedure. In Study 2, 62 participants performed one simulated procedure, and their performance was compared by expertise. In Study 3, the transferability of simulator training to a real-world procedure was assessed with 14 trainees. Study I produced 23 key competencies that were implemented as performance measures in the simulator. Study 2 showed the simulator had both face and construct validity, although some issues were identified. Study 3 showed the group that had undergone simulator training received significantly higher mean performance ratings on a subsequent patient procedure. The findings of this study support the centrality of validation in the successful design of simulators and show the utility of simulators as a training device. The studies show the key elements of a validation program for a simulator. In addition to task analysis and face and construct validities, the authors highlight the importance of transfer of training in validation studies.

  13. Dosimetric studies of the lens of the eye using a new dosimeter - polls in two departments of Interventional Radiology of the autonomous city of Buenos Aires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirchio, R.; Sánchez, H.; Domazet, W

    2013-01-01

    During interventional radiology (IR) and cardiology (IC) procedures, medical staff can receive high doses to their eye lenses. The Retrospective Evaluation of Lens Injuries and Dose (RELID) study organized in Argentina in 2010 found incipient opacity in 50% of IC physicians and 41% of IC technicians/nurses. These results, added to the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), which lowered their former occupational equivalent dose limit for the lens, led us to assess the eye lens dose, Hp(3), during interventional procedures. To this end, a new dosemeter was designed and calibrated at the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) of Argentina to evaluate Hp(3). Personal dose equivalent (Hp(10)), and Hp(3) were assessed for 3 months in two IC and IR departments of Buenos Aires City using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and electronic personal dosimeter (EPD). An Rando Alderson phantom was used to simulate monthly exposures of five occupational staff members. Hp(3) and Hp(10) were obtained monthly for 14 occupational staff members exposed to 121 IR and IC procedures. We concluded that the annual effective dose and Hp(3) were lower than 0.3 and 10 mSv, respectively. An occupational annual dose constraint of 0.3 mSv was calculated. Average cumulative Hp(3) for working life of 40 years should be lower than 400 and 200 mSv for physicians and technicians/scrub nurse, respectively. Also we concluded that a calibrated EPD worn on a pocket in the lead apron and a TLD dosemeter worn on the collar thyroid (both at the maximal radiation side) could be used as guidance to the lens dose. Finally, To reduce doses of medical staff, actions should be promoted to maximize radiation protection in interventional procedures with appropriate training, using personal dosimetry and protection instruments as lead glasses, ceiling-suspended shields and others. (author)

  14. Lean manufacturing and Toyota Production System terminology applied to the procurement of vascular stents in interventional radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bucourt, Maximilian; Busse, Reinhard; Güttler, Felix; Wintzer, Christian; Collettini, Federico; Kloeters, Christian; Hamm, Bernd; Teichgräber, Ulf K

    2011-08-01

    OBJECTIVES: To apply the economic terminology of lean manufacturing and the Toyota Production System to the procurement of vascular stents in interventional radiology. METHODS: The economic- and process-driven terminology of lean manufacturing and the Toyota Production System is first presented, including information and product flow as well as value stream mapping (VSM), and then applied to an interdisciplinary setting of physicians, nurses and technicians from different medical departments to identify wastes in the process of endovascular stent procurement in interventional radiology. RESULTS: Using the so-called seven wastes approach of the Toyota Production System (waste of overproducing, waiting, transport, processing, inventory, motion and waste of defects and spoilage) as well as further waste characteristics (gross waste, process and method waste, and micro waste), wastes in the process of endovascular stent procurement in interventional radiology were identified and eliminated to create an overall smoother process from the procurement as well as from the medical perspective. CONCLUSION: Economic terminology of lean manufacturing and the Toyota Production System, especially VSM, can be used to visualise and better understand processes in the procurement of vascular stents in interventional radiology from an economic point of view.

  15. Comparative analysis of dose levels to patients in radiological procedures guided by fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Pablo Luis; Fernandez, Manuel; Ramos, Julio A.; Delgado, Jose Miguel; Cons, Nestor

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the comparative data of the dose indicators for patient in radiological processes with respect to the values published in the ICRP document. It is analyzed the need for different strategies to communicate to different specialists mechanisms to optimize the radiation beginning with practice by training of second degree level in radiological protection and then, working with them the basics of equipment management to reduce doses without detriment to the welfare purpose

  16. Interventions to reduce waiting times for elective procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballini, Luciana; Negro, Antonella; Maltoni, Susanna; Vignatelli, Luca; Flodgren, Gerd; Simera, Iveta; Holmes, Jane; Grilli, Roberto

    2015-02-23

    Long waiting times for elective healthcare procedures may cause distress among patients, may have adverse health consequences and may be perceived as inappropriate delivery and planning of health care. To assess the effectiveness of interventions aimed at reducing waiting times for elective care, both diagnostic and therapeutic. We searched the following electronic databases: Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (1946-), EMBASE (1947-), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), ABI Inform, the Canadian Research Index, the Science, Social Sciences and Humanities Citation Indexes, a series of databases via Proquest: Dissertations & Theses (including UK & Ireland), EconLit, PAIS (Public Affairs International), Political Science Collection, Nursing Collection, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts and Worldwide Political Science Abstracts. We sought related reviews by searching the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE). We searched trial registries, as well as grey literature sites and reference lists of relevant articles. We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled before-after studies (CBAs) and interrupted time series (ITS) designs that met EPOC minimum criteria and evaluated the effectiveness of any intervention aimed at reducing waiting times for any type of elective procedure. We considered studies reporting one or more of the following outcomes: number or proportion of participants whose waiting times were above or below a specific time threshold, or participants' mean or median waiting times. Comparators could include any type of active intervention or standard practice. Two review authors independently extracted data from, and assessed risk of bias of, each included study, using a standardised form and the EPOC 'Risk

  17. Medical liability and patient law in Germany. Main features with particular focus on treatments in the field of interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, S.A.; Geissler, R.; Stampfl, U.; Radeleff, B.A.; Kauczor, H.U.; Sommer, Christof M.; Richter, G.M.; Pereira, P.L.

    2016-01-01

    On February 26th, 2013 the patient law became effective in Germany. Goal of the lawmakers was a most authoritative case law for liability of malpractice and to improve enforcement of the rights of the patients. The following article contains several examples detailing legal situation. By no means should these discourage those persons who treat patients. Rather should they be sensitized to to various aspects of this increasingly important field of law. To identify relevant sources according to judicial standard research was conducted including first- and second selection. Goal was the identification of jurisdiction, literature and other various analyses that all deal with liability of malpractice and patient law within the field of Interventional Radiology - with particular focus on transarterial chemoembolization of the liver and related procedures. In summary, 89 different sources were included and analyzed. The individual who treats a patient is liable for an error in treatment if it causes injury to life, the body or the patient's health. Independent of the error in treatment the individual providing medical care is liable for mistakes made in the context of obtaining informed consent. Prerequisite is the presence of an error made when obtaining informed consent and its causality for the patient's consent for the treatment. Without an effective consent the treatment is considered illegal whether it was free of treatment error or not. The new patient law does not cause material change of the German liability of malpractice law.

  18. Assessment of exposure to scattered radiation in interventional procedures using special protective bismuth; Evaluacion de la exposicion a radiacion dispersa en procedimientos intervencionistas usando protectores especiales de bismuto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto Bua, M.; Medina Jimenez, E.; Vazquez Vazquez, R.; Santamaria Vazquez, F.; Otero Martinez, C.; Lobato Busto, R.; Luna Vega, V.; Mosquera Suero, J.; Sanchez Garcia, M.; Pombar Camean, M.

    2011-07-01

    There are currently marketed specific producta aimed at reducing personnel exposure to radiation scattered in cardiac catheterization procedures, interventional radiology or electrophysiology. Our service has been proposed to study the attenuation characteristics of the product Drape Armour manufactured by the company Microtek. Is a flexible devices constructed from an alloy of bismuth and sterility characteristics and infection control and fluid makes them particularly suitable for incorporating into the operative field of the patient. To study their behavior, there have been staff dose measurements representative of the moaL common situations of exposure to scattered radiation in a typical procedure of intervention.

  19. Usefulness of a functional tracheobronchial phantom for interventional procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hyung; Lim, Cheong Hwan; Kim, Jeong Koo

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate usefulness of a functional tracheobronchial phantom for interventional procedure. The functional phantom was made as a actual size with human normal anatomy used silicone and a paper clay mold. A tracheobronchial-shape clay mold was placed inside a square box and liquid silicone was poured. After the silicone was formed, the clay was removed. We measured film density and tracheobronchial angle at the human, animal and phantom respectively. The film density of trachea part were 0.76 (± 0.011) in human, 0.97 (± 0.015) in animal, 0.45 (± 0.016) in phantom. The tracheobronchial bifurcation part measured 0.51 (± 0.006) in human, 0.65 (± 0.005) in animal, 0.65 (± 0.008) in phantom. The right bronchus part measured 0.14 (± 0.008) in human, 0.59 (± 0.014) in animal and 0.04 (± 0.007) in phantom. The left bronchus were 0.54 (± 0.004) in human, 0.54 (± 0.008) in animal and 0.08 (± 0.008) in phantom. At the stent part were 0.54 (± 0.004) in human, 0.59 (± 0.011) in animal and 0.04 (± 0.007) in phantom, respectively. The tracheobronchial angle of the left bronchus site were 42.6 (± 2.07).deg. in human, 43.4 (± 2.40).deg. in animal and 35 (± 2.00).deg. in phantom, respectively. The right bronchus site were 32.8 (± 2.77).deg. in human, 34.6 (± 1.94).deg. in animal and 50.2 (± 1.30).deg. in phantom, respectively. The phantom was useful for in-vitro testing of tracheobronchial interventional procedure, since it was easy to reproduce

  20. Applying a structured innovation process to interventional radiology: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sista, Akhilesh K; Hwang, Gloria L; Hovsepian, David M; Sze, Daniel Y; Kuo, William T; Kothary, Nishita; Louie, John D; Yamada, Kei; Hong, Richard; Dhanani, Riaz; Brinton, Todd J; Krummel, Thomas M; Makower, Joshua; Yock, Paul G; Hofmann, Lawrence V

    2012-04-01

    To determine the feasibility and efficacy of applying an established innovation process to an active academic interventional radiology (IR) practice. The Stanford Biodesign Medical Technology Innovation Process was used as the innovation template. Over a 4-month period, seven IR faculty and four IR fellow physicians recorded observations. These observations were converted into need statements. One particular need relating to gastrostomy tubes was diligently screened and was the subject of a single formal brainstorming session. Investigators collected 82 observations, 34 by faculty and 48 by fellows. The categories that generated the most observations were enteral feeding (n = 9, 11%), biopsy (n = 8, 10%), chest tubes (n = 6, 7%), chemoembolization and radioembolization (n = 6, 7%), and biliary interventions (n = 5, 6%). The output from the screening on the gastrostomy tube need was a specification sheet that served as a guidance document for the subsequent brainstorming session. The brainstorming session produced 10 concepts under three separate categories. This formalized innovation process generated numerous observations and ultimately 10 concepts to potentially to solve a significant clinical need, suggesting that a structured process can help guide an IR practice interested in medical innovation. Copyright © 2012 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Provision of out-of-hours interventional radiology services in the London Strategic Health Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illing, R.O.; Ingham Clark, C.L.; Allum, C.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To review the provision of out-of-hours interventional radiology (IR) services in the London Strategic Health Authority (SHA). Materials and methods: All 29 acute hospitals in the London SHA were contacted between November 2008 and January 2009. A questionnaire based on the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) guidelines assessed the provision of out-of-hours IR services. An 'ad-hoc' service was defined as on-call provision where not all the radiologists could perform intervention: If IR was required out of hours, an interventionalist came in when off-duty or the patient was transferred. Results: Seventeen out of the 29 (59%) hospitals provided ad-hoc out-of-hours services, eight (28%) provided a 24-hour rota, and four (14%) provide no out-of-hours cover. No ad-hoc service had formal transfer arrangements to a centre providing a 24 h service. Only two hospitals providing a 24 h service had six radiologists on the rota. Conclusion: Strategic planning for out-of-hours IR across London is recommended. This is likely to be welcomed by the hospitals involved, allowing informal arrangements to be formalized, and collaboration to provide comprehensive regional networks, provided appropriate funding is made available. A national audit is recommended; it is unlikely these findings are unique to London.

  2. Interventional radiology in the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of pseudoaneurysms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, A N

    2009-01-01

    Arterial wall disruption, as a consequence of inflammation\\/infection, trauma (penetrating or blunt), or iatrogenic causes, may result in pseudoaneurysm formation. Currently, iatrogenic causes are increasing as a result of the growth of endovascular intervention. The frequency of other causes also seems to be increasing, but this may simply be the result of increased diagnosis by better imaging techniques, such as multidetector contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Clinically, pseudoaneurysms may be silent, may present with local or systemic signs, or can rupture with catastrophic consequences. Open surgical repair, previously the mainstay of treatment, has largely been replaced by image-guided occlusion methods. On the basis of an experience of over 100 pseudoaneurysms, treatments at various anatomical sites, imaging modalities used for accurate diagnosis, current changing therapeutic options for pseudoaneurysm management, approved embolization agents, and clinical follow-up requirements to ensure adequate treatment will be discussed. Image-guided direct percutaneous and endovascular embolization of pseudoaneurysms are established treatment options with favorable success rates and minimal morbidity. The pendulum has now swung from invasive surgical repair of pseudoaneurysms to that of image-guided interventional radiology.

  3. Provision of out-of-hours interventional radiology services in the London Strategic Health Authority

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illing, R.O., E-mail: rowland@doctors.org.u [University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Ingham Clark, C.L.; Allum, C. [Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Aim: To review the provision of out-of-hours interventional radiology (IR) services in the London Strategic Health Authority (SHA). Materials and methods: All 29 acute hospitals in the London SHA were contacted between November 2008 and January 2009. A questionnaire based on the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) guidelines assessed the provision of out-of-hours IR services. An 'ad-hoc' service was defined as on-call provision where not all the radiologists could perform intervention: If IR was required out of hours, an interventionalist came in when off-duty or the patient was transferred. Results: Seventeen out of the 29 (59%) hospitals provided ad-hoc out-of-hours services, eight (28%) provided a 24-hour rota, and four (14%) provide no out-of-hours cover. No ad-hoc service had formal transfer arrangements to a centre providing a 24 h service. Only two hospitals providing a 24 h service had six radiologists on the rota. Conclusion: Strategic planning for out-of-hours IR across London is recommended. This is likely to be welcomed by the hospitals involved, allowing informal arrangements to be formalized, and collaboration to provide comprehensive regional networks, provided appropriate funding is made available. A national audit is recommended; it is unlikely these findings are unique to London.

  4. Shielding effect of lead glasses on radiologists' eye lens exposure in interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Panpan; Kong, Yan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Qianqian; Zhuo, Weihai; Liu, Haikuan

    2017-01-01

    To study the shielding effect of radiologists' eye lens with lead glasses of different equivalent thicknesses and sizes in interventional radiology procedures. Using the human voxel phantom with a more accurate model of the eye and MCNPX software, eye lens doses of the radiologists who wearing different kinds of lead glasses were simulated, different beam projections were taken into consideration during the simulation. Measurements were also performed with the physical model to verify simulation results. Simulation results showed that the eye lens doses were reduced by a factor from 3 to 9 when wearing a 20 cm 2 -sized lead glasses with the equivalent thickness ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 mm Pb. The increase of dose reduction factor (DRF) was not significant whenever increase the lead equivalent of glasses of which larger than 0.35 mm. Furthermore, the DRF was proportional to the size of glass lens from 6 to 30 cm 2 with the same lead equivalent. The simulation results were in well agreements with the measured ones. For more reasonable and effective protection of the eye lens of interventional radiologists, a pair of glasses with a lead equivalent of 0.5 mm Pb and large-sized (at least 27 cm 2 per glass) lens are recommended (authors)

  5. Blood vessel modeling for interactive simulation of interventional neuroradiology procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrien, E; Yureidini, A; Dequidt, J; Duriez, C; Anxionnat, R; Cotin, S

    2017-01-01

    Endovascular interventions can benefit from interactive simulation in their training phase but also during pre-operative and intra-operative phases if simulation scenarios are based on patient data. A key feature in this context is the ability to extract, from patient images, models of blood vessels that impede neither the realism nor the performance of simulation. This paper addresses both the segmentation and reconstruction of the vasculature from 3D Rotational Angiography data, and adapted to simulation: An original tracking algorithm is proposed to segment the vessel tree while filtering points extracted at the vessel surface in the vicinity of each point on the centerline; then an automatic procedure is described to reconstruct each local unstructured point set as a skeleton-based implicit surface (blobby model). The output of successively applying both algorithms is a new model of vasculature as a tree of local implicit models. The segmentation algorithm is compared with Multiple Hypothesis Testing (MHT) algorithm (Friman et al., 2010) on patient data, showing its greater ability to track blood vessels. The reconstruction algorithm is evaluated on both synthetic and patient data and demonstrate its ability to fit points with a subvoxel precision. Various tests are also reported where our model is used to simulate catheter navigation in interventional neuroradiology. An excellent realism, and much lower computational costs are reported when compared to triangular mesh surface models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Paediatric Interventional Uroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnacle, Alex M.; Wilkinson, A. Graham; Roebuck, Derek J.

    2011-01-01

    Paediatric interventional uroradiology lies at the intersection of the disciplines of paediatric interventional radiology and paediatric endourology. Interdisciplinary collaboration has led to the development of new techniques and refinement of procedures adopted from adult practice. This article reviews the major procedures used in paediatric interventional uroradiology, with emphasis on nephrostomy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, balloon-burst pyeloplasty, and antegrade ureteric stenting.

  7. SU-F-I-72: Evaluation of the Ancillary Lead Shielding for Optimizing Radiation Protection in the Interventional Radiology Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonkopi, E; Lightfoot, C [Dalhousie University, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Ctr, Halifax, NS (Canada); LeBlanc, E [Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Ctr, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The rising complexity of interventional fluoroscopic procedures has resulted in an increase of occupational radiation exposures in the interventional radiology (IR) department. This study assessed the impact of ancillary shielding on optimizing radiation protection for the IR staff. Methods: Scattered radiation measurements were performed in two IR suites equipped with Axiom Artis systems (Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) installed in 2006 and 2010. Both rooms had suspended ceiling-mounted lead-acrylic shields of 75×60 cm (Mavig, Munich, Germany) with lead equivalency of 0.5 mm, and under-table drapes of 70×116 cm and 65×70 cm in the newer and the older room respectively. The larger skirt can be wrapped around the table’s corner and in addition the newer suite had two upper shields of 25×55 cm and 25×35 cm. The patient was simulated by 30 cm of acrylic, air kerma rate (AKR) was measured with the 180cc ionization chamber (AccuPro Radcal Corporation, Monrovia, CA, USA) at different positions. The ancillary shields, x-ray tube, image detector, and table height were adjusted by the IR radiologist to simulate various clinical setups. The same exposure parameters were used for all acquisitions. AKR measurements were made at different positions relative to the operator. Results: The AKR measurements demonstrated 91–99% x-ray attenuation by the drapes in both suites. The smaller size of the under-table skirt and absence of the side-drapes in the older room resulted in a 20–50 fold increase of scattered radiation to the operator. The mobile suspended lead-acrylic shield reduced AKR by 90–94% measured at 150–170 cm height. The recommendations were made to replace the smaller under-table skirt and to use the ceiling-mounted shields for all IR procedures. Conclusion: The ancillary shielding may significantly affect radiation exposure to the IR staff. The use of suspended ceiling-mounted shields is especially important for reduction of

  8. Interim radiological safety standards and evaluation procedures for subseabed high-level waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klett, R.D.

    1997-06-01

    The Seabed Disposal Project (SDP) was evaluating the technical feasibility of high-level nuclear waste disposal in deep ocean sediments. Working standards were needed for risk assessments, evaluation of alternative designs, sensitivity studies, and conceptual design guidelines. This report completes a three part program to develop radiological standards for the feasibility phase of the SDP. The characteristics of subseabed disposal and how they affect the selection of standards are discussed. General radiological protection standards are reviewed, along with some new methods, and a systematic approach to developing standards is presented. The selected interim radiological standards for the SDP and the reasons for their selection are given. These standards have no legal or regulatory status and will be replaced or modified by regulatory agencies if subseabed disposal is implemented. 56 refs., 29 figs., 15 tabs.

  9. Interim radiological safety standards and evaluation procedures for subseabed high-level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klett, R.D.

    1997-06-01

    The Seabed Disposal Project (SDP) was evaluating the technical feasibility of high-level nuclear waste disposal in deep ocean sediments. Working standards were needed for risk assessments, evaluation of alternative designs, sensitivity studies, and conceptual design guidelines. This report completes a three part program to develop radiological standards for the feasibility phase of the SDP. The characteristics of subseabed disposal and how they affect the selection of standards are discussed. General radiological protection standards are reviewed, along with some new methods, and a systematic approach to developing standards is presented. The selected interim radiological standards for the SDP and the reasons for their selection are given. These standards have no legal or regulatory status and will be replaced or modified by regulatory agencies if subseabed disposal is implemented. 56 refs., 29 figs., 15 tabs

  10. Study on Generic Intervention Levels for Protecting the Public in a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, E. F.; Sordi, G. M. A. A.; Rodrigues, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Large amounts of radioactive material can be released to the environment in a nuclear accident or radiological emergency. In these cases, social and economical factors should be considered in the actions for protecting the public and to recover the environment, as these actions may affect not only the exposed individuals but also the society as a whole, because of the social impact and high costs. In 1994, the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, published the radiological protection principles for intervention criteria in accident situations involving radioactive materials, as well as numeric values for the generic intervention levels, GIL, for the main countermeasures for protecting the public. These GIL values were selected to achieve broadly the maximum net benefit in many accident situations and, nowadays, those principles still represent the international consensus about this matter. On the other hand, the economic differences between countries can lead the optimization process to get GIL values that are quite different from those recommended. In this context, the monetary value of unit collective averted dose, called alpha-value, is a key element for the determination of the GIL. In this work, the method recommended by the IAEA, based on the human capital approach, was used to estimate the alpha-value for Brazil and the value of US$ 3268 per person-sievert was obtained, considering the year 2000 prices. The per capita costs of the countermeasures for protecting the public, as sheltering, evacuation, temporary relocation and permanent resettlement, were estimated and the cost-benefit analysis technique was applied to estimate the respective GIL applicable in the country. Some of the results for the GILs were smaller than those internationally recommended, even the alpha-value being about six times lower than the alpha-value considered by the IAEA. These results were discussed and they were also compared to values estimated by a similar study accomplished

  11. Radiological review of intercostal artery: anatomical considerations when performing procedures via intercostal space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, S.; Trieu, J; Ridley, L

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to closely examine the course of the intercostal arteries within the intercostal spaces particularly with regard to where the arteries were located in relation to their adjacent ribs. The degree of tortuosity of the arteries was also examined, along with anatomical differences in different age groups. A total of 81 patients between the age of 30 and 90 years who had underwent a CT examination of the chest for any indication were included in the study. All studies were performed on a dual source 64 slice CT (Siemens Definition Erlangen Germany). Analysis of the intercostal arteries was performed on a CT workstation using volume rendered 3D reconstructions F, or each patient the 10'n intercostals pacesb ilaterally were examined for the course and tortuosity of the intercostal arteries. The ICA is located relatively inferiorly in the intercostal space at costovertebral junction and it gradually becomes more superiorly positioned within the intercostal space it as courses laterally. This finding was consistent in all age groups. In addition, analysis of the data demonstrated increasing intercostal artery tortuosity with advancing age. In this study we have examined the course of the posterior intercostal arteries using MDCT. This study confirms the classical description of the course of ICA. We have shown that in the medial chest, posteriorly, the artery is located in the inferior half of the intercostal space. As it moves away from the costovertebral junction it travels closer to the inferior border of the rib above and reaches the intercostal groove. We have also shown that the artery tends to be more tortuous in elderly patients, decreasing the area of 'safe' space for interventions. Both of these findings are relevant to radiologists and non-radiologists performing interventional procedures via the intercostal space.

  12. Impact on Patient Safety and Satisfaction of Implementation of an Outpatient Clinic in Interventional Radiology (IPSIPOLI-Study): A Quasi-Experimental Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutjeboer, Jacob; Burgmans, Mark Christiaan; Chung, Kaman; Erkel, Arian Robert van

    2015-01-01

    PurposeInterventional radiology (IR) procedures are associated with high rates of preparation and planning errors. In many centers, pre-procedural consultation and screening of patients is performed by referring physicians. Interventional radiologists have better knowledge about procedure details and risks, but often only get acquainted with the patient in the procedure room. We hypothesized that patient safety (PS) and patient satisfaction (PSAT) in elective IR procedures would improve by implementation of a pre-procedural visit to an outpatient IR clinic.Material and MethodsIRB approval was obtained and informed consent was waived. PS and PSAT were measured in patients undergoing elective IR procedures before (control group; n = 110) and after (experimental group; n = 110) implementation of an outpatient IR clinic. PS was measured as the number of process deviations. PSAT was assessed using a questionnaire measuring Likert scores of three dimensions: interpersonal care aspects, information/communication, and patient participation. Differences in PS and PSAT between the two groups were compared using an independent t test.ResultsThe average number of process deviations per patient was 0.39 in the control group compared to 0.06 in the experimental group (p < 0.001). In 9.1 % patients in the control group, no legal informed consent was obtained compared to 0 % in the experimental group. The mean overall Likert score was significantly higher in the experimental group compared to the control group: 2.68 (SD 0.314) versus 2.48 (SD 0.381) (p < 0.001).ConclusionPS and PSAT improve significantly if patients receive consultation and screening in an IR outpatient clinic prior to elective IR procedures

  13. Impact on Patient Safety and Satisfaction of Implementation of an Outpatient Clinic in Interventional Radiology (IPSIPOLI-Study): A Quasi-Experimental Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutjeboer, Jacob, E-mail: j.lutjeboer@lumc.nl; Burgmans, Mark Christiaan, E-mail: m.c.burgmans@lumc.nl, E-mail: mburgmans@hotmail.com; Chung, Kaman, E-mail: kaman.chung10@gmail.com; Erkel, Arian Robert van, E-mail: a.r.van-erkel@lumc.nl [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeInterventional radiology (IR) procedures are associated with high rates of preparation and planning errors. In many centers, pre-procedural consultation and screening of patients is performed by referring physicians. Interventional radiologists have better knowledge about procedure details and risks, but often only get acquainted with the patient in the procedure room. We hypothesized that patient safety (PS) and patient satisfaction (PSAT) in elective IR procedures would improve by implementation of a pre-procedural visit to an outpatient IR clinic.Material and MethodsIRB approval was obtained and informed consent was waived. PS and PSAT were measured in patients undergoing elective IR procedures before (control group; n = 110) and after (experimental group; n = 110) implementation of an outpatient IR clinic. PS was measured as the number of process deviations. PSAT was assessed using a questionnaire measuring Likert scores of three dimensions: interpersonal care aspects, information/communication, and patient participation. Differences in PS and PSAT between the two groups were compared using an independent t test.ResultsThe average number of process deviations per patient was 0.39 in the control group compared to 0.06 in the experimental group (p < 0.001). In 9.1 % patients in the control group, no legal informed consent was obtained compared to 0 % in the experimental group. The mean overall Likert score was significantly higher in the experimental group compared to the control group: 2.68 (SD 0.314) versus 2.48 (SD 0.381) (p < 0.001).ConclusionPS and PSAT improve significantly if patients receive consultation and screening in an IR outpatient clinic prior to elective IR procedures.

  14. The ICRU (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements): Its contribution to dosimetry in diagnostic and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.; Zoetelief, J.; Menzel, H. G.; Paretzke, H.

    2005-01-01

    The ICRU (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements was created to develop a coherent system of quantities and units, universally accepted in all fields where ionizing radiation is used. Although the accuracy of dose or kerma may be low for most radiological applications, the quantity which is measured must be clearly specified. Radiological dosimetry instruments are generally calibrated free-in-air in terms of air kerma. However, to estimate the probability of harm at low dose, the mean absorbed dose for organs is used. In contrast, at high doses, the likelihood of harm is related to the absorbed dose at the site receiving the highest dose. Therefore, to assess the risk of deterministic and stochastic effects, a detailed knowledge of absorbed dose distribution, organ doses, patient age and gender is required. For interventional radiology, where the avoidance of deterministic effects becomes important, dose conversion coefficients are generally not yet developed. (authors)

  15. Dosimetry of the patient and occupational in interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andisco, D.; Bourel, V.; Schmidt, L.; Fernandez, N.

    2014-08-01

    The big necessity to estimate the entrance doses in skin that the patients receive when are exposed to interventional procedures and the personal dosimetry of the professionals that work in these procedures in operating room, has taken to the analysis of different possibilities that allow to carry out these estimates. The objective of this work was to analyze the possibility of using Optically Stimulated Luminescence dosimeters; comparing the results with ionizing cameras and electronic personal dosimeters. To carry out these estimates, we work with a X-ray equipment Phillips Allure, acrylic phantoms, a dosimetry system formed by ionization camera and dosimeter UNIDOS E, OSL (Nano dots) dosimeters and electronic lavalieres Aloka brand, PDM 117 models. To estimate the doses that the patients receive, entrance dose was measured in skin and in personal dosimetry inside places where the medical professionals are habitually located in different situations among 5 and 60 irradiation min. In the case of direct radiation, the OSL (Nano dots) present reliable readings and only were dispersed values for the measurements of secondary radiation. The measured values and the linking among them were also analyzed. The OSL (Nano dot) dosimetry behaves reliable way when is located in the ranges of more dose to 0,1 mGy, according to the maker indications and fundamentally for direct beams of the hemodynamics equipment being ideal for the measurement of entrance dose in skin. For the Nano dots use in personal dosimetry the results should be read carefully for values major to 0,1 mGy and being completely inappropriate for minor values. (Author)

  16. Generic Procedures for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency at Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The IAEA publishes the Emergency Preparedness and Response Series to fulfil that function. This publication is part of that series. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency, contains the following requirement: 'To ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene...'. The IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(53)/RES/10, continues to encourage Member States '...to enhance, where necessary, their own preparedness and response capabilities for nuclear and radiological incidents and emergencies, by improving capabilities to prevent accidents, to respond to emergencies and to mitigate any harmful consequences...'. This publication is intended to assist Member States meet the requirements of GS-R-2 and enhance their preparedness by providing guidance on the response by facility personnel to emergencies at research reactor facilities.

  17. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J.A. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography has made possible the excellent and basic work having to do with the characteristics of the trachea, its caliber, shape, and length in children. Another group of articles has to do with interventional pediatric radiology. This year there were a number of articles of which only a sample is included, dealing with therapeutic procedures involving drainage of abscesses, angioplasty, nephrostomy, therapeutic embolization, and the removal of esophageal foreign bodies. Obviously, there is no reason to think that techniques developed for the adult may not be applicable to the infant or child; also, there is no reason to believe that processes peculiar to the child should not be amenable to intervention, for instance, use of embolization of hepatic hemangioma and transluminal balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary valvular stenosis. Among the reports and reviews, the author would add that sonography remains a basic imaging technique in pediatric radiology and each year its application broadens. For example, there is an excellent article having to do with sonography of the neonatal and infant hip and evaluation of the inferior vena cava and the gallbladder. Nuclear medicine continues to play a significant role in diagnosis, which is featured in two articles concerned with problems of the hip

  18. The Effect of the Extinction Procedure in Function-Based Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janney, Donna M.; Umbreit, John; Ferro, Jolenea B.; Liaupsin, Carl J.; Lane, Kathleen L.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined the contribution of the extinction procedure in function-based interventions implemented in the general education classrooms of three at-risk elementary-aged students. Function-based interventions included antecedent adjustments, reinforcement procedures, and function-matched extinction procedures. Using a combined ABC…

  19. Functional phlebology. Phlebography, function studies, interventional radiology. Funktionelle Phlebologie. Phlebographie, Funktionstests, interventionelle Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, J.; May, R.; Biland, L.; Endert, G.; Gottlob, R.; Justich, E.; Luebcke, P.; Mignon, G.; Moltz, L.; Partsch, H.; Petter, A.; Ritter, H.; Soerensen, R.; Widmer, L.K.; Widmer, M.T.; Zemp, E.

    1990-01-01

    The book presents a complete survey of the problems occurring in the venous system of the legs, pelvis, and abdomen. The material is arranged in the following main chapters: (1) Introduction to the phlebology of the low-pressure system in the lower part of the body; (2) Phlebographic methods; (3) Instrumented function studies and methods; (4) Pathologic findings; (5) Diagnostic methods and vein therapy; (6) Interventional radiology; (7) Expert opinions on venous lesions including insurance aspects. The first chapter encompasses a section briefly discussing the available instrumented diagnostic imaging methods. In view of the novel imaging methods, namely digital subtraction phlebology, sonography, CT and MRI, the classical phlebography remains the gold standard, so to speak: all currently available phlebographic methods for imaging the venes in the legs, pelvis and abdomen are explained and comparatively evaluated. Instrumented function tests such as Doppler effect ultrasound testing, plethysmography, peripheral and central phlebodynamometry (venous pressure measurement) are analysed for their diagnostic value and as alternative or supplementing techniques in comparison to phlebology. (orig./MG) With 843 figs., 101 tabs.

  20. The Role of Interventional Radiology in the Diagnosis and Management of Male Impotence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Shaida, Nadeem; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Krokidis, Miltiadis

    2013-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is defined as the persistent inability to reach or maintain penile rigidity enough for sexual satisfaction. Nearly 30% of the men between ages 40 and 70 years are affected by ED. A variety of pathologies, including neurological, psychological, or endocrine disorders and drug side effects, may incite ED. A commonly identified cause of ED is vascular disease. Initial diagnostic workup includes a detailed physical examination and laboratory tests. Whilst duplex ultrasound is considered the first-line diagnostic modality, intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography is still considered the “gold standard” for the diagnosis of arteriogenic impotence. Percutaneous endovascular treatment may be offered in patients with vasculogenic ED that has failed to respond to oral medical therapy as an alternative to penile prosthesis or open surgical repair. In arteriogenic ED balloon angioplasty of the aorto-iliac axis, and in veno-occlusive ED, percutaneous venous ablation using various embolization materials has been reported to be safe and to improve sexual performance. Recently, the ZEN study investigated the safety and feasibility of drug-eluting stents for the treatment of arteriogenic ED attributed to internal pudendal artery stenosis with promising preliminary results. This manuscript highlights the role of interventional radiology in the diagnosis and minimally invasive treatment of male impotence

  1. The Role of Interventional Radiology in the Diagnosis and Management of Male Impotence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiliopoulos, Stavros [Patras University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Greece); Shaida, Nadeem [Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Trust, Addenbrooke' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Katsanos, Konstantinos [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Trust, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Krokidis, Miltiadis, E-mail: mkrokidis@hotmail.com [Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Trust, Addenbrooke' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is defined as the persistent inability to reach or maintain penile rigidity enough for sexual satisfaction. Nearly 30% of the men between ages 40 and 70 years are affected by ED. A variety of pathologies, including neurological, psychological, or endocrine disorders and drug side effects, may incite ED. A commonly identified cause of ED is vascular disease. Initial diagnostic workup includes a detailed physical examination and laboratory tests. Whilst duplex ultrasound is considered the first-line diagnostic modality, intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography is still considered the 'gold standard' for the diagnosis of arteriogenic impotence. Percutaneous endovascular treatment may be offered in patients with vasculogenic ED that has failed to respond to oral medical therapy as an alternative to penile prosthesis or open surgical repair. In arteriogenic ED balloon angioplasty of the aorto-iliac axis, and in veno-occlusive ED, percutaneous venous ablation using various embolization materials has been reported to be safe and to improve sexual performance. Recently, the ZEN study investigated the safety and feasibility of drug-eluting stents for the treatment of arteriogenic ED attributed to internal pudendal artery stenosis with promising preliminary results. This manuscript highlights the role of interventional radiology in the diagnosis and minimally invasive treatment of male impotence.

  2. Optimization of radiation protection in diagnostic and interventional radiology: Which is the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapaki, V.

    2012-01-01

    As quoted in the latest UNSCEAR 2008 report: 'it appears that the world is entering another period of major technological changes, where the impact of these changes on the population dose worldwide in the future will be difficult to predict'. It is more than true that in this fast changing world and immense technological advances, especially in the medical sector, scientists run a marathon to be able to follow the new techniques that are continuously introduced for the benefit of the patient. Almost half of the radiation to the population in diagnostic radiology arises due to CT and interventional techniques. More and more medical specialties as well as other professions (nurses, technicians, managers, etc.) are currently being introduced into the term 'radiation safety culture' and 'optimization'. Some of these stakeholders were not aware of these expressions and were never trained or educated on these subjects. Each of these specialties should therefore be approached in a different way, indicating and underlining the specific roles of the experts, in order to persuade them to include radiation safety in their every day clinical routine. Below, some of these issues are identified and possible ways to move forward in the future are suggested. (author)

  3. A Leadership Intervention to Further the Training of Female Faculty (LIFT-OFF) in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalluto, Lucy B; Spottswood, Stephanie E; Deitte, Lori A; Chern, Alexander; Dewey, Charlene M

    2017-06-01

    Women are under-represented in the field of radiology, occupy a minority of leadership positions, and, at our institution, have not achieved the same level of academic success as their male counterparts. Consequently, the authors designed, implemented, and evaluated the Leadership Intervention to Further the Training of Female Faculty (LIFT-OFF) program to (1) improve access to opportunities for women's faculty development and advancement, and (2) improve clarification of expectations about the role and path of advancement. LIFT-OFF was developed based on the results of a needs assessment survey. The results generated 14 priority topics, which served as the basis for educational modules conducted by expert speakers. Module effectiveness was assessed with pre- and postsurveys to elicit participant knowledge about the targeted subject matter. A formative program evaluation was performed at the completion of year 1 of 2 to assess outcomes and impacts to date. Seventeen of 55 (31%) educational module post-survey questions demonstrated a statistically significant (P leadership positions. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Examination of types of exposure and management methods for nurses in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroshige; Fujii, Tomonori; Koshida, Kichiro; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro

    2007-01-01

    Although a large number of studies have been done on exposure to operators and doctors during interventional radiology (IVR), there have been very few reports on nurses. This study was carried out to clarify the situation regarding exposure for nurses, and provides examples of how to estimate and manage. We measured space dose-rate distributions with an ionization survey meter, and personal exposure dose by a small fluorescent grass dosimeter (Dose Ace). The experimental results disclosed that there tended to be two types of exposure depending on the task performed. Head and neck (collar level) were associated with the highest exposure dose, which was observed in nurses assisting operators. Alternatively, knees showed the highest exposure dose, which was observed in nurses observing and assisting the patient. When estimation of skin equivalent exposure at the knees is needed, it can be calculated by using the value measured at the collar level. Furthermore, in estimating exposure dose, the directional and energy characteristics of personal dosimeters should be considered adequate. For radiation management, a circular protective sheet can be placed around the patient's lower area and a protective screen near the patient's head, and basic and practical education can be given. We concluded that these are highly useful for the personal monitoring of nurses engaged in IVR. (author)

  5. Estimation of personal dose based on the dependent calibration of personal dosimeters in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroshige; Koshida, Kichiro; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of present study is, in interventional radiology (IVR), to elucidate the differences between each personal dosimeter, and the dependences and calibrations of area or personal dose by measurement with electronic dosimeters in particular. We compare space dose rate distributions measured by an ionization survey meter with the value measured by personal dosimeter: an optically stimulated luminescence, two fluoroglass, and two electronic dosimeters. Furthermore, with electronic dosimeters, we first measured dose rate, energy, and directional dependences. Secondly, we calibrated the dose rate measured by electronic dosimeters with the results, and estimated these methods with coefficient of determination and Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC). The results, especially in electronic dosimeters, revealed that the dose rate measured fell by energy and directional dependences. In terms of methods of calibration, the method is sufficient for energy dependence, but not for directional dependence, because of the lack of stable calibration. This improvement poses a question for the future. The study suggested that these dependences of the personal dosimeter must be considered when area or personal dose is estimated in IVR. (author)

  6. Radiation protection in interventional radiology: survey results of attitudes and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynskey, G Emmett; Powell, Daniel K; Dixon, Robert G; Silberzweig, James E

    2013-10-01

    To assess attitudes of interventional radiologists toward personal radiation protection and the use of radiation protection devices. Invitations to an anonymous online survey that comprised eight questions focused on operator attitudes toward radiation protection devices were sent via e-mail to the active membership of the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR): a total of 3,158 e-mail invitations. A single reminder e-mail was sent. There were 504 survey responders (16% response rate). Reported radiation safety device use included lead apron (99%), thyroid shield (94%), leaded eyeglasses (54%), ceiling-suspended leaded shield (44%), rolling leaded shields (12%), ceiling-suspended/rolling lead-equivalent apron (4%), radiation-attenuating sterile surgical gloves (1%), and sterile lead-equivalent patient-mounted drape (4%). Reasons commonly cited for not using certain devices were comfort (eyewear), ease of use (mounted shields), and lack of availability (rolling/hanging shields and patient-mounted shields). Interventionalists have an array of tools from which to choose for personal radiation protection; however, for a variety of reasons related to lack of availability or choice, these tools are not universally employed. Further study may be of value to clarify why comfort was cited most often as the primary barrier to the use of protective eyewear and difficulty of use was cited as the primary barrier to use of mounted shields (despite reporting that concern for radiation-induced injury to the eye is paramount). It may also be of interest to further study why certain devices with demonstrable protection effects are not readily available, such as rolling/hanging and patient-mounted shields. © SIR, 2013.

  7. Development of procedures Dose Levels interventional pediatric cardiology Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubeda de la Cerda, C.; Miranda Gonzalez, M.; Vano Carruana, E.; Leyton Legues, F.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show the evolution of these dose values during the years 2009 and 2010, which have been quantified as part of the IAEA entitled Ensuring Radiological Protection of Patients in General Medical and during Exhibitions (TSA3)RLA/9/067.

  8. Endoscopic procedure with a modified Reiki intervention: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Rosalinda S; Stuart-Shor, Eileen M; Russo, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study examined the use of Reiki prior to colonoscopy to reduce anxiety and minimize intraprocedure medications compared with usual care. A prospective, nonblinded, partially randomized patient preference design was employed using 21 subjects undergoing colonoscopy for the first time. Symptoms of anxiety and pain were assessed using a Likert-type scale. Between-group differences were assessed using chi-square analyses and analysis of variance. There were no differences between the control (n = 10) and experimental (n = 11) groups on age (mean = 58 years, SD = 8.5) and gender (53% women). The experimental group had higher anxiety (4.5 vs. 2.6, p = .03) and pain (0.8 vs. 0.2, p = .42) scores prior to colonoscopy. The Reiki intervention reduced mean heart rate (-9 beats/minute), systolic blood pressure (-10 mmHg), diastolic blood pressure (-4 mmHg), and respirations (-3 breaths/minute). There were no between-group differences on intraprocedure medication use or postprocedure physiologic measures. Although the experimental group patients had more symptoms, they did not require additional pain medication during the procedure, suggesting that (1) anxious people may benefit from an adjunctive therapy; (2) anxiety and pain are decreased by Reiki therapy for patients undergoing colonoscopy, and (3) additional intraprocedure pain medication may not be needed for colonoscopy patients receiving Reiki therapy. This pilot study provided important insights in preparation for a rigorous, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

  9. Radiological interventions in inflammatory bowel disease; Interventionelle Verfahren bei entzuendlichen Darmerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krolak, C.; Rock, C.; Reiser, M. [Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    Abscesses, fistulas,hemorrhages and stenoses are common complications of inflammatory bowel diseases.This study provides an overview on various methods of radiological intervention and the clinical usefulness of these methods is analyzed. The success rate of percutaneous abscess drainage (PAD), embolisation of hemorrhages and dilatation of bowel stenoses is reviewed and current literature is adressed.Success rate is defined in terms of cure rate and need for subsequent surgery. After PAD, surgery can be avoided during the observation period in about 50% of patients with abscesses due to Crohn's disease and diverticulitis.Preoperative PAD reduces the degree of invasiveness and thus the risk of surgery.Abscess recurrence is found with the same frecuency following surgery or PAD.Bowel dilatation can be performed both with radiological and with endoscopic guidance.Embolisation of GI-hemorrhage is technically feasible, but the indication should be limited to strictly selected cases. In treating abscesses and fistulas associated with Crohn's disease and diverticulitis, PAD is a valuable treatment option.Embolisation or dilatation are restricted to rare cares. (orig.) [German] Fragestellung Abszesse, Fisteln, Blutungen und Darmstenosen sind typische Komplikationen entzuendlicher Darmerkrankungen. Es werden verschiedene radiologisch-interventionelle Verfahren vorgestellt und ihre Wertigkeit fuer die Behandlung geprueft.Methodik Unter Beruecksichtigung der neueren Literatur werden der Erfolg der perkutanen Abszessdrainage (PAD) hinsichtlich der Ausheilung und Notwendigkeit einer folgenden OP, die perkutane Embolisation und die Dilatation von Darmstenosen bewertet.Ergebnisse Die PAD vermeidet bei 50% der Patienten mit Morbus Crohn und bei 20% der Patienten mit Divertikulitis eine OP im kurzfristigen Verlauf.Die PAD verringert die Invasivitaet einer nachfolgenden OP.Rezidivabszesse treten nach PAD und OP gleich haeufig auf.Die Dilatation entzuendlicher Darmstenosen

  10. Utilisation and outcomes following the introduction of an interventional radiology day unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makris, G.C.; Shaida, N.; Pyneeandee, R.; Shaw, A.; See, T.C.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To assess the utilisation of an interventional radiology day unit (RDU), the rates of on-time discharges, the financial performance of the unit, and finally, the patient satisfaction rates. Materials and methods: Data regarding the unit utilisation, discharge times, and complications were retrospectively collected for the first 2 years of operation of the unit (1 April 2013 to 1 January 2015). In addition, monitoring the activity going through the RDU and applying a contribution margin to the freed-up beds measured the financial performance. The data were provided by the finance department of the hospital. Satisfaction survey questionnaires were sent randomly by post to 100 patients who had been previously admitted to the RDU. Results: During the study period, 3019 patients were admitted to the RDU, comprising 1426 during the first year and 1513 during the second. On average, 5.6 patients were discharged from the RDU on every working day during the first year and 7.1 patients during the second (21% increase in the discharge rate). Given the 8-hour working time configuration of the unit, a realistic 80% utilisation rate of the RDU's seven beds could free a total of 1400 inpatient bed days over a full year. The cost of delivering these episodes of care was reduced by approximately 50%. From the financial data, it was estimated that the RDU managed to achieve a total of £393,000 in savings for the Trust for the financial year 2013–2014. The return rate of the patient satisfaction survey was 40%. All patients were satisfied with their overall RDU experience. Conclusion: The RDU has brought significant benefits for patients and the Trust without compromises in safety or quality. - Highlights: • Radiology Day units can improve workflow through improved efficiency. • RDUs can decrease the treatment-related costs mainly by reducing the need for unnecessary overnight hospitalisation. • They appear to be welcome by the patients with excellent feedback so

  11. A feasibility inquiry on the radiodermatitis secondary to an interventional radiology act;Une enquete de faisabilite sur les radiodermites secondaires a un geste de radiologie interventionnelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roudier, C.; Pirard, Ph.; Donadieu, J. [Institut de veille sanitaire, Saint-Maurice (France)

    2006-04-15

    The radiodermatitis is a burning of skin tissue and subcutaneous tissue in relation with ionizing radiation. In the medical practice, outside radiotherapy excluded of our study, it is observed only with acts of interventional radiology. The consequences of a radiodermatitis can be aesthetic, with appearance of a scar or a definitive alopecia, functional with loss of substance needing sometimes a remedial surgical act and finally oncologic with a risk of localised skin cancer. A radiodermatitis can appear with a radiation dose of 2 grays and its intensity worsens with the dose. Since the late 1970's about 200 cases of radiodermatitis have been reported. the most of cases have been reported between 1993 and 2000 and less than ten cases have been reported since 2000, suggesting a possible reduction of incidence explainable by a concomitant improvement of technological quality of the equipment. In order to confirm this eventual trend az feasibility study has been organised and is reported in this article. Given the results, this complication is still existing. In spite of the small number of observed cases, it is to notice that every procedures of interventional radiology are concerned. The preliminary character of this study encourages the institute of Health surveillance to work on the elaboration of a program of radiodermatitis surveillance. It could be associated to actions of improvement of the prevention and follow-up of patients, of feedback, and making easy an optimization of the practices. (N.C.)

  12. Evaluation and assessment methodology, standards, and procedures manual of the United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, K.C.; Burson, Z.G.; Smith, J.M.; Blanchard, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    In the event of a major radiological emergency, the U.S. Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan authorises the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). The FRMAC is established to co-ordinate the Federal off-site monitoring and assessment activities, and is comprised of representatives from several Federal agencies and Department of Energy contractors who provide assistance to the state(s) and Lead Federal Agency. The Evaluation and Assessment (E and A) Division of the FRMAC is responsible for receiving, storing, and interpreting environmental surveillance data to estimate the potential health consequences to the population in the vicinity of the accident site. The E and A Division has commissioned the preparation of a methodology and procedures manual which will result in a consistent approach by Division members in carrying out their duties. The first edition of this manual is nearing completion. In this paper, a brief review of the structure of the FRMAC is presented, with emphasis on the E and A Division. The contents of the E and A manual are briefly described, as are future plans for its expansion. (author)

  13. Cost Analysis of an Open Low-Field (0.23T) MRI Unit: Effect of Procedure Shares in Combined Imaging, Interventional, and Neurosurgical Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronkainen, J.; Tervonen, O.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the cost structure of procedures performed in a multipurpose interventional magnetic resonance imaging (IMRI) unit and to analyze the effect of procedure shares on cost structure. Material and Methods: During a 1-year period, 691 procedures were performed in the IMRI unit, of which 563 were diagnostic MRI examinations, 89 MRI-guided interventions, and 39 MRI-guided neurosurgical operations. Three alternative utilization models of IMRI were created to simulate different local institutions by adjusting the proportions of different procedures. The costs of procedures were calculated by activity-based cost analysis. Results: The cost of the main procedure (imaging, biopsy, injection, or operation) was the most significant item in all procedures, accounting for 66-89% of the total costs. The volume of imaging has a major effect on unit costs. Volume is not such a deterministic factor in interventions due to the high material costs. The volume of neurosurgical use of IMRI has a major effect on the costs of radiological procedures due to the long operation times. Conclusion: The volumes of different procedures done on an IMRI unit have significant effects on the unit costs of the procedures

  14. Deepening the reform of medical education, strengthening the training of reserve specialists in interventional radiology: a profound rethinking based on a survey of medical students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Chongyang; Di Zhenhai; Li Linsun

    2010-01-01

    Although the interventional radiology, a rapidly expanding medical specialty, has already been widely popularized and generally accepted for many years, it is still facing lots of challenges and turf wars, such as the brain drain, understaffed and the gap between the old and the young. This article attempts to analyze the reasons through investigating the current teaching situation of interventional radiology in medical colleges and finding out the undergraduates' attitude to interventional radiology, in order to explore possible paths for solving the imbalance between supply and demand of qualified personnel. (authors)

  15. CBRN Decontamination: Multiservice Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    conflict in the former Yugoslavia, Muslim forces deliberately positioned canisters of chlorine from the Tuzla industrial chemical plant to deter Serb...Listeriosis ( Listeria monocytogenes) Less than 24 hours Diffused light: 24 but not 48 hours In sun; soil surface: 12 days (2-3 cm...biological material Laboratories and storage facilities Radiological Nuclear fuel and medical sources Nuclear power plants , medical facilities, industrial

  16. Medical intervention in radiological emergencies, formation and training; Intervencion medica en emergencias radiologicas, formacion y adiestramiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas H, J. [CPHR, Calle 20 No. 4113, e/41 y 47 Playa, CP 11300, La Habana (Cuba)]. e-mail: cardenas@cphr.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    The work exposes the national experience in the development of training programs in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies. Implemented after valuing the existent situation, identified the necessities and the reach of the training, additionally it was elaborated the content of the training program whose purpose is guided to the invigoration of the medical answer capacity in radiological emergencies The content of the modular program it approaches theoretical- practical aspects on preparation and medical answer in radiological emergencies. The program includes an exercise that simulates a radiological accident, to evaluate during the same one, the answer capacity before this situation. The training concludes with the design of a strategy for the preparation and answer in radiological emergencies in correspondence with the potential accidental scenarios that the participants can face. (Author)

  17. Improving financial performance by modeling and analysis of radiology procedure scheduling at a large community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lingbo; Li, Jingshan; Gisler, Paula

    2011-06-01

    Radiology tests, such as MRI, CT-scan, X-ray and ultrasound, are cost intensive and insurance pre-approvals are necessary to get reimbursement. In some cases, tests may be denied for payments by insurance companies due to lack of pre-approvals, inaccurate or missing necessary information. This can lead to substantial revenue losses for the hospital. In this paper, we present a simulation study of a centralized scheduling process for outpatient radiology tests at a large community hospital (Central Baptist Hospital in Lexington, Kentucky). Based on analysis of the central scheduling process, a simulation model of information flow in the process has been developed. Using such a model, the root causes of financial losses associated with errors and omissions in this process were identified and analyzed, and their impacts were quantified. In addition, "what-if" analysis was conducted to identify potential process improvement strategies in the form of recommendations to the hospital leadership. Such a model provides a quantitative tool for continuous improvement and process control in radiology outpatient test scheduling process to reduce financial losses associated with process error. This method of analysis is also applicable to other departments in the hospital.

  18. Occupational exposures during abdominal fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures for different patient sizes - A Monte Carlo approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, William S; Belinato, Walmir; Perini, Ana P; Caldas, Linda V E; Galeano, Diego C; Santos, Carla J; Neves, Lucio P

    2018-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the occupational exposures during an abdominal fluoroscopically guided interventional radiology procedure. We investigated the relation between the Body Mass Index (BMI), of the patient, and the conversion coefficient values (CC) for a set of dosimetric quantities, used to assess the exposure risks of medical radiation workers. The study was performed using a set of male and female virtual anthropomorphic phantoms, of different body weights and sizes. In addition to these phantoms, a female and a male phantom, named FASH3 and MASH3 (reference virtual anthropomorphic phantoms), were also used to represent the medical radiation workers. The CC values, obtained as a function of the dose area product, were calculated for 87 exposure scenarios. In each exposure scenario, three phantoms, implemented in the MCNPX 2.7.0 code, were simultaneously used. These phantoms were utilized to represent a patient and medical radiation workers. The results showed that increasing the BMI of the patient, adjusted for each patient protocol, the CC values for medical radiation workers decrease. It is important to note that these results were obtained with fixed exposure parameters. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Introduction of an Undergraduate Interventional Radiology (IR) Curriculum: Impact on Medical Student Knowledge and Interest in IR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikh, M. [Bradford Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology, Bradford Teaching Hospital Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Shaygi, B. [Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, Interventional Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Asadi, H., E-mail: asadi.hamed@gmail.com; Thanaratnam, P.; Pennycooke, K.; Mirza, M.; Lee, M., E-mail: mlee@rcsi.ie [Beaumont Hospital, Interventional Radiology Service, Department of Radiology (Ireland)

    2016-04-15

    IntroductionInterventional radiology (IR) plays a vital role in modern medicine, with increasing demand for services, but with a shortage of experienced interventionalists. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a recently introduced IR curriculum on perception, knowledge, and interest of medical students regarding various aspects of IR.MethodsIn 2014, an anonymous web-based questionnaire was sent to 309 4th year medical students in a single institution within an EU country, both before and after delivery of a 10-h IR teaching curriculum.ResultsSeventy-six percent (236/309) of the respondents participated in the pre-IR module survey, while 50 % (157/309) responded to the post-IR module survey. While 62 % (147/236) of the respondents reported poor or no knowledge of IR compared to other medical disciplines in the pre-IR module survey, this decreased to 17 % (27/157) in the post-IR module survey. The correct responses regarding knowledge of selected IR procedures improved from 70 to 94 % for venous access, 78 to 99 % for uterine fibroid embolization, 75 to 97 % for GI bleeding embolization, 60 to 92 % for trauma embolization, 71 to 92 % for tumor ablation, and 81 to 94 % for angioplasty and stenting in peripheral arterial disease. With regard to knowledge of IR clinical roles, responses improved from 42 to 59 % for outpatient clinic review of patients and having inpatient beds, 63–76 % for direct patient consultation, and 43–60 % for having regular ward rounds. The number of students who would consider a career in IR increased from 60 to 73 %.ConclusionDelivering an undergraduate IR curriculum increased the knowledge and understanding of various aspects of IR and also the general enthusiasm for pursuing this specialty as a future career choice.

  20. Medical Liability and Patient Law in Germany: Main Features with Particular Focus on Treatments in the Field of Interventional Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S A; Geissler, R; Stampfl, U; Wolf, M B; Radeleff, B A; Richter, G M; Kauczor, H-U; Pereira, P L; Sommer, C M

    2016-04-01

    On February 26th, 2013 the patient law became effective in Germany. Goal of the lawmakers was a most authoritative case law for liability of malpractice and to improve enforcement of the rights of the patients. The following article contains several examples detailing legal situation. By no means should these discourage those persons who treat patients. Rather should they be sensitized to to various aspects of this increasingly important field of law. To identify relevant sources according to judicial standard research was conducted including first- and second selection. Goal was the identification of jurisdiction, literature and other various analyses that all deal with liability of malpractice and patient law within the field of Interventional Radiology--with particular focus on transarterial chemoembolization of the liver and related procedures. In summary, 89 different sources were included and analyzed. The individual who treats a patient is liable for an error in treatment if it causes injury to life, the body or the patient's health. Independent of the error in treatment the individual providing medical care is liable for mistakes made in the context of obtaining informed consent. Prerequisite is the presence of an error made when obtaining informed consent and its causality for the patient's consent for the treatment. Without an effective consent the treatment is considered illegal whether it was free of treatment error or not. The new patient law does not cause material change of the German liablity of malpractice law. •On February 26th, 2013 the new patient law came into effect. Materially, there was no fundamental remodeling of the German liability for medical malpractice. •Regarding a physician's liability for medical malpractice two different elements of an offence come into consideration: for one the liability for malpractice and, in turn, liability for errors made during medical consultation in the process of obtaining informed consent.

  1. Professional development for radiographers and post graduate nurses in radiological interventions: Building teamwork and collaboration through drama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundén, M; Lundgren, S M; Morrison-Helme, M; Lepp, M

    2017-11-01

    The rapid development within Interventional Radiology presents new challenges. Hybrid operating rooms consist of interventional radiology, open surgery, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and other techniques. This means that several disciplines and professionals need to work in new constellations creating a multidisciplinary team around the patient. In accordance with this development, higher professional education must provide new pedagogic strategies to successfully address the knowledge expected in today's complex working life. To explore the use of Applied Drama as a learning medium, focusing on the use of Forum Theatre, to foster team work and collaboration in the field of radiography and learning. A qualitative approach, closely related to Ethnography, was utilized. The Drama Workshop utilising Forum Theatre created a dynamic learning environment and enabled the participants from three professions to understand each other's priorities better. The use of drama within health care education allows the students to take different roles in order to find the best way to co-operate. Forum Theatre is a useful learning medium in order to promote teamwork and collaboration in the radiological intervention field. By choosing a personal working experience, Forum Theatre seem to engage the participants at a deeper level and to experience various communication strategies and how the outcome changed depending on the approach. This can lead to improved teamwork and collaboration. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnostic radiology 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulis, A.R.; Gooding, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    This is the latest version of the continuing education course on diagnostic radiology given yearly by the Department of Radiology at the University of California, San Francisco. The lectures are grouped into sections on gastrointestinal radiology, mammography, uroradiology, magnetic resonance, hepatobiliary radiology, pediatric radiology, ultrasound, interventional radiology, chest radiology, nuclear medicine, cardiovascular radiology, and skeletal radiology. Each section contains four to eight topics. Each of these consists of text that represents highlights in narrative form, selected illustrations, and a short bibliography. The presentation gives a general idea of what points were made in the lecture

  3. Hybrid treatment combining emergency surgery and intraoperative interventional radiology for severe trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Yuichi; Minehara, Hiroaki; Kashimi, Fumie; Hanajima, Tasuku; Yamaya, Tatsuhiro; Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Asari, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of hybrid treatment combining emergency surgery and intraoperative interventional radiology (IVR) for severe trauma. The records of 63 severely injured patients who underwent concurrent emergency surgery and IVR at our emergency centre from 1999 through 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Mobile digital subtraction angiography device was used in the operating room when performing IVR. Patients undergoing hybrid treatment combining intraoperative IVR and emergency surgery (intraoperative IVR group) were compared with those undergoing IVR in the angiography suite before or after emergency surgery (control group). Thirteen patients underwent hybrid treatment (intraoperative IVR group). Of these 13 patients, 7 underwent treatment for abdominal organ injuries, and 6 for multiregional injuries. Emergency operations were laparotomy (n=12), thoracotomy (n=1), craniotomy (n=1), and haemostasis of the lower extremities (n=1). Five patients underwent damage control surgery. IVR included transarterial embolisation (n=12), endovascular stent or stent-graft placement (n=2), and embolisation of a portal vein by laparotomy (n=2). The mean ISS was 40. The actual overall survival rate was 85%, and the probability of survival (Ps) was 62%. The control group included 45 patients. Five patients who met exclusion criteria were not included in the control group. Age, ISS, RTS, Ps, pH and base excess on arrival, and blood transfusion volume during operation and IVR did not differ significantly between the groups. Total time during operation and IVR was significantly shorter in the intraoperative IVR group than in the control group (229 [SD 72]min vs. 355 [SD 169]min; p=0.007). The mortality were 15 (95% CI 2-45) % in the intraoperative IVR group vs. 36 (95% CI 22-51) % in the control group. Hybrid treatment combining emergency surgery and intraoperative IVR can be a novel treatment strategy for severe trauma, and it will improve patient outcomes due to reduction

  4. Use of Multimedia tools for Training in Radiation Protection for Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guibelalde, E.; Vano, E.

    2003-01-01

    The European Commission has published and distributed cost free in the main European languages and interactive CD-ROM for Radiation Protection Training in Interventional Radiology (MARTIR project-Radiation Protection Series N. 119-EC 2002). The CD-ROM allows: a) To select different levels of training; b) To follow a training programme as a regular course (step by step) or looking only for the topics of interest; c) To do some auto evaluation multiple choice questions at the end of the different sections or topics; d) To perform a final examination at the end of the course and to have a certification with the total time dedicated to the training programme and the obtained score in final examination. During 2001 and 2002 the MARTIR material has been distributed for evaluation purpose to different experts and it has been used in different pilot courses. In this paper the experience of using this interactive CD-ROM is discussed. The University Complutense of Madrid offers an optional specific training on Radiation Protection for the students of Medicine during their clinical period (4th to 6th year). About 100 hundred students are enrolled per year, 10% of these students follow the MARTIR CD at home as a pilot course. All of them used the CD at Least during 40 hours, completed the low level step-by-step course and pass the exam (score over 75% for 60 multiple choice questions. 87% of the students after finishing the course stated that this education methodology was very suitable for them. (Author)

  5. Psychological intervention in medical preparedness and response to nuclear and radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Cuiping; Liu, Ying

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Although the incidence rate of nuclear or radiological accident and their terror attack is very low, their influence is tremendous because of the unexpected of their occurrence and uncertainty of their damage degree. An attack involving the release of radiation will create uncertainty, fear, and terror. Therefore, the management of acute psychological and behavioral responses is likely to be as important and challenging as the treatment of radiation-related injuries and illnesses. In this paper, we introduce the principle of psychological intervention at the preparation stage and during and after emergency. At the preparation stage, people should be educated by various means to prevent them from the impact of accident. When accident happens, effective action should be taken immediately to reduce the psychological influence. Special groups such as children and pregnant women must be considered. Furthermore, we analyze the symptom of different groups including victims, the public and responders and put forward the methods to prevent and treat psychological damage. After radiation accident, victims who have been exposed or anticipate possible exposure may experience feelings of vulnerability, anxiety, and lack of control. The most important element is providing good medical care. Moreover, communication between patients and their family is very important too. The public in the affected community is likely to be anxious and terrified. Trusted and informed leadership should be assigned to give psychological support in counselling center established at monitoring and evacuation centers. Government must be honest in communication with public and media. Responders have to perform their duty under stressful condition. Some of them are unable to deal with such stress could develop mental health problems such as post traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse or depression. Protective clothing and dosimeters must be provided to ensure responders' safety. Moreover

  6. The application of nursing process method in training nurses working in the department of interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Daihui; Wang Hongjuan; Yang Yajuan; Ye Rui; Qu Juan; Li Xinying; Xu Ying

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To describe the training procedure,typical training method and the clinical effect of nursing process method which was used to cultivate nurses working in the interventional ward. Methods: According to the evaluation index, the authors made a detail assessment of each nurse and found out individually the problems which needed to be perfected, then, the practicable measures were made for each individual nurse, after the training course the clinical results were evaluated. Results: After the nurses on different technical levels were cultivated with nursing process method, the comprehensive quality of each nurse was improved in different degree, and the general nursing quality of entire Department was also markedly improved. Conclusion: By using the nursing process method the cultivating period can be effectively shortened, the possible waste of time, manpower, material and energy cause by the blind training plan can be avoided. (authors)

  7. How to operate a university institute as a radiological emergency service?; Comment faire fonctionner un institut universitaire en service d'intervention radiologique?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besancon, A.; Bochud, F. [Institut de radiophysique, Centre hospitalier universitaire vaudois et Universite de Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-07-15

    The Institute of Radiation Physics (IRA) is attached to the Department of Medical Radiology at the Vaud University Hospital Center (CHUV) in Lausanne. The Institute's main tasks are strongly linked to the medical activities of the Department: radiotherapy, radiodiagnostics, interventional radiology and nuclear medicine. The Institute also works in the fields of operational radiation protection, radiation metrology and radioecology. In the case of an accident involving radioactive materials, the emergency services are able to call on the assistance of radiation protection specialists. In order to avoid having to create and maintain a specific structure, both burdensome and rarely needed, Switzerland decided to unite all existing emergency services for such events. Thus, the IRA was invited to participate in this network. The challenge is therefore to integrate a university structure, used to academic collaborations and the scientific approach, to an interventional organization accustomed to strict policies, a military-style command structure and 'drilled' procedures. The IRA's solution entails mobilizing existing resources and the expertise developed through professional experience. The main asset of this solution is that it involves the participation of committed collaborators who remain in a familiar environment, and are able to use proven materials and mastered procedures, even if the atmosphere of an accident situation differs greatly from regular laboratory routines. However, this solution requires both a commitment to education and training in emergency situations, and a commitment in terms of discipline by each collaborator in order to be integrated into a response plan supervised by an operational command center. (authors)

  8. Evaluation of vascular and interventional procedures with time-action analysis: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Niels H.; Tanase, Dafina; Reekers, Jim A.; Grimbergen, Cornelis A.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To provide an objective method to measure the efficiency of vascular and interventional procedures MATERIALS AND METHODS: The time-action analysis method is defined for peripheral vascular and interventional procedures. A taxonomy of actions is defined, geared specifically toward these

  9. Real-time fluoroscopic needle guidance in the interventional radiology suite using navigational software for percutaneous bone biopsies in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shellikeri, Sphoorti; Srinivasan, Abhay; Krishnamurthy, Ganesh; Vatsky, Seth; Zhu, Xiaowei; Keller, Marc S.; Cahill, Anne Marie [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Setser, Randolph M. [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Hoffman Estates, IL (United States); Hwang, Tiffany J. [University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Girard, Erin [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Navigational software provides real-time fluoroscopic needle guidance for percutaneous procedures in the Interventional Radiology (IR) suite. We describe our experience with navigational software for pediatric percutaneous bone biopsies in the IR suite and compare technical success, diagnostic accuracy, radiation dose and procedure time with that of CT-guided biopsies. Pediatric bone biopsies performed using navigational software (Syngo iGuide, Siemens Healthcare) from 2011 to 2016 were prospectively included and anatomically matched CT-guided bone biopsies from 2008 to 2016 were retrospectively reviewed with institutional review board approval. C-arm CT protocols used for navigational software-assisted cases included institution-developed low-dose (0.1/0.17 μGy/projection), regular-dose (0.36 μGy/projection), or a combination of low-dose/regular-dose protocols. Estimated effective radiation dose and procedure times were compared between software-assisted and CT-guided biopsies. Twenty-six patients (15 male; mean age: 10 years) underwent software-assisted biopsies (15 pelvic, 7 lumbar and 4 lower extremity) and 33 patients (13 male; mean age: 9 years) underwent CT-guided biopsies (22 pelvic, 7 lumbar and 4 lower extremity). Both modality biopsies resulted in a 100% technical success rate. Twenty-five of 26 (96%) software-assisted and 29/33 (88%) CT-guided biopsies were diagnostic. Overall, the effective radiation dose was significantly lower in software-assisted than CT-guided cases (3.0±3.4 vs. 6.6±7.7 mSv, P=0.02). The effective dose difference was most dramatic in software-assisted cases using low-dose C-arm CT (1.2±1.8 vs. 6.6±7.7 mSv, P=0.001) or combined low-dose/regular-dose C-arm CT (1.9±2.4 vs. 6.6±7.7 mSv, P=0.04), whereas effective dose was comparable in software-assisted cases using regular-dose C-arm CT (6.0±3.5 vs. 6.6±7.7 mSv, P=0.7). Mean procedure time was significantly lower for software-assisted cases (91±54 vs. 141±68 min, P=0

  10. Awareness of radiation protection and dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiography students, and radiology residents at an academic hospital: Results of a comprehensive survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo, E-mail: lfaggioni@sirm.org [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56100, Pisa (Italy); Paolicchi, Fabio [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56100, Pisa (Italy); Bastiani, Luca [Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124, Pisa (Italy); Guido, Davide [Unit of Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, University of Pavia, Via Forlanini 2, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Caramella, Davide [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56100, Pisa (Italy)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Medical students tend to overstate their knowledge of radiation protection (RP). • Overall RP knowledge of young doctors and students is suboptimal. • RP teaching to undergraduates and postgraduates needs to be substantially improved. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the awareness of radiation protection issues and the knowledge of dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiology residents, and radiography students at an academic hospital. Material and methods: A total of 159 young doctors and students (including 60 radiology residents, 56 medical students, and 43 radiography students) were issued a questionnaire consisting of 16 multiple choice questions divided into three separated sections (i.e., demographic data, awareness about radiation protection issues, and knowledge about radiation dose levels of common radiological examinations). Results: Medical students claimed to have at least a good knowledge of radiation protection issues more frequently than radiology residents and radiography students (94.4% vs 55% and 35.7%, respectively; P < 0.05), with no cases of perceived excellent knowledge among radiography students. However, the actual knowledge of essential radiation protection topics such as regulations, patient and tissue susceptibility to radiation damage, professional radiation risk and dose optimisation, as well as of radiation doses delivered by common radiological procedures was significantly worse among medical students than radiology residents and radiography students (P < 0.05). Those latter significantly outperformed radiology residents as to knowledge of radiation protection issues (P < 0.01). Overall, less than 50% of survey respondents correctly answered all questions of the survey. Conclusions: Radiology residents, radiography students and medical students have a limited awareness about radiation protection, with a specific gap of knowledge concerning real radiation doses of daily radiological

  11. Dosimetry in medical specialist in procedures of interventionist radiology; Dosimetria en medico especialista en procedimientos de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaona, E. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Xochimilco, Calz. del Hueso 1100, Col. Villa Quietud, 04960 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Vazquez V, J. A.; Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Izeta G, A. C. [Hospital Central Militar, Periferico y Av. Ejercito Nacional s/n, 11200 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin V, J. C. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Instituto de Fisica, Loma del Bosque 103, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Arreola, M., E-mail: gaen1310@correo.xoc.uam.mx [Shands Hospital at University of Florida, Department of Radiology, PO Box 100374, Gainesville, FL 32610-0374 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    In this work are presented the experimental results of determining the dose in different body parts, measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters, to medical specialists of implantation procedures of definitive cardiac pacemaker. The medical personnel in ten intervention procedures were controlled according to the procedure type, pathological indication, fluoroscopy time and machine generating estimates of the patient doses. The doses to the extremities of the cardiologist were measured by means of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The domains of first level in the hand are in the index finger of the left and the right hand. The medium doses of the skin in the eyes, a report of the dose received during each type of intervention procedure in the glandular thyroid and fingers of the cardiologists is made. The results represent the integrated dose to the cardiologist, received during the implantation procedures of definitive cardiac pacemaker in the same patient. By a half time of detection of 70 minutes for patient, the half dose of the skin, received for the right and left hand, ascended to 1,4 mSv, under the glove. In conclusion, the dose average for the dosimeters of the thyroid gland and forehead was varied from 0,41 up to 1,14 mSv for study. The exposure to the X-rays is a topic to consider, more important every time on the development of systematic procedures little invasive, including the angiography, catheter, worker and patient. (Author)

  12. Transcrestal Sinus Lift Procedure Approaching Atrophic Maxillary Ridge: A 60-Month Clinical and Radiological Follow-Up Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lo Giudice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to assess the success and the survival rate of dental implants placed in augmented bone after sinus lifting procedures. Material and Methods. 31 patients were mainly enrolled for a residual upper jaw crest thickness of 3 mm. CBCT scans were performed before and after the augmentation technique and at the follow-up appointments, at 3, 6, 12, 24, and up to 60 months. The follow-up examination included cumulative survival rate of implants, peri-implant marginal bone loss, and the height of sinus floor augmentation. Results. This retrospective study on 31 patients and 45 implants later inserted in a less than 3 mm crest showed excellent survival rates (99.5%, one implant was lost before loading due to an acute infection after 24 days, and two implants did not osteointegrate and were removed after 3 months. The radiological evaluation showed an average bone loss of 0.25 mm (±0.78 mm at the first follow-up appointment (3 months up to 0.30 mm (±1.28 mm after 60-month follow-up. Conclusion. In this study it was reported how even in less than 3 mm thick crest a transcrestal technique can predictably be used with a long-term clinical and radiological outcome, giving patients excellent stability of the grafted material and healthy clinical results.

  13. Evaluation of necessity to adapt the procedures of radiological protection in a bone densitometry room; Avaliacao da necessidade de adequacao dos procedimentos de protecao radiologica em uma sala de densitometria ossea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, A.T.; Goulart, A.O.S.; Marconato, J.A.; Streck, E.E.; Bacelar, A. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Fisica]. E-mail: alextroyano@bol.com.br; Furtado, A.P.A. [Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Fisica Medica. Grupo de Pesquisa e Pos-graduacao

    2001-07-01

    This research evaluated the necessity to adapt the procedures of radiological protection to a bone densitometry room. The evaluate was done by measures of absorbed dose in air, in operator position, during the clinical procedures. With this data, was estimate the effective and ambient dose, in this position, and compare with the standards of radiological protection and the minimal sensibility of TLD's. In this way, the procedures of radiological protection must be adapt to a bone densitometry room. (author)

  14. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Long Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Lorentzen, T.; Appelbaum, L.

    2016-01-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS) assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice...... are presented covering indications, contraindications, and safe and effective performance of the broad variety of these techniques. In particular, drainage of abscesses and fluid collections, interventional tumor ablation techniques, interventional treatment of symptomatic cysts and echinococcosis, percutaneous...

  15. Anterior celiac plexus block for interventional biliary procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benenati, J.F.; Widlus, D.M.; Venbrux, A.C.; Lynch-Nyhan, A.; Osterman, F.A.; Taylor, D.R.; Tewes, P.A.; Cassidy, F.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports temporary celiac ganglion block for pain relief during biliary procedures performed without complication in 65 patients. The block was given from an anterior approach, with 30 mL of bupivacaine injected over the right T-12 pedicle. Fluoroscopy was used to guide the needle 2 cm anterior to the spine. Patients were assigned to one of three groups based on degree of anesthesia. In group 1, there was no benefit (20%); in group 2, moderate regional anesthesia (22%); and in group 3, excellent anesthesia (58%). The procedure may be performed at the start of or any time during the examination and provides satisfactory regional anesthesia in 80% of patients

  16. WE-DE-207A-04: Advances in Radiological Neuro-Endovascular Interventional Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudin, S.

    2016-01-01

    1. Parallels in the evolution of x-ray angiographic systems and devices used for minimally invasive endovascular therapy Charles Strother - DSA, invented by Dr. Charles Mistretta at UW-Madison, was the technology which enabled the development of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. As DSA became widely available and the potential benefits for accessing the cerebral vasculature from an endovascular approach began to be apparent, industry began efforts to develop tools for use in these procedures. Along with development of catheters, embolic materials, pushable coils and the GDC coils there was simultaneous development and improvement of 2D DSA image quality and the introduction of 3D DSA. Together, these advances resulted in an enormous expansion in the scope and numbers of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. The introduction of flat detectors for c-arm angiographic systems in 2002 provided the possibility of the angiographic suite becoming not just a location for vascular imaging where physiological assessments might also be performed. Over the last decade algorithmic and hardware advances have been sufficient to now realize this potential in clinical practice. The selection of patients for endovascular treatments is enhanced by this dual capability. Along with these advances has been a steady reduction in the radiation exposure required so that today, vascular and soft tissue images may be obtained with equal or in many cases less radiation exposure than is the case for comparable images obtained with multi-detector CT. Learning Objectives: To understand the full capabilities of today’s angiographic suite To understand how c-arm cone beam CT soft tissue imaging can be used for assessments of devices, blood flow and perfusion. Advances in real-time x-ray neuro-endovascular image guidance Stephen Rudin - Reacting to the demands on real-time image guidance for ever finer neurovascular interventions, great improvements in imaging chains are being

  17. WE-DE-207A-04: Advances in Radiological Neuro-Endovascular Interventional Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, S. [University at Buffalo (SUNY) School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    1. Parallels in the evolution of x-ray angiographic systems and devices used for minimally invasive endovascular therapy Charles Strother - DSA, invented by Dr. Charles Mistretta at UW-Madison, was the technology which enabled the development of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. As DSA became widely available and the potential benefits for accessing the cerebral vasculature from an endovascular approach began to be apparent, industry began efforts to develop tools for use in these procedures. Along with development of catheters, embolic materials, pushable coils and the GDC coils there was simultaneous development and improvement of 2D DSA image quality and the introduction of 3D DSA. Together, these advances resulted in an enormous expansion in the scope and numbers of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. The introduction of flat detectors for c-arm angiographic systems in 2002 provided the possibility of the angiographic suite becoming not just a location for vascular imaging where physiological assessments might also be performed. Over the last decade algorithmic and hardware advances have been sufficient to now realize this potential in clinical practice. The selection of patients for endovascular treatments is enhanced by this dual capability. Along with these advances has been a steady reduction in the radiation exposure required so that today, vascular and soft tissue images may be obtained with equal or in many cases less radiation exposure than is the case for comparable images obtained with multi-detector CT. Learning Objectives: To understand the full capabilities of today’s angiographic suite To understand how c-arm cone beam CT soft tissue imaging can be used for assessments of devices, blood flow and perfusion. Advances in real-time x-ray neuro-endovascular image guidance Stephen Rudin - Reacting to the demands on real-time image guidance for ever finer neurovascular interventions, great improvements in imaging chains are being

  18. The role of interventional radiology in the management of kidney transplant complications; Ruolo della radiologia interventistica nel trattamento delle complicanze del trapianto renale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Lagana, Domenico; Mangini, Monica; Cafaro, Tamara; Recaldini, Chiara; Genovese, Eugenio; Fugazzola, Carlo [Insubria Univ., Varese (Italy). Cattedra di radiologia; Cuffari, Salvatore [Ospedale di circolo, Varese (Italy). Servizio di anestesia e rianimazione

    2005-09-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the role and the effectiveness of interventional radiology in the treatment of renal transplant complications. Materials and methods. From 1996 to 2004 a total of 288 kidney transplants from cadavers were performed in our Institute. The kidney was always collocated in iliac fossa by creating a vascular anastomosis with the external iliac artery and vein; in all cases the ureter was implanted into the recipient bladder. During the follow-up, 34 complications were observed. Twenty-seven complications in 25 patients (20 males and 5 females; age 35-65 years) were treated by a radiologic procedure: 9 renal artery stenosis and 1 native external iliac artery stenosis (by PTA), 5 ureteral obstructions (by nephrostomy and ureteral stenting), 8 ureteral leaks (by nephrostomy, in 2 cases associated to ureteral stenting) and 4 limphoceles (by percutaneous ultrasound-guided catheter drainage). Results. Primary technical success was obtained in 20/27 cases (74%). Success was obtained with a second interventional procedure in 3/27 cases, 2 limphoceles and 1 ureteral fistula (secondary technical success: 85.2%), with a clinical final success in 23/27 cases (85.2%). We observed a peri-procedural complication rate of 3.7% (1 renal artery post-PTA dissection during a restenosis treatment). Four cases (1 renal arterial post-PTA dissection, 1 ureteral obstructions, 1 ureteral leak and llimphocele) needed a surgical correction (14.8%). Conclusions. Interventional radiology is the first therapeutic approach to treat renal transplant complications. It shows good technical and clinical results and a low complication rate. Surgery had to be considered only if minimally invasive procedures are infeasible or ineffective. [Italian] Scopo. Valutare l'efficacia delle procedure di radiologia interventistica nel trattamento delle complicanze del trapianto renale. Materiale e metodi. Dal 1996 al 2004 sono stati eseguiti, presso il nostro centro 288 trapianti renali da

  19. New innovations in interventional cardiac procedures - role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conventional aortic valve replacement.4,5 The most common access routes for ... regurgitation despite optimal medical therapy, who are judged ... Optimal mitral valve morphology for this procedure is a central pathology in segment 2, no leaflet calcification, a mitral valve opening area > 4 cm2, mobile length of the posterior ...

  20. Analysis of risk in computerized tomography and other diagnostic radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossman, K.L.

    1982-01-01

    Medical practice entails continuous risks to the patient taken in good faith by the physician for the benefit of the patient. Risk of radiation induced cancer death approximates 10(-4) per cGy (rad). Assuming an average whole body dose of 0.1 cGy for many diagnostic X-ray procedures, the probability of radiation-induced cancer death is about 10(-5). The purpose of this paper is to compare the risks of common diagnostic X-ray procedures including computerized tomography (CT) with risks of smoking or automobile travel. Such comparisons should be constructive in putting radiation in perspective and facilitating explanation of risk/benefit to patients

  1. Evaluation of an intervention to improve skills in diagnostic radiology of rural physicians over one year in four rural hospitals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tienan Feng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary health care and patient triage are two basic functions of rural hospitals. As a routine test, the diagnostic radiology is still unavailable in some rural hospitals in China. Therefore, high-level hospitals are often the first choice of rural residents when they feel unwell. It brings serious social problems. This study was designed to propose an on-the-job drilling schema with integration of practical medical recordings and experienced radiological doctors as tutors to improve skills in diagnostic radiology of rural physicians. METHODS: The information technology was used to help the contact between rural doctors and tutors. In a longitudinal pre/post-test control study design, a cohort of 20 young physicians, each of whom was working in a rural hospital and had a work experience less than two years, were established as the trial group over one year. Another 20 similar counterparts were established as the control group. Participants' performances were evaluated in four categories at five-time point (TP. RESULTS: The trial group significantly outscored the control group on the style of writing at the second TP (d = 2.28; on the accuracy of the image description at final TP (d = 1.11; on the accuracy of the diagnosis at the fourth TP (d = 3.62; and on the correct treatment selection at the third TP (d = 6.45. The aspects with the most improvement were the accuracies of the diagnosis and the treatment selection. CONCLUSION: This study provided the detailed evidences that applying the on-the-job drilling schema has a significant effect on the skills improvement in diagnostic radiology of rural physicians. It was also concluded that the educational intervention based on practical cases was better than that only based on didactic slides presentation.

  2. The Future of Radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R. Margulis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been my good fortune to live and practice radiology during a long period of momentous change – to see the transformation of the discipline from a supportive service into a mainstream, essential branch of clinical medicine. I remember wearing red goggles to adapt my vision before performing fluoroscopy; observing the horrible, now thankfully obsolete, practice of ventriculography, which was considered advanced neuroradiology; and performing other, now rarely prescribed procedures, such as double-contrast barium enemas and intravenous pyelography. Witnessing the beginnings of interventional radiology, I suggested its name in an editorial. I also had the good fortune to see the introduction of computed tomography (CT and a technology first known as nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Together with fellow members of a committee of the American College of Radiology and editors of prestigious radiological journals, I took part in changing the name of the latter modality to MRI, freeing it from threatening implications. Looking back on these experiences, one lesson stands out above all: Innovation and transformation never cease. Looking forward, it is clear that radiology, along with the rest of medicine, is now undergoing further momentous changes that will affect the future of all those already practicing as well as those yet to start their careers.

  3. A review and survey of policies utilized for interventional pain procedures: a need for consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Lynn; Salajegheh, Reza; Hamill-Ruth, Robin J; Yerra, Sandeep; Butz, John

    2017-01-01

    Other than the newly published anticoagulation guidelines, there are currently few recommendations to assist pain medicine physicians in determining the safety parameters to follow when performing interventional pain procedures. Little information exists regarding policies for oral intake, cumulative steroid dose limits, driving restrictions with and without sedation, and routine medication use for interventional procedures. A 16-question survey was developed on common policies currently in use for interventional pain procedures. The questionnaire was distributed through the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine and American Academy of Pain Medicine. We sought to statistically analyze the range of policies being used by pain medicine physicians and to determine if there are any commonly accepted standards. A total of 337 physicians out of 4037 members responded to our survey with a response rate of 8.4%. A total of 82% of these respondents used a sedative agent while performing an interventional pain procedure. The majority of respondents required drivers after procedures, except after trigger points. A total of 47% indicated that they have an nil per os (NPO) policy for procedures without sedation. A total of 98% reported that they had an anticoagulation policy before an interventional procedure. A total of 17% indicated that the interval between steroid doses was policies regarding anticoagulation. There is an obvious need for evidence-based guidelines for these aspects of interventional pain care to improve patient safety and minimize the risk of adverse events.

  4. Report About a New Standard for Radiation Protection Training of Intervention Persons. In the Case of Radiological emergency Situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geringer, T.; Steurer, A.; Schmitzer, C.

    2004-01-01

    In autumn 2003 the Austrian standard OENORM S 5207 with the title R adiation protection training of intervention persons in the case of radiological emergency situations w ill be published. The standard is directed to persons who have to invent in case of a radiological emergency, security forces and as well training centres. The standard has to fulfil three objectives: 1. Regulation of the minimum requirements for the radiation protection training and education of intervention persons. 2. Harmonization of the radiation protection and training of different security forces, for instance Austrian army, Red Cross Austria, Fire Department, Police Department. 3. Mutual recognition of parts of the education between the different security forces. To fulfil these aims the standard is structured in different education modules. If , for instance, a person attended a special training module at the Austrian military, this part of the education is also valid for a career at the Fire Department. Further the modular structure of the education gives the possibility for persons of a special security force to attend one or more modules at another security force. This will lead to an improved cooperation between the different security forces in case of a radiological emergency situation. The education is structured in four levels. The topics of the standard are: 1. Requirements for training centres 2. Guidelines for the examinations of the candidates 3. Topics and goals of the basic education 4. Topics and goals of the advanced education level one 5. Topics and goals of the advanced education level two 6. Topics and examples of specialised education 7. Obligatory further education once every year. (Author)

  5. A study of inventiveness among Society of Interventional Radiology members and the impact of their social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kieran J; Elias, Gavin; Jaffer, Hussein; Mandani, Rashesh

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the nature of inventiveness among members of the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and learn what influenced the inventors and assisted their creativity. The membership directory of the SIR was cross-referenced with filings at the United States Patent and Trademark Organization (USPTO) and the Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT). The inventors were queried with an online survey to illuminate their institutions of training and practice as well as enabling or inhibiting factors to their inventiveness. Responses were analyzed through the construction of social network maps and thematic and graphical analysis. It was found that 457 members of the SIR held 2,492 patents or patent filings. After 1986, there was a marked and sustained increase in patent filings. The online survey was completed by 73 inventors holding 470 patents and patent filings. The social network maps show the key role of large academic interventional radiology departments and individual inventors in the formation of interconnectivity among inventors and the creation of the intellectual property (IP). Key inhibitors of the inventive process include lack of mentorship, of industry contacts, and of legal advice. Key enablers include mentorship, motivation, and industry contacts. Creativity and inventiveness in SIR members stem from institutions that are hubs of innovation and networks of key innovators; inventors are facilitated by personal motivation, mentorship, and strong industry contacts. Copyright © 2013 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiation doses to adult patients in interventional procedure: the first data for the Biobio region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubeda, C.A.; Nocetti, D.A.; Robles, I.L.

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to estimate the levels of radiation to the patient in interventional cardiology procedures and neurological (diagnostic and therapeutic) in the main public hospital in Chile, in the region of Biobio

  7. Patients and personnel radiation protection in interventional radiology and in surgery;La radioprotection des patients et des travailleurs en radiologie interventionnelle et au bloc operatoire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menechal, P. [Centre de Recherches en Psychopathologie et Psychologie Clinique - CRPPC, 69 - Lyon (France); Valero, M.; Godet, J.L. [Lyon-3 Univ. Jean Moulin, 69 (France)

    2009-10-15

    The development of the interventional radiology and acts realised under radiological guiding is a real benefit for patients. The doses delivered can however, generate important detriments (determinist effects). the patients and the personnel are exposed to important doses, heterogeneous and very different doses according the operator, the patient morphology and the treated pathology. This theme is considered by the the nuclear safety Authority as a priority in the medical medium. (N.C.)

  8. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Short Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Lorentzen, T.; Appelbaum, L.

    2016-01-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice are presen......The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice...... are presented covering indications, contraindications, safety and efficacy of the broad variety of these techniques. In particular, drainage of abscesses and fluid collections, interventional tumor ablation techniques, interventional treatment of symptomatic cysts and echinococcosis, percutaneous transhepatic...

  9. Review of interventional procedures in the very low birth-weight infant (<1.5 kg): complications, lessons learned and current practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laffan, Eo