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Sample records for interstitial macrophages alter

  1. Macrophage Chemotaxis in Anti-tubular Basement Membrane-Induced Interstitial Nephritis in Guinea Pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kennedy, Thomas L.; Merrow, Martha; Phillips, S. Michael; Norman, Michael; Neilson, Eric G.

    1985-01-01

    Interstitial renal lesions containing T cells and macrophages develop after 14 days in guinea pigs immunized to produce anti-tubular basement membrane-induced interstitial nephritis. We serially examined the renal venous and systemic arterial sera from such animals to determine if chemotactic

  2. Dakin Solution Alters Macrophage Viability and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-18

    a major clone in cystic fibrosis patients and aquatic habitats. J Bacteriol 1996;178:85. [31] Qiu H, KuoLee R, Harris G, Van Rooijen N, Patel GB, Chen...injury and inflammation, whereas the M2 macrophage is associated with tissue repair and fibrosis [25]. In the inflammatory phase of wound healing...Tiwari VK, Narayanan RP. Fungal infections in burns: diagnosis and management. Indian J Plast Surg 2010;43(Suppl l):S37. [11] Fleming A. The action of

  3. Restraint stress alters neutrophil and macrophage phenotypes during wound healing

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    Tymen, Stéphanie D.; Rojas, Isolde G.; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Fang, Zong Juan; Zhao, Yan; Marucha, Phillip T.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies reported that stress delays wound healing, impairs bacterial clearance, and elevates the risk for opportunistic infection. Neutrophils and macrophages are responsible for the removal of bacteria present at the wound site. The appropriate recruitment and functions of these cells are necessary for efficient bacterial clearance. In our current study we found that restraint stress induced an excessive recruitment of neutrophils extending the inflammatory phase of healing, and the gene expression of neutrophil attracting chemokines MIP-2 and KC. However, restraint stress did not affect macrophage infiltration. Stress decreased the phagocytic abilities of phagocytic cells ex vivo, yet it did not affect superoxide production. The cell surface expression of adhesion molecules CD11b and TLR4 were decreased in peripheral blood monocytes in stressed mice. The phenotype of macrophages present at the wound site was also altered. Gene expression of markers of pro-inflammatory classically activated macrophages, CXCL10 and CCL5, were down-regulated; as were markers associated with wound healing macrophages, CCL22, IGF-1, RELMα; and the regulatory macrophage marker, chemokine CCL1. Restraint stress also induced up-regulation of IL10 gene expression. In summary, our study has shown that restraint stress suppresses the phenotype shift of the macrophage population, as compared to the changes observed during normal wound healing, while the number of macrophages remains constant. We also observed a general suppression of chemokine gene expression. Modulation of the macrophage phenotype could provide a new therapeutic approach in the treatment of wounds under stress conditions in the clinical setting. PMID:22884902

  4. Alterations of microbiota in urine from women with interstitial cystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Interstitial Cystitis (IC) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the bladder with unknown etiology. The aim of this study was to characterize the microbial community present in the urine from IC female patients by 454 high throughput sequencing of the 16S variable regions V1V2 and V6. The taxonomical composition, richness and diversity of the IC microbiota were determined and compared to the microbial profile of asymptomatic healthy female (HF) urine. Results The composition and distribution of bacterial sequences differed between the urine microbiota of IC patients and HFs. Reduced sequence richness and diversity were found in IC patient urine, and a significant difference in the community structure of IC urine in relation to HF urine was observed. More than 90% of the IC sequence reads were identified as belonging to the bacterial genus Lactobacillus, a marked increase compared to 60% in HF urine. Conclusion The 16S rDNA sequence data demonstrates a shift in the composition of the bacterial community in IC urine. The reduced microbial diversity and richness is accompanied by a higher abundance of the bacterial genus Lactobacillus, compared to HF urine. This study demonstrates that high throughput sequencing analysis of urine microbiota in IC patients is a powerful tool towards a better understanding of this enigmatic disease. PMID:22974186

  5. An endogenous pain control system is altered in subjects with interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Timothy J; Lloyd, L Keith; Fillingim, Roger B

    2014-02-01

    Multiple studies have demonstrated that in healthy subjects, painful stimuli applied to one part of the body inhibit pain sensation in other parts of the body, a phenomenon referred to as conditioned pain modulation. Conditioned pain modulation is related to the presence of endogenous pain control systems. Studies have demonstrated deficits in conditioned pain modulation associated inhibition in many but not all chronic pain disorders. In this study we determine whether conditioned pain modulation is altered in subjects with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. Female subjects with and without the diagnosis of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome were studied psychophysically using quantitative cutaneous thermal, forearm ischemia and ice water immersion tests. Conditioned pain modulation was assessed by quantifying the effects of immersion of the hand in ice water (conditioning stimulus) on threshold and tolerance of cutaneous heat pain (test stimulus) applied to the contralateral lower extremity. The conditioned pain modulation responses of the subjects with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome were statistically different from those of healthy control subjects for cutaneous thermal threshold and tolerance measures. Healthy control subjects demonstrated statistically significant increases in thermal pain tolerance whereas subjects with the diagnosis of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome demonstrated statistically significant reductions in thermal pain tolerance. An endogenous pain inhibitory system normally observed with conditioned pain modulation was altered in subjects with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. This finding identifies interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome as similar to several other chronic pain disorders such as fibromyalgia and irritable bowel syndrome, and suggests that a deficit in endogenous pain inhibitory systems may contribute to such chronic pain disorders. Copyright © 2014 American

  6. Differential cell reaction upon Toll-like receptor 4 and 9 activation in human alveolar and lung interstitial macrophages

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    Meyerhans Andreas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigations on pulmonary macrophages (MΦ mostly focus on alveolar MΦ (AM as a well-defined cell population. Characteristics of MΦ in the interstitium, referred to as lung interstitial MΦ (IM, are rather ill-defined. In this study we therefore aimed to elucidate differences between AM and IM obtained from human lung tissue. Methods Human AM and IM were isolated from human non-tumor lung tissue from patients undergoing lung resection. Cell morphology was visualized using either light, electron or confocal microscopy. Phagocytic activity was analyzed by flow cytometry as well as confocal microscopy. Surface marker expression was measured by flow cytometry. Toll-like receptor (TLR expression patterns as well as cytokine expression upon TLR4 or TLR9 stimulation were assessed by real time RT-PCR and cytokine protein production was measured using a fluorescent bead-based immunoassay. Results IM were found to be smaller and morphologically more heterogeneous than AM, whereas phagocytic activity was similar in both cell types. HLA-DR expression was markedly higher in IM compared to AM. Although analysis of TLR expression profiles revealed no differences between the two cell populations, AM and IM clearly varied in cell reaction upon activation. Both MΦ populations were markedly activated by LPS as well as DNA isolated from attenuated mycobacterial strains (M. bovis H37Ra and BCG. Whereas AM expressed higher amounts of inflammatory cytokines upon activation, IM were more efficient in producing immunoregulatory cytokines, such as IL10, IL1ra, and IL6. Conclusion AM appear to be more effective as a non-specific first line of defence against inhaled pathogens, whereas IM show a more pronounced regulatory function. These dissimilarities should be taken into consideration in future studies on the role of human lung MΦ in the inflammatory response.

  7. Alterations of zinc homeostasis in response to Cryptococcus neoformans in a murine macrophage cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Francine Melise; Piffer, Alícia Corbellini; Schneider, Rafael de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Nicole Sartori; Garcia, Ane Wichine Acosta; Schrank, Augusto; Kmetzsch, Lívia; Vainstein, Marilene Henning; Staats, Charley Christian

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate alterations of zinc homeostasis in macrophages exposed to Cryptococcus neoformans. Materials & methods: Using a fluorescent zinc probe-based flow cytometry and atomic absorption spectrometry, zinc levels were evaluated in J774.A1 cell lines exposed to C. neoformans H99 cells. The transcription profile of macrophage zinc related homeostasis genes - metallothioneins and zinc transporters (ZnTs) of the SLC30 and SLC39 (Zrt-Irt-protein) families - was analyzed by quantitative PCR. Macrophage intracellular labile zinc levels decreased following exposure to C. neoformans. A significant decrease in transcription levels was detected in specific ZnTs from both the Zrt-Irt-protein and ZnT families, especially 24 h after infection. These findings suggest that macrophages may exhibit zinc depletion in response to C. neoformans infection.

  8. Household air pollution causes dose-dependent inflammation and altered phagocytosis in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylance, Jamie; Fullerton, Duncan G; Scriven, James; Aljurayyan, Abdullah N; Mzinza, David; Barrett, Steve; Wright, Adam K A; Wootton, Daniel G; Glennie, Sarah J; Baple, Katy; Knott, Amy; Mortimer, Kevin; Russell, David G; Heyderman, Robert S; Gordon, Stephen B

    2015-05-01

    Three billion people are exposed to household air pollution from biomass fuel use. Exposure is associated with higher incidence of pneumonia, and possibly tuberculosis. Understanding mechanisms underlying these defects would improve preventive strategies. We used human alveolar macrophages obtained from healthy Malawian adults exposed naturally to household air pollution and compared them with human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed in vitro to respirable-sized particulates. Cellular inflammatory response was assessed by IL-6 and IL-8 production in response to particulate challenge; phagosomal function was tested by uptake and oxidation of fluorescence-labeled beads; ingestion and killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were measured by microscopy and quantitative culture. Particulate ingestion was quantified by digital image analysis. We were able to reproduce the carbon loading of naturally exposed alveolar macrophages by in vitro exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages. Fine carbon black induced IL-8 release from monocyte-derived and alveolar macrophages (P < 0.05) with similar magnitude responses (log10 increases of 0.93 [SEM = 0.2] versus 0.74 [SEM = 0.19], respectively). Phagocytosis of pneumococci and mycobacteria was impaired with higher particulate loading. High particulate loading corresponded with a lower oxidative burst capacity (P = 0.0015). There was no overall effect on killing of M. tuberculosis. Alveolar macrophage function is altered by particulate loading. Our macrophage model is comparable morphologically to the in vivo uptake of particulates. Wood smoke-exposed cells demonstrate reduced phagocytosis, but unaffected mycobacterial killing, suggesting defects related to chronic wood smoke inhalation limited to specific innate immune functions.

  9. Cadmium Alters the Concentration of Fatty Acids in THP-1 Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszowski, Tomasz; Gutowska, Izabela; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Łukomska, Agnieszka; Drozd, Arleta; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2018-03-01

    Fatty acid composition of human immune cells influences their function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of known toxicant and immunomodulator, cadmium, at low concentrations on levels of selected fatty acids (FAs) in THP-1 macrophages. The differentiation of THP-1 monocytes into macrophages was achieved by administration of phorbol myristate acetate. Macrophages were incubated with various cadmium chloride (CdCl 2 ) solutions for 48 h at final concentrations of 5 nM, 20 nM, 200 nM, and 2 μM CdCl 2 . Fatty acids were extracted from samples according to the Folch method. The fatty acid levels were determined using gas chromatography. The following fatty acids were analyzed: long-chain saturated fatty acids (SFAs) palmitic acid and stearic acid, very long-chain saturated fatty acid (VLSFA) arachidic acid, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) palmitoleic acid, oleic acid and vaccenic acid, and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) linoleic acid and arachidonic acid. Treatment of macrophages with very low concentrations of cadmium (5-200 nM) resulted in significant reduction in the levels of arachidic, palmitoleic, oleic, vaccenic, and linoleic acids and significant increase in arachidonic acid levels (following exposure to 5 nM Cd), without significant reduction of palmitic and stearic acid levels. Treatment of macrophages with the highest tested cadmium concentration (2 μM) produced significant reduction in the levels of all examined FAs: SFAs, VLSFA, MUFAs, and PUFAs. In conclusion, cadmium at tested concentrations caused significant alterations in THP-1 macrophage fatty acid levels, disrupting their composition, which might dysregulate fatty acid/lipid metabolism thus affecting macrophage behavior and inflammatory state.

  10. Reduced macrophage selenoprotein expression alters oxidized lipid metabolite biosynthesis from arachidonic and linoleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattmiller, Sarah A; Carlson, Bradley A; Gandy, Jeff C; Sordillo, Lorraine M

    2014-06-01

    Uncontrolled inflammation is an underlying etiology for multiple diseases and macrophages orchestrate inflammation largely through the production of oxidized fatty acids known as oxylipids. Previous studies showed that selenium (Se) status altered the expression of oxylipids and magnitude of inflammatory responses. Although selenoproteins are thought to mediate many of the biological effects of Se, the direct effect of selenoproteins on the production of oxylipids is unknown. Therefore, the role of decreased selenoprotein activity in modulating the production of biologically active oxylipids from macrophages was investigated. Thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages were collected from wild-type and myeloid-cell-specific selenoprotein knockout mice to analyze oxylipid production by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry as well as oxylipid biosynthetic enzyme and inflammatory marker gene expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Decreased selenoprotein activity resulted in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, enhanced cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase expression and decreased oxylipids with known anti-inflammatory properties such as arachidonic acid-derived lipoxin A₄ (LXA₄) and linoleic acid-derived 9-​oxo-octadecadienoic acid (9-oxoODE). Treating RAW 264.7 macrophages with LXA₄ or 9-oxoODE diminished oxidant-induced macrophage inflammatory response as indicated by decreased production of TNFα. The results show for the first time that selenoproteins are important for the balanced biosynthesis of pro- and anti-inflammatory oxylipids during inflammation. A better understanding of the Se-dependent control mechanisms governing oxylipid biosynthesis may uncover nutritional intervention strategies to counteract the harmful effects of uncontrolled inflammation due to oxylipids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cytoskeletal stability and metabolic alterations in primary human macrophages in long-term microgravity.

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    Svantje Tauber

    Full Text Available The immune system is one of the most affected systems of the human body during space flight. The cells of the immune system are exceptionally sensitive to microgravity. Thus, serious concerns arise, whether space flight associated weakening of the immune system ultimately precludes the expansion of human presence beyond the Earth's orbit. For human space flight, it is an urgent need to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which altered gravity influences and changes the functions of immune cells. The CELLBOX-PRIME (= CellBox-Primary Human Macrophages in Microgravity Environment experiment investigated for the first time microgravity-associated long-term alterations in primary human macrophages, one of the most important effector cells of the immune system. The experiment was conducted in the U.S. National Laboratory on board of the International Space Station ISS using the NanoRacks laboratory and Biorack type I standard CELLBOX EUE type IV containers. Upload and download were performed with the SpaceX CRS-3 and the Dragon spaceship on April 18th, 2014 / May 18th, 2014. Surprisingly, primary human macrophages exhibited neither quantitative nor structural changes of the actin and vimentin cytoskeleton after 11 days in microgravity when compared to 1g controls. Neither CD18 or CD14 surface expression were altered in microgravity, however ICAM-1 expression was reduced. The analysis of 74 metabolites in the cell culture supernatant by GC-TOF-MS, revealed eight metabolites with significantly different quantities when compared to 1g controls. In particular, the significant increase of free fucose in the cell culture supernatant was associated with a significant decrease of cell surface-bound fucose. The reduced ICAM-1 expression and the loss of cell surface-bound fucose may contribute to functional impairments, e.g. the activation of T cells, migration and activation of the innate immune response. We assume that the surprisingly small

  12. Cytoskeletal stability and metabolic alterations in primary human macrophages in long-term microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Svantje; Lauber, Beatrice A; Paulsen, Katrin; Layer, Liliana E; Lehmann, Martin; Hauschild, Swantje; Shepherd, Naomi R; Polzer, Jennifer; Segerer, Jürgen; Thiel, Cora S; Ullrich, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    The immune system is one of the most affected systems of the human body during space flight. The cells of the immune system are exceptionally sensitive to microgravity. Thus, serious concerns arise, whether space flight associated weakening of the immune system ultimately precludes the expansion of human presence beyond the Earth's orbit. For human space flight, it is an urgent need to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which altered gravity influences and changes the functions of immune cells. The CELLBOX-PRIME (= CellBox-Primary Human Macrophages in Microgravity Environment) experiment investigated for the first time microgravity-associated long-term alterations in primary human macrophages, one of the most important effector cells of the immune system. The experiment was conducted in the U.S. National Laboratory on board of the International Space Station ISS using the NanoRacks laboratory and Biorack type I standard CELLBOX EUE type IV containers. Upload and download were performed with the SpaceX CRS-3 and the Dragon spaceship on April 18th, 2014 / May 18th, 2014. Surprisingly, primary human macrophages exhibited neither quantitative nor structural changes of the actin and vimentin cytoskeleton after 11 days in microgravity when compared to 1g controls. Neither CD18 or CD14 surface expression were altered in microgravity, however ICAM-1 expression was reduced. The analysis of 74 metabolites in the cell culture supernatant by GC-TOF-MS, revealed eight metabolites with significantly different quantities when compared to 1g controls. In particular, the significant increase of free fucose in the cell culture supernatant was associated with a significant decrease of cell surface-bound fucose. The reduced ICAM-1 expression and the loss of cell surface-bound fucose may contribute to functional impairments, e.g. the activation of T cells, migration and activation of the innate immune response. We assume that the surprisingly small and non

  13. What the Erythrocytic Nuclear Alteration Frequencies Could Tell Us about Genotoxicity and Macrophage Iron Storage?

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    Juliana M M Gomes

    Full Text Available Erythrocytic nuclear alterations have been considered as an indicative of organism's exposure to genotoxic agents. Due to their close relationship among their frequencies and DNA damages, they are considered excellent markers of exposure in eukaryotes. However, poor data has been found in literature concerning their genesis, differential occurrence and their life span. In this study, we use markers of cell viability; genotoxicity and cellular turn over in order to shed light to these events. Tilapia and their blood were exposed to cadmium in acute exposure and in vitro assays. They were analyzed using flow cytometry for oxidative stress and membrane disruption, optical microscopy for erythrocytic nuclear alteration, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for cadmium content in aquaria water, blood and cytochemical and analytical electron microscopy techniques for the hemocateretic aspects. The results showed a close relationship among the total nuclear alterations and cadmium content in the total blood and melanomacrophage centres area, mismatching reactive oxygen species and membrane damages. Moreover, nuclear alterations frequencies (vacuolated, condensed and blebbed showed to be associated to cadmium exposure whereas others (lobed and bud were associated to depuration period. Decrease on nuclear alterations frequencies was also associated with hemosiderin increase inside spleen and head kidney macrophages mainly during depurative processes. These data disclosure in temporal fashion the main processes that drive the nuclear alterations frequencies and their relationship with some cellular and systemic biomarkers.

  14. Clonorchis sinensis antigens alter hepatic macrophage polarization in vitro and in vivo.

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    Eun-Min Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Clonorchis sinensis infection elicits hepatic inflammation, which can lead to cholangitis, periductal hepatic fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, and even cholangiocarcinoma. Hepatic macrophages are an intrinsic element of both innate and acquired immunity. This study was conducted to demonstrate the dynamics of hepatic macrophage polarization during C. sinensis infection in mice and to identify factors regulating this polarization. Treatment of hepatic macrophages isolated from normal mice with C. sinensis excretory/secretory products (ESPs resulted in the preferential generation of classically activated hepatic macrophages (M1 macrophages and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, cells stimulated with C. sinensis ESPs exhibited changes in cellular morphology. During the early stages of C. sinensis infection, hepatic macrophages preferentially differentiated into M1 macrophages; however, during the C. sinensis mature worm stage, when eggs are released, there were significant increases in the abundance of both M1 macrophages and alternatively activated hepatic macrophages (M2 macrophages. Moreover, there was a further increase in the M2 macrophage count during the fibrotic and cirrhotic stage of infection. Notably, this fibrotic and cirrhotic stage promoted a strong increase in the proportion of Arg-1-producing macrophages (M2 phenotype, which were associated with fibrosis and tissue repair in the liver. Our results suggest that the dynamic polarization of hepatic macrophages as C. sinensis infection progresses is related to the histological lesions present in liver tissue. Hepatic macrophages thus play an important role in local immunity during C. sinensis infection.

  15. Clonorchis sinensis antigens alter hepatic macrophage polarization in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Min; Kwak, You Shine; Yi, Myung-Hee; Kim, Ju Yeong; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Yong, Tai-Soon

    2017-05-01

    Clonorchis sinensis infection elicits hepatic inflammation, which can lead to cholangitis, periductal hepatic fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, and even cholangiocarcinoma. Hepatic macrophages are an intrinsic element of both innate and acquired immunity. This study was conducted to demonstrate the dynamics of hepatic macrophage polarization during C. sinensis infection in mice and to identify factors regulating this polarization. Treatment of hepatic macrophages isolated from normal mice with C. sinensis excretory/secretory products (ESPs) resulted in the preferential generation of classically activated hepatic macrophages (M1 macrophages) and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, cells stimulated with C. sinensis ESPs exhibited changes in cellular morphology. During the early stages of C. sinensis infection, hepatic macrophages preferentially differentiated into M1 macrophages; however, during the C. sinensis mature worm stage, when eggs are released, there were significant increases in the abundance of both M1 macrophages and alternatively activated hepatic macrophages (M2 macrophages). Moreover, there was a further increase in the M2 macrophage count during the fibrotic and cirrhotic stage of infection. Notably, this fibrotic and cirrhotic stage promoted a strong increase in the proportion of Arg-1-producing macrophages (M2 phenotype), which were associated with fibrosis and tissue repair in the liver. Our results suggest that the dynamic polarization of hepatic macrophages as C. sinensis infection progresses is related to the histological lesions present in liver tissue. Hepatic macrophages thus play an important role in local immunity during C. sinensis infection.

  16. Activating mutations in β-catenin in colon cancer cells alter their interaction with macrophages; the role of snail.

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    Pawan Kaler

    Full Text Available Tumor cells become addicted to both activated oncogenes and to proliferative and pro-survival signals provided by the abnormal tumor microenvironment. Although numerous soluble factors have been identified that shape the crosstalk between tumor cells and stroma, it has not been established how oncogenic mutations in the tumor cells alter their interaction with normal cells in the tumor microenvironment.We showed that the isogenic HCT116 and Hke-3 cells, which differ only by the presence of the mutant kRas allele, both stimulate macrophages to produce IL1β. In turn, macrophages enhanced Wnt signaling, proliferation and survival in both HCT116 and Hke-3 cells, demonstrating that signaling by oncogenic kRas in tumor cells does not impact their interaction with macrophages. HCT116 cells are heterozygous for β-catenin (HCT116(WT/MT, harboring one wild type (WT and one mutant (MT allele, but isogenic lines that carry only the WT (HCT116(WT or MT β-catenin allele (HCT116(MT have been generated. We showed that macrophages promoted Wnt signaling in cells that carry the MT β-catenin allele, but not in HCT116(WT cells. Consistent with this observation, macrophages and IL1β failed to stabilize Snail in HCT116(WT cells, and to protect these cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Finally, we demonstrated that HCT116 cells expressing dominant negative TCF4 (dnTCF4 or HCT116 cells with silenced Snail failed to stimulate IL1β production in macrophages, demonstrating that tumor cells activate macrophages via a Wnt-dependent factor.Our data demonstrate that oncogenic β-catenin mutations in tumor cells, and subsequent activation of Wnt signaling, not only trigger cell-intrinsic alterations, but also have a significant impact on the crosstalk of tumor cells with the tumor associated macrophages.

  17. Depletion of resident macrophages does not alter sensory regeneration in the avian cochlea.

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    Mark E Warchol

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the primary effector cells of the innate immune system and are also activated in response to tissue injury. The avian cochlea contains a population of resident macrophages, but the precise function of those cells is not known. The present study characterized the behavior of cochlear macrophages after aminoglycoside ototoxicity and also examined the possible role of macrophages in sensory regeneration. We found that the undamaged chick cochlea contains a large resting population of macrophages that reside in the hyaline cell region, immediately outside the abneural (inferior border of the sensory epithelium. Following ototoxic injury, macrophages appear to migrate out of the hyaline cell region and towards the basilar membrane, congregating immediately below the lesioned sensory epithelium. In order to determine whether recruited macrophages contribute to the regeneration of sensory receptors, we quantified supporting cell proliferation and hair cell recovery after the elimination of most resident macrophages via application of liposomally-encapsulated clodronate. Examination of macrophage-depleted specimens at two days following ototoxic injury revealed no deficits in hair cell clearance, when compared to normal controls. In addition, we found that elimination of macrophages did not affect either regenerative proliferation of supporting cells or the production of replacement hair cells. However, we did find that macrophage-depleted cochleae contained reduced numbers of proliferative mesothelial cells below the basilar membrane. Our data suggest that macrophages are not required for normal debris clearance and regeneration, but that they may play a role in the maintenance of the basilar membrane.

  18. Role of macrophages in the altered epithelial function during a type 2 immune response induced by enteric nematode infection.

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    Luigi Notari

    Full Text Available Parasitic enteric nematodes induce a type 2 immune response characterized by increased production of Th2 cytokines, IL-4 and IL-13, and recruitment of alternatively activated macrophages (M2 to the site of infection. Nematode infection is associated with changes in epithelial permeability and inhibition of sodium-linked glucose absorption, but the role of M2 in these effects is unknown. Clodronate-containing liposomes were administered prior to and during nematode infection to deplete macrophages and prevent the development of M2 in response to infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. The inhibition of epithelial glucose absorption that is associated with nematode infection involved a macrophage-dependent reduction in SGLT1 activity, with no change in receptor expression, and a macrophage-independent down-regulation of GLUT2 expression. The reduced transport of glucose into the enterocyte is compensated partially by an up-regulation of the constitutive GLUT1 transporter consistent with stress-induced activation of HIF-1α. Thus, nematode infection results in a "lean" epithelial phenotype that features decreased SGLT1 activity, decreased expression of GLUT2 and an emergent dependence on GLUT1 for glucose uptake into the enterocyte. Macrophages do not play a role in enteric nematode infection-induced changes in epithelial barrier function. There is a greater contribution, however, of paracellular absorption of glucose to supply the energy demands of host resistance. These data provide further evidence of the ability of macrophages to alter glucose metabolism of neighboring cells.

  19. Interleukin-18 Amplifies Macrophage Polarization and Morphological Alteration, Leading to Excessive Angiogenesis

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    Takuro Kobori

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available M2 macrophage (Mφ promotes pathologic angiogenesis through a release of pro-angiogenic mediators or the direct cell–cell interaction with endothelium in the micromilieu of several chronic inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and cancer, where interleukin (IL-18 also contributes to excessive angiogenesis. However, the detailed mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanism by which M2 Mφs in the micromilieu containing IL-18 induce excessive angiogenesis in the in vitro experimental model using mouse Mφ-like cell line, RAW264.7 cells, and mouse endothelial cell line, b.End5 cells. We discovered that IL-18 acts synergistically with IL-10 to amplify the production of Mφ-derived mediators like osteopontin (OPN and thrombin, yielding thrombin-cleaved form of OPN generation, which acts through integrins α4/α9, thereby augmenting M2 polarization of Mφ with characteristics of increasing surface CD163 expression in association with morphological alteration. Furthermore, the results of visualizing temporal behavior and morphological alteration of Mφs during angiogenesis demonstrated that M2-like Mφs induced excessive angiogenesis through the direct cell–cell interaction with endothelial cells, possibly mediated by CD163.

  20. Alterations in resting state oscillations and connectivity in sensory and motor networks in women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome.

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    Kilpatrick, Lisa A; Kutch, Jason J; Tillisch, Kirsten; Naliboff, Bruce D; Labus, Jennifer S; Jiang, Zhiguo; Farmer, Melissa A; Apkarian, A Vania; Mackey, Sean; Martucci, Katherine T; Clauw, Daniel J; Harris, Richard E; Deutsch, Georg; Ness, Timothy J; Yang, Claire C; Maravilla, Kenneth; Mullins, Chris; Mayer, Emeran A

    2014-09-01

    The pathophysiology of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome remains incompletely understood but is thought to involve central disturbance in the processing of pain and viscerosensory signals. We identified differences in brain activity and connectivity between female patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome and healthy controls to advance clinical phenotyping and treatment efforts for interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. We examined oscillation dynamics of intrinsic brain activity in a large sample of well phenotyped female patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome and female healthy controls. Data were collected during 10-minute resting functional magnetic resonance imaging as part of the Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain Research Network project. The blood oxygen level dependent signal was transformed to the frequency domain. Relative power was calculated for multiple frequency bands. Results demonstrated altered frequency distributions in viscerosensory (post insula), somatosensory (postcentral gyrus) and motor regions (anterior paracentral lobule, and medial and ventral supplementary motor areas) in patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. Also, the anterior paracentral lobule, and medial and ventral supplementary motor areas showed increased functional connectivity to the midbrain (red nucleus) and cerebellum. This increased functional connectivity was greatest in patients who reported pain during bladder filling. Findings suggest that women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome have a sensorimotor component to the pathological condition involving an alteration in intrinsic oscillations and connectivity in a cortico-cerebellar network previously associated with bladder function. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Elevated Urine Levels of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Inflammatory Bladder Conditions: a Potential Biomarker for a Subgroup of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome Patients.

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    Vera, Pedro L; Preston, David M; Moldwin, Robert M; Erickson, Deborah R; Mowlazadeh, Behzad; Ma, Fei; Kouzoukas, Dimitrios E; Meyer-Siegler, Katherine L; Fall, Magnus

    2018-03-23

    (1) Objectives: To investigate whether urinary levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) are elevated in Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome (IC/BPS) patients with Hunner lesions and also whether urine MIF is elevated in other forms of inflammatory cystitis. (2) Methods: Urine samples were assayed for MIF by ELISA. Urine samples from three female groups were examined: IC/BPS patients without (N=55) and with Hunner lesions (N=43); Non-IC/BPS patients (N=100; control group; no history of IC/BPS; cancer or recent bacterial cystitis). Urine samples from three male groups were examined: patients with bacterial cystitis (N=50), radiation cystitis (N=18) and non-cystitis patients (N = 119; control group; negative for bacterial cystitis). (3) Results: Urine MIF (Mean MIF pg/ml ± SEM) was increased in female IC/BPS patients with Hunner lesions (2159 ± 435.3) compared to IC/BPS patients without Hunner lesions (460 ± 114.5) or non- IC/BPS patients (414 ± 47.6). Receiver-operating curve analyses showed that urine MIF levels discriminated between the two IC groups (AUC = 72%; CI: 61-82%). Male patients with bacterial and radiation cystitis had elevated urine MIF levels (2839 ± 757.1 and 4404 ± 1548.1; respectively) compared to non-cystitis patients (681 ± 75.2). (4) Conclusions: Urine MIF is elevated in IC/BPS patients with Hunner lesions and also in patients with other bladder inflammatory and painful conditions. MIF also may serve as a noninvasive biomarker to select IC/BPS patients more accurately for endoscopic evaluation and possible anti-inflammatory treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Interstitial pulmonary alterations in visceral leishmaniasis: evaluation with high-resolution computed tomography; Alteracoes pulmonares intersticiais na leishmaniose visceral: avaliacao pela tomografia computadorizada de alta resolucao

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    Costa, Norma Selma Santos; Cerri, Giovanni Guido [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia

    1999-08-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis, also called kala-azar, is a disease caused by a protozoan, the Leishmania donovani chagasi, that comprises reticuloendothelial system with involvement of the liver, spleen and bone marrow. It is endemic in some areas of northeastern Brazil and other countries of Latin America and Africa. The pathogenesis is related to the immunologic system of patients that present with the inability to activate the phagocytosis of the macrophages. As occurs in the liver and kidneys, the lungs are also involved with interstitial abnormalities caused by Leishmania that are not dependent upon the presence of the parasite. The histopathologic changes described are the involvement of inter alveolar septal in three different phases, irregularly and diffusely throughout the whole pulmonary parenchyma. This work analyzed high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the thorax in 17 patients with visceral leishmaniasis in order to detect and characterize the abnormalities described in the anatomo pathologic findings reported in the literature. The HRCT is being used to evaluate chronic interstitial lung disease in a good correlation with histologic findings. The most common findings detected by HRCT were the reticular opacities that include peribronchovascular interstitial thickening and interlobular septal thickening an ground-glass opacity. The HRCT suggests that similar changes to that found in alveolar structures may occur in the secondary pulmonary lobule and that the involvement in the parenchymal interstitium represents the findings reported by pathological studies in visceral leishmaniasis. (author)

  3. Impact of the alterations in the interstitial cells of Cajal on intestinal motility in post-infection irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Zhou, Xu-Chun; Lan, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are basic components of gastrointestinal motility. However, changes in ICC and their role in post‑infection irritable bowel syndrome (PI‑IBS) remain to be elucidated. To observe the impact of alterations in the ICC on intestinal motility in a PI‑IBS mouse model, female C57BL\\6 mice were infected by the oral administration of 400 Trichinella spiralis larvae. The abdominal withdrawal reflex, intestine transportation time (ITT), grain numbers, Bristol scores, wet/dry weights and the percentage water content of the mice feces every 2 h were used to assess changes in the intestinal motor function. The intestines were excised and sectioned for pathological and histochemical examination. These intestines were also used to quantify the protein and mRNA expression of c‑kit. The C57BL\\6 mouse can act as a PI‑IBS model at day 56 post‑infection. Compared with the control mice, the ITT was shorter, the grain numbers, Bristol scores, wet weights and water contents of the mice feces were higher and the dry weights were unchanged in the PI‑IBS mice. The protein and mRNA expression levels of c‑kit were upregulated in the entire PI‑IBS mouse intestines. Following immunohistochemical staining, the increased number of c‑kit‑positive cells were detected predominantly in the submucosa and myenteron. These results suggested that the alterations of the ICC resulted in the changes of the intestinal motility patterns in the PI‑IBS mouse models induced by Trichinella spiralis infection, which may be the main mechanism underlying intestinal motility disorders in PI‑IBS.

  4. Proteomic alteration of equine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with equine infectious anemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Cheng; Liu, Hai-Fang; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Ma, Jian; Li, Yi-Jing; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Similar to the well-studied viruses human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is another member of the Lentivirus genus in the family Retroviridae. Previous studies revealed that interactions between EIAV and the host resulted in viral evolution in pathogenicity and immunogenicity, as well as adaptation to the host. Proteomic analysis has been performed to examine changes in protein expression and/or modification in host cells infected with viruses and has revealed useful information for virus-host interactions. In this study, altered protein expression in equine monocyte-derived macrophages (eMDMs, the principle target cell of EIAV in vivo) infected with the EIAV pathogenic strain EIAV(DLV34) (DLV34) was examined using 2D-LC-MS/MS coupled with the iTRAQ labeling technique. The expression levels of 210 cellular proteins were identified to be significantly upregulated or downregulated by infection with DLV34. Alterations in protein expression were confirmed by examining the mRNA levels of eight selected proteins using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR, and by verifying the levels of ten selected proteins using parallel reaction monitoring (PRM). Further analysis of GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG)-Pathway enrichment demonstrated that these differentially expressed proteins are primarily related to the biological processes of oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding, RNA splicing, and ubiquitylation. Our results can facilitate a better understanding of the host response to EIAV infection and the cellular processes required for EIAV replication and pathogenesis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Alteration of human macrophages microRNA expression profile upon infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Lucinda Furci

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: This study signifies the miRNA host response upon intracellular mycobacterial infection in macrophages, providing new aspects of regulation in host-pathogen interactions, at post-transcriptional levels.

  6. Obesity/Type II diabetes alters macrophage polarization resulting in a fibrotic tendon healing response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica E Ackerman

    Full Text Available Type II Diabetes (T2DM dramatically impairs the tendon healing response, resulting in decreased collagen organization and mechanics relative to non-diabetic tendons. Despite this burden, there remains a paucity of information regarding the mechanisms that govern impaired healing of diabetic tendons. Mice were placed on either a high fat diet (T2DM or low fat diet (lean and underwent flexor tendon transection and repair surgery. Healing was assessed via mechanical testing, histology and changes in gene expression associated with collagen synthesis, matrix remodeling, and macrophage polarization. Obese/diabetic tendons healed with increased scar formation and impaired mechanical properties. Consistent with this, prolonged and excess expression of extracellular matrix (ECM components were observed in obese/T2DM tendons. Macrophages are involved in both inflammatory and matrix deposition processes during healing. Obese/T2DM tendons healed with increased expression of markers of pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, and elevated and prolonged expression of M2 macrophages markers that are involved in ECM deposition. Here we demonstrate that tendons from obese/diabetic mice heal with increased scar formation and increased M2 polarization, identifying excess M2 macrophage activity and matrix synthesis as a potential mechanism of the fibrotic healing phenotype observed in T2DM tendons, and as such a potential target to improve tendon healing in T2DM.

  7. Cholesteryl hemiesters alter lysosome structure and function and induce proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Neuza; Estronca, Luís M B B; Silva, João; Encarnação, Marisa R; Mateus, Rita; Silva, Diogo; Santarino, Inês B; Saraiva, Margarida; Soares, Maria I L; Pinho E Melo, Teresa M V D; Jacinto, António; Vaz, Winchil L C; Vieira, Otília V

    2017-02-01

    Cholesteryl hemiesters are oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acid esters of cholesterol. Their oxo-ester precursors have been identified as important components of the "core aldehydes" of human atheromata and in oxidized lipoproteins (Ox-LDL). We had previously shown, for the first time, that a single compound of this family, cholesteryl hemisuccinate (ChS), is sufficient to cause irreversible lysosomal lipid accumulation (lipidosis), and is toxic to macrophages. These features, coupled to others such as inflammation, are typically seen in atherosclerosis. To obtain insights into the mechanism of cholesteryl hemiester-induced pathological changes in lysosome function and induction of inflammation in vitro and assess their impact in vivo. We have examined the effects of ChS on macrophages (murine cell lines and primary cultures) in detail. Specifically, lysosomal morphology, pH, and proteolytic capacity were examined. Exposure of macrophages to sub-toxic ChS concentrations caused enlargement of the lysosomes, changes in their luminal pH, and accumulation of cargo in them. In primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), ChS-exposure increased the secretion of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. In zebrafish larvae (wild-type AB and PU.1:EGFP), fed with a ChS-enriched diet, we observed lipid accumulation, myeloid cell-infiltration in their vasculature and decrease in larval survival. Under the same conditions the effects of ChS were more profound than the effects of free cholesterol (FC). Our data strongly suggest that cholesteryl hemiesters are pro-atherogenic lipids able to mimic features of Ox-LDL both in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine alter monocyte, macrophage and T cell functions: implications for HAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Calderon, Tina M.; Coley, Jacqueline S.; Berman, Joan W.

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications resulting from HIV infection remain a major public health problem as individuals live longer due to the success of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). As many as 70% of HIV infected people have HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Many HIV infected individuals abuse drugs, such as cocaine, heroin or methamphetamine, that may be important cofactors in the development of HIV CNS disease. Despite different mechanisms of action, all drugs of abuse increase extracellular dopamine in the CNS. The effects of dopamine on HIV neuropathogenesis are not well understood, and drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which different types of drugs of abuse impact the development of HAND. Monocytes and macrophages are central to HIV infection of the CNS and to HAND. While T cells have not been shown to be a major factor in HIV-associated neuropathogenesis, studies indicate that T cells may play a larger role in the development of HAND in HIV infected drug abusers. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may dysregulate functions of, or increase HIV infection in, monocytes, macrophages and T cells in the brain. Thus, characterizing the effects of dopamine on these cells is important for understanding the mechanisms that mediate the development of HAND in drug abusers. PMID:23456305

  9. Functional alterations of alveolar macrophages subjected to smoke exposure and antioxidant lazaroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Lantz, R C; Vermeulen, M W; Chen, G J; Breceda, V; Robledo, R F; Hays, A M; Young, S; Witten, M L

    1999-08-01

    Acute inhalation of diesel fuel-polycarbonate plastic (DFPP) smoke causes severe lung injury, leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and death. It has been reported that the initiation of acute lung injury is associated with the activation of pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM). To further explore the pathogenesis, alveolar macrophages (AM) of New Zealand rabbits ventilated and exposed to a 60 tidal volume of DFPP smoke in vivo were recovered at 1 h post-smoke. Smoke exposure induced significant increases in both mRNA and protein levels for PAM tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), when compared to smoke control. Smoke also induced a biphasic response (inhibited at 2 h, enhanced at 24 h after cell isolation) in the production of superoxide (O2-) by PAM. However, aerosolized lazaroid, U75412E (1.6 mg/kg body weight), significantly attenuated smoke-induced expression in AM TNF-alpha at the protein level but not at the mRNA level, and smoke-induced changes in AM production of O2-. This study suggests that highly expressing AM TNF-alpha following smoke may be a key contributor to the cascade that establishes an acute injury process and exacerbates oxidant-derived cell injury. Whereas, the lazaroid may ameliorate smoke-induced lung injury by attenuating AM TNF-alpha release, in addition to its primary antioxidative mechanism.

  10. Probiotic Bacteria Alter Pattern-Recognition Receptor Expression and Cytokine Profile in a Human Macrophage Model Challenged with Candida albicans and Lipopolysaccharide

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    Victor H. Matsubara

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms that confer benefits to the host health. The infection rate of potentially pathogenic organisms such as Candida albicans, the most common agent associated with mucosal candidiasis, can be reduced by probiotics. However, the mechanisms by which the probiotics interfere with the immune system are largely unknown. We evaluated the effect of probiotic bacteria on C. albicans challenged human macrophages. Macrophages were pretreated with lactobacilli alone (Lactobacillus rhamnosus LR32, Lactobacillus casei L324m, or Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM or associated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, followed by the challenge with C. albicans or LPS in a co-culture assay. The expression of pattern-recognition receptors genes (CLE7A, TLR2, and TLR4 was determined by RT-qPCR, and dectin-1 reduced levels were confirmed by flow cytometry. The cytokine profile was determined by ELISA using the macrophage cell supernatant. Overall probiotic lactobacilli down-regulated the transcription of CLEC7A (p < 0.05, resulting in the decreased expression of dectin-1 on probiotic pretreated macrophages. The tested Lactobacillus species down-regulated TLR4, and increased TLR2 mRNA levels in macrophages challenged with C. albicans. The cytokines profile of macrophages challenged with C. albicans or LPS were altered by the probiotics, which generally led to increased levels of IL-10 and IL-1β, and reduction of IL-12 production by macrophages (p < 0.05. Our data suggest that probiotic lactobacilli impair the recognition of PAMPs by macrophages, and alter the production of pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines, thus modulating inflammation.

  11. Alterations in macrophage cellular proteome induced by calcium oxalate crystals: the association of HSP90 and F-actin is important for phagosome formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhto, Nilubon; Sintiprungrat, Kitisak; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2013-08-02

    The presence of macrophages in renal interstitium is the key feature of progressive renal inflammation in kidney stone disease. However, response of macrophages to calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals, the major crystalline composition of kidney stone, remained unclear. This study aimed to investigate alterations in the cellular proteome of macrophages induced by COM crystals using a proteomics approach. U937-derived macrophages (by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate activation) were incubated without or with 100 μg/mL COM crystals for 24 h. Their cellular proteins were resolved by 2-DE (n = 10 gels; 5 were derived from 5 independent cultures in each group) and visualized with Deep Purple fluorescent dye. Spot matching, quantitative intensity analysis, and statistics revealed 18 differentially expressed protein spots, which were successfully identified by Q-TOF MS and MS/MS analyses. The altered levels of α-tubulin, β-actin and ezrin were validated by Western blot analysis. Protein interaction network analysis using STRING software showed that 90 kDa heat shock protein (HSP90) was associated with β-actin and α-tubulin (all these three proteins were increased in the COM-treated macrophages). Multiple immunofluorescence stainings confirmed the associations of HSP90 with filamentous form of actin (F-actin) and α-tubulin. However, only the association between HSP90 and F-actin was found on the phagosome membrane surrounding COM crystal, indicating that the association of HSP90 with F-actin, but not with α-tubulin, is important for phagosome formation. Silencing of HSP90 (siHSP90) reduced expression of cytoskeletal proteins and phagosome marker (Rab5) and successfully diminished COM crystal-induced phagocytosis and migration of macrophages. Our findings enlightened the significant role of these altered proteins, especially HSP90, in enhanced phagocytic activity of the COM-exposed macrophages.

  12. Altered Polarization, Morphology, and Impaired Innate Immunity Germane to Resident Peritoneal Macrophages in Mice with Long-Term Type 2 Diabetes

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    Hui-Fang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is associated with perturbed innate immunity. Macrophages, bridging innate immunity and metabolic disturbances, play important roles in controlling immune homeostasis. However, the effect of long-term diabetic milieu (DM on the functions and phenotypes of macrophages is still not clear. In this study, we used resident peritoneal macrophages (RPMs from 5-month-old db/db mice to investigate the changes of macrophages. It was found that RPMs in db/db mice significantly reduced phagocytosis and adhesion capacity. After standardization with body weight, the number of F4/80+ RPMs markedly reduced in db/db mice, and, furthermore, the macrophages skewed to M2-polarizated macrophages. The results of morphology found that the RPMs shape of db/db mice was nearly round, but the RPMs shape of control mice was spindle-shaped and irregular. In this study, we found the cell numbers, morphology, and innate immunity functions of RPMs in 5-month-old type 2 diabetic mice (db/db mice obtained by abdominal cavity lavage were significantly altered. Importantly, we also found the remarkably increased M2-RPMs in diabetic mice for the first time.

  13. Interstitial Cystitis

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    ... bathroom at scheduled times and using relaxation techniques. Physical therapy. People who have interstitial cystitis may have painful spasms of pelvic floor muscles. If you have muscle spasms, you can ...

  14. Interstitial nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Allergic reaction to a drug (acute interstitial allergic nephritis). Autoimmune disorders, such as antitubular basement membrane disease, Kawasaki disease, Sjögren syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, or Wegener granulomatosis. Infections. Long-term use ...

  15. Dual inhibition of Ang-2 and VEGF receptors normalizes tumor vasculature and prolongs survival in glioblastoma by altering macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Teresa E.; Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Huang, Yuhui; Farrar, Christian T.; Marijt, Koen A.; Kloepper, Jonas; Datta, Meenal; Amoozgar, Zohreh; Seano, Giorgio; Jung, Keehoon; Kamoun, Walid S.; Vardam, Trupti; Snuderl, Matija; Goveia, Jermaine; Chatterjee, Sampurna; Batista, Ana; Muzikansky, Alona; Leow, Ching Ching; Xu, Lei; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Duda, Dan G.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) rapidly become refractory to anti-VEGF therapies. We previously demonstrated that ectopic overexpression of angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) compromises the benefits of anti-VEGF receptor (VEGFR) treatment in murine GBM models and that circulating Ang-2 levels in GBM patients rebound after an initial decrease following cediranib (a pan-VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor) administration. Here we tested whether dual inhibition of VEGFR/Ang-2 could improve survival in two orthotopic models of GBM, Gl261 and U87. Dual therapy using cediranib and MEDI3617 (an anti–Ang-2–neutralizing antibody) improved survival over each therapy alone by delaying Gl261 growth and increasing U87 necrosis, effectively reducing viable tumor burden. Consistent with their vascular-modulating function, the dual therapies enhanced morphological normalization of vessels. Dual therapy also led to changes in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Inhibition of TAM recruitment using an anti–colony-stimulating factor-1 antibody compromised the survival benefit of dual therapy. Thus, dual inhibition of VEGFR/Ang-2 prolongs survival in preclinical GBM models by reducing tumor burden, improving normalization, and altering TAMs. This approach may represent a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome the limitations of anti-VEGFR monotherapy in GBM patients by integrating the complementary effects of anti-Ang2 treatment on vessels and immune cells. PMID:27044097

  16. Cholesterol Corrects Altered Conformation of MHC-II Protein in Leishmania donovani Infected Macrophages: Implication in Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Saikat; Roy, Syamal

    2016-01-01

    Background Previously we reported that Kala-azar patients show progressive decrease in serum cholesterol as a function of splenic parasite burden. Splenic macrophages (MΦ) of Leishmania donovani (LD) infected mice show decrease in membrane cholesterol, while LD infected macrophages (I-MΦ) show defective T cell stimulating ability that could be corrected by liposomal delivery of cholesterol. T helper cells recognize peptide antigen in the context of class II MHC molecule. It is known that the conformation of a large number of membrane proteins is dependent on membrane cholesterol. In this investigation we tried to understand the influence of decreased membrane cholesterol in I-MΦ on the conformation of MHC-II protein and peptide-MHC-II stability, and its bearing on the antigen specific T-cell activation. Methodology/Principal Findings MΦ of CBA/j mice were infected with Leishmania donovani (I-MΦ). Two different anti-Aκ mAbs were used to monitor the status of MHC-II protein under parasitized condition. One of them (11.5–2) was conformation specific, whereas the other one (10.2.16) was not. Under parasitized condition, the binding of 11.5–2 decreased significantly with respect to the normal counterpart, whereas that of 10.2.16 remained unaltered. The binding of 11.5–2 was restored to normal upon liposomal delivery of cholesterol in I-MΦ. By molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies we found that there was considerable conformational fluctuation in the transmembrane domain of the MHC-II protein in the presence of membrane cholesterol than in its absence, which possibly influenced the distal peptide binding groove. This was evident from the faster dissociation of the cognate peptide from peptide-MHC complex under parasitized condition, which could be corrected by liposomal delivery of cholesterol in I-MΦ. Conclusion The decrease in membrane cholesterol in I-MΦ may lead to altered conformation of MHC II, and this may contribute to a faster dissociation of

  17. Consequences of alteration in leucine zipper sequence of melittin in its neutralization of lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory response in macrophage cells and interaction with lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Raghvendra M; Srivastava, Saurabh; Singh, Manish; Bajpai, Virendra Kumar; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2012-01-13

    The bee venom antimicrobial peptide, melittin, besides showing versatile activity against microorganisms also neutralizes lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory responses in macrophage cells. However, how the amino acid sequence of melittin contributes in its anti-inflammatory properties is mostly unknown. To determine the importance of the leucine zipper sequence of melittin in its neutralization of LPS-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages and interaction with LPS, anti-inflammatory properties of melittin and its three analogues and their interactions with LPS were studied in detail. Two of these analogues, namely melittin Mut-1 (MM-1) and melittin Mut-2 (MM-2), possess leucine to alanine substitutions in the single and double heptadic leucine residue(s) of melittin, respectively, whereas the third analogue is a scrambled peptide (Mel-SCR) that contains the amino acid composition of melittin with minor rearrangement in its leucine zipper sequence. Although MM-1 partly inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines in RAW 264.7 and rat primary macrophage cells in the presence of LPS, MM-2 and Mel-SCR were negligibly active. A progressive decrease in interaction of melittin with LPS, aggregation in LPS, and dissociation of LPS aggregates with alteration in the leucine zipper sequence of melittin was observed. Furthermore, with alteration in the leucine zipper sequence of melittin, these analogues failed to exhibit cellular responses associated with neutralization of LPS-induced inflammatory responses in macrophage cells by melittin. The data indicated a probable important role of the leucine zipper sequence of melittin in neutralizing LPS-induced proinflammatory responses in macrophage cells as well as in its interaction with LPS.

  18. Systemic and Cardiac Depletion of M2 Macrophage through CSF-1R Signaling Inhibition Alters Cardiac Function Post Myocardial Infarction.

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    Anne-Laure Leblond

    Full Text Available The heart hosts tissue resident macrophages which are capable of modulating cardiac inflammation and function by multiple mechanisms. At present, the consequences of phenotypic diversity in macrophages in the heart are incompletely understood. The contribution of cardiac M2-polarized macrophages to the resolution of inflammation and repair response following myocardial infarction remains to be fully defined. In this study, the role of M2 macrophages was investigated utilising a specific CSF-1 receptor signalling inhibition strategy to achieve their depletion. In mice, oral administration of GW2580, a CSF-1R kinase inhibitor, induced significant decreases in Gr1lo and F4/80hi monocyte populations in the circulation and the spleen. GW2580 administration also induced a significant depletion of M2 macrophages in the heart after 1 week treatment as well as a reduction of cardiac arginase1 and CD206 gene expression indicative of M2 macrophage activity. In a murine myocardial infarction model, reduced M2 macrophage content was associated with increased M1-related gene expression (IL-6 and IL-1β, and decreased M2-related gene expression (Arginase1 and CD206 in the heart of GW2580-treated animals versus vehicle-treated controls. M2 depletion was also associated with a loss in left ventricular contractile function, infarct enlargement, decreased collagen staining and increased inflammatory cell infiltration into the infarct zone, specifically neutrophils and M1 macrophages. Taken together, these data indicate that CSF-1R signalling is critical for maintaining cardiac tissue resident M2-polarized macrophage population, which is required for the resolution of inflammation post myocardial infarction and, in turn, for preservation of ventricular function.

  19. SIV Infection of Lung Macrophages.

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    Yue Li

    Full Text Available HIV-1 depletes CD4+ T cells in the blood, lymphatic tissues, gut and lungs. Here we investigated the relationship between depletion and infection of CD4+ T cells in the lung parenchyma. The lungs of 38 Indian rhesus macaques in early to later stages of SIVmac251 infection were examined, and the numbers of CD4+ T cells and macrophages plus the frequency of SIV RNA+ cells were quantified. We showed that SIV infected macrophages in the lung parenchyma, but only in small numbers except in the setting of interstitial inflammation where large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages were detected. However, even in this setting, the number of macrophages was not decreased. By contrast, there were few infected CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma, but CD4+ T cells were nonetheless depleted by unknown mechanisms. The CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma were depleted even though they were not productively infected, whereas SIV can infect large numbers of macrophages in the setting of interstitial inflammation without depleting them. These observations point to the need for future investigations into mechanisms of CD4+ T cell depletion at this mucosal site, and into mechanisms by which macrophage populations are maintained despite high levels of infection. The large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages in lungs in the setting of interstitial inflammation indicates that lung macrophages can be an important source for SIV persistent infection.

  20. Urinary Microbiome and Cytokine Levels in Women With Interstitial Cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, Melinda G; Rosenfeld, Amy; White, James R; Mueller, Margaret G; Lewicky-Gaupp, Christina; Kenton, Kimberly

    2017-03-01

    To investigate differences in the urinary microbiome and cytokine levels between women with and without interstitial cystitis and to correlate differences with scores on standardized symptom severity scales and depression and anxiety screening tools. Our cross-sectional study compared women presenting to a pelvic floor clinic and diagnosed with interstitial cystitis over a 6-month period with age-matched women in a control group from the same institution. Participants provided a catheterized urine sample and completed symptom severity, quality-of-life, depression, and anxiety screening questionnaires. Urinary microbiomes generated through bacterial ribosomal RNA sequencing and cytokine levels were analyzed using a standard immunoassay. Nonparametric analyses were used for all comparisons. Participants with interstitial cystitis reported more disability, bothersome urinary symptoms, genitourinary pain, and sexual dysfunction and scored higher on depression and anxiety screens compared with women in the control group. The urine of participants with interstitial cystitis contained fewer distinct operational taxonomic units (2 [median range 2-7, interquartile range 1] compared with 3.5 [median, range 2-22, interquartile range 5.25], P=.015) and was less likely to contain Lactobacillus acidophilus (1/14 [7%] compared with 7/18 [39%], P=.05) compared with women in the control group. L acidophilus was associated with less severe scores on the Interstitial Cystitis Symptoms Index (1 [median, range 0-17, interquartile range 5] compared with 10 [median, range 0-14, interquartile range 11], P=.005) and the Genitourinary Pain Index (0 [median, range 0-42, interquartile range 22] compared with 22.5 [median, range 0-40, interquartile range 28], P=.03). Participants with interstitial cystitis demonstrated higher levels of macrophage-derived chemokine (13.32 [median, range 8.93-17.05, interquartile range 15.86] compared with 0 [median, range 8.93-22.67, interquartile range 10

  1. Media from macrophages co-incubated with Enterococcus faecalis induces epithelial cell monolayer reassembly and altered cell morphology.

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    Natalia Belogortseva

    Full Text Available Signal exchange between intestinal epithelial cells, microbes and local immune cells is an important mechanism of intestinal homeostasis. Given that intestinal macrophages are in close proximity to both the intestinal epithelium and the microbiota, their pathologic interactions may result in epithelial damage. The present study demonstrates that co-incubation of murine macrophages with E. faecalis strains producing gelatinase (GelE and serine protease (SprE leads to resultant condition media (CM capable of inducing reassembly of primary colonic epithelial cell monolayers. Following the conditioned media (CM exposure, some epithelial cells are shed whereas adherent cells are observed to undergo dissolution of cell-cell junctions and morphologic transformation with actin cytoskeleton reorganization resulting in flattened and elongated shapes. These cells exhibit marked filamentous filopodia and lamellipodia formation. Cellular reorganization is not observed when epithelial monolayers are exposed to: CM from macrophages co-incubated with E. faecalis GelE/SprE-deficient mutants, CM from macrophages alone, or E. faecalis (GelE/SprE alone. Flow cytometry analysis reveals increased expression of CD24 and CD44 in cells treated with macrophage/E. faecalis CM. This finding in combination with the appearance colony formation in matrigel demonstrate that the cells treated with macrophage/E. faecalis CM contain a higher proportion progenitor cells compared to untreated control. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for a triangulated molecular dialogue between E. faecalis, macrophages and colonic epithelial cells, which may have important implications for conditions in the gut that involve inflammation, injury or tumorigenesis.

  2. Media from macrophages co-incubated with Enterococcus faecalis induces epithelial cell monolayer reassembly and altered cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogortseva, Natalia; Krezalek, Monika; Guyton, Kristina; Labno, Christine; Poroyko, Valeriy; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C

    2017-01-01

    Signal exchange between intestinal epithelial cells, microbes and local immune cells is an important mechanism of intestinal homeostasis. Given that intestinal macrophages are in close proximity to both the intestinal epithelium and the microbiota, their pathologic interactions may result in epithelial damage. The present study demonstrates that co-incubation of murine macrophages with E. faecalis strains producing gelatinase (GelE) and serine protease (SprE) leads to resultant condition media (CM) capable of inducing reassembly of primary colonic epithelial cell monolayers. Following the conditioned media (CM) exposure, some epithelial cells are shed whereas adherent cells are observed to undergo dissolution of cell-cell junctions and morphologic transformation with actin cytoskeleton reorganization resulting in flattened and elongated shapes. These cells exhibit marked filamentous filopodia and lamellipodia formation. Cellular reorganization is not observed when epithelial monolayers are exposed to: CM from macrophages co-incubated with E. faecalis GelE/SprE-deficient mutants, CM from macrophages alone, or E. faecalis (GelE/SprE) alone. Flow cytometry analysis reveals increased expression of CD24 and CD44 in cells treated with macrophage/E. faecalis CM. This finding in combination with the appearance colony formation in matrigel demonstrate that the cells treated with macrophage/E. faecalis CM contain a higher proportion progenitor cells compared to untreated control. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for a triangulated molecular dialogue between E. faecalis, macrophages and colonic epithelial cells, which may have important implications for conditions in the gut that involve inflammation, injury or tumorigenesis.

  3. Human mesenchymal stem cells alter macrophage phenotype and promote regeneration via homing to the kidney following ischemia-reperfusion injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wise, Andrea F; Williams, Timothy M; Kiewiet, Mensiena B G; Payne, Natalie L; Siatskas, Christopher; Samuel, Chrishan S; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) ameliorate injury and accelerate repair in many organs, including the kidney, although the reparative mechanisms and interaction with macrophages have not been elucidated. This study investigated the reparative potential of human bone marrow-derived MSCs and traced

  4. Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette–Guérin Alters Melanoma Microenvironment Favoring Antitumor T Cell Responses and Improving M2 Macrophage Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo D. Lardone

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intralesional Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG has long been a relatively inexpensive therapy for inoperable cutaneous metastatic melanoma (CMM, although intralesional BCG skin mechanisms remain understudied. We analyzed intralesional BCG-treated CMM lesions combined with in vitro studies to further investigate BCG-altered pathways. Since macrophages play a pivotal role against both cancer and mycobacterial infections, we hypothesized BCG regulates macrophages to promote antitumor immunity. Tumor-associated macrophages (M2 infiltrate melanomas and impair antitumor immunity. BCG-treated, in vitro-polarized M2 (M2-BCG showed transcriptional changes involving inflammation, immune cell recruitment, cross talk, and activation pathways. Mechanistic network analysis indicated M2-BCG potential to improve interferon gamma (IFN-γ responses. Accordingly, frequency of IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells responding to M2-BCG vs. mock-treated M2 increased (p < 0.05. Moreover, conditioned media from M2-BCG vs. M2 elevated the frequency of granzyme B-producing CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs facing autologous melanoma cell lines (p < 0.01. Furthermore, transcriptome analysis of intralesional BCG-injected CMM relative to uninjected lesions showed immune function prevalence, with the most enriched pathways representing T cell activation mechanisms. In vitro-infected MM-derived cell lines stimulated higher frequency of IFN-γ-producing TIL from the same melanoma (p < 0.05. Our data suggest BCG favors antitumor responses in CMM through direct/indirect effects on tumor microenvironment cell types including macrophages, T cells, and tumor itself.

  5. Interstitial Cystitis Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... frequency? You may have IC. Get The Facts Interstitial Cystitis Association The Interstitial Cystitis Association (ICA) is the ... news and events. Please leave this field empty Interstitial Cystitis Association 7918 Jones Branch Drive, Suite 300 McLean, ...

  6. Matrix metalloproteinase 7 restrains Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric inflammation and premalignant lesions in the stomach by altering macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowiak, M S; Noto, J M; Piazuelo, M B; Hardbower, D M; Romero-Gallo, J; Delgado, A; Chaturvedi, R; Correa, P; Wilson, K T; Peek, R M

    2015-04-02

    Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Although the specific mechanisms by which this pathogen induces carcinogenesis have not been fully elucidated, high-expression interleukin (IL)-1β alleles are associated with increased gastric cancer risk among H. pylori-infected persons. In addition, loss of matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7) increases mucosal inflammation in mouse models of epithelial injury, and we have shown that gastric inflammation is increased in H. pylori-infected MMP7(-/-) C57BL/6 mice. In this report, we define mechanisms that underpin such responses and extend these results into a genetic model of MMP7 deficiency and gastric cancer. Wild-type (WT) or MMP7(-/-) C57BL/6 mice were challenged with broth alone as an uninfected control or the H. pylori strain PMSS1. All H. pylori-challenged mice were successfully colonized. As expected, H. pylori-infected MMP7(-/-) C57BL/6 mice exhibited a significant increase in gastric inflammation compared with uninfected or infected WT C57BL/6 animals. Loss of MMP7 resulted in M1 macrophage polarization within H. pylori-infected stomachs, as assessed by Luminex technology and immunohistochemistry, and macrophages isolated from infected MMP7-deficient mice expressed significantly higher levels of the M1 macrophage marker IL-1β compared with macrophages isolated from WT mice. To extend these findings into a model of gastric cancer, hypergastrinemic WT INS-GAS or MMP7(-/-) INS-GAS mice were challenged with H. pylori strain PMSS1. Consistent with findings in the C57BL/6 model, H. pylori-infected MMP7-deficient INS-GAS mice exhibited a significant increase in gastric inflammation compared with either uninfected or infected WT INS-GAS mice. In addition, the incidence of gastric hyperplasia and dysplasia was significantly increased in H. pylori-infected MMP7(-/-) INS-GAS mice compared with infected WT INS-GAS mice, and loss of MMP7 promoted M1 macrophage polarization. These

  7. Update on macrophage clearance of inhaled micro- and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, Marianne

    2010-08-01

    Lung macrophages, that is, the intravascular, interstitial, pleural, and surface macrophages, are part of the mononuclear phagocyte system. They are derived from the hematopoietic stem cell in the bone marrow with the monocytes as their putative precursors. Macrophages residing on the inner surfaces of the lungs and immersed within the lung lining layer, that is, the alveolar and the airway macrophages, are constantly exposed to the environment; it is those cells that are recognized as first line of cellular host defense. Phagocytic uptake of inhaled and deposited particles is the main mechanism to remove insoluble micrometer-sized particles from the lung surfaces, where mucociliary transport, cough, or sneezing fail or are absent. Phagocytosis requires an intact cytoskeleton and is most efficient when mediated by Fc-receptors, but complement and scavenger receptors like MARCO and CD206 are just as important. The main pathway for the clearance of macrophage-associated particles is by mucociliary transport; to a lesser degree and species specific, particle-containing macrophages may reenter into the interstitium and go from there to the lymphatics. Inhaled nanometer-sized particles that deposit along the entire respiratory tract, however, are not efficiently phagocytosed by surface macrophages. Uptake by spontaneous or stimulated (macro-) pinocytosis or electrokinetic's phenomena may become more important. In addition, translocation of nanometer-sized particles into the interstitium and to the blood circulation brings them into contact with other fluids; altered particle properties may influence particle uptake. Moreover, translocated particles may interact with lung macrophage populations that were previously not considered of great significance for the clearance of inhaled particles.

  8. Human Neural Stem Cell Transplantation-Mediated Alteration of Microglial/Macrophage Phenotypes after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junling; Grill, Raymond J; Dunn, Tiffany J; Bedi, Supinder; Labastida, Javier Allende; Hetz, Robert A; Xue, Hasen; Thonhoff, Jason R; DeWitt, Douglas S; Prough, Donald S; Cox, Charles S; Wu, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) promote recovery from brain trauma, but neuronal replacement is unlikely the sole underlying mechanism. We hypothesize that grafted NSCs enhance neural repair at least partially through modulating the host immune response after traumatic brain injury (TBI). C57BL/6 mice were intracerebrally injected with primed human NSCs (hNSCs) or vehicle 24 h after a severe controlled cortical impact injury. Six days after transplantation, brain tissues were collected for Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. Observations included indicators of microglia/macrophage activation, M1 and M2 phenotypes, axonal injury detected by amyloid precursor protein (APP), lesion size, and the fate of grafted hNSCs. Animals receiving hNSC transplantation did not show significant decreases of brain lesion volumes compared to transplantation procedures with vehicle alone, but did show significantly reduced injury-dependent accumulation of APP. Furthermore, intracerebral transplantation of hNSCs reduced microglial activation as shown by a diminished intensity of Iba1 immunostaining and a transition of microglia/macrophages toward the M2 anti-inflammatory phenotype. The latter was represented by an increase in the brain M2/M1 ratio and increases of M2 microglial proteins. These phenotypic switches were accompanied by the increased expression of anti-inflammatory interleukin-4 receptor α and decreased proinflammatory interferon-γ receptor β. Finally, grafted hNSCs mainly differentiated into neurons and were phagocytized by either M1 or M2 microglia/macrophages. Thus, intracerebral transplantation of primed hNSCs efficiently leads host microglia/macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory phenotype that presumably contributes to stem cell-mediated neuroprotective effects after severe TBI in mice.

  9. Macrophage-tropic HIV-1 variants from brain demonstrate alterations in the way gp120 engages both CD4 and CCR5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Hamid; Roche, Michael; Webb, Nicholas; Gray, Lachlan R.; Chikere, Kelechi; Sterjovski, Jasminka; Ellett, Anne; Wesselingh, Steve L.; Ramsland, Paul A.; Lee, Benhur; Churchill, Melissa J.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    BR-derived HIV-1 strains have an exceptional ability to enter macrophages via mechanisms involving their gp120 Env that remain incompletely understood. Here, we used cell-based affinity-profiling methods and mathematical modeling to generate quantitative VERSA metrics that simultaneously measure Env-CD4 and Env-CCR5 interactions. These metrics were analyzed to distinguish the phenotypes of M-tropic and non-M-tropic CCR5-using HIV-1 variants derived from autopsy BRs and LNs, respectively. We show that highly M-tropic Env variants derived from brain can be defined by two distinct and simultaneously occurring phenotypes. First, BR-derived Envs demonstrated an enhanced ability to interact with CD4 compared with LN-derived Envs, permitting entry into cells expressing scant levels of CD4. Second, BR-derived Envs displayed an altered mechanism of engagement between CD4-bound gp120 and CCR5 occurring in tandem. With the use of epitope mapping, mutagenesis, and structural studies, we show that this altered mechanism is characterized by increased exposure of CD4-induced epitopes in gp120 and by a more critical interaction between BR-derived Envs and the CCR5 N-terminus, which was associated with the predicted presence of additional atomic contacts formed at the gp120-CCR5 N-terminus interface. Our results suggest that BR-derived HIV-1 variants with highly efficient macrophage entry adopt conformations in gp120 that simultaneously alter the way in which the Env interacts with CD4 and CCR5. PMID:23077246

  10. HIV-1 Escape from the CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc Associated with an Altered and Less-Efficient Mechanism of gp120-CCR5 Engagement That Attenuates Macrophage Tropism▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Michael; Jakobsen, Martin R.; Sterjovski, Jasminka; Ellett, Anne; Posta, Filippo; Lee, Benhur; Jubb, Becky; Westby, Mike; Lewin, Sharon R.; Ramsland, Paul A.; Churchill, Melissa J.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) inhibits the entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by binding to and modifying the conformation of the CCR5 extracellular loops (ECLs). Resistance to MVC results from alterations in the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoproteins (Env) enabling recognition of the drug-bound conformation of CCR5. To better understand the mechanisms underlying MVC resistance, we characterized the virus-cell interactions of gp120 from in vitro-generated MVC-resistant HIV-1 (MVC-Res Env), comparing them with those of gp120 from the sensitive parental virus (MVC-Sens Env). In the absence of the drug, MVC-Res Env maintains a highly efficient interaction with CCR5, similar to that of MVC-Sens Env, and displays a relatively modest increase in dependence on the CCR5 N terminus. However, in the presence of the drug, MVC-Res Env interacts much less efficiently with CCR5 and becomes critically dependent on the CCR5 N terminus and on positively charged elements of the drug-modified CCR5 ECL1 and ECL2 regions (His88 and His181, respectively). Structural analysis suggests that the Val323 resistance mutation in the gp120 V3 loop alters the secondary structure of the V3 loop and the buried surface area of the V3 loop–CCR5 N terminus interface. This altered mechanism of gp120-CCR5 engagement dramatically attenuates the entry of HIV-1 into monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), cell-cell fusion activity in MDM, and viral replication capacity in MDM. In addition to confirming that HIV-1 escapes MVC by becoming heavily dependent on the CCR5 N terminus, our results reveal novel interactions with the drug-modified ECLs that are critical for the utilization of CCR5 by MVC-Res Env and provide additional insights into virus-cell interactions that modulate macrophage tropism. PMID:21345957

  11. Sodium methyldithiocarbamate inhibits MAP kinase activation through toll-like receptor 4, alters cytokine production by mouse peritoneal macrophages, and suppresses innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Stephen B; Zheng, Qiang; Schwab, Carlton; Fan, Ruping

    2005-09-01

    Sodium methyldithiocarbamate (SMD; trade name, Metam Sodium) is an abundantly used soil fumigant that can cause adverse health effects in humans, including some immunological manifestations. The mechanisms by which SMD acts, and its targets within the immune system are not fully understood. Initial experiments demonstrated that SMD administered by oral gavage substantially decreased IL-12 production and increased IL-10 production induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice. The present study was conducted to further characterize these effects and to evaluate our working hypothesis that the mechanism for these effects involves alteration in signaling through toll-like receptor 4 and that this would suppress innate immunity to infection. SMD decreased the activation of MAP kinases and AP-1 but not NF-kappaB in peritoneal macrophages. The expression of mRNA for IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-18, IFN-gamma, IL-12 p35, IL-12 p40, and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was inhibited by SMD, whereas mRNA for IL-10 was increased. SMD increased the IL-10 concentration in the peritoneal cavity and serum and decreased the concentration of IL-12 p40 in the serum, peritoneal cavity, and intracellularly in peritoneal cells (which are >80% macrophages). Similar effects on LPS-induced cytokine production were observed following dermal administration of SMD. The major breakdown product of SMD, methylisothiocyanate (MITC), caused similar effects on cytokine production at dosages as low as 17 mg/kg, a dosage relevant to human exposure levels associated with agricultural use of SMD. Treatment of mice with SMD decreased survival following challenge with non-pathogenic Escherichia coli within 24-48 h, demonstrating suppression of innate immunity.

  12. [Interstitial lung diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, K; Brasch, F

    2008-11-01

    Interstitial lung diseases comprise a heterogeneous group of about 200 entities. In the classification of these diseases, diffuse parenchymal lung diseases with known cause, granulomatous diseases, and other specific interstitial lung diseases are separated from the important group of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, which are classified according to the 2002 ATS/ERS consensus classification. Concerning the histological pattern, this classification differentiates between "usual interstitial pneumonia" (UIP), "nonspecific interstitial pneumonia" (NSIP), "organising pneumonia" (COP), "diffuse alveolar damage" (DAD), "respiratory bronchiolitis" (RB), "desquamative interstitial pneumonia" (DIP), "lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia" (LIP) and "unclassifiable interstitial pneumonias". A key message of this classification is that the pathologist will give the diagnosis of a histological pattern, whereas the final clinicopathologic diagnosis can be made only by the clinical pulmonologist after careful correlation with the clinical and radiologic features, which is essential in the diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases.

  13. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and ... is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among coal ...

  14. Exposure to di(n-butyl)phthalate and benzo(a)pyrene alters IL-1β secretion and subset expression of testicular macrophages, resulting in decreased testosterone production in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Shanjun; Tian Huaijun; Cao Jia; Gao Yuqi

    2010-01-01

    Di(n-butyl)phthalate (DBP) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) are environmental endocrine disruptors that are potentially hazardous to humans. These chemicals affect testicular macrophage immuno-endocrine function and testosterone production. However, the underlying mechanisms for these effects are not fully understood. It is well known that interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), which is secreted by testicular macrophages, plays a trigger role in regulating Leydig cell steroidogenesis. The purpose of this study was to reveal the effects of co-exposure to DBP and BaP on testicular macrophage subset expression, IL-1β secretion and testosterone production. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into seven groups; two groups received DBP plus BaP (DBP + BaP: 50 + 1 or 250 + 5 mg/kg/day) four groups received DBP or BaP alone (DBP: 50 or 250 mg/kg/day; BaP: 1 or 5 mg/kg/day), and one group received vehicle alone (control). After co-exposure for 90 days, the relative expression of macrophage subsets and their functions changed. ED2 + testicular macrophages (reactive with a differentiation-related antigen present on the resident macrophages) were activated and IL-1β secretion was enhanced. DBP and BaP acted additively, as demonstrated by greater IL-1β secretion relative to each compound alone. These observations suggest that exposure to DBP plus BaP exerted greater suppression on testosterone production compared with each compound alone. The altered balance in the subsets of testicular macrophages and the enhanced ability of resident testicular macrophages to secrete IL-1β, resulted in enhanced production of IL-1β as a potent steroidogenesis repressor. This may represent an important mechanism by which DBP and BaP repress steroidogenesis.

  15. Innate immune humoral factors, C1q and factor H, with differential pattern recognition properties, alter macrophage response to carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pondman, Kirsten M; Pednekar, Lina; Paudyal, Basudev; Tsolaki, Anthony G; Kouser, Lubna; Khan, Haseeb A; Shamji, Mohamed H; Ten Haken, Bennie; Stenbeck, Gudrun; Sim, Robert B; Kishore, Uday

    2015-11-01

    Interaction between the complement system and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can modify their intended biomedical applications. Pristine and derivatised CNTs can activate complement primarily via the classical pathway which enhances uptake of CNTs and suppresses pro-inflammatory response by immune cells. Here, we report that the interaction of C1q, the classical pathway recognition molecule, with CNTs involves charge pattern and classical pathway activation that is partly inhibited by factor H, a complement regulator. C1q and its globular modules, but not factor H, enhanced uptake of CNTs by macrophages and modulated the pro-inflammatory immune response. Thus, soluble complement factors can interact differentially with CNTs and alter the immune response even without complement activation. Coating CNTs with recombinant C1q globular heads offers a novel way of controlling classical pathway activation in nanotherapeutics. Surprisingly, the globular heads also enhance clearance by phagocytes and down-regulate inflammation, suggesting unexpected complexity in receptor interaction. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) maybe useful in the clinical setting as targeting drug carriers. However, it is also well known that they can interact and activate the complement system, which may have a negative impact on the applicability of CNTs. In this study, the authors functionalized multi-walled CNT (MWNT), and investigated the interaction with the complement pathway. These studies are important so as to gain further understanding of the underlying mechanism in preparation for future use of CNTs in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Arsenic-induced alteration in intracellular calcium homeostasis induces head kidney macrophage apoptosis involving the activation of calpain-2 and ERK in Clarias batrachus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Chaitali; Goswami, Ramansu; Datta, Soma; Rajagopal, R.; Mazumder, Shibnath

    2011-01-01

    We had earlier shown that exposure to arsenic (0.50 μM) caused caspase-3 mediated head kidney macrophage (HKM) apoptosis involving the p38-JNK pathway in Clarias batrachus. Here we examined the roles of calcium (Ca 2+ ) and extra-cellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), the other member of MAPK-pathway on arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. Arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis involved increased expression of ERK and calpain-2. Nifedipine, verapamil and EGTA pre-treatment inhibited the activation of calpain-2, ERK and reduced arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis as evidenced from reduced caspase-3 activity, Annexin V-FITC-propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342 staining. Pre-incubation with ERK inhibitor U 0126 inhibited the activation of calpain-2 and interfered with arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. Additionally, pre-incubation with calpain-2 inhibitor also interfered with the activation of ERK and inhibited arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin and diphenyleneiodonium chloride also inhibited ERK activation indicating activation of ERK in arsenic-exposed HKM also depends on signals from NADPH oxidase pathway. Our study demonstrates the critical role of Ca 2+ homeostasis on arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. We suggest that arsenic-induced alteration in intracellular Ca 2+ levels initiates pro-apoptotic ERK and calpain-2; the two pathways influence each other positively and induce caspase-3 mediated HKM apoptosis. Besides, our study also indicates the role of ROS in the activation of ERK pathway in arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis in C. batrachus. - Highlights: → Altered Ca 2+ homeostasis leads to arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. → Calpain-2 plays a critical role in the process. → ERK is pro-apoptotic in arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. → Arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis involves cross talk between calpain-2 and ERK.

  17. Long non-coding RNA cox-2 prevents immune evasion and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma by altering M1/M2 macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yibiao; Xu, Yunxiuxiu; Lai, Yu; He, Wenguang; Li, Yanshan; Wang, Ruomei; Luo, Xinxi; Chen, Rufu; Chen, Tao

    2018-03-01

    Macrophages have been shown to demonstrate a high level of plasticity, with the ability to undergo dynamic transition between M1 and M2 polarized phenotypes. We investigate long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) cox-2 in macrophage polarization and the regulatory mechanism functions in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was used to induce RAW264.7 macrophages into M1 type, and IL-4 was to induce RAW264.7 macrophages into M2 type. We selected mouse hepatic cell line Hepal-6 and hepatoma cell line HepG2 for co-incubation with M1 or M2 macrophages. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect the expressions of lncRNA cox-2 and mRNAs. ELISA was conducted for testing IL-12 and IL-10 expressions; Western blotting for epithelial mesenchymal transition related factors (E-cadherin and Vimentin). An MTT, colony formation assay, flow cytometry, transwell assay, and stretch test were conducted to test cell abilities. The M1 macrophages had higher lncRNA cox-2 expression than that in the non-polarized macrophages and M2 macrophages. The lncRNA cox-2 siRNA decreased the expression levels of IL-12, iNOS, and TNF-α in M1 macrophages, increased the expression levels of IL-10, Arg-1, and Fizz-1 in M2 macrophages (all P evasion and tumor growth by inhibiting the polarization of M2 macrophages. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Inefficient HIV-1 trans infection of CD4+ T cells by macrophages from HIV-1 nonprogressors is associated with altered membrane cholesterol and DC-SIGN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLucia, Diana C; Rinaldo, Charles R; Rappocciolo, Giovanna

    2018-04-11

    Professional antigen presenting cells (APC: myeloid dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages (MΦ); B lymphocytes) mediate highly efficient HIV-1 infection of CD4 + T cells, termed trans infection, that could contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis. We have previously shown that lower cholesterol content in DC and B lymphocytes is associated with a lack of HIV-1 trans infection in HIV-1 infected nonprogressors (NP). Here we assessed whether HIV-1 trans infection mediated by another major APC, MΦ, is deficient in NP due to altered cholesterol metabolism. When comparing healthy HIV-1 seronegatives (SN), rapid progressors (PR), and NP, we found that monocyte-derived MΦ from NP did not mediate HIV-1 trans infection of autologous CD4 + T cells, in contrast to efficient trans infection mediated by SN and PR MΦ. MΦ trans infection efficiency was directly associated with the number of DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN)-expressing MΦ. Significantly fewer NP MΦ expressed DC-SIGN. Unesterified (free) cholesterol in MΦ cell membranes and lipid rafting was significantly lower in NP than PR, as well as virus internalization in early endosomes. Furthermore, simvastatin (SIMV), decreased the subpopulation of DC-SIGN + MΦ, as well as MΦ cis and trans infection. Notably, SIMV decreased cell membrane cholesterol and led to lipid raft dissociation, effectively mimicking the incompetent APC trans infection environment characteristic of NP. Our data support that DC-SIGN and membrane cholesterol are central to MΦ trans infection, and a lack of these limits HIV-1 disease progression. Targeting the ability of MΦ to drive HIV-1 dissemination in trans could enhance HIV-1 therapeutic strategies. IMPORTANCE Despite the success of combination anti-retroviral therapy, neither a vaccine nor a cure for HIV infection has been developed, demonstrating a need for novel prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. Here we show that efficiency of macrophage (M

  19. Expression of Siglec-E Alters the Proteome of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS-Activated Macrophages but Does Not Affect LPS-Driven Cytokine Production or Toll-Like Receptor 4 Endocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula Nagala

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Siglec-E is a murine CD33-related siglec that functions as an inhibitory receptor and is expressed mainly on neutrophils and macrophage populations. Recent studies have suggested that siglec-E is an important negative regulator of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 signaling and one report (1 claimed that siglec-E is required for TLR4 endocytosis following uptake of Escherichia coli by macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs. Our attempts to reproduce these observations using cells from wild-type (WT and siglec-E-deficient mice were unsuccessful. We used a variety of assays to determine if siglec-E expressed by different macrophage populations can regulate TLR4 signaling in response to LPS, but found no consistent differences in cytokine secretion in vitro and in vivo, comparing three different strains of siglec-E-deficient mice with matched WT controls. No evidence was found that the siglec-E deficiency was compensated by expression of siglecs-F and -G, the other murine inhibitory CD33-related siglecs. Quantitative proteomics was used as an unbiased approach and provided additional evidence that siglec-E does not suppress inflammatory TLR4 signaling. Interestingly, proteomics revealed a siglec-E-dependent alteration in macrophage protein composition that could be relevant to functional responses in host defense. In support of this, siglec-E-deficient mice exhibited enhanced growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the liver following intravenous infection, but macrophages lacking siglec-E did not show altered uptake or killing of bacteria in vitro. Using various cell types including bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs, splenic DCs, and macrophages from WT and siglec-E-deficient mice, we showed that siglec-E is not required for TLR4 endocytosis following E. coli uptake or LPS challenge. We failed to see expression of siglec-E by BMDC even after LPS-induced maturation, but confirmed previous studies that splenic DCs express

  20. Experimental depletion of different renal interstitial cell populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohman, S.O.; Sundelin, B.; Forsum, U.; Tribukait, B.

    1988-01-01

    To define different populations of renal interstitial cells and investigate some aspects of their function, we studied the kidneys of normal rats and rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus (DI, Brattleboro) after experimental manipulations expected to alter the number of interstitial cells. DI rats showed an almost complete loss of interstitial cells in their renal papillae after treatment with a high dose of vasopressin. In spite of the lack of interstitial cells, the animals concentrated their urine to the same extent as vasopressin-treated normal rats, indicating that the renomedullary interstitial cells do not have an important function in concentrating the urine. The interstitial cells returned nearly to normal within 1 week off vasopressin treatment, suggesting a rapid turnover rate of these cells. To further distinguish different populations of interstitial cells, we studied the distribution of class II MHC antigen expression in the kidneys of normal and bone-marrow depleted Wistar rats. Normal rats had abundant class II antigen-positive interstitial cells in the renal cortex and outer medulla, but not in the inner medulla (papilla). Six days after 1000 rad whole body irradiation, the stainable cells were almost completely lost, but electron microscopic morphometry showed a virtually unchanged volume density of interstitial cells in the cortex and outer medulla, as well as the inner medulla. Thus, irradiation abolished the expression of the class II antigen but caused no significant depletion of interstitial cells

  1. Desquamative interstitial pneumonia: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovrenski Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Desquamative interstitial pneumonia is one of the rarest idiopathic interstitial pneumonias and the rarest form of smoking-related interstitial lung diseases. It was first described by Liebow in 1965. Histologically, it is characterized by the presence of eosinophilic macrophages uniformly filling airspaces which often contain a finely granular light-brown pigment that does not stain for hemosiderin. The alveolar walls are usually mildly thickened by fibrous tissue and infiltrated by a moderate number of lymphocytes. Case Outline. Our patient was a 56-year-old male, heavy smoker, with bilateral lung infiltrations of unknown etiology and several months of discomfort in the form of dry cough and shortness of breath. Lung function tests showed a moderate restrictive ventilation disorder and a severe reduction of diffusing capacity. Since bronchoscopic specimens did not reveal lung lesion etiology, an open lung biopsy of the lower left pulmonary lobe was performed, and based on the obtained surgical material the pathohistologically diagnosis of desquamative interstitial pneumonia was established. The patient was started on corticosteroid and immunosuppressive therapy, and he ceased smoking. At the last control examination, two years after the onset of symptoms, the patient was feeling well, and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT scan of the thorax showed regression of pathological changes. Conclusion. Although, as in our case, the majority of DIP patients improve on treatment, some patients still develop progressive irreversible fibrosis despite therapy.

  2. Roles of Macrophage Exosomes in Immune Response to Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilubon Singhto

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In kidney stone disease, macrophages secrete various mediators via classical secretory pathway and cause renal interstitial inflammation. However, whether their extracellular vesicles, particularly exosomes, are involved in kidney stone pathogenesis remained unknown. This study investigated alterations in exosomal proteome of U937-derived macrophages (by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate activation after exposure to calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM crystals for 16-h using 2-DE-based proteomics approach. Six significantly altered proteins in COM-treated exosomes were successfully identified by nanoscale liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization–electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry as proteins involved mainly in immune processes, including T-cell activation and homeostasis, Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis, interferon-γ (IFN-γ regulation, and cell migration/movement. The decreased heat shock protein 90-beta (HSP90β and increased vimentin were confirmed by Western blotting. ELISA showed that the COM-treated macrophages produced greater level of interleukin-1β (IL-1β, one of the markers for inflammasome activation. Functional studies demonstrated that COM-treated exosomes enhanced monocyte and T-cell migration, monocyte activation and macrophage phagocytic activity, but on the other hand, reduced T-cell activation. In addition, COM-treated exosomes enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 by monocytes that could be restored to its basal level by small-interfering RNA targeting on vimentin (si-Vimentin. Moreover, si-Vimentin could also abolish effects of COM-treated exosomes on monocyte and T-cell migration as well as macrophage phagocytic activity. These findings provided some implications to the immune response during kidney stone pathogenesis via exosomal pathway of macrophages after exposure to COM crystals.

  3. Acute interstitial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuervo M, Francisco; Carrillo Bayona, Jorge; Ojeda, Paulina

    2004-01-01

    The paper refers to a 71 year-old patient, to who is diagnosed acute interstitial pneumonia; with square of 20 days of evolution of cough dry emetizant, fever, general uneasiness, migraine, progressive dyspnoea and lost of weight

  4. Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grouped together under the label of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, the most common and deadly of which is idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Risk factors Factors that may make you more susceptible to ...

  5. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: radiologic-pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, Alberto; Franquet, Tomas; Gimenez, Ana; Pineda, Rosa; Madrid, Marta; Bordes, Ramon

    2006-01-01

    Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) are a heterogeneous group of entities of unknown cause. These diseases include desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP), respiratory-bronchiolitis-related interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD), pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). High-resolution CT is highly sensitive in the detection of abnormalities in the lung parenchyma and airways. Ground-glass attenuation can occur in DIP and RB-ILD. Whereas DIP is histologically characterized by intra-alveolar pigmented macrophages, RB-ILD shows alveolar macrophages in a patchy peribronchiolar distribution. LCH shows nodular infiltrates on histopathological examination containing varying amounts of characteristic Langerhans' histiocytes. The HRCT findings are characteristically bilateral, symmetrical and diffuse, involving the upper lobe zones with sparing of the costophrenic angles. The most prominent CT features are nodules (sometimes cavitary) measuring 1 to 10 mm in diameter, cysts and areas of ground-glass attenuation. Pathologically, IPF is characterized by its heterogeneity with areas of normal clung, alveolitis and end-stage fibrosis shown in the same biopsy specimen. High-resolution CT findings consist of honeycombing, traction bronchiectasis and intralobular interstitial thickening with subpleural and lower lung predominance. Since coexisting lesions in the same cases have been observed, a better understanding of the different smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) allows a more confident and specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  6. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: radiologic-pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo, Alberto [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Thoracic Radiology, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Franquet, Tomas; Gimenez, Ana; Pineda, Rosa; Madrid, Marta [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Bordes, Ramon [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Pathology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-11-15

    Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) are a heterogeneous group of entities of unknown cause. These diseases include desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP), respiratory-bronchiolitis-related interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD), pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). High-resolution CT is highly sensitive in the detection of abnormalities in the lung parenchyma and airways. Ground-glass attenuation can occur in DIP and RB-ILD. Whereas DIP is histologically characterized by intra-alveolar pigmented macrophages, RB-ILD shows alveolar macrophages in a patchy peribronchiolar distribution. LCH shows nodular infiltrates on histopathological examination containing varying amounts of characteristic Langerhans' histiocytes. The HRCT findings are characteristically bilateral, symmetrical and diffuse, involving the upper lobe zones with sparing of the costophrenic angles. The most prominent CT features are nodules (sometimes cavitary) measuring 1 to 10 mm in diameter, cysts and areas of ground-glass attenuation. Pathologically, IPF is characterized by its heterogeneity with areas of normal clung, alveolitis and end-stage fibrosis shown in the same biopsy specimen. High-resolution CT findings consist of honeycombing, traction bronchiectasis and intralobular interstitial thickening with subpleural and lower lung predominance. Since coexisting lesions in the same cases have been observed, a better understanding of the different smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) allows a more confident and specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 induction alters chemokine regulation and ameliorates human immunodeficiency virus-type-1 infection in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Zhao-Hua [Division of Monoclonal Antibodies, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kumari, Namita; Nekhai, Sergei [Center for Sickle Cell Disease, Department of Medicine, Howard University, Washington, DC (United States); Clouse, Kathleen A. [Division of Monoclonal Antibodies, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wahl, Larry M. [National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [Laboratory of Cell and Development Biology, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dhawan, Subhash, E-mail: subhash.dhawan@fda.hhs.gov [Viral Immunology Section, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Division of Emerging and Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) ameliorated HIV-1 infection of primary human macrophages. •The partial protection by HO-1 against HIV infection was associated with induction of chemokines such as MIP1α and MIP1β. •This mechanism explains lipopolysaccharide-stimulated HO-1-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of macrophages. -- Abstract: We have elucidated a putative mechanism for the host resistance against HIV-1 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that LPS-activated MDM both inhibited HIV-1 entry into the cells and were refractory to post-entry productive viral replication. LPS-treated cells were virtually negative for mature virions as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. LPS activation of MDM markedly enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent inducible cytoprotective enzyme. Increased HO-1 expression was accompanied by elevated production of macrophage inflammatory chemokines (MIP1α and MIP1β) by LPS-activated MDM, significantly decreased surface chemokine receptor-5 (CCR-5) expression, and substantially reduced virus replication. Treatment of cells with HO-1 inhibitor SnPP IX (tin protoporphyrin IX) attenuated the LPS-mediated responses, HIV-1 replication and secretion of MIP1α, MIP1β, and LD78β chemokines with little change in surface CCR-5 expression. These results identify a novel role for HO-1 in the modulation of host immune response against HIV infection of MDM.

  8. Heme oxygenase-1 induction alters chemokine regulation and ameliorates human immunodeficiency virus-type-1 infection in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Zhao-Hua; Kumari, Namita; Nekhai, Sergei; Clouse, Kathleen A.; Wahl, Larry M.; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) ameliorated HIV-1 infection of primary human macrophages. •The partial protection by HO-1 against HIV infection was associated with induction of chemokines such as MIP1α and MIP1β. •This mechanism explains lipopolysaccharide-stimulated HO-1-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of macrophages. -- Abstract: We have elucidated a putative mechanism for the host resistance against HIV-1 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that LPS-activated MDM both inhibited HIV-1 entry into the cells and were refractory to post-entry productive viral replication. LPS-treated cells were virtually negative for mature virions as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. LPS activation of MDM markedly enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent inducible cytoprotective enzyme. Increased HO-1 expression was accompanied by elevated production of macrophage inflammatory chemokines (MIP1α and MIP1β) by LPS-activated MDM, significantly decreased surface chemokine receptor-5 (CCR-5) expression, and substantially reduced virus replication. Treatment of cells with HO-1 inhibitor SnPP IX (tin protoporphyrin IX) attenuated the LPS-mediated responses, HIV-1 replication and secretion of MIP1α, MIP1β, and LD78β chemokines with little change in surface CCR-5 expression. These results identify a novel role for HO-1 in the modulation of host immune response against HIV infection of MDM

  9. Deletion of 12/15-lipoxygenase alters macrophage and islet function in NOD-Alox15(null mice, leading to protection against type 1 diabetes development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamina M Green-Mitchell

    Full Text Available AIMS: Type 1 diabetes (T1D is characterized by autoimmune depletion of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. We showed previously that deletion of the 12/15-lipoxygenase enzyme (12/15-LO, Alox15 gene in NOD mice leads to nearly 100 percent protection from T1D. In this study, we test the hypothesis that cytokines involved in the IL-12/12/15-LO axis affect both macrophage and islet function, which contributes to the development of T1D. METHODS: 12/15-LO expression was clarified in immune cells by qRT-PCR, and timing of expression was tested in islets using qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Expression of key proinflammatory cytokines and pancreatic transcription factors was studied in NOD and NOD-Alox15(null macrophages and islets using qRT-PCR. The two mouse strains were also assessed for the ability of splenocytes to transfer diabetes in an adoptive transfer model, and beta cell mass. RESULTS: 12/15-LO is expressed in macrophages, but not B and T cells of NOD mice. In macrophages, 12/15-LO deletion leads to decreased proinflammatory cytokine mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, splenocytes from NOD-Alox15(null mice are unable to transfer diabetes in an adoptive transfer model. In islets, expression of 12/15-LO in NOD mice peaks at a crucial time during insulitis development. The absence of 12/15-LO results in maintenance of islet health with respect to measurements of islet-specific transcription factors, markers of islet health, proinflammatory cytokines, and beta cell mass. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that 12/15-LO affects islet and macrophage function, causing inflammation, and leading to autoimmunity and reduced beta cell mass.

  10. Sexual Dysfunction in Interstitial Cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonyali, Senol; Yilmaz, Mehmet

    2017-11-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC)/bladder pain syndrome (BPS) is a debilitating disease characterized with urgency, frequency, and pelvic pain affecting especially women. Sexual dysfunction in female patients with IC/BPS consists of dyspareunia, altered sexual desire and orgasm frequency and insufficient lubrication is reported to negatively affect the patient's quality of life. In the present study, we aimed to determine the association between IC/BPS and sexual dysfunction and improvement in sexual dysfunction related to given treatments. A PubMed/Medline and EMBASE search was conducted using keywords: "interstitial cystitis", "sexual dysfunction", and "bladder pain syndrome". Several studies have been conducted to determine the relation between IC/BPS and sexual dysfunction. And also limited studies focusing on IC/BPS specific treatments reported significant improvements in sexual function after either oral or intravesical treatment. However, given the used different questionnaires, study protocols, patient characteristics, previous treatments and follow-up period, it is not possible to make a head-to-head comparison of the treatment effects on sexual function. Further, randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm these results and make a comparison between effects of various treatment modalities on sexual functioning in IC/BPS.

  11. The cellular distribution of extracellular superoxide dismutase in macrophages is altered by cellular activation but unaffected by the natural occurring R213G substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfredsen, Randi Heidemann; Goldstrohm, David; Hartney, John

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is responsible for the dismutation of the superoxide radical produced in the extracellular space and known to be expressed by inflammatory cells, including macrophages and neutrophils. Here we show that EC-SOD is produced by resting macrophages...... and associated with the cell surface via the extracellular matrix (ECM)-binding region. Upon cellular activation induced by lipopolysaccharide, EC-SOD is relocated and detected both in the cell culture medium and in lipid raft structures. Although the secreted material presented a significantly reduced ligand......-binding capacity, this could not be correlated to proteolytic removal of the ECM-binding region, because the integrity of the material recovered from the medium was comparable to that of the cell surface-associated protein. The naturally occurring R213G amino acid substitution located in the ECM-binding region...

  12. Interstitial Cystitis / Painful Bladder Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vesicoureteral Reflux The Urinary Tract & How It Works Interstitial Cystitis (Painful Bladder Syndrome) View or Print All Sections Definition & Facts Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic, or long-lasting, condition ...

  13. Quantitative pulmonary gallium scanning in interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsay, S.C.; Yeates, M.G.; Burke, W.M.J.; Morgan, G.W.; Breit, S.N.; Bryant, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for gallium uptake in chronic, non-infective, diffuse lung disease are not completely understood. This study attempted to clarify some of them. A lung/liver gallium index was calculated in 113 subjects, some normal and some with various interstitial lung diseases, predominantly those associated with connective tissue disease. The mean gallium index was significantly higher in the groups with active interstitial lung disease (5.7) and non-infective bronchiolitis (4.1) compared with non-smoking normals (3.0; P<0.05). To investigate the mechanisms responsible for gallium uptake, the gallium index was correlated with bronchoalveolar lavage findings, respiratory function tests and clinical features. Significant correlations (P<0.05) were found with age in non-smoking normals; lavage macrophages in smoking normals; age but no other parameter in bronchiolitis; lavage lymphocytes, lavage albumin and improvement in diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide in those with active interstitial lung disease. It is concluded that in normal smokers gallium uptake may be due to a macrophage-mediated process. Gallium uptake in active interstitial lung disease associated with connective tissue disease appears to be an immunological process in which transport and retention of gallium is associated with that of albumin. (orig.)

  14. Tumor interstitial fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Olsen, Charlotta J.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) is a proximal fluid that, in addition to the set of blood soluble phase-borne proteins, holds a subset of aberrantly externalized components, mainly proteins, released by tumor cells and tumor microenvironment through various mechanisms, which include classical secr...

  15. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis (IGD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tebeica, Tiberiu; Voicu, Cristiana; Patterson, James W.; Mangarov, Hristo; Lotti, T.; Wollina, Uwe; Lotti, Jacopo; França, Katlein; Batashki, Atanas; Tchernev, Georgi

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 42 years old male patient suffering from skin changes, which appeared in the last 7-8 years. Two biopsies were performed during the evolution of the lesion. Both showed similar findings that consisted in a busy dermis with interstitial, superficial and deep infiltrates of

  16. Macrophages in skin injury and repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahdavian Delavary, B.; van der Veer, W.M.; van Egmond, M.; Niessen, F.B.; Beelen, R.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    After recruitment to the wound bed, monocytes differentiate into macrophages. Macrophages play a central role in all stages of wound healing and orchestrate the wound healing process. Their functional phenotype is dependent on the wound microenvironment, which changes during healing, hereby altering

  17. Interstitial lung diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with interstitial lung diseases in children. It gives an update and the results of the authors’ observations of different forms of interstitial lung diseases. Particular emphasis is placed on hypersensitive pneumonitis as the most common nosological entity among childhood interstitial lung diseases. The authors followed up 186 children with hypersensitive pneumonitis. They present the most important clinical, functional, radiological, and immunological diagnostic signs of this disease and consider its prognosis. In addition, there is evidence for other rare forms of interstitial lung diseases (idiopathic interstitial pneumonia, idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis, etc. in children. 

  18. Interventional MR: interstitial therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Mack, M.G.; Straub, R.; Engelmann, K.; Eichler, K. [Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Mueller, P.K. [Department of Radiology, Virchow, Humboldt Univ. of Berlin (Germany)

    1999-10-01

    The rationale and results for interstitial therapies via interventional MRI in the treatment of tumors in various regions are presented. Different interstitial treatment techniques are presented based on varying technologies both for tumor ablation and treatment monitoring. Data are presented based on 335 patients, 29-84 years of age (mean age 59 years, 196 men and 139 women) with a total of 932 liver tumors, 16 head and neck tumors and 14 abdominal recurrent pelvic and lymphatic tumors. All lesions had been treated with MR-guided laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) via 2516 laser applications and 1856 cannulations. Data in the literature are extremely varying depending on author experience, treatment technique, and the included patient material. In our patient material we were able to achieve a local tumor control of 96.7 % depending on the size of the tumorous lesion, the topographical relationship, and the applied laser parameters. The overall cumulative survival rate of patients with liver metastases was 45.74 months (median 40.97 months, 95 % confidence interval 31.42-50.52). The cumulative survival rate of the patient group with hepatic metastases of colorectal carcinoma was 42.71 months (median 39.33 months, 95 % confidence interval 33.26-45.37). In patients with head and neck tumors a relevant reduction in clinically relevant symptoms such as pain, swallowing disorders, or nervous compression was achieved in 11 of 15 patients treated with LITT. In 14 soft tissue tumors, such as pelvic tumor recurrence and lymph node metastases, a local tumor control was obtained in 68 % of lesions. Interstitial therapies under interventional MRI guidance, such as LITT, results in a high local tumor control with an improved survival rate. (orig.) With 7 figs., 28 refs.

  19. The phenotype of murine wound macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Jean M; Brancato, Samielle K; Thomay, Alan A; Reichner, Jonathan S; Albina, Jorge E

    2010-01-01

    The phenotype of wound macrophages has not been studied by direct examination of these cells, yet macrophages recruited to sites of injury are described as alternatively activated macrophages, requiring IL-4 or IL-13 for phenotypic expression. This study characterized wound macrophage phenotype in the PVA sponge wound model in mice. Eighty-five percent of wound macrophages isolated 1 day after injury expressed Gr-1, but only 20% of those isolated at 7 days expressed this antigen. Macrophages from 1-, 3-, and 7-day wounds expressed markers of alternative activation,including mannose receptor, dectin-1, arginase 1,and Ym1, but did not contain iNOS. Day 1 wound macrophages produced more TNF-alpha, more IL-6, and less TGF-beta than Day 7 wound macrophages. Wound macrophages did not produce IL-10. The cytokines considered necessary for alternative activation of macrophages,IL-4 and IL-13, were not detected in the wound environment and were not produced by wound cells.Wound macrophages did not contain PStat6. Wound fluids inhibited IL-13-dependent phosphorylation of Stat6 and contained IL-13Ralpha2, a soluble decoy receptor for IL-13. The phenotype of wound macrophages was not altered in mice lacking IL-4Ralpha, which is required for Stat6-dependent signaling of IL-4 and IL-13.Wound macrophages exhibit a complex phenotype,which includes traits associated with alternative and classical activation and changes as the wound matures.The wound macrophage phenotype does not require IL-4 or IL-13.

  20. Interstitial Granulomatous Dermatitis (IGD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiberiu Tebeica

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 42 years old male patient suffering from skin changes , which appeared in the last 7-8 years.  Two biopsies were performed during the evolution of the lesion. Both showed similar findings that consisted in a busy dermis with interstitial, superficial and deep infiltrates of lymphocytes and histiocytes dispersed among collagen bundles, with variable numbers of neutrophils scattered throughout. Some histiocytes were clustered in poorly formed granuloma that included rare giant cells, with discrete Palisades and piecemeal collagen degeneration, but without mucin deposition or frank necrobiosis of collagen. The clinical and histologic findings were supportive for interstitial granulomatous dermatitis. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis (IGD is a poorly understood entity that was regarded by many as belonging to the same spectrum of disease or even synonym with palisaded and neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis (PNGD. Although IGD and PNGD were usually related to connective tissue disease, mostly rheumatoid arthritis, some patients with typical histologic findings of IGD never develop autoimmune disorders, but they have different underlying conditions, such as metabolic diseases, lymphoproliferative disorders or other malignant tumours. These observations indicate that IGD and PNGD are different disorders with similar manifestations.

  1. Lipid-induced epigenomic changes in human macrophages identify a coronary artery disease-associated variant that regulates PPAP2B Expression through Altered C/EBP-beta binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Reschen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified over 40 loci that affect risk of coronary artery disease (CAD and the causal mechanisms at the majority of loci are unknown. Recent studies have suggested that many causal GWAS variants influence disease through altered transcriptional regulation in disease-relevant cell types. We explored changes in transcriptional regulation during a key pathophysiological event in CAD, the environmental lipid-induced transformation of macrophages to lipid-laden foam cells. We used a combination of open chromatin mapping with formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE-seq and enhancer and transcription factor mapping using chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP-seq in primary human macrophages before and after exposure to atherogenic oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL, with resultant foam cell formation. OxLDL-induced foam cell formation was associated with changes in a subset of open chromatin and active enhancer sites that strongly correlated with expression changes of nearby genes. OxLDL-regulated enhancers were enriched for several transcription factors including C/EBP-beta, which has no previously documented role in foam cell formation. OxLDL exposure up-regulated C/EBP-beta expression and increased genomic binding events, most prominently around genes involved in inflammatory response pathways. Variants at CAD-associated loci were significantly and specifically enriched in the subset of chromatin sites altered by oxLDL exposure, including rs72664324 in an oxLDL-induced enhancer at the PPAP2B locus. OxLDL increased C/EBP beta binding to this site and C/EBP beta binding and enhancer activity were stronger with the protective A allele of rs72664324. In addition, expression of the PPAP2B protein product LPP3 was present in foam cells in human atherosclerotic plaques and oxLDL exposure up-regulated LPP3 in macrophages resulting in increased degradation of pro-inflammatory mediators

  2. Quantification and localization of M2 macrophages in human kidneys with acute tubular injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer MB

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Matthew B Palmer,1 Alfred A Vichot,2 Lloyd G Cantley,2 Gilbert W Moeckel1 1Department of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: This study addresses for the first time the question whether there is significant macrophage population in human kidney sections from patients with acute tubular injury (ATI. We examined therefore the interstitial macrophage population in human kidney tissue with biopsy-proven diagnosis of ATI, minimal change disease (MCD, and MCD with ATI. Kidney biopsies from patients with the above diagnoses were stained with antibodies directed against CD68 (general macrophage marker, CD163 (M2 marker, and HLA-DR (M1 marker and their respective electron microscopy samples were evaluated for the presence of interstitial macrophages. Our study shows that patients with ATI have significantly increased numbers of interstitial CD68+ macrophages, with an increase in both HLA-DR+ M1 macrophages and CD163+ M2 macrophages as compared to patients with MCD alone. Approximately 75% of macrophages were M2 (CD163+ whereas only 25% were M1 (HLA-DR+. M2 macrophages, which are believed to be critical for wound healing, were found to localize close to the tubular basement membrane of injured proximal tubule cells. Ultra structural examination showed close adherence of macrophages to the basement membrane of injured tubular epithelial cells. We conclude that macrophages accumulate around injured tubules following ATI and exhibit predominantly an M2 phenotype. We further speculate that macrophage-mediated repair may involve physical contact between the M2 macrophage and the injured tubular epithelial cell. Keywords: macrophages, acute kidney injury, CD163, HLA-DR, CD68, electron microscopy

  3. Interstitial line: sonographic finding in interstitial (cornual) ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, T E; Levi, C S; Dashefsky, S M; Holt, S C; Lindsay, D J

    1993-10-01

    To evaluate the relationship of the endometrial canal and decidua vera to the interstitial gestational sac and to determine if this relationship can be used to increase the predictive value of ultrasound (US) in the diagnosis of interstitial ectopic pregnancy. The US findings in 12 patients with interstitial ectopic pregnancy were reviewed. Radiologists also reviewed the cases of 40 patients with various diagnoses to assess the accuracy of the interstitial line sign. US showed a definite gestational sac in four of the 12 patients (33%); the rest had a heterogeneous mass in the cornual region. Thinning of the myometrial mantle was seen in these four patients. The gestational sac appeared eccentric in three of these but in only three of 12 (25%) overall. The endometrial canal or interstitial portion of the tube was identified in 11 of 12 patients (92%). The interstitial line had better sensitivity (80%) and specificity (98%) than eccentric gestational sac location (sensitivity, 40%; specificity, 88%) and myometrial thinning (sensitivity, 40%; specificity, 93%) for the diagnosis of interstitial ectopic pregnancy. The interstitial line sign is a useful diagnostic sign of interstitial ectopic pregnancy.

  4. Interstitial pregnancy: role of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filhastre, M.; Lesnik, A.; Dechaud, H.; Taourel, P.

    2005-01-01

    We report the MRI features of two cases of interstitial pregnancy. In both cases, MRI was able to localize the ectopic pregnancy by showing a gestational structure surrounded by a thick wall in the upper part of the uterine wall separated from the endometrium by an uninterrupted junctional zone. Because US may confuse angular and interstitial pregnancies and because interstitial pregnancy has a particular evolutive course, MR imaging may play a key role in the diagnosis and management of women with interstitial pregnancy. (orig.)

  5. Macrophages Contribute to the Spermatogonial Niche in the Adult Testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony DeFalco

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The testis produces sperm throughout the male reproductive lifespan by balancing self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs. Part of the SSC niche is thought to lie outside the seminiferous tubules of the testis; however, specific interstitial components of the niche that regulate spermatogonial divisions and differentiation remain undefined. We identified distinct populations of testicular macrophages, one of which lies on the surface of seminiferous tubules, in close apposition to areas of tubules enriched for undifferentiated spermatogonia. These macrophages express spermatogonial proliferation- and differentiation-inducing factors, such as colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 and enzymes involved in retinoic acid (RA biosynthesis. We show that transient depletion of macrophages leads to a disruption in spermatogonial differentiation. These findings reveal an unexpected role for macrophages in the spermatogonial niche in the testis and raise the possibility that macrophages play previously unappreciated roles in stem/progenitor cell regulation in other tissues.

  6. Macrophage and nerve interaction in endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinjie; Xie, Hongyu; Yao, Shuzhong; Liang, Yanchun

    2017-03-14

    Dysregulation of the immune system in endometriotic milieus has been considered to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. Macrophage recruitment and nerve fiber infiltration are the two major characteristics of this aberrant immune environment. First, the recruitment of macrophages and their polarization phenotype within the endometriotic lesion have been demonstrated to facilitate the development and maintenance of endometriosis. M1 phenotype of macrophages has the capacity to secrete multiple cytokines for inflammatory response, while M2 macrophage possesses an opposite property that can mediate the process of immunosuppression and neuroangiogenesis. Upon secretion of multiple abnormal signal molecules by the endometriotic lesion, macrophages could alter their location and phenotype. These changes facilitate the accommodation of the aberrant microenvironment and the exacerbation of disease progression. Second, the infiltration of nerve fibers and their abnormal distribution are proved to be involved in the generation of endometriosis-associated pain and inflammatory response. An imbalance in sensory and sympathetic innervation and the abnormal secretion of different cytokines could mediate neurogenesis and subsequent peripheral neuroinflammation in endometriosis. Although endometriosis creates an inflammatory milieu promoting macrophage infiltration and an imbalanced innervation, interaction between macrophages and nerve fibers in this process remains unknown. The aim of this review is to highlight the role of macrophage and nerve interaction in endometriosis, where macrophage recruitment and neurogenesis can be the underlying mechanism of neuroinflammation and pathogenesis of endometriosis.

  7. Surfactant gene polymorphisms and interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelidis Panagiotis

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, which is present in the alveolar lining fluid and is essential for normal lung function. Alterations in surfactant composition have been reported in several interstitial lung diseases (ILDs. Furthermore, a mutation in the surfactant protein C gene that results in complete absence of the protein has been shown to be associated with familial ILD. The role of surfactant in lung disease is therefore drawing increasing attention following the elucidation of the genetic basis underlying its surface expression and the proof of surfactant abnormalities in ILD.

  8. Interstitial cystitis intravesical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tanya; Xu, Jie Hua

    2017-07-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a progressive bladder disorder that presents with symptoms of bladder urgency, frequency and pain. The aetiology of the disease remains uncertain, but it is postulated that there is an initial infective insult which damages the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) layer of the bladder urothelium. This defect allows an influx of ions, particularly potassium, which initiates an inflammatory reaction in the bladder wall, which incites the symptoms described above. Treatment initially involves behavioural and oral medication, with second line being intravesical instillation therapy. Treatment strategies focus on restoring lower urinary tract epithelial function, inhibiting neural activation, controlling allergies and relieving symptoms. In this review, current intravesical therapy will be discussed, as well as what lies on the horizon for intravesical therapy in IC.

  9. Purinergic signaling to terminate TLR responses in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajal eHamidzadeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages undergo profound physiological alterations when they encounter pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. These alterations can result in the elaboration of cytokines and mediators that promote immune responses and contribute to the clearance of pathogens. These innate immune responses by myeloid cells are transient. The termination of these secretory responses is not due to the dilution of stimuli, but rather to the active down-regulation of innate responses induced by the very PAMPs that initiated them. Here we describe a purinergic autoregulatory program whereby TLR-stimulated macrophages control their activation state. In this program, TLR stimulated macrophages undergo metabolic alterations that result in the production of ATP and its release through membrane pannexin channels. This purine nucleotide is rapidly hydrolyzed to adenosine by ectoenzymes on the macrophage surface, CD39 and CD73. Adenosine then signals through the P1 class of seven transmembrane receptors to induce a regulatory state that is characterized by the down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. This purinergic autoregulatory system mitigates the collateral damage that would be caused by the prolonged activation of macrophages, and rather allows the macrophage to maintain homeostasis. The transient activation of macrophages can be prolonged by treating macrophages with IFN-γ. IFN-γ treated macrophages become less sensitive to the regulatory effects of adenosine, allowing them to sustain macrophage activation for the duration of an adaptive immune response.

  10. Interstitial cystitis: painful bladder syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    R F Sholan; G Sh Garaev; G M Nasrullaeva

    2018-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis, or painful bladder syndrome, is a chronic inflammatory disease of a bladder of unknown etiology. It negatively affects the quality of life, causes depressive disorders, anxiety, and sexual dysfunction. Despite numerous studies, the etiology of interstitial cystitis is still unclear and it’s considered as painful bladder syndrome with multifactorial origin. According to the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 470/100 000 people (60/100 000 men, 850/100 0...

  11. Crohn's disease: ultrastructure of interstitial cells in colonic myenteric plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johs.; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    -MP and other interstitial cells in the myenteric region of the colon are lacking for CD. In the present study, we characterized the ultrastructure of interstitial cells, nerves, and glial cells in the myenteric region in Crohn's colitis (CC). In comparison with controls, varicosities of the myenteric bundles...... were dilated and appeared to be empty. Lipid droplets and lipofuscin-bodies were prominent in glial cells and neurons. ICC-MP were scanty but, as in controls, had caveolae, prominent intermediate filaments, cytoplasmic dense bodies, and membrane-associated dense bands with a patchy basal lamina. ICC......The role of the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in chronic inflammatory bowel disease, i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), remains unclear. Ultrastructural alterations in ICC in the colonic myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) have been reported previously in UC, but descriptions of ICC...

  12. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce "activated macrophages" that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as "classical" and "alternative" or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases that provide

  13. [Central lung embolism in chronic interstitial pneumopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordasini, C; Hess, B; Zimmermann, A

    1998-04-15

    An 80 year old patient with known interstitial pneumopathy of unknown etiology was hospitalized because of acute onset and rapid deterioration of dyspnea at rest within days. A foregoing neurologic investigation including CT and EEG because of prior syncopes and cramp attacks had not revealed pathologic findings. Thorax X-ray at admission showed homogenous loss of transparency on the left side, calcified basal plaques on both sides and prominent central pulmonary vessels with jumping caliber. A punctate of the leftsided pleural effusion revealed lymphocytic exsudate, normal pH, low glucose and an elevated LDH. The patient died shortly after a collapse at a bowel visit and pulmonary embolism was suspected in accordance to results from arterial blood gas analysis, ECG and chest X-ray. Neurologic symptoms could be explained by recurrent pulmonary embolism. Pleural plaques together with the punctate suggested a malignant etiology. A mesothelioma was taken into consideration, although there were no anamnestic reports on an exposition to asbestos. Autopsy revealed almost complete central embolism of the left pulmonary artery with acute cor pulmonale thus confirming the clinical suspicion. The embolus showed components of different ages of origin. Besides bronchitic and emphysematous alteration histology of the pulmonary tissue revealed interstitial and septal fibrosis with focal tissue consolidation. In one giant cell a typical asbestos body was found (in 1 out of 10 sections). In spite of missing information on an exposition to asbestos an abnormally high exposition must be taken into consideration because of the finding of an asbestos particle in relation to the amount of tissue studied. Apart from interstitial fibrosis asbestos may also cause consolidation of pulmonary tissue. Histology of plaquelike lesions revealed mesothelioma of fibrous type. This finding supports the suspicion that a major part of the pulmonary lesions was due to exposition to asbestos.

  14. Interstitial cystitis: painful bladder syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R F Sholan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis, or painful bladder syndrome, is a chronic inflammatory disease of a bladder of unknown etiology. It negatively affects the quality of life, causes depressive disorders, anxiety, and sexual dysfunction. Despite numerous studies, the etiology of interstitial cystitis is still unclear and it’s considered as painful bladder syndrome with multifactorial origin. According to the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 470/100 000 people (60/100 000 men, 850/100 000 women are diagnosed with interstitial cystitis. Diagnosis of the disease is difficult and is substantially based on clinical symptoms. Pelvic pain, urinary urgency, frequency and nocturia are the basic complaints in this pathology. The diagnosis requires exclusion of diseases with similar manifestations. So interstitial cystitis is frequently misdiagnosed as urinary tract infection, overactive bladder, urethral obstruction or diverticulosis, chronic prostatitis, bladder cancer, vulvodynia, endometriosis, and chronic pelvic pain. Etiopathogenesis of the disease is uncertain, which makes etiologic treatment impossible. Currently scientific discussions on the causes of disease continue as well as different treatment regimens are offered, but are often ineffective, palliative and temporary. The treatment for intersticial cystitis should focus on restoring normal bladder function, prevention of relapse of symptoms and improvement of patients’ quality of life. The literature review presents current view on the terminology, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis.

  15. Aging and cancer: The role of macrophages and neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackaman, Connie; Tomay, Federica; Duong, Lelinh; Abdol Razak, Norbaini Bintu; Pixley, Fiona J; Metharom, Pat; Nelson, Delia J

    2017-07-01

    Impaired immune function has been implicated in the declining health and higher incidence of cancer in the elderly. However, age-related changes to immunity are not completely understood. Neutrophils and macrophages represent the first line of defence yet their ability to phagocytose pathogens decrease with aging. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes are critical in eliminating tumors, but T cell function is also compromised with aging. T cell responses can be regulated by macrophages and may depend on the functional phenotype macrophages adopt in response to microenvironmental signals. This can range from pro-inflammatory, anti-tumorigenic M1 to anti-inflammatory, pro-tumorigenic M2 macrophages. Macrophages in healthy elderly adipose and hepatic tissue exhibit a more pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype compared to young hosts whilst immunosuppressive M2 macrophages increase in elderly lymphoid tissues, lung and muscle. These M2-like macrophages demonstrate altered responses to stimuli. Recent studies suggest that neutrophils also regulate T cell function and, like macrophages, neutrophil function is modulated with aging. It is possible that age-modified tissue-specific macrophages and neutrophils contribute to chronic low-grade inflammation that is associated with dysregulated macrophage-mediated immunosuppression, which together are responsible for development of multiple pathologies, including cancer. This review discusses recent advances in macrophage and neutrophil biology in healthy aging and cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce “activated macrophages” that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as “classical” and “alternative” or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases

  17. Rac2 is required for alternative macrophage activation and bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis; a macrophage autonomous phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Joshi

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a chronic lung disease characterized by cellular phenotype alterations and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. The alternative activation of macrophages in the lungs has been associated as a major factor promoting pulmonary fibrosis, however the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. In the present study, we have defined a molecular mechanism by which signals transmitted from the extracellular matrix via the α4β1 integrin lead to the activation of Rac2 which regulates alternative macrophage differentiation, a signaling axis within the pulmonary macrophage compartment required for bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis. Mice deficient in Rac2 were protected against bleomycin-induced fibrosis and displayed diminished collagen deposition in association with lower expression of alternatively activated profibrotic macrophage markers. We have demonstrated a macrophage autonomous process by which the injection of M2 and not M1 macrophages restored the bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis susceptibility in Rac2-/- mice, establishing a critical role for a macrophage Rac2 signaling axis in the regulation of macrophage differentiation and lung fibrosis in vivo. We also demonstrate that markers of alternative macrophage activation are increased in patients with IPF. Taken together, these studies define an important role for an integrin-driven Rac2 signaling axis in macrophages, and reveal that Rac2 activation is required for polarization of macrophages towards a profibrotic phenotype and progression of pulmonary fibrosis in vivo.

  18. Rac2 is required for alternative macrophage activation and bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis; a macrophage autonomous phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulcic, Muamera; Jiang, Min; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moises; Hagood, James S.

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic lung disease characterized by cellular phenotype alterations and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. The alternative activation of macrophages in the lungs has been associated as a major factor promoting pulmonary fibrosis, however the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. In the present study, we have defined a molecular mechanism by which signals transmitted from the extracellular matrix via the α4β1 integrin lead to the activation of Rac2 which regulates alternative macrophage differentiation, a signaling axis within the pulmonary macrophage compartment required for bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis. Mice deficient in Rac2 were protected against bleomycin-induced fibrosis and displayed diminished collagen deposition in association with lower expression of alternatively activated profibrotic macrophage markers. We have demonstrated a macrophage autonomous process by which the injection of M2 and not M1 macrophages restored the bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis susceptibility in Rac2-/- mice, establishing a critical role for a macrophage Rac2 signaling axis in the regulation of macrophage differentiation and lung fibrosis in vivo. We also demonstrate that markers of alternative macrophage activation are increased in patients with IPF. Taken together, these studies define an important role for an integrin-driven Rac2 signaling axis in macrophages, and reveal that Rac2 activation is required for polarization of macrophages towards a profibrotic phenotype and progression of pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. PMID:28817691

  19. Gynecological disorders in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervigni, Mauro; Natale, Franca

    2014-04-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis, a chronic inflammatory condition of the bladder, is the source of pain in over 30% of female patients with chronic pelvic pain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the most frequent associations between bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis and gynecological disorders. A literature review of the previous 10 years was carried out to evaluate the incidence of gynecological diseases in patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Hypertonic pelvic floor dysfunction with associated voiding dysfunction can be present in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis patients. It has been estimated that the prevalence ranges from 50% to 87%. Endometriosis affects 1-7% of the general population and up to 70% of women with endometriosis have some type of pain symptoms, a recent systematic review estimated the prevalence of bladder pain syndrome to be 61%, of endometriosis to be 70%, and coexisting bladder pain syndrome and endometriosis to be 48%. Vulvodynia is represented by pain, or an unpleasant altered sensation, in the vulva. Women with vestibulodynia are likely to have other additional pain conditions, such as fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome or chronic fatigue syndrome. Recent data reported that vestibulodynia affects 25% of women with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a complex pathology often associated with vulvodynia, endometriosis and pelvic floor dysfunctions. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to obtain an accurate evaluation ruling out confusable disease, such as pudendal neuropathy. The optimal approach is a combined treatment oriented not only to treat the bladder, but also the other components responsible for the pain disorder. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  20. Ulcerative colitis: ultrastructure of interstitial cells in myenteric plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johs.; Vanderwinden, J-M; Horn, T

    2010-01-01

    degenerative changes, such as lipid droplets and irregular vacuoles. Nerve terminals often appeared swollen and empty. Glial cells, muscle cells, and fibroblast-like cells (FLC) showed no alterations. FLC enclosed macrophages (MLC), which were in close contact with naked axon terminals. The organization...

  1. Ultrasound in Rheumatologic Interstitial Lung Disease: A Case Report of Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Laria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the American Thoracic Society (ATS/European Respiratory Society consensus classification, idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs include several clinic-radiologic-pathologic entities: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP, nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. Ultrasound Lung Comets (ULCs are an echographic chest-sonography hallmark of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. We describe the ultrasound (US findings in the follow-up of a NSIP’s case in rheumatoid arthritis (RA.

  2. Epidemiologic issues in interstitial cystitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parsons, J. Kellogg; Kurth, Karlheinz; Sant, Grannum R.

    2007-01-01

    As a result of variations in disease definition and diagnostic criteria for interstitial cystitis (IC), the performance of epidemiologic studies has been challenging. Initial prevalence studies used physician-confirmed diagnoses of IC; more recent studies, which have incorporated the use of patient

  3. Thermotransport in interstitial solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogel'son, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of literature data the problem of thermotransport of impurities (H, N, O, C) in interstitial solid solutions is considered. It is shown that from experimental data on the thermotransport an important parameter of dissolved atoms can be found which characterizes atom state in these solutions-enthalpy of transport

  4. Epimorphin expression in interstitial pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suga Moritaka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epimorphin modulates epithelial morphogenesis in embryonic mouse organs. We previously suggested that epimorphin contributes to repair of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice via epithelium-mesenchyme interactions. To clarify the role of epimorphin in human lungs, we evaluated epimorphin expression and localization in normal lungs, lungs with nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP, and lungs with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP; we also studied the effect of recombinant epimorphin on cultured human alveolar epithelial cells in vitro. Northern and Western blotting analyses revealed that epimorphin expression in NSIP samples were significantly higher than those in control lungs and lungs with UIP. Immunohistochemistry showed strong epimorphin expression in mesenchymal cells of early fibrotic lesions and localization of epimorphin protein on mesenchymal cells and extracellular matrix of early fibrotic lesions in the nonspecific interstitial pneumonia group. Double-labeled fluorescent images revealed expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 in re-epithelialized cells overlying epimorphin-positive early fibrotic lesions. Immunohistochemistry and metalloproteinase activity assay demonstrated augmented expression of metalloproteinase induced by recombinant epimorphin in human alveolar epithelial cells. These findings suggest that epimorphin contributes to repair of pulmonary fibrosis in nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, perhaps partly by inducing expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2, which is an important proteolytic factor in lung remodeling.

  5. Potential urine and serum biomarkers for patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2014-04-01

    There is a lack of consensus on the pathophysiology of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. The chronic pain symptoms of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis refractory to local treatment could be a result of central nervous system sensitization and persisting abnormalities in the bladder wall, which activate the afferent sensory system. Evidence also shows that bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a heterogeneous syndrome and that the two subtypes, the ulcerative (classic) and non-ulcerative types, represent different disease entities. There is a need for non-invasive markers for the differential diagnoses of the subtypes of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis, and between bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis and bladder sensory disorders, such as hypersensitive bladder syndrome or overactive bladder. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis, but not overactive bladder, involves an aberrant differentiation program in the bladder urothelium that leads to altered synthesis of several proteoglycans, cell adhesion and tight junction proteins, and bacterial defense molecules. These findings have led to the rationale for identifying urinary biomarkers to detect bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis in patients with frequency urgency syndrome. Recently, the markers that have been the focus of the most research are antiproliferative factor, epidermal growth factor, heparin-binding epidermal growth factor, glycosaminoglycans and bladder nitric oxide. In addition, inflammatory proteins in the urine and serum play important roles in the pathogenesis of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. The urinary proteome is an easily accessible source of biomarkers for differentiation between inflammatory bladder disorders. Analysis of multiple urinary proteins and serum cytokines could provide a diagnostic basis for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis, and could be a tool for the differential diagnosis of bladder pain

  6. Intrinsic Gastrointestinal Macrophages: Their Phenotype and Role in Gastrointestinal MotilitySummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Cipriani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing awareness of the role of macrophages in the regulation and maintenance of gastrointestinal function in health and disease. This work has proceeded in the context of an increased understanding of the complex phenotypic variation in macrophages throughout the body and has shown previously unidentified roles for macrophages in diseases such as gastroparesis, postoperative ileus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Opportunities for exploiting the phenotypic modulation of tissue resident macrophages have been identified as possible therapies for some of these diseases. In addition, macrophages are an established component of the innate immune system and can respond to variations and changes in the intestinal microbiome and potentially mediate part of the impact of the microbiota on intestinal health. We reviewed the latest work on novel concepts in defining macrophage phenotype, discuss possible mechanisms of action for tissue-resident macrophages in the gut, address the significance of microbiome effects on macrophage phenotype, and review the known and possible roles of macrophages in motility disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Keywords: Monocyte–Macrophage Precursor Cells, Gastrointestinal Motility, Enteric Nervous System, Interstitial Cells of Cajal

  7. Macrophages and bone inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoli Gu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bone metabolism is tightly regulated by the immune system. Accelerated bone destruction is observed in many bone diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, fracture, and particle-induced osteolysis. These pathological conditions are associated with inflammatory responses, suggesting the contribution of inflammation to bone destruction. Macrophages are heterogeneous immune cells and are polarized into the proinflammatory M1 and antiinflammatory M2 phenotypes in different microenvironments. The cytokines produced by macrophages depend on the macrophage activation and polarization. Macrophages and macrophage-derived cytokines are important to bone loss in inflammatory bone disease. Recent studies have shown that macrophages can be detected in bone tissue and interact with bone cells. The interplay between macrophages and bone cells is critical to bone formation and repair. In this article, we focus on the role of macrophages in inflammatory bone diseases, as well as discuss the latest studies about macrophages and bone formation, which will provide new insights into the therapeutic strategy for bone disease.

  8. Ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 positive macrophages and HO-1 up-regulation in intestinal muscularis resident macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B; Huizinga, Jan D; Larsen, Jytte O

    2017-01-01

    Small intestinal muscularis externa macrophages have been associated with interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). They have been proposed to play various roles in motility disorders and to take part in a microbiota-driven regulation of gastrointestinal motility. Our objective was to understand...... the reaction of resident macrophages of the musculature to a pro-inflammatory stimulator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Mice were injected with LPS or saline and sacrificed after 6 hours. Whole mounts were stained with antibodies toward CD169, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (iba1) (microglial/macrophage...... marker) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Cell densities were measured using unbiased stereology. RESULTS: iba1(pos) cells showed an overall higher density than CD169(pos) and HO-1(pos) cells. Most HO-1(pos) and iba1(pos) cells were positive for CD 169 in serosa and at Auerbach's plexus (AP). At the deep...

  9. Functionalized synchrotron in-line phase-contrast computed tomography: a novel approach for simultaneous quantification of structural alterations and localization of barium-labelled alveolar macrophages within mouse lung samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dullin, Christian; dal Monego, Simeone; Larsson, Emanuel; Mohammadi, Sara; Krenkel, Martin; Garrovo, Chiara; Biffi, Stefania; Lorenzon, Andrea; Markus, Andrea; Napp, Joanna; Salditt, Tim; Accardo, Agostino; Alves, Frauke; Tromba, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized computed tomography (CT) in combination with labelled cells is virtually non-existent due to the limited sensitivity of X-ray-absorption-based imaging, but would be highly desirable to realise cell tracking studies in entire organisms. In this study we applied in-line free propagation X-ray phase-contrast CT (XPCT) in an allergic asthma mouse model to assess structural changes as well as the biodistribution of barium-labelled macrophages in lung tissue. Alveolar macrophages that were barium-sulfate-loaded and fluorescent-labelled were instilled intratracheally into asthmatic and control mice. Mice were sacrificed after 24 h, lungs were kept in situ, inflated with air and scanned utilizing XPCT at the SYRMEP beamline (Elettra Synchrotron Light Source, Italy). Single-distance phase retrieval was used to generate data sets with ten times greater contrast-to-noise ratio than absorption-based CT (in our setup), thus allowing to depict and quantify structural hallmarks of asthmatic lungs such as reduced air volume, obstruction of airways and increased soft-tissue content. Furthermore, we found a higher concentration as well as a specific accumulation of the barium-labelled macrophages in asthmatic lung tissue. It is believe that XPCT will be beneficial in preclinical asthma research for both the assessment of therapeutic response as well as the analysis of the role of the recruitment of macrophages to inflammatory sites.

  10. Coal Mine Dust Desquamative Chronic Interstitial Pneumonia: A Precursor of Dust-Related Diffuse Fibrosis and of Emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav M Jelic

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diseases associated with coal mine dust continue to affect coal miners. Elucidation of initial pathological changes as a precursor of coal dust-related diffuse fibrosis and emphysema, may have a role in treatment and prevention. Objective: To identify the precursor of dust-related diffuse fibrosis and emphysema. Methods: Birefringent silica/silicate particles were counted by standard microscope under polarized light in the alveolar macrophages and fibrous tissue in 25 consecutive autopsy cases of complicated coal worker's pneumoconiosis and in 21 patients with tobacco-related respiratory bronchiolitis. Results: Coal miners had 331 birefringent particles/high power field while smokers had 4 (p<0.001. Every coal miner had intra-alveolar macrophages with silica/silicate particles and interstitial fibrosis ranging from minimal to extreme. All coal miners, including those who never smoked, had emphysema. Fibrotic septa of centrilobular emphysema contained numerous silica/silicate particles while only a few were present in adjacent normal lung tissue. In coal miners who smoked, tobacco-associated interstitial fibrosis was replaced by fibrosis caused by silica/silicate particles. Conclusion: The presence of silica/silicate particles and anthracotic pigment-laden macrophages inside the alveoli with various degrees of interstitial fibrosis indicated a new disease: coal mine dust desquamative chronic interstitial pneumonia, a precursor of both dust-related diffuse fibrosis and emphysema. In studied coal miners, fibrosis caused by smoking is insignificant in comparison with fibrosis caused by silica/silicate particles. Counting birefringent particles in the macrophages from bronchioalveolar lavage may help detect coal mine dust desquamative chronic interstitial pneumonia, and may initiate early therapy and preventive measures.

  11. Coal Mine Dust Desquamative Chronic Interstitial Pneumonia: A Precursor of Dust-Related Diffuse Fibrosis and of Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelic, Tomislav M; Estalilla, Oscar C; Sawyer-Kaplan, Phyllis R; Plata, Milton J; Powers, Jeremy T; Emmett, Mary; Kuenstner, John T

    2017-07-01

    Diseases associated with coal mine dust continue to affect coal miners. Elucidation of initial pathological changes as a precursor of coal dust-related diffuse fibrosis and emphysema, may have a role in treatment and prevention. To identify the precursor of dust-related diffuse fibrosis and emphysema. Birefringent silica/silicate particles were counted by standard microscope under polarized light in the alveolar macrophages and fibrous tissue in 25 consecutive autopsy cases of complicated coal worker's pneumoconiosis and in 21 patients with tobacco-related respiratory bronchiolitis. Coal miners had 331 birefringent particles/high power field while smokers had 4 (pcoal miner had intra-alveolar macrophages with silica/silicate particles and interstitial fibrosis ranging from minimal to extreme. All coal miners, including those who never smoked, had emphysema. Fibrotic septa of centrilobular emphysema contained numerous silica/silicate particles while only a few were present in adjacent normal lung tissue. In coal miners who smoked, tobacco-associated interstitial fibrosis was replaced by fibrosis caused by silica/silicate particles. The presence of silica/silicate particles and anthracotic pigment-laden macrophages inside the alveoli with various degrees of interstitial fibrosis indicated a new disease: coal mine dust desquamative chronic interstitial pneumonia, a precursor of both dust-related diffuse fibrosis and emphysema. In studied coal miners, fibrosis caused by smoking is insignificant in comparison with fibrosis caused by silica/silicate particles. Counting birefringent particles in the macrophages from bronchioalveolar lavage may help detect coal mine dust desquamative chronic interstitial pneumonia, and may initiate early therapy and preventive measures.

  12. Interstitial microwave hyperthermia treatment investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siauve, N; Lormel, C

    2012-01-01

    Microwave ablation also called interstitial hyperthermia is a medical procedure used in the treatment of many cancers, cardiac arrhythmias and other medical conditions. With this medical therapy, an electromagnetic source (antenna) is directly positioned in the target tissue and a sufficient power is injected to necrosis the tissue. The aim of this study is to propose a design procedure and develop the associated tools, for determining the optimal shape, dimensions, type and operating frequency of antenna according to the target volume. In this context, a 3D numerical predictive model of temperature elevation induced by the electric fields and two benches for thermal and electrical tissues properties characterization have been developed. To validate the procedure and the different tools, an experimental bench test which includes interstitial antenna, external microwave generator, phantom that represents the target tissue and measurement system of temperature and electric field has been elaborated.

  13. Eplerenone-Mediated Aldosterone Blockade Prevents Renal Fibrosis by Reducing Renal Inflammation, Interstitial Cell Proliferation and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Chen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Prolonged elevation of serum aldosterone leads to renal fibrosis. Inflammation also plays a role in the pathogenesis of renal disease. We used a rat model of interstitial renal fibrosis to test the hypothesis that eplerenone-mediated aldosterone blockade prevents renal fibrosis due to its anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects. Methods: Eplerenone (a selective aldosterone blocker or vehicle (control, was given to male Wistar rats (50 mg/kg, twice daily for 7 days before unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO and for an additional 28 days after surgery. Body weight, blood pressure, renal histo-morphology, immune-staining for macrophages, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, α-smooth muscle actin, and serum and urine markers of renal function and oxidative stress were determined for both groups on 7, 14, and 28 days after surgery. Results: Epleronone had no effect on body weight or blood pressure. However, eplerenone inhibited the development of renal fibrosis, inflammation (macrophage and monocyte infiltration, interstitial cell proliferation, and activation of interstitial cells (α-SMA expression. Epleronone also reduced oxidative stress. Conclusion: The anti-fibrotic effect of eplerenone appears to be unrelated to its effect on blood pressure. Eplerenone inhibits renal inflammation, interstitial cell proliferation, phenotypic changes of interstitial cells, and reduces oxidative stress.

  14. Interstitial guidance of cancer invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, Pavlo G; Ilina, Olga; Friedl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cell invasion into healthy tissues develops preferentially along pre-existing tracks of least resistance, followed by secondary tissue remodelling and destruction. The tissue scaffolds supporting or preventing guidance of invasion vary in structure and molecular composition between organs. In the brain, the guidance is provided by myelinated axons, astrocyte processes, and blood vessels which are used as invasion routes by glioma cells. In the human breast, containing interstitial collagen-rich connective tissue, disseminating breast cancer cells preferentially invade along bundled collagen fibrils and the surface of adipocytes. In both invasion types, physical guidance prompted by interfaces and space is complemented by molecular guidance. Generic mechanisms shared by most, if not all, tissues include (i) guidance by integrins towards fibrillar interstitial collagen and/or laminins and type IV collagen in basement membranes decorating vessels and adipocytes, and, likely, CD44 engaging with hyaluronan; (ii) haptotactic guidance by chemokines and growth factors; and likely (iii) physical pushing mechanisms. Tissue-specific, resticted guidance cues include ECM proteins with restricted expression (tenascins, lecticans), cell-cell interfaces, and newly secreted matrix molecules decorating ECM fibres (laminin-332, thrombospondin-1, osteopontin, periostin). We here review physical and molecular guidance mechanisms in interstitial tissue and brain parenchyma and explore shared principles and organ-specific differences, and their implications for experimental model design and therapeutic targeting of tumour cell invasion. Copyright © 2011 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Acute Tubular Necrosis and Interstitial Nephritis during Pemetrexed Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Michels

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with unknown primary undifferentiated carcinoma who developed acute renal failure associated with interstitial fibrosis following pemetrexed therapy. Despite drug withdrawal, renal function remained altered and the patient experienced chronic renal insufficiency. Pemetrexed disodium (Alimta™ is a multitargeted antifolate agent approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA for patients diagnosed with mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer. This drug is almost exclusively cleared by renal excretion [1]. The most common side effects are hematologic dose-limiting toxicities and nonhematologic toxicities including fatigue, diarrhea, nausea, mucositis and rash. Although few cases of renal failure have been published, no study has reported on the renal pathological findings in this setting. We present a case of acute tubular necrosis associated with interstitial fibrosis after pemetrexed therapy.

  16. Impact of in vitro gallium arsenide exposure on macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, M.Travis; Hartmann, Constance B.; McCoy, Kathleen L.

    2003-01-01

    The semiconductor gallium arsenide (GaAs) is classified as an immunotoxicant and a carcinogen. We previously showed that GaAs in vivo induces several phenotypic changes in macrophages located at the exposure site, indicative of an activated state. These physiological alterations may be a primary or secondary consequence of chemical exposure. To discern primary influences, our current study examined the in vitro effects of the chemical on macrophage cell lines and murine peritoneal macrophages. GaAs augmented cathepsins L and B proteolytic activities in all three sources of macrophages. Expression of the two mature isoforms of invariant chain and its cleavage fragment was also significantly increased, indicating that the chemical directly affects macrophages. However, GaAs did not alter the overall cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules on macrophages nor influence their ability to stimulate antigen-specific helper T cell hybridomas to respond to intact antigens that require processing. These findings raise the possibility that the chemical's complete in vivo impact may involve cytokines. Further, GaAs in vitro enhanced steady-state cathepsin L protein, and cathepsins L and B mRNA expression in macrophages, indicating that GaAs may alter gene expression, which may contribute to the chemical's adverse biological effects

  17. Impact of in vitro gallium arsenide exposure on macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, M Travis; Hartmann, Constance B; McCoy, Kathleen L

    2003-01-01

    The semiconductor gallium arsenide (GaAs) is classified as an immunotoxicant and a carcinogen. We previously showed that GaAs in vivo induces several phenotypic changes in macrophages located at the exposure site, indicative of an activated state. These physiological alterations may be a primary or secondary consequence of chemical exposure. To discern primary influences, our current study examined the in vitro effects of the chemical on macrophage cell lines and murine peritoneal macrophages. GaAs augmented cathepsins L and B proteolytic activities in all three sources of macrophages. Expression of the two mature isoforms of invariant chain and its cleavage fragment was also significantly increased, indicating that the chemical directly affects macrophages. However, GaAs did not alter the overall cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules on macrophages nor influence their ability to stimulate antigen-specific helper T cell hybridomas to respond to intact antigens that require processing. These findings raise the possibility that the chemical's complete in vivo impact may involve cytokines. Further, GaAs in vitro enhanced steady-state cathepsin L protein, and cathepsins L and B mRNA expression in macrophages, indicating that GaAs may alter gene expression, which may contribute to the chemical's adverse biological effects. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Science (USA)

  18. A Systematic Approach to Identify Markers of Distinctly Activated Human Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayan eSudan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Polarization has been a useful concept for describing activated macrophage phenotypes and gene expression profiles. However, macrophage activation status within tumors and other settings are often inferred based on only a few markers. Complicating matters for relevance to human biology, many of the best studied macrophage activation markers have been best characterized in mice and sometimes are not similarly regulated in human macrophages. To identify novel markers of activated human macrophages, gene expression profiles for human macrophages of a single donor subjected to 33 distinct activating conditions were obtained and a set of putative activation markers were subsequently evaluated in macrophages from multiple donors using integrated fluidic circuit (IFC-based RT-PCR. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the microarray screen, highly-altered transcripts (>4-fold change in expression sorted the macrophage transcription profiles into two major and 13 minor clusters. Among the 1874 highly-altered transcripts, over 100 were uniquely altered in one major or two related minor clusters. IFC PCR-derived data confirmed the microarray results and to show the kinetics of expression of potential macrophage activation markers. Transcripts encoding chemokines, cytokines, and cell surface were prominent in our analyses. The activation markers identified by this study could be used to better characterize tumor-associated macrophages from biopsies as well as other macrophage populations collected from human clinical samples.

  19. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, K.

    2007-01-01

    The most important smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Although traditionally considered to be discrete entities, smoking-related ILDs often coexist, thus accounting for the sometimes complex patterns encountered on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative role of smoking in the development of pulmonary fibrosis

  20. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors in bronchoalveolar lavage cells of patients with interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branley, Howard M.; Bois, Roland M. du; Wells, Athol U.; Jones, Hazel A.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: PK11195 is a ligand with high affinity for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs), which are present in large numbers in macrophages. PBRs play a role in antioxidant pathways and apoptosis, key factors in control of lung health. Intrapulmonary PBRs, assessed in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET), are decreased in interstitial lung disease (ILD) despite increased macrophage numbers. We wished to ascertain whether the observed decrease in in vivo expression of PBRs in the PET scans could be accounted for by a reduction in PBRs per cell by saturation-binding assays of R-PK11195 in cells obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Methods: We performed receptor saturation-binding assays with [ 3 H]-R-PK11195 on a mixed population of cells recovered by BAL to quantify the number of R-PK11195 binding sites per macrophage in 10 subjects with ILD and 10 normal subjects. Results: Receptor affinity [dissociation constant (Kd)] was similar in ILD patients and controls. However, R-PK11195 binding sites per cell [(maximal binding sites available (B max )] were decreased in macrophages obtained by BAL from subjects with ILD compared to normal (P<.0005). Microautoradiography confirmed localization of R-PK11195 to macrophages in a mixed inflammatory cell population obtained by BAL. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that in vitro PBR expression per cell on macrophages obtained by BAL is reduced in patients with ILD indicating a potentially functionally different macrophage phenotype. As PBRs are involved in the orchestration of lung inflammatory responses, this finding offers further insight into the role of macrophages in the pathogenesis of ILDs and offers a potential avenue for pharmacological strategy

  1. Abnormalities in Expression of Structural, Barrier and Differentiation Related Proteins, and Chondroitin Sulfate in Feline and Human Interstitial Cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Paul J; VanGordon, Samuel B; Seavey, Jonathan; Sofinowski, Troy M; Ramadan, Mohammad; Abdullah, Shivon; Buffington, C A Tony; Hurst, Robert E

    2015-08-01

    We analyzed the urothelium of cats diagnosed with feline interstitial cystitis to determine whether abnormalities in protein expression patterns could be detected and whether the expression pattern was similar to that in patients with human interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. The proteins analyzed are involved in cell adhesion and barrier function, comprise the glycosaminoglycan layer or are differentiation markers. Formalin fixed biopsies from 8 cats with feline interstitial cystitis and from 7 healthy control cats were labeled by immunohistochemistry and scored with a modified version of a system previously used for human samples. Cluster analysis was performed to investigate relationships between markers and samples. Of the feline interstitial cystitis bladders 89% showed abnormal protein expression and chondroitin sulfate patterns while only 27% of normal tissues showed slight abnormalities. Abnormalities were found in most feline interstitial cystitis samples, including biglycan in 87.5%, chondroitin sulfate, decorin, E-cadherin and keratin-20 in 100%, uroplakin in 50% and ZO-1 in 87.5%. In feline interstitial cystitis bladders about 75% of chondroitin sulfate, biglycan and decorin samples demonstrated absent luminal staining or no staining. Cluster analysis revealed that feline interstitial cystitis and normal samples could be clearly separated into 2 groups, showing that the urothelium of cats with feline interstitial cystitis is altered from normal urothelium. Feline interstitial cystitis produces changes in luminal glycosaminoglycan and several proteins similar to that in patients, suggesting some commonality in mechanism. Results support the use of feline interstitial cystitis as a model of human interstitial cystitis. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The elusive antifibrotic macrophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhyatmika eAdhyatmika

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fibrotic diseases, especially of the liver, the cardiovascular system, the kidneys, and the lungs account for approximately 45% of deaths in Western societies. Fibrosis is a serious complication associated with aging and/or chronic inflammation or injury and cannot be treated effectively yet. It is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins by myofibroblasts and impaired degradation by macrophages. This ultimately destroys the normal structure of an organ, which leads to loss of function. Most efforts to develop drugs have focused on inhibiting ECM production by myofibroblasts and have not yielded many effective drugs yet. Another option is to stimulate the cells that are responsible for degradation and uptake of excess ECM, i.e. antifibrotic macrophages. However, macrophages are plastic cells that have many faces in fibrosis, including profibrotic behaviour stimulating ECM production. This can be dependent on their origin, as the different organs have tissue-resident macrophages with different origins and a various influx of incoming monocytes in steady-state conditions and during fibrosis. To be able to pharmacologically stimulate the right kind of behaviour in fibrosis, a thorough characterization of antifibrotic macrophages is necessary, as well as an understanding of the signals they need to degrade ECM. In this review we will summarize the current state of the art regarding the antifibrotic macrophage phenotype and the signals that stimulate its behaviour.

  3. Cranberry Proanthocyanidins - Protein complexes for macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo, Sergio M; Haas, Linda; Krueger, Christian G; Reed, Jess D

    2017-09-20

    In this work we characterize the interaction of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) proanthocyanidins (PAC) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) and determine the effects of these complexes on macrophage activation and antigen presentation. We isolated PAC from cranberry and complexed the isolated PAC with BSA and HEL. The properties of the PAC-protein complexes were studied by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), gel electrophoresis and zeta-potential. The effects of PAC-BSA complexes on macrophage activation were studied in RAW 264.7 macrophage like cells after treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Fluorescence microscopy was used to study the endocytosis of PAC-BSA complexes. The effects of the PAC complexes on macrophage antigen presentation were studied in an in vitro model of HEL antigen presentation by mouse peritoneal mononuclear cells to a T-cell hybridoma. The mass spectra of the PAC complexes with BSA and HEL differed from the spectra of the proteins alone by the presence of broad shoulders on the singly and doubly charged protein peaks. Complexation with PAC altered the electrophoretic mobility shift assay in native agarose gel and the electrophoretic mobility (ζ-potential) values. These results indicate that the PAC-protein complexes are stable and alter the protein structure without precipitating the protein. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the RAW 264.7 macrophages endocytosed BSA and PAC-BSA complexes in discrete vesicles that surrounded the nucleus. Macrophages treated with increasing amounts of PAC-BSA complexes had significantly reduced COX-2 and iNOS expression in response to treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in comparison to the controls. The PAC-HEL complexes modulated antigen uptake, processing and presentation in murine peritoneal macrophages. After 4 h of pre-incubation, only trace amounts of IL-2 were detected in the co-cultures treated with HEL

  4. Interstitial ectopic pregnancy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagbe, Olayemi Atinuke; Adeniyi, Tinuola Omolade; Abayomi, Olawale Ayobami; Onifade, Emmanuel Olugbenga

    2017-01-01

    Interstitial ectopic pregnancy is a rare type of tubal pregnancy that poses diagnostic challenge. It is associated with the highest risk of massive, uncontrollable bleeding and can result in uterine rupture in the second trimester. This is a rare case of unruptured interstitial ectopic diagnosed in the first trimester by ultrasonography and managed medically with systemic methrotrexate and serial ultrasound monitoring.`.

  5. Pitfalls in diagnosis of interstitial pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Louis Yik-Si; Fok, Wing Yee; Yuen, Pong Mo

    2003-09-01

    To determine the incidence and reasons for misdiagnosis in interstitial ectopic pregnancy. We conducted a retrospective study from 1990 to 2001. Women with interstitial pregnancy were identified and their case records retrieved and reviewed. Reasons for delay in diagnosis and associated morbidity were recorded. Thirty-six women were diagnosed as having interstitial pregnancy during the study period. Initial diagnosis was incorrect in 15 cases (41.7%). In 14 cases, the interstitial pregnancies were mistaken as intrauterine pregnancy. These misdiagnoses resulted in six inappropriate surgical procedures (evacuation of uterus) being performed and led to rupture of interstitial pregnancy in eight women. In two women, the interstitial pregnancy was mistaken as normal intrauterine pregnancy while the uterus itself was thought to be a cervical fibroid. In both cases, the interstitial pregnancies ruptured at 18-20 weeks of gestation. Despite advances in sonographic skills and equipment and the availability of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) monitoring, misdiagnosis of interstitial pregnancy still occurs frequently. Clinicians should be aware of the limitations of various investigations and maintain a high index of suspicion.

  6. Telomere length in interstitial lung diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snetselaar, Reinier; Van Moorsel, Coline H M; Kazemier, Karin M.; Van Der Vis, Joanne J.; Zanen, Pieter; Van Oosterhout, Matthijs F M; Grutters, Jan C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a heterogeneous group of rare diseases that primarily affect the pulmonary interstitium. Studies have implicated a role for telomere length (TL) maintenance in ILD, particularly in idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP). Here, we measure TL in a wide

  7. The interstitial pneumonitis induced by cytostatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrava, M.; Markova, I.; Mistina, L.

    1998-01-01

    The author presents a cause of 9-year old boy with ALL-F2B in the stage of the prevention treatment where in the its course the induced interstitial pneumonitis by cytostatics was developed. The bacterial, virus, mycological and parasitic causes of the interstitial pneumonitis on the basis of the bronchoscopy, BAL, CT, scintigraphy, laboratory and by cultivation were excluded. (authors)

  8. The behavior of interstitials in irradiated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedraza, D.F.

    1991-01-01

    A computer model is developed to simulate the behavior of self-interstitials with particular attention to clustering. Owing to the layer structure of graphite, atomistic simulations can be performed using a large parallelepipedic supercell containing a few layers. In particular, interstitial clustering is studied here using a supercell that contains two basal planes only. Frenkel pairs are randomly produced. Interstitials are placed at sites between the crystal planes while vacancies are distributed in the two crystal planes. The size of the computational cell is 20000 atoms and periodic boundary conditions are used in two dimensions. Vacancies are assumed immobile whereas interstitials are given a certain mobility. Two point defect sinks are considered, direct recombination of Frenkel pairs and interstitial clusters. The clusters are assumed to be mobile up to a certain size where they are presumed to become loop nuclei. Clusters can shrink by emission of singly bonded interstitials or by recombination of a peripheral interstitial with a neighboring vacancy. The conditions under which interstitial clustering occurs are reported. It is shown that when clustering occurs the cluster size population gradually shifts towards the largest size cluster. The implications of the present results for irradiation growth and irradiation-induced amorphization are discussed

  9. Consistent inhibition of cyclooxygenase drives macrophages towards the inflammatory phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Rang Na

    Full Text Available Macrophages play important roles in defense against infection, as well as in homeostasis maintenance. Thus alterations of macrophage function can have unexpected pathological results. Cyclooxygenase (COX inhibitors are widely used to relieve pain, but the effects of long-term usage on macrophage function remain to be elucidated. Using bone marrow-derived macrophage culture and long-term COX inhibitor treatments in BALB/c mice and zebrafish, we showed that chronic COX inhibition drives macrophages into an inflammatory state. Macrophages differentiated in the presence of SC-560 (COX-1 inhibitor, NS-398 (COX-2 inhibitor or indomethacin (COX-1/2 inhibitor for 7 days produced more TNFα or IL-12p70 with enhanced p65/IκB phosphoylation. YmI and IRF4 expression was reduced significantly, indicative of a more inflammatory phenotype. We further observed that indomethacin or NS-398 delivery accelerated zebrafish death rates during LPS induced sepsis. When COX inhibitors were released over 30 days from an osmotic pump implant in mice, macrophages from peritoneal cavities and adipose tissue produced more TNFα in both the basal state and under LPS stimulation. Consequently, indomethacin-exposed mice showed accelerated systemic inflammation after LPS injection. Our findings suggest that macrophages exhibit a more inflammatory phenotype when COX activities are chronically inhibited.

  10. Expression of Nestin, Vimentin, and NCAM by Renal Interstitial Cells after Ischemic Tubular Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vansthertem

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work explores the distribution of various markers expressed by interstitial cells in rat kidneys after ischemic injury (35 minutes during regeneration of S3 tubules of outer stripe of outer medulla (OSOM. Groups of experimental animals (n=4 were sacrificed every two hours during the first 24 hours post-ischemia as well as 2, 3, 7, 14 days post-ischemia. The occurrence of lineage markers was analyzed on kidney sections by immunohistochemistry and morphometry during the process of tubular regeneration. In postischemic kidneys, interstitial cell proliferation, assessed by 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA labeling, was prominent in outer medulla and reach a maximum between 24 and 72 hours after reperfusion. This population was characterized by the coexpression of vimentin and nestin. The density of -Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM positive interstitial cells increased transiently (18–72 hours in the vicinity of altered tubules. We have also localized a small population of α-Smooth Muscle Actin (SMA-positive cells confined to chronically altered areas and characterized by a small proliferative index. In conclusion, we observed in the postischemic kidney a marked proliferation of interstitial cells that underwent transient phenotypical modifications. These interstitial cells could be implicated in processes leading to renal fibrosis.

  11. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal associated with deep muscular plexus of human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Mikkelsen, H B; Thuneberg, L

    1992-01-01

    Evidence showing that interstitial cells of Cajal have important regulatory functions in the gut musculature is accumulating. In the current study, the ultrastructure of the deep muscular plexus and associated interstial cells of Cajal in human small intestine were studied to provide a reference...... for identification and further physiological or pathological studies. The deep muscular plexus was sandwiched between a thin inner layer of smooth muscle (one to five cells thick) and the bulk of the circular muscle. Interstitial cells of Cajal in this region very much resembled smooth muscle cells (with...... distinguished from fibroblasts or macrophages in the region. They ramified in the inner zone of the outer division of circular muscle, penetrated the inner-most circular layer, and were also found at the submucosal border. They were in close, synapselike contact with nerve terminals of the deep muscular plexus...

  12. Interstitial lung disease: Diagnostic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Saha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung disease (ILD is a final common pathway of a broad heterogeneous group of parenchymal lung disorders. It is characterized by progressive fibrosis of the lung leading to restriction and diminished oxygen transfer. Clinically, the presenting symptoms of ILD are non-specific (cough and progressive dyspnea on exertion and are often attributed to other diseases, thus delaying diagnosis and timely therapy. Clues from the medical history along with the clinical context and radiologic findings provide the initial basis for prioritizing diagnostic possibilities for a patient with ILD. An accurate prognosis and optimal treatment strategy for patients with ILDs can only be after an accurate diagnosis. This review will assist pulmonary physicians and medicine specialist in recognition of ILD. Extensive literature search has been made through PubMed and also Book References has been used for writing this review.

  13. Navigation system for interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strassmann, G.; Kolotas, C.; Heyd, R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the stud was to develop a computed tomography (CT) based electromagnetic navigation system for interstitial brachytherapy. This is especially designed for situations when needles have to be positioned adjacent to or within critical anatomical structures. In such instances interactive 3D visualisation of the needle positions is essential. The material consisted of a Polhemus electromagnetic 3D digitizer, a Pentium 200 MHz laptop and a voice recognition for continuous speech. In addition, we developed an external reference system constructed of Perspex which could be positioned above the tumour region and attached to the patient using a non-invasive fixation method. A specially designed needle holder and patient bed were also developed. Measurements were made on a series of phantoms in order to study the efficacy and accuracy of the navigation system. The mean navigation accuracy of positioning the 20.0 cm length metallic needles within the phantoms was in the range 2.0-4.1 mm with a maximum of 5.4 mm. This is an improvement on the accuracy of a CT-guided technique which was in the range 6.1-11.3 mm with a maximum of 19.4 mm. The mean reconstruction accuracy of the implant geometry was 3.2 mm within a non-ferromagnetic environment. We found that although the needles were metallic this did not have a significant influence. We also found for our experimental setups that the CT table and operation table non-ferromagnetic parts had no significant influence on the navigation accuracy. This navigation system will be a very useful clinical tool for interstitial brachytherapy applications, particularly when critical structures have to be avoided. It also should provide a significant improvement on our existing technique

  14. Chylothorax in dermatomyositis complicated with interstitial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoda, Kentaro; Kiboshi, Takao; Shoda, Takeshi

    2017-04-01

    Chylothorax is a disease in which chyle leaks and accumulates in the thoracic cavity. Interstitial pneumonia and pneumomediastinum are common thoracic manifestations of dermatomyositis, but chylothorax complicated with dermatomyositis is not reported. We report a case of dermatomyositis with interstitial pneumonia complicated by chylothorax. A 77-year-old woman was diagnosed as dermatomyositis with Gottron's papules, skin ulcers, anti-MDA5 antibody and rapid progressive interstitial pneumonia. Treatment with betamethasone, tacrolimus and intravenous high-dose cyclophosphamide was initiated, and her skin symptoms and interstitial pneumonia improved once. However, right-sided chylothorax began to accumulate and gradually increase, and at the same time, her interstitial pneumonia began to exacerbate, and skin ulcers began to reappear on her fingers and auricles. Although her chylothorax improved by fasting and parenteral nutrition, she died due to further exacerbations of dermatomyositis and interstitial pneumonia in spite of steroid pulse therapy, increase in the betamethasone dosage, additional intravenous high-dose cyclophosphamide and plasma pheresis. An autopsy showed no lesions such as malignant tumors in the thoracic cavity. This is the first report of chylothorax complicated by dermatomyositis with interstitial pneumonia.

  15. [Macrophages in asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Avalos, M A; Orea Solano, M

    1997-01-01

    Every time they exist more demonstrations of the paper than performs the line monocytes-macrophage in the patogenesis of the bronchial asthma. The mononuclear phagocytes cells, as the alveolar macrophages, also they can be activated during allergic methods. The monocytes macrophages are possible efficient inductors of the inflammation; this due to the fact that they can secrete inflammatory mediators, between those which are counted the pre-forming granules of peptides, metabolites of oxidation activation, activator of platelets activator and metabolites of the arachidonic acid. The identification of IL-1 in the liquidate of the bronchial ablution of sick asthmatic, as well as the identification of IL-1 in the I bronchioalveolar washing of places of allergens cutaneous prick, supports the activation concept mononuclear of phagocytic cells in allergic sufferings.

  16. LPS-Induced Macrophage Activation and Plasma Membrane Fluidity Changes are Inhibited Under Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Haba, Carlos; Morros, Antoni; Martínez, Paz; Palacio, José R

    2016-12-01

    Macrophage activation is essential for a correct and efficient response of innate immunity. During oxidative stress membrane receptors and/or membrane lipid dynamics can be altered, leading to dysfunctional cell responses. Our aim is to analyze membrane fluidity modifications and cell function under oxidative stress in LPS-activated macrophages. Membrane fluidity of individual living THP-1 macrophages was evaluated by the technique two-photon microscopy. LPS-activated macrophage function was determined by TNFα secretion. It was shown that LPS activation causes fluidification of macrophage plasma membrane and production of TNFα. However, oxidative stress induces rigidification of macrophage plasma membrane and inhibition of cell activation, which is evidenced by a decrease of TNFα secretion. Thus, under oxidative conditions macrophage proinflammatory response might develop in an inefficient manner.

  17. Gallium arsenide differentially affects processing of phagolysosomal targeted antigen by macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, T A; Hartmann, C B; McCoy, K L

    1998-03-01

    Gallium arsenide, a semiconductor utilized in the electronics industry, causes immunosuppression in animals. The chemical's effect on macrophages to process antigen for activating pigeon cytochrome-specific helper T cell hybridoma was investigated. Mice were administered 200 mg/kg gallium arsenide or vehicle intraperitoneally. Five-day exposure suppressed processing by splenic macrophages but augmented processing by thioglycollate-elicited and resident peritoneal macrophages. Cytochrome coupled to latex beads was targeted to phagolysosomes to examine processing in lysosomes. Cytochrome beads required phagocytosis for processing and were located in phagolysosomes. Gallium arsenide did not alter the phagocytic ability of macrophages. Peritoneal macrophages normally processed the targeted antigen, indicating that gallium arsenide influenced compartment(s) preceding lysosomes. However, the processing efficiency of exposed splenic macrophages depended on the size of particulate cytochrome, suggesting that processing varied in phagolysosomes of different sizes. Gallium arsenide impacted different intracellular compartments in these macrophages, perhaps contributing to systemic immunotoxicity and local inflammation caused by exposure.

  18. Macrophage-like cells in the muscularis externa of mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, H B; Thuneberg, L; Rumessen, J J

    1985-01-01

    In muscularis externa of mouse small intestine, cells with ultrastructural features of macrophages were invariably observed in three layers: in the subserosal layer, between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers, and in association with the deep circular plexus. These macrophage-like cells...... by processes of interstitial cells of Cajal. FITC-dextran used in combined fluorescence stereo microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and electron microscopy was employed as a tracer to study the endocytic qualities of the MLC. The mice were killed 5, 15, 30, and 60 min, 1 day, and 4 days after dextran...

  19. Interstitial ectopic pregnancy: conservative surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warda, Hussein; Mamik, Mamta M; Ashraf, Mohammad; Abuzeid, Mostafa I

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial pregnancy is a rare and life-threatening condition. Diagnosis and appropriate management are critical in preventing morbidity and death. Four cases of interstitial pregnancy are presented. Diagnostic laparoscopy followed by laparotomy and cornuostomy with removal of products of conception was performed in 1 case. Laparoscopic cornuostomy and removal of products of conception were performed in the subsequent 3 cases with some modifications of the technique. Subsequent successful reproductive outcomes are also presented. Progressively conservative surgical measures are being used to treat interstitial pregnancy successfully, with no negative impact on subsequent pregnancies.

  20. Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis: a rare interstitial lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, John C; Mayo, John R; Levy, Robert; Yee, John; Leslie, Kevin O

    2015-01-01

    Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) is a newly described form of interstitial lung disease that originates in the upper lung zones and typically progresses to involve the entire lung. The disease may be idiopathic but is often associated with other pre- or coexisting conditions. Pneumothorax is a common complication and can occur at presentation or at other times during the course of the disease. Pathologically, interstitial fibrosis takes the form of a dense consolidation with some preservation of alveolar septal outlines and demonstrates a distinctly abrupt interface with residual normal lung. Unrecognized cases of PPFE may be incorrectly diagnosed as sarcoidosis, atypical idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, or other unclassifiable interstitial pneumonias. PMID:26090119

  1. HRCT of diffuse interstitial pneumonia during treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masashi; Sano, Akira; Imanaka, Kazufumi

    1989-01-01

    HRCT was carried out in twenty patients with diffuse interstitial pneumonia: 13 cases of IIP, 3 of BOOP, 2 of drug-induced pneumonia, 1 of rheumatoid lung and acute interstitial pneumonia of unknown origin. With special attention to inflammatory activity, the patients underwent HRCT periodically during the treatment. Correlative investigation between HRCT image and grade of accumulation in 67 Ga scintigraphy was also performed. Response to steroid therapy was clearly reflected on HRCT image, that was shown as decreasing pulmonary density or thinning of honeycomb wall. HRCT is considered to be useful in assessing the activity of diffuse interstitial pneumonia. (author)

  2. The diffuse interstitial lung disease - with emphasis in the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustillo P, Jose G; Pacheco, Pedro M; Matiz, Carlos; Ojeda, Paulina; Carrillo B, Jorge A.

    2003-01-01

    The term diffuse interstitial lung disease, it refers to those diseases that commit the interstice basically, the space between the membrane basal epithelial and endothelial, although the damage can also commit the outlying air spaces and the vessels; the supplement is centered in the diffuse interstitial lung illness of unknown cause; well-known as idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, making emphasis in the more frequents, the pulmonary fibrosis idiopathic or cryptogenic fibrosant alveolitis

  3. An abundant tissue macrophage population in the adult murine heart with a distinct alternatively-activated macrophage profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R Pinto

    Full Text Available Cardiac tissue macrophages (cTMs are a previously uncharacterised cell type that we have identified and characterise here as an abundant GFP(+ population within the adult Cx(3cr1(GFP/+ knock-in mouse heart. They comprise the predominant myeloid cell population in the myocardium, and are found throughout myocardial interstitial spaces interacting directly with capillary endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. Flow cytometry-based immunophenotyping shows that cTMs exhibit canonical macrophage markers. Gene expression analysis shows that cTMs (CD45(+CD11b(+GFP(+ are distinct from mononuclear CD45(+CD11b(+GFP(+ cells sorted from the spleen and brain of adult Cx(3cr1(GFP/+ mice. Gene expression profiling reveals that cTMs closely resemble alternatively-activated anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, expressing a number of M2 markers, including Mrc1, CD163, and Lyve-1. While cTMs perform normal tissue macrophage homeostatic functions, they also exhibit a distinct phenotype, involving secretion of salutary factors (including IGF-1 and immune modulation. In summary, the characterisation of cTMs at the cellular and molecular level defines a potentially important role for these cells in cardiac homeostasis.

  4. Interstitial Metabolic Monitoring During Hemorrhagic Shock

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pamnani, Motilal

    2003-01-01

    .... We hypothesize that decompensation results from potassium-mediated vasodilation and/or loss of cardiac contractility, and thus a method of measuring interstitial potassium should be a crucial part...

  5. Interstitial Metabolic Monitoring During Hemorrhagic Shock

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pamnani, Motilal

    2004-01-01

    .... We hypothesize that decompensation results from potassium-mediated vasodilation and/or loss of cardiac contractility, and thus a method of measuring interstitial potassium should be a crucial part...

  6. Wormhole Travel for Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Yasutaka; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2016-04-21

    Leukocyte recruitment is generally achieved by rapid migration of inflammatory cells out of circulation, through modified blood vessels, and into affected tissues. Now, Wang and Kubes show that macrophages can be rapidly recruited from body cavities to the liver, via a non-vascular route, where they help to coordinate tissue repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. INTERSTITIAL ECTOPIC PREGNANCY-A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Fateme parooei1, Mahmood Anbari2, Morteza Salarzaei

    2017-01-01

    Introduction:. Interstitial ectopic pregnancy, in which rupture occurs much later than other forms of pregnancy, is a rare phenomenon that occurs in 2% of ectopic pregnancies; delayed rupture is due to the expandability of myometrium. Methods: In this review article, the databases Medline, Cochrane, Science Direct, and Google Scholar were thoroughly searched to identify the Interstitial ectopic pregnancy. In this review, the papers published until early January 2017 that were conducted ...

  8. Treatment Approaches for Interstitial Cystitis: Multimodality Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert J

    2002-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis is an increasingly common disease characterized by urgency, frequency, and pelvic pain. Its etiology is poorly understood but is likely to be multifactorial. A proposed pathophysiology describing a cascade of events, including epithelial dysfunction, mast cell activation, and neurogenic inflammation, is presented. Using this model, multimodality therapy regimens have been developed that treat all components of this cascade. Multimodality therapy appears more effective than single agents in the treatment of interstitial cystitis. PMID:16986029

  9. Interstitial Cystitis: Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Atuğ

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the bladder of unknown etiology characterized by urinary frequency, urgency, nocturia and suprapubic pain. The syndrome presents differently in many patients, with the unifying factor being chronic pelvic pain and disruption of daily life activities.Although there are abundance of theories, the etiology of the condition remains unclear. This review focuses on recently published literature on the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis.

  10. Interstitial Metabolic Monitoring During Hemorrhagic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Mass Spectometry (ICP- MS) ATACCC St. Pete Beach, FL 15 Apr 03 Microdialysis (µD) Measurement Of Interstitial Markers of Hemorrhagic Shock...Jackson Foundation Rockville, MD 20852-1428 REPORT DATE : November 2005 TYPE OF REPORT: Final PREPARED FOR... DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 01-11-2005 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 MAR 2004 - 14 OCT 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Interstitial Metabolic

  11. Interstitial lung diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Annick

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interstitial lung disease (ILD in infants and children comprises a large spectrum of rare respiratory disorders that are mostly chronic and associated with high morbidity and mortality. These disorders are characterized by inflammatory and fibrotic changes that affect alveolar walls. Typical features of ILD include dyspnea, diffuse infiltrates on chest radiographs, and abnormal pulmonary function tests with restrictive ventilatory defect and/or impaired gas exchange. Many pathological situations can impair gas exchange and, therefore, may contribute to progressive lung damage and ILD. Consequently, diagnosis approach needs to be structured with a clinical evaluation requiring a careful history paying attention to exposures and systemic diseases. Several classifications for ILD have been proposed but none is entirely satisfactory especially in children. The present article reviews current concepts of pathophysiological mechanisms, etiology and diagnostic approaches, as well as therapeutic strategies. The following diagnostic grouping is used to discuss the various causes of pediatric ILD: 1 exposure-related ILD; 2 systemic disease-associated ILD; 3 alveolar structure disorder-associated ILD; and 4 ILD specific to infancy. Therapeutic options include mainly anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and/or anti-fibrotic drugs. The outcome is highly variable with a mortality rate around 15%. An overall favorable response to corticosteroid therapy is observed in around 50% of cases, often associated with sequelae such as limited exercise tolerance or the need for long-term oxygen therapy.

  12. Macrophage origin limits functional plasticity in helminth-bacterial co-infection.

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    Dominik Rückerl

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Rapid reprogramming of the macrophage activation phenotype is considered important in the defense against consecutive infection with diverse infectious agents. However, in the setting of persistent, chronic infection the functional importance of macrophage-intrinsic adaptation to changing environments vs. recruitment of new macrophages remains unclear. Here we show that resident peritoneal macrophages expanded by infection with the nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri altered their activation phenotype in response to infection with Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium in vitro and in vivo. The nematode-expanded resident F4/80high macrophages efficiently upregulated bacterial induced effector molecules (e.g. MHC-II, NOS2 similarly to newly recruited monocyte-derived macrophages. Nonetheless, recruitment of blood monocyte-derived macrophages to Salmonella infection occurred with equal magnitude in co-infected animals and caused displacement of the nematode-expanded, tissue resident-derived macrophages from the peritoneal cavity. Global gene expression analysis revealed that although nematode-expanded resident F4/80high macrophages made an anti-bacterial response, this was muted as compared to newly recruited F4/80low macrophages. However, the F4/80high macrophages adopted unique functional characteristics that included enhanced neutrophil-stimulating chemokine production. Thus, our data provide important evidence that plastic adaptation of MΦ activation does occur in vivo, but that cellular plasticity is outweighed by functional capabilities specific to the tissue origin of the cell.

  13. The role of HFE genotype in macrophage phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Anne M; Neely, Elizabeth; Simpson, Ian A; Connor, James R

    2018-02-01

    Iron regulation is essential for cellular energy production. Loss of cellular iron homeostasis has critical implications for both normal function and disease progression. The H63D variant of the HFE gene is the most common gene variant in Caucasians. The resulting mutant protein alters cellular iron homeostasis and is associated with a number of neurological diseases and cancer. In the brain, microglial and infiltrating macrophages are critical to maintaining iron homeostasis and modulating inflammation associated with the pathogenic process in multiple diseases. This study addresses whether HFE genotype affects macrophage function and the implications of these findings for disease processes. Bone marrow macrophages were isolated from wildtype and H67D HFE knock-in mice. The H67D gene variant in mice is the human equivalent of the H63D variant. Upon differentiation, the macrophages were used to analyze iron regulatory proteins, cellular iron release, migration, phagocytosis, and cytokine expression. The results of this study demonstrate that the H67D HFE genotype significantly impacts a number of critical macrophage functions. Specifically, fundamental activities such as proliferation in response to iron exposure, L-ferritin expression in response to iron loading, secretion of BMP6 and cytokines, and migration and phagocytic activity were all found to be impacted by genotype. Furthermore, we demonstrated that exposure to apo-Tf (iron-poor transferrin) can increase the release of iron from macrophages. In normal conditions, 70% of circulating transferrin is unsaturated. Therefore, the ability of apo-Tf to induce iron release could be a major regulatory mechanism for iron release from macrophages. These studies demonstrate that the HFE genotype impacts fundamental components of macrophage phenotype that could alter their role in degenerative and reparative processes in neurodegenerative disorders.

  14. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

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    Laria A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Antonella Laria, Alfredomaria Lurati , Mariagrazia Marrazza , Daniela Mazzocchi, Katia Angela Re, Magda Scarpellini Rheumatology Unit, Fornaroli Hospital, Magenta, Italy Abstract: Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated and M2 (alternatively activated. M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. Keywords: macrophage, rheumatic diseases

  15. How does interstitial cystitis begin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, C Lowell

    2015-12-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC) does not start as an endstage disease, it has a beginning when symptoms are milder, intermittent and the disease is misdiagnosed. To determine how IC develops patients were interviewed on when their symptoms began, what they were and are now as well as the various diagnoses that they received before they were determined to have IC. One hundred female IC patients were screened. They filled out a questionnaire asking about the age their disease presented, their initial and current symptoms, what their original diagnoses were, effect of the menstrual cycle and sexual activity on their symptoms and about any relatives with bladder symptoms or a current diagnosis of IC. By age 30, 81% of patients had bladder symptoms, 21% before age 10. The first symptom was frequency in 81%, pain present in 59% and the symptoms were intermittent in 64%. Most common early misdiagnosis was UTI in 74% with 93% reporting negative urine cultures. Sex was painful and causes symptom flares in 82%, symptoms flared the week before the menses in 75%. Most common gynecologic diagnosis was yeast vaginitis, 42%. Urge incontinence was present in 33%. There were 51% that reported bladder symptoms in a first degree female relative. IC begins primarily with frequency and is intermittent in most patients with symptom flares associated with sexual activity. Pain and urgency incontinence tend to be a later symptoms. When IC flares the most common misdiagnosis is UTI. Symptoms begin before age 30 in most but an IC diagnosis is often not made until age 40. Genetics appear to play a significant role. It is important to consider these facts when evaluating women with "early IC" because correct diagnosis will result in proper therapy and reduced health care costs.

  16. Effect of local macrophage depletion on cellular immunity and tolerance evoked by corneal allografts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slegers, TPAM; van der Gaag, R; van Rooijen, N; van Rij, G; Streilein, JW

    Purpose. To determine whether local macrophage depletion, via administration of clodronate liposomes, alters delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses and induction of anterior chamber associated immune deviation (ACAID) after corneal allotransplantation. Methods. Clodronate liposome-treated and

  17. Deep RNA Sequencing Uncovers a Repertoire of Human Macrophage Long Intergenic Noncoding RNAs Modulated by Macrophage Activation and Associated With Cardiometabolic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanrui; Xue, Chenyi; Wang, Ying; Shi, Jianting; Zhang, Xuan; Li, Wenjun; Nunez, Sara; Foulkes, Andrea S; Lin, Jennie; Hinkle, Christine C; Yang, Wenli; Morrisey, Edward E; Rader, Daniel J; Li, Mingyao; Reilly, Muredach P

    2017-11-13

    Sustained and dysfunctional macrophage activation promotes inflammatory cardiometabolic disorders, but the role of long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) in human macrophage activation and cardiometabolic disorders is poorly defined. Through transcriptomics, bioinformatics, and selective functional studies, we sought to elucidate the lincRNA landscape of human macrophages. We used deep RNA sequencing to assemble the lincRNA transcriptome of human monocyte-derived macrophages at rest and following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide and IFN-γ (interferon γ) for M1 activation and IL-4 (interleukin 4) for M2 activation. Through de novo assembly, we identified 2766 macrophage lincRNAs, including 861 that were previously unannotated. The majority (≈85%) was nonsyntenic or was syntenic but not annotated as expressed in mouse. Many macrophage lincRNAs demonstrated tissue-enriched transcription patterns (21.5%) and enhancer-like chromatin signatures (60.9%). Macrophage activation, particularly to the M1 phenotype, markedly altered the lincRNA expression profiles, revealing 96 lincRNAs differentially expressed, suggesting potential roles in regulating macrophage inflammatory functions. A subset of lincRNAs overlapped genomewide association study loci for cardiometabolic disorders. MacORIS (macrophage-enriched obesity-associated lincRNA serving as a repressor of IFN-γ signaling), a macrophage-enriched lincRNA not expressed in mouse macrophages, harbors variants associated with central obesity. Knockdown of MacORIS , which is located in the cytoplasm, enhanced IFN-γ-induced JAK2 (Janus kinase 2) and STAT1 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 1) phosphorylation in THP-1 macrophages, suggesting a potential role as a repressor of IFN-γ signaling. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived macrophages recapitulated the lincRNA transcriptome of human monocyte-derived macrophages and provided a high-fidelity model with which to study lincRNAs in human macrophage

  18. Macrophages, PPARs, and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo A. Van Ginderachter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mononuclear phagocytes often function as control switches of the immune system, securing the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory reactions. For this purpose and depending on the activating stimuli, these cells can develop into different subsets: proinflammatory classically activated (M1 or anti-inflammatory alternatively activated (M2 macrophages. The expression of the nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs is regulated by M1- or M2-inducing stimuli, and these receptors are generally considered to counteract inflammatory M1 macrophages, while actively promoting M2 activation. This is of importance in a tumor context, where M1 are important initiators of inflammation-driven cancers. As a consequence, PPAR agonists are potentially usefull for inhibiting the early phases of tumorigenesis through their antagonistic effect on M1. In more established tumors, the macrophage phenotype is more diverse, making it more difficult to predict the outcome of PPAR agonism. Overall, in our view current knowledge provides a sound basis for the clinical evaluation of PPAR ligands as chemopreventive agents in chronic inflammation-associated cancer development, while cautioning against the unthoughtful application of these agents as cancer therapeutics.

  19. Endotoxin Disrupts Circadian Rhythms in Macrophages via Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusi Wang

    Full Text Available The circadian clock is a transcriptional network that functions to regulate the expression of genes important in the anticipation of changes in cellular and organ function. Recent studies have revealed that the recognition of pathogens and subsequent initiation of inflammatory responses are strongly regulated by a macrophage-intrinsic circadian clock. We hypothesized that the circadian pattern of gene expression might be influenced by inflammatory stimuli and that loss of circadian function in immune cells can promote pro-inflammatory behavior. To investigate circadian rhythms in inflammatory cells, peritoneal macrophages were isolated from mPer2luciferase transgenic mice and circadian oscillations were studied in response to stimuli. Using Cosinor analysis, we found that LPS significantly altered the circadian period in peritoneal macrophages from mPer2luciferase mice while qPCR data suggested that the pattern of expression of the core circadian gene (Bmal1 was disrupted. Inhibition of TLR4 offered protection from the LPS-induced impairment in rhythm, suggesting a role for toll-like receptor signaling. To explore the mechanisms involved, we inhibited LPS-stimulated NO and superoxide. Inhibition of NO synthesis with L-NAME had no effect on circadian rhythms. In contrast, inhibition of superoxide with Tempol or PEG-SOD ameliorated the LPS-induced changes in circadian periodicity. In gain of function experiments, we found that overexpression of NOX5, a source of ROS, could significantly disrupt circadian function in a circadian reporter cell line (U2OS whereas iNOS overexpression, a source of NO, was ineffective. To assess whether alteration of circadian rhythms influences macrophage function, peritoneal macrophages were isolated from Bmal1-KO and Per-TKO mice. Compared to WT macrophages, macrophages from circadian knockout mice exhibited altered balance between NO and ROS release, increased uptake of oxLDL and increased adhesion and migration

  20. Persistent activation of autophagy in kidney tubular cells promotes renal interstitial fibrosis during unilateral ureteral obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Man J.; Ding, Han-Fei; Huang, Shuang; Hill, Joseph A.; Yin, Xiao-Ming; Dong, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Renal fibrosis is the final, common pathway of end-stage renal disease. Whether and how autophagy contributes to renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here we first detected persistent autophagy in kidney proximal tubules in the renal fibrosis model of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in mice. UUO-associated fibrosis was suppressed by pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy and also by kidney proximal tubule-specific knockout of autophagy-related 7 (PT-Atg7 KO). Consistently, proliferation and activation of fibroblasts, as indicated by the expression of ACTA2/α-smooth muscle actin and VIM (vimentin), was inhibited in PT-Atg7 KO mice, so was the accumulation of extracellular matrix components including FN1 (fibronectin 1) and collagen fibrils. Tubular atrophy, apoptosis, nephron loss, and interstitial macrophage infiltration were all inhibited in these mice. Moreover, these mice showed a specific suppression of the expression of a profibrotic factor FGF2 (fibroblast growth factor 2). In vitro, TGFB1 (transforming growth factor β 1) induced autophagy, apoptosis, and FN1 accumulation in primary proximal tubular cells. Inhibition of autophagy suppressed FN1 accumulation and apoptosis, while enhancement of autophagy increased TGFB1-induced-cell death. These results suggest that persistent activation of autophagy in kidney proximal tubules promotes renal interstitial fibrosis during UUO. The profibrotic function of autophagy is related to the regulation on tubular cell death, interstitial inflammation, and the production of profibrotic factors. PMID:27123926

  1. Follistatin, an Activin Antagonist, Ameliorates Renal Interstitial Fibrosis in a Rat Model of Unilateral Ureteral Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akito Maeshima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Activin, a member of the TGF-β superfamily, regulates cell growth and differentiation in various cell types. Activin A acts as a negative regulator of renal development as well as tubular regeneration after renal injury. However, it remains unknown whether activin A is involved in renal fibrosis. To clarify this issue, we utilized a rat model of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO. The expression of activin A was significantly increased in the UUO kidneys compared to that in contralateral kidneys. Activin A was detected in glomerular mesangial cells and interstitial fibroblasts in normal kidneys. In UUO kidneys, activin A was abundantly expressed by interstitial α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts. Administration of recombinant follistatin, an activin antagonist, reduced the fibrotic area in the UUO kidneys. The number of proliferating cells in the interstitium, but not in the tubules, was significantly lower in the follistatin-treated kidneys. Expression of α-SMA, deposition of type I collagen and fibronectin, and CD68-positive macrophage infiltration were significantly suppressed in the follistatin-treated kidneys. These data suggest that activin A produced by interstitial fibroblasts acts as a potent profibrotic factor during renal fibrosis. Blockade of activin A action may be a novel approach for the prevention of renal fibrosis progression.

  2. [Modern Views on Children's Interstitial Lung Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boĭtsova, E V; Beliashova, M A; Ovsiannikov, D Iu

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILD, diffuse lung diseases) are a heterogeneous group of diseases in which a pathological process primarily involved alveoli and perialveolar interstitium, resulting in impaired gas exchange, restrictive changes of lung ventilation function and diffuse interstitial changes detectable by X-ray. Children's interstitial lung diseases is an topical problem ofpediatricpulmonoogy. The article presents current information about classification, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostics, treatment and prognosis of these rare diseases. The article describes the differences in the structure, pathogenesis, detection of various histological changes in children's ILD compared with adult patients with ILD. Authors cite an instance of registers pediatric patients with ILD. The clinical semiotics of ILD, the possible results of objective research, the frequency of symptoms, the features of medical history, the changes detected on chest X-rays, CT semiotics described in detail. Particular attention was paid to interstitial lung diseases, occurring mainly in newborns and children during the first two years of life, such as congenital deficiencies of surfactant proteins, neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy, pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis. The diagnostic program for children's ILD, therapy options are presented in this article.

  3. Interstitial fluid contains higher in vitro IGF bioactivity than serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espelund, Ulrick; Søndergaard, Klaus; Bjerring, Peter

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: Circulating insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are bound in complexes which affect their tissue-accessibility. Interstitial fluid is in close proximity to target cells, but the IGF-system is not well-described herein. OBJECTIVE: To perform a thorough comparison of the IGF-system in sucti...... relate to an increased enzymatic IGFBP-degradation and an altered IGFBP-composition in SBF, making more IGF-I and -II accessible to the IGF-IR. The impact of food intake on the IGF system differs between serum and interstitial fluid....... blister fluid (SBF) vs. in serum, with emphasis on bioactive IGF levels. DESIGN: Eight hour study including samples collected in the fasting state (20h) and after a meal. SETTING: Clinical research facility. PARTICIPANTS: Six healthy males (age 37.0±8.8years, BMI 22.5±1.4kg/m(2)) (mean±SD). MAIN OUTCOME...... was observed, including 3-fold elevated amounts of IGFBP-3 fragments in SBF (Pfood intake differed between serum and SBF (all P≤0.03). CONCLUSION: Despite lower concentrations, the in vitro IGF bioactivity was higher in SBF than in serum. This may...

  4. Bone tissue engineering: the role of interstitial fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillsley, M. V.; Frangos, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    It is well established that vascularization is required for effective bone healing. This implies that blood flow and interstitial fluid (ISF) flow are required for healing and maintenance of bone. The fact that changes in bone blood flow and ISF flow are associated with changes in bone remodeling and formation support this theory. ISF flow in bone results from transcortical pressure gradients produced by vascular and hydrostatic pressure, and mechanical loading. Conditions observed to alter flow rates include increases in venous pressure in hypertension, fluid shifts occurring in bedrest and microgravity, increases in vascularization during the injury-healing response, and mechanical compression and bending of bone during exercise. These conditions also induce changes in bone remodeling. Previously, we hypothesized that interstitial fluid flow in bone, and in particular fluid shear stress, serves to mediate signal transduction in mechanical loading- and injury-induced remodeling. In addition, we proposed that a lack or decrease of ISF flow results in the bone loss observed in disuse and microgravity. The purpose of this article is to review ISF flow in bone and its role in osteogenesis.

  5. Macrophage immunoregulatory pathways in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Murugesan V S; Ni, Bin; Dodd, Claire E; Schlesinger, Larry S

    2014-12-01

    Macrophages, the major host cells harboring Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), are a heterogeneous cell type depending on their tissue of origin and host they are derived from. Significant discord in macrophage responses to M.tb exists due to differences in M.tb strains and the various types of macrophages used to study tuberculosis (TB). This review will summarize current concepts regarding macrophage responses to M.tb infection, while pointing out relevant differences in experimental outcomes due to the use of divergent model systems. A brief description of the lung environment is included since there is increasing evidence that the alveolar macrophage (AM) has immunoregulatory properties that can delay optimal protective host immune responses. In this context, this review focuses on selected macrophage immunoregulatory pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), cytokines, negative regulators of inflammation, lipid mediators and microRNAs (miRNAs). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Macrophage Populations in Visceral Adipose Tissue from Pregnant Women: Potential Role of Obesity in Maternal Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyerahi Bravo-Flores

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with inflammatory changes and accumulation and phenotype polarization of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs. Obese pregnant women have alterations in adipose tissue composition, but a detailed description of macrophage population is not available. In this study, we characterized macrophage populations in visceral adipose tissue (VAT from pregnant women with normal, overweight, and obese pregestational weight. Immunophenotyping of macrophages from VAT biopsies was performed by flow cytometry using CD45 and CD14 as markers of hematopoietic and monocyte linage, respectively, while HLA-DR, CD11c, CD163, and CD206 were used as pro- and anti-inflammatory markers. Adipocyte number and size were evaluated by light microscopy. The results show that pregnant women that were overweight and obese during the pregestational period had adipocyte hypertrophy. Two different macrophage populations in VAT were identified: recruited macrophages (CD45+CD14+, and a novel population lacking CD45, which was considered to be a resident macrophages subset (CD45−CD14+. The number of resident HLA−DRlow/− macrophages showed a negative correlation with body mass index (BMI. Both resident and recruited macrophages from obese women expressed higher CD206 levels. CD11c expression was higher in resident HLA-DR+ macrophages from obese women. A strong correlation between CD206 and CD11c markers and BMI was observed. Our findings show that being overweight and obese in the pregestational period is associated with adipocyte hypertrophy and specific ATMs populations in VAT.

  7. Phenotypic diversity and emerging new tools to study macrophage activation in bacterial infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Louis eMege

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage polarization is a concept that has been useful to describe the different features of macrophage activation related to specific functions. Macrophage polarization is responsible for a dichotomic approach (killing versus repair of the host response to bacteria: M1-type conditions are protective, whereas M2-type conditions are associated with bacterial persistence. The use of the polarization concept to classify the features of macrophage activation in infected patients using transcriptional and/or molecular data and to provide biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis has most often been unsuccessful. The confrontation of polarization with different clinical situations in which monocytes/macrophages encounter bacteria obliged us to reappraise this concept. With the exception of M2-type infectious diseases such as leprosy and Whipple’s disease, most acute (sepsis or chronic (Q fever, tuberculosis infectious diseases do not exhibit polarized monocytes/macrophages. This is also the case for commensals that shape the immune response and for probiotics that alter the immune response independent of macrophage polarization. We propose that the type of myeloid cells (monocytes vs. macrophages and the kinetics of the immune response (early vs. late responses are critical variables for understanding macrophage activation in human infectious diseases. Explorating the role of these new markers will provide important tools to better understand complex macrophage physiology.

  8. Tramadol differentially regulates M1 and M2 macrophages from human umbilical cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Chen, Liang; Sun, Yunyun; Li, Yuanhai

    2017-03-17

    Tramadol is an analgesic drug and relieves pain through activating μ-opioid receptors and inhibiting serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake. Emerging evidence shows that it also stimulates immune cells, including NK cells, splenocytes, and lymphocytes, and elevates IL-2 production. However, it remains unknown whether and how tramadol directly affects macrophages. To answer these questions, we collected human umbilical cord blood, isolated macrophages, and examined their responses to tramadol. Although tramadol did not alter resting macrophages and the antigen-presenting function in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages, it regulated M1 and M2 macrophages, which are, respectively, transformed by IFN-γ and IL-4. Interestingly, tramadol inhibits production and secretion of cytokines in M1 macrophages, but facilitates the production of inflammation-responding molecules, synthesized in M2 macrophages. We also found that STAT6 cascade pathway in M2 macrophages was significantly enhanced by tramadol. Therefore, this study reveals that tramadol regulates inflammation by inhibiting M1 macrophages (killing process), but promoting the function of M2 macrophages (healing process).

  9. Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias: radiologic-pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Young Cheol; Suh, Gee Young; Han, Joung Ho; Lee, Kyung Soo

    2002-01-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias are at present classified as one of four types: usual, nonspecific, acute, or desquamative. The acute form has the worst prognosis, followed by the usual and the nonspecific form; it is in desquamative cases that prognosis is best. At high-resolution CT, usual interstitial pneumonia, the most frequent type, manifests as patchy subpleural areas of ground-glass attenuation, irregular linear opacity, and honeycombing, which the nonspecific type, the second most frequent, appears as subpleural patchy areas of ground-glass attenuation with associated areas of irregular linear opacity. Acute interstitial pneumonia demonstrates extensive bilateral airspace consolidation and patchy or diffuse bilateral areas of ground-glass attenuation in middle and lower lung zones

  10. Surface plasma functionalization influences macrophage behavior on carbon nanowalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ion, Raluca [University of Bucharest, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 91-95 Spl. Independentei, 050095 Bucharest (Romania); Vizireanu, Sorin [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor, PO Box MG-36, 077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Stancu, Claudia Elena [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor, PO Box MG-36, 077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP Greifswald), Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Luculescu, Catalin [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor, PO Box MG-36, 077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Cimpean, Anisoara, E-mail: anisoara.cimpean@bio.unibuc.ro [University of Bucharest, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 91-95 Spl. Independentei, 050095 Bucharest (Romania); Dinescu, Gheorghe [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor, PO Box MG-36, 077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania)

    2015-03-01

    The surfaces of carbon nanowall samples as scaffolds for tissue engineering applications were treated with oxygen or nitrogen plasma to improve their wettability and to functionalize their surfaces with different functional groups. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle results illustrated the effective conversion of the carbon nanowall surfaces from hydrophobic to hydrophilic and the incorporation of various amounts of carbon, oxygen and nitrogen functional groups during the treatments. The early inflammatory responses elicited by un-treated and modified carbon nanowall surfaces were investigated by quantifying tumor necrosis factor-alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha released by attached RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence studies were employed to investigate the changes in macrophage morphology and adhesive properties, while MTT assay was used to quantify cell proliferation. All samples sustained macrophage adhesion and growth. In addition, nitrogen plasma treatment was more beneficial for cell adhesion in comparison with un-modified carbon nanowall surfaces. Instead, oxygen plasma functionalization led to increased macrophage adhesion and spreading suggesting a more activated phenotype, confirmed by elevated cytokine release. Thus, our findings showed that the chemical surface alterations which occur as a result of plasma treatment, independent of surface wettability, affect macrophage response in vitro. - Highlights: • N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} plasma treatments alter the CNW surface chemistry and wettability. • Cells seeded on CNW scaffolds are viable and metabolically active. • Surface functional groups, independent of surface wettability, affect cell response. • O{sub 2} plasma treatment of CNW leads to a more activated macrophage phenotype.

  11. Macrophages in Homeostatic Immune Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eJantsch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are not only involved in inflammatory and anti-infective processes, but also play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this review, we summarize recent evidence investigating the role of macrophages in controlling angiogenesis, metabolism and salt and water balance. Particularly, we summarize the importance of macrophage tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP, also termed nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 [NFAT5] expression in the regulation of salt and water homeostasis. Further understanding of homeostatic macrophage function may lead to new therapeutic approaches to treat ischemia, hypertension and metabolic disorders.

  12. [Diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, D; Gregorin, J; Schmid, H-P

    2011-02-16

    Interstitial Cystitis, first described in 1887 as an inflammatory disease of the bladder wall, is now regarded as a very common disease with an estimated number of unreported cases. Reasons for underdiagnosis is the widespread use of strict exclusion criteria. The disease can already be suspected by a careful medical history and physical examination in an early stage and then be treated with promising multimodal therapeutic approaches. In addition to a symptomatic oral therapy, local instillations with constituents of the protective glycosaminoglycan-layer are the most common therapeutic approach, because its defective integrity plays a key role in the pathogenesis of interstitial cystitis.

  13. Radionuclide diagnosis of interstitial lung edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khodzhibekov, M.Kh.

    1991-01-01

    Perfusion scintigraphy of the lungs has shown that a reverse direction of postural reactions of the pulmonary blood flow is observed in patients with mitral valvular disease. It is accounted for by the action of gravitation on capillary hydrostatic pressure resulting in the localization of interstitial edema in pulmonary venous hypertension mainly in the lower lung, its microcirculatory bed being compressed and the blood flow redistributed to the opposite upper lung. Therefore successive perfusion scintigraphy of the lungs in the vertical position and in the lateral position with a RP administered twice, can serve as a sensitive test for diagnosis of interstitial lung edema

  14. Influence of interstitial Mn on magnetism in the room-temperature ferromagnet Mn1 +δSb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. E.; Berlijn, T.; Hahn, S. E.; May, A. F.; Williams, T. J.; Poudel, L.; Calder, S.; Fishman, R. S.; Stone, M. B.; Aczel, A. A.; Cao, H. B.; Lumsden, M. D.; Christianson, A. D.

    2015-06-01

    We report elastic and inelastic neutron-scattering measurements of the high-TC ferromagnet Mn1 +δSb . Measurements were performed on a large, TC=434 K, single crystal with an interstitial Mn content of δ ≈0.13 . The neutron-diffraction results reveal that the interstitial Mn has a magnetic moment, and that it is aligned antiparallel to the main Mn moment. We perform density functional theory calculations including the interstitial Mn and find the interstitial to be magnetic, in agreement with the diffraction data. The inelastic neutron-scattering measurements reveal two features in the magnetic dynamics: (i) a spin-wave-like dispersion emanating from ferromagnetic Bragg positions (H K 2 n ), and (ii) a broad, nondispersive signal centered at forbidden Bragg positions (H K 2 n +1 ). The inelastic spectrum cannot be modeled by simple linear spin-wave-theory calculations and appears to be significantly altered by the presence of the interstitial Mn ions. The results show that the influence of the interstitial Mn on the magnetic state in this system is more important than previously understood.

  15. Dysregulation of Macrophage Activation Profiles by Engineered Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodali, Vamsi; Littke, Matthew H.; Tilton, Susan C.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Shi, Liang; Frevert, Charles W.; Wang, Wei; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-08-27

    Although the potential human health impacts from exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are uncertain, past epidemiological studies have established correlations between exposure to ambient air pollution particulates and the incidence of pneumonia and lung infections. Using amorphous silica and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as model high production volume ENPs, we examined how macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the lung pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is altered by ENP pretreatment. Neither silica nor SPIO treatment elicited direct cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory effects in bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, pretreatment of macrophages with SPIO caused extensive reprogramming of nearly 500 genes regulated in response to LPS challenge, hallmarked by exaggerated activation of oxidative stress response pathways and suppressed activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Silica pretreatment altered regulation of only 67 genes, but there was strong correlation with gene sets affected by SPIO. Macrophages exposed to SPIO displayed a phenotype suggesting an impaired ability to transition from an M1 to M2-like activation state, characterized by suppressed IL-10 induction, enhanced TNFα production, and diminished phagocytic activity toward S. pneumoniae. Studies in macrophages deficient in scavenger receptor A (SR-A) showed SR-A participates in cell uptake of both the ENPs and S. pneumonia and co-regulates the anti-inflammatory IL-10 pathway. Thus, mechanisms for dysregulation of innate immunity exist by virtue that common receptor recognition pathways are used by some ENPs and pathogenic bacteria, although the extent of transcriptional reprogramming of macrophage function depends on the physicochemical properties of the ENP after internalization. Our results also illustrate that biological effects of ENPs may be indirectly manifested only after challenging normal cell function. Finally, nanotoxicology screening

  16. Mortality following unilateral twin interstitial ectopic pregnancy. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, G M; Rubin, S M; Sondheimer, S J

    1992-10-01

    Twin ectopic pregnancy is an uncommon event, usually occurring as simultaneous intrauterine and tubal gestations. Interstitial implantation of an ectopic pregnancy is also a rare event, associated with a high mortality rate. Twin interstitial pregnancy has been previously reported only three times in the English literature. We report a recent case of unilateral twin interstitial ectopic pregnancy that resulted in maternal death and review the literature with regard to both ectopic pregnancy and factors associated with mortality from interstitial implantation.

  17. Interstitial insulin concentrations determine glucose uptake rates but not insulin resistance in lean and obese men.

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo, C; Bogardus, C; Bergman, R; Thuillez, P; Lillioja, S

    1994-01-01

    Insulin action and obesity are both correlated with the density of muscle capillary supply in humans. Since the altered muscle anatomy in the obese might affect interstitial insulin concentrations and reduce insulin action, we have cannulated peripheral lymphatic vessels in lean and obese males, and compared peripheral lymph insulin concentrations with whole body glucose uptake during a euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic clamp. Lymph insulin concentrations in the lower limb averaged only 34% of art...

  18. Interstitial Ectopic Pregnancy Report of Four Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Kars

    2009-12-01

    Interstitial pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy which carries a higher risk of morbidity and mortality due to catastrophic hemorrhage. Early diagnosis is mandatory for management of this potentially fatal condition and a high index of suspicion is essential for early diagnosis.

  19. Rituximab-induced interstitial lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naqibullah, Matiuallah; Shaker, Saher B; Bach, Karen S

    2015-01-01

    , rheumatoid arthritis, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Recently, RTX has also been suggested for the treatment of certain connective tissue disease-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Rare but serious pulmonary adverse reactions are reported. To raise awareness about...

  20. Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Linda M; Bhambore, Neelam

    2011-05-15

    Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome affects more than 1 million persons in the United States, but the cause remains unknown. Most patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome are women with symptoms of suprapubic pelvic and/or genital area pain, dyspareunia, urinary urgency and frequency, and nocturia. It is important to exclude other conditions such as infections. Tests and tools commonly used to diagnose interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome include specific questionnaires developed to assess the condition, the potassium sensitivity test, the anesthetic bladder challenge, and cystoscopy with hydrodistension. Treatment options include oral medications, intravesical instillations, and dietary changes and supplements. Oral medications include pentosan polysulfate sodium, antihistamines, tricyclic antidepressants, and immune modulators. Intravesical medications include dimethyl sulfoxide, pentosan polysulfate sodium, and heparin. Pentosan polysulfate sodium is the only oral therapy and dimethyl sulfoxide is the only intravesical therapy with U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. To date, clinical trials of individual therapies have been limited in size, quality, and duration of follow-up. Studies of combination or multimodal therapies are lacking.

  1. Interstitial laser thermotherapy in neurosurgery: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menovsky, T.; Beek, J. F.; van Gemert, M. J.; Roux, F. X.; Bown, S. G.

    1996-01-01

    One of the most recent laser treatment modalities in neurosurgery is interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILTT). In this review, experimental and clinical studies concerning intracranial ILTT are discussed. Two methods for intra-operative control of the laser induced lesions are described; i.e.,

  2. Biology of Bony Fish Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan W. Hodgkinson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are found across all vertebrate species, reside in virtually all animal tissues, and play critical roles in host protection and homeostasis. Various mechanisms determine and regulate the highly plastic functional phenotypes of macrophages, including antimicrobial host defenses (pro-inflammatory, M1-type, and resolution and repair functions (anti-inflammatory/regulatory, M2-type. The study of inflammatory macrophages in immune defense of teleosts has garnered much attention, and antimicrobial mechanisms of these cells have been extensively studied in various fish models. Intriguingly, both similarities and differences have been documented for the regulation of lower vertebrate macrophage antimicrobial defenses, as compared to what has been described in mammals. Advances in our understanding of the teleost macrophage M2 phenotypes likewise suggest functional conservation through similar and distinct regulatory strategies, compared to their mammalian counterparts. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing teleost macrophage functional heterogeneity, including monopoetic development, classical macrophage inflammatory and antimicrobial responses as well as alternative macrophage polarization towards tissues repair and resolution of inflammation.

  3. Epigenetic regulation of macrophage function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a lipid-driven chronic inflammatory disorder with a key role for macrophages in all disease stages. Macrophages are involved as scavengers of lipids, regulate inflammation, attract other immune cells and contribute to the resolution of inflammation, fibrosis and plaque stability.

  4. Interstitial cells of Cajal in the vermiform appendix in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A; Wit, C; Vanderwinden, J-M; Wit, J; Barthlen, W

    2009-02-01

    The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) have not yet been investigated in the vermiform appendix. They are important for the peristalsis of the gastrointestinal tract and have been found to be altered in various motility disorders. Motor disturbance has been suggested as a possible contributor in the unclear etiology of appendicitis. We wanted to examine the distribution of the ICC in the vermiform appendix. Furthermore we investigated whether ICC are altered in persons with appendicitis. We investigated the ICC distribution in 28 appendices of children using immunohistochemistry and anti-c-kit antibodies. Cells and processes were quantified in normal, acute and chronic inflamed appendices. IC(C)-CM and IC(C)-LM were found in the circular and longitudinal muscle layers, respectively. IC(C)-LM, however, were scarce and inhomogeneous in contrast to the IC(C)-CM. The functionally important subgroups of the colon, the IC(C)-SM and IC(C)-MP, however, could not be detected in the appendix with the used antibody. There was no difference in the distribution of detected ICC between normal and inflamed appendices. IC(C)-LM are altered and IC(C)-SM and IC(C)-MP are lost in the vermiform appendix with no differences between healthy and inflamed tissue and without a correlation to appendicitis. Thus, other factors must be considered in the etiology of appendicitis.

  5. [Interstitial pregnancy: experience at Rouen's hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douysset, X; Verspyck, E; Diguet, A; Marpeau, L; Chanavaz-Lacheray, I; Rondeau, S; Resch, B; Sergent, F

    2014-04-01

    Presenting our experience concerning interstitial pregnancies (IP) surgical management and to evaluate our patients' subsequent long-term fertility. Twenty patients underwent surgical treatment of IP in our department over 15 years. In this retrospective study, we present symptoms that led to diagnosis, treatments, fertility and obstetrical outcome. Mean gestational age at diagnosis was 8SA, with a median BHCG rate of 7411 IU/L, and a patient mean age of 30 years. Ninety percent of patients had at least one risk factor for ectopic pregnancy. Pain or bleeding were the most common symptoms at admission, 4 patients were admitted in an hypovolemic shock status. Location of the interstitial ectopic pregnancy was discovered during surgery in 45 % of cases. Six patients had a large hemoperitoneum bigger than 1L, 5 patients had an IP of uterine stump after salpingectomy for a previous ectopic pregnancy. The most used surgical technique was in 60 % of cases the excision by Endo GIA stapling(®) with salpingectomy. Regarding fertility, 12 patients wished pregnancy in the aftermath of the intervention, 10 had at least one pregnancy, among them there is an ectopic contralateral ampullary pregnancy, and a contralateral recurrence of interstitial pregnancy. Four patients were delivered by cesarean section and 4 patients were delivered vaginally, some several times. No uterine rupture occured. Interstitial pregnancy is a rare ectopic pregnancy. Its diagnosis is difficult and may involve maternal life-threatening and fertility. In subsequent pregnancies, the clinician has to be careful concerning the risks of interstitial pregnancy recurrence and uterine rupture. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  6. Impact of Silver and Iron Nanoparticle Exposure on Cholesterol Uptake by Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan H. Shannahan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are central to the development of atherosclerosis by absorbing lipids, promoting inflammation, and increasing plaque deposition. Nanoparticles (NPs are becoming increasingly common in biomedical applications thereby increasing exposure to the immune and vascular systems. This project investigated the influence of NPs on macrophage function and specifically cholesterol uptake. Macrophages were exposed to 20 nm silver NPs (AgNPs, 110 nm AgNPs, or 20 nm Fe3O4 NPs for 2 h and NP uptake, cytotoxicity, and subsequent uptake of fluorescently labeled cholesterol were assessed. Macrophage uptake of NPs did not induce cytotoxicity at concentrations utilized (25 μg/mL; however, macrophage exposure to 20 nm AgNPs reduced subsequent uptake of cholesterol. Further, we assessed the impact of a cholesterol-rich environment on macrophage function following NP exposure. In these sets of experiments, macrophages internalized NPs, exhibited no cytotoxicity, and altered cholesterol uptake. Alterations in the expression of scavenger receptor-B1 following NP exposure, which likely influences cholesterol uptake, were observed. Overall, NPs alter cholesterol uptake, which may have implications in the progression of vascular or immune mediated diseases. Therefore, for the safe development of NPs for biomedical applications, it is necessary to understand their impact on cellular function and biological interactions in underlying disease environments.

  7. Leukocyte compartments in the mouse lung: distinguishing between marginated, interstitial, and alveolar cells in response to injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Kathryn E; Cagnina, R Elaine; Wallace, Kori L; Ramos, Susan I; Mehrad, Borna; Linden, Joel

    2012-01-31

    We developed a flow cytometry-based assay to simultaneously quantify multiple leukocyte populations in the marginated vascular, interstitial, and alveolar compartments of the mouse lung. An intravenous injection of a fluorescently labeled anti-CD45 antibody was used to label circulating and marginated vascular leukocytes. Following vascular flushing to remove non-adherent cells and collection of broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, lungs were digested and a second fluorescent anti-CD45 antibody was added ex vivo to identify cells not located in the vascular space. In the naïve mouse lung, we found about 11 million CD45+ leukocytes, of which 87% (9.5 million) were in the vascular marginated compartment, consisting of 17% NK cells, 17% neutrophils, 57% mononuclear myeloid cells (monocytes, macrophage precursors and dendritic cells), and 10% T cells (CD4+, CD8+, and invariant NKT cells). Non-vascular compartments including the interstitial compartment contained 7.7×10(5)cells, consisting of 49% NK cells, 25% dendritic cells, and 16% other mononuclear myeloid cells. The alveolar compartment was overwhelmingly populated by macrophages (5.63×10(5)cells, or 93%). We next studied leukocyte margination and extravasation into the lung following acid injury, a model of gastric aspiration. At 1 h after injury, neutrophils were markedly elevated in the blood while all other circulating leukocytes declined by an average of 79%. At 4 h after injury, there was a peak in the numbers of marginated neutrophils, NK cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and a peak in the number of alveolar NK cells. Most interstitial cells consisted of DCs, neutrophils, and CD4+ T cells, and most alveolar compartment cells consisted of macrophages, neutrophils, and NK cells. At 24 h after injury, there was a decline in the number of all marginated and interstitial leukocytes and a peak in alveolar neutrophils. In sum, we have developed a novel assay to study leukocyte margination and trafficking following

  8. Periodontitis-activated monocytes/macrophages cause aortic inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Shin-ichi; Naruse, Keiko; Kobayashi, Yasuko; Nakamura, Nobuhisa; Nishikawa, Toru; Adachi, Kei; Suzuki, Yuki; Kikuchi, Takeshi; Mitani, Akio; Mizutani, Makoto; Ohno, Norikazu; Noguchi, Toshihide; Matsubara, Tatsuaki

    2014-01-01

    A relationship between periodontal disease and atherosclerosis has been suggested by epidemiological studies. Ligature-induced experimental periodontitis is an adequate model for clinical periodontitis, which starts from plaque accumulation, followed by inflammation in the periodontal tissue. Here we have demonstrated using a ligature-induced periodontitis model that periodontitis activates monocytes/macrophages, which subsequently circulate in the blood and adhere to vascular endothelial cells without altering the serum TNF-α concentration. Adherent monocytes/macrophages induced NF-κB activation and VCAM-1 expression in the endothelium and increased the expression of the TNF-α signaling cascade in the aorta. Peripheral blood-derived mononuclear cells from rats with experimental periodontitis showed enhanced adhesion and increased NF-κB/VCAM-1 in cultured vascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that periodontitis triggers the initial pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, inflammation of the vasculature, through activating monocytes/macrophages. PMID:24893991

  9. DMPD: Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12472665 Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potential...:545-53. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase:... potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. PubmedID 12472665 Title Macrophage-stimu

  10. Estrogen Signaling Contributes to Sex Differences in Macrophage Polarization during Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keselman, Aleksander; Fang, Xi; White, Preston B; Heller, Nicola M

    2017-09-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic Th2 inflammation in the lungs that constricts the airways and presents as coughing and wheezing. Asthma mostly affects boys in childhood and women in adulthood, suggesting that shifts in sex hormones alter the course of the disease. Alveolar macrophages have emerged as major mediators of allergic lung inflammation in animal models as well as humans. Whether sex differences exist in macrophage polarization and the molecular mechanism(s) that drive differential responses are not well understood. We found that IL-4-stimulated bone marrow-derived and alveolar macrophages from female mice exhibited greater expression of M2 genes in vitro and after allergen challenge in vivo. Alveolar macrophages from female mice exhibited greater expression of the IL-4Rα and estrogen receptor (ER) α compared with macrophages from male mice following allergen challenge. An ERα-specific agonist enhanced IL-4-induced M2 gene expression in macrophages from both sexes, but more so in macrophages from female mice. Furthermore, IL-4-stimulated macrophages from female mice exhibited more transcriptionally active histone modifications at M2 gene promoters than did macrophages from male mice. We found that supplementation of estrogen into ovariectomized female mice enhanced M2 polarization in vivo upon challenge with allergen and that macrophage-specific deletion of ERα impaired this M2 polarization. The effects of estrogen are long-lasting; bone marrow-derived macrophages from ovariectomized mice implanted with estrogen exhibited enhanced IL-4-induced M2 gene expression compared with macrophages from placebo-implanted littermates. Taken together, our findings suggest that estrogen enhances IL-4-induced M2 gene expression and thereby contributes to sex differences observed in asthma. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist rosiglitazone attenuates postincisional pain by regulating macrophage polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa-Moriyama, Maiko, E-mail: hase-mai@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Ohnou, Tetsuya; Godai, Kohei; Kurimoto, Tae; Nakama, Mayo; Kanmura, Yuichi [Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan)

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone attenuated postincisional pain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone alters macrophage polarization to F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages at the incisional sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transplantation of rosiglitazone-treated macrophages produced analgesic effects. -- Abstract: Acute inflammation triggered by macrophage infiltration to injured tissue promotes wound repair and may induce pain hypersensitivity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR){gamma} signaling is known to regulate heterogeneity of macrophages, which are often referred to as classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. M1 macrophages have considerable antimicrobial activity and produce a wide variety of proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast, M2 macrophages are involved in anti-inflammatory and homeostatic functions linked to wound healing and tissue repair. Although it has been suggested that PPAR{gamma} agonists attenuate pain hypersensitivity, the molecular mechanism of macrophage-mediated effects of PPAR{gamma} signaling on pain development has not been explored. In this study, we investigated the link between the phenotype switching of macrophage polarization induced by PPAR{gamma} signaling and the development of acute pain hypersensitivity. Local administration of rosiglitazone significantly ameliorated hypersensitivity to heat and mechanical stimuli, and paw swelling. Consistent with the down-regulation of nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) phosphorylation by rosiglitazone at the incisional sites, the number of F4/80{sup +}iNOS{sup +} M1 macrophages was decreased whereas numbers of F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages were increased in rosiglitazone-treated incisional sites 24 h after the procedure. In addition, gene induction of anti-inflammatory M2-macrophage-associated markers such as arginase1, FIZZ1 and interleukin (IL)-10 were significantly increased, whereas

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist rosiglitazone attenuates postincisional pain by regulating macrophage polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa-Moriyama, Maiko; Ohnou, Tetsuya; Godai, Kohei; Kurimoto, Tae; Nakama, Mayo; Kanmura, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Rosiglitazone attenuated postincisional pain. ► Rosiglitazone alters macrophage polarization to F4/80 + CD206 + M2 macrophages at the incisional sites. ► Transplantation of rosiglitazone-treated macrophages produced analgesic effects. -- Abstract: Acute inflammation triggered by macrophage infiltration to injured tissue promotes wound repair and may induce pain hypersensitivity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR)γ signaling is known to regulate heterogeneity of macrophages, which are often referred to as classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. M1 macrophages have considerable antimicrobial activity and produce a wide variety of proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast, M2 macrophages are involved in anti-inflammatory and homeostatic functions linked to wound healing and tissue repair. Although it has been suggested that PPARγ agonists attenuate pain hypersensitivity, the molecular mechanism of macrophage-mediated effects of PPARγ signaling on pain development has not been explored. In this study, we investigated the link between the phenotype switching of macrophage polarization induced by PPARγ signaling and the development of acute pain hypersensitivity. Local administration of rosiglitazone significantly ameliorated hypersensitivity to heat and mechanical stimuli, and paw swelling. Consistent with the down-regulation of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) phosphorylation by rosiglitazone at the incisional sites, the number of F4/80 + iNOS + M1 macrophages was decreased whereas numbers of F4/80 + CD206 + M2 macrophages were increased in rosiglitazone-treated incisional sites 24 h after the procedure. In addition, gene induction of anti-inflammatory M2-macrophage-associated markers such as arginase1, FIZZ1 and interleukin (IL)-10 were significantly increased, whereas M1-macrophage-related molecules such as integrin αX, IL-1β, MIP2α and leptin were decreased at rosiglitazone-treated incisional sites

  13. Change in refractive index of muscle tissue during laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Na; Chen, Meimei; Liu, Shupeng; Guo, Qiang; Chen, Zhenyi; Wang, Tingyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a long-period fiber-grating (LPG) based Michelson interferometric refractometry to monitor the change in refractive index of porcine muscle during laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT). As the wavelength of RI interferometer alters with the change in refractive index around the probe, the LPG based refractometry is combined with LITT system to measure the change in refractive index of porcine muscle when irradiated by laser. The experimental results show the denaturation of tissue alters the refractive index significantly and the LPG sensor can be applied to monitor the tissue state during the LITT.

  14. Highly efficient transfection of human THP-1 macrophages by nucleofection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeß, Marten B; Wittig, Berith; Lorkowski, Stefan

    2014-09-02

    Macrophages, as key players of the innate immune response, are at the focus of research dealing with tissue homeostasis or various pathologies. Transfection with siRNA and plasmid DNA is an efficient tool for studying their function, but transfection of macrophages is not a trivial matter. Although many different approaches for transfection of eukaryotic cells are available, only few allow reliable and efficient transfection of macrophages, but reduced cell vitality and severely altered cell behavior like diminished capability for differentiation or polarization are frequently observed. Therefore a transfection protocol is required that is capable of transferring siRNA and plasmid DNA into macrophages without causing serious side-effects thus allowing the investigation of the effect of the siRNA or plasmid in the context of normal cell behavior. The protocol presented here provides a method for reliably and efficiently transfecting human THP-1 macrophages and monocytes with high cell vitality, high transfection efficiency, and minimal effects on cell behavior. This approach is based on Nucleofection and the protocol has been optimized to maintain maximum capability for cell activation after transfection. The protocol is adequate for adherent cells after detachment as well as cells in suspension, and can be used for small to medium sample numbers. Thus, the method presented is useful for investigating gene regulatory effects during macrophage differentiation and polarization. Apart from presenting results characterizing macrophages transfected according to this protocol in comparison to an alternative chemical method, the impact of cell culture medium selection after transfection on cell behavior is also discussed. The presented data indicate the importance of validating the selection for different experimental settings.

  15. Revisiting mouse peritoneal macrophages: heterogeneity, development and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Dos Anjos Cassado

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tissue macrophages play a crucial role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and also contribute to inflammatory and reparatory responses during pathogenic infection and tissue injury. The high heterogeneity of these macrophages is consistent with their adaptation to distinct tissue environments and specialization to develop niche-specific functions. Although peritoneal macrophages are one of best-studied macrophage populations, only recently it was demonstrated the co-existence of two subsets in mouse PerC, which exhibit distinct phenotypes, functions and origins. These macrophage subsets have been classified according to their morphology as LPMs (large peritoneal macrophages and SPMs (small peritoneal macrophages. LPMs, the most abundant subset under steady-state conditions, express high levels of F4/80 and low levels of class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC. LPMs appear to be originated from embriogenic precursors, and their maintenance in PerC is regulated by expression of specific transcription factors and tissue-derived signals. Conversely, SPMs, a minor subset in unstimulated PerC, have a F4/80lowMHC-IIhigh phenotype and are generated from bone-marrow-derived myeloid precursors. In response to infectious or inflammatory stimuli, the cellular composition of PerC is dramatically altered, where LPMs disappear and SPMs become the prevalent population together with their precursor, the inflammatory monocyte. SPMs appear to be the major source of inflammatory mediators in PerC during infection whereas LPMs contribute for gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT-independent and retinoic acid-dependent IgA production by peritoneal B-1 cells. In the last years, considerable efforts have been made to broaden our understanding of LPM and SPM origin, transcriptional regulation and functional profile. This review addresses these issues, focusing on the impact of tissue-derived signals and external stimulation in the complex

  16. Cathepsin E deficiency impairs autophagic proteolysis in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Tsukuba

    Full Text Available Cathepsin E is an endosomal aspartic proteinase that is predominantly expressed in immune-related cells. Recently, we showed that macrophages derived from cathepsin E-deficient (CatE(-/- mice display accumulation of lysosomal membrane proteins and abnormal membrane trafficking. In this study, we demonstrated that CatE(-/- macrophages exhibit abnormalities in autophagy, a bulk degradation system for aggregated proteins and damaged organelles. CatE(-/- macrophages showed increased accumulation of autophagy marker proteins such as LC3 and p62, and polyubiquitinated proteins. Cathepsin E deficiency also altered autophagy-related signaling pathways such as those mediated by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, Akt, and extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK. Furthermore, immunofluorescence microscopy analyses showed that LC3-positive vesicles were merged with acidic compartments in wild-type macrophages, but not in CatE(-/- macrophages, indicating inhibition of fusion of autophagosome with lysosomes in CatE(-/- cells. Delayed degradation of LC3 protein was also observed under starvation-induced conditions. Since the autophagy system is involved in the degradation of damaged mitochondria, we examined the accumulation of damaged mitochondria in CatE(-/- macrophages. Several mitochondrial abnormalities such as decreased intracellular ATP levels, depolarized mitochondrial membrane potential, and decreased mitochondrial oxygen consumption were observed. Such mitochondrial dysfunction likely led to the accompanying oxidative stress. In fact, CatE(-/- macrophages showed increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production and up-regulation of oxidized peroxiredoxin-6, but decreased antioxidant glutathione. These results indicate that cathepsin E deficiency causes autophagy impairment concomitantly with increased aberrant mitochondria as well as increased oxidative stress.

  17. Metabolic reprogramming in macrophage polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eGalván-Peña

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Studying the metabolism of immune cells in recent years has emphasized the tight link existing between the metabolic state and the phenotype of these cells. Macrophages in particular are a good example of this phenomenon. Whether the macrophage obtains its energy through glycolysis or through oxidative metabolism can give rise to different phenotypes. Classically activated or M1 macrophages are key players of the first line of defense against bacterial infections and are known to obtain energy through glycolysis. Alternatively activated or M2 macrophages on the other hand, are involved in tissue repair and wound healing and use oxidative metabolism to fuel their longer-term functions. Metabolic intermediates however, are not just a source of energy but can be directly implicated in a particular macrophage phenotype. In M1 macrophages, the Krebs cycle intermediate succinate regulates HIF1α, which is responsible for driving the sustained production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1β. In M2 macrophages, the sedoheptulose kinase CARKL is critical for regulating the pentose phosphate pathway. The potential to target these events and impact on disease is an exciting prospect.

  18. Macrophage-mediated response to hypoxia in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tazzyman S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Simon Tazzyman,1 Craig Murdoch,2 James Yeomans,1 Jack Harrison,1 Munitta Muthana3 1Department of Oncology, 2School of Clinical Dentistry, 3Department of Infection and Immunity, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Abstract: Hypoxia plays a critical role in the pathobiology of various inflamed, diseased tissues, including malignant tumors, atherosclerotic plaques, myocardial infarcts, the synovia of rheumatoid arthritic joints, healing wounds, and sites of bacterial infection. These areas of hypoxia form when the blood supply is occluded and/or the oxygen supply is unable to keep pace with cell growth and/or infiltration of inflammatory cells. Macrophages are ubiquitous in all tissues of the body and exhibit great plasticity, allowing them to perform divergent functions, including, among others, patrolling tissue, combating invading pathogens and tumor cells, orchestrating wound healing, and restoring homeostasis after an inflammatory response. The number of tissue macrophages increases markedly with the onset and progression of many pathological states, with many macrophages accumulating in avascular and necrotic areas, where they are exposed to hypoxia. Recent studies show that these highly versatile cells then respond rapidly to the hypoxia present by altering their expression of a wide array of genes. Here we review the evidence for hypoxia-driven macrophage inflammatory responses in various disease states, and how this influences disease progression and treatment. Keywords: macrophage, hypoxia, inflammation, cytokine

  19. Nuclear receptor mediated mechanisms of macrophage cholesterol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Zsuzsanna S; Czimmerer, Zsolt; Nagy, Laszlo

    2013-04-10

    Macrophages comprise a family of multi-faceted phagocytic effector cells that differentiate "in situ" from circulating monocytes to exert various functions including clearance of foreign pathogens as well as debris derived from host cells. Macrophages also possess the ability to engulf and metabolize lipids and this way connect lipid metabolism and inflammation. The molecular link between these processes is provided by certain members of the nuclear receptor family. For instance, peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) and liver X receptors (LXR) are able to sense the dynamically changing lipid environment and translate it to gene expression changes in order to modulate the cellular phenotype. Atherosclerosis embodies both sides of this coin: it is a disease in which macrophages with altered cholesterol metabolism keep the arteries in a chronically inflamed state. A large body of publications has accumulated during the past few decades describing the role of nuclear receptors in the regulation of macrophage cholesterol homeostasis, their contribution to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques and their crosstalk with inflammatory pathways. This review will summarize the most recent findings from this field narrowly focusing on the contribution of various nuclear receptors to macrophage cholesterol metabolism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Protein energy malnutrition increases arginase activity in monocytes and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corware, Karina; Yardley, Vanessa; Mack, Christopher; Schuster, Steffen; Al-Hassi, Hafid; Herath, Shanthi; Bergin, Philip; Modolell, Manuel; Munder, Markus; Müller, Ingrid; Kropf, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Protein energy malnutrition is commonly associated with immune dysfunctions and is a major factor in susceptibility to infectious diseases. In this study, we evaluated the impact of protein energy malnutrition on the capacity of monocytes and macrophages to upregulate arginase, an enzyme associated with immunosuppression and increased pathogen replication. Our results show that monocytes and macrophages are significantly increased in the bone marrow and blood of mice fed on a protein low diet. No alteration in the capacity of bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from malnourished mice to phagocytose particles, to produce the microbicidal molecule nitric oxide and to kill intracellular Leishmania parasites was detected. However, macrophages and monocytes from malnourished mice express significantly more arginase both in vitro and in vivo. Using an experimental model of visceral leishmaniasis, we show that following protein energy malnutrition, the increased parasite burden measured in the spleen of these mice coincided with increased arginase activity and that macrophages provide a more permissive environment for parasite growth. Taken together, these results identify a novel mechanism in protein energy malnutrition that might contributes to increased susceptibility to infectious diseases by upregulating arginase activity in myeloid cells.

  1. Interstitial Glucose and Physical Exercise in Type 1 Diabetes: Integrative Physiology, Technology, and the Gap In-Between

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othmar Moser

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous and flash glucose monitoring systems measure interstitial fluid glucose concentrations within a body compartment that is dramatically altered by posture and is responsive to the physiological and metabolic changes that enable exercise performance in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Body fluid redistribution within the interstitial compartment, alterations in interstitial fluid volume, changes in rate and direction of fluid flow between the vasculature, interstitium and lymphatics, as well as alterations in the rate of glucose production and uptake by exercising tissues, make for caution when interpreting device read-outs in a rapidly changing internal environment during acute exercise. We present an understanding of the physiological and metabolic changes taking place with acute exercise and detail the blood and interstitial glucose responses with different forms of exercise, namely sustained endurance, high-intensity, and strength exercises in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Further, we detail novel technical information on currently available patient devices. As more health services and insurance companies advocate their use, understanding continuous and flash glucose monitoring for its strengths and limitations may offer more confidence for patients aiming to manage glycemia around exercise.

  2. Macrophage heterogeneity in lymphoid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Haan, Joke M M; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa

    2013-09-01

    Macrophages in lymphoid organs exhibit a wide variety of phenotypes and functions. These cells excel in the removal of apoptotic cells that arise during the generation of immune cells and are thereby essential for the prevention of auto-immune responses. In addition to this macrophages in the secondary lymphoid organs form an important barrier for spreading of infections by phagocytosis of pathogens and the activation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Thus, the remarkable ability of macrophages to phagocytose and handle a wide range of self and non-self material and to produce immunomediators is effectively exploited within lymphoid organs to regulate immune activation.

  3. [Comparative analysis of bronchoalveolar lavages in interstitial lung diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyu Sub; Heo, Woon Bo; Won, Dong Il

    2007-06-01

    This study was purposed to find out the differences in the lymphocyte subsets and differential cell counts of the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) and to analyze the differences according to their ages, gender and smoking habits. BAL fluid samples of 141 ILD patients were examined for lymphocyte subsets and differential cell counts, and the differences among the patients were analyzed according to their diseases. Then, within the three most common disease groups, the differences were further analyzed by the age, gender and smoking habit of the patients. There were no statistically significant differences in total cell counts (per millimeters of BAL fluid) among the patient groups with each ILD. However, significant differences were observed in the percentages of neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils, and macrophages of BAL fluid. Also, in lymphocyte subset analyses, the percentages of total T cells, B cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD4/CD8 T cell ratios, and NK cells were significantly different among the patients with each ILD. However, within the same disease group, there were no differences in differential cell counts and lymphocyte subset analyses according to the age, smoking habit, and gender of the patients. Although the age, smoking habit and gender did not have an effect on the BAL fluid analyses among the patients with the same ILD, there were significant differences among the patients with each ILD; therefore, the differential cell counts and lymphocyte subset analyses of BAL fluid can be useful in differential diagnosis for determining the types of ILD.

  4. Lipid homeostasis and inflammatory activation are disturbed in classically activated macrophages with peroxisomal β-oxidation deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geric, Ivana; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Krysko, Olga; Krysko, Dmitri V; De Schryver, Evelyn; Kagan, Valerian E; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Baes, Myriam; Verheijden, Simon

    2018-03-01

    Macrophage activation is characterized by pronounced metabolic adaptation. Classically activated macrophages show decreased rates of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation and acquire a glycolytic state together with their pro-inflammatory phenotype. In contrast, alternatively activated macrophages require oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation for their anti-inflammatory function. Although it is evident that mitochondrial metabolism is regulated during macrophage polarization and essential for macrophage function, little is known on the regulation and role of peroxisomal β-oxidation during macrophage activation. In this study, we show that peroxisomal β-oxidation is strongly decreased in classically activated bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and mildly induced in alternatively activated BMDM. To examine the role of peroxisomal β-oxidation in macrophages, we used Mfp2 -/- BMDM lacking the key enzyme of this pathway. Impairment of peroxisomal β-oxidation in Mfp2 -/- BMDM did not cause lipid accumulation but rather an altered distribution of lipid species with very-long-chain fatty acids accumulating in the triglyceride and phospholipid fraction. These lipid alterations in Mfp2 -/- macrophages led to decreased inflammatory activation of Mfp2 -/- BMDM and peritoneal macrophages evidenced by impaired production of several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, but did not affect anti-inflammatory polarization. The disturbed inflammatory responses of Mfp2 -/- macrophages did not affect immune cell infiltration, as mice with selective elimination of MFP2 from myeloid cells showed normal monocyte and neutrophil influx upon challenge with zymosan. Together, these data demonstrate that peroxisomal β-oxidation is involved in fine-tuning the phenotype of macrophages, probably by influencing the dynamic lipid profile during macrophage polarization. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Environmental injury to the kidney: Interstitial nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. Chan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The First Emperor of China (Qin Shi Huang: 259–210 BCE would have been interested in interstitial nephritis. He might conceivably be fascinated to know that consumption of mercury elixir, instead of giving him immortality, might have shortened his life by giving him interstitial nephritis. In the Balkan region of Eastern Europe, clustering of a peculiar interstitial nephritis is prevalent. One environmental risk contributing to Balkan endemic nephritis is aristolochic acid contamination of cooking flour, drinking water, and herbal medicine. In addition, the popular use of nonprescription Chinese weight reduction herbs and public unawareness of the consequential aristolochic acid nephropathy has become a worldwide problem. Finally, the mighty Romans of antiquity lost their empire, arguably due to lead in their wine containers, lead water pipes, and lead cooking utensils. In modern times, lead paint has become universally banned, which has resulted in a reduction of lead-induced interstitial nephritis. In recent decades, bisphenol A (BPA has been identified as a new environmental risk. BPA is in the plastic coating of food and beverage containers to prevent corrosion. BPA is so ubiquitous that urinary BPA and proteinuria are present in a high percentage of the population. BPA-induced kidney injury and other health concerns have led certain countries to ban BPA. Now, BPA-free containers are being introduced with great fanfare by manufacturers, but safety issues on all plastic products remain. It begs the question whether “plastics” of today take the place of “lead” in ancient Rome. This is a challenging question without an answer at this point.

  6. Chronic interstitial lung disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griese, Matthias

    2018-03-31

    Children's interstitial lung diseases (chILD) are increasingly recognised and contain many lung developmental and genetic disorders not yet identified in adult pneumology. Worldwide, several registers have been established. The Australasian Registry Network for Orphan Lung Disease (ARNOLD) has identified problems in estimating rare disease prevalence; focusing on chILD in immunocompetent patients, a period prevalence of 1.5 cases per million children and a mortality rate of 7% were determined. The chILD-EU register highlighted the workload to be covered per patient included and provided protocols for diagnosis and initial treatment, similar to the United States chILD network. Whereas case reports may be useful for young physicians to practise writing articles, cohorts of patients can catapult progress, as demonstrated by recent studies on persistent tachypnoea of infancy, hypersensitivity pneumonitis in children and interstitial lung disease related to interferonopathies from mutations in transmembrane protein 173. Translational research has linked heterozygous mutations in the ABCA3 transporter to an increased risk of interstitial lung diseases, not only in neonates, but also in older children and adults. For surfactant dysfunction disorders in infancy and early childhood, lung transplantation was reported to be as successful as in adult patients. Mutual potentiation of paediatric and adult pneumologists is mandatory in this rapidly extending field for successful future development.This brief review highlights publications in the field of paediatric interstitial lung disease as reviewed during the Clinical Year in Review session presented at the 2017 European Respiratory Society (ERS) Annual Congress in Milan, Italy. It was commissioned by the ERS and critically presents progress made as well as drawbacks. Copyright ©ERS 2018.

  7. Self-interstitial atoms in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, W.

    1978-01-01

    The present state of knowledge and understanding of the properties of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) in metals is reviewed. Special emphasis is given to a discussion of the structure of SIAs and those properties which relate to structure such as relaxation volumes, elastic polarizabilities, defect vibrations, geometry of jump processes, and elastic interactions. The present experimental status with respect to these properties is summarized, and the basic theoretical concepts for their understanding are presented as simply as possible. (Auth.)

  8. Chronic interstitial lung disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Griese

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Children's interstitial lung diseases (chILD are increasingly recognised and contain many lung developmental and genetic disorders not yet identified in adult pneumology. Worldwide, several registers have been established. The Australasian Registry Network for Orphan Lung Disease (ARNOLD has identified problems in estimating rare disease prevalence; focusing on chILD in immunocompetent patients, a period prevalence of 1.5 cases per million children and a mortality rate of 7% were determined. The chILD-EU register highlighted the workload to be covered per patient included and provided protocols for diagnosis and initial treatment, similar to the United States chILD network. Whereas case reports may be useful for young physicians to practise writing articles, cohorts of patients can catapult progress, as demonstrated by recent studies on persistent tachypnoea of infancy, hypersensitivity pneumonitis in children and interstitial lung disease related to interferonopathies from mutations in transmembrane protein 173. Translational research has linked heterozygous mutations in the ABCA3 transporter to an increased risk of interstitial lung diseases, not only in neonates, but also in older children and adults. For surfactant dysfunction disorders in infancy and early childhood, lung transplantation was reported to be as successful as in adult patients. Mutual potentiation of paediatric and adult pneumologists is mandatory in this rapidly extending field for successful future development. This brief review highlights publications in the field of paediatric interstitial lung disease as reviewed during the Clinical Year in Review session presented at the 2017 European Respiratory Society (ERS Annual Congress in Milan, Italy. It was commissioned by the ERS and critically presents progress made as well as drawbacks.

  9. Effects of X irradiation on the cytoskeleton of rat alveolar macrophages in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladyman, S.J.; Townsend, K.M.S.; Edwards, C.

    1984-01-01

    The three-dimensional visualization of Triton X-100 resistant cytoskeletons has been used to demonstrate that an absorbed dose of 120 Gy from X rays causes a distinctive and reproducible alteration of the cytoskeleton of intact rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. The alteration has also been shown to be rapidly and completely ''repaired'' and to be apparently similar to alterations caused by colchicine but dissimilar to those caused by cytochalasin B. From these observations and those of other workers who have studied the irradiation of extracted microtubular proteins in vitro, the authors think it likely that microtubules rather than microfilaments are the radiosensitive component of the macrophage cytoskeleton

  10. The macrophage switch in obesity development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela eCastoldi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune cell infiltration in (white adipose tissue during obesity is associated with the development of insulin resistance. In adipose tissue, the main population of leukocytes are macrophages. Macrophages can be classified into two major populations: M1, classically activated macrophages, and M2, alternatively activated macrophages, although recent studies have identified a broad range of macrophage subsets. During obesity, adipose tissue M1 macrophage numbers increase and correlate with adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. Upon activation, pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages induce aerobic glycolysis. By contrast, in lean humans and mice, the number of M2 macrophages predominates. M2 macrophages secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines and utilize oxidative metabolism to maintain adipose tissue homeostasis. Here we review the immunologic and metabolic functions of adipose tissue macrophages and their different facets in obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

  11. Temperature control in interstitial laser cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K.; Holmes, Kyland; Burnett, Corinthius; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2003-07-01

    Positive results of Laser-Assisted Cancer Immunotherapy (LACI) have been reported previously in the irradiation of superficial tumors. This paper reports the effect of LACI using laser interstitial therapy approach. We hypothesize that the maximum immuno response depends on laser induced tumor temperature. The measurement of tumor temperature is crucial to ensure necrosis by thermal damage and immuno response. Wister Furth female rats in this study were inoculated with 13762 MAT B III rat mammary adinocarcinoma. LACI started seven to ten days following inoculation. Contrary to surface irradation, we applied laser interstitial irradiation of tumor volume to maximize the energy deposition. A diode laser with a wavelength of 805 nm was used for tumor irradiation. The laser energy was delivered inside the tumor through a quartz fiber. Tumor temperature was measured with a micro thermocouple (interstitial), while the tumor surface temperature was controlled with an IR detector. The temperature feedback demonstrates that it is possible to maintain the average tumor temperature at the same level with reasonable accuracy in the desired range from 65°C-85°C. In some experiments we used microwave thermometry to control average temperature in deep tissue for considerable period of time, to cause maximum thermal damage to the tumor. The experimental set-up and the different temperature measurement techniques are reported in detail, including the advantages and disadvantages for each method.

  12. Respiratory muscle function in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walterspacher, Stephan; Schlager, Daniel; Walker, David J; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Windisch, Wolfram; Kabitz, Hans-Joachim

    2013-07-01

    Interstitial lung diseases limit daily activities, impair quality of life and result in (exertional) dyspnoea. This has mainly been attributed to a decline in lung function and impaired gas exchange. However, the contribution of respiratory muscle dysfunction to these limitations remains to be conclusively investigated. Interstitial lung disease patients and matched controls performed body plethysmography, a standardised 6-min walk test, volitional tests (respiratory drive (P0.1), global maximal inspiratory mouth occlusion pressure (PImax), sniff nasal pressure (SnPna) and inspiratory muscle load) and nonvolitional tests on respiratory muscle function and strength (twitch mouth and transdiaphragmatic pressure during bilateral magnetic phrenic nerve stimulation (TwPmo and TwPdi)). 25 patients and 24 controls were included in the study. PImax and SnPna remained unaltered (both p>0.05), whereas P0.1 and the load on the inspiratory muscles were higher (both prespiratory muscle strength remains preserved. Central respiratory drive and the load imposed on the inspiratory muscles are increased. Whether impaired respiratory muscle function impacts morbidity and mortality in interstitial lung disease patients needs to be investigated in future studies.

  13. Role of interstitial implantation in gynecological cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nori, D.; Hilaris, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    Recurrent cancer at any site carries a gloomy prognosis. Cancer of the cervix that recurs after radical surgery or curative radiation therapy is a perplexing problem confronting both gynecological and radiation oncologists. In the authors' series, 45% of the patients survived disease-free at 1 year and 10% survived without disease at 5 years or longer following interstitial implantation for recurrent cervical cancer. The optimal utilization of this procedure seems to depend on the site of recurrence, the extent of the disease in the pelvis, and the status of para-aortic node involvement. This retrospective analysis enabled the authors to identify the prognostic factors. The most favorable group benefited by this technique were those who presented with either central recurrence or unilateral, localized pelvic side wall recurrent disease. The least morbidity was noticed in those patients with minimal surgical manipulations at the time of the interstitial implantation. The authors recommended that only a limited and essential surgical procedure should accompany interstitial implantation, since the associated morbidity and mortality is high and survival brief

  14. Interstitial lung involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vladimirovich Bestaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease of unknown etiology, characterized by chronic erosive arthritis and extraarticular manifestations. Pulmonary involvement is one of the common extraarticular manifestations of RA and may show itself as bronchial tree lesions, rheumatoid nodules, Caplan's syndrome, and lesions in the pleura or pulmonary interstitium (interstitial lung involvement (ILI. High-resolution computed tomography allows the diagnosis of ILI in RA in nearly 70% of cases although the incidence of ILI may be lower (4 to 30% depending on diagnostic methods and patient selection criteria. There are several histopathological types of ILI, the differential diagnosis of which can be troublesome. Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia are major types of RA-associated ILI. UIP-pattern ILI has a more severe course than ILI with other histological patterns. The clinical presentation of ILI may be complicated by the likely toxic effect of a number of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs used to treat RA, such as methotrexate and leflunomide, and biological agents (BAs, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors. The pathogenesis of pulmonary involvement in RA and the role of synthetic DMARDs and BAs in the development of ILI call for further investigations.An extraarticular manifestation, such as ILI, affects the choice of treatment policy in patients with RA.The relevance of a study of ILI is beyond question. The paper discusses the state-of-the-art of investigations in this area.

  15. Interstitial prostate brachytherapy. LDR-PDR-HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, Gyoergy; Hoskin, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The first comprehensive overview of interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. Written by an interdisciplinary team who have been responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Teaching Course. Discusses in detail patient selection, the results of different methods, the role of imaging, and medical physics issues. Prostate brachytherapy has been the subject of heated debate among surgeons and the proponents of the various brachytherapy methods. This very first interdisciplinary book on the subject provides a comprehensive overview of innovations in low dose rate (LDR), high dose rate (HDR), and pulsed dose rate (PDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. In addition to detailed chapters on patient selection and the use of imaging in diagnostics, treatment guidance, and implantation control, background chapters are included on related medical physics issues such as treatment planning and quality assurance. The results obtained with the different treatment options and the difficult task of salvage treatment are fully discussed. All chapters have been written by internationally recognized experts in their fields who for more than a decade have formed the teaching staff responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Prostate Brachytherapy Teaching Course. This book will be invaluable in informing residents and others of the scientific background and potential of modern prostate brachytherapy. It will also prove a useful source of up-to-date information for those who specialize in prostate brachytherapy or intend to start an interstitial brachytherapy service.

  16. The Impact of 27-Hydroxycholesterol, a Macrophage-Produced Estrogen Receptor and Liver X Receptor Agonist, on Breast Cancer Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    manner. Macrophages secrete factors which alter the expression of known ER target genes, and we have confirmed that the products of CYP27A1 action are...macrophages derived from wild type mice ( CYP27A1 +/+) or from mice that lack the capacity to synthesize 27HC ( CYP27A1 -/-). Spent media from these...type macrophages, and to a lesser extent by media from CYP27A1 -/- macrophages (Figure 3). The ER responsive genes BRCA1, Ret, PS2, PR, SDK1, and

  17. 87Sr/86Sr and 18O/16O ratios, interstitial water chemistry and diagenesis in deep-sea carbonate sediments of the Ontong Java Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elderfield, H.; Oldfield, R.K.; Hawkesworth, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    Interstitial waters and sediments from DSDP sites 288 and 289 contain information on the chemistry and diagenesis of carbonate in deep-sea sediments and on the role of volcanic matter alteration processes. Sr/Ca ratios are species dependent in unaltered foraminifera from site 289 and atom ratios exceed those predicted by distribution coefficient data. During diagenesis Sr/Ca ratios of carbonates decrease and reach the theoretical distribution at a depth which is identical to the depth of Sr isotopic equilibration, where 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios of interstitial waters and carbonates converge. Mg/Ca ratios in the carbonates do not increase with depth as found in some other DSDP sites, possibly because of diagenetic re-equilibration with interstitial waters showing decreasing Mg 2+ /Ca 2+ ratios with depth due to Ca input and Mg removal by alteration of volcanic matter. Interstitial 18 O/ 16 O ratios increase with depth at site 289 to delta 18 O = 0.67 per thousand (SMOW), reflecting carbonate recrystallization at elevated temperatures, the first recorded evidence of this effect in interstitial waters. Interstitial Sr 2+ concentrations reach high levels, up to 1 mM, chiefly because of carbonate recrystallization. However, 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios decrease from 0.7092 to less than 0.7078, lower than for contemporaneous sea water, showing that there is a volcanic input of strontium at depth. (author)

  18. Early Identification of Interstitial Cystitis May Avoid Unnecessary Hysterectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarnagin, Barry

    2009-01-01

    Background: Interstitial cystitis is a clinical syndrome characterized by symptoms of pelvic pain, urinary urgency and frequency, and nocturia. It can be difficult to accurately identify interstitial cystitis because the symptoms overlap many other common gynecologic and urologic conditions. Patients with undiagnosed interstitial cystitis may undergo unnecessary procedures, including hysterectomy. Methods: A PubMed literature search for articles dating back to 1990 was conducted on the topics of interstitial cystitis and hysterectomy. Further references were identified by cross-referencing the bibliographies in articles of interest. Results: The literature review found that hysterectomy is performed more often in patients with undiagnosed interstitial cystitis than in patients with a confirmed diagnosis. Interstitial cystitis often coexists with conditions like endometriosis, for which hysterectomy is indicated. Many patients subsequently diagnosed with interstitial cystitis continue to experience persistent pelvic pain despite having had a hysterectomy for chronic pelvic pain. Careful history and physical examination can identify the majority of interstitial cystitis cases. Conclusion: Interstitial cystitis should be considered prior to hysterectomy in women who present with pelvic pain or who experience pelvic pain after a hysterectomy. If interstitial cystitis is diagnosed, appropriate therapy may eliminate the need for hysterectomy. PMID:19793476

  19. Intratumoral Delivery of Interferonγ-Secreting Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Repolarizes Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Suppresses Neuroblastoma Proliferation In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relation, Theresa; Yi, Tai; Guess, Adam J; La Perle, Krista; Otsuru, Satoru; Hasgur, Suheyla; Dominici, Massimo; Breuer, Christopher; Horwitz, Edwin M

    2018-02-12

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor in childhood, remains a therapeutic challenge. However, one promising patient treatment strategy is the delivery of anti-tumor therapeutic agents via mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) therapy. MSCs have been safely used to treat genetic bone diseases such as osteogenesis imperfecta, cardiovascular diseases, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. The pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNγ) has been shown to decrease tumor proliferation by altering the tumor microenvironment (TME). Despite this, clinical trials of systemic IFNγ therapy have failed due to the high blood concentration required and associated systemic toxicities. Here, we developed an intra-adrenal model of neuroblastoma, characterized by liver and lung metastases. We then engineered MSCs to deliver IFNγ directly to the TME. In vitro, these MSCs polarized murine macrophages to the M1 phenotype. In vivo, we attained a therapeutically active TME concentration of IFNγ without increased systemic concentration or toxicity. The TME-specific IFNγ reduced tumor growth rate and increased survival in two models of T cell deficient athymic nude mice. Absence of this benefit in NOD SCID gamma (NSG) immunodeficient mouse model indicates a mechanism dependent on the innate immune system. IL-17 and IL-23p19, both uniquely M1 polarization markers, transiently increased in the tumor interstitial fluid. Finally, the MSC vehicle did not promote tumor growth. These findings reveal that MSCs can deliver effective cytokine therapy directly to the tumor while avoiding systemic toxicity. This method transiently induces inflammatory M1 macrophage polarization, which reduces tumor burden in our novel neuroblastoma murine model. Stem Cells 2018. © AlphaMed Press 2018.

  20. Hacking macrophage-associated immunosuppression for regulating glioblastoma angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xin; Morales, Renee-Tyler Tan; Qian, Weiyi; Wang, Haoyu; Gagner, Jean-Pierre; Dolgalev, Igor; Placantonakis, Dimitris; Zagzag, David; Cimmino, Luisa; Snuderl, Matija; Lam, Raymond H W; Chen, Weiqiang

    2018-04-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most lethal primary adult brain tumor and its pathology is hallmarked by distorted neovascularization, diffuse tumor-associated macrophage infiltration, and potent immunosuppression. Reconstituting organotypic tumor angiogenesis models with biomimetic cell heterogeneity and interactions, pro-/anti-inflammatory milieu and extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanics is critical for preclinical anti-angiogenic therapeutic screening. However, current in vitro systems do not accurately mirror in vivo human brain tumor microenvironment. Here, we engineered a three-dimensional (3D), microfluidic angiogenesis model with controllable and biomimetic immunosuppressive conditions, immune-vascular and cell-matrix interactions. We demonstrate in vitro, GL261 and CT-2A GBM-like tumors steer macrophage polarization towards a M2-like phenotype for fostering an immunosuppressive and proangiogenic niche, which is consistent with human brain tumors. We distinguished that GBM and M2-like immunosuppressive macrophages promote angiogenesis, while M1-like pro-inflammatory macrophages suppress angiogenesis, which we coin "inflammation-driven angiogenesis." We observed soluble immunosuppressive cytokines, predominantly TGF-β1, and surface integrin (α v β 3 ) endothelial-macrophage interactions are required in inflammation-driven angiogenesis. We demonstrated tuning cell-adhesion receptors using an integrin (α v β 3 )-specific collagen hydrogel regulated inflammation-driven angiogenesis through Src-PI3K-YAP signaling, highlighting the importance of altered cell-ECM interactions in inflammation. To validate the preclinical applications of our 3D organoid model and mechanistic findings of inflammation-driven angiogenesis, we screened a novel dual integrin (α v β 3 ) and cytokine receptor (TGFβ-R1) blockade that suppresses GBM tumor neovascularization by simultaneously targeting macrophage-associated immunosuppression, endothelial-macrophage interactions, and

  1. Chronic pulmonary interstitial fibrosis in a blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva aestiva).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Olga; Kik, Marja J L; Passon-Vastenburg, Maartje H A C; Westerhof, Ineke; Lumeij, Johannes T; Schoemaker, Nico J

    2007-03-01

    A 30-yr-old blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazon aestiva aestiva) was presented to the clinic with a history of sneezing more often during the last 2 mo. Physical examination revealed only a mild nasal discharge. Complete hematologic and plasma biochemical examination showed no abnormalities. Computerized tomography (CT) of the complete bird showed generalized lung alterations consistent with lung fibrosis. Two lung biopsies were taken. The results of the histologic examination of the biopsies confirmed the tentative CT diagnosis of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of chronic pulmonary interstitial fibrosis diagnosed by means of a lung biopsy in an avian species. The histologic characteristics are discussed and compared with those of human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  2. A Feasibility Study to Determine Whether Clinical Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging can Detect Increased Bladder Permeability in Patients with Interstitial Cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, Rheal A; Wisniewski, Amy B; Wu, Dee H; Van Gordon, Samuel B; Smith, Nataliya; North, Justin C; McElhaney, Rayburt; Aston, Christopher E; Shobeiri, S Abbas; Kropp, Bradley P; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Hurst, Robert E

    2016-03-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome is a bladder pain disorder associated with voiding symptomatology and other systemic chronic pain disorders. Currently diagnosing interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome is complicated as patients present with a wide range of symptoms, physical examination findings and clinical test responses. One hypothesis is that interstitial cystitis symptoms arise from increased bladder permeability to urine solutes. This study establishes the feasibility of using contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging to quantify bladder permeability in patients with interstitial cystitis. Permeability alterations in bladder urothelium were assessed by intravesical administration of the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent Gd-DTPA (Gd-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) in a small cohort of patients. Magnetic resonance imaging signal intensity in patient and control bladders was compared regionally and for entire bladders. Quantitative assessment of magnetic resonance imaging signal intensity indicated a significant increase in signal intensity in anterior bladder regions compared to posterior regions in patients with interstitial cystitis (p interstitial cystitis vs controls (p interstitial cystitis cases differed significantly from controls on the SF-36®, PUF (Pelvic Pain and Urgency/Frequency) and ICPI (Interstitial Cystitis Problem Index) questionnaires with no overlap in the score range in each group. ICSI (Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Index) differed significantly but with a slight overlap in the range of scores. Data suggest that contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging provides an objective, quantifiable measurement of bladder permeability that could be used to stratify bladder pain patients and monitor therapy. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Tumor-Associated Macrophages as Major Players in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanmee, Theerawut [Institute of Advanced Technology, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Ontong, Pawared [Division of Engineering (Biotechnology), Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Konno, Kenjiro [Department of Animal Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Itano, Naoki, E-mail: itanon@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Technology, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Division of Engineering (Biotechnology), Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Department of Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2014-08-13

    During tumor progression, circulating monocytes and macrophages are actively recruited into tumors where they alter the tumor microenvironment to accelerate tumor progression. Macrophages shift their functional phenotypes in response to various microenvironmental signals generated from tumor and stromal cells. Based on their function, macrophages are divided broadly into two categories: classical M1 and alternative M2 macrophages. The M1 macrophage is involved in the inflammatory response, pathogen clearance, and antitumor immunity. In contrast, the M2 macrophage influences an anti-inflammatory response, wound healing, and pro-tumorigenic properties. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) closely resemble the M2-polarized macrophages and are critical modulators of the tumor microenvironment. Clinicopathological studies have suggested that TAM accumulation in tumors correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Consistent with that evidence, experimental and animal studies have supported the notion that TAMs can provide a favorable microenvironment to promote tumor development and progression. In this review article, we present an overview of mechanisms responsible for TAM recruitment and highlight the roles of TAMs in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, immunosuppression, and chemotherapeutic resistance. Finally, we discuss TAM-targeting therapy as a promising novel strategy for an indirect cancer therapy.

  4. Tumor-Associated Macrophages as Major Players in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theerawut Chanmee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available During tumor progression, circulating monocytes and macrophages are actively recruited into tumors where they alter the tumor microenvironment to accelerate tumor progression. Macrophages shift their functional phenotypes in response to various microenvironmental signals generated from tumor and stromal cells. Based on their function, macrophages are divided broadly into two categories: classical M1 and alternative M2 macrophages. The M1 macrophage is involved in the inflammatory response, pathogen clearance, and antitumor immunity. In contrast, the M2 macrophage influences an anti-inflammatory response, wound healing, and pro-tumorigenic properties. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs closely resemble the M2-polarized macrophages and are critical modulators of the tumor microenvironment. Clinicopathological studies have suggested that TAM accumulation in tumors correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Consistent with that evidence, experimental and animal studies have supported the notion that TAMs can provide a favorable microenvironment to promote tumor development and progression. In this review article, we present an overview of mechanisms responsible for TAM recruitment and highlight the roles of TAMs in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, immunosuppression, and chemotherapeutic resistance. Finally, we discuss TAM-targeting therapy as a promising novel strategy for an indirect cancer therapy.

  5. Phagocytosis and immune response studies of Macrophage-Nanodiamond Interactions in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K-J; Lee, C-Y; Lin, Y-C; Lin, C-Y; Perevedentseva, E; Hung, S-F; Cheng, C-L

    2017-10-01

    The applications of nanodiamond as drug delivery and bio-imaging can require the relinquishing ND-drug conjugate via blood flow, where interaction with immune cells may occur. In this work, we investigated the ND penetration in macrophage and the immune response using the tissue-resident murine macrophages (RAW 264.7). Confocal fluorescence imaging, immunofluorescence analysis of nuclear translocation of interferon regulatory factor IRF-3 and transcriptional factor NF-κΒ, analysis of pro-inflammatory cytokines production IL-1β, IL-6 IL-10 with a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technique were applied. The TNF-α factor production has been studied both in vitro at ND interaction with the macrophage and in vivo after ND injection in the mice blood system using immunoassay. The macrophage antibacterial function was estimated through E. coli bacterial colony formation. ND didn't stimulate the immune response and functionality of the macrophage was not altered. Using MTT test, ND was found negligibly cytotoxic to macrophages. Thus, ND can serve as a biocompatible platform for bio-medical applications. Left: Graphic representation of Nanodiamond internalization in macrophage. Right: (a) Fluorescence images of lysosomes, (b) nanodiamond and (c) merged image of nanodiamond internalization in macrophage. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Interstitial lung disease associated with Equine Infectious Anemia Virus infection in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolfa, Pompei; Nolf, Marie; Cadoré, Jean-Luc; Catoi, Cornel; Archer, Fabienne; Dolmazon, Christine; Mornex, Jean-François; Leroux, Caroline

    2013-12-01

    EIA (Equine Infectious Anemia) is a blood-borne disease primarily transmitted by haematophagous insects or needle punctures. Other routes of transmission have been poorly explored. We evaluated the potential of EIAV (Equine Infectious Anemia Virus) to induce pulmonary lesions in naturally infected equids. Lungs from 77 EIAV seropositive horses have been collected in Romania and France. Three types of lesions have been scored on paraffin-embedded lungs: lymphocyte infiltration, bronchiolar inflammation, and thickness of the alveolar septa. Expression of the p26 EIAV capsid (CA) protein has been evaluated by immunostaining. Compared to EIAV-negative horses, 52% of the EIAV-positive horses displayed a mild inflammation around the bronchioles, 22% had a moderate inflammation with inflammatory cells inside the wall and epithelial bronchiolar hyperplasia and 6.5% had a moderate to severe inflammation, with destruction of the bronchiolar epithelium and accumulation of smooth muscle cells within the pulmonary parenchyma. Changes in the thickness of the alveolar septa were also present. Expression of EIAV capsid has been evidenced in macrophages, endothelial as well as in alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells, as determined by their morphology and localization. To summarize, we found lesions of interstitial lung disease similar to that observed during other lentiviral infections such as FIV in cats, SRLV in sheep and goats or HIV in children. The presence of EIAV capsid in lung epithelial cells suggests that EIAV might be responsible for the broncho-interstitial damages observed.

  7. Overexpression of Heme Oxygenase-1 Prevents Renal Interstitial Inflammation and Fibrosis Induced by Unilateral Ureter Obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Chen

    Full Text Available Renal fibrosis plays an important role in the onset and progression of chronic kidney diseases. Many studies have demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is involved in diverse biological processes as a cytoprotective molecule, including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory effects. However, the mechanisms of HO-1 prevention in renal interstitial fibrosis remain unknown. In this study, HO-1 transgenic (TG mice were employed to investigate the effect of HO-1 on renal fibrosis using a unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO model and to explore the potential mechanisms. We found that HO-1 was adaptively upregulated in kidneys of both TG and wild type (WT mice after UUO. The levels of HO-1 mRNA and protein were increased in TG mice compared with WT mice under normal conditions. HO-1 expression was further enhanced after UUO and remained high during the entire experimental process. Renal interstitial fibrosis in the TG group was significantly attenuated compared with that in the WT group after UUO. Moreover, overexpression of HO-1 inhibited the loss of peritubular capillaries. In addition, UUO-induced activation and proliferation of myofibroblasts were suppressed by HO-1 overexpression. Furthermore, HO-1 restrained tubulointerstitial infiltration of macrophages and regulated the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in UUO mice. We also found that high expression of HO-1 inhibited reactivation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which could play a crucial role in attenuating renal fibrosis. In conclusion, these data suggest that HO-1 prevents renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis possibly by regulating the inflammatory response and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. This study provides evidence that augmentation of HO-1 levels may be a therapeutic strategy against renal interstitial fibrosis.

  8. Early Identification of Interstitial Cystitis May Avoid Unnecessary Hysterectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Maurice K.; Jarnagin, Barry

    2009-01-01

    Background: Interstitial cystitis is a clinical syndrome characterized by symptoms of pelvic pain, urinary urgency and frequency, and nocturia. It can be difficult to accurately identify interstitial cystitis because the symptoms overlap many other common gynecologic and urologic conditions. Patients with undiagnosed interstitial cystitis may undergo unnecessary procedures, including hysterectomy. Methods: A PubMed literature search for articles dating back to 1990 was conducted on the topics...

  9. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases; Interstitielle Lungenerkrankungen bei Rauchern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marten, K. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinikum rechts der Isar, Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    2007-03-15

    The most important smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Although traditionally considered to be discrete entities, smoking-related ILDs often coexist, thus accounting for the sometimes complex patterns encountered on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative role of smoking in the development of pulmonary fibrosis.

  10. Isolation of murine peritoneal macrophages to carry out gene expression analysis upon Toll-like receptors stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layoun, Antonio; Samba, Macha; Santos, Manuela M

    2015-04-29

    During infection and inflammation, circulating monocytes leave the bloodstream and migrate into tissues, where they differentiate into macrophages. Macrophages express surface Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which recognize molecular patterns conserved through evolution in a wide range of microorganisms. TLRs play a central role in macrophage activation which is usually associated with gene expression alteration. Macrophages are critical in many diseases and have emerged as attractive targets for therapy. In the following protocol, we describe a procedure to isolate murine peritoneal macrophages using Brewer's thioglycollate medium. The latter will boost monocyte migration into the peritoneum, accordingly this will raise macrophage yield by 10-fold. Several studies have been carried out using bone marrow, spleen or peritoneal derived macrophages. However, peritoneal macrophages were shown to be more mature upon isolation and are more stable in their functionality and phenotype. Thus, macrophages isolated from murine peritoneal cavity present an important cell population that can serve in different immunological and metabolic studies. Once isolated, macrophages were stimulated with different TLR ligands and consequently gene expression was evaluated.

  11. Alpha8 Integrin (Itga8 Signalling Attenuates Chronic Renal Interstitial Fibrosis by Reducing Fibroblast Activation, Not by Interfering with Regulation of Cell Turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Marek

    Full Text Available The α8 integrin (Itga8 chain contributes to the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis in renal glomerular cells. In unilateral ureteral obstruction Itga8 is de novo expressed in the tubulointerstitium and a deficiency of Itga8 results in more severe renal fibrosis after unilateral ureteral obstruction. We hypothesized that the increased tubulointerstitial damage after unilateral ureteral obstruction observed in mice deficient for Itga8 is associated with altered tubulointerstitial cell turnover and apoptotic mechanisms resulting from the lack of Itga8 in cells of the tubulointerstitium. Induction of unilateral ureteral obstruction was achieved by ligation of the right ureter in mice lacking Itga8. Unilateral ureteral obstruction increased proliferation and apoptosis rates of tubuloepithelial and interstitial cells, however, no differences were observed in the tubulointerstitium of mice lacking Itga8 and wild type controls regarding fibroblast or proliferating cell numbers as well as markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis after unilateral ureteral obstruction. In contrast, unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice lacking Itga8 led to more pronounced tubulointerstitial cell activation i.e. to the appearance of more phospho-SMAD2/3-positive cells and more α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells in the tubulointerstitium. Furthermore, a more severe macrophage and T-cell infiltration was observed in these animals compared to controls. Thus, Itga8 seems to attenuate tubulointerstitial fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstruction not via regulation of cell turnover, but via regulation of TGF-β signalling, fibroblast activation and/or immune cell infiltration.

  12. The monocyte to macrophage transition in the murine sterile wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Meredith J; Daley, Jean M; van Houtte, Olivier; Brancato, Samielle K; Henry, William L; Albina, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    The origin of wound repair macrophages is incompletely defined and was examined here in sterile wounds using the subcutaneous polyvinyl alcohol sponge implantation model in mice. Phenotypic analysis identified F4/80(+)Ly6C(hi)CD64(+)MerTK(-) monocytes and F4/80(+)Ly6C(low)CD64(+)MerTK(+) macrophages in the wound. Circulating monocytes were the precursors of inflammatory Ly6C(hi) wound monocytes. Ly6C(low)MerTK(+) macrophages appeared later, expressed CD206, CD11c, and MHC class II, produced cytokines consistent with repair function, and lacked a gene expression profile compatible with mesenchymal transition or fibroblastic transdifferentiation. Data also demonstrated that Ly6C(hi) wound cells were precursors of Ly6C(low) macrophages, although monocytes did not undergo rapid maturation but rather persisted in the wound as Ly6C(hi)MerTK(-) cells. MerTK-deficient mice were examined to determine whether MerTK-dependent signals from apoptotic cells regulated the maturation of wound macrophages. MerTK-deficient mice had day 14 cell compositions that resembled more immature wounds, with a smaller proportion of F4/80(+) cells and higher frequencies of Ly6G(+) neutrophils and Ly6C(hi) monocytes. The cytokine profile and number of apoptotic cells in day 14 wounds of MerTK-deficient mice was unaffected despite the alterations in cell composition. Overall, these studies identified a differentiation pathway in response to sterile inflammation in which monocytes recruited from the circulation acquire proinflammatory function, persist in the wound, and mature into repair macrophages.

  13. Case report: laparoscopic treatment of a ruptured interstitial pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimbizis, Grigoris F; Tsalikis, Tryfon; Mikos, Themistoklis; Zepiridis, Leonidas; Athanasiadis, Apostolos; Tarlatzis, Basil C; Bontis, John N

    2004-10-01

    Interstitial pregnancy is a rare but life-threatening condition. A case of a 28-year-old woman with a partially ruptured interstitial pregnancy treated with operative laparoscopy is presented. A laparoscopic cornual resection and a left salpingectomy were performed uneventfully. Serum beta-human chorionic gonadotrophin concentrations were measured serially at weekly intervals until resolved on day 20 postoperatively. It seems, therefore, that laparoscopic treatment is still an effective option for management even in ruptured interstitial pregnancy, preserving the anatomical integrity of the uterus and future fertility, and that rupture of interstitial ectopic pregnancy is not a contra-indication for laparoscopy.

  14. Interstitial brachytherapy in carcinoma of the penis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, A.J.; Ghosh, S.; Bhalavat, R.L.; Kulkarni, J.N.; Sequeira, B.V.E.

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Keeping in line with the increasing emphasis on organ preservation, we at the Tata Memorial Hospital have evaluated the role of Ir-192 interstitial implant as regards local control, functional and cosmetic outcome in early as well as locally recurrent carcinoma of the distal penis. Patients and Methods: From October 1988 to December 1996, 23 patients with histopathologically proven cancer of the penis were treated with radical radiation therapy using Ir-192 temporary interstitial implant. Our patients were in the age group of 20 to 60 years. The primary lesions were T1 and 7, T2 in 7 and recurrent in 9 patients. Only 7 patients had palpable groin nodes at presentation, all of which were pathologically negative. The median dose of implant was 50 Gy (range 40 to 60 Gy), using the LDR afterloading system and the Paris system of implant rules for dosimetry. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 117 months (median 24 months). Results: At last follow-up 18 of the 23 patients remained locally controlled with implant alone. Three patients failed only locally, 2 locoregionally and 1 only at the groin. Of the 5 patients who failed locally, 4 were successfully salvaged with partial penectomy and remained controlled when last seen. Local control with implant alone at 8 years was 70% by life table analysis. The patients had excellent functional and cosmetic outcome. We did not record any case of skin or softtissue necrosis. Only 2 patients developed meatal stenosis, both of which were treated endoscopically. Conclusion: Our results lead us to interpret that interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 offers excellent local control rates with preservation of organ and function. Penectomy can be reserved as a means for effective salvage. (orig.) [de

  15. Renal extramedullary hematopoiesis: interstitial and glomerular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Mariam P; Nasr, Samih H; Kurtin, Paul J; Casey, Edward T; Hernandez, Loren P Herrera; Fidler, Mary E; Sethi, Sanjeev; Cornell, Lynn D

    2015-12-01

    Renal extramedullary hematopoiesis is rarely recognized in the antemortem setting. We identified 14 patients with renal extramedullary hematopoiesis on antemortem specimens from 1994 to 2015. The mean age was 68 years (range 47-87 years); males predominated (M:F=9:5). All presented with renal insufficiency, including five (36%) with acute kidney injury. The mean serum creatinine at biopsy was 2.9 mg/dl (range 1.2-7.3 mg/dl). All had proteinuria (mean 7.9 g/24 h; range 0.5-28; n=13), including 9 with ≥3 g/24 h. Renal extramedullary hematopoiesis appeared histologically as an interstitial infiltrate (n=12) and/or a perirenal infiltrate (n=3) or mass-like lesion (n=1). Five were misdiagnosed as interstitial nephritis. Concurrent glomerular disease was prevalent and included fibrillary-like glomerulonephritis (n=3), chronic thrombotic microangiopathy (n=5), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (n=6), and diabetic glomerulosclerosis (n=2). All patients had an underlying hematologic malignancy: primary myelofibrosis in 9, myeloproliferative neoplasm not otherwise specified in 1, essential thrombocythemia in 1, polycythemia vera in 1, and plasma cell myeloma in 2. Clinical follow-up was available in 12 patients, mean of 29 months (range 4-120 months). In 10 patients for whom treatment history could be obtained, 9 were treated with chemotherapy, and 1 was treated with steroids. The mean creatinine at last follow-up was 2 mg/dl (range 1.2-3.9 mg/dl) (n=9). Ten patients died in the follow-up period from their underlying hematological disease and had persistent renal disease. The two remaining patients had persistent chronic kidney disease. Renal extramedullary hematopoiesis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of interstitial infiltrates, particularly in the presence of a glomerulopathy and a hematologic malignancy.

  16. Interstitial hydraulic conductivity and interstitial fluid pressure for avascular or poorly vascularized tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L J; Schlesinger, M

    2015-09-07

    A correct description of the hydraulic conductivity is essential for determining the actual tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) distribution. Traditionally, it has been assumed that the hydraulic conductivities both in a tumor and normal tissue are constant, and that a tumor has a much larger interstitial hydraulic conductivity than normal tissue. The abrupt transition of the hydraulic conductivity at the tumor surface leads to non-physical results (the hydraulic conductivity and the slope of the TIFP are not continuous at tumor surface). For the sake of simplicity and the need to represent reality, we focus our analysis on avascular or poorly vascularized tumors, which have a necrosis that is mostly in the center and vascularization that is mostly on the periphery. We suggest that there is an intermediary region between the tumor surface and normal tissue. Through this region, the interstitium (including the structure and composition of solid components and interstitial fluid) transitions from tumor to normal tissue. This process also causes the hydraulic conductivity to do the same. We introduce a continuous variation of the hydraulic conductivity, and show that the interstitial hydraulic conductivity in the intermediary region should be monotonically increasing up to the value of hydraulic conductivity in the normal tissue in order for the model to correspond to the actual TIFP distribution. The value of the hydraulic conductivity at the tumor surface should be the lowest in value. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Photothermal damage prediction of laser interstitial thermotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxia; Fan, Shifu; Zhao, Youquan

    2006-11-01

    An improved scattering optical model was developed under cylindrical coordinate to simulate the thermal effect of diffusing applicator in laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT). The thermal damage was calculated by finite element method (FEM) using Pennes bio-heat transfer equation and Arrhenius injury integral formula. The numerical results showed that the scattering can considerably influence the evaluation of the lesion area, and the relationship between application powers or time and resulting tissue thermal damage was nonlinear. Although usually applying relatively low power can avoid tissue charring, rather higher power is recommended because it is indispensable to achieve necessary damage threshold and the therapy time can be shortened.

  18. Interstitial pneumonitis in canine visceral leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. S. Duarte

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available Forty-one naturally infected dogs with visceral leishmaniasis from an urban area of Corumbá (Mato Grosso do Sul-BRAZIL were studied and three types of lung involvement due to visceral leishmaniasis were characterized; a cellular, a cellular-fibrotic and a fibrotic type. These types seem to represent a sequential evolutive proce'as. Visceral leishmaniasis frequently causes an interstitial pneu monitis in naturally infected dogs (80.5% as well as in man and experimentally infected hamsters.

  19. On the optimization of interstitial hyperthermia systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handl-Zeller, L.; Kaercher, K.H.; Schreier, K.; Handl, O.

    1987-07-01

    After having studied the fundamental possibilities of proceedings allowing an intracorporal transfer of energy, two systems were investigated in detail in order to achieve a wide range of application: 1. Resistance heating of tissue by modified standard needles and individual regulation of each needle (system KHS-9). 2. Water heating of standard needles as used in interstitial radiotherapy and overall regulation of the total system. These new systems are supposed to be applied in clinical practice and have been developed by GSP-Wien at the suggestion of the University Hospital. Patent is applied for both of them.

  20. Interstitial cystitis: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, Mary T

    2014-09-01

    Interstitial cystitis, or painful bladder syndrome, can present with lower abdominal pain/discomfort and dyspareunia, and pain in any distribution of lower spinal nerves. Patients with this condition experience some additional symptoms referable to the bladder, such as frequency, urgency, or nocturia. It can occur across all age groups, although the specific additional symptoms can vary in prevalence depending on patient age. It should be considered in patients who have other chronic pain conditions such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, irritable bowel, and vulvodynia. The cause is still largely not understood, although there are several postulated mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Diagnosis and management of interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Susan

    2014-09-01

    Interstitial cystitis is a diagnosis of exclusion. The definition has expanded over the years to encompass painful bladder syndrome. It is disease state that is often delayed in its diagnosis and difficult to manage. Treatment options include oral and intravesical therapies as well as both minor and major surgical options. Also, a patient can improve symptoms by following self-management recommendations that focus on both diet and stress management. Treatment options should be periodically evaluated with validated questionnaires to insure they are improving the patient's symptoms, and a multidisciplinary approach is best to manage the patient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. On the optimization of interstitial hyperthermia systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handl-Zeller, L.; Kaercher, K.H.; Schreier, K.; Handl, O.

    1987-01-01

    After having studied the fundamental possibilities of proceedings allowing an intracorporal transfer of energy, two systems were investigated in detail in order to achieve a wide range of application: 1. Resistance heating of tissue by modified standard needles and individual regulation of each needle (system KHS-9). 2. Water heating of standard needles as used in interstitial radiotherapy and overall regulation of the total system. These new systems are supposed to be applied in clinical practice and have been developed by GSP-Wien at the suggestion of the University Hospital. Patent is applied for both of them. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Nephron progenitor cell death elicits a limited compensatory response associated with interstitial expansion in the neonatal kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sree Deepthi Muthukrishnan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The final nephron number in an adult kidney is regulated by nephron progenitor cell availability and collecting duct branching in the fetal period. Fetal environmental perturbations that cause reductions in cell numbers in these two compartments result in low nephron endowment. Previous work has shown that maternal dietary factors influence nephron progenitor cell availability, with both caloric restriction and protein deprivation leading to reduced cell numbers through apoptosis. In this study, we evaluate the consequences of inducing nephron progenitor cell death on progenitor niche dynamics and on nephron endowment. Depletion of approximately 40% of nephron progenitor cells by expression of diphtheria toxin A at embryonic day 15 in the mouse results in 10-20% nephron reduction in the neonatal period. Analysis of cell numbers within the progenitor cell pool following induction of apoptosis reveals a compensatory response in which surviving progenitor cells increase their proliferation and replenish the niche. The proliferative response is temporally associated with infiltration of macrophages into the nephrogenic zone. Colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 has a mitogenic effect on nephron progenitor cells, providing a potential explanation for the compensatory proliferation. However, CSF1 also promotes interstitial cell proliferation, and the compensatory response is associated with interstitial expansion in recovering kidneys which can be pharmacologically inhibited by treatment with clodronate liposomes. Our findings suggest that the fetal kidney employs a macrophage-dependent compensatory regenerative mechanism to respond to acute injury caused by death of nephron progenitor cells, but that this regenerative response is associated with neonatal interstitial expansion.

  4. Macrophage Ablation Reduces M2-Like Populations and Jeopardizes Tumor Growth in a MAFIA-Based Glioma Model12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Hossain, Mohammad B.; Cortes-Santiago, Nahir; Fan, Xuejun; Kaminska, Bozena; Marini, Frank C.; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are an influential component of the glioma microenvironment. However, understanding their diversity and plasticity constitute one of the most challenging areas of research due to the paucity of models to study these cells' inherent complexity. Herein, we analyzed the role of monocytes/macrophages in glioma growth by using a transgenic model that allows for conditional ablation of this cell population. We modeled glioma using intracranial GL261-bearing CSF-1R–GFP+ macrophage Fas-induced apoptosis (MAFIA) transgenic mice. Conditional macrophage ablation was achieved by exposure to the dimerizer AP20187. Double immunofluorescence was used to characterize M1- and M2-like monocytes/macrophages during tumor growth and after conditional ablation. During glioma growth, the monocyte/macrophage population consisted predominantly of M2 macrophages. Conditional temporal depletion of macrophages reduced the number of GFP+ cells, targeting mainly the repopulation of M2-polarized cells, and altered the appearance of M1-like monocytes/macrophages, which suggested a shift in the M1/M2 macrophage balance. Of interest, compared with control-treated mice, macrophage-depleted mice had a lower tumor mitotic index, microvascular density, and reduced tumor growth. These results demonstrated the possibility of studying in vivo the role and phenotype of macrophages in gliomas and suggested that transitory depletion of CSF-1R+ population influences the reconstitutive phenotypic pool of these cells, ultimately suppressing tumor growth. The MAFIA model provides a much needed advance in defining the role of macrophages in gliomas. PMID:25925380

  5. Macrophage Ablation Reduces M2-Like Populations and Jeopardizes Tumor Growth in a MAFIA-Based Glioma Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Hossain, Mohammad B; Cortes-Santiago, Nahir; Fan, Xuejun; Kaminska, Bozena; Marini, Frank C; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria

    2015-04-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are an influential component of the glioma microenvironment. However, understanding their diversity and plasticity constitute one of the most challenging areas of research due to the paucity of models to study these cells' inherent complexity. Herein, we analyzed the role of monocytes/macrophages in glioma growth by using a transgenic model that allows for conditional ablation of this cell population. We modeled glioma using intracranial GL261-bearing CSF-1R-GFP(+) macrophage Fas-induced apoptosis (MAFIA) transgenic mice. Conditional macrophage ablation was achieved by exposure to the dimerizer AP20187. Double immunofluorescence was used to characterize M1- and M2-like monocytes/macrophages during tumor growth and after conditional ablation. During glioma growth, the monocyte/macrophage population consisted predominantly of M2 macrophages. Conditional temporal depletion of macrophages reduced the number of GFP(+) cells, targeting mainly the repopulation of M2-polarized cells, and altered the appearance of M1-like monocytes/macrophages, which suggested a shift in the M1/M2 macrophage balance. Of interest, compared with control-treated mice, macrophage-depleted mice had a lower tumor mitotic index, microvascular density, and reduced tumor growth. These results demonstrated the possibility of studying in vivo the role and phenotype of macrophages in gliomas and suggested that transitory depletion of CSF-1R(+) population influences the reconstitutive phenotypic pool of these cells, ultimately suppressing tumor growth. The MAFIA model provides a much needed advance in defining the role of macrophages in gliomas. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The impact of splenectomy on human coronary artery atherosclerosis and vascular macrophage distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Stone, James R

    Splenectomy can potentially impact atherosclerosis through multiple mechanisms including altered lipid homeostasis, increased coagulation, and altered macrophage recruitment to the plaque. In patients, splenectomy has been associated with increased rates of coronary artery events, while in experimental mice, splenectomy causes increased atherosclerosis but reduces systemic monocyte supply. In this study, the direct impact of splenectomy on human coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque severity and macrophage content was investigated. Coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque severity was determined at autopsy in 18 long-term (≥10 years) splenectomy patients and 90 matched control patients. Coronary artery macrophage content was evaluated in mild atherosclerotic plaques of 11 mid- to long-term (≥1 year) splenectomy patients and 11 matched control patients. Splenectomy was associated with reduced coronary artery atherosclerosis (P=.03). The association was most pronounced for the subgroup of patients who had undergone splenectomy 20 years or more prior to death (P=.02). There was no difference in the density of macrophages in the plaque, media, or adventitia upon comparing splenectomy and control patients. In the control group, there was no correlation between the macrophage densities in the three arterial layers. However, in the splenectomy patients, there was a strong correlation in the macrophage densities across the plaque, media, and adventitia (P≤.0002), with resulting slopes that were significantly greater than seen in the control patients (P=.0007-.011). These findings indicate that, in humans, splenectomy is associated with lower coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque severity and altered coronary artery macrophage distribution. These results suggest that the spleen can modulate the recruitment of macrophages into human coronary arteries and the progression of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Macrophage Heterogeneity in Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carian E. Boorsma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are among the most abundant cells in the respiratory tract, and they can have strikingly different phenotypes within this environment. Our knowledge of the different phenotypes and their functions in the lung is sketchy at best, but they appear to be linked to the protection of gas exchange against microbial threats and excessive tissue responses. Phenotypical changes of macrophages within the lung are found in many respiratory diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper will give an overview of what macrophage phenotypes have been described, what their known functions are, what is known about their presence in the different obstructive and restrictive respiratory diseases (asthma, COPD, pulmonary fibrosis, and how they are thought to contribute to the etiology and resolution of these diseases.

  8. Macrophages play a dual role during pulmonary tuberculosis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemans, Jaklien C.; Thepen, Theo; Weijer, Sebastiaan; Florquin, Sandrine; van Rooijen, Nico; van de Winkel, Jan G.; van der Poll, Tom

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary macrophages provide the preferred hiding and replication site of Mycobacterium tuberculosis but display antimicrobial functions. This raises questions regarding the role of macrophages during tuberculosis. We depleted lungs of activated macrophages (activated macrophage(-) mice) and

  9. Tolerance of monocytes and macrophages in response to bacterial endotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Wiśnik

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes belong to myeloid effector cells, which constitute the first line of defense against pathogens, also called the nonspecific immune system and play an important role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. In response to stimulation, monocytes differentiate into macrophages capable of microorganism phagocytosis and secrete factors that play a key role in the regulation of immune responses. However excessive exposure of monocytes/macrophages to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS of Gram negative bacteria leads to the acquisition of immune tolerance by these cells. Such state results from disruption of different biological processes, for example intracellular signaling pathways and is accompanied by a number of disease states (immune, inflammatory or neoplastic conditions. Regulation of monocytes/macrophages activity is controlled by miRNAs, which are involved in the modulation of immune tolerance acquired by these cells. Moreover, the tolerance to endotoxin is conditioned by the posttranscriptional processes and posttranslational epigenetic modifications leading to the impairment of normal immune response for example by alterations in the expression of many genes encoding immune signaling mediators. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview existing knowledge on the modulation of activity of monocytes/macrophages in response to bacterial endotoxin and impaired immune responses.

  10. Atypical presentation of a large interstitial pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheinboldt, Matthew; Ibrahim, Sherif

    2013-06-01

    We report the case of a 20-year-old female who presented to the ER with a 1-week history of worsening abdominal pain and intermittent vaginal bleeding for the previous 5 days. Physical exam was notable for bilateral adnexal tenderness and a closed cervix without motion tenderness or discharge. Laboratory data demonstrated a beta HCG level of 7,787 IU/L, and pelvic ultrasound with transvaginal imaging was subsequently performed. Neither an adnexal mass nor a normal intrauterine pregnancy was demonstrable; however, a focal right fundal 7-cm area of heterogeneous echogenicity was observed. Initial findings were felt indeterminate with considerations including potential degenerating leiomyoma coexistent with a nonvisualized intrauterine pregnancy, ectopic pregnancy, or recent spontaneous abortion versus atypical interstitial ectopic pregnancy. The patient, initially declining further clinical intervention, returned within 24 h with continued pain. A repeat ultrasound demonstrated a relatively static and unchanged appearance with only a minimal concurrent interval increase in beta HCG levels. MRI was performed for further elucidation and demonstrated a heterogeneously hypervascular right fundal interstitial 6-cm mass, which, in the clinical context, was most suspicious for an ectopic pregnancy. Confirmatory laparoscopic cornual wedge resection and salpingectomy was subsequently performed.

  11. Intravesical liposome therapy for interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Kashyap, Mahendra; Majima, Tsuyoshi; Kawamorita, Naoki; Yoshizawa, Tsuyoshi; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2017-04-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been lot of interest in the use of liposomes as lipid-based biocompatible carriers for drugs administered by the intravesical route. The lipidic bilayer structure of liposomes facilitates their adherence to the apical membrane surface of luminal cells in the bladder, and their vesicular shape allows them to co-opt the endocytosis machinery for bladder uptake after instillation. Liposomes have been shown to enhance the penetration of both water-soluble and insoluble drugs, toxins, and oligonucleotides across the bladder epithelium. Empty liposomes composed entirely of the endogenous phospholipid, sphingomyelin, could counter mucosal inflammation and promote wound healing in patients suffering from interstitial cystitis. Recent clinical studies have tested multilamellar liposomes composed entirely of sphingomyelin as a novel intravesical therapy for interstitial cystitis. In addition, liposomes have been used as a delivery platform for the instillation of botulinum toxin in overactive bladder patients. The present review discusses the properties of liposomes that are important for their intrinsic therapeutic effect, summarizes the recently completed clinical studies with intravesical liposomes and covers the latest developments in this field. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  12. The Interstitial Language and Transnational Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bartoloni

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this essay I argue that the idea of inhabiting, and of human individuality as the house of being, are fruitful ideas if located in a space defined by movement, porosity, interstitiality, and in an urban and architectural paradigm which is based on openness and inclusiveness. Transnational experiences and localities can be, to this end, extremely instructive. It is essential to articulate the notion of dwelling within an urban context in which building is the result of complex cultural and social interactions, which are characterised not only by the negotiation of space and materials but also, and more importantly, by a range of symbolic values. The symbolism that I refer to here is the product of mnemonic and emotional experiences marked by time and space, which in the case of the migratory and transnational experiences is arrived at through a delicate negotiation of the past and the present, and the ‘here’ (the current locality and the ‘there’ (the native locality. The dwelling that I speak of is, therefore, a double dwelling divided between the present at-hand and the remembered past, and as such it inhabits a space, which is both interstitial and liminal, simultaneously in and out-of-place. I have chosen the Italian Forum in Sydney as a working sample of the place-out-of-place

  13. Macrophages in bone fracture healing: Their essential role in endochondral ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlundt, Claudia; El Khassawna, Thaqif; Serra, Alessandro; Dienelt, Anke; Wendler, Sebastian; Schell, Hanna; van Rooijen, Nico; Radbruch, Andreas; Lucius, Richard; Hartmann, Susanne; Duda, Georg N; Schmidt-Bleek, Katharina

    2018-01-01

    In fracture healing, skeletal and immune system are closely interacting through common cell precursors and molecular mediators. It is thought that the initial inflammatory reaction, which involves migration of macrophages into the fracture area, has a major impact on the long term outcome of bone repair. Interestingly, macrophages reside during all stages of fracture healing. Thus, we hypothesized a critical role for macrophages in the subsequent phases of bone regeneration. This study examined the impact of in vivo induced macrophage reduction, using clodronate liposomes, on the different healing phases of bone repair in a murine model of a standard closed femoral fracture. A reduction in macrophages had no obvious effect on the early fracture healing phase, but resulted in a delayed hard callus formation, thus severely altering endochondral ossification. Clodronate treated animals clearly showed delayed bony consolidation of cartilage and enhanced periosteal bone formation. Therefore, we decided to backtrack macrophage distribution during fracture healing in non-treated mice, focusing on the identification of the M1 and M2 subsets. We observed that M2 macrophages were clearly prevalent during the ossification phase. Therefore enhancement of M2 phenotype in macrophages was investigated as a way to further bone healing. Induction of M2 macrophages through interleukin 4 and 13 significantly enhanced bone formation during the 3week investigation period. These cumulative data illustrate their so far unreported highly important role in endochondral ossification and the necessity of a fine balance in M1/M2 macrophage function, which appears mandatory to fracture healing and successful regeneration. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Controlled release of cytokines using silk-biomaterials for macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Andrew R D; Spiller, Kara L; Freytes, Donald O; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Kaplan, David L

    2015-12-01

    Polarization of macrophages into an inflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotype is important for clearing pathogens and wound repair, however chronic activation of either type of macrophage has been implicated in several diseases. Methods to locally control the polarization of macrophages is of great interest for biomedical implants and tissue engineering. To that end, silk protein was used to form biopolymer films that release either IFN-γ or IL-4 to control the polarization of macrophages. Modulation of the solubility of the silk films through regulation of β-sheet (crystalline) content enabled a short-term release (4-8 h) of either cytokine, with smaller amounts released out to 24 h. Altering the solubility of the films was accomplished by varying the time that the films were exposed to water vapor. The released IFN-γ or IL-4 induced polarization of THP-1 derived macrophages into the M1 or M2 phenotypes, respectively. The silk biomaterials were able to release enough IFN-γ or IL-4 to repolarize the macrophage from M1 to M2 and vice versa, demonstrating the well-established plasticity of macrophages. High β-sheet content films that are not soluble and do not release the trapped cytokines were also able to polarize macrophages that adhered to the surface through degradation of the silk protein. Chemically conjugating IFN-γ to silk films through disulfide bonds allowed for longer-term release to 10 days. The release of covalently attached IFN-γ from the films was also able to polarize M1 macrophages in vitro. Thus, the strategy described here offers new approaches to utilizing biomaterials for directing the polarization of macrophages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Recruitment of macrophages from the spleen contributes to myocardial fibrosis and hypertension induced by angiotensin II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning-Ping Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine whether macrophages migrated from the spleen are associated with angiotensin II-induced cardiac fibrosis and hypertension. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to angiotensin II infusion in vehicle (500 ng/kg/min for up to four weeks. In splenectomy, the spleen was removed before angiotensin II infusion. In the angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockade, telmisartan was administered by gastric gavage (10 mg/kg/day during angiotensin II infusion. The heart and aorta were isolated for Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Results: Angiotensin II infusion caused a significant reduction in the number of monocytes in the spleen through the AT1 receptor-activated monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Comparison of angiotensin II infusion, splenectomy and telmisartan comparatively reduced the recruitment of macrophages into the heart. Associated with this change, transforming growth factor β1 expression and myofibroblast proliferation were inhibited, and Smad2/3 and collagen I/III were downregulated. Furthermore, interstitial/perivascular fibrosis was attenuated. These modifications occurred in coincidence with reduced blood pressure. At week 4, invasion of macrophages and myofibroblasts in the thoracic aorta was attenuated and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase was upregulated, along with a reduction in aortic fibrosis. Conclusions: These results suggest that macrophages when recruited into the heart and aorta from the spleen potentially contribute to angiotensin II-induced cardiac fibrosis and hypertension.

  16. Functional ability and fate of pulmonary alveolar macrophages after intratracheal instillation into rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snipes, M.B.; Feddersen, D.; Mueller, H.L.; Guilmette, R.A.; Haley, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) from donor rats were intratracheally instilled into recipient rats to determine if donor macrophages were functionally similar to the recipient's own macrophages. Recipient and donor (extrinsic) PAM were equivalent in their ability to phagocytize 1.7 μm and 3.9 μm latex microspheres in vivo and sensitized sheep red blood cells in vitro. Also, the extrinsic PAM appeared functionally equivalent to recipient PAM with respect to ability to translocate into interstitial tissue and migrate to the lung-associated lymph nodes (LALN). The recipient PAN appeared to phagocytize the extrinsic PAM, but the extrinsic PAM did not appear to phagocytize the recipient PAM. This could represent a different degree of physiological coordination of intrinsic and extrinsic PAM activities in the lung. Overall, results indicated that extrinsic PAM can live and function in the lungs of recipient rats, and perform most or all of the functions ascribed to recipient PAM. Results also support the hypothesis that PAM are able to move into the pulmonary interstitium and translocate to the LALM without the involvement of other pulmonary macrophages. (author)

  17. IAP survivin regulates atherosclerotic macrophage survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanc-Brude, Olivier P.; Teissier, Elisabeth; Castier, Yves; Lesèche, Guy; Bijnens, Ann-Pascal; Daemen, Mat; Staels, Bart; Mallat, Ziad; Tedgui, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory macrophage apoptosis is critical to atherosclerotic plaque formation, but its mechanisms remain enigmatic. We hypothesized that inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) survivin regulates macrophage death in atherosclerosis. Western blot analysis revealed discrete survivin expression in

  18. In-vivo investigations on interstitial Ho:YAG laser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Perlmutter, Aaron P.; Pongratz, T.; Muschter, Rolf

    1997-05-01

    Laser induced interstitial thermotherapy is a new minimally invasive procedure for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. In this study Ho:YAG laser induced lesions were investigated on liver, kidney and prostates of canines. While the dependency of the induced lesions on the energy/pulse at a constant mean power had been investigated on the liver, the dependency on the pulse duration was studied on the kidney. Additionally the dependency of the lesions induced on the total applied energy at optimized parameters had been determined in prostate tissue. In all experiments it could be demonstrated that interstitial pulsed Ho:YAG irradiation resulted in a cavity surrounded by a coagulation zone. The results show that changing the pulse duration by a factor of two or changing the energy/pulse at a constant mean power result in no significant alteration of the lesions sizes. These experimental findings may offer new treatment modalities with respect to interstitial laser therapy of BPH without damaging the urethra.

  19. Brain White Matter Abnormalities in Female Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome: A MAPP Network Neuroimaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Melissa A; Huang, Lejian; Martucci, Katherine; Yang, Claire C; Maravilla, Kenneth R; Harris, Richard E; Clauw, Daniel J; Mackey, Sean; Ellingson, Benjamin M; Mayer, Emeran A; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Apkarian, A Vania

    2015-07-01

    Several chronic pain conditions may be distinguished by condition specific brain anatomical and functional abnormalities on imaging, which are suggestive of underlying disease processes. We present what is to our knowledge the first characterization of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome associated white matter (axonal) abnormalities based on multicenter neuroimaging from the MAPP Research Network. We assessed 34 women with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and 32 healthy controls using questionnaires on pain, mood and daily function. White matter microstructure was evaluated by diffusion tensor imaging to model directional water flow along axons or fractional anisotropy. Regions correlating with clinical parameters were further examined for gender and syndrome dependence. Women with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome showed numerous white matter abnormalities that correlated with pain severity, urinary symptoms and impaired quality of life. Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome was characterized by decreased fractional anisotropy in aspects of the right anterior thalamic radiation, the left forceps major and the right longitudinal fasciculus. Increased fractional anisotropy was detected in the right superior and bilateral inferior longitudinal fasciculi. To our knowledge we report the first characterization of brain white matter abnormalities in women with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. Regional decreases and increases in white matter integrity across multiple axonal tracts were associated with symptom severity. Given that white matter abnormalities closely correlated with hallmark symptoms of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, including bladder pain and urinary symptoms, brain anatomical alterations suggest that there are neuropathological contributions to chronic urological pelvic pain. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  20. Macrophage Heterogeneity and Plasticity: Impact of Macrophage Biomarkers on Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joselyn Rojas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is a global epidemic, currently representing the worldwide leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Atherosclerosis is the fundamental pathophysiologic component of CVD, where the immune system plays an essential role. Monocytes and macrophages are key mediators in this aspect: due to their heterogeneity and plasticity, these cells may act as either pro- or anti-inflammatory mediators. Indeed, monocytes may develop heterogeneous functional phenotypes depending on the predominating pro- or anti-inflammatory microenvironment within the lesion, resulting in classic, intermediate, and non-classic monocytes, each with strikingly differing features. Similarly, macrophages may also adopt heterogeneous profiles being mainly M1 and M2, the former showing a proinflammatory profile while the latter demonstrates anti-inflammatory traits; they are further subdivided in several subtypes with more specialized functions. Furthermore, macrophages may display plasticity by dynamically shifting between phenotypes in response to specific signals. Each of these distinct cell profiles is associated with diverse biomarkers which may be exploited for therapeutic intervention, including IL-10, IL-13, PPAR-γ, LXR, NLRP3 inflammasomes, and microRNAs. Direct modulation of the molecular pathways concerning these potential macrophage-related targets represents a promising field for new therapeutic alternatives in atherosclerosis and CVD.

  1. Theory of the change of elastic constants by interstitials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuer, N.; Dederichs, P.H.; Lehmann, C.; Leibfried, G.; Scholz, A.

    1975-01-01

    The theory of the change of elastic constants by point-defects, in particular by interstitials, is briefly summarized. The typical effects of spring changes in a defect lattice on the elastic data are discussed qualitatively. Numerical results for the change of elastic constants by self-interstitials and vacancies are given and compared with experimental data for Cu and Al

  2. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis in a Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Benedikte; Hesse, Ulrik; Hansen, Alastair B

    2010-01-01

    To characterize and evaluate a Danish patient population with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC), using a working definition for BPS/IC incorporating six variables, and a set of criteria defined by the European Society for the Study of Interstitial Cystitis (ESSIC); to describe...

  3. Evaluation of Patients with Painful Bladder Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Jacques Wyndaele

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This review looks into the evaluation of patients with interstitial cystitis (IC. Interstitial cystitis is not easy to define. There is a lot of activity in this domain and a great international effort is made to get to a generally accepted definition and standardised protocols for diagnosis and treatment. We have not reached this point so far.

  4. Atomic displacements due to interstitial hydrogen in Cu and Pd

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The density functional theory (DFT) is used to study the atomic interac- tions in transition metal-based interstitial alloys. The strain field is calculated in the discrete lattice model using Kanzaki method. The total energy and hence atomic forces between interstitial hydrogen and transition metal hosts are calculated ...

  5. Interstitial ectopic pregnancy: a case report | Alagbe | Pan African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interstitial ectopic pregnancy is a rare type of tubal pregnancy that poses diagnostic challenge. It is associated with the highest risk of massive, uncontrollable bleeding and can result in uterine rupture in the second trimester. This is a rare case of unruptured interstitial ectopic diagnosed in the first trimester by ...

  6. Advanced sickle cell associated interstitial lung disease presenting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous studies have reported abnormal pulmonary function and pulmonary hypertension among Nigerians with sickle cell disease, but there is no report of interstitial lung disease among them. We report a Nigerian sickle cell patient who presented with computed tomography proven interstitial lung disease complicated by ...

  7. Acute interstitial nephritis with acetaminophen and alcohol intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexopoulou Iakovina

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis (AIN represents a growing cause of renal failure in current medical practice. While antimicrobials and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are typically associated with drug-induced AIN, few reports have been made on the involvement of other analgesics. We report our experience in managing a 17-year-old female with AIN and subsequent renal injury following an acetaminophen overdose in conjunction with acute alcohol intoxication. It is well established that acetaminophen metabolism, particularly at high doses, produces reactive metabolites that may induce renal and hepatic toxicity. It is also plausible however, that such reactive species could instead alter renal peptide immunogenicity, thereby inducing AIN. In the following report, we review a possible mechanism for the acetaminophen-induced AIN observed in our patient and also discuss the potential involvement of acute alcohol ingestion in disease onset. The objective of our report is to increase awareness of healthcare professionals to the potential involvement of these commonly used agents in AIN pathogenesis.

  8. Role of Osteal Macrophages in Bone Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wook Cho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages have been shown to have pleiotropic functions in various pathophysiologies, especially in terms of anti-inflammatory and regenerative activity. Recently, the novel functions of bone marrow resident macrophages (called osteal macrophages were intensively studied in bone development, remodeling and tissue repair processes. This review discusses the current evidence for a role of osteal macrophages in bone modeling, remodeling, and fracture healing processes.

  9. Hemopexin therapy reverts heme-induced proinflammatory phenotypic switching of macrophages in a mouse model of sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinchi, Francesca; Costa da Silva, Milene; Ingoglia, Giada; Petrillo, Sara; Brinkman, Nathan; Zuercher, Adrian; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Tolosano, Emanuela; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2016-01-28

    Hemolytic diseases, such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, are characterized by enhanced release of hemoglobin and heme into the circulation, heme-iron loading of reticulo-endothelial system macrophages, and chronic inflammation. Here we show that in addition to activating the vascular endothelium, hemoglobin and heme excess alters the macrophage phenotype in sickle cell disease. We demonstrate that exposure of cultured macrophages to hemolytic aged red blood cells, heme, or iron causes their functional phenotypic change toward a proinflammatory state. In addition, hemolysis and macrophage heme/iron accumulation in a mouse model of sickle disease trigger similar proinflammatory phenotypic alterations in hepatic macrophages. On the mechanistic level, this critically depends on reactive oxygen species production and activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that the heme scavenger hemopexin protects reticulo-endothelial macrophages from heme overload in heme-loaded Hx-null mice and reduces production of cytokines and reactive oxygen species. Importantly, in sickle mice, the administration of human exogenous hemopexin attenuates the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Taken together, our data suggest that therapeutic administration of hemopexin is beneficial to counteract heme-driven macrophage-mediated inflammation and its pathophysiologic consequences in sickle cell disease. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Selective Uterine Artery Embolization for Management of Interstitial Ectopic Pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seung Boo; Lee, Sang Jin; Joe, Hwan Sung; Goo, Dong Erk; Chang, Yun Woo [Soonchunhyang University Gumi Hospital, Gumi (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Hun [Chosun University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Interstitial pregnancy is defined as any gestation that develops in the uterine portion of the fallopian tubes lateral to the round ligament. Interstitial pregnancies account for 2-4% of all ectopic pregnancies and have been reported to have an associated 2% to 2.5% maternal mortality rate. The traditional treatment for interstitial pregnancy using surgical cornual resection may cause infertility or uterine rupture in subsequent pregnancies. Recently, the early identification of intact interstitial pregnancy has been made possible in many cases with high resolution transvaginal ultrasound as well as more sensitive assays for betahuman chorionic gonadotropin ({beta}-hCG). The treatment includes: hysteroscopic transcervical currettage, local and systemic methotrexate (MTX) therapy and prostaglandin or potassium chloride injection of the ectopic mass under sonographic guidance. We describe a case of successful treatment of interstitial pregnancy using uterine artery embolization, after failure of methotrexate treatment.

  11. Selective Uterine Artery Embolization for Management of Interstitial Ectopic Pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seung Boo; Lee, Sang Jin; Joe, Hwan Sung; Goo, Dong Erk; Chang, Yun Woo; Kim, Dong Hun

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial pregnancy is defined as any gestation that develops in the uterine portion of the fallopian tubes lateral to the round ligament. Interstitial pregnancies account for 2-4% of all ectopic pregnancies and have been reported to have an associated 2% to 2.5% maternal mortality rate. The traditional treatment for interstitial pregnancy using surgical cornual resection may cause infertility or uterine rupture in subsequent pregnancies. Recently, the early identification of intact interstitial pregnancy has been made possible in many cases with high resolution transvaginal ultrasound as well as more sensitive assays for betahuman chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG). The treatment includes: hysteroscopic transcervical currettage, local and systemic methotrexate (MTX) therapy and prostaglandin or potassium chloride injection of the ectopic mass under sonographic guidance. We describe a case of successful treatment of interstitial pregnancy using uterine artery embolization, after failure of methotrexate treatment

  12. Heterogeneity of macrophage activation in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forlenza, M.; Fink, I.R.; Raes, G.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we focus on four different activation states of fish macrophages. In vitro, stimulation with microbial ligands induces the development of innate activated macrophages whereas classically activated macrophages can be induced by stimulation with LPS in combination with (recombinant)

  13. Glutathione peroxidase 3 localizes to the epithelial lining fluid and the extracellular matrix in interstitial lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Schamberger, A.; Schiller, H.; Fernandez, I.; Sterclova, M.; Heinzelmann, K.; Hennen, E.; Hatz, R.; Behr, J.; Vasakova, M.; Mann, M.; Eickelberg, O.; Staab-Weijnitz, C.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant antioxidant activity and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) are hallmarks of interstitial lung diseases (ILD). It is known that oxidative stress alters the ECM, but extracellular antioxidant defence mechanisms in ILD are incompletely understood. Here, we extracted abundance and detergent solubility of extracellular antioxidant enzymes from a proteomic dataset of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in mice and assessed regulation and distribution of glutathione peroxidase ...

  14. TNFα-induced macrophage death via caspase-dependent and independent pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tri M.; Temkin, Vladislav; Shi, Bo; Pagliari, Lisa; Daniel, Soizic; Ferran, Christiane; Pope, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages are the principal source of TNFα, yet they are highly resistant to TNFα-mediated cell death. Previously, employing in vitro differentiated human macrophages, we showed that following the inhibition of NF-κB, TNFα-induced caspase-8 activation contributes to DNA fragmentation but is not necessary for the loss of the inner mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) or cell death. We here extend these observations to demonstrate that, when NF-κB is inhibited in macrophages, TNFα alters lysosomal membrane permeability (LMP). This results in the release of cathepsin B with subsequent loss of ΔΨm and caspase-8 independent cell death. Interestingly, the cytoprotective, NF-κB-dependent protein A20 was rapidly induced in macrophages treated with TNFα. Ectopic expression of A20 in macrophages preserves LMP following treatment with TNFα, and as a result, mitochondrial integrity is safeguarded and macrophages are protected from cell death. These observations demonstrate that TNFα triggers both caspase 8-dependent and -independent cell death pathways in macrophages and identify a novel mechanism by which A20 protects these cells against both pathways. PMID:19152111

  15. Curdlan-Conjugated PLGA Nanoparticles Possess Macrophage Stimulant Activity and Drug Delivery Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukulula, Matshawandile; Hayeshi, Rose; Fonteh, Pascaline; Meyer, Debra; Ndamase, Abongile; Madziva, Michael T; Khumalo, Vincent; Labuschagne, Philip; Lubuschagne, Philip; Naicker, Brendon; Swai, Hulda; Dube, Admire

    2015-08-01

    There is significant interest in the application of nanoparticles to deliver immunostimulatory signals to cells. We hypothesized that curdlan (immune stimulating polymer) could be conjugated to PLGA and nanoparticles from this copolymer would possess immunostimulatory activity, be non-cytotoxic and function as an effective sustained drug release system. Carbodiimide chemistry was employed to conjugate curdlan to PLGA. The conjugate (C-PLGA) was characterized using (1)H and (13)C NMR, FTIR, DSC and TGA. Nanoparticles were synthesized using an emulsion-solvent evaporation technique. Immunostimulatory activity was characterized in THP-1 derived macrophages. MTT assay and real-time impedance measurements were used to characterize polymer and nanoparticle toxicity and uptake in macrophages. Drug delivery capability was assessed across Caco-2 cells using rifampicin as a model drug. Spectral characterization confirmed successful synthesis of C-PLGA. C-PLGA nanoparticles enhanced phosphorylated ERK production in macrophages indicating cell stimulation. Nanoparticles provided slow release of rifampicin across Caco-2 cells. Polymers but not nanoparticles altered the adhesion profiles of the macrophages. Impedance measurements suggested Ca(2+) dependent uptake of nanoparticles by the macrophages. PLGA nanoparticles with macrophage stimulating and sustained drug delivery capabilities have been prepared. These nanoparticles can be used to stimulate macrophages and concurrently deliver drug in infectious disease therapy.

  16. Characterization of macrophage adhesion molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remold-O'Donnell, E.; Savage, B.

    1988-01-01

    Macrophage adhesion molecule (MAM), an abundant surface molecule which functions in the adhesion and spreading of guinea pig macrophages on surfaces, is characterized as a heterodimer of the trypsin- and plasmin-sensitive glycopeptide gp160 (MAM-α) and the glycopeptide gp93 (MAM-β). The density of MAM molecules is estimated at 630,000 per macrophage on the basis of quantitative binding of 125 I-labeled monoclonal antibody. The glycopeptide subunits display microheterogeneity on isoelectrofocusing; the pI is 5.8-6.3 for gp160 (MAM-α) and 6.4-7.0 for gp93 (MAM-β). A neutrophil gp160, gp93 molecule was shown to be indistinguishable from macrophage MAM on the basis of electrophoresis, isoelectrofocusing, and reactivity with 10 monoclonal antibodies. A related heterodimer of gp93 associated with a larger, antigenically different glycopeptide (gp180, gp93)was identified on circulating lymphocytes. Cumulative properties indicate that MAM is the guinea pig analog of human Mo1 and mouse Mac-1

  17. HIV-1 and the macrophage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, Sebastiaan M.; Cobos-Jimenez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; van 't Wout, Angelique B.

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages and CD4(+) T cells are natural target cells for HIV-1, and both cell types contribute to the establishment of the viral reservoir that is responsible for continuous residual virus replication during antiretroviral therapy and viral load rebound upon treatment interruption. Scientific

  18. Rare pneumoconiosis induced by long-term amorphous silica exposure: the histological characteristics and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 as an antifibrogenic mediator in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumasaka, Toshio; Akaike, Yasushi; Nakamura, Osamu; Yamazaki, Kazuma; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Takemura, Tamiko

    2011-11-01

    Pneumoconiosis induced by non-crystalline silica is considered rare, although silicosis resulting from contact with crystalline silica is a well-known hazard associated with progressive pulmonary fibrosis. Here we describe a patient with pneumoconiosis induced by diatomaceous earth composed of amorphous silica detected by two-dimensional imaging of chemical elements. The histology revealed that the disease was characterized by a granulomatous reaction in the lung. A large number of macrophages laden with yellow and black pigments accumulated in alveolar spaces and were incorporated into the interstitial sites. Bronchiolar walls were destroyed by palisade macrophages, suggesting airflow obstruction. Packed macrophages adhering to and covering the denuded interstitium indicated that macrophages might be incorporated into pulmonary interstitium in this fashion. Immunohistochemistry showed that cyclooxygenase-2, an antifibrogenic mediator, was intensely expressed in the macrophages compared with macrophages in control lungs. No birefringent material was found in the tissues. When two-dimensional analysis of chemical elements was performed using an electron probe microanalyzer with a wavelength-dispersive spectrometer, the resultant fine mapping of silicon and oxygen on the tissue indicated that the pigments phagocytosed by macrophages corresponded to amorphous silica. In conclusion, two-dimensional analysis of elements is very useful for pathologists in correlating the presence of chemical elements with histological changes. © 2011 The Authors. Pathology International © 2011 Japanese Society of Pathology and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Tumor-Associated Macrophages Derived from Circulating Inflammatory Monocytes Degrade Collagen through Cellular Uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel Hargbøl; Jürgensen, Henrik Jessen; Siersbæk, Majken Storm

    2017-01-01

    -associated macrophage (TAM)-like cells that degrade collagen in a mannose receptor-dependent manner. Accordingly, mannose-receptor-deficient mice display increased intratumoral collagen. Whole-transcriptome profiling uncovers a distinct extracellular matrix-catabolic signature of these collagen-degrading TAMs. Lineage......-ablation studies reveal that collagen-degrading TAMs originate from circulating CCR2+ monocytes. This study identifies a function of TAMs in altering the tumor microenvironment through endocytic collagen turnover and establishes macrophages as centrally engaged in tumor-associated collagen degradation. Madsen et...... al. identify a population of tumor-associated macrophages with a distinct matrix catabolic signature as key effectors of collagen turnover during invasive tumor growth. These matrix-degrading macrophages are largely derived from CCR2+ monocytes reprogrammed by the tumor microenvironment and degrade...

  20. Exercise enhances wound healing and prevents cancer progression during aging by targeting macrophage polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Jorming; Ladiges, Warren C

    2014-07-01

    Physical activity, which can include regular and repetitive exercise training, has been shown to decrease the incidence of age-related diseases. Aging is characterized by aberrant immune responses, including impaired wound healing and increased cancer risk. The behavior and polarized phenotype of tissue macrophages are distinct between young and old organisms. The balance of M1 and M2 macrophages is altered in the aged tissue microenvironment, with a tilt towards an M2-dominant macrophage population, as well as its associated signaling pathways. These M2-type responses may result in unresolved inflammation and create an environment that impairs wound healing and is favorable for cancer growth. We discuss the concept that exercise training can improve the regulation of macrophage polarization and normalize the inflammatory process, and thereby exert anticancer effects and enhance wound healing in older humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pemphigus vulgaris-associated interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yi-Xiu; Chu, Jin-Gang; Xiao, Ting; Chen, Hong-Duo

    2016-07-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases (AIBDs)-associated interstitial lung disease (ILD) is extremely rare. Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an intraepidermal autoimmune blistering disease caused by circulating autoantibodies against desmoglein. To date, PV-associated ILD has rarely been reported in English literature. We report a rare association of PV and ILD. A 53-year-old Chinese female with PV for 8 months developed ILD after a relapse of PV for 2 months due to discontinuation of oral prednisone by herself. She was successfully treated by systemic methylprednisolone. Taken previously reported bullous pemphigoid-associated ILD and linear IgA/IgG bullous dermatosis-associated ILD together, in general, AIBDs-associated ILD occurs when AIBDs relapse or are not controlled, responds well to systemic corticosteroids, and has a relatively better prognosis when compared with rheumatoid arthritis- or dermatomyositis-associated ILD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Systems medicine advances in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiffo, Flavia R; Eickelberg, Oliver; Fernandez, Isis E

    2017-09-30

    Fibrotic lung diseases involve subject-environment interactions, together with dysregulated homeostatic processes, impaired DNA repair and distorted immune functions. Systems medicine-based approaches are used to analyse diseases in a holistic manner, by integrating systems biology platforms along with clinical parameters, for the purpose of understanding disease origin, progression, exacerbation and remission.Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) refer to a heterogeneous group of complex fibrotic diseases. The increase of systems medicine-based approaches in the understanding of ILDs provides exceptional advantages by improving diagnostics, unravelling phenotypical differences, and stratifying patient populations by predictable outcomes and personalised treatments. This review discusses the state-of-the-art contributions of systems medicine-based approaches in ILDs over the past 5 years. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  3. Interstitial radiophosphorus diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portnoj, S.M.; Gabuniya, R.I.; Godin, V.P.; Letyagin, V.P.

    1992-01-01

    Method of invasive β-radiometry in breast cancer was developed. Analysis of observations of 148 patients with breast cancer was presented. Qualitative increase of count efficiency is the important advantage for interstitial β-radiometry in intratumoral situation of β-detector. Radionuclide activity of 37-74 kBq/kg permits to receive values of relative accumulation of 32 P in a tumor (RAPTu1) by invasive method. Tendency is evident to some decrease of mean values of RAPTu1 in investigations conducted in 70 hrs and more after 32 P introduction. Study on relative accumulation of radionuclide in tumor after conservative treatment can serve as a criterion for evaluation of efficiency of antitumor treatment

  4. Treatment of interstitial cystitis in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hung Hsieh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis (IC has been described as a chronic debilitating sterile inflammatory multifactorial bladder syndrome of unknown etiology. IC is characterized by bladder pain (or suprapubic pain associated with urgency, urinary frequency, and nocturia. Because the pathogenesis of IC remains unclear, it is still an enigma and represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The diagnosis of IC remains unclear and is based on exclusion of other diseases. Consequently, IC has usually been underdiagnosed, and the consensus on best available treatment for the disease is lacking. The current goal for the treatment of IC is usually symptomatic relief, and treatment protocols are based on empiricism. Multiple forms of therapy are available, and most patients can be managed conservatively. Nevertheless, the efficacy of most treatments is short term. This review article gives an overview of the available treatments for IC.

  5. The multiple faces of leukocyte interstitial migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lämmermann, Tim; Germain, Ronald N.

    2014-01-01

    Spatiotemporal control of leukocyte dynamics within tissues is critical for successful innate and adaptive immune responses. Homeostatic trafficking and coordinated infiltration into and within sites of inflammation and infection rely on signaling in response to extracellular cues that in turn controls a variety of intracellular protein networks regulating leukocyte motility, migration, chemotaxis, positioning, and cell–cell interaction. In contrast to mesenchymal cells, leukocytes migrate in an amoeboid fashion by rapid cycles of actin polymerization and actomyosin contraction, and their migration in tissues is generally referred to as low adhesive and nonproteolytic. The interplay of actin network expansion, contraction, and adhesion shapes the exact mode of amoeboid migration, and in this review, we explore how leukocyte subsets potentially harness the same basic biomechanical mechanisms in a cell-type-specific manner. Most of our detailed understanding of these processes derives from in vitro migration studies in three-dimensional gels and confined spaces that mimic geometrical aspects of physiological tissues. We summarize these in vitro results and then critically compare them to data from intravital imaging of leukocyte interstitial migration in mouse tissues. We outline the technical challenges of obtaining conclusive mechanistic results from intravital studies, discuss leukocyte migration strategies in vivo, and present examples of mode switching during physiological interstitial migration. These findings are also placed in the context of leukocyte migration defects in primary immunodeficiencies. This overview of both in vitro and in vivo studies highlights recent progress in understanding the molecular and biophysical mechanisms that shape robust leukocyte migration responses in physiologically complex and heterogeneous environments. PMID:24573488

  6. Interstitial photonic radiosurgery for brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Osami; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Iseki, Hiroshi; Hori, Tomokatsu; Takakura, Kintomo [Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan). Neurological Inst.

    1999-12-01

    The photon radiosurgery system (PRS) is a developed of the Photo-electron Corp. of Walham, Mass. The heart of this system is a thin needle, 3 mm in diameter and 100 mm long, from whose tip low-energy X-ray photon are isotropically emitted. This apparatus is a compact radiosurgery system that irradiates soft X ray from the tip of its small probe (weight of the machine=1.9 Kg). The PRS can be used either with a stereotactic frame or during a craniotomy as interstitial radiotherapy. The PRS is able to irradiate 15 Gy at the portion of 1.5 cm from the center for about 20 minutes and avoid severe damage to surrounding normal brain because of steep dose distribution curve. Because this system emits low-energy photons, almost the x-rays are attenuated in the patient. For a treatment of this system, dose rates outside the patient are close to background radiation levels. No special shielding of the patient or health care personnel is required. Basic examination of this system was done. C 6 cell line of Glioma was irradiated by PRS in vitro. A majority of tumor cells were died after 24 hrs. This time we estimated the effect of the PRS for brain tumors. We underwent the PRS to 72 patients from June 1995 to May 1999. Sixty-eight patients underwent intraoperative irradiation after removal and 4 patients had interstitial irradiation after stereotactic biopsy. All 16 cases of primary anaplastic astrocytomas survived and demonstrated good Karnofski performance scale. Median survival tomes of 17 primary cases of glioblastoma is 14 month. Two cases of malignant lymphoma showed complete remission in CT scan 24 hours after intraoperative radiosurgery using PRS and 2 cases of germ cell tumor demonstrated dramatic decrease of tumor size in a short period. There was no definite newly neurological deficit. The intraoperative radiosurgery using PRS is useful adjuvant therapy for brain tumors. (author)

  7. Metabolic and Epigenetic Coordination of T Cell and Macrophage Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Anthony T; Goldrath, Ananda W; Glass, Christopher K

    2017-05-16

    Recognition of pathogens by innate and adaptive immune cells instructs rapid alterations of cellular processes to promote effective resolution of infection. To accommodate increased bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands, metabolic pathways are harnessed to maximize proliferation and effector molecule production. In parallel, activation initiates context-specific gene-expression programs that drive effector functions and cell fates that correlate with changes in epigenetic landscapes. Many chromatin- and DNA-modifying enzymes make use of substrates and cofactors that are intermediates of metabolic pathways, providing potential cross talk between metabolism and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. In this review, we discuss recent studies of T cells and macrophages supporting a role for metabolic activity in integrating environmental signals with activation-induced gene-expression programs through modulation of the epigenome and speculate as to how this may influence context-specific macrophage and T cell responses to infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of the Micro-Environment of the Testis that Shapes the Phenotype and Function of Testicular Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Fijak, Monika; Hossain, Hamid; Markmann, Melanie; Nüsing, Rolf M; Lochnit, Günter; Hartmann, Michaela F; Wudy, Stefan A; Zhang, Lizong; Gu, Huanpeng; Konrad, Lutz; Chakraborty, Trinad; Meinhardt, Andreas; Bhushan, Sudhanshu

    2017-06-01

    Macrophages are important in the activation of innate immune responses and in a tissue-specific manner in the maintenance of organ homeostasis. Testicular macrophages (TM), which reside in the testicular interstitial space, comprise the largest leukocyte population in the testes and are assumed to play a relevant function in maintaining testicular immune privilege. Numerous studies have indicated that the interstitial fluid (IF) surrounding the TM has immunosuppressive properties, which may influence the phenotype of TM. However, the identity of the immunosuppressive molecules present in the IF is poorly characterized. We show that the rat testicular IF shifted GM-CSF-induced M1 toward the M2 macrophage phenotype. IF-polarized M2 macrophages mimic the properties of TM, such as increased expression of CD163, high secretion of IL-10, and low secretion of TNF-α. In addition, IF-polarized macrophages display immunoregulatory functions by inducing expansion of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells. We further found that corticosterone was the principal immunosuppressive molecule present in the IF and that the glucocorticoid receptor is needed for induction of the testis-specific phenotype of TM. In addition, TM locally produce small amounts of corticosterone, which suppresses the basal expression of inflammatory genes as a means to render TM refractory to inflammatory stimuli. Taken together, these results suggest that the corticosterone present in the testicular environment shapes the immunosuppressive function and phenotype of TM and that this steroid may play an important role in the establishment and sustenance of the immune privilege of the testis. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Regulation of tumor invasion by interstitial fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Adrian C.; Swartz, Melody A.

    2011-02-01

    The importance of the tumor microenvironment in cancer progression is undisputed, yet the significance of biophysical forces in the microenvironment remains poorly understood. Interstitial fluid flow is a nearly ubiquitous and physiologically relevant biophysical force that is elevated in tumors because of tumor-associated angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, as well as changes in the tumor stroma. Not only does it apply physical forces to cells directly, but interstitial flow also creates gradients of soluble signals in the tumor microenvironment, thus influencing cell behavior and modulating cell-cell interactions. In this paper, we highlight our current understanding of interstitial fluid flow in the context of the tumor, focusing on the physical changes that lead to elevated interstitial flow, how cells sense flow and how they respond to changes in interstitial flow. In particular, we emphasize that interstitial flow can directly promote tumor cell invasion through a mechanism known as autologous chemotaxis, and indirectly support tumor invasion via both biophysical and biochemical cues generated by stromal cells. Thus, interstitial fluid flow demonstrates how important biophysical factors are in cancer, both by modulating cell behavior and coupling biophysical and biochemical signals.

  10. Modeling of interstitial diffusion of ion-implanted boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velichko, O.I.; Knyazheva, N.V.

    2009-01-01

    A model of the interstitial diffusion of ion-implanted boron during rapid thermal annealing of silicon layers previously amorphized by implantation of germanium has been proposed. It is supposed that the boron interstitials are created continuously during annealing due to generation, dissolution, or rearrangement of the clusters of impurity atoms which are formed in the ion-implanted layers with impurity concentration above the solubility limit. The local elastic stresses arising due to the difference of boron atomic radius and atomic radius of silicon also contribute to the generation of boron interstitials. A simulation of boron redistribution during thermal annealing for 60 s at a temperature of 850 C has been carried out. The calculated profile agrees well with the experimental data. A number of the parameters of interstitial diffusion have been derived. In particular, the average migration length of nonequilibrium boron interstitials is equal to 12 nm. It was also obtained that approximately 1.94% of boron atoms were converted to the interstitial sites, participated in the fast interstitial migration, and then became immobile again transferring into a substitutional position or forming the electrically inactive complexes with crystal lattice defects. (authors)

  11. Regulation of tumor invasion by interstitial fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, Adrian C; Swartz, Melody A

    2011-01-01

    The importance of the tumor microenvironment in cancer progression is undisputed, yet the significance of biophysical forces in the microenvironment remains poorly understood. Interstitial fluid flow is a nearly ubiquitous and physiologically relevant biophysical force that is elevated in tumors because of tumor-associated angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, as well as changes in the tumor stroma. Not only does it apply physical forces to cells directly, but interstitial flow also creates gradients of soluble signals in the tumor microenvironment, thus influencing cell behavior and modulating cell–cell interactions. In this paper, we highlight our current understanding of interstitial fluid flow in the context of the tumor, focusing on the physical changes that lead to elevated interstitial flow, how cells sense flow and how they respond to changes in interstitial flow. In particular, we emphasize that interstitial flow can directly promote tumor cell invasion through a mechanism known as autologous chemotaxis, and indirectly support tumor invasion via both biophysical and biochemical cues generated by stromal cells. Thus, interstitial fluid flow demonstrates how important biophysical factors are in cancer, both by modulating cell behavior and coupling biophysical and biochemical signals

  12. Impaired Functions of Macrophage from Cystic Fibrosis Patients: CD11b, TLR-5 Decrease and sCD14, Inflammatory Cytokines Increase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonin-Le Jeune, Karin; Le Jeune, André; Jouneau, Stéphane; Belleguic, Chantal; Roux, Pierre-François; Jaguin, Marie; Dimanche-Boitre, Marie-Thérèse; Lecureur, Valérie; Leclercq, Caroline; Desrues, Benoît; Brinchault, Graziella; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Martin-Chouly, Corinne

    2013-01-01

    Background Early in life, cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are infected with microorganisms. The role of macrophages has largely been underestimated in literature, whereas the focus being mostly on neutrophils and epithelial cells. Macrophages may however play a significant role in the initiating stages of this disease, via an inability to act as a suppressor cell. Yet macrophage dysfunction may be the first step in cascade of events leading to chronic inflammation/infection in CF. Moreover, reports have suggested that CFTR contribute to altered inflammatory response in CF by modification of normal macrophage functions. Objectives In order to highlight possible intrinsic macrophage defects due to impaired CFTR, we have studied inflammatory cytokines secretions, recognition of pathogens and phagocytosis in peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages from stable adult CF patients and healthy subjects (non-CF). Results In CF macrophage supernatants, concentrations of sCD14, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10 were strongly raised. Furthermore expression of CD11b and TLR-5 were sorely decreased on CF macrophages. Beside, no difference was observed for mCD14, CD16, CD64, TLR-4 and TLR1/TLR-2 expressions. Moreover, a strong inhibition of phagocytosis was observed for CF macrophages. Elsewhere CFTR inhibition in non-CF macrophages also led to alterations of phagocytosis function as well as CD11b expression. Conclusions Altogether, these findings demonstrate excessive inflammation in CF macrophages, characterized by overproduction of sCD14 and inflammatory cytokines, with decreased expression of CD11b and TLR-5, and impaired phagocytosis. This leads to altered clearance of pathogens and non-resolution of infection by CF macrophages, thereby inducing an exaggerated pro-inflammatory response. PMID:24098711

  13. Interstitial lung diseases with fibrosis - the pattern at high resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarzemska, A.; Lasek, W.; Nawrocka, E.; Meder, G.; Zapala, M.

    2003-01-01

    Surgical lung biopsy, either open thoracotomy or video-assisted thoracoscopy is recommended in the diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases (ILD). In some cases, however, the repetitive pattern of radiological features in high-resolution computed tomography is often sufficient to confirm the diagnosis in a non-invasive manner. The purpose of the study was to determine whether patients with ILD can be selected on the basis of the HRCT pattern. Thin-section CT scans were performed in 40 patients with histologically proven idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (26 patients with usual interstitial pneumonia UIP, 2 patients with desquamative interstitial pneumonia DIP, 2 patients with bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia BOOP, 2 patients with non-specific interstitial pneumonia NSIP, 11 patients with hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and 3 patients with pulmonary histiocytosis X). The location and the intensity of lesions were taken into consideration. Clinical and histopathological findings were compared. HRCT features of interstitial lung diseases such as nodules and cystic spaces in hypersensitivity pneumonitis and pulmonary histiocytosis, and ground-glass opacities in idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIP) were statistically significant for differential diagnosis in ILD cases. Combination of honeycombing and ground-glass opacities found in UIP and nodules found in DIP were also statistically significant features in IIP subtypes diagnosis. In some cases, HRCT patterns of hypersensitivity pneumonitis, pulmonary histiocytosis X and IPF combined with clinical findings allowed for the accurate diagnosis without resorting to lung biopsy. Within a group of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia only in usual interstitial pneumonia characteristic pattern in thin-section CT can be defined. In other subgroups some typical features can imply a diagnosis. (author)

  14. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Ballestas, Mary E. [Department of Pediatrics Infectious Disease, Children' s of Alabama, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Robbins, David J. [Department of Surgery, Molecular Oncology Program, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami (United States); Matalon, Sadis [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Deshane, Jessy S. [Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Afaq, Farrukh [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bickers, David R. [Department of Dermatology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions.

  15. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Elmets, Craig A.; Robbins, David J.; Matalon, Sadis; Deshane, Jessy S.; Afaq, Farrukh; Bickers, David R.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions

  16. Selective uterine artery embolization for management of interstitial ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seung Boo; Lee, Sang Jin; Joe, Hwan Sung; Goo, Dong Erk; Chang, Yun Woo; Kim, Dong Hun

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial ectopic pregnancy is a rare condition of pregnancy and may be very dangerous if not identified and treated urgently. We report a case of successful treatment of an interstitial pregnancy using selective uterine artery embolization. A 27-year-old woman with interstitial pregnancy was treated by uterine artery embolization after failure of systemic methotrexate treatment. Her serum beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) was undetectable one month after the therapeutic embolization and transvaginal sonography 31 days after embolization showed normal endometrium and cornu. The patient achieved a normal pregnancy eight months after embolization.

  17. A conservative and fertility preserving treatment for interstitial ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Sarah D; Busbridge, Romy C; Gard, Gregory B

    2013-04-01

    This is a case series of women presenting to a tertiary care centre with a diagnosis of interstitial pregnancy. Dilatation and evacuation was performed under ultrasound control with systemic methotrexate post-operatively. All women had successful termination of their interstitial pregnancy. Although described in the international literature, this is the first time that this technique has been documented in Australia, and it may ultimately prove to be a relatively safe and simple fertility preserving method of treating women with unruptured interstitial pregnancies. © 2013 The Authors ANZJOG © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  18. High-resolution CT of lymphoid interstitial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilgrain, V.; Frija, J.; Yana, C.; Couderc, L.J.; David, M.; Clauvel, J.P.; Laval-Jeantet, M.

    1989-01-01

    Three patients with lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (two HIV 1+ patients with chronic lymphadenopathic syndromes and one with a not-characterized autoimmune disease) have been studied with high-resolution computed tomography (HR-CT). This technique reveals septal lines, small reticulonodular opacities, polyhedral micronodular opacities, 'ground-glass' opacities and a dense, subpleural, curved broken line in one patient. The lesions dominate in the bases of the lungs. They are not characteristic for lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. If a patient presents with a chronic lymphadenopathic syndrome, the diagnosis of an opportunistic infection should not be automatically made, since the syndrome can be caused by lymphoid interstitial pneumonia [fr

  19. Bladder afferent hyperexcitability in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Naoki; Oguchi, Tomohiko; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yasuhito; Yoshikawa, Satoru; Sugino, Yoshio; Kawamorita, Naoki; Kashyap, Mahendra P; Chancellor, Michael B; Tyagi, Pradeep; Ogawa, Teruyuki

    2014-04-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a disease with lower urinary tract symptoms, such as bladder pain and urinary frequency, which results in seriously impaired quality of life of patients. The extreme pain and urinary frequency are often difficult to treat. Although the etiology of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is still not known, there is increasing evidence showing that afferent hyperexcitability as a result of neurogenic bladder inflammation and urothelial dysfunction is important to the pathophysiological basis of symptom development. Further investigation of the pathophysiology will lead to the effective treatment of patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  20. Gallium interstitial contributions to diffusion in gallium arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Joseph T.; Morgan, Caroline G.

    2011-09-01

    A new diffusion path is identified for gallium interstitials, which involves lower barriers than the barriers for previously identified diffusion paths [K. Levasseur-Smith and N. Mousseau, J. Appl. Phys. 103, 113502 (2008), P. A. Schultz and O. A. von Lilienfeld, Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering 17, 084007 (2009)] for the charge states which dominate diffusion over most of the available range of Fermi energies. This path passes through the ⟨110⟩ gallium-gallium split interstitial configuration, and has a particularly low diffusion barrier of 0.35 eV for diffusion in the neutral charge state. As a part of this work, the character of the charge states for the gallium interstitials which are most important for diffusion is investigated, and it is shown that the last electron bound to the neutral interstitial occupies a shallow hydrogenic bound state composed of conduction band states for the hexagonal interstitial and both tetrahedral interstitials. How to properly account for the contributions of such interstitials is discussed for density-functional calculations with a k-point mesh not including the conduction band edge point. Diffusion barriers for gallium interstitials are calculated in all the charge states which can be important for a Fermi level anywhere in the gap, q = 0, +1, +2, and +3, for diffusion via the ⟨110⟩ gallium-gallium split interstitial configuration and via the hexagonal interstitial configuration. The lowest activation enthalpies over most of the available range of Fermi energies are found to correspond to diffusion in the neutral or singly positive state via the ⟨110⟩ gallium-gallium split interstitial configuration. It is shown that several different charge states and diffusion paths contribute significantly for Fermi levels within 0.2 eV above the valence band edge, which may help to explain some of the difficulties [H. Bracht and S. Brotzmann, Phys. Rev. B 71, 115216 (2005)] which have been

  1. Gallium interstitial contributions to diffusion in gallium arsenide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph T. Schick

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A new diffusion path is identified for gallium interstitials, which involves lower barriers than the barriers for previously identified diffusion paths [K. Levasseur-Smith and N. Mousseau, J. Appl. Phys. 103, 113502 (2008, P. A. Schultz and O. A. von Lilienfeld, Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering 17, 084007 (2009] for the charge states which dominate diffusion over most of the available range of Fermi energies. This path passes through the ⟨110⟩ gallium-gallium split interstitial configuration, and has a particularly low diffusion barrier of 0.35 eV for diffusion in the neutral charge state. As a part of this work, the character of the charge states for the gallium interstitials which are most important for diffusion is investigated, and it is shown that the last electron bound to the neutral interstitial occupies a shallow hydrogenic bound state composed of conduction band states for the hexagonal interstitial and both tetrahedral interstitials. How to properly account for the contributions of such interstitials is discussed for density-functional calculations with a k-point mesh not including the conduction band edge point. Diffusion barriers for gallium interstitials are calculated in all the charge states which can be important for a Fermi level anywhere in the gap, q = 0, +1, +2, and +3, for diffusion via the ⟨110⟩ gallium-gallium split interstitial configuration and via the hexagonal interstitial configuration. The lowest activation enthalpies over most of the available range of Fermi energies are found to correspond to diffusion in the neutral or singly positive state via the ⟨110⟩ gallium-gallium split interstitial configuration. It is shown that several different charge states and diffusion paths contribute significantly for Fermi levels within 0.2 eV above the valence band edge, which may help to explain some of the difficulties [H. Bracht and S. Brotzmann, Phys. Rev. B 71, 115216 (2005] which

  2. Interstitial shadow on chest CT is associated with the onset of interstitial lung disease caused by chemotherapeutic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niho, Seiji; Goto, Koichi; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Kim, Y.H.; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Kubota, Kaoru; Saijo, Nagahiro; Nishiwaki, Yutaka

    2006-01-01

    Pretreatment computerized tomography (CT) films of the chest was studied to clarify the influence of interstitial shadow on developing interstitial lung disease (ILD). Eligible patients were those lung cancer patients who started to receive first-line chemotherapy between October 2001 and March 2004. Patients who received thoracic radiotherapy to the primary lesion, mediastinum, spinal or rib metastases were excluded. We reviewed pretreatment conventional CT and plain X-ray films of the chest. Ground-glass opacity, consolidation or reticular shadow without segmental distribution was defined as interstitial shadow, with this event being graded as mild, moderate or severe. If interstitial shadow was detected on CT films of the chest, but not via plain chest X-ray, it was graded as mild. Patients developing ILD were identified from medial records. A total of 502 patients were eligible. Mild, moderate and severe interstitial shadow was identified in 7, 8 and 5% of patients, respectively. A total of 188 patients (37%) received tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment, namely gefitinib or erlotinib. Twenty-six patients (5.2%) developed ILD either during or after chemotherapy. Multivariate analyses revealed that interstitial shadow on CT films of the chest and treatment history with TKI were associated with the onset of ILD. It is recommended that patients with interstitial shadow on chest CT are excluded from future clinical trials until this issue is further clarified, as it is anticipated that use of chemotherapeutic agents frequently mediate onset of ILD in this context. (author)

  3. Storage xyloglucans: potent macrophages activators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Rosário, Marianna Maia Taulois; Kangussu-Marcolino, Mônica Mendes; do Amaral, Alex Evangelista; Noleto, Guilhermina Rodrigues; Petkowicz, Carmen Lúcia de Oliveira

    2011-01-15

    Storage xyloglucans from the seeds of Copaifera langsdorffii, Hymenaea courbaril and Tamarindus indica were obtained by aqueous extraction from the milled and defatted cotyledons, XGC, XGJ and XGT, respectively. The resulting fractions showed similar monosaccharide composition with Glc:Xyl:Gal molar ratios of 2.4:1.5:1.0, 3.8:1.5:1,0 and 3.6:2.4:1.0 for XGC, XGJ and XGT, respectively. High-performance size-exclusion chromatography of the polysaccharides showed unimodal profiles, and the average molar mass (M(w)) was obtained for XGC (9.6 × 10⁵ g/mol), XGJ (9.1 × 10⁵ g/mol) and XGT (7.3 × 10⁵ g/mol). The immunomodulatory effects of the xyloglucans on peritoneal macrophages were evaluated. Phagocytic activity was observed in macrophages treated with XGT. The effect of XGT was tested on the production of O₂(.-) and NO. At 25 μg/ml XGT caused a 100% increase in NO production when compared to the control group; however, it did not affect O₂(.-) production in the absence of PMA. The production of TNF-α, interleukins 1β and 6 by macrophages in the presence of the xyloglucans was evaluated. The polysaccharides affected the production of the cytokines by macrophages to different degrees. XGC caused an enhancement of IL-1β and TNF-α production, compared to the other xyloglucans. For IL-6 production, XGT gave greater stimulation than XGC and XGJ, reaching 87% at 50 μg/ml. XGJ promoted a statistically significant effect on all cytokine productions tested. The results indicate that the xyloglucans from C. langsdorffii, H. courbaril and T. indica can be classified as biological response modifiers (BRM). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Interstitial brachytherapy in carcinoma of the penis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, A.J.; Ghosh, S.; Bhalavat, R.L. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kulkarni, J.N. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Surgery; Sequeira, B.V.E. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Keeping in line with the increasing emphasis on organ preservation, we at the Tata Memorial Hospital have evaluated the role of Ir-192 interstitial implant as regards local control, functional and cosmetic outcome in early as well as locally recurrent carcinoma of the distal penis. Patients and Methods: From October 1988 to December 1996, 23 patients with histopathologically proven cancer of the penis were treated with radical radiation therapy using Ir-192 temporary interstitial implant. Our patients were in the age group of 20 to 60 years. The primary lesions were T1 and 7, T2 in 7 and recurrent in 9 patients. Only 7 patients had palpable groin nodes at presentation, all of which were pathologically negative. The median dose of implant was 50 Gy (range 40 to 60 Gy), using the LDR afterloading system and the Paris system of implant rules for dosimetry. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 117 months (median 24 months). Results: At last follow-up 18 of the 23 patients remained locally controlled with implant alone. Three patients failed only locally, 2 locoregionally and 1 only at the groin. Of the 5 patients who failed locally, 4 were successfully salvaged with partial penectomy and remained controlled when last seen. Local control with implant alone at 8 years was 70% by life table analysis. The patients had excellent functional and cosmetic outcome. We did not record any case of skin or softtissue necrosis. Only 2 patients developed meatal stenosis, both of which were treated endoscopically. Conclusion: Our results lead us to interpret that interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 offers excellent local control rates with preservation of organ and function. Penectomy can be reserved as a means for effective salvage. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Das Prinzip des Organerhalts gewinnt in der Onkologie zunehmend an Bedeutung. Ziel dieser Untersuchung war es, die Rolle der interstitiellen Brachytherapie mit Ir-192 zur Behandlung des fruehen und rezidivierten Peniskarzinoms zu

  5. Effects of ischemia on lung macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aigul Moldobaeva

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis after pulmonary ischemia is initiated by reactive O(2 species and is dependent on CXC chemokine growth factors, and its magnitude is correlated with the number of lavaged macrophages. After complete obstruction of the left pulmonary artery in mice, the left lung is isolated from the peripheral circulation until 5-7 days later, when a new systemic vasculature invades the lung parenchyma. Consequently, this model offers a unique opportunity to study the differentiation and/or proliferation of monocyte-derived cells within the lung. In this study, we questioned whether macrophage subpopulations were differentially expressed and which subset contributed to growth factor release. We characterized the change in number of all macrophages (MHCII(int, CD11C+, alveolar macrophages (MHCII(int, CD11C+, CD11B- and mature lung macrophages (MHCII(int, CD11C+, CD11B+ in left lungs from mice immediately (0 h or 24 h after left pulmonary artery ligation (LPAL. In left lung homogenates, only lung macrophages increased 24 h after LPAL (vs. 0 h; p<0.05. No changes in proliferation were seen in any subset by PCNA expression (0 h vs. 24 h lungs. When the number of monocytic cells was reduced with clodronate liposomes, systemic blood flow to the left lung 14 days after LPAL decreased by 42% (p<0.01 compared to vehicle controls. Furthermore, when alveolar macrophages and lung macrophages were sorted and studied in vitro, only lung macrophages secreted the chemokine MIP-2α (ELISA. These data suggest that ischemic stress within the lung contributes to the differentiation of immature monocytes to lung macrophages within the first 24 h after LPAL. Lung macrophages but not alveolar macrophages increase and secrete the proangiogenic chemokine MIP-2α. Overall, an increase in the number of lung macrophages appears to be critical for neovascularization in the lung, since clodronate treatment decreased their number and attenuated functional angiogenesis.

  6. Bladder Distension Increases Blood Flow in Pain Related Brain Structures in Subjects with Interstitial Cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Georg; Deshpande, Hrishikesh; Frölich, Michael A; Lai, H Henry; Ness, Timothy J

    2016-09-01

    In healthy control subjects certain brain regions of interest demonstrate increased regional cerebral blood flow in response to painful stimuli. We examined the effect of bladder distension on arterial spin label functional magnetic resonance imaging measures of regional cerebral blood flow in regions of interest in subjects with interstitial cystitis. A total of 11 female subjects with interstitial cystitis and 11 healthy controls underwent 3 brain perfusion scan studies using arterial spin label functional magnetic resonance imaging, including 1) with a full bladder, 2) with an empty bladder and 3) while experiencing heat pain. Regional cerebral blood flow was calculated using custom software and individual scans were spatially normalized to the MNI (Montreal Neurological Institute) template. Region of interest based, absolute regional cerebral blood flow was determined for each condition and for the within group/within subject regional cerebral blood flow distribution changes induced by each condition. Bladder distension was associated with robust increases in regional cerebral blood flow in subjects with interstitial cystitis. The increases were greater than those in healthy controls in multiple regions of interest, including the supplemental motor area (mainly Brodmann area 6), the motor and sensory cortex, the insula bilaterally, the hippocampal structures bilaterally, and the middle and posterior cingulate areas bilaterally. During heat pain healthy controls had more robust regional cerebral blood flow increases in the amygdala bilaterally. At baseline with an empty bladder there was lower regional cerebral blood flow in the insula, and the mid and posterior cingulate cortex bilaterally in subjects with interstitial cystitis. Compared to healthy controls, subjects with interstitial cystitis have limited differences in regional cerebral blood flow in baseline (empty bladder) conditions as well as during heat pain. However, they had robust regional cerebral

  7. Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Quentin E.; Xu, Jinghzu; Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Li, Xing; Rockey, William R.; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Enger, Shirin A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present a novel needle, catheter, and radiation source system for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) of the prostate. I-RSBT is a promising technique for reducing urethra, rectum, and bladder dose relative to conventional interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Methods: A wire-mounted 62 GBq 153 Gd source is proposed with an encapsulated diameter of 0.59 mm, active diameter of 0.44 mm, and active length of 10 mm. A concept model I-RSBT needle/catheter pair was constructed using concentric 50 and 75 μm thick nickel-titanium alloy (nitinol) tubes. The needle is 16-gauge (1.651 mm) in outer diameter and the catheter contains a 535 μm thick platinum shield. I-RSBT and conventional HDR-BT treatment plans for a prostate cancer patient were generated based on Monte Carlo dose calculations. In order to minimize urethral dose, urethral dose gradient volumes within 0–5 mm of the urethra surface were allowed to receive doses less than the prescribed dose of 100%. Results: The platinum shield reduced the dose rate on the shielded side of the source at 1 cm off-axis to 6.4% of the dose rate on the unshielded side. For the case considered, for the same minimum dose to the hottest 98% of the clinical target volume (D 98% ), I-RSBT reduced urethral D 0.1cc below that of conventional HDR-BT by 29%, 33%, 38%, and 44% for urethral dose gradient volumes within 0, 1, 3, and 5 mm of the urethra surface, respectively. Percentages are expressed relative to the prescription dose of 100%. For the case considered, for the same urethral dose gradient volumes, rectum D 1cc was reduced by 7%, 6%, 6%, and 6%, respectively, and bladder D 1cc was reduced by 4%, 5%, 5%, and 6%, respectively. Treatment time to deliver 20 Gy with I-RSBT was 154 min with ten 62 GBq 153 Gd sources. Conclusions: For the case considered, the proposed 153 Gd-based I-RSBT system has the potential to lower the urethral dose relative to HDR-BT by 29%–44% if the clinician allows

  8. Successful Laparoscopic Removal of an Interstitial Ectopic Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi

    1994-08-01

    This presentation describes the successful laparoscopic removal of an interstitial ectopic pregnancy. Interstitial pregnancy is rare (2%-4% of tubal pregnancies). Due to its location, rupture usually results in hemorrhagic shock. Current treatments include cornual resection, hysterectomy, local injection of potassium chloride or methotrexate, and systemic methotrexate. The laparoscopic treatment of interstitial pregnancy has not been reported with the exception of Reich et al (1988). A 38 year-old gravida 4 para 3 underwent cornual resection, while preserving the tube, for a right interstitial 9-week pregnancy using the single umbilical puncture approach. The operating time was 45 minutes and blood loss 50 ml. The patient was discharged at 24 hours and had an uneventful postoperative course.

  9. CD34-positive interstitial cells of the human detrusor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle; Hansen, Alastair; Smedts, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are well described in the bowel wall. They are c-kit positive and play a role as pacemaker cells. Similar c-kit-positive cells have recently been described in the human bladder. The aim of this study was to characterize interstitial cells of the bladder detrusor...... using a panel of antibodies directed against CD117/c-kit, CD34, CD31, S100, tryptase, neurofilament, NSE, Factor-VIII and GFAP. A striking finding was an interstitial type of cell which is CD34 immunoreactive (CD34-ir) but CD117/c-kit negative. The cells have a tentacular morphology, enveloping...... and intermingling with individual muscle fasicles. Morphologically and immunohistochemically, they show no neurogenic, endothelial or mast cell differentiation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the presence of interstitial cells with a round-to-oval nucleus, sparse perinuclear cytoplasm and long...

  10. CT in the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergin, C.J.; Mueller, N.L.

    1985-01-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of interstitial lung disease was assessed in 23 patients with known interstitial disease. These included seven patients with fibrosing alveolitis, six with silicosis, two with hypersensitivity pneumonitis, three with lymphangitic spread of tumor, two with sarcoidosis, one with rheumatoid lung disease, and two with neurofibromatosis. The CT appearance of the interstitial changes in the different disease entities was assessed. Nodules were a prominent CT feature in silicosis, sarcoidosis, and lymphangitic spread of malignancy. Distribution of nodules and associated interlobular septal thickening provided further distinguishing features in these diseases. Reticular densities were the predominant CT change in fibrosing alveolitis, rheumatoid lung disease, and extrinsic allergic alveolitis. CT can be useful in the investigation of selected instances of interstitial pulmonary disease

  11. A new interstitial flatworm (Turbellaria: Promesostomidae) from the Indian Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clerck, De G.G.

    1994-01-01

    Paraproboscifer alacerregis, representing a new genus and a new species of the interstitial typloplanoid flatworms is described from the Seychelles and Kenya. It is placed in the turbellarian family Promesostomidae, The type locality is on Mahé Island, Seychelles.

  12. Serum markers of macrophage activation in pre-eclampsia: no predictive value of soluble CD163 and neopterin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Camilla S; Knudsen, Ulla Breth; Moestrup, Søren K

    2007-01-01

    -eclampsia group (r=0.32, p=0.011). C-reactive protein was higher in pre-eclampsia than in healthy pregnancies by week 38 (159 versus 91 nmol/l, p=0.0189). CONCLUSIONS: The macrophage serum-markers sCD163 and neopterin are not pre-symptomatic nor prognostic markers for pre-eclampsia......BACKGROUND: Alternatively activated macrophages expressing the CD163 and CD206 surface receptors are the dominant immune-cell type found in the placenta. The placental number and distribution of macrophages is altered in pre-eclampsia, and the generalised inflammatory reaction associated with pre...

  13. The macrophage system in the intestinal muscularis externa during inflammation: an immunohistochemical and quantitative study of osteopetrotic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne Birte; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Hadberg, Hanne

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation results in disturbed intestinal motility in humans as well as in animal models. This altered function of smooth muscle cells and/or the enteric nervous system may be caused by activation of macrophages in muscularis externa and a thereby following release of cytokines...... and chemokines that causes influx of mononuclear cells and neutrophilic granulocytes. We subjected osteopetrotic (op/op) mice that lack certain macrophage subtypes, e.g. macrophages in the muscularis externa and +/+ mice to LPS to induce inflammatory cell influx. The densities of F4/80(+), MHCII...

  14. Implication of the Tpl2 kinase in inflammatory changes and insulin resistance induced by the interaction between adipocytes and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceppo, Franck; Berthou, Flavien; Jager, Jennifer; Dumas, Karine; Cormont, Mireille; Tanti, Jean-François

    2014-03-01

    Adipose tissue inflammation is associated with the development of insulin resistance. In obese adipose tissue, lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) and saturated fatty acids trigger inflammatory factors that mediate a paracrine loop between adipocytes and macrophages. However, the inflammatory signaling proteins underlying this cross talk remain to be identified. The mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl2) is activated by inflammatory stimuli, including LPS, and its expression is up-regulated in obese adipose tissue, but its role in the interaction between adipocytes and macrophages remains ill-defined. To assess the implication of Tpl2 in the cross talk between these 2 cell types, we used coculture system and conditioned medium (CM) from macrophages. Pharmacological inhibition of Tpl2 in the coculture markedly reduced lipolysis and cytokine production and prevented the decrease in adipocyte insulin signaling. Tpl2 knockdown in cocultured adipocytes reduced lipolysis but had a weak effect on cytokine production and did not prevent the alteration of insulin signaling. By contrast, Tpl2 silencing in cocultured macrophages resulted in a marked inhibition of cytokine production and prevented the alteration of adipocyte insulin signaling. Further, when Tpl2 was inhibited in LPS-activated macrophages, the produced CM did not alter adipocyte insulin signaling and did not induce an inflammatory response in adipocytes. By contrast, Tpl2 silencing in adipocytes did not prevent the deleterious effects of a CM from LPS-activated macrophages. Together, these data establish that Tpl2, mainly in macrophages, is involved in the cross talk between adipocytes and macrophages that promotes inflammatory changes and alteration of insulin signaling in adipocytes.

  15. Activating transcription factor 4 underlies the pathogenesis of arsenic trioxide-mediated impairment of macrophage innate immune functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Wang, Yong; Weng, Zhiping; Elmets, Craig A.; Harrod, Kevin S.; Deshane, Jessy S.; Athar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure to humans is considered immunosuppressive with augmented susceptibility to several infectious diseases. The exact molecular mechanisms, however, remain unknown. Earlier, we showed the involvement of unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling in arsenic-mediated impairment of macrophage functions. Here, we show that activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), a UPR transcription factor, regulates arsenic trioxide (ATO)-mediated dysregulation of macrophage functions. In ATO-treated ATF4 +/+ wild-type mice, a significant down-regulation of CD11b expression was associated with the reduced phagocytic functions of peritoneal and lung macrophages. This severe immuno-toxicity phenotype was not observed in ATO-treated ATF4 +/− heterozygous mice. To confirm these observations, we demonstrated in Raw 264.7 cells that ATF4 knock-down rescues ATO-mediated impairment of macrophage functions including cytokine production, bacterial engulfment and clearance of engulfed bacteria. Sustained activation of ATF4 by ATO in macrophages induces apoptosis, while diminution of ATF4 expression protects against ATO-induced apoptotic cell death. Raw 264.7 cells treated with ATO also manifest dysregulated Ca ++ homeostasis. ATO induces Ca ++ -dependent calpain-1 and caspase-12 expression which together regulated macrophage apoptosis. Additionally, apoptosis was also induced by mitochondria-regulated pathway. Restoring ATO-impaired Ca ++ homeostasis in ER/mitochondria by treatments with the inhibitors of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) attenuate innate immune functions of macrophages. These studies identify a novel role for ATF4 in underlying pathogenesis of macrophage dysregulation and immuno-toxicity of arsenic. - Highlights: • ATF4 regulates arsenic-mediated impairment in macrophage functions. • Arsenic-mediated alterations in pulmonary macrophage are diminished in ATF4 +/− mice. • Changes in macrophage

  16. Laparoscopic management of interstitial pregnancy with automatic stapler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan Akhtar, Muhammad; Izzat, Feras; Keay, Stephen D

    2012-10-22

    A 36-year-old woman was referred by general practitioner to the early pregnancy unit with pelvic pain in her seventh week of pregnancy. She had a transvaginal ultrasound. Unruptured live twin tubal ectopic pregnancy was diagnosed on. Diagnostic laparoscopy revealed an unruptured left interstitial ectopic pregnancy. The interstitial tubal pregnancy was removed by laparoscopic automatic stapler with minimal blood loss. The patient had an uneventful recovery to health.

  17. Laparoscopic management of interstitial pregnancy with automatic stapler

    OpenAIRE

    Ahsan Akhtar, Muhammad; Izzat, Feras; Keay, Stephen D

    2012-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman was referred by general practitioner to the early pregnancy unit with pelvic pain in her seventh week of pregnancy. She had a transvaginal ultrasound. Unruptured live twin tubal ectopic pregnancy was diagnosed on. Diagnostic laparoscopy revealed an unruptured left interstitial ectopic pregnancy. The interstitial tubal pregnancy was removed by laparoscopic automatic stapler with minimal blood loss. The patient had an uneventful recovery to health.

  18. Interstitial ectopic pregnancy: A rare and difficult clinicosonographic diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    R Rastogi; G L Meena; N Rastogi; V Rastogi

    2008-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy in the interstitial part of the fallopian tube is a rare event. This condition presents a challenge for clinical as well as radiological diagnosis. Although routine two-dimensional ultrasound can be suggestive, three-dimensional ultrasound is highly accurate in diagnosis. Hence, the authors report a rare case of interstitial ectopic pregnancy diagnosed preoperatively by three-dimensional ultrasound and managed laparoscopically.

  19. Single dose methotrexate therapy: application to interstitial ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgatta, L; Burnhill, M; Stubblefield, P

    1998-03-01

    A woman with a small (6-mm gestational sac) interstitial pregnancy had complete resolution after medical therapy alone. A single cycle of methotrexate 50 mg/m2 was used as outpatient treatment without any operative procedure either for diagnosis or intervention. The guidelines that have evolved for selection of women for single dose methotrexate treatment for both intrauterine and tubal ectopic pregnancies may be applicable to interstitial ectopic pregnancy as well. A suggested framework for treatment decisions is presented.

  20. Interstitial ectopic pregnancy: A rare and difficult clinicosonographic diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Rastogi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic pregnancy in the interstitial part of the fallopian tube is a rare event. This condition presents a challenge for clinical as well as radiological diagnosis. Although routine two-dimensional ultrasound can be suggestive, three-dimensional ultrasound is highly accurate in diagnosis. Hence, the authors report a rare case of interstitial ectopic pregnancy diagnosed preoperatively by three-dimensional ultrasound and managed laparoscopically.

  1. Interstitial ectopic pregnancy: A rare and difficult clinicosonographic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, R; Gl, Meena; Rastogi, N; Rastogi, V

    2008-07-01

    Ectopic pregnancy in the interstitial part of the fallopian tube is a rare event. This condition presents a challenge for clinical as well as radiological diagnosis. Although routine two-dimensional ultrasound can be suggestive, three-dimensional ultrasound is highly accurate in diagnosis. Hence, the authors report a rare case of interstitial ectopic pregnancy diagnosed preoperatively by three-dimensional ultrasound and managed laparoscopically.

  2. The idiopathic interstitial pneumonias: understanding key radiological features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, S. [Department of Radiology, Churchill Hospital, Old Road, Oxford OX3 7LJ (United Kingdom); Benamore, R., E-mail: Rachel.Benamore@orh.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, Churchill Hospital, Old Road, Oxford OX3 7LJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    Many radiologists find it challenging to distinguish between the different interstitial idiopathic pneumonias (IIPs). The British Thoracic Society guidelines on interstitial lung disease (2008) recommend the formation of multidisciplinary meetings, with diagnoses made by combined radiological, pathological, and clinical findings. This review focuses on understanding typical and atypical radiological features on high-resolution computed tomography between the different IIPs, to help the radiologist determine when a confident diagnosis can be made and how to deal with uncertainty.

  3. Seasonal Variation in Interstitial Fluid Quality of the Andoni Flats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physicochemical characteristics of the interstitial fluid of the sediment of the intertidal and subtidal zones of the Andoni flats were studied. The results for the interstitial fluid showed low dissolved oxygen levels (0.1 – 1.3mg/l), high temperature values (26.2 -32.4°C), wide salinity range (8 – 21ppt) and near neutral pH (6.26 ...

  4. New spacing material for interstitial implantation of radioactive seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, J.; Hawliczek, R.; Kaercher, K.H.R.; Riccabona, M.

    1989-01-01

    Poly-p-dioxanon sutures (PDS) have been common in surgery as an absorbable material for years. After hardening by a particular procedure we use PDS pins as spacer material in interstitial I-125 implantations. The advantages of PDS are the mechanical qualities in contrast to catgut which causes hazards because of its soft consistency. PDS supports the efforts in optimization of seed distribution and dose application in interstitial radiotherapy.

  5. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Assayag

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease affecting about 1% of the population. Interstitial lung disease is a serious and frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD is characterized by several histopathologic subtypes. This article reviews the proposed pathogenesis and risk factors for RA-ILD. We also outline the important steps involved in the work-up of RA-ILD and review the evidence for treatment and prognosis.

  6. Differential neutron cross section for free interstitial production in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstone, J.A.; Parkin, D.M.; Simpson, H.M.

    1979-01-01

    Free interstitials produced by monoenergetic neutrons were monitored by changes in Young's modulus of a vibrating foil specimen. These changes can be related to the number of pinners on dislocations which depends on the number of defects produced. The pinning rate is compared with displacement cross section calculations and agrees with the Norgett--Robinson--Torrens (NRT) model. Electron irradiations on the same sample yield estimates of the free interstitial production cross section to be approx. 1% of the NRT cross section

  7. Macrophage phenotypic subtypes diametrically regulate epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Min; Ma, Bo; Shao, Hanshuang; Clark, Amanda M.; Wells, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic progression of breast cancer involves phenotypic plasticity of the carcinoma cells moving between epithelial and mesenchymal behaviors. During metastatic seeding and dormancy, even highly aggressive carcinoma cells take on an E-cadherin-positive epithelial phenotype that is absent from the emergent, lethal metastatic outgrowths. These phenotypes are linked to the metastatic microenvironment, though the specific cells and induction signals are still to be deciphered. Recent evidence suggests that macrophages impact tumor progression, and may alter the balance between cancer cell EMT and MErT in the metastatic microenvironment. Here we explore the role of M1/M2 macrophages in epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity of breast cancer cells by coculturing epithelial and mesenchymal cells lines with macrophages. We found that after polarizing the THP-1 human monocyte cell line, the M1 and M2-types were stable and maintained when co-cultured with breast cancer cells. Surprisingly, M2 macrophages may conferred a growth advantage to the epithelial MCF-7 cells, with these cells being driven to a partial mesenchymal phenotypic as indicated by spindle morphology. Notably, E-cadherin protein expression is significantly decreased in MCF-7 cells co-cultured with M2 macrophages. M0 and M1 macrophages had no effect on the MCF-7 epithelial phenotype. However, the M1 macrophages impacted the highly aggressive mesenchymal-like MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells to take on a quiescent, epithelial phenotype with re-expression of E-cadherin. The M2 macrophages if anything exacerbated the mesenchymal phenotype of the MDA-MB-231 cells. Our findings demonstrate M2 macrophages might impart outgrowth and M1 macrophages may contribute to dormancy behaviors in metastatic breast cancer cells. Thus EMT and MErT are regulated by selected macrophage phenotype in the liver metastatic microenvironment. These results indicate macrophage could be a potential therapeutic target for limiting death due

  8. Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and glycosaminoglycans replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a debilitating chronic disease characterized by discomfort or recurrent abdominal and pelvic pains in the absence of urinary tract infections. Its symptomatology includes discomfort, increased bladder pressure, sensitivity and intense pain in the bladder and pelvic areas, increased voiding frequency and urgency, or a combination of these symptoms. For these reasons, this pathology has a very negative impact on quality of life. The etiology of IC/BPS is still not well understood and different hypotheses have been formulated, including autoimmune processes, allergic reactions, chronic bacterial infections, exposure to toxins or dietary elements, and psychosomatic factors. The finding of an effective and specific therapy for IC/BPS remains a challenge for the scientific community because of the lack of a consensus regarding the causes and the inherent difficulties in the diagnosis. The last recent hypothesis is that IC/BPS could be pathophysiologically related to a disruption of the bladder mucosa surface layer with consequent loss of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). This class of mucopolysaccharides has hydrorepellent properties and their alteration expose the urothelium to many urinary toxic agents. It has been hypothesized that when these substances penetrate the bladder wall a chain is triggered in the submucosa. In order to improve the integrity and function of the bladder lining, GAG layer replenishment therapy is widely accepted as therapy for patients with IC/BPS who have poor or inadequate response to conventional therapy. Currently, Chondroitin sulfate (CS), heparin, hyaluronic acid (HA), and pentosan polysulphate (PPS), and combinations of two GAGs (CS and HA) are the available substances with different effectiveness rates in patients with IC/BPS. There are four different commercially available products for GAG replenishment including CS, heparin, HA and PPS. Each product has different concentrations and

  9. New insights into canted spiro carbon interstitial in graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-Barbary, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    The self-interstitial carbon is the key to radiation damage in graphite moderator nuclear reactor, so an understanding of its behavior is essential for plant safety and maximized reactor lifetime. The density functional theory is applied on four different graphite unit cells, starting from of 64 carbon atoms up to 256 carbon atoms, using AIMPRO code to obtain the energetic, athermal and mechanical properties of carbon interstitial in graphite. This study presents first principles calculations of the energy of formation that prove its high barrier to athermal diffusion (1.1 eV) and the consequent large critical shear stress (39 eV-50 eV) necessary to shear graphite planes in its presence. Also, for the first time, the gamma surface of graphite in two dimensions is calculated and found to yield the critical shear stress for perfect graphite. Finally, in contrast to the extensive literature describing the interstitial of carbon in graphite as spiro interstitial, in this work the ground state of interstitial carbon is found to be canted spiro interstitial.

  10. [Interstitial cystitis in urology clinic: current status and problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanri, Masaharu; Nanri, Masayuki; Nanri, Kazushige

    2014-10-01

    We examined the complications in the diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis in daily clinical practice. The study included 82 patients who were suspected of having interstitial cystitis at our hospital from March 2002 to April 2013. All hydrodistention procedures were performed with the aid of an anesthesiologist, as recommended by the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare since April 2010. Of the 82, 20 patients were male and 62 were female, (mean age at diagnosis 53 years.) Six of the suspected cases did not have interstitial cystitis. Of the 67 patients diagnosed with interstitial cystitis during hydrodistention, 29 (43%) did not experience pain. The time taken to diagnose these asymptomatic patients was longer than that taken for those who experienced pain. Twenty-eight patients (42%) discontinued treatment because it was ineffective. Interstitial cystitis has been widely recognized, but general physicians are unable to provide a diagnosis and suggest aggressive treatment because of difficulty associated in the treatment and diagnosis. To resolve these issues, physicians should be keep in mind that interstitial cystitis involves a hypersensitive bladder, and that some patients may not experience pain. Further, knowledge about Hunner's ulcer is essential. We believe that the most important points are improving health insurance about facility criteria of hydrodistention, and evaluating behavioral modification and dietary manipulation.

  11. Microstructures and phase transformations in interstitial alloys of tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahmen, U.

    1979-01-01

    The analysis of microstructures, phases, and possible ordering of interstitial solute atoms is fundamental to an understanding of the properties of metal-interstitial alloys in general. As evidenced by the controversies on phase transformations in the particular system tantalum--carbon, our understanding of this class of alloys is inferior to our knowledge of substitutional metal alloys. An experimental clarification of these controversies in tantalum was made. Using advanced techniques of electron microscopy and ultrahigh vacuum techology, an understanding of the microstructures and phase transformations in dilute interstitial tantalum--carbon alloys is developed. Through a number of control experiments, the role and sources of interstitial contamination in the alloy preparation (and under operating conditions) are revealed. It is demonstrated that all previously published work on the dilute interstitially ordered phase Ta 64 C can be explained consistently in terms of ordering of the interstitial contaminants oxygen and hydrogen, leading to the formation of the phases Ta 12 O and Ta 2 H

  12. Modeling of long-range migration of boron interstitials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velichko, O.I.; Burunova, O.N.

    2009-01-01

    A model of the interstitial migration of ion-implanted dopant in silicon during low-temperature thermal treatment has been formulated. It is supposed that the boron interstitials are created during ion implantation or at the initial stage of annealing. During thermal treatment a migration of these impurity interstitials to the surface and in the bulk of a semiconductor occurs. On this basis, a simulation of boron redistribution during thermal annealing for 35 minutes at a temperature of 800 0 C has been carried out. The calculated boron profile agrees well with the experimental data. A number of the parameters describing the interstitial diffusion have been derived. In particular, the average migration length of nonequilibrium boron interstitials is equal to 0.092 μm at a temperature of 800 0 C. To carry out modeling of ion-implanted boron redistribution, the analytical solutions of nonstationary diffusion equation for impurity interstitials have been obtained. The case of Dirichlet boundary conditions and the case of reflecting boundary on the surface of a semiconductor have been considered. (authors)

  13. Dose optimisation in single plane interstitial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Honoré, Henriette Benedicte; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Olsen, Dag Rune; Grau, Cai; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2006-10-01

    Brachytherapy dose distributions can be optimised by modulation of source dwell times. In this study dose optimisation in single planar interstitial implants was evaluated in order to quantify the potential benefit in patients. In 14 patients, treated for recurrent rectal and cervical cancer, flexible catheters were sutured intra-operatively to the tumour bed in areas with compromised surgical margin. Both non-optimised, geometrically and graphically optimised CT -based dose plans were made. The overdose index (OI), homogeneity index (HI), conformal index (COIN), minimum target dose, and high dose volumes were evaluated. The dependence of OI, HI, and COIN on target volume and implant regularity was evaluated. In addition, 12 theoretical implant configurations were analyzed. Geometrical and graphical optimisation improved the dose plans significantly with graphical optimisation being superior. Graphically optimised dose plans showed a significant decrease of 18%+/-9% in high dose volume (pusability of these parameters for comparison of dose plans between patients. Dwell time optimisation significantly improved the dose distribution regarding homogeneity, conformity, minimum target dose, and size of high dose volumes. Graphical optimisation is fast, reproducible and superior to geometric optimisation.

  14. Dose optimisation in single plane interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Honoré, Henriette Benedicte

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brachytherapy dose distributions can be optimised       by modulation of source dwell times. In this study dose optimisation in       single planar interstitial implants was evaluated in order to quantify the       potential benefit in patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 14...... patients,       treated for recurrent rectal and cervical cancer, flexible catheters were       sutured intra-operatively to the tumour bed in areas with compromised       surgical margin. Both non-optimised, geometrically and graphically       optimised CT -based dose plans were made. The overdose index...... (OI),       homogeneity index (HI), conformal index (COIN), minimum target dose, and       high dose volumes were evaluated. The dependence of OI, HI, and COIN on       target volume and implant regularity was evaluated. In addition, 12       theoretical implant configurations were analyzed. RESULTS...

  15. Granular Material Flows with Interstitial Fluid Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Melany L.; Brennen, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    The research focused on experimental measurements of the rheological properties of liquid-solid and granular flows. In these flows, the viscous effects of the interstitial fluid, the inertia of the fluid and particles, and the collisional interactions of the particles may all contribute to the flow mechanics. These multiphase flows include industrial problems such as coal slurry pipelines, hydraulic fracturing processes, fluidized beds, mining and milling operation, abrasive water jet machining, and polishing and surface erosion technologies. In addition, there are a wide range of geophysical flows such as debris flows, landslides and sediment transport. In extraterrestrial applications, the study of transport of particulate materials is fundamental to the mining and processing of lunar and Martian soils and the transport of atmospheric dust (National Research Council 2000). The recent images from Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft dramatically depict the complex sand and dust flows on Mars, including dune formation and dust avalanches on the slip-face of dune surfaces. These Aeolian features involve a complex interaction of the prevailing winds and deposition or erosion of the sediment layer; these features make a good test bed for the verification of global circulation models of the Martian atmosphere.

  16. Classical patterns of interstitial lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Mang, C.

    2014-01-01

    High resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is the most important non-invasive tool in the diagnostics and follow-up of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). A systematic review of the HRCT patterns of ILD was carried out and the most relevant differential diagnoses are discussed in order to provide a road map for the general radiologist to successfully navigate the complex field of ILD. Using HRCT four basic patterns of ILD can be identified: linear and reticular patterns, the nodular pattern, the high attenuation and low attenuation patterns. These patterns can be further differentiated according to their localization within the secondary pulmonary lobule (SPL), e.g. centrilobular or perilymphatic and their distribution within the lungs (e.g. upper or lower lobe predominance). Relevant clinical data, such as smoking history and course of the disease provide useful additional information in the diagnosis of ILD. On the basis of the pattern and anatomical distribution on HRCT, an accurate diagnosis can be achieved in some cases of ILD; however, due to morphological and clinical overlap the final diagnosis of many ILDs requires close cooperation between clinicians, radiologists and pathologists. (orig.) [de

  17. Magnetic effects of interstitial hydrogen in nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    León, Andrea [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Valparaíso (Chile); Velásquez, E.A. [Facultad de Física y Centro de Investigación en Nanotecnología y Materiales Avanzados CIEN-UC, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología CEDENNA, Santiago (Chile); Grupo de Investigación en Modelamiento y Simulación Computacional, Universidad de San Buenaventura Sec. Medellín, Medellín (Colombia); Mazo-Zuluaga, J. [Grupo de Instrumentación Científica y Microelectrónica, Grupo de Estado Sólido, IF-FCEN, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Mejía-López, J. [Facultad de Física y Centro de Investigación en Nanotecnología y Materiales Avanzados CIEN-UC, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología CEDENNA, Santiago (Chile); Florez, J.M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Valparaíso (Chile); and others

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen storage in materials is among the most relevant fields when thinking about energy conversion and storage. In this work we present a study that responds to a couple of questions concerning induced electronic changes that H produces in ferromagnetic nickel (Ni) host. We calculate and explain the change of magnetic properties of Ni with different concentrations of H. Density functional theory calculations (DFT) were performed for super-cells of fcc Ni with interstitial H in octahedral sites at different concentrations. In order to physically explain the effect of magnetization diminishing as the hydrogen concentration increases, we propose a simple Stoner type of model to describe the influence of the H impurity on the magnetic properties of Ni. The exchange splitting reduction, as shown in first principles calculations, is clearly explained within this physical model. Using a paramagnetic Ni fcc band with variable number of electrons and a Stoner model allow us to obtain the correct trend for the magnetic moment of the system as a function of the H concentration. - Highlights: • We calculate and explain the change of magnetic properties of Ni with different concentrations of H. • We propose a simple Stoner type of model to describe the influence of the H impurity on the magnetic properties of Ni. • The band exchange splitting reduction as the H concentration increases, is a consequence of the competition between the band energy term (kinetic energy) and the ferromagnetic energy term (Weiss field).

  18. Renaissance of laser interstitial thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon; Barnett, Gene H

    2015-03-01

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive technique for treating intracranial tumors, originally introduced in 1983. Its use in neurosurgical procedures was historically limited by early technical difficulties related to the monitoring and control of the extent of thermal damage. The development of magnetic resonance thermography and its application to LITT have allowed for real-time thermal imaging and feedback control during laser energy delivery, allowing for precise and accurate provision of tissue hyperthermia. Improvements in laser probe design, surgical stereotactic targeting hardware, and computer monitoring software have accelerated acceptance and clinical utilization of LITT as a neurosurgical treatment alternative. Current commercially available LITT systems have been used for the treatment of neurosurgical soft-tissue lesions, including difficult to access brain tumors, malignant gliomas, and radiosurgery-resistant metastases, as well as for the ablation of such lesions as epileptogenic foci and radiation necrosis. In this review, the authors aim to critically analyze the literature to describe the advent of LITT as a neurosurgical, laser excision tool, including its development, use, indications, and efficacy as it relates to neurosurgical applications.

  19. Acute interstitial nephritis induced by Dioscorea quinqueloba

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of herbal medicine may be a risk factor for the development of kidney injury, as it has been reported to cause various renal syndromes. Dioscorea quinqueloba is a medicinal herb that is used as an alternative therapy for cardiovascular disease and various medical conditions. Case presentation A 52-year-old man was admitted with complaints of skin rash and burning sensation. He had ingested a raw extract of D. quinqueloba as a traditional remedy. Laboratory tests revealed the following values: absolute eosinophil count, 900/mm3; serum creatinine level, 2.7 mg/dL; and blood urea nitrogen, 33.0 mg/dL. The immunoglobulin E level was markedly increased at 1320.0 IU/mL. Urinalysis revealed a fractional excretion of sodium of 3.77%, protein 1+, and blood 3+. Histological examination of the renal biopsy specimen showed a diffusely edematous interstitium with infiltrates composed of eosinophils, lymphocytes, and neutrophils. Conclusion Here, we present the first reported case of biopsy-proven acute interstitial nephritis following ingestion of D. quinqueloba associated with skin rash, eosinophilia, and increased plasma immunoglobulin E level. PMID:25186588

  20. Palliative care and interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwah, Sabrina; Yorke, Janelle

    2017-09-01

    The palliative care needs of people with interstitial lung disease (ILD) have recently been highlighted by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All people with progressive ILD should receive best supportive care to improve symptom control and quality of life and where possible this should be evidence based. Deaths from ILD are increasing and deaths in hospital are more common compared to home. People with ILD experience a wide range of symptoms including breathlessness and cough. People living with ILD often suffer unmet physical and psychological needs throughout the disease journey. Few appropriately validated outcome measures exist for ILD which has hampered research on the longitudinal experience of symptoms and quality of life and the evaluation of interventions. Recent recommendations from the National Institute of Clinical Excellence promote the use of a new palliative care needs assessment tool. Use of a tool in busy respiratory clinics may help to highlight those requiring specialist input. Further research into the role of opioids, oxygen and neuromodulatory agents in symptom management are needed. In addition, exploration of breathlessness and case conference interventions in transitioning patients from the hospital to community settings is a priority. Further work is needed to identify a core set of validated ILD-specific patient-reported outcome measures for the robust evaluation of interventions.

  1. Wound Macrophages as Key Regulators of Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancato, Samielle K.; Albina, Jorge E.

    2011-01-01

    Recent results call for the reexamination of the phenotype of wound macrophages and their role in tissue repair. These results include the characterization of distinct circulating monocyte populations with temporally restricted capacities to migrate into wounds and the observation that the phenotype of macrophages isolated from murine wounds partially reflects those of their precursor monocytes, changes with time, and does not conform to current macrophage classifications. Moreover, findings in genetically modified mice lacking macrophages have confirmed that these cells are essential to normal wound healing because their depletion results in retarded and abnormal repair. This mini-review focuses on current knowledge of the phenotype of wound macrophages, their origin and fate, and the specific macrophage functions that underlie their reparative role in injured tissues, including the regulation of the cellular infiltration of the wound and the production of transforming growth factor-β and vascular endothelial growth factor. PMID:21224038

  2. High-resolution transcriptome of human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Beyer

    Full Text Available Macrophages are dynamic cells integrating signals from their microenvironment to develop specific functional responses. Although, microarray-based transcriptional profiling has established transcriptional reprogramming as an important mechanism for signal integration and cell function of macrophages, current knowledge on transcriptional regulation of human macrophages is far from complete. To discover novel marker genes, an area of great need particularly in human macrophage biology but also to generate a much more thorough transcriptome of human M1- and M1-like macrophages, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq of human macrophages. Using this approach we can now provide a high-resolution transcriptome profile of human macrophages under classical (M1-like and alternative (M2-like polarization conditions and demonstrate a dynamic range exceeding observations obtained by previous technologies, resulting in a more comprehensive understanding of the transcriptome of human macrophages. Using this approach, we identify important gene clusters so far not appreciated by standard microarray techniques. In addition, we were able to detect differential promoter usage, alternative transcription start sites, and different coding sequences for 57 gene loci in human macrophages. Moreover, this approach led to the identification of novel M1-associated (CD120b, TLR2, SLAMF7 as well as M2-associated (CD1a, CD1b, CD93, CD226 cell surface markers. Taken together, these data support that high-resolution transcriptome profiling of human macrophages by RNA-seq leads to a better understanding of macrophage function and will form the basis for a better characterization of macrophages in human health and disease.

  3. CD34+ cells in human intestine are fibroblasts adjacent to, but distinct from, interstitial cells of Cajal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderwinden, J M; Rumessen, J J; De Laet, M H

    1999-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) generate the pacemaker component of the gut and play important roles in the control of gut motility. The tyrosine kinase receptor Kit is an established marker for ICC. Recently, it has been reported that immunoreactivity for the sialomucin CD34 may be present...... and confocal microscopy. CD34 immunoreactivity identified previously unrecognized cells closely adjacent to, but distinct from, the Kit immunoreactive ICC. These CD34 immunoreactive cells expressed the fibroblast marker prolyl 4-hydroxylase-whereas ICC did not-and were also distinct from smooth muscle cells......, glial cells, and macrophages. In the human gut, CD34 immunoreactivity is not expressed by ICC but by a population of fibroblasts, likely corresponding to the "fibroblast-like cells" described in previous ultrastructural studies. Our findings also challenge the hypothesis that stromal tumors originate...

  4. Water Extract of Deer Bones Activates Macrophages and Alleviates Neutropenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Seok Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracts from deer bones, called nok-gol in Korean, have long been used to invigorate Qi. While neutropenia is not well detected in normal physiological condition, it could be a cause of severe problems to develop diseases such as infectious and cancerous diseases. Thus, a prevention of neutropenia in normal physiology and pathophysiological states is important for maintaining Qi and preventing disease progress. In cell biological aspects, activated macrophages are known to prevent neutropenia. In this study, we demonstrate that water extract of deer bone (herein, NG prevents neutropenia by activating macrophages. In mouse neutropenia model system in vivo where ICR mice were treated with cyclophosphamide to immunosuppress, an oral administration of NG altered the number of blood cells including lymphocytes, neutrophils, basophils, and eosinophils. This in vivo effect of NG was relevant to that of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF that was known to improve neutropenia. Our in vitro studies further showed that NG treatment increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and promoted macrophagic differentiation of mouse monocytic Raw264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, NG enhanced nitric oxide (NO synthesis and secretions of cytokines including IL-6 and TNF-α. Consistently, NG treatment induced phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, IKK, IκBα, and NF-κB in Raw264.7 cells. Thus, our data suggest that NG is helpful for alleviating neutropenia.

  5. Cytokines and macrophage function in humans - role of stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    We have begun this study to commence the determination of the role of mild chronic stress in the effects of space flight on macrophage/monocyte function, a component of the immune response. Medical students undergoing regular periods of stress and relaxation have been shown to be an excellent model for determining the effects of stress on immune responses. We have begun using this model using the macrophage/monocyte as model leukocyte. The monocyte/macrophage plays a central role in immunoregulation. The studies to be included in this three year project are the effects of stress on: (1) interactions of monocytes with microbes, (2) monocyte production of cytokines, (3) monocyte phagocytosis and activity, and (4) monocyte expression of cell surface antigens important in immune responses. Stress hormone levels will also be carried out to determine if there is a correlation between stress effects on immune responses and hormonal levels. Psychological testing to insure subjects are actually stressed or relaxed at the time of testing will also be carried out. The results obtained from the proposed studies should be comparable with space flight studies with whole animals and isolated cell cultures. When complete this study should allow the commencement of the establishment of the role of stress as one compartment of the induction of immune alterations by space flight.

  6. Yersinia pestis Requires Host Rab1b for Survival in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Connor

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes the disease known as plague. During infection of macrophages Y. pestis actively evades the normal phagosomal maturation pathway to establish a replicative niche within the cell. However, the mechanisms used by Y. pestis to subvert killing by the macrophage are unknown. Host Rab GTPases are central mediators of vesicular trafficking and are commonly targeted by bacterial pathogens to alter phagosome maturation and killing by macrophages. Here we demonstrate for the first time that host Rab1b is required for Y. pestis to effectively evade killing by macrophages. We also show that Rab1b is specifically recruited to the Yersinia containing vacuole (YCV and that Y. pestis is unable to subvert YCV acidification when Rab1b expression is knocked down in macrophages. Furthermore, Rab1b knockdown also altered the frequency of association between the YCV with the lysosomal marker Lamp1, suggesting that Rab1b recruitment to the YCV directly inhibits phagosome maturation. Finally, we show that Rab1b knockdown also impacts the pH of the Legionella pneumophila containing vacuole, another pathogen that recruits Rab1b to its vacuole. Together these data identify a novel role for Rab1b in the subversion of phagosome maturation by intracellular pathogens and suggest that recruitment of Rab1b to the pathogen containing vacuole may be a conserved mechanism to control vacuole pH.

  7. Quantitative GPCR and ion channel transcriptomics in primary alveolar macrophages and macrophage surrogates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groot-Kormelink Paul J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages are one of the first lines of defence against invading pathogens and play a central role in modulating both the innate and acquired immune systems. By responding to endogenous stimuli within the lung, alveolar macrophages contribute towards the regulation of the local inflammatory microenvironment, the initiation of wound healing and the pathogenesis of viral and bacterial infections. Despite the availability of protocols for isolating primary alveolar macrophages from the lung these cells remain recalcitrant to expansion in-vitro and therefore surrogate cell types, such as monocyte derived macrophages and phorbol ester-differentiated cell lines (e.g. U937, THP-1, HL60 are frequently used to model macrophage function. Methods The availability of high throughput gene expression technologies for accurate quantification of transcript levels enables the re-evaluation of these surrogate cell types for use as cellular models of the alveolar macrophage. Utilising high-throughput TaqMan arrays and focussing on dynamically regulated families of integral membrane proteins, we explore the similarities and differences in G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR and ion channel expression in alveolar macrophages and their widely used surrogates. Results The complete non-sensory GPCR and ion channel transcriptome is described for primary alveolar macrophages and macrophage surrogates. The expression of numerous GPCRs and ion channels whose expression were hitherto not described in human alveolar macrophages are compared across primary macrophages and commonly used macrophage cell models. Several membrane proteins known to have critical roles in regulating macrophage function, including CXCR6, CCR8 and TRPV4, were found to be highly expressed in macrophages but not expressed in PMA-differentiated surrogates. Conclusions The data described in this report provides insight into the appropriate choice of cell models for

  8. Immune modulation with sulfasalazine attenuates immunopathogenesis but enhances macrophage-mediated fungal clearance during Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Although T cells are critical for host defense against respiratory fungal infections, they also contribute to the immunopathogenesis of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP. However, the precise downstream effector mechanisms by which T cells mediate these diverse processes are undefined. In the current study the effects of immune modulation with sulfasalazine were evaluated in a mouse model of PcP-related Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (PcP-IRIS. Recovery of T cell-mediated immunity in Pneumocystis-infected immunodeficient mice restored host defense, but also initiated the marked pulmonary inflammation and severe pulmonary function deficits characteristic of IRIS. Sulfasalazine produced a profound attenuation of IRIS, with the unexpected consequence of accelerated fungal clearance. To determine whether macrophage phagocytosis is an effector mechanism of T cell-mediated Pneumocystis clearance and whether sulfasalazine enhances clearance by altering alveolar macrophage phagocytic activity, a novel multispectral imaging flow cytometer-based method was developed to quantify the phagocytosis of Pneumocystis in vivo. Following immune reconstitution, alveolar macrophages from PcP-IRIS mice exhibited a dramatic increase in their ability to actively phagocytose Pneumocystis. Increased phagocytosis correlated temporally with fungal clearance, and required the presence of CD4(+ T cells. Sulfasalazine accelerated the onset of the CD4(+ T cell-dependent alveolar macrophage phagocytic response in PcP-IRIS mice, resulting in enhanced fungal clearance. Furthermore, sulfasalazine promoted a TH2-polarized cytokine environment in the lung, and sulfasalazine-enhanced phagocytosis of Pneumocystis was associated with an alternatively activated alveolar macrophage phenotype. These results provide evidence that macrophage phagocytosis is an important in vivo effector mechanism for T cell-mediated Pneumocystis clearance, and that macrophage phenotype can be altered

  9. Interleukin-1β mediates macrophage-induced impairment of insulin signaling in human primary adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dan; Madi, Mohamed; Ding, Cherlyn; Fok, Matthew; Steele, Thomas; Ford, Christopher; Hunter, Leif; Bing, Chen

    2014-08-01

    Adipose tissue expansion during obesity is associated with increased macrophage infiltration. Macrophage-derived factors significantly alter adipocyte function, inducing inflammatory responses and decreasing insulin sensitivity. Identification of the major factors that mediate detrimental effects of macrophages on adipocytes may offer potential therapeutic targets. IL-1β, a proinflammatory cytokine, is suggested to be involved in the development of insulin resistance. This study investigated the role of IL-1β in macrophage-adipocyte cross-talk, which affects insulin signaling in human adipocytes. Using macrophage-conditioned (MC) medium and human primary adipocytes, we examined the effect of IL-1β antagonism on the insulin signaling pathway. Gene expression profile and protein abundance of insulin signaling molecules were determined, as was the production of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokines. We also examined whether IL-1β mediates MC medium-induced alteration in adipocyte lipid storage. MC medium and IL-1β significantly reduced gene expression and protein abundance of insulin signaling molecules, including insulin receptor substrate-1, phosphoinositide 3-kinase p85α, and glucose transporter 4 and phosphorylation of Akt. In contrast, the expression and release of the proinflammatory markers, including IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 by adipocytes were markedly increased. These changes were significantly reduced by blocking IL-1β activity, its receptor binding, or its production by macrophages. MC medium-inhibited expression of the adipogenic factors and -stimulated lipolysis was also blunted with IL-1β neutralization. We conclude that IL-1β mediates, at least in part, the effect of macrophages on insulin signaling and proinflammatory response in human adipocytes. Blocking IL-1β could be beneficial for preventing obesity-associated insulin resistance and inflammation in human adipose tissue. Copyright

  10. Development and maintainance of resident macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdiguero, Elisa Gomez; Geissmann, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    The molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie the many roles of macrophages in health and disease states in vivo remain poorly understood. The purpose of this Review is to present and discuss current knowledge on the developmental biology of macrophages, as it underlies the concept of a layered myeloid system composed of ‘resident’ macrophages that mostly originate from yolk sac progenitors and of ‘passenger’ or ‘transitory’ myeloid cells that originate and renew from bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, and to provide a framework to investigate the functions of macrophages in vivo. PMID:26681456

  11. Macrophage Plasticity in Skeletal Muscle Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Rigamonti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are one of the first barriers of host defence against pathogens. Beyond their role in innate immunity, macrophages play increasingly defined roles in orchestrating the healing of various injured tissues. Perturbations of macrophage function and/or activation may result in impaired regeneration and fibrosis deposition as described in several chronic pathological diseases. Heterogeneity and plasticity have been demonstrated to be hallmarks of macrophages. In response to environmental cues they display a proinflammatory (M1 or an alternative anti-inflammatory (M2 phenotype. A lot of evidence demonstrated that after acute injury M1 macrophages infiltrate early to promote the clearance of necrotic debris, whereas M2 macrophages appear later to sustain tissue healing. Whether the sequential presence of two different macrophage populations results from a dynamic shift in macrophage polarization or from the recruitment of new circulating monocytes is a subject of ongoing debate. In this paper, we discuss the current available information about the role that different phenotypes of macrophages plays after injury and during the remodelling phase in different tissue types, with particular attention to the skeletal muscle.

  12. Macrophage antioxidant protection within atherosclerotic plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieseg, Steven P; Leake, David S; Flavall, Elizabeth M; Amit, Zunika; Reid, Linzi; Yang, Ya-Ting

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage cells within inflammatory lesions are exposed to a wide range of degrading and cytotoxic molecules including reactive oxygen species. Unlike neutrophils, macrophages do not normally die in this environment but continue to generate oxidants, phagocytose cellular remains, and release a range of cyto-active agents which modulate the immune response. It is this potential of the macrophage cell to survive in an oxidative environment that allows the growth and complexity of advanced atherosclerotic plaques. This review will examine the oxidants encountered by macrophages within an atherosclerotic plaque and describe some of the potential antioxidant mechanisms which enable macrophages to function within inflammatory lesions. Ascorbate, a-tocopherol, and glutathione appear to be central to the protection of macrophages yet additional antioxidant mechanisms appear to be involved. Gamma-Interferon causes macrophages to generate 7,8-dihydroneopterin, neopterin and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid both of which have antioxidant properties. Manganese superoxide dismutase is also upregulated in macrophages. The evidence that these antioxidants provide further protection, so allowing the macrophage cells to survive within sites of chronic inflammation such as atherosclerotic plaques, will be described.

  13. DMPD: Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage TNFalpha expression. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11841920 Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage TNFalpha expression. Tsukamoto H. Fr...ee Radic Biol Med. 2002 Feb 15;32(4):309-13. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Iron regulation of hepatic m...acrophage TNFalpha expression. PubmedID 11841920 Title Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage TNFalpha expres

  14. DMPD: Nuclear receptors in macrophages: a link between metabolism and inflammation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18022390 Nuclear receptors in macrophages: a link between metabolism and inflammati... Show Nuclear receptors in macrophages: a link between metabolism and inflammation. PubmedID 18022390 Title ...Nuclear receptors in macrophages: a link between metabolism and inflammation. Aut

  15. Evidence for M2 macrophages in granulomas from pulmonary sarcoidosis : a new aspect of macrophage heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shamaei, Masoud; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Pourabdollah, Mihan; Garssen, Johan; Tabarsi, Payam; Velayati, Aliakbar; Adcock, Ian M

    BACKGROUND: Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. Macrophages play a key role in granuloma formation with the T cells, having a significant impact on macrophage polarization (M1 and M2) and the cellular composition of the granuloma. This study evaluates macrophage polarization

  16. DMPD: Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18161744 Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. Zhang X, Mosser DM. J ...Pathol. 2008 Jan;214(2):161-78. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage activation by endogenous dange...r signals. PubmedID 18161744 Title Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. Authors Zhang X, Moss

  17. DMPD: Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18388328 Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. Kockx ...svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. PubmedID 18388...328 Title Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. Aut

  18. DMPD: Macrophage differentiation and function in health and disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18251777 Macrophage differentiation and function in health and disease. Naito M. Pa...thol Int. 2008 Mar;58(3):143-55. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage differentiation and function in health... and disease. PubmedID 18251777 Title Macrophage differentiation and function in health and disease

  19. DMPD: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor and host innate immune responses tomicrobes. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14620137 Macrophage migration inhibitory factor and host innate immune responses to...microbes. Calandra T. Scand J Infect Dis. 2003;35(9):573-6. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage migration... inhibitory factor and host innate immune responses tomicrobes. PubmedID 14620137 Title Macrophage migration

  20. DMPD: Cellular signaling in macrophage migration and chemotaxis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11073096 Cellular signaling in macrophage migration and chemotaxis. Jones GE. J Leu...koc Biol. 2000 Nov;68(5):593-602. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Cellular signaling in macrophage migration... and chemotaxis. PubmedID 11073096 Title Cellular signaling in macrophage migration and chemotaxis. Autho

  1. Reduced number and morphofunctional change of alveolar macrophages in MafB gene-targeted mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiko Sato-Nishiwaki

    Full Text Available Alveolar macrophages (AMs play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. We previously demonstrated that the transcription factor, MafB, increased in the AMs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke, and in those of human patients with COPD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of MafB in AMs using newly established transgenic (TG mice that specifically express dominant negative (DN MafB in macrophages under the control of macrophage scavenger receptor (MSR enhancer-promoter. We performed cell differential analyses in bronchoalveolar lavage cells, morphological analyses with electron microscopy, and flow cytometry-based analyses of surface markers and a phagocytic capacity assay in macrophages. AM number in the TG mice was significantly decreased compared with wild-type (WT mice. Morphologically, the high electron density area in the nucleus increased, the shape of pseudopods on the AMs was altered, and actin filament was less localized in the pseudopods of AMs of TG mice, compared with WT mice. The expression of surface markers, F4/80 and CD11b, on peritoneal macrophages in TG mice was reduced compared with WT mice, while those on AMs remained unchanged. Phagocytic capacity was decreased in AMs from TG mice, compared with WT mice. In conclusion, MafB regulates the phenotype of macrophages with respect to the number of alveolar macrophages, the nuclear compartment, cellular shape, surface marker expression, and phagocytic function. MSR-DN MafB TG mice may present a useful model to clarify the precise role of MafB in macrophages.

  2. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Madera

    Full Text Available Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and CCL2 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS while production of interleukin-10 remained unchanged. The increased LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was transient and correlated with enhanced cytokine production in response to other Toll-like receptor agonists, including peptidoglycan and flagellin. In addition, 4T1-conditioned BMDMs exhibited strengthened LPS-induced nitric oxide production and enhanced phagocytosis of Escherichia coli. 4T1-mediated augmentation of macrophage responses to LPS was partially dependent on the NFκB pathway, macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and actin polymerization, as well as the presence of 4T1-secreted extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages obtained from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice displayed enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to LPS. These results suggest that uptake of 4T1-secreted factors and actin-mediated ingestion of 4T1-secreted exosomes by macrophages cause a transient enhancement of innate inflammatory responses. Mammary carcinoma-mediated regulation of innate immunity may have significant implications for our understanding of host defense and cancer progression.

  3. In vitro testing of dental materials by means of macrophage cultures: II. Effects of particulate dental amalgams and their constituent phases on cultured macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrjänen, S; Hensten-Pettersen, A; Nilner, K

    1986-10-01

    It is known that macrophages play an important role in the removal of foreign particulate matter from tissue. When powdered dental amalgam is introduced into the soft tissues an amalgam tattoo is formed due to the intracellular degradation of amalgam by macrophages and their polykaryons. It was therefore feasible to study the effects of particulate amalgams as well as their individual phases on macrophages in vitro. The parameters compared were rate of the phagocytosis, changes of cellular morphology, and release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) to demonstrate plasma membrane permeability. It was shown that all the alloys except the Sn8Hg particles (gamma 2-phase) and gamma 2-containing Revalloy were effectively phagocytized by macrophages, and the alterations in cellular morphology were slight during the first day. Prominent cellular damage was seen in cultures treated with particulate Ag2Hg3 (gamma 1-phase) and Revalloy for 1 week. A slight increase in LDH activity in the medium was seen one hour after the alloy treatment. The LDH activities due to the amalgam treatment increased in the order Dispersalloy less than Revalloy less than Sybraloy. Intraperitoneal phagocytosis did not cause any morphological changes in macrophages, but the per cent of phagocytosis was diminished.

  4. Over-expression of the mycobacterial trehalose-phosphate phosphatase OtsB2 results in a defect in macrophage phagocytosis associated with increased mycobacterial-macrophage adhesion

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    Hao Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (OtsB2 is involved in the OtsAB trehalose synthesis pathway to produce free trehalose and is strictly essential for mycobacterial growth. We wished to determine the effects of OtsB2 expression on mycobacterial phenotypes such as growth, phagocytosis and survival in macrophages. Mycobacterium bovis-BCG (BCG over-expressing OtsB2 were able to better survive in stationary phase. Over-expression of OtsB2 led to a decrease in phagocytosis but not survival in THP-1 macrophage-like cells, and this was not due to a decrease in general macrophage phagocytic activity. Surprisingly, when we investigated macrophage-mycobacterial interactions by flow cytometry and atomic force microscopy, we discovered that BCG over-expressing OtsB2 have stronger binding to THP-1 cells than wild-type BCG. These results suggest that altering OtsB2 expression has implications for mycobacterial host-pathogen interactions. Macrophage-mycobacteria phagocytic interactions are complex and merit further study.

  5. Impact of Leishmania Metalloprotease GP63 on Macrophage Signalling

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    Amandine eIsnard

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Several Leishmania surface molecules are known to be important virulence factors. For instance, LPG is recognized as one of the key virulence factor for Leishmania. Interestingly, recent findings permit to believe that the Leishmania GP63 could be also a critical one. GP63 is a metalloprotease found in all Leishmania species under different forms going from membrane-bound to extracellularly secreted ones. Even before parasite entries into the host macrophage, GP63 provides parasite resistance to the complement-mediated lysis and facilitate promastigote engulfment by macrophages. Additionally, it has been found that the degradation of proteins from the macrophage extracellular matrix by GP63 could confer protection to promastigotes, as well as amastigotes, during their initial interaction with the host cell. More recently, GP63 has been observed to rapidly enter within the host macrophage -in part via lipid raft microdomains- and to be pivotal for the subversion of host innate immune response. For instance, it has been found to be responsible for the activation of negative regulatory mechanisms involving activation of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs; SHP-1, PTP1B and TCPTP that lead to the alteration of several key signalling pathways utilizing JAK and MAP kinases family members, as well as the pivotal IRAK-1 kinase for toll like-dependent signalling. In addition, it has been recently reported that inactivation of some transcription factors such as AP-1 occurs directly in the nuclear environment of the infected cells, and to involve the cleavage and degradation of c-jun and c-fos family members by GP63. Altogether, this signalling inactivation under the mediation of GP63 concurs to inhibit important antimicrobial actions usually under the regulation of the innate immune response, and therefore favouring the survival and propagation of the parasite once into its host intracellular environment.

  6. Interstitial Lung disease in Systemic Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooi, G.C.; Mok, M.Y.; Tsang, K.W.T.; Khong, P.L.; Fung, P.C.W.; Chan, S.; Tse, H.F.; Wong, R.W.S.; Lam, W.K.; Lau, C.S.; Wong, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate high-resolution CT (HRCT) parameters of inflammation and fibrosis in systemic sclerosis (SSc), for correlation with lung function, skin scores and exercise tolerance. Material and Methods: : 45 SSc patients (40 women, 48.5±13.4 years), underwent thoracic HRCT, lung function assessment, and modified Rodnan skin scores. Exercise tolerance was also graded. HRCT were scored for extent of 4 HRCT patterns of interstitial lung disease (ILD): ground glass opacification (GGO), reticular, mixed and honeycomb pattern in each lobe. Total HRCT score, inflammation index (GGO and mixed score) and fibrosis index (reticular and honeycomb scores) were correlated with lung function and clinical parameters. Results: ILD was present in 39/45 (86.7%) patients. Abnormal (<80% predicted) forced vital capacity (FVC), total lung capacity (TLC) and carbon monoxide diffusion factor (DLco) were detected in 30%, 22% and 46% of patients. Total HRCT score correlated with FVC (r=0.43, p=0.008), FEV1 (forced expiratory volume) (r=-0.37, p=0.03), TLC (r=-0.47, p=0.003), and DLCO (r=-0.43, p=0.008); inflammatory index with DLCO (r=-0.43, p=0.008) and exercise tolerance (r=-0.39, p < 0.05); and fibrosis index with FVC (r=-0.31, p=0.05) and TLC (r=-0.38, p=0.02). Higher total HRCT score, and inflammation and fibrosis indices were found in patients with abnormal lung function. Conclusion: Qualitative HRCT is able to evaluate inflammation and fibrosis, showing important relationships with diffusion capacity and lung volume, respectively

  7. Co-morbidities of Interstitial Cystitis

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    Gisela eChelimsky

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aimed to estimate the proportion of patients with Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome (IC/BPS with systemic dysfunction associated co-morbidities such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS and fibromyalgia (FM. Material and Methods: Two groups of subjects with IC/BPS were included: 1 Physician diagnosed patients with IC/BPS and 2 Subjects meeting NIDDK IC/PBS criteria based on a questionnaire (ODYSA. These groups were compared to healthy controls matched for age and socio-economic status. NIDDK criteria required: pain with bladder filling that improves with emptying, urinary urgency due to discomfort or pain, polyuria > 11 times/24 hrs, and nocturia > 2 times/night. The ODYSA instrument evaluates symptoms pertaining to a range of disorders including chronic fatigue, orthostatic intolerance, syncope, IBS, dyspepsia, cyclic vomiting syndrome, headaches and migraines, sleep, Raynaud’s syndrome and chronic aches and pains. Results: IC/BPS was diagnosed in 26 subjects (mean age 47 +/- 16 yrs, 92% females, 58 had symptoms of IC/BPS by NIDDK criteria, (mean age 40 +/- 17 yrs, 79% females and 48 were healthy controls (mean age 31+/- 14 yrs, mean age 77%. Co-morbid complaints in the IC/BPS groups included gastrointestinal symptoms suggestive of IBS and dyspepsia, sleep abnormalities with delayed onset of sleep, feeling poorly refreshed in the morning, waking up before needed, snoring, severe chronic fatigue and chronic generalized pain, migraines and syncope. Discussion: Patients with IC/BPS had co-morbid central and autonomic nervous system disorders. Our findings mirror those of others in regard to IBS, symptoms suggestive of FM, chronic pain and migraine. High rates of syncope and functional dyspepsia found in the IC/BPS groups merit further study to determine if IC/BPS is part of a diffuse disorder of central, autonomic and sensory processing affecting multiple organs outside the bladder.

  8. Conservative medical and surgical management of interstitial ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, S; Tulandi, T

    1999-08-01

    To review the definition and diagnosis of interstitial and heterotopic interstitial pregnancy and to evaluate the conservative management of these conditions. A MEDLINE computer search was used to identify relevant studies. The mean values for the duration of amenorrhea, serum beta-hCG level, size of the ectopic mass, and success rates of the various treatment modalities were calculated from the raw data in the original publications. A review of 41 patients with interstitial pregnancy who were treated with methotrexate systemically, locally, or in combination revealed an overall success rate of 83%. The mean duration of amenorrhea, mean serum beta-hCG level, and mean size of the ectopic mass were 54 days, 15,127 mIU/mL, and 23 mm, respectively. Among 22 patients with interstitial pregnancy who were treated with conservative laparoscopic techniques, the overall success rate was 100%. In this group, the mean duration of amenorrhea, mean serum beta-hCG level, and mean size of the ectopic mass were 54 days, 7,572 mIU/mL, and 31 mm, respectively. There were nine cases of heterotopic interstitial pregnancy. Seven patients were managed with potassium chloride injected into the ectopic pregnancy, and two patients were treated by laparoscopy. Overall, 67% of the coexisting intrauterine pregnancies resulted in successful deliveries and the remainder ended in spontaneous abortions. Cornual resection or hysterectomy with a laparotomy should no longer be the first line of treatment for a hemodynamically stable patient with an interstitial pregnancy. In selected cases, methotrexate and laparoscopy can be used successfully in treating early interstitial pregnancy.

  9. Nicotine Impairs Macrophage Control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiyuan; Stitzel, Jerry A; Bai, An; Zambrano, Cristian A; Phillips, Matthew; Marrack, Philippa; Chan, Edward D

    2017-09-01

    Pure nicotine impairs macrophage killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), but it is not known whether the nicotine component in cigarette smoke (CS) plays a role. Moreover, the mechanisms by which nicotine impairs macrophage immunity against MTB have not been explored. To neutralize the effects of nicotine in CS extract, we used a competitive inhibitor to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mecamylamine-as well as macrophages derived from mice with genetic disruption of specific subunits of nAChR. We also determined whether nicotine impaired macrophage autophagy and whether nicotine-exposed T regulatory cells (Tregs) could subvert macrophage anti-MTB immunity. Mecamylamine reduced the CS extract increase in MTB burden by 43%. CS extract increase in MTB was also significantly attenuated in macrophages from mice with genetic disruption of either the α7, β2, or β4 subunit of nAChR. Nicotine inhibited autophagosome formation in MTB-infected THP-1 cells and primary murine alveolar macrophages, as well as increased the intracellular MTB burden. Nicotine increased migration of THP-1 cells, consistent with the increased number of macrophages found in the lungs of smokers. Nicotine induced Tregs to produce transforming growth factor-β. Naive mouse macrophages co-cultured with nicotine-exposed Tregs had significantly greater numbers of viable MTB recovered with increased IL-10 production and urea production, but no difference in secreted nitric oxide as compared with macrophages cocultured with unexposed Tregs. We conclude that nicotine in CS plays an important role in subverting macrophage control of MTB infection.

  10. NAC attenuates LPS-induced toxicity in aspirin-sensitized mouse macrophages via suppression of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

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    Haider Raza

    Full Text Available Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS induces the production of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS under in vivo and in vitro conditions. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, aspirin is a commonly used anti-inflammatory drug. Our aim was to study the effects of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant precursor of GSH synthesis, on aspirin-sensitized macrophages treated with LPS. We investigated the effects of LPS alone and in conjunction with a sub-toxic concentration of ASA, on metabolic and oxidative stress, apoptosis, and mitochondrial function using J774.2 mouse macrophage cell line. Protection from LPS-induced toxicity by NAC was also studied. LPS alone markedly induced ROS production and oxidative stress in macrophage cells. When ASA was added to LPS-treated macrophages, the increase in oxidative stress was significantly higher than that with LPS alone. Similarly, alteration in glutathione-dependent redox metabolism was also observed in macrophages after treatment with LPS and ASA. The combination of LPS and ASA selectively altered the CYP 3A4, CYP 2E1 and CYP 1A1 catalytic activities. Mitochondrial respiratory complexes and ATP production were also inhibited by LPS-ASA treatment. Furthermore a higher apoptotic cell death was also observed in LPS-ASA treated macrophages. NAC pre-treatment showed protection against oxidative stress induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. These effects are presumed, at least in part, to be associated with alterations in NF-κB/Nrf-2 mediated cell signaling. These results suggest that macrophages are more sensitive to LPS when challenged with ASA and that NAC pre-treatment protects the macrophages from these deleterious effects.

  11. Increased metabolite levels of glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway in rabbit atherosclerotic arteries and hypoxic macrophage.

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    Atsushi Yamashita

    Full Text Available AIMS: Inflammation and possibly hypoxia largely affect glucose utilization in atherosclerotic arteries, which could alter many metabolic systems. However, metabolic changes in atherosclerotic plaques remain unknown. The present study aims to identify changes in metabolic systems relative to glucose uptake and hypoxia in rabbit atherosclerotic arteries and cultured macrophages. METHODS: Macrophage-rich or smooth muscle cell (SMC-rich neointima was created by balloon injury in the iliac-femoral arteries of rabbits fed with a 0.5% cholesterol diet or a conventional diet. THP-1 macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS and interferon-γ (INFγ were cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. We evaluated comprehensive arterial and macrophage metabolism by performing metabolomic analyses using capillary electrophoresis-time of flight mass spectrometry. We evaluated glucose uptake and its relationship to vascular hypoxia using (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18F-FDG and pimonidazole, a marker of hypoxia. RESULTS: The levels of many metabolites increased in the iliac-femoral arteries with macrophage-rich neointima, compared with those that were not injured and those with SMC-rich neointima (glycolysis, 4 of 9; pentose phosphate pathway, 4 of 6; tricarboxylic acid cycle, 4 of 6; nucleotides, 10 of 20. The uptake of (18F-FDG in arterial walls measured by autoradiography positively correlated with macrophage- and pimonidazole-immunopositive areas (r = 0.76, and r = 0.59 respectively; n = 69 for both; p<0.0001. Pimonidazole immunoreactivity was closely localized with the nuclear translocation of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and hexokinase II expression in macrophage-rich neointima. The levels of glycolytic (8 of 8 and pentose phosphate pathway (4 of 6 metabolites increased in LPS and INFγ stimulated macrophages under hypoxic but not normoxic condition. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 protein levels in the supernatant were closely

  12. Adoptive transfer of M2 macrophages reduces neuropathic pain via opioid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannell, Maria; Labuz, Dominika; Celik, Melih Ö; Keye, Jacqueline; Batra, Arvind; Siegmund, Britta; Machelska, Halina

    2016-10-07

    During the inflammation which occurs following nerve damage, macrophages are recruited to the site of injury. Phenotypic diversity is a hallmark of the macrophage lineage and includes pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 populations. Our aim in this study was to investigate the ability of polarized M0, M1, and M2 macrophages to secrete opioid peptides and to examine their relative contribution to the modulation of neuropathic pain. Mouse bone marrow-derived cells were cultured as unstimulated M0 macrophages or were stimulated into an M1 phenotype using lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ or into an M2 phenotype using interleukin-4. The macrophage phenotypes were verified using flow cytometry for surface marker analysis and cytokine bead array for cytokine profile assessment. Opioid peptide levels were measured by radioimmunoassay and enzyme immunoassay. As a model of neuropathic pain, a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve was employed. Polarized M0, M1, and M2 macrophages (5 × 10 5 cells) were injected perineurally twice, on days 14 and 15 following CCI or sham surgery. Mechanical and heat sensitivity were measured using the von Frey and Hargreaves tests, respectively. To track the injected macrophages, we also transferred fluorescently stained polarized cells and analyzed the surface marker profile of endogenous and injected cells in the nerves ex vivo. Compared to M0 and M1 cells, M2 macrophages contained and released higher amounts of opioid peptides, including Met-enkephalin, dynorphin A (1-17), and β-endorphin. M2 cells transferred perineurally at the nerve injury site reduced mechanical, but not heat hypersensitivity following the second injection. The analgesic effect was reversed by the perineurally applied opioid receptor antagonist naloxone methiodide. M2 cells did not affect sensitivity following sham surgery. Neither M0 nor M1 cells altered mechanical and heat sensitivity in CCI or sham-operated animals. Tracing the

  13. Mycobacterium leprae-Infected Macrophages Preferentially Primed Regulatory T Cell Responses and Was Associated with Lepromatous Leprosy.

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    Degang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae infection is largely dependent on the types of host immune responses being induced. Macrophage, a crucial modulator of innate and adaptive immune responses, could be directly infected by M. leprae. We therefore postulated that M. leprae-infected macrophages might have altered immune functions.Here, we treated monocyte-derived macrophages with live or killed M. leprae, and examined their activation status and antigen presentation. We found that macrophages treated with live M. leprae showed committed M2-like function, with decreased interleukin 1 beta (IL-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha and MHC class II molecule expression and elevated IL-10 and CD163 expression. When incubating with naive T cells, macrophages treated with live M. leprae preferentially primed regulatory T (Treg cell responses with elevated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression, while interferon gamma (IFN-gamma expression and CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity were reduced. Chromium release assay also found that live M. leprae-treated macrophages were more resistant to CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity than sonicated M. leprae-treated monocytes. Ex vivo studies showed that the phenotype and function of monocytes and macrophages had clear differences between L-lep and T-lep patients, consistent with the in vitro findings.Together, our data demonstrate that M. leprae could utilize infected macrophages by two mechanisms: firstly, M. leprae-infected macrophages preferentially primed Treg but not Th1 or cytotoxic T cell responses; secondly, M. leprae-infected macrophages were more effective at evading CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  14. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein by HIV protease inhibitors increases intracellular accumulation of berberine in murine and human macrophages.

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    Weibin Zha

    Full Text Available HIV protease inhibitor (PI-induced inflammatory response in macrophages is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We have previously reported that berberine (BBR, a traditional herbal medicine, prevents HIV PI-induced inflammatory response through inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in macrophages. We also found that HIV PIs significantly increased the intracellular concentrations of BBR in macrophages. However, the underlying mechanisms of HIV PI-induced BBR accumulation are unknown. This study examined the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp in HIV PI-mediated accumulation of BBR in macrophages.Cultured mouse RAW264.7 macrophages, human THP-1-derived macrophages, Wild type MDCK (MDCK/WT and human P-gp transfected (MDCK/P-gp cells were used in this study. The intracellular concentration of BBR was determined by HPLC. The activity of P-gp was assessed by measuring digoxin and rhodamine 123 (Rh123 efflux. The interaction between P-gp and BBR or HIV PIs was predicated by Glide docking using Schrodinger program. The results indicate that P-gp contributed to the efflux of BBR in macrophages. HIV PIs significantly increased BBR concentrations in macrophages; however, BBR did not alter cellular HIV PI concentrations. Although HIV PIs did not affect P-gp expression, P-gp transport activities were significantly inhibited in HIV PI-treated macrophages. Furthermore, the molecular docking study suggests that both HIV PIs and BBR fit the binding pocket of P-gp, and HIV PIs may compete with BBR to bind P-gp.HIV PIs increase the concentration of BBR by modulating the transport activity of P-gp in macrophages. Understanding the cellular mechanisms of potential drug-drug interactions is critical prior to applying successful combinational therapy in the clinic.

  15. Mycobacteria, Metals, and the Macrophage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederweis, Michael; Wolschendorf, Frank; Mitra, Avishek; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that thrives inside host macrophages. A key trait of M. tuberculosis is to exploit and manipulate metal cation trafficking inside infected macrophages to ensure survival and replication inside the phagosome. Here we describe the recent fascinating discoveries that the mammalian immune system responds to infections with M. tuberculosis by overloading the phagosome with copper and zinc, two metals which are essential nutrients in small quantities but are toxic in excess. M. tuberculosis has developed multi-faceted resistance mechanisms to protect itself from metal toxicity including control of uptake, sequestration inside the cell, oxidation, and efflux. The host response to infections combines this metal poisoning strategy with nutritional immunity mechanisms that deprive M. tuberculosis from metals such as iron and manganese to prevent bacterial replication. Both immune mechanisms rely on the translocation of metal transporter proteins to the phagosomal membrane during the maturation process of the phagosome. This review summarizes these recent findings and discusses how metal-targeted approaches might complement existing TB chemotherapeutic regimens with novel anti-infective therapies. PMID:25703564

  16. A broken krebs cycle in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Luke A J

    2015-03-17

    Macrophages undergo metabolic rewiring during polarization but details of this process are unclear. In this issue of Immunity, Jha et al. (2015) report a systems approach for unbiased analysis of cellular metabolism that reveals key metabolites and metabolic pathways required for distinct macrophage polarization states. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolic regulation of macrophages in tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bossche, Jan; Saraber, Doina L.

    2018-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that provide host defense and have tissue-specific roles in the maintenance of organ homeostasis and integrity. In most cases macrophages keep us healthy but when their balanced response to damage or homeostatic signals is perturbed, they can drive chronic

  18. Macrophages Promote Axon Regeneration with Concurrent Neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gensel, J.C.; Nakamura, S.; Guan, Z.; Rooijen, van N.; Ankeny, D.P.; Popovich, P.G.

    2009-01-01

    Activated macrophages can promote regeneration of CNS axons. However, macrophages also release factors that kill neurons. These opposing functions are likely induced simultaneously but are rarely considered together in the same experimental preparation. A goal of this study was to unequivocally

  19. Human malignant astrocytes express macrophage phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenstra, S.; Das, P. K.; Troost, D.; de Boer, O. J.; Bosch, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Six well-characterized specimens of cultured astrocytoma cells were investigated with a panel of macrophage markers. Our results show that the macrophage markers OKM-1(CD11b), OKM5(CD36), EBM11(CD68), HAM56, Factor 13, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, ferritin and lysozyme are clearly

  20. Macrophage polarization: the epigenetic point of view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bossche, Jan; Neele, Annette E.; Hoeksema, Marten A.; de Winther, Menno P. J.

    2014-01-01

    The first functions of macrophages to be identified by Metchnikoff were phagocytosis and microbial killing. Although these are important features, macrophages are functionally very complex and involved in virtually all aspects of life, from immunity and host defense, to homeostasis, tissue repair

  1. Interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene welding: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brvar, Miran

    2014-01-01

    Acetylene is a colorless gas commonly used for welding. It acts mainly as a simple asphyxiant. In this paper, however, we present a patient who developed a severe interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene exposure during aluminum welding. A 44-year old man was welding with acetylene, argon and aluminum electrode sticks in a non-ventilated aluminum tank for 2 h. Four hours after welding dyspnea appeared and 22 h later he was admitted at the Emergency Department due to severe respiratory insufficiency with pO2 = 6.7 kPa. Chest X-ray showed diffuse interstitial infiltration. Pulmonary function and gas diffusion tests revealed a severe restriction (55% of predictive volume) and impaired diffusion capacity (47% of predicted capacity). Toxic interstitial pneumonitis was diagnosed and high-dose systemic corticosteroid methylprednisolone and inhalatory corticosteroid fluticasone therapy was started. Computed Tomography (CT) of the lungs showed a diffuse patchy ground-glass opacity with no signs of small airway disease associated with interstitial pneumonitis. Corticosteroid therapy was continued for the next 8 weeks gradually reducing the doses. The patient's follow-up did not show any deterioration of respiratory function. In conclusion, acetylene welding might result in severe toxic interstitial pneumonitis that improves after an early systemic and inhalatory corticosteroid therapy.

  2. Interstitial impurity interactions and dislocation microdynamics in Mo crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, D.N.

    1975-05-01

    The effects of interstitial impurities on the mechanical properties of molybdenum are explored by comparing results obtained for crystals of various interstitial contents controlled by ultra-high vacuum outgassing. Results show a modulus reduction for as-grown samples and for outgassed specimens at low applied stresses. As a function of plastic microstrain, the values of modulus defect for both as-grown and outgassed specimens saturate at the same value. Interstitial impurities act as pinning agents to dislocation bowing, but when all the easy dislocation loops have broken away from local interstitial pins, the modulus defect reaches a constant saturation value. Etch pitting techniques were used to correlate microstrain observations with dislocation generation and motion. It has been found that edge dislocation generation and movement are active in the microstrain region while screw dislocations are relatively inactive until the macrostrain region is reached. Dislocation velocities range from 10 -6 to 10 -3 cm/s and the average distance between interstitial impurity pinning points is found to be approximately 8 x 10 -4 cm. (U.S.)

  3. Acute Abdomen in Interstitial Ectopic Pregnancy, An Emergency Laparoscopic Treatment

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    E. Picardo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present case report demonstrates a laparoscopic approach to treat interstitial cornual pregnancy in emergency. Interstitial ectopic pregnancy develops in the uterine portion of the fallopian tube which accounts for 2–4% of all ectopic pregnancies and has the potential to cause life-threatening hemorrhage at rupture. The mortality rate for a woman diagnosed with such a pregnancy is 2–2.5%. Diagnosis of interstitial pregnancy is made by ultrasound. In this case a 32 year-old woman, Gravida 0 Parity 0 Living 0 Ectopic 1, presented to the emergency obstetrical room complaining acute abdominal pain. There was a history of 10 weeks of pregnancy but no pelvic ultrasound scan was performed before the access. A transvaginal ultrasound scan immediately performed demonstrated a gestational sac with viable fetus in the right interstitial region. Moreover there was an ultrasound evidence of hemoperitoneum. She was transferred to the operating room and an emergency laparoscopy surgery was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged two days after the surgery. Interstitial pregnancies present a difficult management problem with no absolute standard of care in literature. Laparoscopic technique is under study with favorable results. For our personal point of view a treatment via laparoscopy could be performed both in elective and in emergency cases.

  4. Interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene welding: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acetylene is a colorless gas commonly used for welding. It acts mainly as a simple asphyxiant. In this paper, however, we present a patient who developed a severe interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene exposure during aluminum welding. A 44-year old man was welding with acetylene, argon and aluminum electrode sticks in a non-ventilated aluminum tank for 2 h. Four hours after welding dyspnea appeared and 22 h later he was admitted at the Emergency Department due to severe respiratory insufficiency with pO2 = 6.7 kPa. Chest X-ray showed diffuse interstitial infiltration. Pulmonary function and gas diffusion tests revealed a severe restriction (55% of predictive volume and impaired diffusion capacity (47% of predicted capacity. Toxic interstitial pneumonitis was diagnosed and high-dose systemic corticosteroid methylprednisolone and inhalatory corticosteroid fluticasone therapy was started. Computed Tomography (CT of the lungs showed a diffuse patchy ground-glass opacity with no signs of small airway disease associated with interstitial pneumonitis. Corticosteroid therapy was continued for the next 8 weeks gradually reducing the doses. The patient's follow-up did not show any deterioration of respiratory function. In conclusion, acetylene welding might result in severe toxic interstitial pneumonitis that improves after an early systemic and inhalatory corticosteroid therapy.

  5. Unraveling Macrophage Heterogeneity in Erythroblastic Islands

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    Katie Giger Seu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian erythropoiesis occurs within erythroblastic islands (EBIs, niches where maturing erythroblasts interact closely with a central macrophage. While it is generally accepted that EBI macrophages play an important role in erythropoiesis, thorough investigation of the mechanisms by which they support erythropoiesis is limited largely by inability to identify and isolate the specific macrophage sub-population that constitute the EBI. Early studies utilized immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence to study EBI morphology and structure, while more recent efforts have used flow cytometry for high-throughput quantitative characterization of EBIs and their central macrophages. However, these approaches based on the expectation that EBI macrophages are a homogeneous population (F4/80+/CD169+/VCAM-1+ for example provide an incomplete picture and potentially overlook critical information about the nature and biology of the islands and their central macrophages. Here, we present a novel method for analysis of EBI macrophages from hematopoietic tissues of mice and rats using multispectral imaging flow cytometry (IFC, which combines the high-throughput advantage of flow cytometry with the morphological and fluorescence features derived from microscopy. This method provides both quantitative analysis of EBIs, as well as structural and morphological details of the central macrophages and associated cells. Importantly, the images, combined with quantitative software features, can be used to evaluate co-expression of phenotypic markers which is crucial since some antigens used to identify macrophages (e.g., F4/80 and CD11b can be expressed on non-erythroid cells associated with the islands instead of, or in addition to the central macrophage itself. We have used this method to analyze native EBIs from different hematopoietic tissues and evaluated the expression of several markers that have been previously reported to be expressed on EBI macrophages. We

  6. Clinical Utility of YKL-40 in Polymyositis/dermatomyositis-associated Interstitial Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozumi, Hironao; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Nakashima, Ran; Enomoto, Yasunori; Suzuki, Yuzo; Kono, Masato; Karayama, Masato; Furuhashi, Kazuki; Murakami, Akihiro; Inui, Naoki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Suda, Takafumi

    2017-09-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is involved in polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM), a disease associated with poor prognoses. Chitinase-3-like-1 protein (YKL-40) has pleiotropic biological activities involved in inflammation, cell proliferation, and tissue remodeling; however, the clinical application of YKL-40 remains limited. We investigated the clinical significance of YKL-40 in PM/DM-ILD. Sixty-nine consecutive patients with PM/DM-ILD and 34 healthy controls were analyzed. We measured baseline and followup serum YKL-40 using an ELISA, evaluated the association of YKL-40 with clinical variables and survival, and examined YKL-40 expression in lung specimens from patients with PM/DM-ILD using immunohistochemistry. Serum YKL-40 levels were significantly greater in patients with PM/DM-ILD compared with healthy controls (p 40 was correlated with arterial oxygen pressure (r = -0.40, p 40 and lower percent-predicted forced vital capacity were independently associated with a poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that YKL-40 expression was enhanced in aggregated intraalveolar macrophages and hyperproliferative alveolar epithelial cells in patients with PM/DM-ILD. YKL-40 is a promising biomarker for evaluating PM/DM-ILD activity/severity and predicting disease prognosis. Insights into YKL-40 might help elucidate the pathogenesis of PM/DM-ILD.

  7. Chronic interstitial pneumonitis in dogs naturally infected with Leishmania (Leishmania chagasi: a histopathological and morphometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalves Ricardo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen mongrel dogs of unknown age and naturally infected with Leishmania (Leishmania chagasi, were obtained from the City Hall of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Four dogs were used as control. Lung samples were obtained and immediately fixed in formalin. The histopathological picture of all lung tissue sections was a chronic and diffuse interstitial pneumonitis. The thickened inter-alveolar septa were characterized by the cellular exudate (mostly macrophages, lymphocytes and plasmocytes associated with collagen deposition. Morphometric analysis showed greater septal thickness in the infected animals than in controls. In fact, the morphometric study of collagen stained with ammoniac silver confirmed a larger deposition of collagen in the infected animals. The parasitologic method was carried out during the study of the lesions on the slides. However, we did not observe any correlation between the histopathologic and morphometric data and the clinical status of the animals. We conclude that the pulmonary lesions observed in all naturally infected dogs were correlated with the disease and that the morphometric method used was satisfactory for the analysis of septal thickness and of increased collagen deposition, confirming the presence of fibrosis.

  8. Chronic interstitial pneumonitis in dogs naturally infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi: a histopathological and morphometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Ricardo; Tafuri, Washington Luiz; Melo, Maria Norma de; Raso, Pedro; Tafuri, Wagner Luiz

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen mongrel dogs of unknown age and naturally infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi, were obtained from the City Hall of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Four dogs were used as control. Lung samples were obtained and immediately fixed in formalin. The histopathological picture of all lung tissue sections was a chronic and diffuse interstitial pneumonitis. The thickened inter-alveolar septa were characterized by the cellular exudate (mostly macrophages, lymphocytes and plasmocytes) associated with collagen deposition. Morphometric analysis showed greater septal thickness in the infected animals than in controls. In fact, the morphometric study of collagen stained with ammoniac silver confirmed a larger deposition of collagen in the infected animals. The parasitologic method was carried out during the study of the lesions on the slides. However, we did not observe any correlation between the histopathologic and morphometric data and the clinical status of the animals. We conclude that the pulmonary lesions observed in all naturally infected dogs were correlated with the disease and that the morphometric method used was satisfactory for the analysis of septal thickness and of increased collagen deposition, confirming the presence of fibrosis.

  9. Iron chelation by deferoxamine prevents renal interstitial fibrosis in mice with unilateral ureteral obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasumasa Ikeda

    Full Text Available Renal fibrosis plays an important role in the onset and progression of chronic kidney diseases (CKD. Although several mechanisms underlying renal fibrosis and candidate drugs for its treatment have been identified, the effect of iron chelator on renal fibrosis remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the effect of an iron chelator, deferoxamine (DFO, on renal fibrosis in mice with surgically induced unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO. Mice were divided into 4 groups: UUO with vehicle, UUO with DFO, sham with vehicle, and sham with DFO. One week after surgery, augmented renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis and the expression of collagen I, III, and IV increased in mice with UUO; these changes were suppressed by DFO treatment. Similarly, UUO-induced macrophage infiltration of renal interstitial tubules was reduced in UUO mice treated with DFO. UUO-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and extracellular matrix proteins was abrogated by DFO treatment. DFO inhibited the activation of the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1-Smad3 pathway in UUO mice. UUO-induced NADPH oxidase activity and p22(phox expression were attenuated by DFO. In the kidneys of UUO mice, divalent metal transporter 1, ferroportin, and ferritin expression was higher and transferrin receptor expression was lower than in sham-operated mice. Increased renal iron content was observed in UUO mice, which was reduced by DFO treatment. These results suggest that iron reduction by DFO prevents renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis by regulating TGF-β-Smad signaling, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses.

  10. Macrophage Polarization in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassetta, Luca; Cassol, Edana; Poli, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages are terminally differentiated cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system that also encompasses dendritic cells, circulating blood monocytes, and committed myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow. Both macrophages and their monocytic precursors can change their functional state in response to microenvironmental cues exhibiting a marked heterogeneity. However, there are still uncertainties regarding distinct expression patterns of surface markers that clearly define macrophage subsets, particularly in the case of human macrophages. In addition to their tissue distribution, macrophages can be functionally polarized into M1 (proinflammatory) and M2 (alternatively activated) as well as regulatory cells in response to both exogenous infections and solid tumors as well as by systems biology approaches. PMID:22194670

  11. Increased Interstitial Concentrations of Glutamate and Pyruvate in Vastus Lateralis of Women with Fibromyalgia Syndrome Are Normalized after an Exercise Intervention - A Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Gerdle

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is associated with central alterations, but controversies exist regarding the presence and role of peripheral factors. Microdialysis (MD can be used in vivo to study muscle alterations in FMS. Furthermore for chronic pain conditions such as FMS, the mechanisms for the positive effects of exercise are unclear. This study investigates the interstitial concentrations of algesics and metabolites in the vastus lateralis muscle of 29 women with FMS and 28 healthy women before and after an exercise intervention.All the participants went through a clinical examination and completed a questionnaire. In addition, their pressure pain thresholds (PPTs in their upper and lower extremities were determined. For both groups, MD was conducted in the vastus lateralis muscle before and after a 15-week exercise intervention of mainly resistance training of the lower limbs. Muscle blood flow and interstitial muscle concentrations of lactate, pyruvate, glutamate, glucose, and glycerol were determined.FMS was associated with significantly increased interstitial concentrations of glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate. After the exercise intervention, the FMS group exhibited significant decreases in pain intensity and in mean interstitial concentrations of glutamate, pyruvate, and glucose. The decrease in pain intensity in FMS correlated significantly with the decreases in pyruvate and glucose. In addition, the FMS group increased their strength and endurance.This study supports the suggestion that peripheral metabolic and algesic muscle alterations are present in FMS patients and that these alterations contribute to pain. After an exercise intervention, alterations normalized, pain intensity decreased (but not abolished, and strength and endurance improved, all findings that suggest the effects of exercise are partially peripheral.

  12. Exertional dyspnoea in interstitial lung diseases: the clinical utility of cardiopulmonary exercise testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Bonini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs represent a heterogeneous group of pathologies characterised by alveolar and interstitial damage, pulmonary inflammation (usually associated with fibrosis, decreased lung function and impaired gas exchange, which can be attributed to either a known or an unknown aetiology. Dyspnoea is one of the most common and disabling symptoms in patients with ILD, significantly impacting quality of life. The mechanisms causing dyspnoea are complex and not yet fully understood. However, it is recognised that dyspnoea occurs when there is an imbalance between the central respiratory efferent drive and the response of the respiratory musculature. The respiratory derangement observed in ILD patients at rest is even more evident during exercise. Pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for exertional dyspnoea and reduced exercise tolerance include altered respiratory mechanics, impaired gas exchange, cardiovascular abnormalities and peripheral muscle dysfunction. This review describes the respiratory physiology of ILD, both at rest and during exercise, and aims to provide comprehensive and updated evidence on the clinical utility of the cardiopulmonary exercise test in the assessment and management of these pathological entities. In addition, the role of exercise training and pulmonary rehabilitation programmes in the ILD population is addressed.

  13. Acute pergolide exposure stiffens engineered valve interstitial cell tissues and reduces contractility in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capulli, Andrew K; MacQueen, Luke A; O'Connor, Blakely B; Dauth, Stephanie; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    Medications based on ergoline-derived dopamine and serotonin agonists are associated with off-target toxicities that include valvular heart disease (VHD). Reports of drug-induced VHD resulted in the withdrawal of appetite suppressants containing fenfluramine and phentermine from the US market in 1997 and pergolide, a Parkinson's disease medication, in 2007. Recent evidence suggests that serotonin receptor activity affected by these medications modulates cardiac valve interstitial cell activation and subsequent valvular remodeling, which can lead to cardiac valve fibrosis and dysfunction similar to that seen in carcinoid heart disease. Failure to identify these risks prior to market and continued use of similar drugs reaffirm the need to improve preclinical evaluation of drug-induced VHD. Here, we present two complimentary assays to measure stiffness and contractile stresses generated by engineered valvular tissues in vitro. As a case study, we measured the effects of acute (24 h) pergolide exposure to engineered porcine aortic valve interstitial cell (AVIC) tissues. Pergolide exposure led to increased tissue stiffness, but it decreased both basal and active contractile tone stresses generated by AVIC tissues. Pergolide exposure also disrupted AVIC tissue organization (i.e., tissue anisotropy), suggesting that the mechanical properties and contractile functionality of these tissues are governed by their ability to maintain their structure. We expect further use of these assays to identify off-target drug effects that alter the phenotypic balance of AVICs, disrupt their ability to maintain mechanical homeostasis, and lead to VHD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Acute Pergolide Exposure Stiffens Engineered Valve Interstitial Cell Tissues and Reduces Contractility In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capulli, Andrew K.; MacQueen, Luke A.; O’Connor, Blakely B.; Dauth, Stephanie; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    Medications based on ergoline-derived dopamine and serotonin agonists are associated with off-target toxicities that include valvular heart disease (VHD). Reports of drug-induced VHD resulted in the withdrawal of appetite suppressants containing fenfluramine and phentermine from the U.S. market in 1997 and pergolide, a Parkinson’s disease medication, in 2007. Recent evidence suggests that serotonin receptor activity affected by these medications modulates cardiac valve interstitial cell activation and subsequent valvular remodeling, which can lead to cardiac valve fibrosis and dysfunction similar to that seen in carcinoid heart disease. Failure to identify these risks prior to market, and continued use of similar drugs, reaffirms the need to improve preclinical evaluation of drug-induced VHD. Here, we present two complimentary assays to measure stiffness and contractile stresses generated by engineered valvular tissues in vitro. As a case study, we measured the effects of acute (24 hr) pergolide exposure to engineered porcine aortic valve interstitial cell (AVIC) tissues. Pergolide exposure led to increased tissue stiffness but it decreased both basal and active contractile tone stresses generated by AVIC tissues. Pergolide exposure also disrupted AVIC tissue organization (i.e., tissue anisotropy), suggesting that the mechanical properties and contractile functionality of these tissues are governed by their ability to maintain their structure. We expect further use of these assays to identify off-target drug effects that alter the phenotypic balance of AVICs, disrupt their ability to maintain mechanical homeostasis, and lead to VHD. PMID:27174867

  15. Comparison of an interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome clinical cohort with symptomatic community women from the RAND Interstitial Cystitis Epidemiology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkle, Katy S; Berry, Sandra H; Elliott, Marc N; Hilton, Lara; Suttorp, Marika J; Clauw, Daniel J; Clemens, J Quentin

    2012-02-01

    The RAND Interstitial Cystitis Epidemiology survey estimated that 2.7% to 6.5% of United States women have urinary symptoms consistent with a diagnosis of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. We describe the demographic and clinical characteristics of the symptomatic community based RAND Interstitial Cystitis Epidemiology cohort, and compare them with those of a clinically based interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome cohort. Subjects included 3,397 community women who met the criteria for the RAND Interstitial Cystitis Epidemiology high sensitivity case definition, and 277 women with an interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome diagnosis recruited from specialist practices across the United States (clinical cohort). Questions focused on demographic information, symptom severity, quality of life indicators, concomitant diagnoses and treatment. Average symptom duration for both groups was approximately 14 years. Women in the clinical cohort reported worse baseline pain and maximum pain, although the absolute differences were small. Mean Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Index scores were approximately 11 for both groups, but mean Interstitial Cystitis Problem Index scores were 9.9 and 13.2 for the clinical cohort and the RAND Interstitial Cystitis Epidemiology cohort, respectively (p Interstitial Cystitis Epidemiology subjects were more likely to be uninsured. The RAND Interstitial Cystitis Epidemiology community cohort was remarkably similar to an interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome clinical cohort with respect to demographics, symptoms and quality of life measures. In contrast to other chronic pain conditions for which clinical cohorts typically report worse symptoms and functional status than population based samples, our data suggest that many measures of symptom severity and functional impact are similar, and sometimes worse, in the RAND Interstitial Cystitis Epidemiology cohort. These findings suggest that interstitial cystitis/bladder pain

  16. Adipose tissue macrophage polarization by intermittent hypoxia in a mouse model of OSA: effect of tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendros, Isaac; Gileles-Hillel, Alex; Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Shelley X; Carreras, Alba; Farré, Ramon; Gozal, David

    2015-06-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH)-induces alterations in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) that are associated with adverse cancer outcomes, as reported in patients suffering from sleep apnea. Adipose tissues (AT) and bone-marrow (BM)-derived cells are the inferred sources of macrophages infiltrating malignant tumors. Here, the sources of TAMs and the phenotypic changes induced by IH in the ipsilateral and contralateral AT were investigated by using a syngeneic murine solid tumor model (TC1). C57/B6 male mice were exposed to either IH or room air (RA) for 6 weeks, with TC1 cells being inoculated in the 2nd week. Macrophage content, phenotype and tissue origin were assessed in tumors, and ipsilateral and contralateral AT. IH induced a ~2.2-fold increase in TAM tumor infiltration. However, differential responses in the tumor ipsilateral and contralateral AT emerged: IH increased infiltration of preferentially M1 macrophages in contralateral AT, while reductions in macrophages emerged in ipsilateral AT and primarily consisted of the M2 phenotype. These changes were accompanied by reciprocal increases in resident and BM-derived TAMs in the tumor. IH-induced phenotypic alterations in AT macrophages surrounding the tumor and their increased infiltration within the tumor may contribute to the accelerated tumor progression associated with IH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Surfactant Protein D Binds to Coxiella burnetii and Results in a Decrease in Interactions with Murine Alveolar Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A Soltysiak

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of Q fever. Infections are usually acquired after inhalation of contaminated particles, where C. burnetii infects its cellular target cells, alveolar macrophages. Respiratory pathogens encounter the C-type lectin surfactant protein D (SP-D during the course of natural infection. SP-D is a component of the innate immune response in the lungs and other mucosal surfaces. Many Gram-negative pulmonary pathogens interact with SP-D, which can cause aggregation, bactericidal effects and aid in bacterial clearance. Here we show that SP-D binds to C. burnetii in a calcium-dependent manner with no detectable bacterial aggregation or bactericidal effects. Since SP-D interactions with bacteria often alter macrophage interactions, it was determined that SP-D treatment resulted in a significant decrease in C. burnetii interactions to a mouse alveolar macrophage model cell line MH-S indicating SP-D causes a significant decrease in phagocytosis. The ability of SP-D to modulate macrophage activation by C. burnetii was tested and it was determined that SP-D does not alter the correlates measured for macrophage activation. Taken together these studies support those demonstrating limited activation of alveolar macrophages with C. burnetii and demonstrate interactions with SP-D participate in reduction of phagocyte attachment and phagocytosis.

  18. Concurrent interstitial ectopic pregnancy and appendicitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, R Lee; Magann, Everett F; O'Boyle, John D

    2008-05-01

    Concurrent ectopic pregnancy and acute appendicitis is rarely encountered. Since 1960, only 22 cases have been reported. No case of concurrent interstitial ectopic pregnancy and appendicitis has ever been reported. A 24-year-old, African American woman, gravida 4, para 3, had a right interstitial ectopic pregnancy. She was managed as an inpatient with parenteral methotrexate and her beta-human chorionic gonadotropin level decreased appropriately. She was discharged 3 days after treatment but subsequently returned with right lower quadrant pain, nausea, vomiting and fever. The patient underwent laparoscopy with removal of a suppurative appendix. A stable interstitial ectopic pregnancy was visualized and left in situ. The discipline to consider concomitant abdominal pathology is paramount. The perceived rarity of an ectopic pregnancy and appendicitis should not obscure a thorough clinical evaluation.

  19. Eccentrically located intrauterine pregnancy misdiagnosed as interstitial ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Adam; Ko, Patrick; Dewar, Christopher; Raio, Christopher

    2010-12-01

    This is a case report of an eccentrically located intrauterine pregnancy initially diagnosed as an interstitial ectopic pregnancy. Although interstitial ectopic pregnancy represents a well-known pitfall in first-trimester sonography, the common error is to misidentify the ectopic pregnancy as intrauterine, not the reverse. Such an error is potentially catastrophic because it may lead to the inadvertent termination of a viable pregnancy. Although the role of ultrasonography for evaluation of ectopic pregnancy is well established, its diagnostic accuracy for interstitial ectopic pregnancy remains uncertain. Because of this, sonographic findings should be considered suggestive, but not diagnostic, in this setting. Copyright © 2010 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The behaviour of stacking fault energy upon interstitial alloying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee-Yong; Koo, Yang Mo; Lu, Song; Vitos, Levente; Kwon, Se Kyun

    2017-09-11

    Stacking fault energy is one of key parameters for understanding the mechanical properties of face-centered cubic materials. It is well known that the plastic deformation mechanism is closely related to the size of stacking fault energy. Although alloying is a conventional method to modify the physical parameter, the underlying microscopic mechanisms are not yet clearly established. Here, we propose a simple model for determining the effect of interstitial alloying on the stacking fault energy. We derive a volumetric behaviour of stacking fault energy from the harmonic approximation to the energy-lattice curve and relate it to the contents of interstitials. The stacking fault energy is found to change linearly with the interstitial content in the usual low concentration domain. This is in good agreement with previously reported experimental and theoretical data.

  1. What is new in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, P.; Nordling, J.; Ophoven, A. van

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is an important and poorly understood disorder. This review highlights current research findings that may be of benefit to the clinician who is responsible for the diagnosis and treatment of patients who suffer from this condition....... Recent findings The perspective from which we view bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is evolving, as is apparent in the literature this year. It is best perceived as one of many chronic pain syndromes, some of which may be related. International efforts aimed at consistent definition...... the world. In this review we hope to bring practicing healthcare providers up to date with the literature on bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis, and the implications for their patients Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  2. Role of inflammation in bladder function and interstitial cystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sonal; Srivastava, Abhishek; Lee, Richard; Tewari, Ashutosh K.; Te, Alexis E.

    2011-01-01

    Cystitis, or inflammation of the bladder, has a direct effect on bladder function. Interstitial cystitis is a syndrome characterized by urinary bladder pain and irritative symptoms of more than 6 months duration. It commonly occurs in young to middle-aged women with no known cause and in fact represents a diagnosis of exclusion. Many factors have been suggested, including chronic or subclinical infection, autoimmunity and genetic susceptibility, which could be responsible for initiating the inflammatory response. However, a central role of inflammation has been confirmed in the pathogenesis of interstitial cystitis. Patients with interstitial cystitis are usually managed with multimodal therapy to break the vicious cycle of chronic inflammation at every step. Patients who develop irreversible pathologies such as fibrosis are managed surgically, which is usually reserved for refractory cases. PMID:21789096

  3. Acute ciprofloxacin-induced crystal nephropathy with granulomatous interstitial nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Goli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystal-induced acute kidney injury (AKI is caused by the intratubular precipitation of crystals, which results in obstruction and kidney injury. Ciprofloxacin, a commonly used antibiotic, causes AKI secondary to immune-mediated interstitial injury. Rare mechanisms of ciprofloxacin-induced renal injury include crystalluria, rhabdomyolysis, and granulomatous interstitial nephritis. Clinical and experimental studies have suggested that crystalluria and crystal nephropathy due to ciprofloxacin occur in alkaline urine. Preexisting kidney function impairment, high dose of the medication, and advanced age predispose to this complication. We report a case of ciprofloxacin-induced crystal nephropathy and granulomatous interstitial nephritis in a young patient with no other predisposing factors. The patient responded to conservative treatment without the need for glucocorticoids.

  4. Interstitial integrals in the multiple-scattering model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, J.R.; Dill, D.

    1982-01-01

    We present an efficient method for the evaluation of integrals involving multiple-scattering wave functions over the interstitial region. Transformation of the multicenter interstitial wave functions to a single center representation followed by a geometric projection reduces the integrals to products of analytic angular integrals and numerical radial integrals. The projection function, which has the value 1 in the interstitial region and 0 elsewhere, has a closed-form partial-wave expansion. The method is tested by comparing its results with exact normalization and dipole integrals; the differences are 2% at worst and typically less than 1%. By providing an efficient means of calculating Coulomb integrals, the method allows treatment of electron correlations using a multiple scattering basis set

  5. Blood and milk polymorphonuclear leukocyte and monocyte/macrophage functions in naturally caprine arthritis encephalitis virus infection in dairy goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Bruna Parapinski; Souza, Fernando Nogueira; Blagitz, Maiara Garcia; Batista, Camila Freitas; Bertagnon, Heloísa Godoi; Diniz, Soraia Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Haddad, João Paulo Amaral; Della Libera, Alice Maria Melville Paiva

    2017-06-01

    The exact influence of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) infection on blood and milk polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) and monocyte/macrophages of goats remains unclear. Thus, the present study sought to explore the blood and milk PMNL and monocyte/macrophage functions in naturally CAEV-infected goats. The present study used 18 healthy Saanen goats that were segregated according to sera test outcomes into serologically CAEV negative (n=8; 14 halves) and positive (n=10; 14 halves) groups. All milk samples from mammary halves with milk bacteriologically positive outcomes, somatic cell count ≥2×10 6 cellsmL -1 , and abnormal secretions in the strip cup test were excluded. We evaluated the percentage of blood and milk PMNLs and monocyte/macrophages, the viability of PMNLs and monocyte/macrophages, the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the nonopsonized phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by flow cytometry. In the present study, a higher percentage of milk macrophages (CD14 + ) and milk polymorphonuclear leukocytes undergoing late apoptosis or necrosis (Annexin-V + /Propidium iodide + ) was observed in CAEV-infected goats; we did not find any further alterations in blood and milk PMNL and monocyte/macrophage functions. Thus, regarding our results, the goats naturally infected with CAEV did not reveal pronounced dysfunctions in blood and milk polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes/macrophages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Lung lobar volume in patients with chronic interstitial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Hisao; Koba, Hiroyuki; Saitoh, Tsukasa; Abe, Shosaku.

    1997-01-01

    We measured lung lobar volume by using helical computed tomography (HCT) in 23 patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP), 7 patients with chronic interstitial pneumonia associated with collagen vascular disease (CVD-IP), and 5 healthy volunteers HCT scanning was done at the maximal inspiratory level and the resting end-expiratory level. To measure lung lobar volume, we traced the lobar margin on HCT images with a digitizer and calculated the lobar volume with a personal computer. The lower lobar volume and several factors influencing it in chronic interstitial pneumonia were studied. At the maximal inspiratory level, the lower lobar volume as a percent of the whole lung volume was 46.8±4.13% (mean ± SD) in the volunteers, 39.5±6.19% in the patients with IIP, and 27.7±7. 86% in the patients with CVD-IP. The lower lobar volumes in the patients were significantly lower than in the volunteers. Patients with IIP in whom autoantibody tests were positive had lower lobar volumes that were very low and were similar to those of patients with CVD-IP. These data suggest that collagen vascular disease may develop in patients with interstitial pneumonia. The patients with IIP who had emphysematous changes on the CT scans had smaller decreases in total lung capacity and lower ratios of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity than did those who had no emphysematous changes, those two groups did not differ in the ratio of lower lobar volume to whole lung volume. This suggests that emphysematous change is not factor influencing lower lobar volume in patients with chronic interstitial pneumonia. We conclude that chronic interstitial pneumonia together with very low values for lower lobar volume may be a pulmonary manifestation of collagen vascular disease. (author)

  7. Pulmonary interstitial emphysema in neonates -reporting of 11 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvares, Beatriz Regina; Santos Mezzacappa, Maria Aparecida dos; Marba, Sergio Tadeu Martins

    1997-01-01

    The present paper relates the radiologic and clinical aspects of pulmonary interstitial emphysema in 11 infants submitted to assisted ventilation. The radiologic diagnosis was made using the classification of Boothroyd and Barson (levels I to III). A prevalence of pulmonary interstitial emphysema of levels II and III was observed in masculine premature infants with hyaline membrane disease and intrauterine pneumonia. Mortality was high and occurred in the infants with advanced levels of the disease. The authors emphasize the importance of early radiologic diagnosis of this condition during the treatment of premature infants submitted to assisted ventilation. (author)

  8. Ultrasound diagnosis and laparoscopic excision of an interstitial ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C; Hurley, V

    1992-11-01

    Interstitial tubal pregnancy occurs in about 5% of ectopic tubal pregnancies and is associated with an increased risk of severe haemorrhage (1). Diagnosis prior to rupture of the pregnancy into the peritoneal cavity is very important to avoid haemorrhage. Its presence has been considered to be a contraindication to laparoscopic surgery (2), although most ectopic pregnancies can be managed laparoscopically by an experienced endoscopist. We report the diagnosis of an interstitial pregnancy by ultrasound before rupture and treatment by laparoscopic excision of the pregnancy.

  9. Unilateral twin interstitial ectopic pregnancy. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starks, G C

    1980-08-01

    An unusual case of twin unilateral interstitial pregnancy with premature rupture of membranes and leiomyomata uteri is described. A review of the literature reveals only two previous cases of this type. On admission, the patient was diagnosed as having an intrauterine pregnancy of 27 weeks' gestation, with documented premature rupture of the membranes having occurred. An ultrasound was performed revealing a fibroid uterus, an anterior placenta and an gestation. Septicemia ensued, and antibiotics plus pitocin was begun; however, no uterine response occurred. A culdocentesis revealed free intraabdominal blood. Laparotomy followed, revealing a ruptured twin interstitial pregnancy with placenta accreta and leiomyomata of the uterus.

  10. Interstitial cells in the musculature of the gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri J; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie

    2003-01-01

    "non-Cajal" (including the FLC and possibly also other cell types) cell types in the interstitium of the smooth musculature of the gastrointestinal tract, is proposed. Furthermore, evidence is accumulating to suggest that, as postulated by Santiago Ramon y Cajal, the concept of interstitial cells......Expression of the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT on cells referred to as interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) has been instrumental during the past decade in the tremendous interest in cells in the interstitium of the smooth muscle layers of the digestive tract. ICC generate the pacemaker component...

  11. [The interstitial pregnancy. Report of three observations (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuisson, J B; Henrion, R

    1979-01-01

    The recent occurrence at the Port-Royal obstetrics and gynaecology center of three cases of interstitial pregnancy out of a total number of 208 ectopic pregnancies give us the opportunity to discuss the diagnosis and present management of the rarest form of tubal pregnancies. The diagnosis is always difficult. Nowadays, thanks to the use of echography and especially of laparoscopy, interstitial pregnancies can be detected earlier. Thus the precocity of the diagnosis should permit a conservative surgical treatment. Hysterectomy should not be considered but in very special cases.

  12. Global concepts of bladder pain syndrome (interstitial cystitis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus; Hanno, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome (BPS), commonly referred to as "interstitial cystitis", is no longer considered a rare disorder. It may affect up to 2.7% of the adult female population (Ueda et al. in Int J Urol 10:1-70, 2003) with up to 20% of cases occurring in men.......Bladder pain syndrome (BPS), commonly referred to as "interstitial cystitis", is no longer considered a rare disorder. It may affect up to 2.7% of the adult female population (Ueda et al. in Int J Urol 10:1-70, 2003) with up to 20% of cases occurring in men....

  13. Painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis: Aetiology, evaluation and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Rourke

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis or bladder pain syndrome (BPS is often a chronic debilitating condition characterised by predominantly storage symptoms and associated frequently with pelvic pain that varies with bladder filling. The aetiology is uncertain as the condition occurs in the absence of a urinary tract infection or other obvious pathology. Resulting discomfort may vary and ranges from abdominal tenderness to intense bladder spasms. Diagnosis and management of this syndrome may be difficult and is often made by its typical cystoscopic features. This review discusses the diagnosis and management of interstitial cystitis according to the current available best evidence and advises a multimodal approach in its management.

  14. Texture analysis using proton density and T2 relaxation in patients with histological usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP or nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria T A Buzan

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to assess proton density (PD and T2 relaxation time of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP and to evaluate their utility in differentiating the two patterns. Furthermore, we aim to investigate whether these two parameters could help differentiate active-inflammatory and stable-fibrotic lesions in NSIP.32 patients (mean age: 69 years; M:F, 1:1 with pathologically proven disease (UIP:NSIP, 1:1, underwent thoracic thin-section multislice CT scan and 1.5T MRI. A total of 437 regions-of-interest (ROIs were classified at CT as advanced, moderate or mild alterations. Based on multi-echo single-shot TSE sequence acquired at five echo times, with breath-holding at end-expiration and ECG-triggering, entire lung T2 and PD maps were generated from each subject. The T2 relaxation time and the respective signal intensity were quantified by performing a ROI measurement on the T2 and PD maps in the corresponding CT selected areas of the lung.UIP and NSIP regional patterns could not be differentiated by T2 relaxation times or PD values alone. Overall, a strong positive correlation was found between T2 relaxation and PD in NSIP, r = 0.64, p0.05.T2 relaxation times and PD values may provide helpful quantitative information for differentiating NSIP from UIP pattern. These parameters have the potential to differentiate active-inflammatory and stable-fibrotic lesions in NSIP.

  15. HIV-1 Latency in Monocytes/Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 targets CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. HIV pathogenesis is characterized by the depletion of T lymphocytes and by the presence of a population of cells in which latency has been established called the HIV-1 reservoir. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has significantly improved the life of HIV-1 infected patients. However, complete eradication of HIV-1 from infected individuals is not possible without targeting latent sources of infection. HIV-1 establishes latent infection in resting CD4+ T cells and findings indicate that latency can also be established in the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Monocyte/macrophage lineage includes among others, monocytes, macrophages and brain resident macrophages. These cells are relatively more resistant to apoptosis induced by HIV-1, thus are important stable hideouts of the virus. Much effort has been made in the direction of eliminating HIV-1 resting CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. However, it is impossible to achieve a cure for HIV-1 without considering these neglected latent reservoirs, the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this review we will describe our current understanding of the mechanism of latency in monocyte/macrophage lineage and how such cells can be specifically eliminated from the infected host.

  16. Interstitial and adsorbed phosphates in shelf sediments off Visakhapatnam, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.; Raju, G.R.K.

    Spatial distribution of interstitial and adsorbed phosphates in the shelf sediments shows an increasing trend with distance from coastal to inshore region. Maximum concentration ranges of interstitial and adsorbed phosphates are 16-19 and 40-50 mu g...

  17. Interstitial pneumonia and pulmonary hypertension associated with suspected ehrlichiosis in a dog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toom, Marjolein Lisette den; Dobak, Tetyda Paulina; Broens, Els Marion; Valtolina, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In dogs with canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME), respiratory signs are uncommon and clinical and radiographic signs of interstitial pneumonia are poorly described. However, in human monocytic ehrlichiosis, respiratory signs are common and signs of interstitial pneumonia are well known.

  18. Fiber-optic temperature sensor using a liquid crystal film for laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bong-Soo; Tack, Gye-Rae; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Yi, Jeong-Han [Konkuk University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sin [Cheju National University, Cheju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyo-Sung [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    In this paper, we describe the feasibility of developing a new fiber-optic temperature sensor using a thermo-sensitive liquid crystal (LC) film for laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT). The temperature change in the tissue or the tumor causes the color of the LC film in contacted with the tissue to change, and that change alters the reflectivity of the LC film. The light with a selected wavelength that is transmitted to the LC film and the optical power of the reflected light are measured using transmitting and receiving optical fibers, respectively. Also, the relationship between the temperature and the optical power of reflected light is determined using the characteristics of the LC films.

  19. Soluble immune complexes shift the TLR-induced cytokine production of distinct polarized human macrophage subsets towards IL-10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen A Ambarus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Costimulation of murine macrophages with immune complexes (ICs and TLR ligands leads to alternative activation. Studies on human myeloid cells, however, indicate that ICs induce an increased pro-inflammatory cytokine production. This study aimed to clarify the effect of ICs on the pro- versus anti-inflammatory profile of human polarized macrophages. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Monocytes isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors were polarized for four days with IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, GM-CSF, M-CSF, or LPS, in the presence or absence of heat aggregated gamma-globulins (HAGGs. Phenotypic polarization markers were measured by flow cytometry. Polarized macrophages were stimulated with HAGGs or immobilized IgG alone or in combination with TLR ligands. TNF, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and IL-23 were measured by Luminex and/or RT-qPCR. RESULTS: HAGGs did not modulate the phenotypic polarization and the cytokine production of macrophages. However, HAGGs significantly altered the TLR-induced cytokine production of all polarized macrophage subsets, with the exception of MΦ(IL-4. In particular, HAGGs consistently enhanced the TLR-induced IL-10 production in both classically and alternatively polarized macrophages (M1 and M2. The effect of HAGGs on TNF and IL-6 production was less pronounced and depended on the polarization status, while IL-23p19 and IL-12p35 expression was not affected. In contrast with HAGGs, immobilized IgG induced a strong upregulation of not only IL-10, but also TNF and IL-6. CONCLUSION: HAGGs alone do not alter the phenotype and cytokine production of in vitro polarized human macrophages. In combination with TLR-ligands, however, HAGGs but not immobilized IgG shift the cytokine production of distinct macrophage subsets toward IL-10.

  20. MKL1 expressed in macrophages contributes to the development of murine colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jianbo; Nagaishi, Takashi; Watabe, Taro; Naruse, Taeko K; Watanabe, Mamoru; Kimura, Akinori

    2017-10-20

    Mice deficient in the megakaryoblastic leukaemia 1 (Mkl1) gene experience less severe dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, implying that Mkl1 plays a pathological role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the contribution of Mkl1 to the development of colitis remains to be elucidated. The expression of Mkl1 is higher in the colonic lamina propria macrophages (LPMac) of DSS-treated mice than in those of control mice. Therefore, we established a transgenic mouse line that overexpresses human MKL1 (MKL1-Tg) specifically in cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage, in order to investigate the potential role of macrophage MKL1 in the pathogenesis of colitis. MKL1-Tg mice displayed spontaneous colon shortening and rectal prolapse. Flow cytometric and quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that, in MKL1-Tg mice compared to littermate controls, the population of LPMac was decreased and had an altered inflammatory phenotype indicative of impaired anti-inflammatory properties, whereas bone marrow-derived macrophages from MKL1-Tg mice skewed towards M1 polarisation. In addition, MKL1-Tg mice had higher susceptibility to DSS-induced colitis than their littermate controls. These observations indicated that MKL1 crucially contributes to the development of colitis via the regulation of the function of macrophages, suggesting that it may be a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of IBD.

  1. Effects of apoE genotype on macrophage inflammation and heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofre-Monseny, Laia; Loboda, Agnieszka; Wagner, Anika E; Huebbe, Patricia; Boesch-Saadatmandi, Christine; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Minihane, Anne-Marie; Dulak, Jozef; Rimbach, Gerald

    2007-05-25

    In order to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the aetiology of apolipoprotein E4 genotype-cardiovascular disease (CVD) associations, the impact of the apoE genotype on the macrophage inflammatory response was examined. The murine monocyte-macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) stably transfected to produce equal amounts of human apoE3 or apoE4 was used. Following LPS stimulation, apoE4-macrophages showed higher and lower concentrations of tumour necrosis factor alpha (pro-inflammatory) and interleukin 10 (anti-inflammatory), respectively, both at mRNA and protein levels. In addition, increased expression of heme oxygenase-1 (a stress-induced anti-inflammatory protein) was observed in the apoE4-cells. Furthermore, in apoE4-macrophages, an enhanced transactivation of the key redox sensitive transcription factor NF-kappaB was shown. Current data indicate that apoE4 macrophages have an altered inflammatory response, which may contribute to the higher CVD risk observed in apoE4 carriers.

  2. A possible mechanism in the recruitment of eosinophils and Th2 cells through CD163(+) M2 macrophages in the lesional skin of eosinophilic cellulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Taku; Kambayashi, Yumi; Furudate, Sadanori; Kakizaki, Aya; Aiba, Setsuya

    2014-01-01

    M2 macrophages play a critical role in the recruitment of T helper 2 (Th2) regulatory T cells (Treg). To study the role of M2 macrophages and Treg cells in eosinophilic celulitis. We employed immunohistochemical staining for CD163( )and CD206 (macrophages) as well as FoxP3 (Treg), in lesional skin of four cases of eosinophilic cellulitis. CD163(+) CD206(+) M2 macrophages, which were previously reported to produce CCL17 to induce Th2 cells and Treg cells, were predominantly infiltrating the subcutaneous tissues and interstitial area of the dermis. M2 macrophages derived from PBMC showed significantly increased expression of CCL11, CCL17, CCL24 and CCL26 mRNA and production of CCL17 and CCL24, when stimulated by IL-4 or IL- 13. In addition, CCL17-producing cells and CCL24-producing cells were prominent in the lesional skin of EC. Our study sheds light on one of the possible immunological mechanisms of eosinophilic cellulitis.

  3. Monocyte/macrophage-derived soluble CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten N; Abildgaard, Niels; Maniecki, Maciej B

    2014-01-01

    in bone marrow samples than in the matched blood samples, which indicate a localized production of sCD163 within the bone marrow microenvironment. CONCLUSIONS: Soluble CD163 was found to be a prognostic marker in patients with multiple myeloma. This may indicate that macrophages and/or monocytes have......OBJECTIVES: Macrophages play an important role in cancer by suppression of adaptive immunity and promotion of angiogenesis and metastasis. Tumor-associated macrophages strongly express the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163, which can also be found as a soluble protein in serum and other body...

  4. Influence of interstitial Mn on magnetism in room-temperature ferromagnet Mn(1+delta)Sb

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, A. E.; Berlijn, T.; Hahn, S. E.; May, A. F.; Williams, T. J.; Poudel, L.; Calder, S.; Fishman, R. S.; Stone, M. B.; Aczel, A. A.; Cao, H. B.; Lumsden, M. D.; Christianson, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    We report elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the high-TC ferromagnet Mn(1+delta)Sb. Measurements were performed on a large, TC=434 K, single crystal with interstitial Mn content of delta~0.13. The neutron diffraction results reveal that the interstitial Mn has a magnetic moment, and that it is aligned antiparallel to the main Mn moment. We perform density functional theory calculations including the interstitial Mn, and find the interstitial to be magnetic in agreement w...

  5. MR-guided transcranial focused ultrasound safely enhances interstitial dispersion of large polymeric nanoparticles in the living brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Hersh

    Full Text Available Generating spatially controlled, non-destructive changes in the interstitial spaces of the brain has a host of potential clinical applications, including enhancing the delivery of therapeutics, modulating biological features within the tissue microenvironment, altering fluid and pressure dynamics, and increasing the clearance of toxins, such as plaques found in Alzheimer's disease. Recently we demonstrated that ultrasound can non-destructively enlarge the interstitial spaces of the brain ex vivo. The goal of the current study was to determine whether these effects could be reproduced in the living brain using non-invasive, transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS. The left striatum of healthy rats was treated using MRgFUS. Computer simulations facilitated treatment planning, and targeting was validated using MRI acoustic radiation force impulse imaging. Following MRgFUS treatments, Evans blue dye or nanoparticle probes were infused to assess changes in the interstitial space. In MRgFUS-treated animals, enhanced dispersion was observed compared to controls for 70 nm (12.8 ± 0.9 mm3 vs. 10.6 ± 1.0 mm3, p = 0.01, 200 nm (10.9 ± 1.4 mm3 vs. 7.4 ± 0.7 mm3, p = 0.01 and 700 nm (7.5 ± 0.4 mm3 vs. 5.4 ± 1.2 mm3, p = 0.02 nanoparticles, indicating enlargement of the interstitial spaces. No evidence of significant histological or electrophysiological injury was identified. These findings suggest that transcranial ultrasound can safely and effectively modulate the brain interstitium and increase the dispersion of large therapeutic entities such as particulate drug carriers or modified viruses. This has the potential to expand the therapeutic uses of MRgFUS.

  6. Dexamethasone targeted directly to macrophages induces macrophage niches that promote erythroid expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falchi, Mario; Varricchio, Lilian; Martelli, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Cultures of human CD34(pos) cells stimulated with erythroid growth factors plus dexamethasone, a model for stress erythropoiesis, generate numerous erythroid cells plus a few macrophages (approx. 3%; 3:1 positive and negative for CD169). Interactions occurring between erythroblasts and macrophages...... in these cultures and the biological effects associated with these interactions were documented by live phase-contrast videomicroscopy. Macrophages expressed high motility interacting with hundreds/thousands of erythroblasts per hour. CD169(pos) macrophages established multiple rapid 'loose' interactions...... with proerythroblasts leading to formation of transient erythroblastic island-like structures. By contrast, CD169(neg) macrophages established 'tight' interactions with mature erythroblasts and phagocytosed these cells. 'Loose' interactions of CD169(pos) macrophages were associated with proerythroblast cytokinesis (the...

  7. ADAR1 attenuates allogeneic graft rejection by suppressing miR-21 biogenesis in macrophages and promoting M2 polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjie; Xie, Jiangang; Liu, Shanshou; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Dongliang; Wang, Xianqi; Jiang, Jinquan; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Yuan; Jin, Boquan; Zhuang, Ran; Yin, Wen

    2018-04-25

    ADAR1 (adenosine deaminase acting on double-stranded RNA 1) is an RNA-editing enzyme that mediates adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing events, an important post-transcriptional modification mechanism that can alter the coding properties of mRNA or regulate microRNA biogenesis. ADAR1 also regulates the innate immune response. Here, we have demonstrated that ADAR1 expression increased in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Silencing ADAR1 by using small interfering RNA in macrophages resulted in the pronounced polarization of macrophages to M1, whereas ADAR1 overexpression promoted M2 polarization, which indicated that ADAR1 can inhibit macrophage hyperpolarization and prevent immune hyperactivity. The RNA-RNP immunoprecipitation binding assay demonstrated a direct interaction between ADAR1 and miR-21 precursor. Significant up-regulation in IL-10 and down-regulation in miR-21 were observed in ADAR1-overexpressing macrophages. We evaluated miR-21 target mRNAs and macrophage polarization signaling pathways and found that forkhead box protein O1 (Foxo1) was up-regulated in cells that overexpressed ADAR1. In a mouse allogeneic skin transplantation model, grafts in the ADAR1-overexpressed group survived longer and suffered less immune cell infiltration. In ADAR1-overexpressed recipients, splenic macrophages were significantly polarized to M2, and levels of sera IL-10 were markedly higher than those in the control group. In summary, ADAR1 modulates macrophage M2 polarization via the ADAR1-miR-21-Foxo1-IL-10 axis, thereby suppressing allogeneic graft rejection.-Li, J., Xie, J., Liu, S., Li, X., Zhang, D., Wang, X., Jiang, J., Hu, W., Zhang, Y., Jin, B., Zhuang, R., Yin, W. ADAR1 attenuates allogeneic graft rejection by suppressing miR-21 biogenesis in macrophages and promoting M2 polarization.

  8. Cell-autonomous sex differences in gene expression in chicken bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Morales, Carla; Nandi, Sunil; Zhao, Debiao; Sauter, Kristin A; Vervelde, Lonneke; McBride, Derek; Sang, Helen M; Clinton, Mike; Hume, David A

    2015-03-01

    We have identified differences in gene expression in macrophages grown from the bone marrow of male and female chickens in recombinant chicken M-CSF (CSF1). Cells were profiled with or without treatment with bacterial LPS for 24 h. Approximately 600 transcripts were induced by prolonged LPS stimulation to an equal extent in the male and female macrophages. Many transcripts encoded on the Z chromosome were expressed ∼1.6-fold higher in males, reflecting a lack of dosage compensation in the homogametic sex. A smaller set of W chromosome-specific genes was expressed only in females. LPS signaling in mammals is associated with induction of type 1 IFN-responsive genes. Unexpectedly, because IFNs are encoded on the Z chromosome of chickens, unstimulated macrophages from the female birds expressed a set of known IFN-inducible genes at much higher levels than male cells under the same conditions. To confirm that these differences were not the consequence of the actions of gonadal hormones, we induced gonadal sex reversal to alter the hormonal environment of the developing chick and analyzed macrophages cultured from male, female, and female sex-reversed embryos. Gonadal sex reversal did not alter the sexually dimorphic expression of either sex-linked or IFN-responsive genes. We suggest that female birds compensate for the reduced dose of inducible IFN with a higher basal set point of IFN-responsive genes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors.

  9. Radiodiagnosis of pulmonary alterations in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamenetskij, M.S.; Lezova, T.F.; Kajzerman, I.A.; Sinyachenko, O.V.; Dyadyk, A.I.; Nikolenko, Yu.I. (Donetskij Meditsinskij Inst. (Ukrainian SSR))

    X-ray examination was carried out in 170 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Certain parameters of specific immunity were studied in 60 of them, while X-ray data were compared with morphological findings on autopsy in 20 cases. A tendency toward escalation of specific cell and humoral parameters was discovered in pulmonary lesion, predetermined by vasculitis and perivasculitis, as well as inflammatory and fibrotic alterations in the interstitial tissue.

  10. Radiodiagnosis of pulmonary alterations in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenetskij, M.S.; Lezova, T.F.; Kajzerman, I.A.; Sinyachenko, O.V.; Dyadyk, A.I.; Nikolenko, Yu.I.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray examination was carried out in 170 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Certain parameters of specific immunity were studied in 60 of them, while X-ray data were compared with morphological findings on autopsy in 20 cases. A tendency toward escalation of specific cell and humoral parameters was discovered in pulmonary lesion, predetermined by vasculitis and perivasculitis, as well as inflammatory and fibrotic alterations in the interstitial tissue

  11. Strain field due to self-interstitial impurity in Ni

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    metals due to substitutional impurities using Kanzaki lattice static method based on discrete lattice theory. This method ... lattice under applied external forces is expanded in powers series of the displacements which in the .... Since the interstitial impurity interacts with short-range interactions, the external force is expected to ...

  12. Interstitial meiofauna of Namib sandy beaches | McGwynne | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interstitial meiofauna were sampled across the intertidal zone and into the sublittoral region on two exposed sandy beaches on the Namibian coast, Langstrand and Cape Cross. A transverse barrip beach configuration at Langstrand allowed a comparison between the distribution and abundance patterns at the horn and ...

  13. Nonequilibrium effects in fixed-bed interstitial fluid dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kronberg, Alexandre E.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    Continuum models for the role of the interstitial fluid with respect to mass and heat dispersion in a fixed bed are discussed. It is argued that the departures from local equilibrium and not the concentration and temperature gradients as such should be considered as the driving forces for mass and

  14. Atomic displacements due to interstitial hydrogen in Cu and Pd

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    c Indian Academy of Sciences. Vol. 69, No. 2. — journal of. August 2007 physics pp. 255–265. Atomic displacements due to interstitial hydrogen in Cu and Pd ..... Phys. 64, 1015 (1992). [7] Martin Fuchs and Matthias Scheffer, Comput. Phys. Commun. 119, 67 (1999). [8] Hitesh Sharma and S Prakash, Pramana – J. Phys.

  15. "C" arm guidance in interstitial brachytherapy of pelvic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P P; Bartone, F F; Jacobs, A J; Taylor, J E; Jones, E O

    1983-11-01

    Since 1979 more than 50 transperineal interstitial implants, both removable and permanent, have been performed at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. The "C" arm of the mobile image-intensifier television unit Siemens Mobile 2 was used to guide the placement of the needles and was found to be useful in achieving accurate implantation.

  16. [Lung transplantation in pulmonary fibrosis and other interstitial lung diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berastegui, Cristina; Monforte, Victor; Bravo, Carlos; Sole, Joan; Gavalda, Joan; Tenório, Luis; Villar, Ana; Rochera, M Isabel; Canela, Mercè; Morell, Ferran; Roman, Antonio

    2014-09-15

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the second indication for lung transplantation (LT) after emphysema. The aim of this study is to review the results of LT for ILD in Hospital Vall d'Hebron (Barcelona, Spain). We retrospectively studied 150 patients, 87 (58%) men, mean age 48 (r: 20-67) years between August 1990 and January 2010. One hundred and four (69%) were single lung transplants (SLT) and 46 (31%) bilateral-lung transplants (BLT). The postoperative diagnoses were: 94 (63%) usual interstitial pneumonia, 23 (15%) nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, 11 (7%) unclassifiable interstitial pneumonia and 15% miscellaneous. We describe the functional results, complications and survival. The actuarial survival was 87, 70 and 53% at one, 3 and 5 years respectively. The most frequent causes of death included early graft dysfunction and development of chronic rejection in the form of bronchiolitis obliterans (BOS). The mean postoperative increase in forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) was similar in SLT and BLT. The best FEV1 was reached after 10 (r: 1-36) months. Sixteen percent of patients returned to work. At some point during the evolution, proven acute rejection was diagnosed histologically in 53 (35%) patients. The prevalence of BOS among survivors was 20% per year, 45% at 3 years and 63% at 5 years. LT is the best treatment option currently available for ILD, in which medical treatment has failed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Interstitial cells in the musculature of the gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri J; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie

    2003-01-01

    Expression of the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT on cells referred to as interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) has been instrumental during the past decade in the tremendous interest in cells in the interstitium of the smooth muscle layers of the digestive tract. ICC generate the pacemaker component (e...

  18. [Interstitial pregnancy: a rare type of ectopic pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, E; Roovers, J P W R; Ankum, W M; Hajenius, P J

    2008-04-05

    Three women, aged 21, 28 and 37 years, respectively, were diagnosed with interstitial pregnancies. The first patient presented with lateral abdominal pain, the second patient was asymptomatic and consulted the physician for a routine first trimester scan and the third patient had painless vaginal bleeding in the first trimester. Each was treated with systemic methotrexate in a multiple dose regimen, which was successful in the latter two patients. The first patient was discharged in good condition after her last methotrexate injection, but developed severe abdominal pain and collapsed at home after the interstitial pregnancy had ruptured. She underwent surgery and recovered. Today, the incidence of ectopic pregnancy in the Netherlands is around 8 per 1000 live births. Interstitial pregnancies, which nidate in the portion of the fallopian tube embedded in the uterine wall, account for 2-3% of all ectopic pregnancies. A urinary pregnancy test should be performed for any fertile woman with abdominal pain or abnormal vaginal bleeding. If the result is positive, the patient should be referred to a gynaecologist for transvaginal ultrasound to exclude ectopic pregnancy. In case of a pregnancy of unknown location, one should search for specific ultrasound markers of non-tubal ectopic pregnancy and assess serum human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG). Interstitial ectopic pregnancy should be considered if the serum HCG level is above 2000 U/l.

  19. Factors influencing the success of conservative treatment of interstitial pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassik, P; Ofili-Yebovi, D; Yazbek, J; Lee, C; Elson, J; Jurkovic, D

    2005-09-01

    To identify demographic, morphological and biochemical characteristics of interstitial pregnancies that are associated with a successful outcome of conservative treatment (expectant management or medical treatment with methotrexate). Over a period of 6 years all clinically stable women with a certain ultrasound diagnosis of interstitial ectopic pregnancy were managed either expectantly (no interventions) or medically (systemic or local methotrexate injection). The outcome of conservative treatment was compared to a number of diagnostic parameters, which were recorded at the initial visit. The treatment was classified as successful if serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) level declined below 20 IU/L without the need for any additional interventions, such as the administration of methotrexate or surgery. A total of 42 interstitial pregnancies were diagnosed during the study period. Out of 35 women included in the final analysis 7 (20%) were managed expectantly and 28 (80%) received either local (n = 23) or systemic methotrexate (n = 5). There were no significant differences in the success rates of expectant treatment and treatment with either systemic or local methotrexate. The initial median serum hCG was significantly lower in women with successful conservative management (3216 IU/L vs. 15 900 IU/L; P < 0.05) but there were no other significant differences between cases with successful and failed treatment. The measurement of serum hCG at the initial visit may be used to predict the likelihood of successful conservative treatment of interstitial pregnancy.

  20. Incidental Detection of Interstitial Pregnancy on CT Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Byung Seok; Park, Mi-hyun

    2009-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is a potentially life-threatening condition. Detection of ectopic pregnancy on CT images is rare. In this case, we describe the CT findings of interstitial pregnancy both before and after rupture. If CT images demonstrate the presence of a strong enhancing ring-like mass in the pelvis, ectopic pregnancy should be considered.

  1. Hysteroscopic removal of an interstitial ectopic gestation. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, W R; Mitchell, D E

    1989-11-01

    A 31-year-old woman with plauteauing quantitative serial beta-human chorionic gonadotropin levels, suspect pelvic sonography and the absence of products of conception on uterine curettage was suspected of having an interstitial ectopic pregnancy. Confirmation was by endoscopy. Cornual uterine wedge resection was avoided with laparoscopically guided hysteroscopic removal of the products of conception.

  2. Pulmonary function vascular index predicts prognosis in idiopathic interstitial pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corte, Tamera J.; Wort, Stephen J.; MacDonald, Peter S.; Edey, Anthony; Hansell, David M.; Renzoni, Elisabetta; Maher, Toby M.; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Bandula, Steven; Bresser, Paul; Wells, Athol U.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective: Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with increased mortality in fibrotic idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP). We hypothesize that baseline KCO (diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide/alveolar volume) and 6-month decline in KCO reflect PH, thus predicting mortality

  3. Interstitial pressure and lung oedema in chronic hypoxia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rivolta, I.; Lucchini, G.; Rocchetti, M.; Kolář, František; Palazzo, F.; Zaza, A.; Miserocchi, G.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 4 (2011), s. 943-949 ISSN 0903-1936 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : capillary patency * lung morphometry * microvascular permeability * pulmonary hypertension * pulmonary interstitial pressure Subject RIV: FC - Pulmology Impact factor: 5.895, year: 2011

  4. Bronchoalveolar lavage in HIV infected patients with interstitial pneumonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blic, J; Blanche, S; Danel, C; Le Bourgeois, M; Caniglia, M; Scheinmann, P

    1989-01-01

    The value of taking microbiological and cytological specimens by flexible bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage under local anaesthesia was assessed on 43 occasions in 35 HIV infected children, aged 3 months to 16 years, with interstitial pneumonitis. In acute interstitial pneumonitis (n = 22, 26 specimens from bronchoalveolar lavages) the microbiological yield was 73%, Pneumocystis carinii being the commonest infective agent (n = 14). P carinii pneumonia was found only in children with deficient antigen induced lymphocyte proliferative responses who had not been treated with long term prophylactic co-trimoxazole. In contrast, in 13 children with chronic interstitial pneumonitis that was consistent with a diagnosis of pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia who underwent bronchoalveolar lavage on 17 occasions, there were two isolates of cytomegalovirus and one of adenovirus, but P carinii was not found. Ten of the 13 children had normal antigen induced lymphocyte proliferative responses. Useful cytological data were also gleaned from bronchoalveolar lavage specimens. Lymphocytosis was significantly higher in pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia (36(SD 11)%) than in P carinii pneumonia (24(19)%) whereas the percentage of polymorphonuclear neutrophils was significantly lower (3(2)% compared with 12(13)%). Flexible bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage is safe even in young infants and should reduce the necessity for open lung biopsy in the management of HIV infected children with interstitial pneumonitis. PMID:2817943

  5. Muscle interstitial potassium kinetics during intense exhaustive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Nikolai; Mohr, Magni; Pedersen, Lasse Dannemann

    2003-01-01

    Interstitial K+ ([K+]i) was measured in human skeletal muscle by microdialysis during exhaustive leg exercise, with (AL) and without (L) previous intense arm exercise. In addition, the reproducibility of the [K+]i determinations was examined. Possible microdialysis-induced rupture of the sarcolem...

  6. Self-interstitial configuration in molybdenum studied by modified ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The stability of various atomic configurations containing a self-interstitial atom (SIA) in a model representing Mo has been investigated using the modified analytical embedded atom method (MAEAM). The lattice relaxations are treated with the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation at absolute zero of temperature.

  7. Interstitial cystitis is bladder pain syndrome with Hunner's lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Magnus; Logadottir, Yr; Peeker, Ralph

    2014-04-01

    The contents and understanding of the term, interstitial cystitis, have undergone major changes during the past 100 years, moving from a chronic, true inflammatory bladder disorder to an extensive syndrome with lower urinary tract pain. Comments on this development are presented. From examples in the literature, some important features of classic interstitial cystitis are outlined. The more inclusive attitude of later decades has drawn desirable attention to the entire spectrum of disorders resulting in bladder pain. The wish to include all of them into one handy entity has unfortunately resulted in much scientific and clinical confusion, though. It is noted that originally interstitial cystitis represented the Hunner type of disease. Today, there is agreement that the classic type of interstitial cystitis with Hunner's lesions, bladder pain syndrome type 3C according to current terminology, stands out as a well-defined phenotype; it has to evaluated separately in clinical studies and practice, as treatment requirements differ importantly between this and other phenotypes. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  8. The interstitial cystitis syndrome: Intravesical and oral treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurth, K. H.; Parsons, C. L.

    2003-01-01

    The interstitial cystitis (IC) syndrome is a debilitating bladder disorder affecting greater than or equal to16/100,000 people in the Netherlands. A prevalence of 450/100,000 was found in Finland when IC symptom and problem index questionnaires were used. The origin of IC is not known. The syndrome

  9. Erectile dysfunction is a common problem in interstitial lung diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløe, Andreas; Hilberg, Ole; Wijsenbeek, Marlies

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is related to chronic diseases, including COPD. The patho- genesis may involve chronic hypoxia, which is common in interstitial lung disease (ILD). We aimed to study the relationship between ILD and ED. Method: Male patients with ILD detected by high-resolu...

  10. Investigations of lymphatic drainage from the interstitial space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayathungage Don, Tharanga; Richard Clarke Collaboration; John Cater Collaboration; Vinod Suresh Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    The lymphatic system is a highly complex biological system that facilitates the drainage of excess fluid in body tissues. In addition, it is an integral part of the immunological control system. Understanding the mechanisms of fluid absorption from the interstitial space and flow through the initial lymphatics is important to treat several pathological conditions. The main focus of this study is to computationally model the lymphatic drainage from the interstitial space. The model has been developed to consider a 3D lymphatic network and uses biological data to inform the creation of realistic geometries for the lymphatic capillary networks. We approximate the interstitial space as a porous region and the lymphatic vessel walls as permeable surfaces. The dynamics of the flow is approximated by Darcy's law in the interstitium and the Navier-Stokes equations in the lymphatic capillary lumen. The proposed model examines lymph drainage as a function of pressure gradient. In addition, we have examined the effects of interstitial and lymphatic wall permeabilities on the lymph drainage and the solute transportation in the model. The computational results are in accordance with the available experimental measurements.

  11. Fine sand in motion: the influence of interstitial air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homan, T.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Sand is a granular material, and therefore it consists of individual grains arranged in a packing. The pores in-between the grains are usually filled with a fluid, in this case air. Now, is this interstitial air able to influence the behavior of the sand bed as a whole? When a ball impacts on fine,

  12. Incidental Detection of Interstitial Pregnancy on CT Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Byung Seok [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Mi Hyun [Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    Ectopic pregnancy is a potentially life-threatening condition. Detection of ectopic pregnancy on CT images is rare. In this case, we describe the CT findings of interstitial pregnancy both before and after rupture. If CT images demonstrate the presence of a strong enhancing ring-like mass in the pelvis, ectopic pregnancy should be considered

  13. Incidental Detection of Interstitial Pregnancy on CT Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Byung Seok; Park, Mi Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is a potentially life-threatening condition. Detection of ectopic pregnancy on CT images is rare. In this case, we describe the CT findings of interstitial pregnancy both before and after rupture. If CT images demonstrate the presence of a strong enhancing ring-like mass in the pelvis, ectopic pregnancy should be considered

  14. Tumor interstitial fluid - a treasure trove of cancer biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Olsen, Charlotta J; Timmermans-Wielenga, Vera; Talman, Mai-Lis; Serizawa, Reza R; Moreira, José M A

    2013-11-01

    Tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) is a proximal fluid that, in addition to the set of blood soluble phase-borne proteins, holds a subset of aberrantly externalized components, mainly proteins, released by tumor cells and tumor microenvironment through various mechanisms, which include classical secretion, non-classical secretion, secretion via exosomes and membrane protein shedding. Consequently, the interstitial aqueous phase of solid tumors is a highly promising resource for the discovery of molecules associated with pathological changes in tissues. Firstly, it allows one to delve deeper into the regulatory mechanisms and functions of secretion-related processes in tumor development. Secondly, the anomalous secretion of molecules that is innate to tumors and the tumor microenvironment, being associated with cancer progression, offers a valuable source for biomarker discovery and possible targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we provide an overview of the features of tumor-associated interstitial fluids, based on recent and updated information obtained mainly from our studies of breast cancer. Data from the study of interstitial fluids recovered from several other types of cancer are also discussed. This article is a part of a Special Issue entitled: The Updated Secretome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Rheumatoid interstitial lung disease presenting as cor pulmonale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Sourya; Mahajan, S N; Shukla, Samarth; Diwan, S K; Banode, Pankaj; Kothari, Nirmesh

    2010-10-01

    Rheumatiod arthritis (RA) is a multisystem connective tissue disorder. The predominant presentation is polyarticular, symmetric peripheral arthritis with relative sparing of axial skeleton. Inflammatory synovitis is the pathologic hallmark. Extra-articular manifestations of RA can involve several other organ systems and amongst them pulmonary manifestations occur commonly. We report a case of rheumatoid interstitial lung disease presenting as cor pulmonale.

  16. Rheumatoid interstitial lung disease presenting as cor pulmonale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acharya Sourya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatiod arthritis (RA is a multisystem connective tissue disorder. The predominant presentation is polyarticular, symmetric peripheral arthritis with relative sparing of axial skeleton. Inflammatory synovitis is the pathologic hallmark. Extra-articular manifestations of RA can involve several other organ systems and amongst them pulmonary manifestations occur commonly. We report a case of rheumatoid interstitial lung disease presenting as cor pulmonale.

  17. Interstitial cells of Cajal in human gut and gastrointestinal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderwinden, J M; Rumessen, J J

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the distribution of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract, based on ultrastructural and immunohistochemical evidence. The distribution and morphology of ICC at each level of the normal GI tracts is addressed from the perspective of their fun...

  18. Obesity Promotes Alterations in Iron Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Citelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepcidin is a key hormone that induces the degradation of ferroportin (FPN, a protein that exports iron from reticuloendothelial macrophages and enterocytes. The aim of the present study was to experimentally evaluate if the obesity induced by a high-fat diet (HFD modifies the expression of FPN in macrophages and enterocytes, thus altering the iron bioavailability. In order to directly examine changes associated with iron metabolism in vivo, C57BL/6J mice were fed either a control or a HFD. Serum leptin levels were evaluated. The hepcidin, divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1, FPN and ferritin genes were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The amount of iron present in both the liver and spleen was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Ferroportin localization within reticuloendothelial macrophages was observed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Obese animals were found to exhibit increased hepcidin gene expression, while iron accumulated in the spleen and liver. They also exhibited changes in the sublocation of splenic cellular FPN and a reduction in the FPN expression in the liver and the spleen, while no changes were observed in enterocytes. Possible explanations for the increased hepcidin expression observed in HFD animals may include: increased leptin levels, the liver iron accumulation or endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Together, the results indicated that obesity promotes changes in iron bioavailability, since it altered the iron recycling function.

  19. Macrophage Polarization in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes: Weighing Down our Understanding of Macrophage Function?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael James Kraakman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and type 2 diabetes are now recognized as chronic pro-inflammatory diseases. In the last decade, the role of the macrophage in particular has become increasingly implicated in their pathogenesis. Abundant literature now establishes that monocytes get recruited to peripheral tissues (ie pancreas, liver and adipose tissue to become resident macrophages and contribute to local inflammation, development of insulin resistance or even pancreatic dysfunction. Furthermore, an accumulation of evidence has established an important role for macrophage polarisation in the development of metabolic diseases. The general view in obesity is that there is an imbalance in the ratio of M1/M2 macrophages, with M1 pro-inflammatory macrophages being enhanced compared with M2 anti-inflammatory macrophages being down-regulated, leading to chronic inflammation and the propagation of metabolic dysfunction. However, there is emerging evidence revealing a more complex scenario with the spectrum of macrophage states exceeding well beyond the M1/M2 binary classification and confused further by human and animal models exhibiting different macrophage profiles. In this review we will discuss the recent findings regarding macrophage polarization in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  20. Intimal lining layer macrophages but not synovial sublining macrophages display an IL-10 polarized-like phenotype in chronic synovitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambarus, Carmen A.; Noordenbos, Troy; de Hair, Maria J. H.; Tak, Paul P.; Baeten, Dominique L. P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Synovial tissue macrophages play a key role in chronic inflammatory arthritis, but the contribution of different macrophage subsets in this process remains largely unknown. The main in vitro polarized macrophage subsets are classically (M1) and alternatively (M2) activated macrophages,

  1. Macrophage Recognition of Crystals and Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Masafumi

    2018-01-01

    Inhalation of exogenous crystals such as silica, asbestos, and carbon nanotubes can cause lung fibrosis and cancer. Endogenous crystals such as monosodium urate, cholesterol, and hydroxyapatite are associated with pathogenesis of gout, atherosclerosis, and osteoarthritis, respectively. These crystal-associated-inflammatory diseases are triggered by the macrophage NLRP3 inflammasome activation and cell death. Therefore, it is important to understand how macrophages recognize crystals. However, it is unlikely that macrophages have evolutionally acquired receptors specific for crystals or recently emerged nanoparticles. Several recent studies have reported that some crystal particles are negatively charged and are recognized by scavenger receptor family members in a charge-dependent manner. Alternatively, a model for receptor-independent phagocytosis of crystals has also been proposed. This review focuses on the mechanisms by which macrophages recognize crystals and nanoparticles. PMID:29434606

  2. Macrophage Recognition of Crystals and Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Nakayama

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation of exogenous crystals such as silica, asbestos, and carbon nanotubes can cause lung fibrosis and cancer. Endogenous crystals such as monosodium urate, cholesterol, and hydroxyapatite are associated with pathogenesis of gout, atherosclerosis, and osteoarthritis, respectively. These crystal-associated-inflammatory diseases are triggered by the macrophage NLRP3 inflammasome activation and cell death. Therefore, it is important to understand how macrophages recognize crystals. However, it is unlikely that macrophages have evolutionally acquired receptors specific for crystals or recently emerged nanoparticles. Several recent studies have reported that some crystal particles are negatively charged and are recognized by scavenger receptor family members in a charge-dependent manner. Alternatively, a model for receptor-independent phagocytosis of crystals has also been proposed. This review focuses on the mechanisms by which macrophages recognize crystals and nanoparticles.

  3. Macrophage Recognition of Crystals and Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Masafumi

    2018-01-01

    Inhalation of exogenous crystals such as silica, asbestos, and carbon nanotubes can cause lung fibrosis and cancer. Endogenous crystals such as monosodium urate, cholesterol, and hydroxyapatite are associated with pathogenesis of gout, atherosclerosis, and osteoarthritis, respectively. These crystal-associated-inflammatory diseases are triggered by the macrophage NLRP3 inflammasome activation and cell death. Therefore, it is important to understand how macrophages recognize crystals. However, it is unlikely that macrophages have evolutionally acquired receptors specific for crystals or recently emerged nanoparticles. Several recent studies have reported that some crystal particles are negatively charged and are recognized by scavenger receptor family members in a charge-dependent manner. Alternatively, a model for receptor-independent phagocytosis of crystals has also been proposed. This review focuses on the mechanisms by which macrophages recognize crystals and nanoparticles.

  4. Botanical polysaccharides: macrophage immunomodulation and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Quinn, Mark T

    2006-03-01

    Botanical polysaccharides exhibit a number of beneficial therapeutic properties, and it is thought that the mechanisms involved in these effects are due to the modulation of innate immunity and, more specifically, macrophage function. In this review, we summarize our current state of understanding of the macrophage modulatory effects of botanical polysaccharides isolated from a wide array of different species of flora, including higher plants, mushrooms, lichens and algae. Overall, the primary effect of botanical polysaccharides is to enhance and/or activate macrophage immune responses, leading to immunomodulation, anti-tumor activity, wound-healing and other therapeutic effects. Furthermore, botanical and microbial polysaccharides bind to common surface receptors and induce similar immunomodulatory responses in macrophages, suggesting that evolutionarily conserved polysaccharide structural features are shared between these organisms. Thus, the evaluation of botanical polysaccharides provides a unique opportunity for the discovery of novel therapeutic agents and adjuvants that exhibit beneficial immunomodulatory properties.

  5. Epigenetic Regulation of Monocyte and Macrophage Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, Marten A.; de Winther, Menno P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are key players in tissue homeostasis and immune responses. Epigenetic processes tightly regulate cellular functioning in health and disease. Recent Advances: Recent technical developments have allowed detailed characterizations of the transcriptional circuitry underlying

  6. Smectite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.M.

    1984-11-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  7. How feasible is expectant management of interstitial ectopic pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, L C Y; Emmanuel, E; Ross, J A; Johns, J

    2014-03-01

    To review the success rate of expectant management in a series of interstitial pregnancies. We identified all women with an ultrasound diagnosis of interstitial pregnancy seen within a 9-year period (January 2004 to April 2013). The clinical history, ultrasound findings and biochemical results were reviewed. The outcome of all interstitial pregnancies managed conservatively was recorded. Treatment was considered as successful when the serum β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) level declined below 20 IU/L without the need for further intervention. A total of 48 interstitial pregnancies were diagnosed during the study period. Surgery was the first-line treatment in nine (18.8%) cases. Thirty-eight (79.2%) women were offered non-surgical management: 19 (39.6%) had methotrexate (MTX) and 19 (39.6%) were managed expectantly. One (2.1%) woman returned to her local hospital following diagnosis and we were unable to obtain any follow-up information regarding her care. The median initial serum β-hCG level and ectopic size were not significantly different between any of the groups according to initial treatment. The overall success rate of expectant management was 89.5%. There were no cases of ectopic rupture in this group. Length of follow-up ranged from 7 to 141 days with a median duration of follow-up of 50.6 days. Our data show that expectant management is an option for selected women with non-viable interstitial pregnancies and declining serum β-hCG levels, irrespective of ectopic mass size and initial serum β-hCG levels. Copyright © 2013 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Microdefects and self-interstitial diffusion in crystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, W.B.

    1998-05-01

    In this thesis, a study is presented of D-defects and self-interstitial diffusion in silicon using Li ion (Li{sup +}) drifting in an electric field and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Obstruction of Li{sup +} drifting has been found in wafers from certain but not all FZ p-type Si. Incomplete Li{sup +} drifting always occurs in the central region of the wafers. This work established that interstitial oxygen is not responsible for hindering Li{sup +} drifting. TEM was performed on a samples from the partially Li{sup +} drifted area and compared to regions without D-defects. Precipitates were found only in the region containing D-defects that had partially Li{sup +} drifted. This result indicates D-defects are responsible for the precipitation that halts the Li{sup +} drift process. Nitrogen (N) doping has been shown to eliminate D-defects as measured by conventional techniques. Li{sup +} drifting and D-defects provide a useful means to study Si self-interstitial diffusion. The process modeling program SUPREM-IV was used to simulate the results of Si self-interstitial diffusion obtained from Li{sup +} drifting experiments. Anomalous results from the Si self-interstitial diffusion experiments forced a re-examination of the possibility of thermal dissociation of D-defects. Thermal annealing experiments that were performed support this possibility. A review of the current literature illustrates the need for more research on the effects of thermal processing on FZ Si to understand the dissolution kinetics of D-defects.

  9. Macrophage Polarization in Metabolism and Metabolic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is now recognized as the main cause of the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Obesity-associated chronic inflammation is a contributing key factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Numbers of studies have clearly demonstrated that the immune system and metabolism are highly integrated. CONTENT: Macrophages are an essential component of innate immunity and play a central role in inflammation and host defense. Moreover, these cells have homeostatic functions beyond defense, including tissue remodeling in ontogenesis and orchestration of metabolic functions. Diversity and plasticity are hallmarks of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. In response to interferons (IFNs, toll-like receptor (TLR, or interleukin (IL-4/IL-13 signals, macrophages undergo M1 (classical or M2 (alternative activation. Progress has now been made in defining the signaling pathways, transcriptional networks, and epigenetic mechanisms underlying M1, M2 or M2-like polarized activation. SUMMARY: In response to various signals, macrophages may undergo classical M1 activation (stimulated by TLR ligands and IFN-γ or alternative M2 activation (stimulated by IL-4/IL-13; these states mirror the T helper (Th1–Th2 polarization of T cells. Pathology is frequently associated with dynamic changes in macrophage activation, with classically activated M1 cells implicate in initiating and sustaining inflammation, meanwhile M2 or M2-like activated cells associated with resolution or smoldering chronic inflammation. Identification of the mechanisms and molecules that are associated with macrophage plasticity and polarized activation provides a basis for macrophage centered diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. KEYWORDS: obesity, adipose tissue, inflammation, macrophage polarization.

  10. Macrophage Recognition of Crystals and Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Nakayama, Masafumi

    2018-01-01

    Inhalation of exogenous crystals such as silica, asbestos, and carbon nanotubes can cause lung fibrosis and cancer. Endogenous crystals such as monosodium urate, cholesterol, and hydroxyapatite are associated with pathogenesis of gout, atherosclerosis, and osteoarthritis, respectively. These crystal-associated-inflammatory diseases are triggered by the macrophage NLRP3 inflammasome activation and cell death. Therefore, it is important to understand how macrophages recognize crystals. However,...

  11. Endometriosis, a disease of the macrophage

    OpenAIRE

    Capobianco, Annalisa; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Endometriosis, a common cause of pelvic pain and female infertility, depends on the growth of vascularized endometrial tissue at ectopic sites. Endometrial fragments reach the peritoneal cavity during the fertile years: local cues decide whether they yield endometriotic lesions. Macrophages are recruited at sites of hypoxia and tissue stress, where they clear cell debris and heme-iron and generate pro-life and pro-angiogenesis signals. Macrophages are abundant in endometriotic lesions, where ...

  12. Annihilating vacancies via dynamic reflection and emission of interstitials in nano-crystal tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangyan; Duan, Guohua; Xu, Yichun; Zhang, Yange; Liu, Wei; Liu, C. S.; Liang, Yunfeng; Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G.-N.

    2017-11-01

    Radiation damage not only seriously degrades the mechanical properties of tungsten (W) but also enhances hydrogen retention in the material. Introducing a large amount of defect sinks, e.g. grain boundaries (GBs) is an effective method for improving radiation-resistance of W. However, the mechanism by which the vacancies are dynamically annihilated at long timescale in nano-crystal W is still not clear. The dynamic picture for eliminating vacancies with single interstitials and small interstitial-clusters has been investigated by combining molecular dynamics, molecular statics and object Kinetic Monte Carlo methods. On one hand, the annihilation of bulk vacancies was enhanced due to the reflection of an interstitial-cluster of parallel ≤ftright> crowdions by the GB. The interstitial-cluster was observed to be reflected back into the grain interior when approaching a locally dense GB region. Near this region, the energy landscape for the interstitial was featured by a shoulder, different to the decreasing energy landscape of the interstitial near a locally loose region as indicative of the sink role of the GB. The bulk vacancy on the reflection path was annihilated. On the other hand, the dynamic interstitial emission efficiently anneals bulk vacancies. The single interstitial trapped at the GB firstly moved along the GB quickly and clustered to be the di-interstitial therein, reducing its mobility to a value comparable to that that for bulk vacancy diffusion. Then, the bulk vacancy was recombined via the coupled motion of the di-interstitial along the GB, the diffusion of the vacancy towards the GB and the accompanying interstitial emission. These results suggest that GBs play an efficient role in improving radiation-tolerance of nano-crystal W via reflecting highly-mobile interstitials and interstitial-clusters into the bulk and annihilating bulk vacancies, and via complex coupling of in-boundary interstitial diffusion, clustering of the interstitial and vacancy

  13. Macrophages in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Calum C; Mowat, Allan McI

    2014-01-01

    The intestine contains the largest pool of macrophages in the body which are essential for maintaining mucosal homeostasis in the face of the microbiota and the constant need for epithelial renewal but are also important components of protective immunity and are involved in the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, defining the biological roles of intestinal macrophages has been impeded by problems in defining the phenotype and origins of different populations of myeloid cells in the mucosa. Here, we discuss how multiple parameters can be used in combination to discriminate between functionally distinct myeloid cells and discuss the roles of macrophages during homeostasis and how these may change when inflammation ensues. We also discuss the evidence that intestinal macrophages do not fit the current paradigm that tissue-resident macrophages are derived from embryonic precursors that self-renew in situ, but require constant replenishment by blood monocytes. We describe our recent work demonstrating that classical monocytes constantly enter the intestinal mucosa and how the environment dictates their subsequent fate. We believe that understanding the factors that drive intestinal macrophage development in the steady state and how these may change in response to pathogens or inflammation could provide important insights into the treatment of IBD. PMID:24942685

  14. Endometriosis, a disease of the macrophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa eCapobianco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis, a common cause of pelvic pain and female infertility, depends on the growth of vascularised endometrial tissue at ectopic sites. Endometrial fragments reach the peritoneal cavity during the fertile years: local cues decide whether they yield endometriotic lesions. Macrophages are recruited at sites of hypoxia and tissue stress, where they clear cell debris and heme-iron and generate pro-life and pro-angiogenesis signals. Macrophages are abundant in endometriotic lesions, where are recruited and undergo alternative activation. In rodents macrophages are required for lesions to establish and to grow; bone-marrow derived Tie-2 expressing macrophages specifically contribute to lesions neovasculature, possibly because they concur to the recruitment of circulating endothelial progenitors, and sustain their survival and the integrity of the vessel wall. Macrophages sense cues (hypoxia, cell death, iron overload in the lesions and react delivering signals to restore the local homeostasis: their action represents a necessary, non-redundant step in the natural history of the disease. Endometriosis may be due to a misperception of macrophages about ectopic endometrial tissue. They perceive it as a wound, they activate programs leading to ectopic cell survival and tissue vascularization. Clearing this misperception is a critical area for the development of novel medical treatments of endometriosis, an urgent and unmet medical need.

  15. Macrophages and nerve fibres in peritoneal endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Lu Vinh Phuc; Tokushige, Natsuko; Berbic, Marina; Markham, Robert; Fraser, Ian S

    2009-04-01

    Endometriosis is considered to be an inflammatory disease, and macrophages are the most numerous immune cells in endometriotic lesions. However, the mechanisms underlying the elevation of macrophages and their role in the pathogenesis and manifestations of endometriosis still remain unclear. The number of macrophages stained for CD68 in endometriotic lesions (n = 24) and in peritoneum distant from the lesions (n = 14) from women with endometriosis was compared with the number of macrophages in normal peritoneum from women without endometriosis (n = 18). Peritoneal lesions were also double-stained for CD68 and protein gene product 9.5 to study the relationship between macrophages and nerve fibres. The densities of macrophages in peritoneal endometriotic lesions and unaffected peritoneum from women with endometriosis were both significantly higher than that in normal peritoneum from women without endometriosis (P peritoneal lesions from women with endometriosis compared with normal peritoneum from women without endometriosis. These cells may well play roles in the growth and development of endometriotic lesions and in the generation of pain through interaction with nerve fibres.

  16. Renal Alterations in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV-Infected Cats: A Natural Model of Lentivirus-Induced Renal Disease Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Pistello

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy.

  17. Renal alterations in feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats: a natural model of lentivirus-induced renal disease changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy.

  18. Classical and alternative macrophages have impaired function during acute and chronic HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão-Lima, Leonardo J; Espíndola, Milena S; Soares, Luana S; Zambuzi, Fabiana A; Cacemiro, Maira; Fontanari, Caroline; Bollela, Valdes R; Frantz, Fabiani G

    Three decades after HIV recognition and its association with AIDS development, many advances have emerged - especially related to prevention and treatment. Undoubtedly, the development of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) dramatically changed the future of the syndrome that we know today. In the present study, we evaluate the impact of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy on macrophage function and its relevance to HIV pathogenesis. PBMCs were isolated from blood samples and monocytes (CD14+ cells) were purified. Monocyte-Derived Macrophages (MDMs) were activated on classical (M GM-CSF+IFN-γ ) or alternative (M IL-4+IL13 ) patterns using human recombinant cytokines for six days. After this period, Monocyte-Derived Macrophages were stimulated with TLR2/Dectin-1 or TLR4 agonists and we evaluated the influence of HIV-1 infection and Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy on the release of cytokines/chemokines by macrophages. The data were obtained using Monocyte-Derived Macrophages derived from HIV naïve or from patients on regular Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy. Classically Monocyte-Derived Macrophages obtained from HIV-1 infected patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy released higher levels of IL-6 and IL-12 even without PAMPs stimuli when compared to control group. On the other hand, alternative Monocyte-Derived Macrophages derived from HIV-1 infected patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy released lower levels of IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, IP-10 and RANTES after LPS stimuli when compared to control group. Furthermore, healthy individuals have a complex network of cytokines/chemokines released by Monocyte-Derived Macrophages after PAMP stimuli, which was deeply affected in MDMs obtained from naïve HIV-1 infected patients and only partially restored in MDMs derived from HIV-1 infected patients even on regular Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy. Our therapy protocols were not effective in restoring the functional alterations induced

  19. Phenotypic and functional plasticity of cells of innate immunity: macrophages, mast cells and neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Stephen J; Borregaard, Niels; Wynn, Thomas A

    2011-01-01

    ). Here we focus on the occurrence of phenotypically distinct subpopulations in three lineages of myeloid cells with important roles in innate and acquired immunity: macrophages, mast cells and neutrophils. Cytokine signals, epigenetic modifications and other microenvironmental factors can substantially...... and, in some cases, rapidly and reversibly alter the phenotype of these cells and influence their function. This suggests that regulation of the phenotype and function of differentiated hematopoietic cells by microenvironmental factors, including those generated during immune responses, represents...

  20. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Induces Arginase Activity in Leishmania amazonensis Amastigote-Infected Macrophages through a Cytokine-Independent Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Maria Vieira Vendrame

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis exhibits peculiarities in its interactions with hosts. Because amastigotes are the primary form associated with the progression of infection, we studied the effect of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I on interactions between L. (L. amazonensis amastigotes and macrophages. Upon stimulation of infected macrophages with IGF-I, we observed decreased nitric oxide production but increased arginase expression and activity, which lead to increased parasitism. However, stimulation of amastigote-infected macrophages with IGF-I did not result in altered cytokine levels compared to unstimulated controls. Because IGF-I is present in tissue fluids and also within macrophages, we examined the possible effect of this factor on phosphatidylserine (PS exposure on amastigotes, seen previously in tissue-derived amastigotes leading to increased parasitism. Stimulation with IGF-I induced PS exposure on amastigotes but not on promastigotes. Using a PS-liposome instead of amastigotes, we observed that the PS-liposome but not the control phosphatidylcholine-liposome led to increased arginase activity in macrophages, and this process was not blocked by anti-TGF-β antibodies. Our results suggest that in L. (L. amazonensis amastigote-infected macrophages, IGF-I induces arginase activity directly in amastigotes and in macrophages through the induction of PS exposure on amastigotes in the latter, which could lead to the alternative activation of macrophages through cytokine-independent mechanisms.

  1. Essential roles for the Tec family kinases Tec and Btk in M-CSF receptor signaling pathways that regulate macrophage survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Martin; Unger, Bernd; Schmidt, Uwe; Rajantie, Iiro A; Alitalo, Kari; Ellmeier, Wilfried

    2008-06-15

    Tec family kinases have important roles in lymphocytes; however, little is known about their function in monocytes/macrophages. In this study we report that Tec family kinases are essential for M-CSF (M-CSF)-induced signaling pathways that regulate macrophage survival. Compared with wild-type bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMM) cultures, Tec(-/-)Btk(-/-) BMM cultures displayed increased cell death that correlated with a severe drop in macrophage numbers. In addition, macrophages deficient in either Tec or Btk showed expression and activation of caspase-11. Elucidation of M-CSF receptor (M-CSFR) signaling pathways revealed that the total tyrosine phosphorylation pattern upon M-CSF stimulation was altered in Tec(-/-)Btk(-/-) macrophages despite normal expression and phosphorylation of the M-CSFR. Further, Tec and Btk are required for proper expression of the GM-CSF receptor alpha (GM-CSFRalpha) chain in macrophages but not dendritic cells, implicating Tec family kinases in the lineage-specific regulation of GM-CSFRalpha expression. Taken together, our study shows that Tec and Btk regulate M-CSFR signaling-induced macrophage survival and provides a novel link between Tec family kinases and the regulation of caspase-11 and GM-CSFRalpha expression.

  2. Determination of the population of octahedral and tetrahedral interstitials in zirconium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, V.M.; Gogava, V.V.; Shilo, S.I.; Biryukova, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    Results of neutron investigations of ZrHsub(1.66), ZrHsub(1.75) and ZrHsub(1.98) zirconium hydrides are presented. Investigations were conducted using plane polycrystal samples by multidetector system of scattered neutron detection. Neutron diffraction method was used to determine the number of interstitial hydrogen atoms in interstitials of the lattice cell in the case of statistic atom distribution. The numbers of interstitial atoms in octahedral interstitials for zirconium hydrides were determined experimentally; the difference of potential energies of hydrogen atoms in octa- and tetrahedral interstitials was determined as well. It is shown that experimentally determined difference of potential energies of hydrogen atoms, occupying octa- and tetrahedral positions in investigated zirconium hydrides results at room temperature in the pretailing occupation of tetrahedral interstitials by hydrogen atoms (85-90%); the occupation number grows with temperature decrease and the ordering of interstitial vacancies with formation of hydrogen superstructure takes place at low temperatures

  3. DMPD: Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17056121 Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. Hasko ...G, Pacher P, Deitch EA, Vizi ES. Pharmacol Ther. 2007 Feb;113(2):264-75. Epub 2006 Sep 14. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Shapi...ng of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. PubmedID 17056121 Title Shapi

  4. DMPD: The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10534106 The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. Sester DP, Stacey KJ, ...Sweet MJ, Beasley SJ, Cronau SL, Hume DA. J Leukoc Biol. 1999 Oct;66(4):542-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The... actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. PubmedID 10534106 Title The actions of bacterial D

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis decreases human macrophage IFN-γ responsiveness through miR-132 and miR-26a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bin; Rajaram, Murugesan V S; Lafuse, William P; Landes, Michelle B; Schlesinger, Larry S

    2014-11-01

    IFN-γ-activated macrophages play an essential role in controlling intracellular pathogens; however, macrophages also serve as the cellular home for the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Based on previous evidence that M. tuberculosis can modulate host microRNA (miRNA) expression, we examined the miRNA expression profile of M. tuberculosis-infected primary human macrophages. We identified 31 differentially expressed miRNAs in primary human macrophages during M. tuberculosis infection by NanoString and confirmed our findings by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. In addition, we determined a role for two miRNAs upregulated upon M. tuberculosis infection, miR-132 and miR-26a, as negative regulators of transcriptional coactivator p300, a component of the IFN-γ signaling cascade. Knockdown expression of miR-132 and miR-26a increased p300 protein levels and improved transcriptional, translational, and functional responses to IFN-γ in human macrophages. Collectively, these data validate p300 as a target of miR-132 and miR-26a, and demonstrate a mechanism by which M. tuberculosis can limit macrophage responses to IFN-γ by altering host miRNA expression. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Impaired Hematopoiesis and Disrupted Monocyte/Macrophage Homeostasis in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Gustavo Monteiro; Buri, Marcus Vinícius; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Martins, Ana Maria; D'Almeida, Vânia

    2016-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by alpha-L-iduronidase deficiency in which heparan and dermatan sulfate degradation is compromised. Besides primary lysosomal glycosaminoglycan accumulation, further changes in cellular functions have also been described in several murine MPS models. Herein, we evaluated alterations in hematopoiesis and its implications on the production of mature progeny in a MPS I murine model. Despite the significant increase in hematopoietic stem cells, a reduction in common myeloid progenitors and granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells was observed in Idua -/- mice bone marrow. Furthermore, no alterations in number, viability nor activation of cell death mechanisms were observed in Idua -/- mice mature macrophages but they presented higher sensitivity to apoptotic induction after staurosporine treatment. In addition, changes in Ca(2+) signaling and a reduction in phagocytosis ability were also found. In summary, our results revealed significant intracellular changes in mature Idua -/- macrophages related to alterations in Idua -/- mice hematopoiesis, revealing a disruption in cell homeostasis. These results provide new insights into physiopathology of MPS I. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Macrophage polarisation: an immunohistochemical approach for identifying M1 and M2 macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Henrique M Barros

    Full Text Available Macrophage polarization is increasingly recognised as an important pathogenetic factor in inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. Proinflammatory M1 macrophages promote T helper (Th 1 responses and show tumoricidal activity. M2 macrophages contribute to tissue repair and promote Th2 responses. CD68 and CD163 are used to identify macrophages in tissue sections. However, characterisation of polarised macrophages in situ has remained difficult. Macrophage polarisation is regulated by transcription factors, pSTAT1 and RBP-J for M1, and CMAF for M2. We reasoned that double-labelling immunohistochemistry for the detection of macrophage markers together with transcription factors may be suitable to characterise macrophage polarisation in situ. To test this hypothesis, we have studied conditions associated with Th1- and Th2-predominant immune responses: infectious mononucleosis and Crohn's disease for Th1 and allergic nasal polyps, oxyuriasis, wound healing and foreign body granulomas for predominant Th2 response. In all situations, CD163+ cells usually outnumbered CD68+ cells. Moreover, CD163+ cells, usually considered as M2 macrophages, co-expressing pSTAT1 and RBP-J were found in all conditions examined. The numbers of putative M1 macrophages were higher in Th1- than in Th2-associated diseases, while more M2 macrophages were seen in Th2- than in Th1 related disorders. In most Th1-related diseases, the balance of M1 over M2 cells was shifted towards M1 cells, while the reverse was observed for Th2-related conditions. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed two distinct clusters: cluster I included Th1 diseases together with cases with high numbers of CD163+pSTAT1+, CD68+pSTAT1+, CD163+RBP-J+ and CD68+RBP-J+ macrophages; cluster II comprised Th2 conditions together with cases displaying high numbers of CD163+CMAF+ and CD68+CMAF+ macrophages. These results suggest that the detection of pSTAT1, RBP-J, and CMAF in the context of CD68 or CD163 expression is a

  8. BMP pathway regulation of and by macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Talati

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a disease of progressively increasing pulmonary vascular resistance, associated with mutations of the type 2 receptor for the BMP pathway, BMPR2. The canonical signaling pathway for BMPR2 is through the SMAD family of transcription factors. BMPR2 is expressed in every cell type, but the impact of BMPR2 mutations affecting SMAD signaling, such as Bmpr2delx4+, had only previously been investigated in smooth muscle and endothelium. In the present study, we created a mouse with universal doxycycline-inducible expression of Bmpr2delx4+ in order to determine if broader expression had an impact relevant to the development of PAH. We found that the most obvious phenotype was a dramatic, but patchy, increase in pulmonary inflammation. We crossed these double transgenic mice onto an NF-κB reporter strain, and by luciferase assays on live mice, individual organs and isolated macrophages, we narrowed down the origin of the inflammatory phenotype to constitutive activation of tissue macrophages. Study of bone marrow-derived macrophages from mutant and wild-type mice suggested a baseline difference in differentiation state in Bmpr2 mutants. When activated with LPS, both mutant and wild-type macrophages secrete BMP pathway inhibitors sufficient to suppress BMP pathway activity in smooth muscle cells (SMC treated with conditioned media. Functionally, co-culture with macrophages results in a BMP signaling-dependent increase in scratch closure in cultured SMC. We conclude that SMAD signaling through BMP is responsible, in part, for preventing macrophage activation in both live animals and in cells in culture, and that activated macrophages secrete BMP inhibitors in sufficient quantity to cause paracrine effect on vascular smooth muscle.

  9. A macrophage activation switch (MAcS)-index for assessment of monocyte/macrophage activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Lauridsen, Mette; Knudsen, Troels Bygum

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The monocyte/macrophage system plays important roles in host defense, regulation of immune responses, tissue repair, neovascularization, and inflammation. These diverse roles are performed by specific subpopulations of macrophages that are differently activated by surrounding stimuli...... is expressed exclusively on monocytes and macrophages, and its expression is strongly induced by anti-inflammatory stimuli like IL10 and glucocorticoid, making CD163 an ideal M2 macrophage marker (2). Furthermore a soluble variant of CD163 (sCD163) is shed from the cell surface to plasma by protease mediated...... for the resolution of inflammation. Clin Exp Immunol. 2005 Dec;142(3):481-9. 2. Mantovani A, Sica A, Sozzani S, Allavena P, Vecchi A, Locati M. The chemokine system in diverse forms of macrophage activation and polarization. Trends Immunol. 2004 Dec;25(12):677-86. 3. Weaver LK, Hintz-Goldstein KA, Pioli PA, Wardwell...

  10. Alternate splicing of transcripts shape macrophage response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroon Kalam

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional reprogramming of macrophages upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection is widely studied; however, the significance of alternate splicing (AS in shaping cellular responses to mycobacterial infections is not yet appreciated. Alternate splicing can influence transcript stability or structure, function and localization of corresponding proteins thereby altering protein stoichiometry and physiological consequences. Using comprehensive analysis of a time-series RNA-seq data obtained from human macrophages infected with virulent or avirulent strains of Mtb, we show extensive remodeling of alternate splicing in macrophage transcriptome. The global nature of this regulation was evident since genes belonging to functional classes like trafficking, immune response, autophagy, redox and metabolism showed marked departure in the pattern of splicing in the infected macrophages. The systemic perturbation of splicing machinery in the infected macrophages was apparent as genes involved at different stages of spliceosome assembly were also regulated at the splicing level. Curiously there was a considerable increase in the expression of truncated/non-translatable variants of several genes, specifically upon virulent infections. Increased expression of truncated transcripts correlated with a decline in the corresponding protein levels. We verified the physiological relevance for one such candidate gene RAB8B; whose truncated variant gets enriched in H37Rv infected cells. Upon tweaking relative abundance of longer or shorter variants of RAB8B transcripts by specialized transduction, mycobacterial targeting to lysosomes could be promoted or blocked respectively, which also resulted in corresponding changes in the bacterial survival. Our results show RAB8B recruitment to the mycobacterial phagosomes is required for phagosome maturation. Thus the abundance of truncated RAB8B variant helps virulent Mtb survival by limiting the RAB8B levels in the

  11. Macrophage secretory products selectively stimulate dermatan sulfate proteoglycan production in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, I.J.; Wagner, W.D.; Owens, R.T.

    1990-01-01

    Arterial dermatan sulfate proteoglycan has been shown to increase with atherosclerosis progression, but factors responsible for this increase are unknown. To test the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis may be modified by macrophage products, pigeon arterial smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of either cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1. Proteoglycans radiolabeled with [35S]sulfate and [3H]serine were isolated from culture media and smooth muscle cells and purified following precipitation with 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and chromatography. Increasing concentrations of macrophage-conditioned media were associated with a dose-response increase in [35S]sulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, but there was no change in cell-associated proteoglycans. Incorporation of [3H]serine into total proteoglycan core proteins was not significantly different (5.2 X 10(5) dpm and 5.5 X 10(5) disintegrations per minute (dpm) in control and conditioned media-treated cultures, respectively), but selective effects were observed on individual proteoglycan types. Twofold increases in dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and limited degradation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were apparent based on core proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoinhibition studies indicated that interleukin-1 was involved in the modulation of proteoglycan synthesis by macrophage-conditioned media. These data provide support for the role of macrophages in alteration of the matrix proteoglycans synthesized by smooth muscle cells and provide a mechanism to account for the reported increased dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate ratios in the developing atherosclerotic lesion

  12. Screening for immunomodulators: Effects of xenobiotics on macrophage chemiluminescence in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, P.E.; Hinsdill, R.D. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA))

    1990-04-01

    Macrophage chemiluminescence (CL) was evaluated as a primary screening assay by assessing the modulatory activity of 17 different chemicals. The chemicals were either known immunomodulatory drugs or environmental toxicants with reported immunomodulatory activity. Elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages were exposed to the chemicals in vitro, and CL was measured in response to an opsonized yeast stimulus. Ten chemicals (hydrocortisone, dextran sulfate, di-n-octyltin dichloride, dimethyltin dichloride, azathioprine, lambda carrageenan (l-carrageenan), lead, N-propyl gallate, gallic acid, and indomethacin) were identified as effective modulators of CL. The polyanions dextran sulfate and l-carrageenan either suppressed or enhanced CL, depending on the experimental conditions, while the remaining modulators were inhibitory. A series of secondary assays was used to verify this modulatory activity and to explore different mechanisms of action. Each effective modulator altered only a few specific components of the more complex CL response, and the following general mechanisms were apparent. At least 2 chemicals showed distinct antioxidant activity and thus probably did not alter functional aspects of macrophage CL. Chemicals which blocked Fc receptor function delayed the peak CL of macrophages stimulated by opsonized yeast. Nine of the 10 modulators inhibited hydrogen peroxide release, but only 3 inhibited the release of superoxide. Finally, some effective modulators were chemicals known to interact with cell membranes or specific membrane receptors, and these were able to directly induce a CL response without the addition of opsonized yeast as a stimulus. Thus, macrophage CL was a simple, quantitative, yet sensitive immunotoxicologic screening assay capable of identifying many known immunomodulatory drugs.

  13. Silencing of OSBP-related protein 8 (ORP8) modifies the macrophage transcriptome, nucleoporin p62 distribution, and migration capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaslas, Olivier; Vihervaara, Terhi [Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, FI-00290 Helsinki (Finland); Li, Jiwei [Department of Biology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Laurila, Pirkka-Pekka [FIMM, Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, FI-00290 Helsinki (Finland); National Institute for Health and Welfare, Public Health Genomics Unit, FI-00290 Helsinki (Finland); Yan, Daoguang [Department of Biology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Olkkonen, Vesa M., E-mail: vesa.olkkonen@helsinki.fi [Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, FI-00290 Helsinki (Finland); Institute of Biomedicine, Anatomy, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 (Finland)

    2012-09-10

    ORP8 is an oxysterol/cholesterol binding protein anchored to the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope, and is abundantly expressed in the macrophage. We created and characterized mouse RAW264.7 macrophages with ORP8 stably silenced using shRNA lentiviruses. A microarray transcriptome and gene ontology pathway analysis revealed significant alterations in several nuclear pathways and ones associated with centrosome and microtubule organization. ORP8 knockdown resulted in increased expression and altered subcellular distribution of an interaction partner of ORP8, nucleoporin NUP62, with an intranuclear localization aspect and association with cytoplasmic vesicular structures and lamellipodial edges of the cells. Moreover, ORP8 silenced cells displayed enhanced migration, and a more pronounced microtubule cytoskeleton than controls expressing a non-targeting shRNA. ORP8 was shown to compete with Exo70 for interaction with NUP62, and NUP62 knockdown abolished the migration enhancement of ORP8-silenced cells, suggesting that the endogenous ORP8 suppresses migration via binding to NUP62. As a conclusion, the present study reveals new, unexpected aspects of ORP8 function in macrophages not directly involving lipid metabolism, but rather associated with nuclear functions, microtubule organization, and migration capacity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phenotype of Raw264.7 macrophage with ORP8 silenced is characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP8 silencing alters mRNA levels of nuclear and microtubule/centrosome pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP8 silencing results in increased expression and altered distribution of NUP62. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP8 silenced macrophages show enhanced migration and altered microtubule cytoskeleton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP8 competes in vitro with Exo70 for binding to NUP62.

  14. The influence of protein malnutrition on the production of GM-CSF and M-CSF by macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Cunha de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT It is well established that protein malnutrition (PM impairs immune defenses and increases susceptibility to infection. Macrophages are cells that play a central role in innate immunity, constituting one of the first barriers against infections. Macrophages produce several soluble factors, including cytokines and growth factors, important to the immune response. Among those growth factors, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF. GM-CSF and M-CSF are important to monocyte and macrophage development and stimulation of the immune response process. Knowing the importance of GM-CSF and M-CSF, we sought to investigate the influence of PM on macrophage production of these growth factors. Two-month-old male BALB/c mice were subjected to PM with a low-protein diet (2% and compared to a control diet (12% mouse group. Nutritional status, hemogram and the number of peritoneal cells were evaluated. Additionally, peritoneal macrophages were cultured and the production of GM-CSF and M-CSF and mRNA expression were evaluated. To determine if PM altered macrophage production of GM-CSF and M-CSF, they were stimulated with TNF-α. The PM animals had anemia, leukopenia and a reduced number of peritoneal cells. The production of M-CSF was not different between groups; however, cells from PM animals, stimulated with or without TNF-α, presented reduced capability to produce GM-CSF. These data imply that PM interferes with the production of GM-CSF, and consequently would affect the production and maturation of hematopoietic cells and the immune response.

  15. Preferential macrophage recruitment and polarization in LPS-induced animal model for COPD: noninvasive tracking using MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achraf Al Faraj

    Full Text Available Noninvasive imaging of macrophages activity has raised increasing interest for diagnosis