WorldWideScience

Sample records for interstitial lung diseases

  1. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and ... is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among coal ...

  2. [Interstitial lung diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, K; Brasch, F

    2008-11-01

    Interstitial lung diseases comprise a heterogeneous group of about 200 entities. In the classification of these diseases, diffuse parenchymal lung diseases with known cause, granulomatous diseases, and other specific interstitial lung diseases are separated from the important group of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, which are classified according to the 2002 ATS/ERS consensus classification. Concerning the histological pattern, this classification differentiates between "usual interstitial pneumonia" (UIP), "nonspecific interstitial pneumonia" (NSIP), "organising pneumonia" (COP), "diffuse alveolar damage" (DAD), "respiratory bronchiolitis" (RB), "desquamative interstitial pneumonia" (DIP), "lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia" (LIP) and "unclassifiable interstitial pneumonias". A key message of this classification is that the pathologist will give the diagnosis of a histological pattern, whereas the final clinicopathologic diagnosis can be made only by the clinical pulmonologist after careful correlation with the clinical and radiologic features, which is essential in the diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases.

  3. Interstitial lung diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with interstitial lung diseases in children. It gives an update and the results of the authors’ observations of different forms of interstitial lung diseases. Particular emphasis is placed on hypersensitive pneumonitis as the most common nosological entity among childhood interstitial lung diseases. The authors followed up 186 children with hypersensitive pneumonitis. They present the most important clinical, functional, radiological, and immunological diagnostic signs of this disease and consider its prognosis. In addition, there is evidence for other rare forms of interstitial lung diseases (idiopathic interstitial pneumonia, idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis, etc. in children. 

  4. Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grouped together under the label of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, the most common and deadly of which is idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Risk factors Factors that may make you more susceptible to ...

  5. Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... process. Overview Researchers have only begun to study, define, and understand chILD in the last decade. Currently, ... This term refers to inhaling substances—such as food, liquid, or vomit—into the lungs. Inhaling these ...

  6. Interstitial lung disease: Diagnostic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Saha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung disease (ILD is a final common pathway of a broad heterogeneous group of parenchymal lung disorders. It is characterized by progressive fibrosis of the lung leading to restriction and diminished oxygen transfer. Clinically, the presenting symptoms of ILD are non-specific (cough and progressive dyspnea on exertion and are often attributed to other diseases, thus delaying diagnosis and timely therapy. Clues from the medical history along with the clinical context and radiologic findings provide the initial basis for prioritizing diagnostic possibilities for a patient with ILD. An accurate prognosis and optimal treatment strategy for patients with ILDs can only be after an accurate diagnosis. This review will assist pulmonary physicians and medicine specialist in recognition of ILD. Extensive literature search has been made through PubMed and also Book References has been used for writing this review.

  7. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, K.

    2007-01-01

    The most important smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Although traditionally considered to be discrete entities, smoking-related ILDs often coexist, thus accounting for the sometimes complex patterns encountered on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative role of smoking in the development of pulmonary fibrosis

  8. Interstitial lung diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Annick

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interstitial lung disease (ILD in infants and children comprises a large spectrum of rare respiratory disorders that are mostly chronic and associated with high morbidity and mortality. These disorders are characterized by inflammatory and fibrotic changes that affect alveolar walls. Typical features of ILD include dyspnea, diffuse infiltrates on chest radiographs, and abnormal pulmonary function tests with restrictive ventilatory defect and/or impaired gas exchange. Many pathological situations can impair gas exchange and, therefore, may contribute to progressive lung damage and ILD. Consequently, diagnosis approach needs to be structured with a clinical evaluation requiring a careful history paying attention to exposures and systemic diseases. Several classifications for ILD have been proposed but none is entirely satisfactory especially in children. The present article reviews current concepts of pathophysiological mechanisms, etiology and diagnostic approaches, as well as therapeutic strategies. The following diagnostic grouping is used to discuss the various causes of pediatric ILD: 1 exposure-related ILD; 2 systemic disease-associated ILD; 3 alveolar structure disorder-associated ILD; and 4 ILD specific to infancy. Therapeutic options include mainly anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and/or anti-fibrotic drugs. The outcome is highly variable with a mortality rate around 15%. An overall favorable response to corticosteroid therapy is observed in around 50% of cases, often associated with sequelae such as limited exercise tolerance or the need for long-term oxygen therapy.

  9. Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis: a rare interstitial lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, John C; Mayo, John R; Levy, Robert; Yee, John; Leslie, Kevin O

    2015-01-01

    Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) is a newly described form of interstitial lung disease that originates in the upper lung zones and typically progresses to involve the entire lung. The disease may be idiopathic but is often associated with other pre- or coexisting conditions. Pneumothorax is a common complication and can occur at presentation or at other times during the course of the disease. Pathologically, interstitial fibrosis takes the form of a dense consolidation with some preservation of alveolar septal outlines and demonstrates a distinctly abrupt interface with residual normal lung. Unrecognized cases of PPFE may be incorrectly diagnosed as sarcoidosis, atypical idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, or other unclassifiable interstitial pneumonias. PMID:26090119

  10. Telomere length in interstitial lung diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snetselaar, Reinier; Van Moorsel, Coline H M; Kazemier, Karin M.; Van Der Vis, Joanne J.; Zanen, Pieter; Van Oosterhout, Matthijs F M; Grutters, Jan C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a heterogeneous group of rare diseases that primarily affect the pulmonary interstitium. Studies have implicated a role for telomere length (TL) maintenance in ILD, particularly in idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP). Here, we measure TL in a wide

  11. [Modern Views on Children's Interstitial Lung Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boĭtsova, E V; Beliashova, M A; Ovsiannikov, D Iu

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILD, diffuse lung diseases) are a heterogeneous group of diseases in which a pathological process primarily involved alveoli and perialveolar interstitium, resulting in impaired gas exchange, restrictive changes of lung ventilation function and diffuse interstitial changes detectable by X-ray. Children's interstitial lung diseases is an topical problem ofpediatricpulmonoogy. The article presents current information about classification, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostics, treatment and prognosis of these rare diseases. The article describes the differences in the structure, pathogenesis, detection of various histological changes in children's ILD compared with adult patients with ILD. Authors cite an instance of registers pediatric patients with ILD. The clinical semiotics of ILD, the possible results of objective research, the frequency of symptoms, the features of medical history, the changes detected on chest X-rays, CT semiotics described in detail. Particular attention was paid to interstitial lung diseases, occurring mainly in newborns and children during the first two years of life, such as congenital deficiencies of surfactant proteins, neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy, pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis. The diagnostic program for children's ILD, therapy options are presented in this article.

  12. Rituximab-induced interstitial lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naqibullah, Matiuallah; Shaker, Saher B; Bach, Karen S

    2015-01-01

    , rheumatoid arthritis, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Recently, RTX has also been suggested for the treatment of certain connective tissue disease-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Rare but serious pulmonary adverse reactions are reported. To raise awareness about...

  13. Chronic interstitial lung disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griese, Matthias

    2018-03-31

    Children's interstitial lung diseases (chILD) are increasingly recognised and contain many lung developmental and genetic disorders not yet identified in adult pneumology. Worldwide, several registers have been established. The Australasian Registry Network for Orphan Lung Disease (ARNOLD) has identified problems in estimating rare disease prevalence; focusing on chILD in immunocompetent patients, a period prevalence of 1.5 cases per million children and a mortality rate of 7% were determined. The chILD-EU register highlighted the workload to be covered per patient included and provided protocols for diagnosis and initial treatment, similar to the United States chILD network. Whereas case reports may be useful for young physicians to practise writing articles, cohorts of patients can catapult progress, as demonstrated by recent studies on persistent tachypnoea of infancy, hypersensitivity pneumonitis in children and interstitial lung disease related to interferonopathies from mutations in transmembrane protein 173. Translational research has linked heterozygous mutations in the ABCA3 transporter to an increased risk of interstitial lung diseases, not only in neonates, but also in older children and adults. For surfactant dysfunction disorders in infancy and early childhood, lung transplantation was reported to be as successful as in adult patients. Mutual potentiation of paediatric and adult pneumologists is mandatory in this rapidly extending field for successful future development.This brief review highlights publications in the field of paediatric interstitial lung disease as reviewed during the Clinical Year in Review session presented at the 2017 European Respiratory Society (ERS) Annual Congress in Milan, Italy. It was commissioned by the ERS and critically presents progress made as well as drawbacks. Copyright ©ERS 2018.

  14. Chronic interstitial lung disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Griese

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Children's interstitial lung diseases (chILD are increasingly recognised and contain many lung developmental and genetic disorders not yet identified in adult pneumology. Worldwide, several registers have been established. The Australasian Registry Network for Orphan Lung Disease (ARNOLD has identified problems in estimating rare disease prevalence; focusing on chILD in immunocompetent patients, a period prevalence of 1.5 cases per million children and a mortality rate of 7% were determined. The chILD-EU register highlighted the workload to be covered per patient included and provided protocols for diagnosis and initial treatment, similar to the United States chILD network. Whereas case reports may be useful for young physicians to practise writing articles, cohorts of patients can catapult progress, as demonstrated by recent studies on persistent tachypnoea of infancy, hypersensitivity pneumonitis in children and interstitial lung disease related to interferonopathies from mutations in transmembrane protein 173. Translational research has linked heterozygous mutations in the ABCA3 transporter to an increased risk of interstitial lung diseases, not only in neonates, but also in older children and adults. For surfactant dysfunction disorders in infancy and early childhood, lung transplantation was reported to be as successful as in adult patients. Mutual potentiation of paediatric and adult pneumologists is mandatory in this rapidly extending field for successful future development. This brief review highlights publications in the field of paediatric interstitial lung disease as reviewed during the Clinical Year in Review session presented at the 2017 European Respiratory Society (ERS Annual Congress in Milan, Italy. It was commissioned by the ERS and critically presents progress made as well as drawbacks.

  15. Surfactant gene polymorphisms and interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelidis Panagiotis

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, which is present in the alveolar lining fluid and is essential for normal lung function. Alterations in surfactant composition have been reported in several interstitial lung diseases (ILDs. Furthermore, a mutation in the surfactant protein C gene that results in complete absence of the protein has been shown to be associated with familial ILD. The role of surfactant in lung disease is therefore drawing increasing attention following the elucidation of the genetic basis underlying its surface expression and the proof of surfactant abnormalities in ILD.

  16. Respiratory muscle function in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walterspacher, Stephan; Schlager, Daniel; Walker, David J; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Windisch, Wolfram; Kabitz, Hans-Joachim

    2013-07-01

    Interstitial lung diseases limit daily activities, impair quality of life and result in (exertional) dyspnoea. This has mainly been attributed to a decline in lung function and impaired gas exchange. However, the contribution of respiratory muscle dysfunction to these limitations remains to be conclusively investigated. Interstitial lung disease patients and matched controls performed body plethysmography, a standardised 6-min walk test, volitional tests (respiratory drive (P0.1), global maximal inspiratory mouth occlusion pressure (PImax), sniff nasal pressure (SnPna) and inspiratory muscle load) and nonvolitional tests on respiratory muscle function and strength (twitch mouth and transdiaphragmatic pressure during bilateral magnetic phrenic nerve stimulation (TwPmo and TwPdi)). 25 patients and 24 controls were included in the study. PImax and SnPna remained unaltered (both p>0.05), whereas P0.1 and the load on the inspiratory muscles were higher (both prespiratory muscle strength remains preserved. Central respiratory drive and the load imposed on the inspiratory muscles are increased. Whether impaired respiratory muscle function impacts morbidity and mortality in interstitial lung disease patients needs to be investigated in future studies.

  17. Systems medicine advances in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiffo, Flavia R; Eickelberg, Oliver; Fernandez, Isis E

    2017-09-30

    Fibrotic lung diseases involve subject-environment interactions, together with dysregulated homeostatic processes, impaired DNA repair and distorted immune functions. Systems medicine-based approaches are used to analyse diseases in a holistic manner, by integrating systems biology platforms along with clinical parameters, for the purpose of understanding disease origin, progression, exacerbation and remission.Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) refer to a heterogeneous group of complex fibrotic diseases. The increase of systems medicine-based approaches in the understanding of ILDs provides exceptional advantages by improving diagnostics, unravelling phenotypical differences, and stratifying patient populations by predictable outcomes and personalised treatments. This review discusses the state-of-the-art contributions of systems medicine-based approaches in ILDs over the past 5 years. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  18. Advanced sickle cell associated interstitial lung disease presenting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous studies have reported abnormal pulmonary function and pulmonary hypertension among Nigerians with sickle cell disease, but there is no report of interstitial lung disease among them. We report a Nigerian sickle cell patient who presented with computed tomography proven interstitial lung disease complicated by ...

  19. Pemphigus vulgaris-associated interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yi-Xiu; Chu, Jin-Gang; Xiao, Ting; Chen, Hong-Duo

    2016-07-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases (AIBDs)-associated interstitial lung disease (ILD) is extremely rare. Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an intraepidermal autoimmune blistering disease caused by circulating autoantibodies against desmoglein. To date, PV-associated ILD has rarely been reported in English literature. We report a rare association of PV and ILD. A 53-year-old Chinese female with PV for 8 months developed ILD after a relapse of PV for 2 months due to discontinuation of oral prednisone by herself. She was successfully treated by systemic methylprednisolone. Taken previously reported bullous pemphigoid-associated ILD and linear IgA/IgG bullous dermatosis-associated ILD together, in general, AIBDs-associated ILD occurs when AIBDs relapse or are not controlled, responds well to systemic corticosteroids, and has a relatively better prognosis when compared with rheumatoid arthritis- or dermatomyositis-associated ILD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Interstitial Lung disease in Systemic Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooi, G.C.; Mok, M.Y.; Tsang, K.W.T.; Khong, P.L.; Fung, P.C.W.; Chan, S.; Tse, H.F.; Wong, R.W.S.; Lam, W.K.; Lau, C.S.; Wong, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate high-resolution CT (HRCT) parameters of inflammation and fibrosis in systemic sclerosis (SSc), for correlation with lung function, skin scores and exercise tolerance. Material and Methods: : 45 SSc patients (40 women, 48.5±13.4 years), underwent thoracic HRCT, lung function assessment, and modified Rodnan skin scores. Exercise tolerance was also graded. HRCT were scored for extent of 4 HRCT patterns of interstitial lung disease (ILD): ground glass opacification (GGO), reticular, mixed and honeycomb pattern in each lobe. Total HRCT score, inflammation index (GGO and mixed score) and fibrosis index (reticular and honeycomb scores) were correlated with lung function and clinical parameters. Results: ILD was present in 39/45 (86.7%) patients. Abnormal (<80% predicted) forced vital capacity (FVC), total lung capacity (TLC) and carbon monoxide diffusion factor (DLco) were detected in 30%, 22% and 46% of patients. Total HRCT score correlated with FVC (r=0.43, p=0.008), FEV1 (forced expiratory volume) (r=-0.37, p=0.03), TLC (r=-0.47, p=0.003), and DLCO (r=-0.43, p=0.008); inflammatory index with DLCO (r=-0.43, p=0.008) and exercise tolerance (r=-0.39, p < 0.05); and fibrosis index with FVC (r=-0.31, p=0.05) and TLC (r=-0.38, p=0.02). Higher total HRCT score, and inflammation and fibrosis indices were found in patients with abnormal lung function. Conclusion: Qualitative HRCT is able to evaluate inflammation and fibrosis, showing important relationships with diffusion capacity and lung volume, respectively

  1. [Lung transplantation in pulmonary fibrosis and other interstitial lung diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berastegui, Cristina; Monforte, Victor; Bravo, Carlos; Sole, Joan; Gavalda, Joan; Tenório, Luis; Villar, Ana; Rochera, M Isabel; Canela, Mercè; Morell, Ferran; Roman, Antonio

    2014-09-15

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the second indication for lung transplantation (LT) after emphysema. The aim of this study is to review the results of LT for ILD in Hospital Vall d'Hebron (Barcelona, Spain). We retrospectively studied 150 patients, 87 (58%) men, mean age 48 (r: 20-67) years between August 1990 and January 2010. One hundred and four (69%) were single lung transplants (SLT) and 46 (31%) bilateral-lung transplants (BLT). The postoperative diagnoses were: 94 (63%) usual interstitial pneumonia, 23 (15%) nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, 11 (7%) unclassifiable interstitial pneumonia and 15% miscellaneous. We describe the functional results, complications and survival. The actuarial survival was 87, 70 and 53% at one, 3 and 5 years respectively. The most frequent causes of death included early graft dysfunction and development of chronic rejection in the form of bronchiolitis obliterans (BOS). The mean postoperative increase in forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) was similar in SLT and BLT. The best FEV1 was reached after 10 (r: 1-36) months. Sixteen percent of patients returned to work. At some point during the evolution, proven acute rejection was diagnosed histologically in 53 (35%) patients. The prevalence of BOS among survivors was 20% per year, 45% at 3 years and 63% at 5 years. LT is the best treatment option currently available for ILD, in which medical treatment has failed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases; Interstitielle Lungenerkrankungen bei Rauchern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marten, K. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinikum rechts der Isar, Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    2007-03-15

    The most important smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Although traditionally considered to be discrete entities, smoking-related ILDs often coexist, thus accounting for the sometimes complex patterns encountered on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative role of smoking in the development of pulmonary fibrosis.

  3. Classical patterns of interstitial lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Mang, C.

    2014-01-01

    High resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is the most important non-invasive tool in the diagnostics and follow-up of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). A systematic review of the HRCT patterns of ILD was carried out and the most relevant differential diagnoses are discussed in order to provide a road map for the general radiologist to successfully navigate the complex field of ILD. Using HRCT four basic patterns of ILD can be identified: linear and reticular patterns, the nodular pattern, the high attenuation and low attenuation patterns. These patterns can be further differentiated according to their localization within the secondary pulmonary lobule (SPL), e.g. centrilobular or perilymphatic and their distribution within the lungs (e.g. upper or lower lobe predominance). Relevant clinical data, such as smoking history and course of the disease provide useful additional information in the diagnosis of ILD. On the basis of the pattern and anatomical distribution on HRCT, an accurate diagnosis can be achieved in some cases of ILD; however, due to morphological and clinical overlap the final diagnosis of many ILDs requires close cooperation between clinicians, radiologists and pathologists. (orig.) [de

  4. The diffuse interstitial lung disease - with emphasis in the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustillo P, Jose G; Pacheco, Pedro M; Matiz, Carlos; Ojeda, Paulina; Carrillo B, Jorge A.

    2003-01-01

    The term diffuse interstitial lung disease, it refers to those diseases that commit the interstice basically, the space between the membrane basal epithelial and endothelial, although the damage can also commit the outlying air spaces and the vessels; the supplement is centered in the diffuse interstitial lung illness of unknown cause; well-known as idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, making emphasis in the more frequents, the pulmonary fibrosis idiopathic or cryptogenic fibrosant alveolitis

  5. Palliative care and interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwah, Sabrina; Yorke, Janelle

    2017-09-01

    The palliative care needs of people with interstitial lung disease (ILD) have recently been highlighted by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All people with progressive ILD should receive best supportive care to improve symptom control and quality of life and where possible this should be evidence based. Deaths from ILD are increasing and deaths in hospital are more common compared to home. People with ILD experience a wide range of symptoms including breathlessness and cough. People living with ILD often suffer unmet physical and psychological needs throughout the disease journey. Few appropriately validated outcome measures exist for ILD which has hampered research on the longitudinal experience of symptoms and quality of life and the evaluation of interventions. Recent recommendations from the National Institute of Clinical Excellence promote the use of a new palliative care needs assessment tool. Use of a tool in busy respiratory clinics may help to highlight those requiring specialist input. Further research into the role of opioids, oxygen and neuromodulatory agents in symptom management are needed. In addition, exploration of breathlessness and case conference interventions in transitioning patients from the hospital to community settings is a priority. Further work is needed to identify a core set of validated ILD-specific patient-reported outcome measures for the robust evaluation of interventions.

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Assayag

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease affecting about 1% of the population. Interstitial lung disease is a serious and frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD is characterized by several histopathologic subtypes. This article reviews the proposed pathogenesis and risk factors for RA-ILD. We also outline the important steps involved in the work-up of RA-ILD and review the evidence for treatment and prognosis.

  7. CT in the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergin, C.J.; Mueller, N.L.

    1985-01-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of interstitial lung disease was assessed in 23 patients with known interstitial disease. These included seven patients with fibrosing alveolitis, six with silicosis, two with hypersensitivity pneumonitis, three with lymphangitic spread of tumor, two with sarcoidosis, one with rheumatoid lung disease, and two with neurofibromatosis. The CT appearance of the interstitial changes in the different disease entities was assessed. Nodules were a prominent CT feature in silicosis, sarcoidosis, and lymphangitic spread of malignancy. Distribution of nodules and associated interlobular septal thickening provided further distinguishing features in these diseases. Reticular densities were the predominant CT change in fibrosing alveolitis, rheumatoid lung disease, and extrinsic allergic alveolitis. CT can be useful in the investigation of selected instances of interstitial pulmonary disease

  8. Quantitative pulmonary gallium scanning in interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsay, S.C.; Yeates, M.G.; Burke, W.M.J.; Morgan, G.W.; Breit, S.N.; Bryant, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for gallium uptake in chronic, non-infective, diffuse lung disease are not completely understood. This study attempted to clarify some of them. A lung/liver gallium index was calculated in 113 subjects, some normal and some with various interstitial lung diseases, predominantly those associated with connective tissue disease. The mean gallium index was significantly higher in the groups with active interstitial lung disease (5.7) and non-infective bronchiolitis (4.1) compared with non-smoking normals (3.0; P<0.05). To investigate the mechanisms responsible for gallium uptake, the gallium index was correlated with bronchoalveolar lavage findings, respiratory function tests and clinical features. Significant correlations (P<0.05) were found with age in non-smoking normals; lavage macrophages in smoking normals; age but no other parameter in bronchiolitis; lavage lymphocytes, lavage albumin and improvement in diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide in those with active interstitial lung disease. It is concluded that in normal smokers gallium uptake may be due to a macrophage-mediated process. Gallium uptake in active interstitial lung disease associated with connective tissue disease appears to be an immunological process in which transport and retention of gallium is associated with that of albumin. (orig.)

  9. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: radiologic-pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, Alberto; Franquet, Tomas; Gimenez, Ana; Pineda, Rosa; Madrid, Marta; Bordes, Ramon

    2006-01-01

    Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) are a heterogeneous group of entities of unknown cause. These diseases include desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP), respiratory-bronchiolitis-related interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD), pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). High-resolution CT is highly sensitive in the detection of abnormalities in the lung parenchyma and airways. Ground-glass attenuation can occur in DIP and RB-ILD. Whereas DIP is histologically characterized by intra-alveolar pigmented macrophages, RB-ILD shows alveolar macrophages in a patchy peribronchiolar distribution. LCH shows nodular infiltrates on histopathological examination containing varying amounts of characteristic Langerhans' histiocytes. The HRCT findings are characteristically bilateral, symmetrical and diffuse, involving the upper lobe zones with sparing of the costophrenic angles. The most prominent CT features are nodules (sometimes cavitary) measuring 1 to 10 mm in diameter, cysts and areas of ground-glass attenuation. Pathologically, IPF is characterized by its heterogeneity with areas of normal clung, alveolitis and end-stage fibrosis shown in the same biopsy specimen. High-resolution CT findings consist of honeycombing, traction bronchiectasis and intralobular interstitial thickening with subpleural and lower lung predominance. Since coexisting lesions in the same cases have been observed, a better understanding of the different smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) allows a more confident and specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  10. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: radiologic-pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo, Alberto [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Thoracic Radiology, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Franquet, Tomas; Gimenez, Ana; Pineda, Rosa; Madrid, Marta [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Bordes, Ramon [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Pathology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-11-15

    Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) are a heterogeneous group of entities of unknown cause. These diseases include desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP), respiratory-bronchiolitis-related interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD), pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). High-resolution CT is highly sensitive in the detection of abnormalities in the lung parenchyma and airways. Ground-glass attenuation can occur in DIP and RB-ILD. Whereas DIP is histologically characterized by intra-alveolar pigmented macrophages, RB-ILD shows alveolar macrophages in a patchy peribronchiolar distribution. LCH shows nodular infiltrates on histopathological examination containing varying amounts of characteristic Langerhans' histiocytes. The HRCT findings are characteristically bilateral, symmetrical and diffuse, involving the upper lobe zones with sparing of the costophrenic angles. The most prominent CT features are nodules (sometimes cavitary) measuring 1 to 10 mm in diameter, cysts and areas of ground-glass attenuation. Pathologically, IPF is characterized by its heterogeneity with areas of normal clung, alveolitis and end-stage fibrosis shown in the same biopsy specimen. High-resolution CT findings consist of honeycombing, traction bronchiectasis and intralobular interstitial thickening with subpleural and lower lung predominance. Since coexisting lesions in the same cases have been observed, a better understanding of the different smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) allows a more confident and specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  11. Interstitial lung diseases with fibrosis - the pattern at high resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarzemska, A.; Lasek, W.; Nawrocka, E.; Meder, G.; Zapala, M.

    2003-01-01

    Surgical lung biopsy, either open thoracotomy or video-assisted thoracoscopy is recommended in the diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases (ILD). In some cases, however, the repetitive pattern of radiological features in high-resolution computed tomography is often sufficient to confirm the diagnosis in a non-invasive manner. The purpose of the study was to determine whether patients with ILD can be selected on the basis of the HRCT pattern. Thin-section CT scans were performed in 40 patients with histologically proven idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (26 patients with usual interstitial pneumonia UIP, 2 patients with desquamative interstitial pneumonia DIP, 2 patients with bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia BOOP, 2 patients with non-specific interstitial pneumonia NSIP, 11 patients with hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and 3 patients with pulmonary histiocytosis X). The location and the intensity of lesions were taken into consideration. Clinical and histopathological findings were compared. HRCT features of interstitial lung diseases such as nodules and cystic spaces in hypersensitivity pneumonitis and pulmonary histiocytosis, and ground-glass opacities in idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIP) were statistically significant for differential diagnosis in ILD cases. Combination of honeycombing and ground-glass opacities found in UIP and nodules found in DIP were also statistically significant features in IIP subtypes diagnosis. In some cases, HRCT patterns of hypersensitivity pneumonitis, pulmonary histiocytosis X and IPF combined with clinical findings allowed for the accurate diagnosis without resorting to lung biopsy. Within a group of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia only in usual interstitial pneumonia characteristic pattern in thin-section CT can be defined. In other subgroups some typical features can imply a diagnosis. (author)

  12. Erectile dysfunction is a common problem in interstitial lung diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløe, Andreas; Hilberg, Ole; Wijsenbeek, Marlies

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is related to chronic diseases, including COPD. The patho- genesis may involve chronic hypoxia, which is common in interstitial lung disease (ILD). We aimed to study the relationship between ILD and ED. Method: Male patients with ILD detected by high-resolu...

  13. Rheumatoid interstitial lung disease presenting as cor pulmonale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Sourya; Mahajan, S N; Shukla, Samarth; Diwan, S K; Banode, Pankaj; Kothari, Nirmesh

    2010-10-01

    Rheumatiod arthritis (RA) is a multisystem connective tissue disorder. The predominant presentation is polyarticular, symmetric peripheral arthritis with relative sparing of axial skeleton. Inflammatory synovitis is the pathologic hallmark. Extra-articular manifestations of RA can involve several other organ systems and amongst them pulmonary manifestations occur commonly. We report a case of rheumatoid interstitial lung disease presenting as cor pulmonale.

  14. Rheumatoid interstitial lung disease presenting as cor pulmonale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acharya Sourya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatiod arthritis (RA is a multisystem connective tissue disorder. The predominant presentation is polyarticular, symmetric peripheral arthritis with relative sparing of axial skeleton. Inflammatory synovitis is the pathologic hallmark. Extra-articular manifestations of RA can involve several other organ systems and amongst them pulmonary manifestations occur commonly. We report a case of rheumatoid interstitial lung disease presenting as cor pulmonale.

  15. Microbiome in interstitial lung disease: from pathogenesis to treatment target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Margaret L; Han, MeiLan K; Dickson, Robert P; Molyneaux, Philip L

    2017-09-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge of the role of the lung microbiome in interstitial lung disease and poses considerations of the microbiome as a therapeutic target. Although historically considered sterile, bacterial communities have now been well documented in lungs in health and disease. Studies in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) suggest that increased bacterial burden and/or abundance of potentially pathogenic bacteria may drive disease progression, acute exacerbations, and mortality. More recent work has highlighted the interaction between the lung microbiome and the innate immune system in IPF, strengthening the argument for the role of both host and environment interaction in disease pathogenesis. In support of this, studies of interstitial lung diseases other than IPF suggest that it may be the host immune response, which shapes the microbiome in these diseases. Some clinical and mouse model data also suggest that the lung microbiome may represent a therapeutic target, via antibiotic administration, immunization against pathogenic organisms, or treatment directed at gastroesophageal reflux. Evidence suggests that the lung microbiome may serve as a prognostic biomarker, a therapeutic target, or provide an explanation for disease pathogenesis in IPF.

  16. [Chronic interstitial lung disease in children: Diagnostic approach and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuger, M; Clair, M-P; El Ayoun Ibrahim, N; L'Excellent, S; Nizery, L; O'Neill, C; Tabone, L; Truffinet, O; Yakovleff, C; de Blic, J

    2016-05-01

    Chronic interstitial lung disease (ILD) in children is a heterogeneous group of rare lung disorders characterized by an inflammatory process of the alveolar wall and the pulmonary interstitium that induces gas exchange disorders. The diagnostic approach to an ILD involves three essential steps: recognizing the ILD, appreciating the impact, and identifying the cause. The spectrum of clinical findings depends to a large extent on age. In the newborn, the beginning is often abrupt (neonatal respiratory distress), whereas there is a more gradual onset in infants (failure to thrive, tachypnea, indrawing of the respiratory muscles). In older children, the onset is insidious and the diagnosis can only be made at an advanced stage of the disease. The diagnosis is based on noninvasive methods (clinical history, respiratory function tests, chest X-ray, and high-resolution CT scan) and invasive techniques (bronchoalveolar lavage, transbronchial biopsy, video-assisted thoracoscopic biopsy, and open lung biopsy). The treatment of interstitial lung disease in children depends on the nature of the underlying pathology. The most common therapeutic approach involves the use of corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents for their anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects. Children with ILD also need support therapy (oxygen therapy, nutritional support, treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, vaccination). Lung transplantation is discussed in patients with severe respiratory failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Multidisciplinary discussion (MDD in interstitial lung disease; some reflections

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    Colby TV

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Multidisciplinary discussion (MDD has been used in many disciplines in medicine, notably in thoracic oncology for some two decades (1. MDD at a multidisciplinary conference (MDC formalizes activities that have also gone under the label of case conferences, tumor boards, etc. and this practice is time- honored in medical practice. In the setting of interstitial lung disease (ILD, especially the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs and IPF MDD conducted by a “multidisciplinary team” (MDT and is now the “gold standard” for diagnosis in this clinical setting (2 and is recommended in the 2011 guidelines for IPF and the 2013 guidelines for IIPs (3, 4. Clinical-pathologic correlation, clinical-radiologic-pathologic correlation and clinical-radiologic correlation have been integral to the study of interstitial lung disease since early work of Heitzman (5, Carrington and Gaensler (6 and many others. This represents the conceptual framework on which the Fleischner Society: “…an international, multidisciplinary medical society for thoracic ...

  18. Flock worker's lung: chronic interstitial lung disease in the nylon flocking industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, D G; Crausman, R S; Durand, K T; Nayer, A; Kuhn, C

    1998-08-15

    Two young men working at a nylon flocking plant in Rhode Island developed interstitial lung disease of unknown cause. Similar clusters at the same company's Canadian plant were reported previously. To define the extent, clinicopathologic features, and potential causes of the apparent disease outbreak. Case-finding survey and retrospective cohort study. Academic occupational medicine program. All workers employed at the Rhode Island plant on or after 15 June 1990. Symptomatic employees had chest radiography, pulmonary function tests, high-resolution computed tomography, and serologic testing. Those with unexplained radiographic or pulmonary function abnormalities underwent bronchoalveolar lavage, lung biopsy, or both. The case definition of "flock worker's lung" required histologic evidence of interstitial lung disease (or lavage evidence of lung inflammation) not explained by another condition. Eight cases of flock worker's lung were identified at the Rhode Island plant. Three cases were characterized by a high proportion of eosinophils (25% to 40%) in lavage fluid. Six of the seven patients who had biopsy had histologic findings of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, and the seventh had bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia. All seven of these patients had peribronchovascular interstitial lymphoid nodules, usually with germinal centers, and most had lymphocytic bronchiolitis and interstitial fibrosis. All improved after leaving work. Review of the Canadian tissue specimens showed many similar histologic findings. Among the 165-member study cohort, a 48-fold or greater increase was seen in the sex-adjusted incidence rate of all interstitial lung disease. Work in the nylon flocking industry poses substantial risk for a previously unrecognized occupational interstitial lung disease. Nylon fiber is the suspected cause of this condition.

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) associated interstitial lung disease (ILD).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, David N

    2013-10-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is the most common Connective Tissue Disease (CTD) and represents an increasing burden on global health resources. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) has been recognised as a complication of RA but its potential for mortality and morbidity has arguably been under appreciated for decades. New studies have underscored a significant lifetime risk of ILD development in RA. Contemporary work has identified an increased risk of mortality associated with the Usual Interstitial Pneumonia (UIP) pattern which shares similarity with the most devastating of the interstitial pulmonary diseases, namely Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). In this paper, we discuss recent studies highlighting the associated increase in mortality in RA-UIP. We explore associations between radiological and histopathological features of RA-ILD and the prognostic implications of same. We emphasise the need for translational research in this area given the growing burden of RA-ILD. We highlight the importance of the respiratory physician as a key stakeholder in the multidisciplinary management of this disorder. RA-ILD focused research offers the opportunity to identify early asymptomatic disease and define the natural history of this extra articular manifestation. This may provide a unique opportunity to define key regulatory fibrotic events driving progressive disease. We also discuss some of the more challenging and novel aspects of therapy for RA-ILD.

  20. Ultrasound in Rheumatologic Interstitial Lung Disease: A Case Report of Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia in Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    A. Laria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the American Thoracic Society (ATS/European Respiratory Society consensus classification, idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs include several clinic-radiologic-pathologic entities: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP, nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. Ultrasound Lung Comets (ULCs are an echographic chest-sonography hallmark of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. We describe the ultrasound (US findings in the follow-up of a NSIP’s case in rheumatoid arthritis (RA.

  1. Building a reference multimedia database for interstitial lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Vargas, Alejandro; Platon, Alexandra; Geissbuhler, Antoine; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Müller, Henning

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the methodology used to create a multimedia collection of cases with interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) at the University Hospitals of Geneva. The dataset contains high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) image series with three-dimensional annotated regions of pathological lung tissue along with clinical parameters from patients with pathologically proven diagnoses of ILDs. The motivations for this work is to palliate the lack of publicly available collections of ILD cases to serve as a basis for the development and evaluation of image-based computerized diagnostic aid. After 38 months of data collection, the library contains 128 patients affected with one of the 13 histological diagnoses of ILDs, 108 image series with more than 41l of annotated lung tissue patterns as well as a comprehensive set of 99 clinical parameters related to ILDs. The database is available for research on request and after signature of a license agreement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of Preexisting Interstitial Lung Disease on Acute, Extensive Radiation Pneumonitis: Retrospective Analysis of Patients with Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ozawa, Yuichi; Abe, Takefumi; Omae, Minako; Matsui, Takashi; Kato, Masato; Hasegawa, Hirotsugu; Enomoto, Yasunori; Ishihara, Takeaki; Inui, Naoki; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokomura, Koshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study investigated the clinical characteristics and predictive factors for developing acute extended radiation pneumonitis with a focus on the presence and radiological characteristics of preexisting interstitial lung disease. Methods Of 1429 irradiations for lung cancer from May 2006 to August 2013, we reviewed 651 irradiations involving the lung field. The presence, compatibility with usual interstitial pneumonia, and occupying area of preexisting interstitial lung disease...

  3. Respiratory and lower limb muscle function in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotou, Marios; Polychronopoulos, Vlasis; Strange, Charlie

    2016-05-01

    Growing evidence suggests that respiratory and limb muscle function may be impaired in patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Importantly, muscle dysfunction could promote dyspnoea, fatigue and functional limitation all of which are cardinal features of ILD. This article examines the risk factors for skeletal muscle dysfunction in ILD, reviews the current evidence on overall respiratory and limb muscle function and focuses on the occurrence and implications of skeletal muscle dysfunction in ILD. Research limitations and pathways to address the current knowledge gaps are highlighted. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. The Multifaceted Aspects of Interstitial Lung Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Lorenzo Cavagna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung disease (ILD is a relevant extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA that may occur either in early stages or as a complication of long-standing disease. RA related ILD (RA-ILD significantly influences the quoad vitam prognosis of these patients. Several histopathological patterns of RA-ILD have been described: usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP is the most frequent one, followed by nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP; other patterns are less commonly observed. Several factors have been associated with an increased risk of developing RA-ILD. The genetic background plays a fundamental but not sufficient role; smoking is an independent predictor of ILD, and a correlation with the presence of rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies has also been reported. Moreover, both exnovo occurrence and progression of ILD have been related to drug therapies that are commonly prescribed in RA, such as methotrexate, leflunomide, anti-TNF alpha agents, and rituximab. A greater understanding of the disease process is necessary in order to improve the therapeutic approach to ILD and RA itself and to reduce the burden of this severe extra-articular manifestation.

  5. Interstitial lung disease during trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuzurio, Syota; Horita, Naokatsu; Shiota, Yutaro; Kanehiro, Arihiko; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2010-01-01

    We studied clinical and radiographic features of interstitial lung disease (ILD) during trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) administration. Ten patients who had received prednisolone treatment for underlying diffuse pulmonary disease showed various ILDs after introduction of TMP/SMX. The radiographic features of the ILDs were not consistent with infectious disease or exacerbation of the underlying disease, and these diagnoses were excluded radiographically and on clinical grounds during the differential diagnosis of the ILDs. These ILDs emerged relatively early after introduction of TMP/SMX, which is consistent with the former case report of drug-induced ILD (DI-ILD) caused by TMP/SMX. Therefore DI-ILDs caused by TMP/SMX were suspected in these cases. In most of these cases, the ILDs were clinically mild and disappeared immediately although administration of TMP/SMX was continued. (author)

  6. Advanced sickle cell associated interstitial lung disease presenting with cor pulmonale in a Nigerian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawibe, Ademola Emmanuel; Kolo, Philip Manman; Ogunmodede, James Ayodele; Desalu, Olufemi Olumuyiwa; Salami, Kazeem Alakija

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have reported abnormal pulmonary function and pulmonary hypertension among Nigerians with sickle cell disease, but there is no report of interstitial lung disease among them. We report a Nigerian sickle cell patient who presented with computed tomography proven interstitial lung disease complicated by pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale.

  7. Impact of Preexisting Interstitial Lung Disease on Acute, Extensive Radiation Pneumonitis: Retrospective Analysis of Patients with Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Yuichi; Abe, Takefumi; Omae, Minako; Matsui, Takashi; Kato, Masato; Hasegawa, Hirotsugu; Enomoto, Yasunori; Ishihara, Takeaki; Inui, Naoki; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokomura, Koshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the clinical characteristics and predictive factors for developing acute extended radiation pneumonitis with a focus on the presence and radiological characteristics of preexisting interstitial lung disease. Of 1429 irradiations for lung cancer from May 2006 to August 2013, we reviewed 651 irradiations involving the lung field. The presence, compatibility with usual interstitial pneumonia, and occupying area of preexisting interstitial lung disease were retrospectively evaluated by pretreatment computed tomography. Cases of non-infectious, non-cardiogenic, acute respiratory failure with an extended bilateral shadow developing within 30 days after the last irradiation were defined as acute extended radiation pneumonitis. Nine (1.4%) patients developed acute extended radiation pneumonitis a mean of 6.7 days after the last irradiation. Although preexisting interstitial lung disease was found in 13% of patients (84 patients), 78% of patients (7 patients) with acute extended radiation pneumonitis cases had preexisting interstitial lung disease, which resulted in incidences of acute extended radiation pneumonitis of 0.35 and 8.3% in patients without and with preexisting interstitial lung disease, respectively. Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that the presence of preexisting interstitial lung disease (odds ratio = 22.6; 95% confidence interval = 5.29-155; p acute extended radiation pneumonitis (odds ratio = 6.14; 95% confidence interval = 1.0-37.4); p = 0.038). Pretreatment computed tomography evaluations of the presence of and area size occupied by preexisting interstitial lung disease should be assessed for safer irradiation of areas involving the lung field.

  8. Asymptomatic Preclinical Rheumatoid Arthritis-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease

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    Juan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Interstitial lung disease (ILD is a common extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to define high-resolution chest CT (HRCT and pulmonary function test (PFT abnormalities capable of identifying asymptomatic, preclinical forms of RA-ILD that may represent precursors to more severe fibrotic lung disease. Methods. We analyzed chest HRCTs in consecutively enrolled RA patients and subsequently classified these individuals as RA-ILD or RA-no ILD based on the presence/absence of ground glass opacification, septal thickening, reticulation, traction bronchiectasis, and/or honeycombing. Coexisting PFT abnormalities (reductions in percent predicted FEV1, FVC, TLC, and/or DLCO were also used to further characterize occult respiratory defects. Results. 61% (63/103 of RA patients were classified as RA-ILD based on HRCT and PFT abnormalities, while 39% (40/103 were designated as RA-no ILD. 57/63 RA-ILD patients lacked symptoms of significant dyspnea or cough at the time of HRCT and PFT assessment. Compared with RA-no ILD, RA-ILD patients were older and had longer disease duration, higher articular disease activity, and more significant PFT abnormalities. Conclusion. HRCT represents an effective tool to detect occult/asymptomatic ILD that is highly prevalent in our unselected, university-based cohort of RA patients.

  9. Sequential change of high-resolution CT findings of interstitial lung disease in polymyositis and dermatomyositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Hiroshi; Furuizumi, Naoya; Akita, Shinichi; Oda, Junichi; Sakai, Kunio; Suzuki, Eiichi; Emura, Iwao (Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-01-01

    Sequential changes of interstitial lung disease in fourteen patients of polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM) were followed up by high-resolution CT (HRCT). Most frequent CT findings were intense lung attenuation (ILA) with volume loss and slightly increased lung attenuation (SILA). Open lung biopsy was performed in a case with ILA shadow which revealed so-called usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). Most intense ILA and SILA shadows resolved after steroid therapy. Some of ILA, however, reappeared and accompanied more prominent volume loss findings than before treatment. We think HRCT findings of interstitial lung disease in PM/DM may indicate prognosis of these diagnoses to some degree. (author).

  10. [Interstitial lung disease as an initial manifestation of dermatomyositis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Min; Gong, Yulin; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fengchun; Tang, Fulin

    2014-11-25

    To explore the clinical features and prognosis of dermatomyositis patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) as an initial manifestation. Medical records of 184 dermatomyositis inpatients complicated with ILD, admitted into Peking Union Medical College Hospital from January 1999 to January 2013, were retrospectively analyzed. The clinical features, biochemical parameters, positive rates of autoantibodies, radiology, pulmonary function tests, pathology, treatments and prognosis were compared between two subgroups of ILD-initial and non-ILD-initial dermatomyositis. The incidence of ILD of dermatomyositis inpatients was 17%. The average age was 48 ± 12 years and the gender ratio of male-to-female was 63: 121. Eighty eight (47.8%) dermatomyositis patients had ILD as an initial manifestation, including (n = 42, 22.8%) of ILD concomitant dermatomyositis (within 1 month) and (n = 46, 25.0%) of ILD before dermatomyositis with an average ahead time of (11 ± 3) months. Patients of ILD-initial dermatomyositis had a higher incidence of dyspnea on exertion, cough and lung crackles, but there were lower incidences of heliotrope rash, chest V area rash, shawl sign and joint involvement than non-ILD-initial dermatomyositis (P dermatomyositis group was 13.6%. The main performances of ILD-initial dermatomyositis on pulmonary function tests were diffusing and restrictive ventilation impairment. And there was a lower diffusing rate of carbon monoxide than non-ILD-initial dermatomyositis group (P dermatomyositis. The mortality rate of ILD-initial dermatomyositis patients was 19.3% and there was no significant difference from non-ILD-initial dermatomyositis (P > 0.05). The main course of ILD-initial dermatomyositis was respiratory failure due to progressive ILD (n = 13, 76.5%). ILD as an initial manifestation is a common complication and a major mortality cause of dermatomyositis inpatients. And the frequent clinical pathology types are organic and non-specific interstitial

  11. Long-term macrolides in diffuse interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Faverio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present review we provide currently available evidence for the use of macrolides in the treatment of diffuse interstitial lung diseases (ILDs. Up to now, research on macrolides has mainly focused on three areas. First, macrolides have shown some promising results in cellular models and case reports as antifibrotic agents, by promoting autophagy and clearance of intracellular protein aggregates and acting as regulators of surfactant homeostasis. Secondly, macrolides have an immunomodulatory effect, which has been applied in some organising pneumonia cases. In particular, macrolides have been tested in association with systemic corticosteroids as steroid-sparing agents and alone as either first-line agents in mild cases or second-line agents where steroids were poorly tolerated or had failed. Thirdly, a recent area of research concerns the possible role of macrolides as modulators of lung microbiota and the host–microbiota interaction. This function has been particularly studied in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients, in whom changes in microbiota have been proved to be associated with disease progression. However, the lack of high-quality studies makes the application of macrolide therapy in ILDs a field in which research should be conducted on a large scale.

  12. Statin Use Is Associated with Reduced Mortality in Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel-Krogh, Signe; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We hypothesized that statin use begun before the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease is associated with reduced mortality. METHODS: We studied all patients diagnosed with interstitial lung disease in the entire Danish population from 1995 through 2009, comparing statin use versus...... no statin use in a nested 1:2 matched study. RESULTS: The cumulative survival as a function of follow-up time from the date of diagnosis of interstitial lung disease (n = 1,786 + 3,572) and idiopathic lung fibrosis (n = 261 + 522) was higher for statin users versus never users (log-rank: P = 7 · 10......(-9) and P = 0.05). The median survival time in patients with interstitial lung disease was 3.3 years in statin users and 2.1 years in never users. Corresponding values in patients with idiopathic lung fibrosis were 3.4 versus 2.4 years. After multivariable adjustment, the hazard ratio for all...

  13. Impact of Preexisting Interstitial Lung Disease on Acute, Extensive Radiation Pneumonitis: Retrospective Analysis of Patients with Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Ozawa

    Full Text Available This study investigated the clinical characteristics and predictive factors for developing acute extended radiation pneumonitis with a focus on the presence and radiological characteristics of preexisting interstitial lung disease.Of 1429 irradiations for lung cancer from May 2006 to August 2013, we reviewed 651 irradiations involving the lung field. The presence, compatibility with usual interstitial pneumonia, and occupying area of preexisting interstitial lung disease were retrospectively evaluated by pretreatment computed tomography. Cases of non-infectious, non-cardiogenic, acute respiratory failure with an extended bilateral shadow developing within 30 days after the last irradiation were defined as acute extended radiation pneumonitis.Nine (1.4% patients developed acute extended radiation pneumonitis a mean of 6.7 days after the last irradiation. Although preexisting interstitial lung disease was found in 13% of patients (84 patients, 78% of patients (7 patients with acute extended radiation pneumonitis cases had preexisting interstitial lung disease, which resulted in incidences of acute extended radiation pneumonitis of 0.35 and 8.3% in patients without and with preexisting interstitial lung disease, respectively. Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that the presence of preexisting interstitial lung disease (odds ratio = 22.6; 95% confidence interval = 5.29-155; p < 0.001 and performance status (≥2; odds ratio = 4.22; 95% confidence interval = 1.06-20.8; p = 0.049 were significant predictive factors. Further analysis of the 84 patients with preexisting interstitial lung disease revealed that involvement of more than 10% of the lung field was the only independent predictive factor associated with the risk of acute extended radiation pneumonitis (odds ratio = 6.14; 95% confidence interval = 1.0-37.4; p = 0.038.Pretreatment computed tomography evaluations of the presence of and area size occupied by preexisting interstitial lung

  14. Recent Treatment of Interstitial Lung Disease with Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenaga Kawasumi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung disease (ILD is a prognostic factor for poor outcome in polymyositis (PM/dermatomyositis (DM. The appropriate management of ILD is very important to improve the prognosis of patients with PM/DM. ILD activity and severity depend on the disease subtype. Therefore, clinicians should determine therapeutic strategies according to the disease subtype in each patient with PM/DM. Anti–melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 antibody and hyperferritinemia predict the development and severity of rapidly progressive (RP ILD, particularly in East Asian patients. Combination therapy with corticosteroids, intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse, and calcineurin inhibitors should be administered in RP-ILD. In contrast, patients with anti–aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (ARS show better responses to corticosteroids alone. However, ILDs with anti-ARS often display disease recurrence or become refractory to corticosteroid monotherapy. Recent studies have demonstrated that the administration of tacrolimus or rituximab in addition to corticosteroids may be considered in ILD patients with anti-ARS. Large-scale, multicenter randomized clinical trials should be conducted in the future to confirm that the aforementioned agents exhibit efficacy in ILD patients with PM/DM. The pathophysiology of ILD with PM/DM should also be elucidated in greater detail to develop effective therapeutic strategies for patients with ILD in PM/DM.

  15. Interstitial Lung Disease in a 70-Year-Old Man with Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Hampton W; Frye, Jeanetta W

    2018-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease is a rare but increasingly recognized extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease that can have devastating consequences if left untreated. We report a case of ulcerative colitis-associated interstitial lung disease presenting with acute hypoxic respiratory failure during an ulcerative colitis flare. Gastroenterologists and pulmonologists should be aware of the numerous bronchopulmonary signs and symptoms that can suggest systemic illness in inflammatory bowel disease.

  16. Oxygen therapy for interstitial lung disease: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily C. Bell

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to establish the impact of oxygen therapy on dyspnoea, health-related quality of life (HRQoL, exercise capacity and mortality in interstitial lung disease (ILD. We included studies that compared oxygen therapy to no oxygen therapy in adults with ILD. No limitations were placed on study design or intervention type. Two reviewers independently evaluated studies for inclusion, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. The primary outcome was dyspnoea. Eight studies evaluated the acute effects of oxygen (n=1509. There was no effect of oxygen therapy on modified Borg dyspnoea score at end exercise (mean difference (MD −0.06 units, 95% CI −0.24–0.13; two studies, n=27. However, effects on exercise outcomes consistently favoured oxygen therapy. One study showed reduction in dyspnoea at rest with oxygen in patients who were acutely unwell (MD visual analogue scale 30 mm versus 48 mm, p<0.05; n=10. Four studies of long-term oxygen therapy (n=2670 had high risk of bias and no inferences could be drawn. This systematic review showed no effects of oxygen therapy on dyspnoea during exercise in ILD, although exercise capacity was increased. Future trials should evaluate whether acute improvements in exercise capacity with oxygen can be translated into improved physical activity and HRQoL.

  17. [Comparative analysis of bronchoalveolar lavages in interstitial lung diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyu Sub; Heo, Woon Bo; Won, Dong Il

    2007-06-01

    This study was purposed to find out the differences in the lymphocyte subsets and differential cell counts of the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) and to analyze the differences according to their ages, gender and smoking habits. BAL fluid samples of 141 ILD patients were examined for lymphocyte subsets and differential cell counts, and the differences among the patients were analyzed according to their diseases. Then, within the three most common disease groups, the differences were further analyzed by the age, gender and smoking habit of the patients. There were no statistically significant differences in total cell counts (per millimeters of BAL fluid) among the patient groups with each ILD. However, significant differences were observed in the percentages of neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils, and macrophages of BAL fluid. Also, in lymphocyte subset analyses, the percentages of total T cells, B cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD4/CD8 T cell ratios, and NK cells were significantly different among the patients with each ILD. However, within the same disease group, there were no differences in differential cell counts and lymphocyte subset analyses according to the age, smoking habit, and gender of the patients. Although the age, smoking habit and gender did not have an effect on the BAL fluid analyses among the patients with the same ILD, there were significant differences among the patients with each ILD; therefore, the differential cell counts and lymphocyte subset analyses of BAL fluid can be useful in differential diagnosis for determining the types of ILD.

  18. Interstitial lung disease in classic and clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis: a retrospective study with screening recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganroth, Pamela A.; Kreider, Mary Elizabeth; Okawa, Joyce; Taylor, Lynne; Werth, Victoria P.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives (1) Determine the prevalence of interstitial lung disease and isolated low diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) in a large cohort of dermatomyositis outpatients. (2) Compare the pulmonary abnormalities of classic dermatomyositis (CDM) and clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis (CADM) patients. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting University hospital outpatient dermatology referral center. Patients Records of 91 outpatients with adult-onset dermatomyositis seen between May 26, 2006 and May 25, 2009 were reviewed. Main Outcome Measures Presence of interstitial lung disease on thin slice chest computed tomography (CT) scans and DLCO. Results Of the 71 dermatomyositis patients who had CT or DLCO data, 23% (16/71, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 13–33%) had interstitial lung disease as defined by CT results. All interstitial lung disease patients had a reduced DLCO, and the interstitial lung disease prevalence was not different between CADM (29% [10/35]) and CDM (17% [6/36]) patients (p=0.27). Twenty-five percent (18/71, 95% CI = 15–36%) of patients (20% [7/35], CADM; 31% [11/36], CDM; p=0.41), had an isolated low DLCO in the absence of CT findings showing interstitial lung disease. Conclusions Established interstitial lung disease and isolated reductions in DLCO, which may signify early interstitial lung disease or pulmonary hypertension, are very common in both classic and clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis dermatology outpatients. As the DLCO is an inexpensive test that is sensitive for pulmonary disease, it may be appropriate to screen all dermatomyositis patients with serial DLCO measurements and base further testing on DLCO results. PMID:20644033

  19. Case-based lung image categorization and retrieval for interstitial lung diseases: clinical workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Vargas, Alejandro; Gaillard, Frédéric; Platon, Alexandra; Geissbuhler, Antoine; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Müller, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Clinical workflows and user interfaces of image-based computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) for interstitial lung diseases in high-resolution computed tomography are introduced and discussed. Three use cases are implemented to assist students, radiologists, and physicians in the diagnosis workup of interstitial lung diseases. In a first step, the proposed system shows a three-dimensional map of categorized lung tissue patterns with quantification of the diseases based on texture analysis of the lung parenchyma. Then, based on the proportions of abnormal and normal lung tissue as well as clinical data of the patients, retrieval of similar cases is enabled using a multimodal distance aggregating content-based image retrieval (CBIR) and text-based information search. The global system leads to a hybrid detection-CBIR-based CAD, where detection-based and CBIR-based CAD show to be complementary both on the user's side and on the algorithmic side. The proposed approach is in accordance with the classical workflow of clinicians searching for similar cases in textbooks and personal collections. The developed system enables objective and customizable inter-case similarity assessment, and the performance measures obtained with a leave-one-patient-out cross-validation (LOPO CV) are representative of a clinical usage of the system.

  20. Interstitial shadow on chest CT is associated with the onset of interstitial lung disease caused by chemotherapeutic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niho, Seiji; Goto, Koichi; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Kim, Y.H.; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Kubota, Kaoru; Saijo, Nagahiro; Nishiwaki, Yutaka

    2006-01-01

    Pretreatment computerized tomography (CT) films of the chest was studied to clarify the influence of interstitial shadow on developing interstitial lung disease (ILD). Eligible patients were those lung cancer patients who started to receive first-line chemotherapy between October 2001 and March 2004. Patients who received thoracic radiotherapy to the primary lesion, mediastinum, spinal or rib metastases were excluded. We reviewed pretreatment conventional CT and plain X-ray films of the chest. Ground-glass opacity, consolidation or reticular shadow without segmental distribution was defined as interstitial shadow, with this event being graded as mild, moderate or severe. If interstitial shadow was detected on CT films of the chest, but not via plain chest X-ray, it was graded as mild. Patients developing ILD were identified from medial records. A total of 502 patients were eligible. Mild, moderate and severe interstitial shadow was identified in 7, 8 and 5% of patients, respectively. A total of 188 patients (37%) received tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment, namely gefitinib or erlotinib. Twenty-six patients (5.2%) developed ILD either during or after chemotherapy. Multivariate analyses revealed that interstitial shadow on CT films of the chest and treatment history with TKI were associated with the onset of ILD. It is recommended that patients with interstitial shadow on chest CT are excluded from future clinical trials until this issue is further clarified, as it is anticipated that use of chemotherapeutic agents frequently mediate onset of ILD in this context. (author)

  1. Progression of Common Variable Immunodeficiency Interstitial Lung Disease Accompanies Distinct Pulmonary and Laboratory Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Paul J; Overbey, Jessica R; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency may be complicated by interstitial lung disease, which leads to worsened morbidity and mortality in some. Although immunomodulatory treatment has efficacy, choice of patient, duration of treatment, and long-term follow-up are not available. Interstitial lung disease appears stable in certain instances, so it is not known whether all patients will develop progressive disease or require immunomodulatory therapy. This study aims to determine if all common variable immunodeficiency patients with interstitial lung disease have physiological worsening, and if clinical and/or laboratory parameters may correlate with disease progression. A retrospective review of medical records at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York was conducted for referred patients with common variable immunodeficiency, CT scan-confirmed interstitial lung disease, and periodic pulmonary function testing covering 20 or more months before immunomodulatory therapy. Fifteen patients were identified from the retrospective review and included in this study. Of the 15 patients with common variable immunodeficiency, 9 had physiological worsening of interstitial lung disease adapted from consensus guidelines, associated with significant reductions in forced expiratory volume in 1 second, forced vital capacity, and diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide. Those with progressive lung disease also had significantly lower mean immunoglobulin G levels, greater increases and highest levels of serum immunoglobulin M (IgM), and more significant thrombocytopenia. Interstitial lung disease resulted in physiological worsening in many, but not all subjects, and was associated with suboptimal immunoglobulin G replacement. Those with worsening pulmonary function tests, elevated IgM, and severe thrombocytopenic episodes appear to be at highest risk for progressive disease. Such patients may benefit from immunomodulatory treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy

  2. High-resolution CT study of interstitial lung disease in polymyositis and dermatomyositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomii, Keisuke; Iwata, Takekuni; Oida, Kazukiyo (Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan)) (and others)

    1992-01-01

    High-resolution CT scans of lung parenchyma were obtained in 8 patients with pure polymyositis or dermatomyositis (PM-DM) with interstitial lung involvement. The most frequent findings were subpleural curved band-like shadows (A 2), which were demonstrated in 7 patients (88%). Open lung biopsy was performed in a case of A 2 shadow, which revealed non-specific interstitial pneumonia (chronic interstitial pneumonia, not otherwise specified). Most of the A 2 shadows gradually shrinked with steroids or immunosuppressants, and then disappeared completely or changed into subpleural curvilinear shadows (A 1). Peri-bronchovascular shadows (B) were detected in 4 patients (50%). Acute exacerbation had occurred in the two of them, but after all every B shadow reduced or disappeared with therapy. We think A 2 and B shadows are characteristic HRCT findings of interstitial lung disease in PM-DM and their prognosis is fairly good. (author).

  3. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive and interstitial lung diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Charlotte U; Mellemkjær, Søren; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik

    2013-01-01

    , and is considered one of the most frequent types of PH. However, the prevalence of PH among patients with COPD and ILD is not clear. The diagnosis of PH in chronic lung disease is often established by echocardiographic screening, but definitive diagnosis requires right heart catheterization, which...... treatment with existent drugs effective in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is beneficial in lung disease related PH. Studies investigating existing PAH drugs in animal models of lung disease related PH have indicated a positive effect, and so have case reports and open label studies. However...

  4. Clinical Outcomes in Interstitial Lung Diseases : Measuring and improving quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.G. Van Manen (Mirjam)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractInterstitial lung diseases (ILDs) contain a wide variety of disorders, usually affecting both lungs diffusely. The most common ILDs are idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis. ILDs have a major impact on quality of life. Although it is well-known that quality of life is

  5. Introduction of cryobiopsies in the diagnostics of interstitial lung diseases - experiences in a referral center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg-White, Sissel; Folkersen, Birgitte; Rasmussen, Torben Riis

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Transbronchial cryobiopsies (cTBB) has emerged as a new method for obtaining lung tissue biopsies in the diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). Until now, it has been used in a few highly specialized interventional centers and has shown promising results in obtaining...

  6. Fatal interstitial lung disease associated with oral erlotinib therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makris, Demosthenes; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Colin, Guillaume; Brun, Luc; Lafitte, Jean Jacques; Marquette, Charles Hugo

    2007-01-01

    Erlotinib is a Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Type 1/tyrosine kinase (EGFR) inhibitor which is used for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment. Despite that erlotinib is considered to have a favorable safety profile, adverse events such as interstitial lung disease (ILD) were reported in pivotal studies. The authors report the first histologically confirmed case of fatal ILD associated with erlotinib therapy. The medical record of a patient who developed fatal ILD after receiving erlotinib treatment was reviewed to identify the cause of death and other factors potentially contributive to this adverse outcome. A 55-year-old smoker with no evidence of pre-existing interstitial disease developed bilateral ILD and respiratory failure which could be explained only as a toxicity of erlotinib. He had a history of stage IV left upper lobe squamous-cell carcinoma for which he had received three successive regimens of chemotherapy (ifosfamide plus gemcitabine, docetaxel, mitomycin plus navelbine), followed five months later by erlotinib. At initiation of erlotinib treatment there were no radiological signs suggestive of ILD disease or apparent clinical signs of respiratory distress. While the patient completed two months with erlotinib therapy he developed bilateral interstitial infiltrates; despite discontinuation of erlotinib he was admitted with respiratory failure two weeks later. Diagnostic work up for other causes of pneumonitis including infectious diseases, congestive cardiac failure and pulmonary infraction was negative. Empiric treatment with oxygene, corticosteroids and later with cyclophosphamide was ineffective and the patient progressively deteriorated and died. The clinical and post-mortem examination findings are presented and the possible association relationship between erlotinib induced ILD and previous chemotherapy is discussed. Physicians should be alert to the fact that erlotinib related ILD, although infrequent, is potential fatal. The

  7. Reversible Lansoprazole-Induced Interstitial Lung Disease Showing Improvement after Drug Cessation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Kyu Won; Woo, Ok Hee; Yong, Hwan Seok; Shin, Bong Kyung; Shim, Jae Jeong; Kang, Eun Young

    2008-01-01

    Lansoprazole is an acid proton-pump inhibitor that is similar to omeprazole. It is used to treat duodenal or gastric ulcers, H. pylori infection, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Common adverse effects of lansoprazole are diarrhea, abdominal pain, skin rash and/or itching. Information from U.S. National Library of Medicine warns that this drug can on rare occasion cause cough or cold-like symptoms. The pathophysiological mechanisms of lansoprazole-related pulmonary symptoms are not yet understood. In particular, there are no known reports regarding lansoprazole-induced interstitial lung diseases. We report here a case of interstitial lung disease (ILD) induced by oral administration of lansoprazole, which showed a pattern of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) as detected from a video-assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy. We believe that this is the first report of a case of pathologically proven lansoprazole-induced ILD for which a surgical lung biopsy was performed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of DI-ILD caused by lansoprazole. The diagnosis was made by considering the radiological, histopathological and clinical findings, including the close temporal relationship between lansoprazole exposure and symptom severity. Other possible causes were excluded due to a lack of a temporal relationship between the symptoms and work history or prednisolone therapy, and no other history of specific allergen exposure. When there is diffuse interstitial lung disease with an unknown etiology, it is important to remember that drugs can be the cause of pulmonary symptoms and it is crucial to take a careful patient history. If there is a recent history of taking lansoprazole in a patient with clinical and radiological findings of diffuse interstitial lung disease, we recommend stopping the medication to see if there is clinical and radiological improvement. That way, one can avoid using invasive procedures to

  8. Prognostic factors and outcomes in Japanese lung transplant candidates with interstitial lung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Ikezoe

    Full Text Available Young patients with advanced interstitial lung disease (ILD are potential candidates for cadaveric lung transplantation. This study aimed to examine clinical features, outcomes, and prognostic factors in Japanese ILD patients awaiting lung transplantation.We investigated the clinical features and outcomes of 77 consecutive candidates with ILD who were referred to Kyoto University Hospital and subsequently actively listed for lung transplant in the Japan Organ Transplant Network between 2010 and 2014.Of the 77 candidates, 33 had idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF and 15 had unclassifiable ILD. During the observational period, 23 patients (30% received lung transplantations and 49 patients (64% died before transplantation. Of the 33 patients with IPF, 13 (39% had a family history of ILD and 13 (39% had an "inconsistent with usual interstitial pneumonia pattern" on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT. The median survival time from registration was 16.7 months, and mortality was similar among patients with IPF, unclassifiable ILD, and other ILDs. Using a multivariate stepwise Cox proportional hazards model, 6-min walking distance was shown to be an independent prognostic factor in candidates with ILD (per 10 m, hazard ratio (HR: 0.97; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.95-0.99, p<0.01, while lower body mass index (HR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.72-0.95, p < 0.01 independently contributed to mortality in patients with IPF.Japanese patients with ILD awaiting transplantation had very poor outcomes regardless of their specific diagnosis. A substantial percentage of IPF patients had an atypical HRCT pattern. 6-min walking distance in ILD patients and body mass index in IPF patients were independent predictors of mortality.

  9. HRCT patterns of the most important interstitial lung diseases; HRCT-Muster der wichtigsten interstitiellen Lungenerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer-Prokop, C. [Meander Medisch Centrum, Abt. Radiologie, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Radboud Universitaet, Abt. Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Interstitial lung diseases are a mixed group of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases which can have an acute or chronic course. Idiopathic diseases and diseases with an underlying cause (e.g. collagen vascular diseases) share the same patterns. Thin section computed tomography (CT) plays a central role in the diagnostic work-up. The article describes the most important interstitial lung diseases following a four pattern approach with a predominant nodular or reticular pattern or a pattern with increased or decreased lung density. (orig.) [German] Interstitielle Lungenerkrankungen stellen eine gemischte Gruppe diffuser Lungenparenchymerkrankungen dar, die einen akuten oder chronischen Verlauf haben koennen. Idiopathische Erkrankungen und Erkrankungen mit definierter Ursache (z. B. kollagenvaskulaere Erkrankungen) weisen ein gemeinsames Muster auf. Die Duennschichtcomputertomographie spielt eine zentrale Rolle in der diagnostischen Abklaerung. In dem vorliegenden Beitrag werden die wichtigsten interstitiellen Lungenerkrankungen beschrieben. Dabei gibt es 4 Grundmuster: ueberwiegend nodulaere Verdichtungen, vorwiegend retikulaere Verdichtungen, erhoehte oder erniedrigte Lungenparenchymdichte. (orig.)

  10. Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting as Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Vali Khojeini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBL is a rare subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that resides in the lumen of blood vessels. Patients typically present with nonspecific findings, particularly bizarre neurologic symptoms, fever, and skin lesions. A woman presented with shortness of breath and a chest CT scan showed diffuse interstitial thickening and ground glass opacities suggestive of an interstitial lung disease. On physical exam she was noted to have splenomegaly. The patient died and at autopsy was found to have an IVLBL in her lungs as well as nearly all her organs that were sampled. Although rare, IVLBL should be included in the differential diagnosis of interstitial lung disease and this case underscores the importance of the continuation of autopsies.

  11. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Monotherapy for Granulomatous Lymphocytic Interstitial Lung Disease in Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Mizue; Sakai, Fumikazu; Okabayashi, Asako; Sato, Akitoshi; Yokohori, Naoko; Katsura, Hideki; Asano, Chihiro; Kamata, Toshiko; Koh, Eitetsu; Sekine, Yasuo; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Ogura, Takashi; Takemura, Tamiko

    2017-11-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogeneous subset of immunodeficiency disorders. Recurrent bacterial infection is the main feature of CVID, but various non-infectious complications can occur. A 42-year-old woman presented with cough and abnormal chest X-ray shadows. Laboratory tests showed remarkable hypogammaglobulinemia. Computed tomography revealed multiple consolidation and nodules on the bilateral lung fields, systemic lymphadenopathy, and splenomegaly. A surgical lung biopsy specimen provided the final diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disease in CVID, which was grouped under the term granulomatous lymphocytic interstitial lung disease. Interestingly, the lung lesions of this case resolved immediately after the initiation of intravenous immunoglobulin monotherapy.

  12. Air pollution exposure: a novel environmental risk factor for interstitial lung disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannson, Kerri A; Balmes, John R; Collard, Harold R

    2015-04-01

    Air pollution exposure is a well-established risk factor for several adverse respiratory outcomes, including airways diseases and lung cancer. Few studies have investigated the relationship between air pollution and interstitial lung disease (ILD) despite many forms of ILD arising from environmental exposures. There are potential mechanisms by which air pollution could cause, exacerbate, or accelerate the progression of certain forms of ILD via pulmonary and systemic inflammation as well as oxidative stress. This article will review the current epidemiologic and translational data supporting the plausibility of this relationship and propose a new conceptual framework for characterizing novel environmental risk factors for these forms of lung disease.

  13. A systematic review of occupational exposure to coal dust and the risk of interstitial lung diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beer, Christiane; Kolstad, Henrik A; Søndergaard, Klaus; Bendstrup, Elisabeth; Heederik, Dick|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072910542; Olsen, Karen E; Omland, Øyvind; Petsonk, Edward; Sigsgaard, Torben; Sherson, David L; Schlünssen, Vivi

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Exposure to coal dust can cause interstitial lung disease (ILD), but whether this is due to pure coal or to the contents of quartz in coal is less clear. Here, we systematically reviewed the relation between 'pure coal' and ILD. Methods: In a systematic review based on PRISMA criteria

  14. International management platform for children's interstitial lung disease (chILD-EU)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griese, Matthias; Seidl, Elias; Hengst, Meike

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children's interstitial lung diseases (chILD) cover many rare entities, frequently not diagnosed or studied in detail. There is a great need for specialised advice and for internationally agreed subclassification of entities collected in a register.Our objective was to implement an in...

  15. Undifferentiated connective tissue disease presenting with prevalent interstitial lung disease: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sfriso Paolo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Undifferentiated connective tissue diseases (UCTDs are clinical entities characterised by signs and symptoms suggestive of a systemic autoimmune disease, which do not fulfil the diagnostic criteria for a defined connective tissue disease. Lung involvement can complicate the course and management of the disease, often determining a worse outcome. Respiratory dysfunction as the first clinical manifestation has seldom been reported. We describe a case of a female patient who developed significant respiratory dysfunction as the principal clinical sign. Video-assisted thoracoscopy was performed and a histological pattern of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP was found. A pathological diagnosis suggested careful follow-up with extensive immunological screening which then detected Raynaud's phenomenon and positivity of antinuclear antibodies. After a multidisciplinary discussion (pneumologist, radiologist, pathologist and rheumatologist a final diagnosis of NSIP associated with UCTD was made. The diagnosis of UCTD should be considered when NSIP is diagnosed even in cases with evident first clinical manifestations of severe respiratory dysfunction. A multidisciplinary approach in the field of interstitial lung disease with NSIP, also including rheumatologic expertise, is fundamental to achieve a prompt and correct diagnosis.

  16. Serum B cell-activating factor (BAFF) level in connective tissue disease associated interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Tsutomu; Samukawa, Takuya; Kumamoto, Tomohiro; Hatanaka, Kazuhito; Tsukuya, Go; Yamamoto, Masuki; Machida, Kentaro; Watanabe, Masaki; Mizuno, Keiko; Higashimoto, Ikkou; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Inoue, Hiromasa

    2015-09-30

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) are common in patients with connective tissue diseases (CTDs). Although the diagnosis of an underlying CTD in ILD (CTD-ILD) affects both prognosis and treatment, it is sometimes difficult to distinguish CTD-ILD from chronic fibrosing interstitial pneumonia (CFIP). B cell-activating factor belonging to the tumour necrosis factor family (BAFF) plays a crucial role in B cell development, survival, and antibody production. We examined serum levels of BAFF, surfactant protein D (SP-D), and Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6) in 33 patients with CTD-ILD, 16 patients with undifferentiated CTD-ILD, 19 patients with CFIP, and 26 healthy volunteers. And we analysed the relationship between serum BAFF levels and pulmonary function, as well as the expression of BAFF in the lung tissue of patients with CTD-ILD. Serum levels of BAFF were significantly higher in CTD-ILD patients compared to healthy subjects and CFIP patients. However, there were no significant differences in serum levels of SP-D and KL-6. Furthermore, serum BAFF levels in CTD-ILD patients were inversely correlated with pulmonary function. BAFF was strongly expressed in the lungs of CTD-ILD patients, but weakly in normal lungs. This is the first study to demonstrate that serum BAFF levels were significantly higher in CTD-ILD patients compared to healthy subjects and CFIP patients. Furthermore, serum BAFF levels were correlated with pulmonary function. We consider that serum BAFF levels in patients with CTD-ILD reflect the presence of ILDs disease activity and severity. These finding suggest that BAFF may be a useful marker for distinguishing CTD-ILD from CFIP.

  17. Granulomatous-lymphocytic interstitial lung disease as the first manifestation of common variable immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashtoush, Basheer; Memarpour, Roya; Ramirez, Jose; Bejarano, Pablo; Mehta, Jinesh

    2018-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is one of the most common primary immunodeficiencies, which is characterized by reduced serum immunoglobulin levels and B-lymphocyte dysfunction. There are many clinical manifestations of this disease, the most common of which are recurrent respiratory tract infections. Among the most recently recognized autoimmune manifestation of CVID is a disease described as granulomatous-lymphocytic interstitial lung disease (GLILD), where CVID coexists with a small airway lymphoproliferative disorder, mimicking follicular bronchiolitis, or lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis (LIP) on histology specimens. We herein describe the clinical and radiological features of GLILD in a 55-year-old woman where the diagnosis of CVID was actively pursued and eventually confirmed after her lung biopsy showed characteristic features of GLILD. The patient had dramatic response to treatment with IVIG and corticosteroids for 3 months followed by Mycophenolate mofetil for maintenance therapy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The diagnostic value of the bronchoalveolar lavage in interstitial lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efared, Boubacar; Ebang-Atsame, G; Rabiou, Sani; Diarra, Abdoulsalam S; Tahiri, Layla; Hammas, Nawal; Smahi, Mohamed; Amara, Bouchra; Benjelloun, Mohamed C; Serraj, Mounia; Chbani, Laila; El Fatemi, Hinde

    2017-03-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is a diagnostic tool often used during the management of interstitial lung diseases (ILD). However, its diagnostic value in discrimination between entities comprising the very heterogenous group of ILD, is still a controversial issue. The objective of our study is to assess the diagnostic value of BAL in the management of ILD, by comparing the cytological findings in BAL fluid among the different diseases of this group. It was a retrospective, observational study of 151 patients between January 2012 and December 2015. BAL fluid cytology was performed to analyse the distribution of leucocytes population subsets in patients with ILD. The mean age was 52.78 years; 74.83% were women. The analysis of the following main groups of diseases was performed : sarcoïdosis (n = 30), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF; n = 22), other idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (non specific interstitial pneumonia, cryptogenic organising pneumonia and respiratory bronchiolitis interstitial lung disease; n = 20) and connective tissue disease (n = 14). Overall, out of 141 patients, 22% had sarcoïdosis, 15.6% had idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), 14.18% had other idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) and 9.9% had connective tissue disease (CTD). Mixed alveolitis was common in the 4 groups, sarcoïdosis had higher proportion of lymphocytes and IPF had higher neutrophils count. However, there was no significant statistical difference of BAL cellular count among these diseases (p > 0.05). Also, the prevalence of studied diseases did not change with variation of BAL cellular count (p > 0.05). Alone, the BAL cytological analysis has a limited value to provide substantial information that could lead to discriminate between diseases that form ILD. Thus, it must be always associated with other diagnostic methods.

  19. T2 mapping of CT remodelling patterns in interstitial lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzan, Maria T.A. [Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Pneumology, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Thoraxklinik at Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Eichinger, Monika; Heussel, Claus Peter [Thoraxklinik at Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Heidelberg (Germany); Kreuter, Michael; Herth, Felix J. [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Heidelberg (Germany); Thoraxklinik at Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Pneumology, Center for Rare and Interstitial Lung Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Heidelberg (Germany); Warth, Arne [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Institute for Pathology, Heidelberg (Germany); Pop, Carmen Monica [Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Pneumology, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Dinkel, Julien [Thoraxklinik at Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Heidelberg (Germany); Comprehensive Pneumology Center Munich (CPC-M), German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Munich (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate lung T2 mapping for quantitative characterization and differentiation of ground-glass opacity (GGO), reticulation (RE) and honeycombing (HC) in usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) and non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP). Twelve patients with stable UIP or NSIP underwent thin-section multislice CT and 1.5-T MRI of the lung. A total of 188 regions were classified at CT into normal (n = 29) and pathological areas, including GGO (n = 48), RE (n = 60) and HC (n = 51) predominant lesions. Entire lung T2 maps based on multi-echo single shot TSE sequence (TE: 20, 40, 79, 140, 179 ms) were generated from each subject with breath-holds at end-expiration and ECG-triggering. The median T2 relaxation of GGO was 67 ms (range 60-72 ms). RE predominant lesions had a median relaxation of 74 ms (range 69-79 ms), while for HC pattern this was 79 ms (range 74-89 ms). The median T2 relaxation for normal lung areas was 41 ms (ranged 38-49 ms), and showed significant difference to pathological areas (p < 0.001). A statistical difference was found between the T2 relaxation of GGO, RE and HC (p < 0.05). The proposed method provides quantitative information for pattern differentiation, potentially allowing for monitoring of progression and response to treatment, in interstitial lung disease. (orig.)

  20. Interstitial Lung Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Era of Biologics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Picchianti Diamanti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung disease (ILD represents a severe manifestation in connective tissue diseases (CTD, with an overall incidence of 15%, and it is still a challenge for clinicians evaluation and management. ILD is the most common manifestation of lung involvement in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA, observed in up to 80% of biopsies, 50% of chest Computed Tomography (CT and only 5% of chest radiographs. Histopatological patterns of ILD in RA may present with different patterns, such as: usual interstitial pneumonia, non specific interstitial pneumonia, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, organizing pneumonia, and eosinophilic infiltration. The incidence of ILD in RA patients is not only related to the disease itself, many drugs may be in fact associated with the development of pulmonary damage. Some reports suggest a causative role for TNFα inhibitors in RA-ILD development/worsening, anyway, no definitive statement can be drawn thus data are incomplete and affected by several variables. A tight control (pulmonary function tests and/or HRCT is mandatory in patients with preexisting ILD, but it should be also performed in those presenting risk factors for ILD and mild respiratory symptoms. Biologic therapy should be interrupted, and, after excluding triggering infections, corticosteroids should be administered.

  1. The safety and efficacy of carboplatin plus nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer patients with interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Yuichiro; Hattori, Yoshihiro; Tohnai, Rie; Ito, Shoichi; Kawa, Yoshitaka; Kono, Yuko; Urata, Yoshiko; Nogami, Munenobu; Takenaka, Daisuke; Negoro, Shunichi; Satouchi, Miyako

    2018-01-01

    The optimal chemotherapy regimen for non-small cell lung cancer patients with interstitial lung disease is unclear. We therefore investigated the safety and efficacy of carboplatin plus nab-paclitaxel as a first-line regimen for non-small cell lung cancer in patients with interstitial lung disease. We retrospectively reviewed advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients with interstitial lung disease who received carboplatin plus nab-paclitaxel as a first-line chemotherapy regimen at Hyogo Cancer Center between February 2013 and August 2016. interstitial lung disease was diagnosed according to the findings of pretreatment chest high-resolution computed tomography. Twelve patients were included (male, n = 11; female, n = 1). The overall response rate was 67% and the disease control rate was 100%. The median progression free survival was 5.1 months (95% CI: 2.9-8.3 months) and the median overall survival was 14.9 months (95% CI: 4.8-not reached). A chemotherapy-related acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease was observed in one patient; the extent of this event was Grade 2. There were no treatment-related deaths. Carboplatin plus nab-paclitaxel, as a first-line chemotherapy regimen for non-small cell lung cancer, showed favorable efficacy and safety in patients with preexisting interstitial lung disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  2. Lung-dominant connective tissue disease among patients with interstitial lung disease: prevalence, functional stability, and common extrathoracic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Antunes Silva Pereira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics of a cohort of patients with lung-dominant connective tissue disease (LD-CTD. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD, positive antinuclear antibody (ANA results (≥ 1/320, with or without specific autoantibodies, and at least one clinical feature suggestive of connective tissue disease (CTD. RESULTS: Of the 1,998 patients screened, 52 initially met the criteria for a diagnosis of LD-CTD: 37% were male; the mean age at diagnosis was 56 years; and the median follow-up period was 48 months. During follow-up, 8 patients met the criteria for a definitive diagnosis of a CTD. The remaining 44 patients comprised the LD-CTD group, in which the most prevalent extrathoracic features were arthralgia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and Raynaud's phenomenon. The most prevalent autoantibodies in this group were ANA (89% and anti-SSA (anti-Ro, 27%. The mean baseline and final FVC was 69.5% and 74.0% of the predicted values, respectively (p > 0.05. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and usual interstitial pneumonia patterns were found in 45% and 9% of HRCT scans, respectively; 36% of the scans were unclassifiable. A similar prevalence was noted in histological samples. Diffuse esophageal dilatation was identified in 52% of HRCT scans. Nailfold capillaroscopy was performed in 22 patients; 17 showed a scleroderma pattern. CONCLUSIONS: In our LD-CTD group, there was predominance of females and the patients showed mild spirometric abnormalities at diagnosis, with differing underlying ILD patterns that were mostly unclassifiable on HRCT and by histology. We found functional stability on follow-up. Esophageal dilatation on HRCT and scleroderma pattern on nailfold capillaroscopy were frequent findings and might come to serve as diagnostic criteria.

  3. pattern of interstitial lung disease as seen by high resolution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-01

    Sep 1, 2012 ... Black and white bands (so called “Hurricane artifact”) are seen on HRCT due to difference in attenuation of structures like blood vessels and adjacent lung. Motion artifact may also be a problem in dyspnoeic patients undergoing volumetric imaging. This can mitigate against by doing axial incremental.

  4. Calcium Channel Blockers and Esophageal Sclerosis: Should We Expect Exacerbation of Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos Seretis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal sclerosis is the most common visceral manifestation of systemic sclerosis, resulting in impaired esophageal clearance and retention of ingested food; in addition, co-existence of lung fibrosis with esophageal scleroderma is not uncommon. Both the progression of generalized connective tissue disorders and the damaging effect of chronic aspiration due to esophageal dysmotility appear to be involved in this procedure of interstitial fibrosis. Nifedipine is a widely prescribed calcium antagonist in a significant percentage of rheumatologic patients suffering from Raynaud syndrome, in order to inhibit peripheral vasospasm. Nevertheless, blocking calcium channels has proven to contribute to exacerbation of gastroesophageal reflux, which consequently can lead to chronic aspiration. We describe the case of severe exacerbation of interstitial lung disease in a 76-year-old female with esophageal sclerosis who was treated with oral nifedipine for Raynaud syndrome.

  5. Image-based diagnostic aid for interstitial lung disease with secondary data integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Müller, Henning; Hidki, Asmâa; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; Geissbuhler, Antoine

    2007-03-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) are a relatively heterogeneous group of around 150 illnesses with often very unspecific symptoms. The most complete imaging method for the characterisation of ILDs is the high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the chest but a correct interpretation of these images is difficult even for specialists as many diseases are rare and thus little experience exists. Moreover, interpreting HRCT images requires knowledge of the context defined by clinical data of the studied case. A computerised diagnostic aid tool based on HRCT images with associated medical data to retrieve similar cases of ILDs from a dedicated database can bring quick and precious information for example for emergency radiologists. The experience from a pilot project highlighted the need for detailed database containing high-quality annotations in addition to clinical data. The state of the art is studied to identify requirements for image-based diagnostic aid for interstitial lung disease with secondary data integration. The data acquisition steps are detailed. The selection of the most relevant clinical parameters is done in collaboration with lung specialists from current literature, along with knowledge bases of computer-based diagnostic decision support systems. In order to perform high-quality annotations of the interstitial lung tissue in the HRCT images an annotation software and its own file format is implemented for DICOM images. A multimedia database is implemented to store ILD cases with clinical data and annotated image series. Cases from the University & University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG) are retrospectively and prospectively collected to populate the database. Currently, 59 cases with certified diagnosis and their clinical parameters are stored in the database as well as 254 image series of which 26 have their regions of interest annotated. The available data was used to test primary visual features for the classification of lung tissue patterns

  6. Interstitial lung disease associated with Equine Infectious Anemia Virus infection in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolfa, Pompei; Nolf, Marie; Cadoré, Jean-Luc; Catoi, Cornel; Archer, Fabienne; Dolmazon, Christine; Mornex, Jean-François; Leroux, Caroline

    2013-12-01

    EIA (Equine Infectious Anemia) is a blood-borne disease primarily transmitted by haematophagous insects or needle punctures. Other routes of transmission have been poorly explored. We evaluated the potential of EIAV (Equine Infectious Anemia Virus) to induce pulmonary lesions in naturally infected equids. Lungs from 77 EIAV seropositive horses have been collected in Romania and France. Three types of lesions have been scored on paraffin-embedded lungs: lymphocyte infiltration, bronchiolar inflammation, and thickness of the alveolar septa. Expression of the p26 EIAV capsid (CA) protein has been evaluated by immunostaining. Compared to EIAV-negative horses, 52% of the EIAV-positive horses displayed a mild inflammation around the bronchioles, 22% had a moderate inflammation with inflammatory cells inside the wall and epithelial bronchiolar hyperplasia and 6.5% had a moderate to severe inflammation, with destruction of the bronchiolar epithelium and accumulation of smooth muscle cells within the pulmonary parenchyma. Changes in the thickness of the alveolar septa were also present. Expression of EIAV capsid has been evidenced in macrophages, endothelial as well as in alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells, as determined by their morphology and localization. To summarize, we found lesions of interstitial lung disease similar to that observed during other lentiviral infections such as FIV in cats, SRLV in sheep and goats or HIV in children. The presence of EIAV capsid in lung epithelial cells suggests that EIAV might be responsible for the broncho-interstitial damages observed.

  7. Erectile Dysfunction ia a common problem in Interstitial Lung Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløe, Andreas; Hilberg, Ole; Wijsenbeek, Marlies

    Rationale : The relationship between erectile dysfunction (ED) and chronic diseases, most notably diabetes and atherosclerosis, is well established. Previous studies have shown a relationship between COPD and ED. The pathogenesis is not clearly established, but studies have shown a correlation be...

  8. Pattern of interstitial lung disease detected by high resolution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) is the recommended imaging technique in the diagnosis, assessment and followup of these diseases. Objectives: To describe the pattern of HRCT ... This is important in narrowing the differential diagnosis as well as for pre-biopsy planning. The diagnosis of ILD requires a ...

  9. Chronic interstitial lung disease in nylon flocking industry workers--Rhode Island, 1992-1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-26

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) occurs infrequently; some cases are attributed to sarcoidosis, pulmonary hemorrhage syndromes, connective tissue diseases, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, drugs, radiation, and mineral dusts (e.g., silica or asbestos). However, most cases of ILD are of uncertain classification or etiology. This report describes preliminary findings of the investigation in Rhode Island of an outbreak of ILD among workers involved in the manufacture of finely cut nylon (flock) and flocked fabric (used for upholstery, clothing, and automobiles); the findings provide evidence of a newly recognized occupational illness.

  10. Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases. Often forgotten; Medikamenteninduzierte interstitielle Lungenerkrankungen. Haeufig vergessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poschenrieder, F.; Stroszczynski, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg, Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Regensburg (Germany); Hamer, O.W. [Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg, Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Regensburg (Germany); Lungenfachklinik Donaustauf, Donaustauf (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases (DILD) are probably more common than diagnosed. Due to their potential reversibility, increased vigilance towards DILD is appropriate also from the radiologist's point of view, particularly as these diseases regularly exhibit radiological correlates in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the lungs. Based on personal experience typical relatively common manifestations of DILD are diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), eosinophilic pneumonia (EP), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), organizing pneumonia (OP), non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) and usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). These patterns are presented based on case studies, whereby emphasis is placed on the clinical context. This is to highlight the relevance of interdisciplinary communication and discussion in the diagnostic field of DILD as it is a diagnosis of exclusion or of probability in most cases. Helpful differential diagnostic indications for the presence of DILD, such as an accompanying eosinophilia or increased attenuation of pulmonary consolidations in amiodarone-induced pneumopathy are mentioned and the freely available online database http://www.pneumotox.com is presented. (orig.) [German] Medikamenteninduzierte interstitielle Lungenerkrankungen (engl. ''drug-induced interstitial lung diseases'', DILD) sind wahrscheinlich haeufiger, als sie diagnostiziert werden. Aufgrund ihrer potenziellen Reversibilitaet ist eine erhoehte Vigilanz gegenueber DILD auch seitens der Radiologie angebracht, da diese regelmaessig ein radiomorphologisches Korrelat in der hochaufloesenden Computertomographie (''high-resolution CT'', HRCT) der Lunge aufweisen. Typische, nach eigener Erfahrung relativ haeufige Manifestationsformen von DILD sind der diffuse Alveolarschaden (engl. ''diffuse alveolar damage'', DAD), die eosinophile Pneumonie (EP), die Hypersensitivitaetspneumonitis (HP), die organisierende

  11. Pulmonary Artery Dimensions as a Prognosticator of Transplant-Free Survival in Scleroderma Interstitial Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, James Benjamin; Patel, Krunal B; Hernandez, Felix; Hadeh, Anas; Highland, Kristin B; Rahaghi, Franck; Mehta, Jinesh P

    2017-08-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disease characterized by endothelial dysfunction and multi-organ fibrosis. Interstitial lung disease, a common manifestation of SSc, is termed scleroderma-related interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD) and along with pulmonary hypertension contributes to a majority of deaths in SSc. SSc-ILD patients frequently develop pulmonary hypertension, which prognosticates a poorer outcome. We investigated pulmonary artery dimensions as an outcome predictor in patients with SSc-ILD. A retrospective chart review abstracting data from SSc-ILD patients evaluated at a large tertiary care center was performed. HRCT imaging was reviewed and pulmonary artery (PA) and ascending aorta (Ao) diameters were measured for calculation of the PA:Ao ratio. Additionally, demographics, vital signs, spirometric parameters, comorbidities, and mean pulmonary artery pressures were collected when available. Outcome analysis with lung transplant or death events within 4 years based on pulmonary artery size as well as PA:Ao ratio was performed. 70 SSc-ILD patients were identified. Mean pulmonary artery diameter and PA:Ao ratio was 31.17 and 1.07 mm, respectively. Patients with a pulmonary artery diameter ≥32 mm had higher risk of lung transplantation or death (p < 0.001) within 4 years. Patients with a PA:Ao ratio ≥1.1 also had higher risk of lung transplantation or death (p < 0.001) within 4 years. Unadjusted outcomes analyses also identified PA:Ao ratio ≥1.1 as an independent outcome predictor (hazard ratio 3.30, p < 0.001). In SSc-ILD patients, a PA:Ao ratio ≥1.1 is associated with higher risk of lung transplant or death. These data suggest that PA:Ao dimension may be used for prognostication in SSc-ILD.

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease: lung inflammation evaluated with high resolution computed tomography scan is correlated to rheumatoid arthritis disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Dórame, Renzo; Mejía, Mayra; Mateos-Toledo, Heidegger; Rojas-Serrano, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    To describe the association between rheumatoid arthritis disease activity (RA) and interstitial lung damage (inflammation and fibrosis), in a group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD). A retrospective study of RA patients with interstitial lung disease (restrictive pattern in lung function tests and evidence of interstitial lung disease in high resolution computed tomography (HRCT)). Patients were evaluated to exclude other causes of pulmonary disease. RA disease activity was measured with the CDAI index. Interstitial lung inflammation and fibrosis were determined by Kazerooni scale. We compared Kazerooni ground-glass score with the nearest CDAI score to HRCT date scan of the first medical evaluation at our institution. In nine patients, we compared the first ground-glass score with a second one after treatment with DMARDs and corticosteroids. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used to evaluate association between RA disease activity and the Kazerooni ground-glass and fibrosis scores. Thirty-four patients were included. A positive correlation between CDAI and ground-glass scores was found (rs=0.3767, P<0.028). Fibrosis and CDAI scores were not associated (rs=-0.0747, P<0.6745). After treatment, a downward tendency in the ground-glass score was observed (median [IQR]): (2.33 [2,3] vs. 2 [1.33-2.16]), P<0.056, along with a lesser CDAI score (27 [8-43] vs. 9 [5-12]), P<0.063. There is a correlation between RA disease activity and ground-glass appearance in the HRCT of RA-ILD patients. These results suggest a positive association between RA disease activity and lung inflammation in RA-ILD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Interstitial lung disease in patients with polymyositis, dermatomyositis and amyopathic dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, E H; Lee, E B; Shin, K C; Im, C H; Chung, D H; Han, S K; Song, Y W

    2005-10-01

    To assess the prevalence, characteristics and prognostic factors of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in Korean patients with polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM) and amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM). We reviewed the medical records of 72 consecutive PM and DM patients, including six patients with ADM, who were seen at the Rheumatology Clinic of Seoul National University Hospital between 1984 and 2003. Twenty-nine PM/DM patients (40.3%) developed ILD. Anti-Jo-1 antibody and arthralgia were associated with the presence of ILD (P = 0.022 and P = 0.041, respectively), whereas dysphagia was more frequently found in patients without ILD (P = 0.041). Lung biopsies revealed diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) (n = 2), usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) with DAD (n = 2), UIP (n = 1), and non-specific interstitial pneumonia (n = 2). Of the 29 patients, 11 (37.9%) died. The mean survival time in ILD patients was significantly shorter than in those without ILD (13.8+/-1.8 vs 19.2+/-0.9 yr, P = 0.017). Poor survival in ILD patients was associated with a Hamman-Rich-like presentation (P = 0.0000), ADM features (P = 0.0001) and an initial forced vital capacity (FVC) poor survival. A Hamman-Rich-like presentation, ADM features and an initial FVC poor survival in ILD.

  14. Efficacy of immunosoppressive therapy and steroid sparing effect in interstitial lung disease associated to antisynthetase syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. De Marchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the role of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL in patients with interstitial lung disease associated to antisynthetase syndrome. Methods: We describe 5 patients, anti-Jo1 positive, with interstitial lung disease (lung fibrosis and/or diffusion capacity of CO <80%. Patients were monitored with lung function tests every 6 months, with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT every 12 months, and with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL at baseline and in the subsequent follow-up. Patients were treated as follows: a azathioprine with colchicine, or cyclosporine alone b cyclophosphamide when high neutrophil or eosinophil count on BAL was observed. Only low-dose steroids were used for mild muscular or articular involvement. Results: Pulmonary involvement remained stable in all patients at months +24. Lung function remained unchanged compared to the baseline evaluation; HRCT was stable in patients with fibrosis and no progression into fibrosis was observed in patients with ground glass areas at baseline. Bacterial pneumonia occurred in one patient treated with cyclophosphamide and resolved after antibiotic therapy. Conclusions: Clinical manifestations, instrumental tests and BAL may be of value to choice the best immunosuppressive therapy in the single case. An early less aggressive approach (azathioprine with colchicine, or cyclosporine alone may be useful. BAL could be performed when a progression of the lung involvement is demonstrated in the subsequent follow-up. Cyclophosphamide may be a valid alternative treatment in the presence of a neutrophilic or eosinophilic alveolitis. Efficacy and safety of the aforementioned immunosuppressive approach were observed in our series, avoiding prolonged high-dose steroid administration.

  15. An integrated approach in the diagnosis of smoking-related interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Harari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke consists of several chemical compounds with a variety of effects in many organs. In the lung, apart being the main cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, carcinoma and idiopathic spontaneous pneumothorax, tobacco smoke is associated with interstitial lung diseases (ILDs, including respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD (RB-ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP, pulmonary Langerhans’ cell histiocytosis (PLCH, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, ILD in rheumatoid arthritis and pulmonary haemorrhage in Goodpasture syndrome. This review will focus on the diseases with a stronger epidemiological association with tobacco smoke, namely RB-ILD, DIP and PLCH. Although the exact pathogenetic evidence linking smoking with these disorders is still not completely understood, there is growing evidence that tobacco smoke targets the terminal or respiratory bronchioles in these diseases, and the differences are reflective of the degree of severity of small airway and parenchymal reaction to the smoke exposure. Despite considerable clinical, radiological and histological overlap between RB-ILD, DIP and PLCH, it is useful to retain the separate classifications for prognostic and therapeutic implications.

  16. Bilateral pleural effusion and interstitial lung disease as unusual manifestations of kikuchi-fujimoto disease: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Fernandez-Martinez

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kikuchi-Fujimoto's disease (KFD, also called histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis, is a rare, idiopathic and self-limited condition usually characterized by cervical lymphadenopathy and fever, most often affecting young patients. Aetiology is unknown. Differential diagnosis includes mainly malignant lymphoma, tuberculous lymphadenitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, so early diagnosis is crucial. Pleuropulmonary involvement due to isolated KFD has been seldom reported. Case Presentation a 32-year-old man, on treatment for iatrogenic hypothyroidism, was admitted due to high grade fever and painful cervical lymphadenopathies. KFD was diagnosed by lymph node biopsy. Some days after admission the patient got worse, he developed generalized lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion and interstitial lung disease. All of them resolved with prednisone and after two years of following up he remains asymptomatic and without evidence of any other associated disease. Conclusion Pleural effusion and interstitial lung disease are very uncommon manifestations of KFD. In our experience, treatment with oral prednisone was effective.

  17. World experience on the treatment of interstitial diseases of the lungs in children (up-date 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Gonchar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article shows modern principles of classification, diagnosis and treatment of interstitial lung diseases in children for the practice of pediatricians, family doctors, pediatric pulmonologists, thoracic surgeons, transplantologists. Interstitial lung diseases are part of the structure of diffuse parenchymal diseases of the lungs, which today includes more than 80 nosological forms. The author presents a chILD (based on evidence base patient monitoring program, which includes active immunization, treatment of respiratory dysfunction (in its presence, optimal nutrition support, aggressive treatment of intercurrent infection, exclusion of passive smoking and inhalation of other pollutants, education and support, genetic family counseling to the patient, pharmacotherapy and indications for lung transplantation. The publication presents a schedule for patient’s monitoring during the year and a long-term follow-up with the definition of the prediction of a lung disease in a sick child.

  18. Automated diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases and emphysema in MDCT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetita, Catalin; Chang Chien, Kuang-Che; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Prêteux, Françoise

    2007-09-01

    Diffuse lung diseases (DLD) include a heterogeneous group of non-neoplasic disease resulting from damage to the lung parenchyma by varying patterns of inflammation. Characterization and quantification of DLD severity using MDCT, mainly in interstitial lung diseases and emphysema, is an important issue in clinical research for the evaluation of new therapies. This paper develops a 3D automated approach for detection and diagnosis of diffuse lung diseases such as fibrosis/honeycombing, ground glass and emphysema. The proposed methodology combines multi-resolution 3D morphological filtering (exploiting the sup-constrained connection cost operator) and graph-based classification for a full characterization of the parenchymal tissue. The morphological filtering performs a multi-level segmentation of the low- and medium-attenuated lung regions as well as their classification with respect to a granularity criterion (multi-resolution analysis). The original intensity range of the CT data volume is thus reduced in the segmented data to a number of levels equal to the resolution depth used (generally ten levels). The specificity of such morphological filtering is to extract tissue patterns locally contrasting with their neighborhood and of size inferior to the resolution depth, while preserving their original shape. A multi-valued hierarchical graph describing the segmentation result is built-up according to the resolution level and the adjacency of the different segmented components. The graph nodes are then enriched with the textural information carried out by their associated components. A graph analysis-reorganization based on the nodes attributes delivers the final classification of the lung parenchyma in normal and ILD/emphysematous regions. It also makes possible to discriminate between different types, or development stages, among the same class of diseases.

  19. B-Lines in Assessment of Pulmonary Hypertension in Patients With Interstitial Lung Diseases: Feasibility of Transthoracic Lung Sonographic Signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao-Zhi; Zheng, Quan; Zhou, Jing; Yang, Bin

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the value of sonographic B-lines (previously called "comet tail artifacts") in assessment of pulmonary hypertension in patients with interstitial lung diseases. One hundred thirty-four patients with clinically diagnosed interstitial lung diseases complicated by pulmonary hypertension underwent transthoracic lung sonography and Doppler echocardiography for assessment of the presence of B-lines, the distance between them, and the pulmonary artery (PA) systolic pressure. A correlation analysis and a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis were performed. All patients had diffuse bilateral B-lines. The maximum number of B-lines seen in any positive zone (not a summation) was significantly correlated with the severity of PA systolic pressure (r= 0.812; P30 mm Hg). The number of B-lines is useful in assessment of pulmonary hypertension, especially when tricuspid regurgitation and pulmonary valve regurgitation do not exist or cannot be satisfactorily measured by Doppler echocardiography. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  20. Subclinical interstitial lung involvement in rheumatic diseases. Correlations of high-resolution Computed Tomography patterns with functional and cytologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaffi, F.; Baldelli, S.

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this study were to quantify the severity and extent of subclinical interstitial lung disease as depicted on HRCT and to study the relationship between the patterns of lung disease quantified by HRCT and the functional parameters and bronchoalveolar lavage findings in patients with rheumatic diseases. The results confirm that HRCT is a sensitive tool in detecting interstitial lung disease in patients with rheumatic diseases with no signs and symptoms of pulmonary involvement. The relationship between the different HRCT patterns and bronchoalveolar lavage cell profiles can identify patients at higher risk of developing irreversible lung fibrosis. A long-term, prospective follow-up study is needed to determine whether these patients will develop over pulmonary disease [it

  1. The Assessment of Health-Related Quality of Life in Scleroderma-Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad M Lari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pulmonary involvement is the most common cause of mortality and disability in patients with systemic sclerosis and it significantly affects the quality of life in these patients. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary involvement seems necessary in patients with SSc. In this study, we aimed to assess the health-related quality of life (HRQoL in patients with Scleroderma-Interstitial Lung Disease (SSc-ILD and its relationship with pulmonary function parameters. Materials and Methods: Considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 25 patients with SSc-ILD were enrolled in this cross-sectional study from April 2012 to June 2013. Full tests of lung function, including body plethysmography and diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLCO, 6-minute walk distance (6MWD, and pulse oximetry were performed. The HRQoL was assessed using St. George’s and CAT questionnaires; also, dyspnea was evaluated for all the patients, using modified medical research council (MMRC scale. Afterwards, the relationship between the total scores of HRQoL questionnaires and the severity of lung disease was analyzed, based on the recorded variables. Results: The mean age of the patients was 40.36±9.50 years and the mean duration of the disease was 7.16±4.50 years. A statistically significant inverse correlation was observed between 6MWD (r=-0.50, P=0.01, DLCO (r=-0.67, P

  2. Adalimumab-induced acute interstitial lung disease in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Meira Dias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of immunobiological agents for the treatment of autoimmune diseases is increasing in medical practice. Anti-TNF therapies have been increasingly used in refractory autoimmune diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis, with promising results. However, the use of such therapies has been associated with an increased risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. In addition, the use of anti-TNF agents can cause pulmonary complications, such as reactivation of mycobacterial and fungal infections, as well as sarcoidosis and other interstitial lung diseases (ILDs. There is evidence of an association between ILD and the use of anti-TNF agents, etanercept and infliximab in particular. Adalimumab is the newest drug in this class, and some authors have suggested that its use might induce or exacerbate preexisting ILDs. In this study, we report the first case of acute ILD secondary to the use of adalimumab in Brazil, in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and without a history of ILD.

  3. State of the art in the diagnosis and management of interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzan, Maria T A; Pop, Carmen Monica

    2015-01-01

    The interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) are a diverse group of disorders characterized by a varying combination of inflammation and fibrosis of the pulmonary parenchyma. Treatment and prognosis of ILD typically depend on the underlying ILD subtype, highlighting the importance of accurate classification and diagnosis. Besides a thorough history and clinical examination, the protocol should include a 6-minute walk test, chest radiography, high-resolution computed tomography, biochemical analysis, pulmonary function tests, blood gas analysis, bronchoalveolar lavage, and, when necessary, a lung biopsy. The final diagnosis of ILD entities requires dynamic interaction between clinicians, radiologists and pathologists to reach a clinico-radiologic-pathologic diagnosis, the gold standard no longer being the histology but rather a multidisciplinary approach.

  4. Histologist's original opinion compared with multidisciplinary team in determining diagnosis in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, P S; Reynolds, J; Trotter, S; Burge, G A; Walters, G

    2017-03-01

    Guidelines recommend that multidisciplinary interstitial lung disease meeting (ILD MDT) decisions become the gold standard for diagnosis, replacing the histologist from this position, and identify this as requiring supportive evidence. We have compared diagnoses from lung biopsy material made by expert histologists with the subsequent consensus opinion from a properly constituted ILD MDT in 71 consecutive patients referred to a regional thoracic unit. MDT changed the original histological diagnoses in 30% (95% CI 19.3% to 41.6%) and strengthened the diagnoses from probable to confident in a further 17% (95% CI 9.1% to 27.7%). The assessment of hypersensitivity pneumonitis, non-necrotising granulomas and organising pneumonia accounted for the majority of the changes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Interstitial lung disease induced by fluoxetine: Systematic review of literature and analysis of Vigiaccess, Eudravigilance and a national pharmacovigilance database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deidda, Arianna; Pisanu, Claudia; Micheletto, Laura; Bocchetta, Alberto; Del Zompo, Maria; Stochino, Maria Erminia

    2017-06-01

    We investigated a pulmonary adverse drug reaction possibly induced by fluoxetine, the Interstitial Lung Disease, by performing a systematic review of published case reports on this subject, a review of the World Health Organization VigiAccess database, of the European EudraVigilance database and of a national Pharmacovigilance database (Italian Pharmacovigilance Network). The research found a total of seven cases linking fluoxetine to Interstitial Lung Disease in the literature. 36 cases of interstitial lung disease related to fluoxetine were retrieved from the VigiAccess database (updated to July 2016), and 36 reports were found in EudraVigilance database (updated to June 2016). In the Italian Pharmacovigilance database (updated to August 2016), we found only one case of Interstitial Lung Disease, codified as "pulmonary disease". Our investigation shows that fluoxetine might be considered as a possible cause of Interstitial Lung Disease. In particular, although here we do not discuss the assessment of benefits and harms of fluoxetine, since this antidepressant is widely used, our review suggests that fluoxetine-induced Interstitial Lung Disease should be considered in patients with dyspnea, associated or not with dry cough, who are treated with this drug. An early withdrawn of fluoxetine could be useful to obtain a complete remission of this adverse drug reaction and special attention should be particularly devoted to long-term therapy, and to female and elderly patients. Although the spontaneous reporting system is affected by important limitations, drug post- marketing surveillance represents an important tool to evaluate the real world effectiveness and safety of drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Undifferentiated connective tissue disease and interstitial lung disease: Trying to define patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, María Laura; Paulin, Francisco; Toledo, Heidegger Mateos; Fernández, Martín Eduardo; Caro, Fabián Matías; Rojas-Serrano, Jorge; Mejía, Mayra Edith

    To identify clinical or immunological features in patients with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) associated interstitial lung disease (ILD), in order to group them and recognize different functional and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) behavior. Retrospective cohort study. Patients meeting Kinder criteria for UCTD were included. We defined the following predictive variables: 'highly specific' connective tissue disease (CTD) manifestations (Raynaud's phenomenon, dry eyes or arthritis), high antinuclear antibody (ANA) titer (above 1: 320), and 'specific' ANA staining patterns (centromere, cytoplasmic and nucleolar patterns). We evaluated the following outcomes: change in the percentage of the predicted forced vital capacity (FVC%) during the follow-up period, and HRCT pattern. Sixty-six patients were included. Twenty-nine (43.94%) showed at least one 'highly specific' CTD manifestation, 16 (28.57%) had a 'specific' ANA staining pattern and 29 (43.94%) high ANA titer. Patients with 'highly specific' CTD manifestations were younger (mean [SD] 52 years [14.58] vs 62.08 years [9.46], P<.001), were more likely men (10.34% vs 48.65%, P<.001) and showed a smaller decline of the FVC% (median [interquartile range] 1% [-1 to 10] vs -6% [-16 to -4], P<.006). In the multivariate analysis, the presence of highly specific manifestations was associated with improvement in the FVC% (B coefficient of 13.25 [95% confidence interval, 2.41 to 24.09]). No association was observed in relation to the HRCT pattern. The presence of 'highly specific' CTD manifestations was associated with female sex, younger age and better functional behavior. These findings highlight the impact of the clinical features in the outcome of patients with UCTD ILD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  7. Up-to-Date Information on Rheumatoid Arthritis-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takafumi Suda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary involvement is common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and affects all the components of the lung. Interstitial lung disease (ILD is the most predominant pulmonary manifestation and has been identified as the main cause of morbidity and mortality in RA. Clinically significant RA-ILD occurs in approximately 10% of RA patients. Several risk factors, such as old age, male gender, and smoking, have been reported to date. Histologically, the proportion of the usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP pattern is higher in RA-ILD than in ILD associated with other connective tissue diseases, and RA-ILD also shows nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and organizing pneumonia patterns. High-resolution computed tomography scans are highly predictive of the histological UIP pattern with a specificity of 96%-100%. Acute exacerbation, which is the acute deterioration of the respiratory status characterized by newly developed bilateral infiltrates with unknown etiologies, has been reported in RA-ILD. Although acute exacerbation of RA-ILD has high mortality, similar to that of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, its incidence is lower in RA-ILD than in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. A consensus treatment has not yet been established. Current therapeutic regimens typically include corticosteroids with or without cytotoxic agents. Recent large longitudinal studies reported that the prognosis of RA-ILD was poor with a median survival of 2.6-3.0 years. Furthermore, histological and/or radiological patterns, such as UIP or non-UIP, have significant prognostic implications. RA-ILD patients with histological or radiological UIP patterns have poorer prognoses than those with non-UIP patterns. This review assessed the characteristics of RA-ILD by overviewing recent studies in the field and focused on the clinical significance of histological and/or radiological patterns in RA-ILD.

  8. Radionuclide diagnosis of interstitial lung edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khodzhibekov, M.Kh.

    1991-01-01

    Perfusion scintigraphy of the lungs has shown that a reverse direction of postural reactions of the pulmonary blood flow is observed in patients with mitral valvular disease. It is accounted for by the action of gravitation on capillary hydrostatic pressure resulting in the localization of interstitial edema in pulmonary venous hypertension mainly in the lower lung, its microcirculatory bed being compressed and the blood flow redistributed to the opposite upper lung. Therefore successive perfusion scintigraphy of the lungs in the vertical position and in the lateral position with a RP administered twice, can serve as a sensitive test for diagnosis of interstitial lung edema

  9. Biopsia en enfermedad intersticial pulmonar Lung biopsy for the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease

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    Silvia Quadrelli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente estudio fue determinar el rédito diagnóstico y los factores asociados a mayor morbimortalidad en la biopsia quirúrgica de pulmón en pacientes con enfermedad intersticial difusa. Se analizaron en forma retrospectiva los registros clínicos de 71 pacientes. Se registraron complicaciones en 16 pacientes (22.5%. La mortalidad operatoria fue 11.2%. Los pacientes en quienes la biopsia se realizó por videotoracoscopia (n = 52 y por toracotomía (n = 17 tuvieron la misma duración de estadía en terapia intensiva y de estadía hospitalaria. La tasa de complicaciones (22.2% vs. 21.0%, p = 1.0000 y la mortalidad (9.2 vs. 15.7%, p = 0.2738 no fueron diferentes. Ocho pacientes murieron dentro de los 30 días. La prevalencia de inmunosupresión (4/8 vs. 9/63, p = 0.0325 fue significativamente superior en el grupo de pacientes fallecidos. Estos pacientes tuvieron valores preoperatorios más elevados de urea (50 ± 20.1 mg/dl vs. 31.2 ± 10.3 mg/ dl, p = 0.0013 y menores valores de saturación de O2: 82.7 ± 14.8% vs. 92.8 ± 3.4%, p = 0.0009. En los 11 pacientes con iniciación aguda la mortalidad fue significativamente más elevada (36.3% vs. 7.1%, p = 0.0223. La biopsia aportó un diagnóstico específico en 100% de los pacientes y cambió la estrategia terapéutica en 66.7%. En conclusión, la biopsia de pulmón por vía toracoscópica es un procedimiento útil y seguro en los pacientes con enfermedad intersticial difusa del pulmón. Sin embargo, en el grupo de pacientes inmunocomprometidos, con cuadros de presentación aguda y con insuficiencia respiratoria preoperatoria, la mortalidad es elevada y deben balancearse muy críticamente los riesgos contra los beneficios en ese grupo de enfermos.The objective of this study was to determine the morbidity, mortality and diagnostic yield of video assisted thoracoscopy (VATS and thoracotomy lung biopsy in interstitial lung disease (ILD. Clinical records of 71 patients were

  10. Exertional dyspnoea in interstitial lung diseases: the clinical utility of cardiopulmonary exercise testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Bonini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs represent a heterogeneous group of pathologies characterised by alveolar and interstitial damage, pulmonary inflammation (usually associated with fibrosis, decreased lung function and impaired gas exchange, which can be attributed to either a known or an unknown aetiology. Dyspnoea is one of the most common and disabling symptoms in patients with ILD, significantly impacting quality of life. The mechanisms causing dyspnoea are complex and not yet fully understood. However, it is recognised that dyspnoea occurs when there is an imbalance between the central respiratory efferent drive and the response of the respiratory musculature. The respiratory derangement observed in ILD patients at rest is even more evident during exercise. Pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for exertional dyspnoea and reduced exercise tolerance include altered respiratory mechanics, impaired gas exchange, cardiovascular abnormalities and peripheral muscle dysfunction. This review describes the respiratory physiology of ILD, both at rest and during exercise, and aims to provide comprehensive and updated evidence on the clinical utility of the cardiopulmonary exercise test in the assessment and management of these pathological entities. In addition, the role of exercise training and pulmonary rehabilitation programmes in the ILD population is addressed.

  11. 18FDG uptake associated with CT density on PET/CT in lungs with and without chronic interstitial lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Kentaro; Okada, Ken; Taki, Yasuyuki; Goto, Ryoi; Kinomura, Shigeo; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The dependent-density of computed tomography (CT) images of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT is sometimes difficult to distinguish from chronic interstitial lung disease (ILD) when it accompanies increased 18 F-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose ( 18 FDG) uptake. Though the possible utility of 18 FDG-PET for the diagnosis of active ILD has been reported, the clinical relevance of mild lung 18 FDG uptake in ILD cases without signs and symptoms suggesting acute progression has not been described. This study aimed to test relationships between 18 FDG uptake and lung density on CT using PET/CT in patients with normal lung as well as clinically stable chronic ILD. Thirty-six patients with normal lungs (controls) and 28 patients with chronic ILD (ILD cases) without acute exacerbation were retrospectively selected from 18 FDG PET/CT scans performed in examination of malignant neoplasms. Elliptical regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on the lung. The relationships between CT density and 18 FDG uptake between the control and ILD cases were tested. The CT density and 18 FDG uptake had a linear correlation in both the controls and the ILD cases without a difference in their regression slopes, and they were overlapped between the controls and the ILD cases with higher mean values in the ILD cases. Lung 18 FDG uptake was considered to reflect a gravity-dependent tissue density in the normal lung. Though the lung 18 FDG uptake as well as the CT density tended to be higher in chronic ILD patients, it may be difficult to distinguish them in normal dependent regions from those related to chronic ILD in some cases. (author)

  12. Serial chest CT findings in interstitial lung disease associated with polymyositis-dermatomyositis

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    Bonnefoy, Olivier; Ferretti, Gilbert; Calaque, Olivier; Coulomb, Max; Begueret, Hugues; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Laurent, Francois E-mail: francois.laurent@chu-bordeaux.fr

    2004-03-01

    Objective: A retrospective study was carried out in two institutions to determine serial changes in the pattern, distribution, and extent of interstitial lung disease (ILD) associated with polymyositis (PM)-dermatomyositis (DM) using HRCT. Subjects and methods: Twenty patients with PM-DM and clinical suspicion of ILD who underwent at least two serial HRCT examinations were retrospectively evaluated by two readers. Patients were classified according to the dominant CT pattern which was correlated with clinical evolution and underlying histology when available (n=6). Results: Patients were classified into four groups according to the dominant pattern: ground-glass attenuation and reticulation (group 1, n=9); honeycombing (group 2, n=4); airspace consolidation (group 3, n=4), and normal or almost normal lung (group 4, n=3). Under medical treatment, serial HRCT showed that the extent of areas of ground-glass opacities (group 1) decreased in five patients, stabilized in two, and increased in two. Pathologic findings demonstrated usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) in two cases and unspecified interstitial pneumonia in one. In group 2, extent of honeycombing increased in three cases and stabilized in one. In group 3, dramatic resolution of airspace consolidation occurred in three cases. Clinical deterioration with extensive consolidation at CT and diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) at histology occurred in one patient of each of the three previous groups. Lesions stayed invisible or progressed slightly in the fourth group. Conclusion: In ILD associated with PM-DM, clinical deterioration and DAD in the follow-up can be observed whatever the HRCT pattern. However, unfavorable evolution is constant when honeycombing is present at the initial CT.

  13. Crohn's disease-associated interstitial lung disease mimicking sarcoidosis: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thao, Choua; Lagstein, Amir; Allen, Tadashi; Dincer, Huseyin Erhan; Kim, Hyun Joo

    2016-10-07

    Respiratory involvement in Crohn's disease (CD) is a rare manifestation known to involve the large and small airways, lung parenchyma, and pleura. The clinical presentation is nonspecific, and diagnostic tests can mimic other pulmonary diseases, posing a diagnostic challenge and delay in treatment. We report a case of a 60-year-old female with a history of CD and psoriatic arthritis who presented with dyspnea, fever, and cough with abnormal radiological findings. Diagnostic testing revealed an elevated CD4:CD8 ratio in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and cryoprobe lung biopsy results showed non-necrotizing granulomatous inflammation. We describe here the second reported case of pulmonary involvement mimicking sarcoidosis in Crohn's disease and a review of the literature on the approaches to making a diagnosis of CD-associated interstitial lung disease.

  14. A role for MCP-1/CCR2 in interstitial lung disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhardt Dietrich

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstitial lung diseases (ILD are chronic inflammatory disorders leading to pulmonary fibrosis. Monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1 promotes collagen synthesis and deletion of the MCP-1 receptor CCR2 protects from pulmonary fibrosis in ILD mouse models. We hypothesized that pulmonary MCP-1 and CCR2+ T cells accumulate in pediatric ILD and are related to disease severity. Methods Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was obtained from 25 children with ILD and 10 healthy children. Levels of pulmonary MCP-1 and Th1/Th2-associated cytokines were quantified at the protein and the mRNA levels. Pulmonary CCR2+, CCR4+, CCR3+, CCR5+ and CXCR3+ T cells were quantified by flow-cytometry. Results CCR2+ T cells and MCP-1 levels were significantly elevated in children with ILD and correlated with forced vital capacity, total lung capacity and ILD disease severity scores. Children with lung fibrosis had significantly higher MCP-1 levels and CCR2+ T cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared to non-fibrotic children. Conclusion The results indicate that pulmonary CCR2+ T cells and MCP-1 contribute to the pathogenesis of pediatric ILD and might provide a novel target for therapeutic strategies.

  15. Pulmonary hypertension in childhood interstitial lung disease: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Susan; Vizcaya, David

    2017-05-01

    Childhood interstitial lung disease (chILD) comprises a wide heterogeneous group of rare parenchymal lung disorders associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Pulmonary hypertension is a common comorbidity in adults with interstitial lung disease (ILD) and associated with poor survival. We aimed to systematically review the literature regarding the occurrence of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in chILD, its effect on prognosis and healthcare use, and its treatment in clinical practice. Searches of PubMed and EMBASE databases (up to February 2016), and American Thoracic Society conference abstracts (2009-2015) were conducted using relevant keywords. References from selected articles and review papers were scanned to identify further relevant articles. A total of 20 articles were included; estimates of PH in chILD ranged from 1% to 64% with estimates among specific chILD entities ranging from 0% to 43%. Comparisons between studies were limited by differences in the study populations, including the size, age range, and heterogeneous composition of the ILD case series in terms of the nature and severity of the clinical entities, and also the methods used to diagnose PH. Three studies found that among patients with chILD, those with PH had a significantly higher risk (up to sevenfold) of death compared with those without PH. Information on the treatment of pulmonary hypertension in chILD or the effect of PH on healthcare use was not available. Data on the use and effectiveness of treatments for pulmonary hypertension in chILD are required to address this area of unmet need. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2017;52:689-698. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Detection and classification of interstitial lung diseases and emphysema using a joint morphological-fuzzy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang Chien, Kuang-Che; Fetita, Catalin; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Prêteux, Françoise; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2009-02-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has high accuracy and specificity on volumetrically capturing serial images of the lung. It increases the capability of computerized classification for lung tissue in medical research. This paper proposes a three-dimensional (3D) automated approach based on mathematical morphology and fuzzy logic for quantifying and classifying interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) and emphysema. The proposed methodology is composed of several stages: (1) an image multi-resolution decomposition scheme based on a 3D morphological filter is used to detect and analyze the different density patterns of the lung texture. Then, (2) for each pattern in the multi-resolution decomposition, six features are computed, for which fuzzy membership functions define a probability of association with a pathology class. Finally, (3) for each pathology class, the probabilities are combined up according to the weight assigned to each membership function and two threshold values are used to decide the final class of the pattern. The proposed approach was tested on 10 MDCT cases and the classification accuracy was: emphysema: 95%, fibrosis/honeycombing: 84% and ground glass: 97%.

  17. A case of bilateral endogenous Pantoea agglomerans endophthalmitis with interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Susie; Jang, Young Jun; Lee, Seung Woo; Kim, Ho Chang; Ha, Gyoung Yim

    2010-08-01

    We here in report a case of bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Pantoea agglomerans (P. agglomerans) in a patient who had interstitial lung disease and was treated with oral corticosteroids. A 72-year-old man presented with decreased visual acuity in both eyes nine days after he received oral corticosteroids. He had marked uveitis, cataracts, and vitreous opacities. Cultures were taken of blood, aqueous humor, and vitreous. We initially suspected a fungal etiology and treated him with antifungal drugs; however, the intraocular disease progressed without improvement. Vitreous culture was positive for P. agglomerans. The patient underwent pars plana vitrectomy with cataract surgery bilaterally, followed by a 2-week course of antibiotics. The final visual acuity was 20/25 in the right eye and 20/200 in the left eye. This is the first report of bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis caused by P. agglomerans in Korea; it is also the first case reported outside of the United States.

  18. Cryobiopsy in the diagnosis of diffuse interstitial lung disease: yield and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-González, Fernanda; Lucena, Carmen M; Ramírez, José; Sánchez, Marcelo; Jimenez, María José; Xaubet, Antoni; Sellares, Jacobo; Agustí, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    Assessment of patients with suspected interstitial lung disease (ILD) includes surgical lung biopsy (SLB) when clinical and radiological data are inconclusive. However, cryobiopsy is acquiring an important role in the ILD diagnostic process. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic yield, safety and economic costs of the systematic use of cryobiopsy in the assessment of patients with suspected ILD. This was a retrospective observational study of patients who had undergone transbronchial cryobiopsy for evaluation of ILD from January 2011 to January 2014. The procedures were performed with a video bronchoscope using a cryoprobe for the collection of lung parenchyma specimens, which were analyzed by pathologists. Diagnostic yield, complications and economic costs of this technique were analyzed. Criobiopsy specimens from a total of 33 patients were included. A specific diagnosis was obtained in 26, producing a diagnostic yield of 79%. In 5 patients, SLB was required for a histopathological confirmation of disease, but the procedure could not be performed in 4, due to severe comorbidities. The most frequent complications were pneumothorax (12%) and gradei (9%) or gradeii (21%) bleeding. There were no life-threatening complications. The systematic use of cryobiopsy saved up to €59,846. Cryobiopsy is a safe and potentially useful technique in the diagnostic assessment of patients with ILD. Furthermore, the systematic use of cryobiopsy has an important economic impact. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimal management of interstitial lung disease associated with dermatomyositis/polymyositis: lessons from the Japanese experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurasawa K

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Kazuhiro Kurasawa,1,2 Satoko Arai2 1Center of Rheumatic Diseases, Dokkyo Medical University, Mibu, Tochigi, Japan; 2Department of Clinical Immunology, Dokkyo Medical University, Mibu, Tochigi, Japan Abstract: Interstitial lung disease (ILD is a serious complication in dermatomyositis (DM and polymyositis (PM. In Japan, patients with DM/PM develop acute life-threatening ILD with high frequency. Physicians in Japan have shown the following: refractory acute/subacute (A/S-ILD is not a rare complication in DM and amyopathic DM (ADM; anti-anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (anti-MDA5 antibody (Ab is closely related to A/S-ILD with poor outcomes in DM/ADM; and poor prognostic factors in A/S-ILD in DM/PM are ADM, DM with low creatine kinase elevation, positivity for anti-MDA5 Ab, serum ferritin elevation, and consolidation with ground-glass opacities on high-resolution computed tomography. There are subtypes in DM/PM-ILD: refractory DM/ADM A/S-ILD positive for anti-MDA5 Ab with poor prognosis; DM A/S-ILD with glucocorticoid (GC resistance; PM A/S-ILD with GC sensitivity; chronic ILD positive for anti-aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetases (anti-ARS Abs with GC responsiveness; and C-ILD negative for anti-ARS Abs. For patients with A/S-ILD with poor prognosis, initial combination therapy with cyclosporine and cyclophosphamide in addition to GC has been developed, which rescues 50%–80% of the patients, although elucidation of the efficacy of the combination therapy is required. A/S-ILD with potentially fatal outcomes is found worldwide, not only in Japan. Clinicians caring for patients with DM/PM should be cautious when dealing with A/S-ILD and treat the patients based on clinical subtypes. Keywords: interstitial lung disease, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, management, cyclosporine, cyclophosphamide

  20. Characterization of interstitial lung disease in chest radiographs using SOM artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo-Marques, P.M. de; Ambrosio, P.E.; Pereira, R.R. Jr.; Valini, R. de A.; Salomao, S.C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an automated approach to apply a self-organizing map (SOM) artificial neural network (ANN) as a tool for feature extraction and dimensionality reduction to recognize and characterize radiologic patterns of interstitial lung diseases in chest radiography. After feature extraction and dimensionality reduction a multilayer perceptron (MLP) ANN is applied for radiologic patterns classification in normal, linear, nodular or mixed. A leave-one-out methodology was applied for training and test over a database containing 17 samples of linear pattern, 9 samples of nodular pattern, 9 samples of mixed pattern and 18 samples of normal pattern. The MLP network provided an average result of 88.7% of right classification, with 100% of right classification for linear pattern, 55.5% for nodular pattern, 77.7% for mixed pattern and 100% for normal pattern. (orig.)

  1. Classical patterns of interstitial lung diseases; Klassische Muster der interstitiellen Lungenerkrankungen

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    Mueller-Mang, C. [Institut fuer CT und MRT, Gaenserndorf (Austria); Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)

    2014-12-15

    High resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is the most important non-invasive tool in the diagnostics and follow-up of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). A systematic review of the HRCT patterns of ILD was carried out and the most relevant differential diagnoses are discussed in order to provide a road map for the general radiologist to successfully navigate the complex field of ILD. Using HRCT four basic patterns of ILD can be identified: linear and reticular patterns, the nodular pattern, the high attenuation and low attenuation patterns. These patterns can be further differentiated according to their localization within the secondary pulmonary lobule (SPL), e.g. centrilobular or perilymphatic and their distribution within the lungs (e.g. upper or lower lobe predominance). Relevant clinical data, such as smoking history and course of the disease provide useful additional information in the diagnosis of ILD. On the basis of the pattern and anatomical distribution on HRCT, an accurate diagnosis can be achieved in some cases of ILD; however, due to morphological and clinical overlap the final diagnosis of many ILDs requires close cooperation between clinicians, radiologists and pathologists. (orig.) [German] Die hochaufloesende CT (High-resolution[HR]-CT) ist das wichtigste nichtinvasive Verfahren zur Identifikation und Verlaufsbeurteilung von Patienten mit interstitiellen Lungenerkrankungen (''interstitial lung diseases'', ILD). Systematische Darstellung der HRCT-Muster interstitieller Lungenerkrankungen und Diskussion der relevanten Differenzialdiagnosen, um dem Radiologen eine erfolgreiche Analyse der komplexen CT-Morphologie der ILD zu ermoeglichen. Mit der HRCT koennen 4 Grundmuster interstitieller Grunderkrankungen identifiziert werden: das retikulaere und lineare Muster, das nodulaere Muster, das Muster mit erhoehter Lungendichte und das Muster mit verminderter Lungendichte. Diese Muster koennen anhand ihrer Lage im sekundaeren

  2. Clinical Utility of YKL-40 in Polymyositis/dermatomyositis-associated Interstitial Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozumi, Hironao; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Nakashima, Ran; Enomoto, Yasunori; Suzuki, Yuzo; Kono, Masato; Karayama, Masato; Furuhashi, Kazuki; Murakami, Akihiro; Inui, Naoki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Suda, Takafumi

    2017-09-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is involved in polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM), a disease associated with poor prognoses. Chitinase-3-like-1 protein (YKL-40) has pleiotropic biological activities involved in inflammation, cell proliferation, and tissue remodeling; however, the clinical application of YKL-40 remains limited. We investigated the clinical significance of YKL-40 in PM/DM-ILD. Sixty-nine consecutive patients with PM/DM-ILD and 34 healthy controls were analyzed. We measured baseline and followup serum YKL-40 using an ELISA, evaluated the association of YKL-40 with clinical variables and survival, and examined YKL-40 expression in lung specimens from patients with PM/DM-ILD using immunohistochemistry. Serum YKL-40 levels were significantly greater in patients with PM/DM-ILD compared with healthy controls (p 40 was correlated with arterial oxygen pressure (r = -0.40, p 40 and lower percent-predicted forced vital capacity were independently associated with a poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that YKL-40 expression was enhanced in aggregated intraalveolar macrophages and hyperproliferative alveolar epithelial cells in patients with PM/DM-ILD. YKL-40 is a promising biomarker for evaluating PM/DM-ILD activity/severity and predicting disease prognosis. Insights into YKL-40 might help elucidate the pathogenesis of PM/DM-ILD.

  3. Improved pulmonary function following pirfenidone treatment in a patient with progressive interstitial lung disease associated with systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarir F Udwadia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pirfenidone is an anti-fibrotic drug which has been approved for the management of patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF. However, its role in interstitial lung disease (ILD due to other causes such as systemic sclerosis (SSc is not clear. We present a case of a patient with SSc associated ILD who showed a subjective as well as objective improvement in lung function with pirfenidone.

  4. Glutathione peroxidase 3 localizes to the epithelial lining fluid and the extracellular matrix in interstitial lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Schamberger, A.; Schiller, H.; Fernandez, I.; Sterclova, M.; Heinzelmann, K.; Hennen, E.; Hatz, R.; Behr, J.; Vasakova, M.; Mann, M.; Eickelberg, O.; Staab-Weijnitz, C.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant antioxidant activity and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) are hallmarks of interstitial lung diseases (ILD). It is known that oxidative stress alters the ECM, but extracellular antioxidant defence mechanisms in ILD are incompletely understood. Here, we extracted abundance and detergent solubility of extracellular antioxidant enzymes from a proteomic dataset of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in mice and assessed regulation and distribution of glutathione peroxidase ...

  5. Interstitial lung disease pattern turned out to be a predominantly lepidic lung adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Hammen, Dr. Med

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 46-year-old woman without any medical history who presented to our Respiratory Department with exertional dyspnoea for the last 6 weeks associated with non-productive cough. Chest radiography showed bilateral diffuse interstitial opacity. Bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial biopsies performed during flexible bronchoscopy as a step in the diagnostic workup of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia showed cells of pulmonary adenocarcinoma.

  6. Mortality Risk Prediction in Scleroderma-Related Interstitial Lung Disease: The SADL Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisset, Julie; Vittinghoff, Eric; Elicker, Brett M; Hu, Xiaowen; Le, Stephanie; Ryu, Jay H; Jones, Kirk D; Haemel, Anna; Golden, Jeffrey A; Boin, Francesco; Ley, Brett; Wolters, Paul J; King, Talmadge E; Collard, Harold R; Lee, Joyce S

    2017-11-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with scleroderma (Scl). Risk prediction and prognostication in patients with Scl-ILD are challenging because of heterogeneity in the disease course. We aimed to develop a clinical mortality risk prediction model for Scl-ILD. Patients with Scl-ILD were identified from two ongoing longitudinal cohorts: 135 patients at the University of California, San Francisco (derivation cohort) and 90 patients at the Mayo Clinic (validation cohort). Using these two separate cohorts, a mortality risk prediction model was developed and validated by testing every potential candidate Cox model, each including three or four variables of a possible 19 clinical predictors, for time to death. Model discrimination was assessed using the C-index. Three variables were included in the final risk prediction model (SADL): ever smoking history, age, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (% predicted). This continuous model had similar performance in the derivation (C-index, 0.88) and validation (C-index, 0.84) cohorts. We created a point scoring system using the combined cohort (C-index, 0.82) and used it to identify a classification with low, moderate, and high mortality risk at 3 years. The SADL model uses simple, readily accessible clinical variables to predict all-cause mortality in Scl-ILD. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel Assessment of Interstitial Lung Disease Using the "Computer-Aided Lung Informatics for Pathology Evaluation and Rating" (CALIPER) Software System in Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungprasert, Patompong; Wilton, Katelynn M; Ernste, Floranne C; Kalra, Sanjay; Crowson, Cynthia S; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Bartholmai, Brian J

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the correlation between measurements from quantitative thoracic high-resolution CT (HRCT) analysis with "Computer-Aided Lung Informatics for Pathology Evaluation and Rating" (CALIPER) software and measurements from pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM)-associated interstitial lung disease (ILD). A cohort of patients with IIM-associated ILD seen at Mayo Clinic was identified from medical record review. Retrospective analysis of HRCT data and PFTs at baseline and 1 year was performed. The abnormalities in HRCT were quantified using CALIPER software. A total of 110 patients were identified. At baseline, total interstitial abnormalities as measured by CALIPER, both by absolute volume and by percentage of total lung volume, had a significant negative correlation with diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO), total lung capacity (TLC), and oxygen saturation. Analysis by subtype of interstitial abnormality revealed significant negative correlations between ground glass opacities (GGO) and reticular density (RD) with DLCO and TLC. At one year, changes of total interstitial abnormalities compared with baseline had a significant negative correlation with changes of TLC and oxygen saturation. A negative correlation between changes of total interstitial abnormalities and DLCO was also observed, but it was not statistically significant. Analysis by subtype of interstitial abnormality revealed negative correlations between changes of GGO and RD and changes of DLCO, TLC, and oxygen saturation, but most of the correlations did not achieve statistical significance. CALIPER measurements correlate well with functional measurements in patients with IIM-associated ILD.

  8. Anti-citrullinated alpha enolase antibodies, interstitial lung disease and bone erosion in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alunno, Alessia; Bistoni, Onelia; Pratesi, Federico; La Paglia, Giuliana Maria Concetta; Puxeddu, Ilaria; Migliorini, Paola; Gerli, Roberto

    2018-02-14

    RA is an articular chronic inflammatory disease that in a subgroup of patients can also present with extra-articular manifestations (EAMs). Despite intense investigation on this topic, reliable biomarkers for EAMs are lacking. In recent years several ACPAs, including those targeting anti-citrullinated alpha enolase peptide-1 (anti-CEP-1), have been identified in patients with RA. Data about the ability of anti-CEP-1 to predict the development of erosive disease are confliciting and no evidence concerning their possible association with EAMs in RA is currently available. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and significance of anti-CEP-1 with regard to the association with erosive disease and EAMs in a large cohort of patients with RA. Anti-CCP and anti-CEP-1 antibodies have been assessed on serum samples of RA patients, healthy donors and patients with SpA using commercially available ELISA kits. Anti-CEP-1 antibodies are detectable in over 40% of RA patients and are associated with erosive RA and with RA-associated interstitial lung disease (ILD). Anti-CEP-1 antibodies may represent a useful biomarker for RA-associated ILD and erosive disease to be employed in clinical practice. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  9. High-resolution computed tomography versus chest radiography in the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Ana Beatriz Cordeiro de; Calderaro, Debora; Moreira, Caio; Guimaraes, Silvana Mangeon Meirelles; Tavares Junior, Wilson Campos; Leao Filho, Hilton Muniz; Andrade, Diego Correa de; Ferreira, Cid Sergio; Vieira, Jose Nelson Mendes

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with chest radiography in the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Materials And Methods: HRCT scans and chest radiographs in postero-anterior and lateral views were performed in 34 patients with systemic sclerosis, according to the American College of Rheumatology preliminary criteria for the diagnosis of SSc. The prevalence of radiological findings suggestive of interstitial lung disease in SSc seen on both imaging methods was compared. Results: Interstitial disease was observed on HRCT images of 31 patients (91%) and in the chest radiographs of 16 patients (47%). The most frequent findings observed on HRCT were septal lines (74%), honeycombing (56%) and parenchymal bands (26%). Chest radiographs showed reticular areas of attenuation in 11 patients (32%) and parenchymal distortion in 12% of the patients. In 18 patients (53%) with normal chest radiographs HRCT showed septal lines in 55%, ground glass in 44%, honeycombing in 38.5% and cysts in 33%. Conclusion: HRCT is more sensitive than chest radiography in the evaluation of incipient interstitial lung involvement in patients with SSc and can provide a justification for immunosuppressive therapy in patients with early disease. (author)

  10. Interstitial lung disease in anti-synthetase syndrome: Initial and follow-up CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debray, Marie-Pierre, E-mail: marie-pierre.debray@bch.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital, Department of Radiology, 46, rue Henri Huchard, 75877 Paris Cedex 18 (France); Borie, Raphael, E-mail: raphael.borie@bch.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital, Department of Pneumology A and Centre de Compétence Maladies Pulmonaires rares, DHU Fire 46, rue Henri Huchard, 75877 Paris Cedex 18 (France); Inserm, U1152, Paris (France); Revel, Marie-Pierre, E-mail: marie-pierre.revel@htd.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Cochin Hospital, Department of Radiology, 27, Rue du Fg Saint Jacques, 75679 Paris Cedex 14 (France); Naccache, Jean-Marc, E-mail: jean-marc.naccache@tnn.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Avicenne Hospital, Department of Pneumology and Centre de Compétence Maladies Pulmonaires rares, Bobigny (France); AP-HP, Tenon Hospital, Department of Pneumology and Centre de Compétence Maladies Pulmonaires rares, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Khalil, Antoine, E-mail: antoine.khalil@tnn.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Tenon Hospital, Department of Radiology, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Toper, Cécile, E-mail: cecile.toper@gmail.com [AP-HP, Tenon Hospital, Department of Pneumology and Centre de Compétence Maladies Pulmonaires rares, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Israel-Biet, Dominique, E-mail: dominique.israel-biet@egp.aphp.fr [Université Paris Descartes and AP-HP, Department of Pneumology, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, 20, rue Leblanc, 75015 Paris (France); and others

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To describe the initial and follow-up CT features of interstitial lung disease associated with anti-synthetase syndrome (AS-ILD). Materials and methods: Two independent thoracic radiologists retrospectively analysed thin-section CT images obtained at diagnosis of AS-ILD in 33 patients (17 positive for anti-Jo1, 13 for anti-PL12, and three for anti-PL7 antibodies). They evaluated the pattern, distribution and extent of the CT abnormalities. They also evaluated the change in findings during follow-up (median 27 months; range 13–167 months) in 26 patients. Results: At diagnosis, ground-glass opacities (100%), reticulations (87%) and traction bronchiectasis (76%) were the most common CT findings. Consolidations were present in 45% of patients. A non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), organizing pneumonia (OP) or mixed NSIP-OP CT pattern were observed in 15 out of 33 (45%), seven out of 33 (21%) and eight out of 33 (24%) patients, respectively, whereas the CT pattern was indeterminate in three patients. During follow-up, consolidations decreased or disappeared in 11 out of 12 patients (92%), among which seven within the first 6 months, but honeycombing progressed or appeared in ten out of 26 patients (38%) and overall disease extent increased in nine out of 26 patients (35%). Conclusion: CT features at diagnosis of AS-ILD mainly suggest NSIP and OP, isolated or in combination. Consolidations decrease or disappear in most cases but the disease may progress to fibrosis in more than one third of patients.

  11. FOXP3 polymorphisms in interstitial lung disease among Chinese Han population: A genetic association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianyu; Zhang, Tianze; Zhang, Lili; Han, Kaiyu; Zhang, Linyou

    2018-03-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors are implicated in the pathogenesis of interstitial lung disease (ILD). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in FOXP3 genes were implicated in the causation of some autoimmune diseases; however, association of these genes and ILD has not been reported. To investigate whether FOXP3 polymorphisms are associated with ILD in a representative Chinese population. One hundred and fifty-seven ILD patients and 170 healthy controls were recruited; SNPs were genotyped by the Sequenom MassARRAY platform and SHEsis was used to estimate the haplotype frequencies of SNPs. The CC and TC genotypes of FOXP3 rs2280883 were associated with a significantly higher risk of connective tissue disease-associated ILD (CTP-ILD) than the TT genotype (P = .006). Patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) showed a significantly higher frequency of rs3761547 (GG genotype) and rs3761549 (CC genotype) polymorphisms of FOXP3 as compared to that in controls (P = .038 and P = .026, respectively). The rs2294021 (TC genotype) was less frequently observed among IIP patients as compared to that in controls (P = 0.029). In addition, the FOXP3 CAATC haplotype was associated with a greater risk for CTD-ILD (P =.048) as compared to controls, and the FOXP3 TCCCC haplotype showed an increased IIP risk (P = .001); however, patients with the FOXP3 TACTT haplotype showed a significant protective effect against IIP (P = .036). FOXP3 polymorphisms may be important markers to determine susceptibility to IIP or CTP-ILD in Chinese population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Pirfenidone in patients with rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease associated with clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Guo, Li; Chen, Zhiwei; Gu, Liyang; Sun, Fangfang; Tan, Xiaoming; Chen, Sheng; Wang, Xiaodong; Ye, Shuang

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of pirfenidone in patients with rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease (RPILD) related to clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis (CADM), we conducted an open-label, prospective study with matched retrospective controls. Thirty patients diagnosed with CADM-RPILD with a disease duration <6 months at Renji Hospital South Campus from June 2014 to November 2015 were prospectively enrolled and treated with pirfenidone at a target dose of 1800 mg/d in addition to conventional treatment, such as a glucocorticoid and/or other immunosuppressants. Matched patients without pirfenidone treatment (n = 27) were retrospectively selected as controls between October 2012 and September 2015. We found that the pirfenidone add-on group displayed a trend of lower mortality compared with the control group (36.7% vs 51.9%, p = 0.2226). Furthermore, the subgroup analysis indicated that the pirfenidone add-on had no impact on the survival of acute ILD patients (disease duration <3 months) (50% vs 50%, p = 0.3862) while for subacute ILD patients (disease duration 3-6 months), the pirfenidone add-on (n = 10) had a significantly higher survival rate compared with the control subgroup (n = 9) (90% vs 44.4%, p = 0.0450). Our data indicated that the pirfenidone add-on may improve the prognosis of patients with subacute ILD related to CADM.

  13. INTERSTITIAL LUNG-DISEASE AND MYOSITIS IN A PATIENT WITH SIMULTANEOUSLY OCCURRING SARCOIDOSIS AND SCLERODERMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GROEN, H; POSTMA, DS; KALLENBERG, CGM

    1993-01-01

    A patient initially presented with sarcoidosis in combination with myositis of sarcoid origin and Raynaud's phenomenon. During the course of his disease, he additionally developed scleroderma. Bronchoalveolar lavage, performed because of increase of interstitial markings in the presence of enlarged

  14. The evidence of benefits of exercise training in interstitial lung disease: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowman, Leona M; McDonald, Christine F; Hill, Catherine J; Lee, Annemarie L; Barker, Kathryn; Boote, Claire; Glaspole, Ian; Goh, Nicole S L; Southcott, Anne M; Burge, Angela T; Gillies, Rebecca; Martin, Alicia; Holland, Anne E

    2017-07-01

    Uncertainty exists regarding the clinical relevance of exercise training across the range of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). To establish the impact of exercise training in patients with ILDs of differing aetiology and severity. 142 participants with ILD (61 idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), 22 asbestosis, 23 connective tissue disease-related ILD (CTD-ILD) and 36 with other aetiologies) were randomised to either 8 weeks of supervised exercise training or usual care. Six-minute walk distance (6MWD), Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRDQ), St George Respiratory Questionnaire IPF-specific version (SGRQ-I) and modified Medical Research Council dyspnoea score were measured at baseline, 9 weeks and 6 months. Exercise training significantly increased 6MWD (25 m, 95% CI 2 to 47 m) and health-related quality of life (CRDQ and SGRQ-I) in people with ILD. Larger improvements in 6MWD, CRDQ, SGRQ-I and dyspnoea occurred in asbestosis and IPF compared with CTD-ILD, but with few significant differences between subgroups. Benefits declined at 6 months except in CTD-ILD. Lower baseline 6MWD and worse baseline symptoms were associated with greater benefit in 6MWD and symptoms following training. Greater gains were seen in those whose exercise prescription was successfully progressed according to the protocol. At 6 months, sustained improvements in 6MWD and symptoms were associated with better baseline lung function and less pulmonary hypertension. Exercise training is effective in patients across the range of ILDs, with clinically meaningful benefits in asbestosis and IPF. Successful exercise progression maximises improvements and sustained treatment effects favour those with milder disease. Results, ACTRN12611000416998. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Procoagulant, tissue factor-bearing microparticles in bronchoalveolar lavage of interstitial lung disease patients: an observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Novelli

    Full Text Available Coagulation factor Xa appears involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Through its interaction with protease activated receptor-1, this protease signals myofibroblast differentiation in lung fibroblasts. Although fibrogenic stimuli induce factor X synthesis by alveolar cells, the mechanisms of local posttranslational factor X activation are not fully understood. Cell-derived microparticles are submicron vesicles involved in different physiological processes, including blood coagulation; they potentially activate factor X due to the exposure on their outer membrane of both phosphatidylserine and tissue factor. We postulated a role for procoagulant microparticles in the pathogenesis of interstitial lung diseases. Nineteen patients with interstitial lung diseases and 11 controls were studied. All subjects underwent bronchoalveolar lavage; interstitial lung disease patients also underwent pulmonary function tests and high resolution CT scan. Microparticles were enumerated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid with a solid-phase assay based on thrombin generation. Microparticles were also tested for tissue factor activity. In vitro shedding of microparticles upon incubation with H₂O₂ was assessed in the human alveolar cell line, A549 and in normal bronchial epithelial cells. Tissue factor synthesis was quantitated by real-time PCR. Total microparticle number and microparticle-associated tissue factor activity were increased in interstitial lung disease patients compared to controls (84±8 vs. 39±3 nM phosphatidylserine; 293±37 vs. 105±21 arbitrary units of tissue factor activity; mean±SEM; p<.05 for both comparisons. Microparticle-bound tissue factor activity was inversely correlated with lung function as assessed by both diffusion capacity and forced vital capacity (r² = .27 and .31, respectively; p<.05 for both correlations. Exposure of lung epithelial cells to H₂O₂ caused an increase in microparticle-bound tissue factor

  16. Genetic predictors of systemic sclerosis-associated interstitial lung disease: a review of recent literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Carmel J W; Renzoni, Elisabetta A

    2018-02-23

    The interplay between genetic and environmental factors is likely involved in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Interstitial lung disease associated in the context of SSc (SSc-ILD) is associated with significant morbidity, and is the leading cause of death in SSc. The spectrum of SSc-ILD severity is wide, ranging from patients with only limited and inherently stable pulmonary involvement, to those with extensive and progressive pulmonary fibrosis. In order to provide accurate prognostic information for patients, and to initiate appropriate monitoring and treatment regimens, the ability to identify patients at risk of developing severe ILD early in the disease course is crucial. Identification of genetic variants involved in disease pathogenesis can not only potentially provide diagnostic/prognostic markers, but can also highlight dysregulated molecular pathways for therapeutic targeting. A number of genetic associations have been established for susceptibility to SSc, but far fewer studies have investigated genetic susceptibility to SSc-ILD specifically. In this review we present a summary of the studies assessing genetic associations with SSc-ILD.

  17. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors in bronchoalveolar lavage cells of patients with interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branley, Howard M.; Bois, Roland M. du; Wells, Athol U.; Jones, Hazel A.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: PK11195 is a ligand with high affinity for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs), which are present in large numbers in macrophages. PBRs play a role in antioxidant pathways and apoptosis, key factors in control of lung health. Intrapulmonary PBRs, assessed in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET), are decreased in interstitial lung disease (ILD) despite increased macrophage numbers. We wished to ascertain whether the observed decrease in in vivo expression of PBRs in the PET scans could be accounted for by a reduction in PBRs per cell by saturation-binding assays of R-PK11195 in cells obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Methods: We performed receptor saturation-binding assays with [ 3 H]-R-PK11195 on a mixed population of cells recovered by BAL to quantify the number of R-PK11195 binding sites per macrophage in 10 subjects with ILD and 10 normal subjects. Results: Receptor affinity [dissociation constant (Kd)] was similar in ILD patients and controls. However, R-PK11195 binding sites per cell [(maximal binding sites available (B max )] were decreased in macrophages obtained by BAL from subjects with ILD compared to normal (P<.0005). Microautoradiography confirmed localization of R-PK11195 to macrophages in a mixed inflammatory cell population obtained by BAL. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that in vitro PBR expression per cell on macrophages obtained by BAL is reduced in patients with ILD indicating a potentially functionally different macrophage phenotype. As PBRs are involved in the orchestration of lung inflammatory responses, this finding offers further insight into the role of macrophages in the pathogenesis of ILDs and offers a potential avenue for pharmacological strategy

  18. Thoracoabdominal asynchrony: Two methods in healthy, COPD, and interstitial lung disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Caleffi Pereira

    Full Text Available Thoracoabdominal asynchrony is the nonparallel motion of the ribcage and abdomen. It is estimated by using respiratory inductive plethysmography and, recently, using optoelectronic plethysmography; however the agreement of measurements between these 2 techniques is unknown. Therefore, the present study compared respiratory inductive plethysmography with optoelectronic plethysmography for measuring thoracoabdominal asynchrony to see if the measurements were similar or different.27 individuals (9 healthy subjects, 9 patients with interstitial lung disease, and 9 with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease performed 2 cycle ergometer tests with respiratory inductive plethysmography or optoelectronic plethysmography in a random order. Thoracoabdominal asynchrony was evaluated at rest, and at 50% and 75% of maximal workload between the superior ribcage and abdomen using a phase angle.Thoracoabdominal asynchrony values were very similar in both approaches not only at rest but also with exercise, with no statistical difference. There was a good correlation between the methods and the Phase angle values were within the limits of agreement in the Bland-Altman analysis.Thoracoabdominal asynchrony measured by optoelectronic plethysmography and respiratory inductive plethysmography results in similar values and has a satisfactory agreement at rest and even for different exercise intensities in these groups.

  19. Computer-assisted quantification of interstitial lung disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis: Preliminary technical validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, K.; Dicken, V.; Kneitz, C.; Hoehmann, M.; Kenn, W.; Hahn, D.; Engelke, C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To validate a threshold-based prototype software application (MeVis PULMO 3D) for quantification of chronic interstitial lung disease (ILD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using variable threshold settings for segmentation of diseased lung areas. Methods: Twenty-two patients with rheumatoid arthritis were included and underwent thin-section CT (4 x 1.25 mm collimation). CT scans were assessed by two observers for extent of ILD (EoILD), and twice by MeVis PULMO 3D for each protocol. MeVis PULMO 3D used four segmentation threshold (ST) settings (ST = -740, -780, -800 and -840 HU). Pulmonary function tests were obtained in all patients. Statistical evaluation used 95% limits of agreement (LoA) and linear regression analysis. Results: There was total concordance between the software measurements. Interobserver agreement was good (LoA = -28.36 to 17.58%). EoILD by readers correlated strongly with DL CO (r = -0.702, p CO at ST of -800 HU (r = -0.44, -0.49, -0.58 and -0.57 for ST = -740, -780, -800 and -840, respectively; p = 0.007-0.05) and moderately with FVC (r = -0.44, -0.51, -0.59 and -0.45 for ST = -740, -780, -800 and -840), respectively; p = 0.007-0.05). Conclusion: The MeVis PULMO 3D system used holds promise to become a valuable instrument for quantification of chronic ILD in patients with RA when using the threshold value of -800 HU, with evidence of the closest correlations, both with human observers and physiologic impairment.

  20. Clinical and pathological characteristics of IgG4-related interstitial lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiaoting; Gao, Feng; Liu, Qicai; Zhang, Sheng; Huang, Zhihua; Zhu, Yongping; Zong, Haiyang; Li, Quwen; Li, Sanyan

    2018-01-01

    IgG4-related interstitial lung disease (IgG4-RILD), which is characterized by increased IgG4 levels, IgG4+ plasma cell infiltration and irregular whorled fibrosis, is a recently described lung disorder that belongs to the group of systemic fibroinflammatory IgG4-related diseases (IgG4-RD). The aim of the present study was to improve the current knowledge regarding the specific clinical and histopathological characteristics of IgG4-RILD and to investigate its underlying immune mechanism in vivo. A total of 7 patients newly diagnosed with IgG4-RILD were enrolled in the present study (4 men and 3 women; mean age, 57 years; range, 29–71 years). Patients' clinical history was collected and serological indicators, including C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) and tumor markers were measured. Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgE and IgG4 levels were also evaluated. In addition, computed tomographic (CT) images and pathological examinations were used to determine the characteristics of lung lesions in all patients. The majority of patients presented with symptoms of fever, cough and dyspnea, while allergic symptoms were also encountered. The laboratory examination results revealed different degrees of increased CRP, ESR, tumor markers, ANA, serum IgE and IgG4. The CT images revealed diffuse ground glass opacities, bronchiectasis and thickened bronchovascular bundles. Histologically, the lung lesions were characterized by dense IgG4+ lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates intermixed with extensive fibrous tissue hyperplasia and an irregularly storiform pattern of fibrosis. The mean number of IgG4+ plasma cells was >10 cells/high power field. The ratio of IgG/IgG4+ plasma cells was >50% in inflamed lesions and the number of parenchymal cells was markedly reduced. Obliterative phlebitis or obliterative arteritis was observed in all patients. In conclusion, the clinicopathological similarities between IgG4-RILD and other IgG4-RD

  1. An 18-year-old woman with Kabuki syndrome, immunoglobulin deficiency and granulomatous lymphocytic interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Dios, Jose Angelo A; Javaid, Adnan A; Ballesteros, Enrique; Metersky, Mark L

    2012-01-01

    Granulomatous lymphocytic interstitial lung disease, or GLILD, is an uncommon condition associated with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). We present an interesting case of an 18-year-old woman with Kabuki syndrome and CVID who was seen in our clinic for an abnormal chest CT scan. She was subsequently diagnosed with GLILD. There are no established guidelines for the treatment of GLILD in CVID. Immune globulin replacement therapy is the main treatment for CVID and higher doses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) may prevent the progression of chronic lung disease. Patients with CVID and GLILD are at increased risk for malignancy and their prognosis is worse compared to patients with CVID without GLILD.

  2. A national internet-linked based database for pediatric interstitial lung diseases: the French network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Nadia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs in children represent a heterogeneous group of rare respiratory disorders that affect the lung parenchyma. After the launch of the French Reference Centre for Rare Lung Diseases (RespiRare®, we created a national network and a web-linked database to collect data on pediatric ILD. Methods Since 2008, the database has been set up in all RespiRare® centres. After patient's parents' oral consent is obtained, physicians enter the data of children with ILD: identity, social data and environmental data; specific aetiological diagnosis of the ILD if known, genetics, patient visits to the centre, and all medical examinations and tests done for the diagnosis and/or during follow up. Each participating centre has a free access to his own patients' data only, and cross-centre studies require mutual agreement. Physicians may use the system as a daily aid for patient care through a web-linked medical file, backed on this database. Results Data was collected for 205 cases of ILD. The M/F sex ratio was 0.9. Median age at diagnosis was 1.5 years old [0–16.9]. A specific aetiology was identified in 149 (72.7% patients while 56 (27.3% cases remain undiagnosed. Surfactant deficiencies and alveolar proteinosis, haemosiderosis, and sarcoidosis represent almost half of the diagnoses. Median length of follow-up is 2.9 years [0–17.2]. Conclusions We introduce here the French network and the largest national database in pediatric ILDs. The diagnosis spectrum and the estimated incidence are consistent with other European databases. An important challenge will be to reduce the proportion of unclassified ILDs by a standardized diagnosis work-up. This database is a great opportunity to improve patient care and disease pathogenesis knowledge. A European network including physicians and European foundations is now emerging with the initial aim of devising a simplified European database/register as a first step to

  3. Bronchoalveolar lavage in patients with interstitial lung diseases: side effects and factors affecting fluid recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, D P; Haslam, P L; Townsend, P J; Primett, Z; Collins, J V; Turner-Warwick, M

    1986-05-01

    One hundred and seventy patients with interstitial lung diseases undergoing bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), were contrasted with 51 patients undergoing fibreoptic bronchoscopy alone to define the factors which predispose to post-lavage side-effects. Transient post-bronchoscopy fall in the peak expired flow (PEF) greater than or equal to 20% occurred in both groups (24% and 23% respectively), and thus was probably related to the bronchoscopy procedure. Post-lavage pyrexia (greater than or equal to 1 degree C) occurred only in the patients undergoing BAL (26%), p less than 0.001. Only 4% with pyrexia required antibiotics, and only 2% with falls in PEF needed bronchodilator therapy. The only significant clinical association was more frequent pyrexia in patients on treatment with prednisolone, particularly in women (p less than 0.01). Pyrexia was also associated with higher lavage fluid introduction volumes (greater than 240 ml). Side effects did not relate to the percentages of lavage fluid recovered, although smokers had lower recoveries and, recoveries tended to be higher in sarcoidosis than cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis. Serial lavages in 25 patients caused no significant increase in side effects.

  4. Content-Based Image Retrieval by Metric Learning From Radiology Reports: Application to Interstitial Lung Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, José; Kockelkorn, Thessa T J P; Ramos, Isabel; Ramos, Rui; Grutters, Jan; Viergever, Max A; van Ginneken, Bram; Campilho, Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) is a search technology that could aid medical diagnosis by retrieving and presenting earlier reported cases that are related to the one being diagnosed. To retrieve relevant cases, CBIR systems depend on supervised learning to map low-level image contents to high-level diagnostic concepts. However, the annotation by medical doctors for training and evaluation purposes is a difficult and time-consuming task, which restricts the supervised learning phase to specific CBIR problems of well-defined clinical applications. This paper proposes a new technique that automatically learns the similarity between the several exams from textual distances extracted from radiology reports, thereby successfully reducing the number of annotations needed. Our method first infers the relation between patients by using information retrieval techniques to determine the textual distances between patient radiology reports. These distances are subsequently used to supervise a metric learning algorithm, that transforms the image space accordingly to textual distances. CBIR systems with different image descriptions and different levels of medical annotations were evaluated, with and without supervision from textual distances, using a database of computer tomography scans of patients with interstitial lung diseases. The proposed method consistently improves CBIR mean average precision, with improvements that can reach 38%, and more marked gains for small annotation sets. Given the overall availability of radiology reports in picture archiving and communication systems, the proposed approach can be broadly applied to CBIR systems in different medical problems, and may facilitate the introduction of CBIR in clinical practice.

  5. Influence of chest background on pulmonary 99m Tc-DTPA clearance in interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kanazawa, Minoru; Suzuki, Yukio; Hasegawa, Naoki; Kubo, Atsushi; Kawashiro, Takeo

    1992-01-01

    The authors examined the effect of chest extracellular 99m T c -diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) as a background in the measurement of pulmonary 99m T c -DTPA clearance in patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Eight healthy nonsmokers (HN) and eight patients with ILD were studied. They monitored changes in gamma counts after the inhalation of 99m T c -DTPA aerosol by using a gamma camera placed over the anterior chest. The rate constant of pulmonary 99m T c -DTPA clearance (k; %/min) was assessed by calculating the slope of the decrease in the gamma counts. The chest background, estimated by 99m T c -DTPA intravenous injection, was subtracted from the original data to obtain the corrected DTPA clearance (k c ; %/min). In patients with ILD, k was significantly greater [2.19 ± 1.03 (SD) %/min; n = 8] compared with HN (0.86 ± 0.17%/min; n = 8; P c was also greater (2.80 ± 1.15%/min; n = 8; P c among all subjects (r = 0.987, P 99m T c -DTPA clearance. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Acute respiratory failure in critically ill patients with interstitial lung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Zafrani

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic known or unknown interstitial lung disease (ILD may present with severe respiratory flares that require intensive management. Outcome data in these patients are scarce.Clinical and radiological features were collected in 83 patients with ILD-associated acute respiratory failure (ARF. Determinants of hospital mortality and response to corticosteroid therapy were identified by logistic regression.Hospital and 1-year mortality rates were 41% and 54% respectively. Pulmonary hypertension, computed tomography (CT fibrosis and acute kidney injury were independently associated with mortality (odds ratio (OR 4.55; 95% confidence interval (95%CI (1.20-17.33; OR, 7.68; (1.78-33.22 and OR 10.60; (2.25-49.97 respectively. Response to steroids was higher in patients with shorter time from hospital admission to corticosteroid therapy. Patients with fibrosis on CT had lower response to steroids (OR, 0.03; (0.005-0.21. In mechanically ventilated patients, overdistension induced by high PEEP settings was associated with CT fibrosis and hospital mortality.Mortality is high in ILD-associated ARF. CT and echocardiography are valuable prognostic tools. Prompt corticosteroid therapy may improve survival.

  7. Anti-MDA-5 antibody-positive bullous dermatomyositis with palmar papules complicating rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Noriki; Honda, Shinichiro; Wakabayashi, Makiko; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Fujimoto, Manabu; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2016-07-01

    We present the first case of dermatomyositis showing both vesicle formation and palmar papules. The association of bullous formation and internal malignancy, and palmar papules and interstitial lung disease (ILD) is well known in dermatomyositis, respectively. This patient presented with vesicles; however, the immunoprecipitation assays detected anti-MDA-5 antibody and the patient complicated rapidly progressive ILD, but no malignancy. We propose that palmar papules might be regarded as more critical than blister formation.

  8. Interstitial lung disease and anti-Jo-1 antibodies: difference between acute and gradual onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillie-Leblond, I; Wislez, M; Valeyre, D; Crestani, B; Rabbat, A; Israel-Biet, D; Humbert, M; Couderc, L J; Wallaert, B; Cadranel, J

    2008-01-01

    A multicentre retrospective study was undertaken to examine patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) with the initial clinical manifestation of an anti-synthetase syndrome (anti-Jo-1 antibodies), and to analyse the characteristics and long-term outcome of these patients according to their clinical presentation (acute or gradual onset), treatment and adverse events related to treatment. 32 patients, 15 (47%) presenting with acute onset and associated respiratory insufficiency (group A) and 17 (53%) with gradual onset (group G) were examined. Myositis was diagnosed at admission in only 31% of cases and was observed during follow-up in 56% of cases, but the prevalence did not differ between the two groups. Fever and radiological patterns including diffuse patchy ground-glass opacities, basal irregular lines and consolidation on high-resolution CT scan were more frequent in group A than in group G. More patients in group G had neutrophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and autoantibodies other than anti-Jo-1 (rheumatoid factor, anti SSa/SSb) than in group A. The percentage of patients in whom the ILD improved at 3 months was significantly higher in group A than in group G (13/15 vs 9/17; p = 0.006). In contrast, after 12 months, most patients with ILD progression were in group A and were treated with corticosteroids alone. A combination of corticosteroids and an immunosuppressive drug was required in most cases (84%) at the end of the follow-up period. Severe adverse effects of treatment were observed and varicella zoster virus infection was frequent. Early testing for anti-synthetase antibodies, particularly anti-Jo-1, and creatine kinase determination are useful procedures in patients presenting with ILD. Treatment with corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs is required in most patients. At the end of the study, around two-thirds of patients had stable ILD while the other third had disease progression with respiratory insufficiency.

  9. Initial experience with lung-MRI at 3.0 T: Comparison with CT and clinical data in the evaluation of interstitial lung disease activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutterbey, G.; Grohe, C.; Gieseke, J.; Falkenhausen, M. von; Morakkabati, N.; Wattjes, M.P.; Manka, R.; Trog, D.; Schild, H.H.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: We evaluated the feasibility of highfield lung-MRI at 3.0 T. A comparison with Computed Tomography (CT) and clinical data regarding the assessment of inflammatory activity in patients with diffuse lung disease was performed. Material and methods: Prospective evaluation of 21 patients (15 males, 6 females, 43-80 y) with diffuse lung diseases who underwent clinical work-up inclusive laboratory tests, lung-function tests and transbronchial biopsy. After routine helical CT (additional 12 HRCT) a lung-MRI (3.0 Intera, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands) using a T2-weighted, cardiac and respiratory triggered Fast-Spinecho-Sequence (TE/TR = 80/1500-2500 ms, 22 transverse slices, 7/2 mm slice-thickness/-gap) was performed. A pneumologist classified the cases into two groups: A = temporary acute interstitial disease or chronic interstitial lung disease with acute episode or superimposed infection/B = burned out interstitial lung disease without activity. Two blinded CT-radiologists graded the cases in active/inactive disease on the basis of nine morphological criteria each. A third radiologist rated the MRI-cases as active/inactive, depending on the signal-intensities of lung tissues. Results: The pneumologist classified 14 patients into group A and 7 patients into group B. Using CT, 6 cases were classified as active, 15 cases as inactive disease. With MRI 12 cases were classified as active and 9 cases as inactive. In the complete group of 21 patients MRI decisions and CT decisions respectively were false positive/false negative/correct in 2/4/15 respectively 0/8/13 cases. Correct diagnoses were obtained in 72% (MRI) respectively 62% (CT). In the subgroup of 12 cases including HRCT, MRI respectively CT were false positive/false negative/correct in 2/1/9 respectively 0/5/7 cases. Correct diagnoses were obtained in 75% (MRI) respectively 58% (CT). Conclusion: Highfield MRI of the lung is feasible and performed slightly better compared to CT in the

  10. Initial experience with lung-MRI at 3.0 T: Comparison with CT and clinical data in the evaluation of interstitial lung disease activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutterbey, G. [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53105 Bonn (Germany)]. E-mail: goetz.lutterbey@ukb.uni-bonn.de; Grohe, C. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Bonn (Germany); Gieseke, J. [PHILIPS Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Falkenhausen, M. von [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53105 Bonn (Germany); Morakkabati, N. [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53105 Bonn (Germany); Wattjes, M.P. [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53105 Bonn (Germany); Manka, R. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Bonn (Germany); Trog, D. [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53105 Bonn (Germany); Schild, H.H. [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53105 Bonn (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    Objectives: We evaluated the feasibility of highfield lung-MRI at 3.0 T. A comparison with Computed Tomography (CT) and clinical data regarding the assessment of inflammatory activity in patients with diffuse lung disease was performed. Material and methods: Prospective evaluation of 21 patients (15 males, 6 females, 43-80 y) with diffuse lung diseases who underwent clinical work-up inclusive laboratory tests, lung-function tests and transbronchial biopsy. After routine helical CT (additional 12 HRCT) a lung-MRI (3.0 Intera, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands) using a T2-weighted, cardiac and respiratory triggered Fast-Spinecho-Sequence (TE/TR = 80/1500-2500 ms, 22 transverse slices, 7/2 mm slice-thickness/-gap) was performed. A pneumologist classified the cases into two groups: A = temporary acute interstitial disease or chronic interstitial lung disease with acute episode or superimposed infection/B = burned out interstitial lung disease without activity. Two blinded CT-radiologists graded the cases in active/inactive disease on the basis of nine morphological criteria each. A third radiologist rated the MRI-cases as active/inactive, depending on the signal-intensities of lung tissues. Results: The pneumologist classified 14 patients into group A and 7 patients into group B. Using CT, 6 cases were classified as active, 15 cases as inactive disease. With MRI 12 cases were classified as active and 9 cases as inactive. In the complete group of 21 patients MRI decisions and CT decisions respectively were false positive/false negative/correct in 2/4/15 respectively 0/8/13 cases. Correct diagnoses were obtained in 72% (MRI) respectively 62% (CT). In the subgroup of 12 cases including HRCT, MRI respectively CT were false positive/false negative/correct in 2/1/9 respectively 0/5/7 cases. Correct diagnoses were obtained in 75% (MRI) respectively 58% (CT). Conclusion: Highfield MRI of the lung is feasible and performed slightly better compared to CT in the

  11. Induced sputum in interstitial lung diseases – A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Araújo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Induced sputum with hypertonic saline has been suggested as a safer and cheaper alternative to bronchoalveolar lavage for evaluation of patients with interstitial lung diseases (ILD. Objective: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of sputum induction in ILD and to compare sputum cellular profiles with paired bronchoalveolar lavage fluid results. Materials and methods: Twenty patients underwent sputum induction with 4.5% saline within 2 weeks of bronchoalveolar lavage. Total, differential cell counts and cellular viability were assessed. Wilcoxon test and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were used and a p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: From a total of 20 subjects (mean age 49.4 ± 16.4 years, 70% male a satisfactory sputum sample was obtained in 15 subjects (75%. Induction was stopped in one subject, due to a significant decrease in PEF. The cell profiles for induced sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF were different (p < 0.05, except for eosinophils, and there were no significant correlations between the two methods. Compared to sputum reference values there was an increase of lymphocytes (3.2% vs 0.5% and eosinophils (1.4% vs 0.0%. Comparing sarcoidosis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis sputum, both diseases had an increase in lymphocytes (4.4 vs 3.9%, with a significant higher neutrophil count in hypersensitivity pneumonitis (65.4% vs 10.6% p < 0.05, a finding also seen in BALF. Conclusion: Induced sputum is feasible and safe in interstitial lung diseases. Although sputum cellular counts are not correlated with bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, sputum cellular profiles may help to distinguish different ILD. Resumo: Introdução: A indução de esputo com soro hipertónico tem sido apontada como uma alternativa, mais económica e segura, ao lavado broncoalveolar na avaliação de doentes com doença pulmonar intersticial (DPI. Objetivo: Avaliar a

  12. Interstitial lung disease associated with collagen vascular disorders: disease quantification using a computer-aided diagnosis tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, K.; Engelke, C.; Dicken, V.; Kneitz, C.; Hoehmann, M.; Kenn, W.; Hahn, D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) tool compared to human observers in quantification of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in patients with collagen-vascular disorders. A total of 52 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n=24), scleroderma (n=14) and systemic lupus erythematosus (n=14) underwent thin-section CT. Two independent observers assessed the extent of ILD (EoILD), reticulation (EoRet) and ground-glass opacity (EoGGO). CAD assessed EoILD twice. Pulmonary function tests were obtained. Statistical evaluation used 95% limits of agreement and linear regression analysis. CAD correlated well with diffusing capacity (DL CO ) (R=-0.531, P CO (R=-0.705, P CO and moderately with FVC (DL CO : R=-0.663; FVC: R=-0.436; P≤0.005). The CAD system is a promising tool for ILD quantification, showing close correlation with human observers and physiologic impairment. (orig.)

  13. Childhood interstitial lung diseases in immunocompetent children in Australia and New Zealand: a decade's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddi, Vishal; Beggs, Sean; Bennetts, Bruce; Harrison, Joanne; Hime, Neil; Kapur, Nitin; Lipsett, Jill; Nogee, Lawrence M; Phu, Amy; Suresh, Sadasivam; Schultz, André; Selvadurai, Hiran; Sherrard, Stephanie; Strachan, Roxanne; Vyas, Julian; Zurynski, Yvonne; Jaffé, Adam

    2017-07-25

    Childhood interstitial lung disease (chILD) represents a rare heterogeneous group of respiratory disorders. In the absence of randomized controlled clinical trials, global collaborations have utilized case series with an aim to standardising approaches to diagnosis and management. Australasian data are lacking. The aim of this study was to calculate prevalence and report the experience of chILD in Australasia over a decade. Paediatric pulmonologists in Australia and New Zealand involved in the care of patients aged 0-18 years with chILD completed a questionnaire on demographics, clinical features and outcomes, over a 10 year period. These data, together with data from the 2 reference genetics laboratories, were used to calculate prevalence. One hundred fifteen cases were identified equating to a period prevalence (range) of 1.5 (0.8-2.1) cases/million for children aged 0-18years. Clinical data were provided on 106 patients: the <2 year group comprised 66 children, median age (range) 0.50 years (0.01-1.92); the ≥2 year group comprised 40 children, median age 8.2 years (2.0-18.0). Management approach was heterogeneous. Overall, 79% of patients had a good clinical outcome. Mortality rate was 7% in the study population. chILD is rare in Australasia. This study demonstrates variation in the investigations and management of chILD cases across Australasia, however the general outcome is favorable. Further international collaboration will help finesse the understanding of these disorders.

  14. Observer agreement in the diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases based on HRCT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Viviane Baptista; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Jasinowodolinski, Dany; Verrastro, Carlos Gustavo Yuji; Torlai, Fabiola Goda

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to determine the interobserver and intraobserver agreement in the diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) based on HRCT scans and the impact of observer expertise, clinical data and confidence level on such agreement. Methods: two thoracic radiologists and two general radiologists independently reviewed the HRCT images of 58 patients with ILDs on two distinct occasions: prior to and after the clinical anamnesis. The radiologists selected up to three diagnostic hypotheses for each patient and defined the confidence level for these hypotheses. One of the thoracic and one of the general radiologists re-evaluated the same images up to three months after the first readings. In the coefficient analyses, the kappa statistic was used. Results: the thoracic and general radiologists, respectively, agreed on at least one diagnosis for each patient in 91.4% and 82.8% of the patients. The thoracic radiologists agreed on the most likely diagnosis in 48.3% (κ = 0.42) and 62.1% (κ = 0.58) of the cases, respectively, prior to and after the clinical anamnesis; likewise, the general radiologists agreed on the most likely diagnosis in 37.9% (κ 0.32) and 36.2% (κ = 0.30) of the cases. For the thoracic radiologist, the intraobserver agreement on the most likely diagnosis was 0.73 and 0.63 prior to and after the clinical anamnesis, respectively. That for the general radiologist was 0.38 and 0.42.The thoracic radiologists presented almost perfect agreement for the diagnostic hypotheses defined with the high confidence level. Conclusions: Interobserver and intraobserver agreement in the diagnosis of ILDs based on HRCT scans ranged from fair to almost perfect and was influenced by radiologist expertise, clinical history and confidence level. (author)

  15. Predictive factors for long-term outcome in polymyositis/dermatomyositis-associated interstitial lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Hozumi, Hironao; Kono, Masato; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Inui, Naoki; Nakashima, Ran; Imura, Yoshitaka; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Suda, Takafumi

    2017-03-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is strongly associated with polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), and clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis (CADM). It is also related to mortality. Previous studies have highlighted that the acute form of PM/DM/CADM-associated ILD (PM/DM/CADM-ILD) has a poor short-term prognosis. However, little is known about the long-term clinical features of patients with PM/DM/CADM-ILD. The aim of the present study is to clarify the clinical characteristics and the predictive factors for long-term outcomes in patients with PM/DM/CADM-ILD. Thirty-four patients with PM/DM/CADM-ILD who were followed up for more than 12 months were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were classified as "stable" or "deterioration" according to respiratory symptoms, serial changes in forced vital capacity (FVC) or arterial oxygen pressure, and radiologic findings during the follow-up period. Twenty-six patients (76%) were in the stable group and eight patients (24%) were in the deterioration group. Home oxygen therapy was performed in six cases in the deterioration group because of chronic respiratory failure due to progression of ILD. The deterioration group, in comparison to the stable group, had a significantly lower %FVC and a higher positive rate for the anti-PL-7 antibody. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that a positive anti-PL-7 antibody test and a lower %FVC were independently associated with deterioration during long-term follow-up. Patients with PM/DM/CADM-ILD are at risk for chronic respiratory failure due to the deterioration of ILD during long-term follow-up. The presence of anti-PL-7 antibody and a lower %FVC at initial diagnosis may predict long-term deterioration in patients with PM/DM/CADM-ILD. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Selecting registration schemes in case of interstitial lung disease follow-up in CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlachopoulos, Georgios; Korfiatis, Panayiotis; Skiadopoulos, Spyros; Kazantzi, Alexandra; Kalogeropoulou, Christina; Pratikakis, Ioannis; Costaridou, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Primary goal of this study is to select optimal registration schemes in the framework of interstitial lung disease (ILD) follow-up analysis in CT. Methods: A set of 128 multiresolution schemes composed of multiresolution nonrigid and combinations of rigid and nonrigid registration schemes are evaluated, utilizing ten artificially warped ILD follow-up volumes, originating from ten clinical volumetric CT scans of ILD affected patients, to select candidate optimal schemes. Specifically, all combinations of four transformation models (three rigid: rigid, similarity, affine and one nonrigid: third order B-spline), four cost functions (sum-of-square distances, normalized correlation coefficient, mutual information, and normalized mutual information), four gradient descent optimizers (standard, regular step, adaptive stochastic, and finite difference), and two types of pyramids (recursive and Gaussian-smoothing) were considered. The selection process involves two stages. The first stage involves identification of schemes with deformation field singularities, according to the determinant of the Jacobian matrix. In the second stage, evaluation methodology is based on distance between corresponding landmark points in both normal lung parenchyma (NLP) and ILD affected regions. Statistical analysis was performed in order to select near optimal registration schemes per evaluation metric. Performance of the candidate registration schemes was verified on a case sample of ten clinical follow-up CT scans to obtain the selected registration schemes. Results: By considering near optimal schemes common to all ranking lists, 16 out of 128 registration schemes were initially selected. These schemes obtained submillimeter registration accuracies in terms of average distance errors 0.18 ± 0.01 mm for NLP and 0.20 ± 0.01 mm for ILD, in case of artificially generated follow-up data. Registration accuracy in terms of average distance error in clinical follow-up data was in the

  17. Selecting registration schemes in case of interstitial lung disease follow-up in CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlachopoulos, Georgios; Korfiatis, Panayiotis; Skiadopoulos, Spyros; Kazantzi, Alexandra [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine,University of Patras, Patras 26504 (Greece); Kalogeropoulou, Christina [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Patras 26504 (Greece); Pratikakis, Ioannis [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, Xanthi 67100 (Greece); Costaridou, Lena, E-mail: costarid@upatras.gr [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Patras 26504 (Greece)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Primary goal of this study is to select optimal registration schemes in the framework of interstitial lung disease (ILD) follow-up analysis in CT. Methods: A set of 128 multiresolution schemes composed of multiresolution nonrigid and combinations of rigid and nonrigid registration schemes are evaluated, utilizing ten artificially warped ILD follow-up volumes, originating from ten clinical volumetric CT scans of ILD affected patients, to select candidate optimal schemes. Specifically, all combinations of four transformation models (three rigid: rigid, similarity, affine and one nonrigid: third order B-spline), four cost functions (sum-of-square distances, normalized correlation coefficient, mutual information, and normalized mutual information), four gradient descent optimizers (standard, regular step, adaptive stochastic, and finite difference), and two types of pyramids (recursive and Gaussian-smoothing) were considered. The selection process involves two stages. The first stage involves identification of schemes with deformation field singularities, according to the determinant of the Jacobian matrix. In the second stage, evaluation methodology is based on distance between corresponding landmark points in both normal lung parenchyma (NLP) and ILD affected regions. Statistical analysis was performed in order to select near optimal registration schemes per evaluation metric. Performance of the candidate registration schemes was verified on a case sample of ten clinical follow-up CT scans to obtain the selected registration schemes. Results: By considering near optimal schemes common to all ranking lists, 16 out of 128 registration schemes were initially selected. These schemes obtained submillimeter registration accuracies in terms of average distance errors 0.18 ± 0.01 mm for NLP and 0.20 ± 0.01 mm for ILD, in case of artificially generated follow-up data. Registration accuracy in terms of average distance error in clinical follow-up data was in the

  18. Rituximab treatment in a case of antisynthetase syndrome with severe interstitial lung disease and acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zappa Maria

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of severe interstitial pneumonitis, mild polyarthritis and polymyositis, and Raynaud's syndrome with the presence of anti-Jo-1 antibodies, which had been diagnosed as anti-synthetase syndrome. The presence, however, of anti-Ro/SSA antibodies led us to understand that we were dealing here with a more severe form of interstitial lung disease. The patient was treated for acute respiratory failure but he showed resistance to glucocorticoids and cyclosporine. Thus, he was treated with infusions of anti-CD20 therapy (rituximab: his clinical conditions improved very rapidly and a significant decrease in the activity of pulmonary disease was detected using high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT of the thorax and pulmonary function tests.

  19. β-thymosins and interstitial lung disease: study of a scleroderma cohort with a one-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messana Irene

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background β-thymosins play roles in cytoskeleton rearrangement, angiogenesis, fibrosis and reparative process, thus suggesting a possible involvement in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis. The aim of the study was to investigate the presence of thymosins β4, β4 sulfoxide, and β10 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of scleroderma patients with interstitial lung disease and the relation of these factors with pulmonary functional and radiological parameters. Methods β-thymosins concentrations were determined by Reverse Phase-High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray-Mass Spectrometry in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of 46 scleroderma patients with lung involvement and of 15 controls. Results Thymosin β4, β4 sulfoxide, and β10 were detectable in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients and controls. Thymosin β4 levels were significantly higher in scleroderma patients than in controls. In addition, analyzing the progression of scleroderma lung disease at one-year follow-up, we have found that higher thymosin β4 levels seem to have a protective role against lung tissue damage. Thymosin β4 sulfoxide levels were higher in the smokers and in the scleroderma patients with alveolitis. Conclusions We describe for the first time β-thymosins in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of scleroderma lung disease. Thymosin β4 seems to have a protective role against lung tissue damage, while its oxidation product mirrors an alveolar inflammatory status.

  20. Interstitial Lung Disease After Kidney Transplantation and the Role of Everolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solazzo, A; Botta, C; Nava, F; Baisi, A; Bonucchi, D; Cappelli, G

    2016-03-01

    Kidney transplant recipients are at higher risk of developing pulmonary complications related to immunosuppression, and inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTORi) has been reported as a potential cause. Five hundred kidney-transplanted patients were retrospectively analyzed for pulmonary complications on the basis of clinical and instrumental data (chest radiography, high-resolution computed tomography, broncho-alveolar lavage, oximetry). We found 26 interstitial lung diseases (ILD) (16%): 12 cases (46.2%) were from infections (42.8% by Pneumocystis jirovecii) and 14 cases of ILD (53.8%) resulted as drug-induced ILD (DI-ILD). According to anti-rejection protocols, DI-ILD occurred in 8 patients (57%) while on triple regimen including steroids, everolimus (EVL), and cyclosporine (CyA) and in 6 patients on double regimen with steroids and mTORi: EVL or sirolimus (43%). In ILD+ patients, everolimus trough-concentration (EVL(TLC)) and cyclosporine (2nd-hour concentration: CyA(C2)) levels were higher than in patients in the same regimen but with ILD- (EVL(TLC) [ng/mL] 9.84 versus 6.85; CyA(C2) [ng/mL] 303.97 versus 298.56). The formula that used the combined blood levels of both drugs (EVL(TLC) + CyA(C2)/100) resulted in a significant difference between groups of patients (12.88 ± 1.61 versus 9.83 ± 1.91). Applying receiver operator characteristic curve (ROC) analysis to detect risk of developing ILD when on combined protocol with EVL and CyA, we obtained an area under the curve of 0.8622 (P = .0081) and 0.9082 (P = .0028), respectively, when using EVL(TLC) or the combination formula with both drugs. In renal transplant patients, we obtained a relationship of ILD to specific drug concentration. On the basis of ROC analysis, patients on EVL and CyA combined protocol are at risk of ILD when EVL(TLC) is >9.03 ng/mL or >11.41 when a formula with summation of EVL(TLC) and CyA(C2) is used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dermatomyositis with Rapidly Progressive Interstitial Lung Disease Treated with Rituximab: A Report of 3 Cases in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Kenichiro; Hagino, Noboru

    2017-01-01

    We performed a retrospective chart review of three patients with hypomyopathic dermatomyositis and rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease. The patients were Japanese women of 71, 69, and 65 years of age. Two patients were anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (anti-MDA5) antibody-positive and 1 was anti-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (anti-ARS) antibody-positive. Their respiratory statuses deteriorated despite the administration of glucocorticoid, calcineurin inhibitors, and intravenous cyclophosphamide therapy. We subsequently administered rituximab. The anti-ARS antibody-positive patient survived, while 2 anti-MDA5 antibody-positive patients died.

  2. Dynamic Gd-DTPA enhanced breath-hold 1.5 t MRI of normal lungs and patients with interstitial lung disease and pulmonary nodules: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semelka, R.C.; Maycher, B.; Shoenut, J.P.; Kroeker, R.; Griffin, P.; Lertzman, M.

    1992-01-01

    A FLASH technique was used, which encompassed the entire thorax in the transverse plane, before and after dynamic intravenous injection of godalinium DTPA (Gd-DTPA) to study 7 patients with normal lungs, 12 patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD), and 11 patients with pulmonary nodules. Comparative CT studies were obtained within 2 weeks of the MRI study in the patients with lung disease. Quantitative signal intensity (SI) measurements were performed. Qualitative evaluation of lung parenchyma was determined in a prospective blinded fashion, and in the normal group comparison was made with the CT images. In normal patients, SI of lung parenchyma increased by 7.7±1.3%. On precontrast images, second-order pulmonary branchings were visible while post-contrast, fifth- to sixth-order branches were apparent. In patients with ILD, interstitial changes enhanced to a variable extent, increases in SI ranging from minimal (49.9%) to substantial (308.4%). Detection of pulmonary nodules improved following contrast injection. The minimum lesion size detectable decreased from 8 mm precontrast to 5 mm post-contrast. Percentage contrast enhancement was greater for malignant nodules (124.2±79.7%) than benign nodules (5.8±4.7%) (p<0.01). (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of chronic infectious interstitial pulmonary disease in children by low-dose CT-guided transthoracic lung biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyer, Christoph M.; Lemburg, Stefan P.; Kagel, Thomas; Nicolas, Volkmar [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, BG Clinics Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany); Mueller, Klaus-Michael [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Institute of Pathology, BG Clinics Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany); Nuesslein, Thomas G.; Rieger, Christian H.L. [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Pediatric Hospital, Bochum (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Children with chronic infectious interstitial lung disease often have to undergo open lung biopsy to establish a final diagnosis. Open lung biopsy is an invasive procedure with major potential complications. Transthoracic lung biopsy (TLB) guided by computed tomography (CT) is a less-invasive well-established procedure in adults. Detailing the role of low-dose CT-guided TLB in the enhanced diagnosis of chronic lung diseases related to infection in children. A group of 11 children (age 8 months to 16 years) underwent CT-guided TLB with a 20-gauge biopsy device. All investigations were done under general anaesthesia on a multidetector CT scanner (SOMATOM Volume Zoom, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using a low-dose protocol (single slices, 120 kV, 20 mAs). Specimens were processed by histopathological, bacteriological, and virological techniques. All biopsies were performed without major complications; one child developed a small pneumothorax that resolved spontaneously. A diagnosis could be obtained in 10 of the 11 patients. Biopsy specimens revealed chronic interstitial alveolitis in ten patients. In five patients Chlamydia pneumoniae PCR was positive, in three Mycoplasma pneumoniae PCR was positive, and in two Cytomegalovirus PCR was positive. The average effective dose was 0.83 mSv. Low-dose CT-guided TLB can be a helpful tool in investigating chronic infectious inflammatory processes in children with minimal radiation exposure. It should be considered prior to any open surgical procedure performed for biopsy alone. In our patient group no significant complication occurred. A disadvantage of the method is that it does not allow smaller airways and vessels to be assessed. (orig.)

  4. [Comparison of LCD and CRT monitors for detection of pulmonary nodules and interstitial lung diseases on digital chest radiographs by using receiver operating characteristic analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Ryuji; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Shimonobou, Toshiaki; Hiai, Yasuhiro; Hashida, Masahiro; Awai, Kazuo; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Doi, Kunio

    2006-05-20

    Soft copy reading of digital images has been practiced commonly in the PACS environment. In this study, we compared liquid-crystal display (LCD) and cathode-ray tube (CRT) monitors for detection of pulmonary nodules and interstitial lung diseases on digital chest radiographs by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Digital chest images with a 1000x1000 matrix size and a 8 bit grayscale were displayed on LCD/CRT monitor with 2M pixels in each observer test. Eight and ten radiologists participated in the observer tests for detection of nodules and interstitial diseases, respectively. In each observer test, radiologists marked their confidence levels for diagnosis of pulmonary nodules or interstitial diseases. The detection performance of radiologists was evaluated by ROC analyses. The average Az values (area under the ROC curve) in detecting pulmonary nodules with LCD and CRT monitors were 0.792 and 0.814, respectively. In addition, the average Az values in detecting interstitial diseases with LCD and CRT monitors were 0.951 and 0.953, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between LCD and CRT for both detection of pulmonary nodules (P=0.522) and interstitial lung diseases (P=0.869). Therefore, we believe that the LCD monitor instead of the CRT monitor can be used for the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules and interstitial lung diseases in digital chest images.

  5. Interstitial lung disease associated with Equine Infectious Anemia Virus infection in horses

    OpenAIRE

    Cadoré, Jean-Luc; Catoi, Cornel; Archer, Fabienne; Dolmazon, Christine; Mornex, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    EIA (Equine Infectious Anemia) is a blood-borne disease primarily transmitted by haematophagous insects or needle punctures. Other routes of transmission have been poorly explored. We evaluated the potential of EIAV (Equine Infectious Anemia Virus) to induce pulmonary lesions in naturally infected equids. Lungs from 77 EIAV seropositive horses have been collected in Romania and France. Three types of lesions have been scored on paraffin-embedded lungs: lymphocyte infiltration, bronchiolar inf...

  6. Evaluation and management of alveolitis and interstitial lung disease in scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latsi, Panagiota I; Wells, Athol U

    2003-11-01

    In the fibrosing alveolitis of systemic sclerosis, treatment decisions depend on prognostic evaluation, which continues to excite considerable interest and debate. Advances in the staging of fibrosing alveolitis of systemic sclerosis and recent therapeutic studies are discussed in this review. The decision about whether to start treatment is often the most difficult clinical challenge, because many patients have limited pulmonary fibrosis that will not necessarily progress. The estimation of disease extent (using high-resolution CT) and disease severity (using pulmonary function tests) is pivotal. Factors reducing the threshold for treatment, in addition to severe disease, include evidence of recent deterioration, a short duration of systemic disease, antitopoisomerase antibody positivity, and, in some cases, bronchoalveolar lavage findings (although the role of bronchoalveolar lavage remains contentious). Histologic appearances at surgical biopsy have little prognostic value, with the great majority of patients having nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Best current initial treatment consists of either oral or intravenous cyclophosphamide, usually administered with low-dose corticosteroid therapy, although the risk of scleroderma renal crisis with low-dose steroid therapy requires further evaluation. Careful prognostic evaluation, including the staging of disease severity and the definition of longitudinal disease behavior (by serial imaging and pulmonary function tests), is central to the formulation of a logical management plan in fibrosing alveolitis of systemic sclerosis. Cyclophosphamide, the best initial treatment currently, is associated with significant toxicity, justifying therapeutic studies of other immunosuppressive agents and a wide range of anticytokine and antifibrotic agents.

  7. [Efficacy and safety of the use of levodropropizine in patients with chronic interstitial lung diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunella, G; Zanasi, A; Massimo Vanasia, C B

    1991-02-28

    Efficacy and tolerability of an antitussive drug, levodropropizine, in 21 adult patients with interstitial lung disorders was evaluated in this study. Levodropropizine dosage was 60 mg t.i.d. for four days of therapy. The authors evaluated the effectiveness of the antitussive therapy and, on the other hand, the tolerability of levodropropizine in these patients, monitoring PaO2, PaCO2 and pH values. The changes in cough frequency (34.1 +/- 5.6 20.4 +/- 5.4 mean +/- d.s. before and after treatment) and the overall efficacy judgment as reported by the doctor indicate a decrease in cough as confirmed by the significance of Kruskal-Wallis test (p less than 0.05). Furthermore the tolerability has been excellent, because the PaO2, PaCo2 ad pH values before and after treatment were unchanged (PaO2 mmHg: basal 71 +/- 16.6, after treatment 73.8 +/- 14.2; PaCO2 mmHg: basal 36.6 +/- 5, after treatment 36.6 +/- 4.6; pH basal 7.4 +/- 0.03, after treatment 7.4 +/- 0.02).

  8. Interstitial Lung Disease in Werner Syndrome: A Case Report of a 55-Year-Old Male Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiphaine Goletto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is a progeroid or premature aging syndrome characterized by early onset of age-related pathologies and cancer. The average life expectancy of affected people is 52.8 years and tends to increase. The major causes of death are malignancy and myocardial infarction. Increased telomere attrition and decay are thought to play a causative role in the clinical and pathological manifestations of the disease. Although telomere length, with or without germline mutation, is known to be associated with interstitial lung disease, the latter is not associated with WS. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case describing a WS patient with fatal ILD. This case suggests that older patients with WS could develop ILD. Clinical outcome of WS patients may thus be improved by counselling them regarding smoking cessation or other exposure and by proposing antifibrotic therapy.

  9. HMGB1 May Be a Biomarker for Predicting the Outcome in Patients with Polymyositis /Dermatomyositis with Interstitial Lung Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Shu

    Full Text Available To investigate the significance of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 levels in polymyositis (PM and dermatomyositis (DM patients with interstitial lung disease and whether HMGB1 levels could predict disease outcome.HMGB1 levels were measured in sera from 34 patients with PM/DM and from 34 healthy controls by ELISA.Significantly higher serum levels of HMGB1 were found in patients with PM [12.75 ng/ml (4.34-25.07 ng/ml, p < 0.001] and DM [20.75 ng/ml (3.80-124.88 ng/ml, p < 0.001] than in healthy controls [5.64 ng/ml (2.71-8.71 ng/ml]. Importantly, the average HMGB1 level in PM/DM patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD was 25.84 ng/ml, which is significantly higher than that in PM/DM patients without ILD [12.68 ng/ml] (p < 0.05. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis revealed that the serum HMGB1 cutoff value that best discriminated PM/DM patients with ILD from those without ILD was 14.5ng/ml. The area under the curve was 0.87±0.05, and the 95% Confidence interval (CI was 0.77-0.98. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of this serum HMGB1 cutoff level was 84.6% and 89% respectively. Patients with higher levels of HMGB1 expression had lower overall survival rates and disease-free survival rates, whereas patients with lower levels of HMGB1 expression had higher survival rates.Multivariate analysis showed that HMGB1 expression is a prognostic indicator for patient survival. These data support the notion that HMGB1 overexpression is involved in PM/DM progression for patients with ILD and is relative to its poor clinical outcomes.

  10. Assessment of interstitial lung disease in Sjögren's syndrome by lung ultrasound: a pilot study of correlation with high-resolution chest tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasco, Pablo Guisado; de Luna Cardenal, Gonzalo; Garrido, Isabel Martín; Pinilla, José Manuel Luque; Rodríguez, Guadalupe Fraile; Mateo, Juan José Nava; Ruiz, Daniel Carnevalli

    2017-04-01

    The background of this study is to assess the accuracy of lung ultrasound (LUS) to diagnose interstitial lung disease (ILD) in Sjögren's syndrome (Sjs), in patients who have any alterations in pulmonary function tests (PFT) or respiratory symptoms. LUS was correlated with chest tomography (hrCT), considering it as the imaging gold standard technique to diagnose ILD. This is a pilot, multicenter, cross-sectional, and consecutive-case study. The inclusion criteria are ≥18 years old, Signs and symptoms: according to ACEG 2002 criteria, respiratory symptoms (dyspnea, cough), or any alterations in PFR. LUS was done following the International Consensus Conference on Lung Ultrasound protocol for interstitial syndrome (B pattern). Of the 50 patients in follow-up, 13 (26%) met the inclusion criteria. All were women with age 63.62 years (range 39-88). 78.6% of the cases had primary Sjs (SLE, RA, n = 2). The intra-rater reliability k is 1, according to Gwet's Ac1 and GI index (probability to concordance-e(K)-, by Cohen, of 0.52). LUS has a sensitivity of 1 (95% CI 0.398-1.0), specificity of 0.89 (95% CI 0.518-0.997), and a positive probability reason of 9.00 (95% CI 7.1-11.3) to detect ILD. The correlation of Pearson is r = 0.84 (p < 0.001). To check the accuracy of LUS to diagnose ILD, a completely bilateral criterion of yes/no for interstitial pattern was chosen, AUC reaches significance, 0.94 (0.07) (95% CI 0.81-1.0, p = 0.014). LUS reaches an excellent correlation to hrCT in Sjs affected with ILD, and might be a useful technique in daily clinical practice for the assessment of pulmonary disease in the sicca syndrome.

  11. Short-Term Pulmonary Function Trends Are Predictive of Mortality in Interstitial Lung Disease Associated With Systemic Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Nicole S; Hoyles, Rachel K; Denton, Christopher P; Hansell, David M; Renzoni, Elisabetta A; Maher, Toby M; Nicholson, Andrew G; Wells, Athol U

    2017-08-01

    To determine the prognostic value of pulmonary function test (PFT) trends at 1 and 2 years in interstitial lung disease (ILD) associated with systemic sclerosis (SSc). The prognostic significance of PFT trends at 1 year (n = 162) and 2 years (n = 140) was examined against 15-year survival in patients with SSc-associated ILD. PFT trends, expressed as continuous change and as categorical change in separate analyses, were examined against mortality in univariate and multivariate models. SSc-associated ILD was defined at presentation as either limited lung fibrosis or extensive lung fibrosis, using the United Kingdom Raynaud's and Scleroderma Association severity staging system. One-year PFT trends were predictive of mortality only in patients with extensive lung fibrosis: categorical change in the forced vital capacity (FVC), alone or in combination with categorical change in the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLco), had greater prognostic significance than continuous change in the FVC or trends in other PFT variables. Taking into account both prognostic value and sensitivity to change, the optimal definition of progression for trial purposes was an FVC and DLco composite end point, consisting of either an FVC decline from baseline of ≥10% or an FVC decline of 5-9% in association with a DLco decline of ≥15%. At 2 years, gas transfer trends had the greatest prognostic significance, in the whole cohort and in those with limited lung fibrosis. However, in patients with extensive lung fibrosis, the above-defined FVC and DLco composite end point was the strongest prognostic determinant. Larger changes in the FVC:DLco ratio than in the carbon monoxide transfer coefficient were required to achieve prognostic significance. Based on linkages to long-term outcomes, these findings provide support for use of routine spirometry and gas transfer monitoring in patients with SSc-associated ILD, with further evaluation of a composite FVC and DLco end point

  12. Spectrum of interstitial lung diseases at a tertiary center in a developing country: A study of 803 subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahajal Dhooria

    Full Text Available The spectrum of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs have mainly been reported from the developed countries; data from developing countries is sparse and conflicting. The aim of this study is to describe the distribution of various ILDs from a developing country.This is an analysis of prospectively collected clinical, radiological and histological data of consecutive subjects (age >12 years with ILDs from a single tertiary care medical center. The diagnosis of the specific subtype of ILD was made according to standard criteria for various ILDs.A total of 803 subjects (mean age, 50.6 years; 50.2% women were enrolled between March 2015 to February 2017 of which 566 (70.5% were diagnosed during the study period (incident cases. Sarcoidosis (42.2%, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, 21.2%, connective tissue disease (CTD-related ILDs (12.7%, hypersensitivity pneumonitis (10.7%, and non-IPF idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (9.2% were the most common ILDs. The spectrum of ILDs was not significantly different (p = 0.87 between incident and prevalent cases. A histopathological specimen was obtained in 49.9% of the subjects yielding a histologically confirmed diagnosis in 40.6%. A diagnostic procedure was not performed in 402 subjects; the most common reasons were presence of definite usual interstitial pneumonia pattern on high resolution computed tomography and patients' unwillingness to undergo the procedure.Sarcoidosis, IPF and CTD-ILDs were the most common ILDs seen at a tertiary center in northern India similar to the spectrum reported from developed countries. More studies are required from developing countries to ascertain the spectrum of ILDs in different geographic locales.

  13. Interstitial lung disease associated with collagen vascular disorders: disease quantification using a computer-aided diagnosis tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marten, K.; Engelke, C. [University Hospital of Goettingen, Department of Radiology, Goettingen (Germany); Dicken, V. [MeVis Research GmbH, Bremen (Germany); Kneitz, C. [University Hospital of Wuerzburg, Dept. of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Medizinische Klinik and Poliklinik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Hoehmann, M.; Kenn, W.; Hahn, D. [University Hospital of Wuerzburg, Department of Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2009-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) tool compared to human observers in quantification of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in patients with collagen-vascular disorders. A total of 52 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n=24), scleroderma (n=14) and systemic lupus erythematosus (n=14) underwent thin-section CT. Two independent observers assessed the extent of ILD (EoILD), reticulation (EoRet) and ground-glass opacity (EoGGO). CAD assessed EoILD twice. Pulmonary function tests were obtained. Statistical evaluation used 95% limits of agreement and linear regression analysis. CAD correlated well with diffusing capacity (DL{sub CO}) (R=-0.531, P<0.0001) and moderately with forced vital capacity (FVC) (R=-0.483, P=0.0008). There was close correlation between CAD and the readers (EoILD vs. CAD: R=0.716, P<0.0001; EoRet vs. CAD: R=0.69, P<0.0001). Subgroup analysis including patients with minimal EoGGO (<15%) strengthened the correlations between CAD and the readers, readers and PFT, and CAD and PFT. EoILD by readers correlated strongly with DL{sub CO} (R=-0.705, P<0.0001) and moderately with FVC (R=-0.559, P=0.0002). EoRet correlated closely with DL{sub CO} and moderately with FVC (DL{sub CO}: R=-0.663; FVC: R=-0.436; P{<=}0.005). The CAD system is a promising tool for ILD quantification, showing close correlation with human observers and physiologic impairment. (orig.)

  14. Mesenchymal stromal stem cell therapy in advanced interstitial lung disease - Anaphylaxis and short-term follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balamugesh Thangakunam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are limited treatment options for advanced interstitial lung disease (ILD. We describe a patient of ILD treated with mesenchymal stromal stem cell infusion. The index patient had end-stage ILD due to a combination of insults including treatment with radiotherapy and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor Erlotinib. He was oxygen-dependent and this was hampering his quality of life. He tolerated the first infusion stem cells without any problem. During the second infusion he developed anaphylactic shock, which was appropriately managed. At 6-months follow-up he had no improvement in oxygenation, pulmonary function or CT scan parameters. In view of anaphylaxis, further infusions of MSC were withheld. A longer follow-up may reveal long-term benefits or side effects, if any. However the occurrence of anaphylaxis is of concern suggesting that further trials should be conducted with intensive monitoring.

  15. Management of a patient undergoing sitting position craniotomy for acoustic neuroma with co-existing interstitial lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Suvarna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old woman with acoustic neuroma associated with occupational interstitial lung disease (ILD was successfully managed for sitting position craniotomy using carefully titrated desflurane-based anaesthesia. The anaesthetic challenges included maintenance an adequate depth of anaesthesia, reducing perioperative airway events and ensuring smooth recovery. While dealing with ILD patient in sitting position, careful risk assessment is important because it will help us predict the course of the perioperative events. Balanced general anaesthesia using desflurane fulfilled the requirement of good depth and smooth recovery in this patient. Though there are reports of maintenance of anaesthesia with other inhalational agents, there are scanty reports of using desflurane in these cases.

  16. Diagnostic accuracy for X-ray chest in interstitial lung disease as confirmed by high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afzal, F.; Raza, S.; Shafique, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of x-ray chest in interstitial lung disease as confirmed by high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) chest. Study Design: A cross-sectional validational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from Oct 2013 to Apr 2014. Material and Method: A total of 137 patients with clinical suspicion of interstitial lung disease (ILD) aged 20-50 years of both genders were included in the study. Patients with h/o previous histopathological diagnosis, already taking treatment and pregnant females were excluded. All the patients had chest x-ray and then HRCT. The x-ray and HRCT findings were recorded as presence or absence of the ILD. Results: Mean age was 40.21 ± 4.29 years. Out of 137 patients, 79 (57.66 percent) were males and 58 (42.34 percent) were females with male to female ratio of 1.36:1. Chest x-ray detected ILD in 80 (58.39 percent) patients, out of which, 72 (true positive) had ILD and 8 (false positive) had no ILD on HRCT. Overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy of chest x-ray in diagnosing ILD was 80.0 percent, 82.98 percent, 90.0 percent, 68.42 percent and 81.02 percent respectively. Conclusion: This study concluded that chest x-ray is simple, non-invasive, economical and readily available alternative to HRCT with an acceptable diagnostic accuracy of 81 percent in the diagnosis of ILD. (author)

  17. Psycho-Physiological Associates of Dyspnea in Hospitalized Patients with Interstitial Lung Diseases: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Yim Wah

    2017-01-01

    Dyspnea has been found to be an independent predictor of mortality among patients with respiratory diseases and is often regarded as a difficult symptom to control in patients with interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). Previous studies have found an association of psychological and physiological factors with dyspnea among patients with chronic obstructive airway diseases. However, symptom management of hospitalized patients with ILDs has been hampered by difficulty in priority, since they are often admitted with multiple psycho-physiological needs. This study examined the prevalence of dyspnea and the psycho-physiological factors associated with it among hospitalized Chinese patients with ILDs. We studied 165 hospitalized patients with ILDs recruited consecutively over three months in a public hospital in Guangzhou, China. Dyspnea and common psycho-physiological factors, including cough symptoms, activity capacity, lung function, physical and mental health status, and anxiety and depression symptoms, were measured. By ordered logistic regression, level of dyspnea statistically significantly affected performance in a six-minute walk test and physical functioning in work or other regular daily activities in hospitalized patients with ILDs. Respiratory rehabilitation with an appropriate intensity of exercise training or other strategies for enhancing the physical functioning of this population with moderate and severe levels of dyspnea should be prioritized. PMID:29064440

  18. Psycho-Physiological Associates of Dyspnea in Hospitalized Patients with Interstitial Lung Diseases: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan Hua; Mak, Yim Wah

    2017-10-24

    Dyspnea has been found to be an independent predictor of mortality among patients with respiratory diseases and is often regarded as a difficult symptom to control in patients with interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). Previous studies have found an association of psychological and physiological factors with dyspnea among patients with chronic obstructive airway diseases. However, symptom management of hospitalized patients with ILDs has been hampered by difficulty in priority, since they are often admitted with multiple psycho-physiological needs. This study examined the prevalence of dyspnea and the psycho-physiological factors associated with it among hospitalized Chinese patients with ILDs. We studied 165 hospitalized patients with ILDs recruited consecutively over three months in a public hospital in Guangzhou, China. Dyspnea and common psycho-physiological factors, including cough symptoms, activity capacity, lung function, physical and mental health status, and anxiety and depression symptoms, were measured. By ordered logistic regression, level of dyspnea statistically significantly affected performance in a six-minute walk test and physical functioning in work or other regular daily activities in hospitalized patients with ILDs. Respiratory rehabilitation with an appropriate intensity of exercise training or other strategies for enhancing the physical functioning of this population with moderate and severe levels of dyspnea should be prioritized.

  19. Interstitial lung involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vladimirovich Bestaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease of unknown etiology, characterized by chronic erosive arthritis and extraarticular manifestations. Pulmonary involvement is one of the common extraarticular manifestations of RA and may show itself as bronchial tree lesions, rheumatoid nodules, Caplan's syndrome, and lesions in the pleura or pulmonary interstitium (interstitial lung involvement (ILI. High-resolution computed tomography allows the diagnosis of ILI in RA in nearly 70% of cases although the incidence of ILI may be lower (4 to 30% depending on diagnostic methods and patient selection criteria. There are several histopathological types of ILI, the differential diagnosis of which can be troublesome. Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia are major types of RA-associated ILI. UIP-pattern ILI has a more severe course than ILI with other histological patterns. The clinical presentation of ILI may be complicated by the likely toxic effect of a number of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs used to treat RA, such as methotrexate and leflunomide, and biological agents (BAs, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors. The pathogenesis of pulmonary involvement in RA and the role of synthetic DMARDs and BAs in the development of ILI call for further investigations.An extraarticular manifestation, such as ILI, affects the choice of treatment policy in patients with RA.The relevance of a study of ILI is beyond question. The paper discusses the state-of-the-art of investigations in this area.

  20. Early aggressive intra-venous pulse cyclophosphamide therapy for interstitial lung disease in a patient with systemic sclerosis. A case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Peshin, R

    2009-06-01

    Interstitial lung disease is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). There are currently no recommended guidelines for management of these patients. This is probably due to the rarity of this condition, as well as clinical trials with only a small number of cases. There are published case report and case series along with the two main trials, viz. Scleroderma Lung Study and the Fibrosing Alveolitis Study, but again, there is no consensus on treatment protocols. In this report, we present a case of aggressive interstitial lung disease in a patient with SSc, which improved dramatically on treatment with intra-venous cyclophosphamide and high dose prednisolone therapy.

  1. Statins and interstitial lung disease: a systematic review of the literature and of food and drug administration adverse event reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Antonio B; Karas, Richard H; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Thompson, Paul D

    2008-10-01

    To systematically review all published case reports and the US Food and Drug Administration adverse event reporting (FDA-AER) database to examine the relationship between statins and interstitial lung disease (ILD). PubMed (1987 to September 2007) and the FDA-AER database (as of June 2007) were searched for reports of ILD in which a statin was listed as a causative suspect. Two authors (one author for Pub Med cases and one for FDA-AER cases) independently abstracted patient data. Given the paucity of information, all case reports and case series in English and French were included. All adverse event reports from the FDA-AER database in which a statin was listed as causative suspect were included. The literature search using PubMed yielded eight articles describing a total of 14 case reports of ILD in association with statin use. The FDA-AER system database contained 162 cases of reported statin-induced ILD as of June 2007. For every 10,000 reports of a statin-associated adverse event, approximately 1 to 40 reports were for ILD. Statin-induced ILD is a possible newly recognized side effect of statin therapy. The mechanism of lung injury is not defined. The current review provides novel information from the FDA-AER that supports a possible, although unusual, pulmonary class effect of statins.

  2. Correlation between HRCT findings, pulmonary function tests and bronchoalveolar lavage cytology in interstitial lung disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biederer, J.; Muhle, C.; Heller, M.; Reuter, M.; Schnabel, A.; Gross, W.L.

    2004-01-01

    A prospective study correlating high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), lung function tests (PFT) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cytology in patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Fifty-three RA patients with suspected ILD (19 men, 34 women) underwent 71 HRCT (14 of 53 with sequential HRCT, mean follow-up 24.3 months). The HRCT evaluation by two observers on consensus included a semi-quantitative characterisation of lesion pattern and profusion on representative anatomical levels. Fifty-two HRCT were followed by PFT and BAL. Agreement or discordance of HRCT-, PFT- and BAL findings were analysed with Pearson's correlation, κ score and McNemar's test. Tobacco-fume exposure was estimated in pack years. Smoking/non-smoking groups were compared with Student's t test. In 49 of 53 patients, HRCT was suggestive of ILD associated with RA (66 of 71 HRCT). Reticular lesions were found in 40 of 53 patients, in 15 of 40 presenting as mixed pattern with ground-glass opacities (GGO). Pure reticular patterns predominated in patients with long duration of ILD (p>0.01). Pure GGO were not observed. Lesion profusion was highly variable and correlated moderately negative with diffusion capacity (mean 88.2% (SD±20.9%); r=-0.54; p 0.2), but not towards lymphocytosis (κ=0.10; p=0.23; McNemar test p>0.2). Differences in smoking history were not significant (p>0.1). The HRCT appears most appropriate for the detection and follow-up of ILD associated with RA. The PFT and BAL correlate only partially with lesion profusion or grading on HRCT, but they contribute valuable information about dynamic lung function and differential diagnoses (pneumonia, medication side effects). (orig.)

  3. Anti-Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies and Severity of Interstitial Lung Disease in Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Daniel Rocha-Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate whether serum titers of second-generation anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP2 are associated with the severity and extent of interstitial lung disease in rheumatoid arthritis (RA-ILD. Methods. In across-sectional study, 39 RA-ILD patients confirmed by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT were compared with 42 RA without lung involvement (RA only. Characteristics related to RA-ILD were assessed in all of the patients and serum anti-CCP2 titers quantified. Results. Higher anti-CCP2 titers were found in RA-ILD compared with RA only (medians 77.9 versus 30.2 U/mL, P<0.001. In the logistic regression analysis after adjustment for age, disease duration (DD, smoke exposure, disease activity, functioning, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and methotrexate (MTX treatment duration, the characteristics associated with RA-ILD were higher anti-CCP2 titers (P=0.003 and + RF (P=0.002. In multivariate linear regression, the variables associated with severity of ground-glass score were anti-CCP2 titers (P=0.02 and with fibrosis score DD (P=0.01, anti-CCP2 titers (P<0.001, and MTX treatment duration (P<0.001. Conclusions. Anti-CCP2 antibodies are markers of severity and extent of RA-ILD in HRCT. Further longitudinal studies are required to identify if higher anti-CCP2 titers are associated with worst prognosis in RA-ILD.

  4. High-resolution computed tomography to differentiate chronic diffuse interstitial lung diseases with predominant ground-glass pattern using logical analysis of data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Sophie Grivaud; Brauner, Michel W.; Rety, Frederique; Kronek, Louis-Philippe; Brauner, Nadia; Valeyre, Dominique; Nunes, Hilario; Brillet, Pierre-Yves

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) to differentiate chronic diffuse interstitial lung diseases (CDILD) with predominant ground-glass pattern by using logical analysis of data (LAD). A total of 162 patients were classified into seven categories: sarcoidosis (n = 38), connective tissue disease (n = 32), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (n = 18), drug-induced lung disease (n = 15), alveolar proteinosis (n = 12), idiopathic non-specific interstitial pneumonia (n = 10) and miscellaneous (n = 37). First, 40 CT attributes were investigated by the LAD to build up patterns characterising a category. From the association of patterns, LAD determined models specific to each CDILD. Second, data were recomputed by adding eight clinical attributes to the analysis. The 20 x 5 cross-folding method was used for validation. Models could be individualised for sarcoidosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, connective tissue disease and alveolar proteinosis. An additional model was individualised for drug-induced lung disease by adding clinical data. No model was demonstrated for idiopathic non-specific interstitial pneumonia and the miscellaneous category. The results showed that HRCT had a good sensitivity (≥64%) and specificity (≥78%) and a high negative predictive value (≥93%) for diseases with a model. Higher sensitivity (≥78%) and specificity (≥89%) were achieved by adding clinical data. The diagnostic performance of HRCT is high and can be increased by adding clinical data. (orig.)

  5. Blocking TGFβ via Inhibition of the αvβ6 Integrin: A Possible Therapy for Systemic Sclerosis Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamiko R. Katsumoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung disease (ILD is a commonly encountered complication of systemic sclerosis (SSc and accounts for a significant proportion of SSc-associated morbidity and mortality. Its pathogenesis remains poorly understood, and therapies that treat SSc ILD are suboptimal, at best. SSc ILD pathogenesis may share some common mechanisms with other fibrotic lung diseases, in which dysregulation of lung epithelium can contribute to pathologic fibrosis via recruitment or in situ generation and activation of fibroblasts. TGFβ, a master regulator of fibrosis, is tightly regulated in the lung by the integrin αvβ6, which is expressed at low levels on healthy alveolar epithelial cells but is highly induced in the setting of lung injury or fibrosis. Here we discuss the biology of αvβ6 and present this integrin as a potentially attractive target for inhibition in the setting of SSc ILD.

  6. Minor Salivary Gland Biopsy To Detect Primary Sjögren Syndrome in Patients With Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey J. Swigris; du Bois, Roland M.; Groshong, Steve D.; Cool, Carlyne D.; Sahin, Hakan; Lynch, David A.; Gillis, JoAnn Z.; Cohen, Marc D.; Meehan, Richard T.; Brown, Kevin K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a cohort of patients who presented with interstitial lung disease (ILD) of unknown cause, features of primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS), and a positive minor salivary gland biopsy (MSGB). Methods: Thirty-eight patients with ILD evaluated at our center underwent an MSGB to confirm a diagnosis of pSS. All of the samples were reviewed by pathologists experienced in the evaluation of salivary gland histology. We defined a positive MSGB finding as a lymphocyte focus score of >1. Results: At presentation, all patients had ILD, and symptoms of cough and dyspnea. None had a definable connective tissue disease (CTD) or known cause for their ILD. Thirteen patients (34%) had positive MSGB findings. Of these, the median age was 61 years (age range, 33 to 75 years); 7 patients (54%) were women; 8 patients (62%) had a smoking history; and 10 patients (77%) had sicca symptoms. In all patients, a thoracic high-resolution CT scan evaluation demonstrated bibasilar, peripheral-predominant, ground-glass, and reticular opacities. Four patients (31%) were negative for both antinuclear autoantibody (ANA) and rheumatoid factor (RF) autoantibody, and three patients (23%) were negative for ANA, RF, Sjögren syndrome (SS)-A, and SS-B autoantibodies. No patients experienced any complications from the MSGB. The identification of underlying pSS did not affect the management of ILD in these patients. Conclusions: Confirming a diagnosis of pSS-related ILD by performing MSGB allows for a moreprecise CTD classification. This study provides evidence that CTD may exist subclinically, andlongitudinal studies are needed to determine whether identifying occult CTD impacts on management, longitudinal changes in lung function, or survival. PMID:19429722

  7. Video-assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy in the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease: a prospective, multi-center study in 224 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibla, Juan J; Molins, Laureano; Blanco, Ana; Royo, Iñigo; Martínez Vallina, Primitivo; Martínez, Néstor; García Barajas, Santiago; Gomez, Ana; Estors, Miriam; Moldes, Milagros; Fernández, Esther; Xaubet, Antoni

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate whether the location and number of lung biopsies obtained by video-assisted thoracoscopy (VAT) influence the diagnosis of diffuse interstitial lung disease (ILD). To assess the applicability of an Ambulatory Surgery Program (ASP). Prospective, multicenter study of VAT lung biopsies due to suspected ILD from January 2007 to December 2009, including 224 patients from 13 Spanish centers (mean age 57.1 years; 52.6% females). Data were prospectively collected in every institution and sent to the coordination center for analysis. The most affected areas in high resolution chest CT were the lower lobes (55%). Bronchoscopy was performed in 84% and transbronchial biopsy in 49.1%. In 179 cases (79.9%), more than one biopsy was performed, with a diagnostic agreement of 97.2%. A definitive histopathologic diagnosis was obtained in 195 patients (87%). Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was the most frequent diagnosis (26%). There were no statistically significant factors that could predict a greater diagnostic yield (neither anatomical location nor number of biopsies). Seventy patients (31.3%) were included in an ASP. After discharge, there were complications in 12 patients (5.4%), similar between patients admitted postoperatively (9/154: 5.8%) and those included in an ASP (3/70: 4.3%). Anatomical location and number of lung biopsy specimens did not seem to influence the diagnosis. The patients included in an ASP had a complication rate comparable to that of the hospitalized, so this procedure can be included in a surgical outpatient program. Lung biopsy obtained by VAT is a powerful and safe tool for diagnosis of suspected ILD, resulting in a definitive diagnosis for the majority of patients with a low morbidity rate. Copyright © 2011 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Interstitial lung disease in gefitinib-treated Japanese patients with non-small cell lung cancer – a retrospective analysis: JMTO LC03-02

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tada Harue

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Japan, high incidences of interstitial lung disease (ILD and ILD-related deaths have been reported among gefitinib-treated patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We investigated the efficacy of gefitinib, the incidence of ILD and risk factors for ILD in these patients. Findings We obtained patient data retrospectively using questionnaires sent to 22 institutions. We asked for demographic and clinical data on NSCLC patients for whom gefitinib treatment had begun between July 2002 and February 2003. Data from a total of 526 patients were analyzed. The patient characteristics were as follows: 64% male, 69% with adenocarcinoma, 61% with a performance score of 0–1, and 5% with concurrent interstitial pneumonitis. The objective response proportion was 80/439 (18.2%; 95% CI: 14.7–22.0. ILD developed in 17 patients (3.2%; 95% CI 1.9–5.1%, of whom 7 died. According to multivariate analysis, female sex, history of prior chemotherapy, low absolute neutrophil count before gefitinib treatment, and adenocarcinoma histology were associated with response to gefitinib treatment. None of the factors we evaluated were associated with the development of ILD. Conclusion The results of this study are consistent with previously published values for treatment response proportions and incidence of ILD during gefitinib treatment in Japanese patients. Future studies should be aimed at identifying factors indicating that a patient has a high probability of receiving benefit from gefitinib and a low risk of developing ILD.

  9. Diffuse interstitial lung disease as a first manifestation of Waldenström's macroglobulinemia: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consuegra, Angélica; Marcos, Pedro J; Vázquez, Rubén; Pombo, Jorge; Debén, Guillermo; Verea-Hernando, Héctor

    2014-04-01

    Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM) is a lymphoid malignancy characterized by infiltration, mainly of the bone marrow and lymph nodes, by small mature lymphocytes showing plasmacytoid differentiation, associated with an IgM monoclonal band, and, in general, a low degree of aggressiveness. We present the first case reported in the Spanish literature of interstitial lung disease presenting as MW and we review the literature. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Successful delivery in a patient with clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis during pregnancy despite first-trimester acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Moeko; Sato, Eri; Tanaka, Eiichi; Tochihara, Mari; Shimizu, Yoko; Osawa, Hikota; Sidara, Kumi; Sugimoto, Naoki; Hoshi, Daisuke; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2017-03-01

    A 37-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis and interstitial lung disease (ILD) developed clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis (CADM) after achieving pregnancy through in vitro fertilization. She was given oral prednisolone, which improved her respiratory status, and delivered a healthy baby at 35 weeks' gestation. There are few reports of successful outcomes for CADM during pregnancy; to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of successful delivery in a patient with both CADM and ILD.

  11. Personalised medicine in interstitial lung diseases: Number 6 in the Series "Personalised medicine in respiratory diseases" Edited by Renaud Louis and Nicolas Roche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokosi, Maria A; Margaritopoulos, George A; Wells, Athol U

    2018-06-30

    Interstitial lung diseases in general, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in particular, are complex disorders with multiple pathogenetic pathways, various disease behaviour profiles and different responses to treatment, all facets that make personalised medicine a highly attractive concept. Personalised medicine is aimed at describing distinct disease subsets taking into account individual lifestyle, environmental exposures, genetic profiles and molecular pathways. The cornerstone of personalised medicine is the identification of biomarkers that can be used to inform diagnosis, prognosis and treatment stratification. At present, no data exist validating a personalised approach in individual diseases. However, the importance of the goal amply justifies the characterisation of genotype and pathway signatures with a view to refining prognostic evaluation and trial design, with the ultimate aim of selecting treatments according to profiles in individual patients. Copyright ©ERS 2018.

  12. Nanoparticles as a Potential Cause of Pleural and Interstitial Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bonner, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology holds the promise of revolutionizing our society, bringing numerous beneficial innovations to improve structural materials, electronics, energy, medical imaging, and drug delivery, among other applications. However, nanomaterials present potential safety concerns, and there is accumulating evidence to suggest that nanoparticles may exert adverse effects on the lung and other organ systems. This article will overview the potential risks of engineered nanoparticles and nanotechno...

  13. Reconciling healthcare professional and patient perspectives in the development of disease activity and response criteria in connective tissue disease-related interstitial lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saketkoo, Lesley Ann; Mittoo, Shikha; Frankel, Sid; LeSage, Daphne; Sarver, Catherine; Phillips, Kristine; Strand, Vibeke; Matteson, Eric L

    2014-04-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILD), including those related to connective tissue disease (CTD), and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) carry high morbidity and mortality. Great efforts are under way to develop and investigate meaningful treatments in the context of clinical trials. However, efforts have been challenged by a lack of validated outcome measures and by inconsistent use of measures in clinical trials. Lack of consensus has fragmented effective use of strategies in CTD-ILD and IPF, with a history of resultant difficulties in obtaining agency approval of treatment interventions. Until recently, the patient perspective to determine domains and outcome measures in CTD-ILD and IPF had never been applied. Efforts described here demonstrate unequivocally the value and influence of patient involvement on core set development. Regarding CTD-ILD, this is the first OMERACT working group to directly address a manifestation/comorbidity of a rheumatic disease (ILD) as well as a disease not considered rheumatic (IPF). The OMERACT 11 proceedings of the CTD-ILD Working Group describe the forward and lateral process to include both the medical and patient perspectives in the urgently needed identification of a core set of preliminary domains and outcome measures in CTD-ILD and IPF.

  14. Cyclophosphamide-refractory scleroderma-associated interstitial lung disease: remarkable clinical and radiological response to a single course of rituximab combined with high-dose corticosteroids.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2011-10-01

    We would like to report our experience of using rituximab in cyclophosphamide refractory, rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) in a patient with limited scleroderma. A 40-year-old man presented with 10-week history of inflammatory polyarthritis, which responded to a short course of oral corticosteroids. However, 3 weeks later, he developed new onset of exertional dyspnoea. High-resolution CT of the thorax was suggestive of early ILD. Surgical lung biopsy showed features of fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia. He was diagnosed with scleroderma on the basis of: presence of anticentromere antibodies, Raynaud\\'s phenomenon, pulmonary fibrosis, digital oedema and hypomotility along with a dilated oesophagus. He was treated aggressively with pulse doses of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide; however, his ILD continued to deteriorate. At this stage, he received rituximab (two pulses of 1 g each), which led to a gradual clinical improvement. Now, 12 months since his rituximab infusion, he walks 2 miles daily without any exertional dyspnoea.

  15. Validity of Ultrasound Lung Comets for Assessment of the Severity of Interstitial Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Mariko; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Sato, Kazuhiro; Okuda, Yuji; Sakamoto, Sho; Hasegawa, Yukiyasu; Sudo, Kazuhisa; Takeda, Masahide; Sano, Masaaki; Kibira, Satoshi; Ito, Hiroshi

    2017-11-30

    Ultrasound (US) lung comets are often observed in patients with interstitial lung disease or congestive heart failure, but few studies have explored the clinical importance of US lung comets in patients with the former condition. We explored whether the US lung comet number could be used to assess the severity of interstitial pneumonia. Forty stable patients with interstitial pneumonia were examined. Lung comets evident on transthoracic US imaging in 12 selected regions of the posterior chest wall were analyzed. We defined lung comets accompanied by thickened and irregular pleural lines as interstitial US lung comets; these predominated in patients with interstitial pneumonia. The total number of interstitial US lung comets was correlated with the data from chest high-resolution computed tomography, pulmonary function tests, serologic tests, and the 6-minute walk test. The 40 patients included 16 with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and 24 with nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Thirty-four patients had interstitial US lung comets, which were more common in the lower than the upper lung area. Good correlations were evident between the lung comet number and the extent of the reticular pattern on chest high-resolution computed tomography (r = 0.710; P comet number had a strong negative correlation with the percutaneous oxygen saturation level after the 6-minute walk test (r = -0.751; P comets evident on transthoracic US imaging may be a valuable marker of disease severity in patients with interstitial pneumonia. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  16. Cutaneous Ulceration in Dermatomyositis: Association With Anti–Melanoma Differentiation–Associated Gene 5 Antibodies and Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    NARANG, NEERA S.; CASCIOLA-ROSEN, LIVIA; LI, SHUFENG; CHUNG, LORINDA; FIORENTINO, DAVID F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify clinical and serologic correlates of cutaneous ulcers in dermatomyositis (DM). Methods We retrospectively examined a cohort of 152 DM patients. We compared the features of patients with ulcers to those without ulcers using chi-square or Fisher’s exact tests and used univariate and multivariate logistic regression models to assess the association between ulcers and clinical features such as malignancy, interstitial lung disease (ILD), and amyopathic disease. Results Forty-three patients (28%) had cutaneous ulcers. Nearly half the patients had ulcers present in more than 1 location: 24 (56%) had ulcers over the extensor surfaces of joints, 18 (42%) at the digital pulp or periungual areas, and 25 (58%) had ulcers located elsewhere. In univariate analysis ulcers were associated with Asian race, but not with other clinical and demographic features, including malignancy or ILD. In multivariate analysis ulcers were significantly associated with anti–melanoma differentiation gene 5 (anti-MDA5) antibodies (odds ratio 10.14, 95% confidence interval 1.95–52.78, P = 0.0059) and this was greatest for ulcers located at the digital pulp. In patients with cutaneous ulcers, ILD risk was specifically increased only in patients with anti-MDA5+ antibodies. Conclusion We confirmed the strong association between anti-MDA5 antibodies and cutaneous ulcers, with the novel finding that the association of cutaneous ulcers with ILD depends upon the presence of anti-MDA5 antibodies. DM patients who display this cutaneous phenotype should undergo appropriate evaluation for ILD. PMID:25331610

  17. Digital Clubbing Is Associated with Higher Serum KL-6 Levels and Lower Pulmonary Function in Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazushige Shiraishi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although digital clubbing is a common presentation in patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD, little has been reported regarding its role in assessing patients with ILD. This study evaluated patients with ILD for the presence of clubbing and investigated its association with clinical data. Methods. We evaluated patients with ILD who visited the teaching hospital at which the study was conducted, between October 2014 and January 2015. Clubbing, evaluated using a Vernier caliper for individual patients, was defined as a phalangeal depth ratio > 1. We examined the association of clubbing with clinical data. Results. Of 102 patients with ILD, we identified 17 (16.7% with clubbing. The partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood was lower (65.2 ± 5.9 mmHg versus 80.2 ± 3.1 mmHg; p=0.03, serum Krebs von den Lugen-6 (KL-6 levels were higher (1495.0 ± 277.4 U/mL versus 839.1 ± 70.2 U/mL; p=0.001, and the percent predicted diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide was lower (50.0 ± 6.0 versus 73.5 ± 3.1; p=0.002 in these patients with clubbing. Conclusions. Patients with clubbing had lower oxygen levels, higher serum KL-6 levels, and lower pulmonary function than those without clubbing.

  18. Differentiation of several interstitial lung disease patterns in HRCT images using support vector machine: role of databases on performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Mandar; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Dash, Jatindra K.; Garg, Mandeep; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2016-03-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is complicated group of pulmonary disorders. High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) considered to be best imaging technique for analysis of different pulmonary disorders. HRCT findings can be categorised in several patterns viz. Consolidation, Emphysema, Ground Glass Opacity, Nodular, Normal etc. based on their texture like appearance. Clinician often find it difficult to diagnosis these pattern because of their complex nature. In such scenario computer-aided diagnosis system could help clinician to identify patterns. Several approaches had been proposed for classification of ILD patterns. This includes computation of textural feature and training /testing of classifier such as artificial neural network (ANN), support vector machine (SVM) etc. In this paper, wavelet features are calculated from two different ILD database, publically available MedGIFT ILD database and private ILD database, followed by performance evaluation of ANN and SVM classifiers in terms of average accuracy. It is found that average classification accuracy by SVM is greater than ANN where trained and tested on same database. Investigation continued further to test variation in accuracy of classifier when training and testing is performed with alternate database and training and testing of classifier with database formed by merging samples from same class from two individual databases. The average classification accuracy drops when two independent databases used for training and testing respectively. There is significant improvement in average accuracy when classifiers are trained and tested with merged database. It infers dependency of classification accuracy on training data. It is observed that SVM outperforms ANN when same database is used for training and testing.

  19. Elevated Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Is Predictive of Interstitial Lung Disease and Mortality in Dermatomyositis: a Korean Retrospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a major cause of death in patients with dermatomyositis (DM). This study was aimed to examine the utility of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) as a predictor of ILD and prognostic marker of mortality in patients with DM. One hundred-and-fourteen patients with DM were examined, including 28 with clinically amyopathic DM (CADM). A diagnosis of ILD was made based on high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans. The association between elevated ESR and pulmonary impairment and mortality was then examined. ILD was diagnosed in 53 (46.5%) of 114 DM patients. Cancer was diagnosed in 2 (3.8%) of 53 DM patients with ILD and in 24 (92.3%) of those without ILD (P < 0.001). The median ESR (50.0 mm/hour) in patients with ILD was significantly higher than that in patients without ILD (29.0 mm/hour; P < 0.001). ESR was inversely correlated with forced vital capacity (Spearman ρ = - 0.303; P = 0.007) and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (ρ = - 0.319; P = 0.006). DM patients with baseline ESR ≥ 30 mm/hour had significantly higher mortality than those with ESR < 30 mm/hour (P = 0.002, log-rank test). Patients with a persistently high ESR despite immunosuppressive therapy was associated with higher mortality than those with a normalized ESR (P = 0.039, log-rank test). Elevated ESR is associated with increased mortality in patients with DM due to respiratory failure. Thus, monitoring ESR should be an integral part of the clinical care of DM patients. PMID:26955239

  20. Lung lobar volume in patients with chronic interstitial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Hisao; Koba, Hiroyuki; Saitoh, Tsukasa; Abe, Shosaku.

    1997-01-01

    We measured lung lobar volume by using helical computed tomography (HCT) in 23 patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP), 7 patients with chronic interstitial pneumonia associated with collagen vascular disease (CVD-IP), and 5 healthy volunteers HCT scanning was done at the maximal inspiratory level and the resting end-expiratory level. To measure lung lobar volume, we traced the lobar margin on HCT images with a digitizer and calculated the lobar volume with a personal computer. The lower lobar volume and several factors influencing it in chronic interstitial pneumonia were studied. At the maximal inspiratory level, the lower lobar volume as a percent of the whole lung volume was 46.8±4.13% (mean ± SD) in the volunteers, 39.5±6.19% in the patients with IIP, and 27.7±7. 86% in the patients with CVD-IP. The lower lobar volumes in the patients were significantly lower than in the volunteers. Patients with IIP in whom autoantibody tests were positive had lower lobar volumes that were very low and were similar to those of patients with CVD-IP. These data suggest that collagen vascular disease may develop in patients with interstitial pneumonia. The patients with IIP who had emphysematous changes on the CT scans had smaller decreases in total lung capacity and lower ratios of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity than did those who had no emphysematous changes, those two groups did not differ in the ratio of lower lobar volume to whole lung volume. This suggests that emphysematous change is not factor influencing lower lobar volume in patients with chronic interstitial pneumonia. We conclude that chronic interstitial pneumonia together with very low values for lower lobar volume may be a pulmonary manifestation of collagen vascular disease. (author)

  1. Prevalence and Effects of Emphysema in Never-Smokers with Rheumatoid Arthritis Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Jacob

    2018-02-01

    Conclusion: 27% of RA-ILD never-smokers demonstrate emphysema on CT. Emphysema presence in never-smokers independently associates with a definite CT-UIP pattern and a worsened outcome following adjustment for baseline disease severity.

  2. [Interstitial lung disease-associated with amyopathic dermatomyositis and anti-MDA5 autoantibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerfaud-Valentin, M; Ahmad, K; Piegay, F; Fabien, N; Raphanel, B; Cordier, J-F; Cottin, V

    2014-11-01

    Amyopathic dermatomyositis associated with anti-MDA5 autoantibodies is a rare and very recently described clinical entity. A 58-year-old woman was admitted with subacute onset of dyspnea (NYHA class IV) associated with cough, oligoarthritis of the wrists, myalgia and intermittent fever. Examination demonstrated skin lesions with heliotrope rash, Gottron's papules, "mechanics hands", and basal inspiratory crackles on lung auscultation. Pulmonary function tests showed a restrictive ventilatory defect, with decreased carbon monoxide diffusion capacity and marked hypoxemia (PaO2 61 mmHg). The chest high-resolution computed tomography appearances were consistent with organizing pneumonia. Bronchoalveolar lavage differential cell count demonstrated 22 % neutrophils. Serum creatine kinase and electromyography were normal ; the serum ferritin level was elevated. Antinuclear antibodies were present and anti-MDA5 autoantibodies were identified. Significant improvement was obtained with systemic corticosteroids, later converted to mycophenolate mofetil as a steroid-sparing agent. Amyopathic dermatomyositis associated with anti-MDA5 autoantibodies shares some characteristics with those associated with anti-synthetase antibodies. Muscular involvement may be mild or absent. Early diagnosis and treatment may improve outcome. Copyright © 2014 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. The impact of iterative reconstruction in low-dose computed tomography on the evaluation of diffuse interstitial lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hyun Ju; Chung, Myung Jin; Shin, Kyung Eun; Hwang, Hye Sun; Lee, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Radiology nd Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the impact of iterative reconstruction (IR) on the assessment of diffuse interstitial lung disease (DILD) using CT. An American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom (module 4 to assess spatial resolution) was scanned with 10-100 effective mAs at 120 kVp. The images were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), with blending ratios of 0%, 30%, 70% and 100%, and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), and their spatial resolution was objectively assessed by the line pair structure method. The patient study was based on retrospective interpretation of prospectively acquired data, and it was approved by the institutional review board. Chest CT scans of 23 patients (mean age 64 years) were performed at 120 kVp using 1) standard dose protocol applying 142-275 mA with dose modulation (high-resolution computed tomography [HRCT]) and 2) low-dose protocol applying 20 mA (low dose CT, LDCT). HRCT images were reconstructed with FBP, and LDCT images were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Matching images were randomized and independently reviewed by chest radiologists. Subjective assessment of disease presence and radiological diagnosis was made on a 10-point scale. In addition, semi-quantitative results were compared for the extent of abnormalities estimated to the nearest 5% of parenchymal involvement. In the phantom study, ASIR was comparable to FBP in terms of spatial resolution. However, for MBIR, the spatial resolution was greatly decreased under 10 mA. In the patient study, the detection of the presence of disease was not significantly different. The values for area under the curve for detection of DILD by HRCT, FBP, ASIR, and MBIR were as follows: 0.978, 0.979, 0.972, and 0.963. LDCT images reconstructed with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR tended to underestimate reticular or honeycombing opacities (-2.8%, -4.1%, and -5.3%, respectively) and overestimate ground glass opacities (+4.6%, +8.9%, and

  4. Do the number and volume of surgical lung biopsies influence the diagnostic yield in interstitial lung disease? A propensity score analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibla, Juan J; Brunelli, Alessandro; Allen, Mark S; Wigle, Dennis; Shen, Robert; Nichols, Francis; Deschamps, Claude; Cassivi, Stephen D

    2015-02-01

    Our objective was to evaluate whether the number and volume of surgical lung biopsies (SLB) influence the diagnosis of diffuse interstitial lung disease (ILD). Retrospective study of SLB for suspected ILD in patients from the Mayo Clinic from January 2002 to January 2010. Data were collected in the institution and analyzed. 311 patients were studied. Mean number of biopsies was 2.05 (SD 0.6); 1 biopsy in 50 (16%), 2 in 198 (63.7%), 3 in 59 (19%) and 4 in 4 (1.3%). Histopathologic diagnosis was: definitive (specific): 232 (74.6%), descriptive (non-specific): 76 (24.4%), no diagnosis: 3 (1%). After excluding patients without diagnosis (n=3), there were 50 patients with only 1 biopsy, 196 with 2 and 62 with 3 or 4; the definitive diagnostic yield was similar in all 3 groups (37/50; 74%, 150/196; 77%, and 45/62; 73%) (Chi-square, p value 0.8). The propensity score analysis between patients with 1 SLB and patients with more than 1 SLB also showed no difference in diagnostic yield. Regarding the volume of biopsies, mean total volume was 34.4 cm(3) (SD 46): 41.2 cm(3) (3 cases) in patients with no diagnosis; 33.6 cm(3) (232 cases, SD 47) in patients with specific diagnosis; and 36.6 cm(3) (76 cases, SD 44) in patients with descriptive diagnosis. Biopsy volume had no influence on histopathology yield (ANOVA, p value .8). The number and volume of the biopsy specimens in SLB did not seem to influence diagnosis. Based on our results, we believe a single sample from a representative area may be sufficient for diagnosis. Randomized prospective trials should be performed to optimize SLB for ILD. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Outcome in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients with successful rechallenge after recovery from epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor-induced interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwabara, Kosuke; Semba, Hiroshi; Fujii, Shinji; Tsumura, Shinsuke

    2017-04-01

    Several non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases of successful rechallenge with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) after recovery from gefitinib or erlotinib-induced interstitial lung disease (ILD) have been reported, but it is not clear whether the rechallenge affects the outcome. We retrospectively evaluated the difference in the outcome between advanced NCLC patients with active EGFR mutations who received EGFR-TKI rechallenge after recovery from EGFR-TKI-induced ILD and those who did not. EGFR-TKI-induced ILD occurred in 11 (10%) of 110 patients receiving gefitinib, five (7%) of 73 patients receiving erlotinib and one (8%) of 13 patients receiving afatinib. Diffuse alveolar damage pattern ILD was observed in six cases, four of which had chemotherapy-related death. Five of 13 patients who had recovered from ILD received EGFR-TKI rechallenge with concurrent oral administration of prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg after the strict informed consent of the risk for the recurrence of severe ILD. All of the five patients achieved a partial response. The median overall survival from the occurrence of EGFR-TKI-induced ILD was longer in patients with EGFR-TKI rechallenge than that in patients without (15.5 vs. 3.5 months, p = 0.029). The adverse events of EGFR-TKI rechallenge were tolerable, but one case receiving EGFR-TKI rechallenge with the suspected drug exhibited the recurrence of grade 3 ILD after the discontinuation of prednisolone. EGFR-TKI rechallenge with concurrent prednisolone therapy might be salvage therapy in advanced NSCLC patients with active EGFR mutations after recovery from EGFR-TKI-induced ILD.

  6. Surfactant protein-D predicts prognosis of interstitial lung disease induced by anticancer agents in advanced lung cancer: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kota; Kato, Motoyasu; Shukuya, Takehito; Mori, Keita; Sekimoto, Yasuhito; Ihara, Hiroaki; Kanemaru, Ryota; Ko, Ryo; Shibayama, Rina; Tajima, Ken; Koyama, Ryo; Shimada, Naoko; Nagashima, Osamu; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Sasaki, Shinichi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2017-05-02

    Interstitial lung diseases induced by anticancer agents (ILD-AA) are rare adverse effects of anticancer therapy. However, prognostic biomarkers for ILD-AA have not been identified in patients with advanced lung cancer. Our aim was to analyze the association between serum biomarkers sialylated carbohydrate antigen Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6) and surfactant protein D (SP-D), and clinical characteristics in patients diagnosed with ILD-AA. Between April 2011 and March 2016, 1224 advanced lung cancer patients received cytotoxic agents and epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors at Juntendo University Hospital and Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital. Of these patients, those diagnosed with ILD-AA were enrolled in this case control study. ΔKL-6 and ΔSP-D were defined as the difference between the levels at the onset of ILD-AA and their respective levels prior to development of ILD-AA. We evaluated KL-6 and SP-D at the onset of ILD-AA, ΔKL-6 and ΔSP-D, the risk factors for death related to ILD-AA, the chest high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings, and survival time in patients diagnosed with ILD-AA. Thirty-six patients diagnosed with ILD-AA were enrolled in this study. Among them, 14 patients died of ILD-AA. ΔSP-D in the patients who died was significantly higher than that in the patients who survived. However, ΔKL-6 did not differ significantly between the two groups. Moreover, ΔSP-D in patients who exhibited diffuse alveolar damage was significantly higher than that in the other patterns on HRCT. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to set the optimal cut off value for ΔSP-D at 398 ng/mL. Survival time for patients with high ΔSP-D (≥ 398 ng/mL) was significantly shorter than that for patients with low ΔSP-D. Multivariate analysis revealed that ΔSP-D was a significant prognostic factor of ILD-AA. This is the first research to evaluate high ΔSP-D (≥ 398 ng/mL) in patients with ILD-AA and to

  7. Interstitial lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your breathing is getting harder, faster, or more shallow than before You cannot get a deep breath, ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  8. Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gregory P. Downey, MD Professor Executive Vice President, Academic Affairs Department of Medicine Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine Gregory P. Downey, MD, is a pulmonologist ...

  9. CT protocols in interstitial lung diseases--a survey among members of the European Society of Thoracic Imaging and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosch, Helmut; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M; Eisenhuber, Edith; Kienzl, Daniela; Herold, Christian J

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to survey the current CT protocols used by members of the European Society of Thoracic Imaging (ESTI) to evaluate patients with interstitial lung diseases (ILD). A questionnaire was e-mailed to 173 ESTI members. The survey focussed on CT acquisition and reconstruction techniques. In particular, questions referred to the use of discontinuous HRCT or volume CT protocols, the acquisition of additional acquisitions in expiration or in the prone position, and methods of radiation dose reduction and on reconstruction algorithms. The overall response rate was 37 %. Eighty-five percent of the respondents used either volume CT alone or in combination with discontinuous HRCT. Forty-five percent of the respondents adapt their CT protocols to the patient's weight and/or age. Expiratory CT or CT in the prone position was performed by 58 % and 59 % of the respondents, respectively. The number of reconstructed series ranged from two to eight. Our survey showed that radiologists with a special interest and experience in chest radiology use a variety of CT protocols for the evaluation of ILD. There is a clear preference for volumetric scans and a strong tendency to use the 3D information. • Experienced thoracic radiologists use various CT protocols for evaluating interstitial lung diseases. • Most workers prefer volumetric CT acquisitions, making use of the 3D information • More attention to reducing the radiation dose appears to be needed.

  10. Mild pulmonary emphysema a risk factor for interstitial lung disease when using cetuximab for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Isaku; Tsukahara, Kiyoaki; Sato, Hiroki; Motohashi, Ray; Yunaiyama, Daisuke; Shimizu, Akira

    2017-12-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is an occasionally fatal adverse event associated with cetuximab (Cmab) therapy. Our objective was to clarify to what degree pulmonary emphysema is a risk factor in the treatment of head and neck cancer with Cmab through a retrospective analysis. Subjects were 116 patients who were administered Cmab for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The degree of pulmonary emphysema before initiating treatment with Cmab was visually assessed retrospectively, with scoring according to the Goddard classification used in Japanese chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) guidelines for chest computed tomography (CT). Scoring was conducted by two diagnostic radiologists and mean scores were used. Cutoffs for the development and nondevelopment of ILD were examined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and Fisher's exact test. Values of p emphysema would represent a risk factor for ILD when using Cmab.

  11. Procollagen Type I and III Aminoterminal Propeptide Levels and Severity of Interstitial Lung Disease in Mexican Women With Progressive Systemic Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura; Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto D; Olivas-Flores, Eva M; Garcia-Gonzalez, Araceli; Peguero-Gómez, Ana R; Flores-Navarro, Juan; Villa-Manzano, Alberto I; Zavaleta-Muñiz, Soraya A; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Mejía, Mayra; Juárez-Contreras, Pablo; Vazquez-Del Mercado, Monica; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto G; Trujillo-Hernández, Benjamin; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo H; Gamez-Nava, Jorge I

    2015-09-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a frequent complication in progressive systemic sclerosis (SSc), being present in 25% to 90% of cases. To evaluate whether serum levels of procollagen typei and iii aminoterminal propeptide (PINP and PIIINP) correlate with severity and patterns of ILD in Mexican women with SSc. Thirty three SSc patients were assessed for disease characteristics and anti-topoisomerase antibodies (topoi), and also underwent pulmonary function tests and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Nineteen patients had ILD+SSc, and 14 had no lung involvement (no ILD-SSc); data were compared with those from 45 healthy controls. PINP and PIIINP were assessed in all 3 groups. Patients with SSc had higher PINP and PIIINP vs controls (P=.001, Ptopoi U/mL (Ptopoi (P=.045). PINP and PIIINP are useful markers for severe ILD+SSc, suggesting they could play a role in the follow-up of this complication in SSc. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Doença pulmonar intersticial crônica na criança Chronic interstitial lung disease in children

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    Maria Aparecida S. S. Paiva

    2007-06-01

    conduct in a group of pediatric patients with chronic interstitial lung disease. METHODS: A retrospective study of 25 immunocompetent patients, aged 2 months to 17 years, with chronic interstitial lung disease, admitted to the Pediatric Pulmonary Section, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital dos Servidores do Estado, over a 20-year period (1984-2004. A routine protocol for persistent chronic pneumonias was used and the patients with interstitial lung disease were selected. Clinical, laboratory and imaging data were analyzed. RESULTS: Twenty-five patients were diagnosed with chronic interstitial lung disease, 13 were aged less than 2 years and 17 were male. Diagnoses were made based on history, physical examination and routine tests in one case, based on more complex tests in three cases and based on the results of invasive tests in 21 cases (20 by lung biopsy and one by bronchoalveolar lavage. Except for one patient with pulmonary lymphangiectasia, the long-term treatment (1 to 7 years consisted of corticosteroid, in six cases associated with hydroxychloroquine. Four patients required home oxygen therapy. The authors followed the patients in the outpatient department (6 a 8 visits/year. Patient outcome was: good (15; regular, with mild sequelae (4; and poor, with severe sequelae (3. One patient was lost in the follow-up period and two died. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic interstitial lung diseases in children are a group of rare pulmonary disorders, but a relevant one because of the possible progression to pulmonary fibrosis. Early diagnosis and a long-term, specialized treatment and follow-up are important for the patient outcome. Pediatricians should be aware of these diseases because in many cases diagnosis and treatment are overlooked.

  13. Comprometimento do interstício pulmonar em portadores de esclerose sistêmica progressiva: estudo de uma série de 58 casos Interstitial lung disease in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis: a study of 58 cases

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    Sergio Fernandes de Oliveira Jezler

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estimar a freqüência de doença intersticial pulmonar em um grupo de indivíduos com esclerose sistêmica progressiva e descrever suas características clínicas, funcionais e radiológicas. MÉTODOS: Após confirmação diagnóstica, 58 pacientes com esclerose sistêmica progressiva foram estudados com tomografia computadorizada de alta resolução, provas de função pulmonar, bem como pesquisa do anti-Scl 70. Foram feitas comparações entre os pacientes com e sem comprometimento intersticial pulmonar e pesquisados possíveis fatores preditivos deste acometimento através de análise multivariada. RESULTADOS: Do total, 51,7% apresentaram evidências de doença intersticial pulmonar na tomografia computadorizada de alta resolução. Dispnéia e tosse foram os sintomas mais relatados, (65,5% e 39,7%, respectivamente. Bronquiolectasias e faveolamento foram as anormalidades tomográficas mais comuns (83,3% e 80,0% respectivamente. Quando comparados com os indivíduos sem doença intersticial pulmonar, os pacientes com este acometimento apresentaram freqüência semelhante de sintomas pulmonares e extrapulmonares, porém apresentaram esclerose sistêmica progressiva de maior duração, estertores crepitantes mais freqüentes, maior positividade de anti-Scl 70, e capacidade vital forçada e pulmonar total reduzidas. Somente uma capacidade vital forçada OBJECTIVE: To estimate the frequency of interstitial lung disease in a group of patients with progressive systemic sclerosis, and to describe the clinical, functional and radiological characteristics of the patients studied. METHODS: Fifty-eight patients diagnosed with progressive systemic sclerosis were submitted to high-resolution computed tomography of the chest, pulmonary function tests and a blood test for anti-Scl 70 antibodies. Comparisons were drawn between patients with interstitial lung disease and those without. Logistic regression with multivariate analysis was used to

  14. Correlation of B-Lines on Ultrasonography With Interstitial Lung Disease on Chest Radiography and CT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinsky, Theodore J; Shah, Hardik; Sonneborn, Rachelle; Hippe, Daniel S

    2017-11-01

    We prospectively identified B-lines in patients undergoing ultrasonographic (US) examinations following liver transplantation who also had chest radiography (CXR) or chest CT imaging, or both, on the same day to determine if an association between the presence of B-lines from the thorax on US images correlates with the presence of lung abnormalities on CXR. Following institutional review board (IRB) approval, patients who received liver transplants and underwent routine US examinations and chest radiography or CT imaging, or both, on the same day between January 1, 2015 through July 1, 2016 were prospectively identified. Two readers who were blinded to chest films and CT images and reports independently reviewed the US interreader agreement for the presence or absence of B-lines and performed an evaluation for the presence or absence of diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD) on chest films and CT images as well as from clinical evaluation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed. There was good agreement between the two readers on the presence of absence of B-lines (kappa = 0.94). The area under the ROC curve for discriminating between positive DPLD and negative DPLD for both readers was 0.79 (95% CI, 0.71-0.87). There is an association between the presence of extensive B-lines to the point of confluence and "dirty shadowing" on US examinations of the chest and associated findings on chest radiographs and CT scans of DPLD. Conversely, isolated B-lines do not always correlate with abnormalities on chest films and in fact sometimes appear to be a normal variant. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Diffuse parenchymal lung disease

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    Sara Tomassetti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Between September 2015 and August 2016 there were >1500 publications in the field of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs. For the Clinical Year in Review session at the European Respiratory Society Congress that was held in London, UK, in September 2016, we selected only five articles. This selection, made from the enormous number of published papers, does not include all the relevant studies that will significantly impact our knowledge in the field of DPLDs in the near future. This review article provides our personal view on the following topics: early diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, current knowledge on the multidisciplinary team diagnosis of DPLDs and the diagnostic role of transbronchial cryobiopsy in this diagnostic setting, insights on the new entity of interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features, and new therapeutic approaches for scleroderma-related interstitial lung disease.

  16. Pomalidomide in Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease due to Systemic Sclerosis: A Phase II, Multicenter, Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled, Parallel-group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Vivien M; Denton, Christopher P; Domsic, Robyn T; Furst, Daniel E; Rischmueller, Maureen; Stanislav, Marina; Steen, Virginia D; Distler, Jörg H W; Korish, Shimon; Cooper, Alyse; Choi, Suktae; Schafer, Peter H; Horan, Gerald; Hough, Douglas R

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of pomalidomide (POM) on forced vital capacity (FVC), modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS), and gastrointestinal (GI) symptomatology over 52 weeks of treatment in patients with interstitial lung disease due to systemic sclerosis (SSc). Twenty-three adult patients diagnosed with SSc were randomized 1:1 POM:placebo (PBO). Mean change at Week 52 from baseline in predicted FVC% -5.2 and -2.8; mRSS -2.7 and -3.7; and UCLA Scleroderma Clinical Trial Consortium Gastrointestinal Tract (SCTC GIT 2.0) score 0.1 and 0.0, with POM and PBO, respectively. Statistical significance was not achieved for any of these 3 primary endpoints at 52 weeks. Because of recruitment challenges, subject enrollment was discontinued early. In an interim analysis, the study did not meet its Week 52 primary endpoints. Therefore, a decision was made to terminate all study phases. POM was generally well tolerated, with an adverse event profile consistent with the known safety and tolerability profile of POM in other diseases. Study results were neither positive nor negative because too few subjects were enrolled to make meaningful conclusions. Clinical Trials number: NCT01559129.

  17. Gallium-67 lung index computerization in interstitial pneumonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, H D; Brown, P H; Haines, J E; McNeill, M

    1987-12-01

    To improve ease of use, precision, and reduce interobserver variability of the 67Ga lung index, we developed and tested a computer method that yields similar numeric values and uses previous indexing principles, except that the computer matrix unit is the fractional area assessed. Patients were referred for suspected interstitial lung disease. Fifty-three image studies were available for both manual and computer indexing. Linear regression analysis gave a correlation of 0.884. Decision matrix analysis of 58 different nonimmunosuppressed patients resulted in 93% sensitivity and 76% specificity. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the ideal index cutoff was 50. Because there is tighter control over 67Ga uptake intensity and spatial distribution assessment, the computerized 67Ga index appears to perform better than the manual analysis.

  18. Immunologic lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harman, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The term immunologic lung disease comprises a broad spectrum of disease. The authors have covered a few entities in which recent studies have been particularly helpful in elucidating pathophysiology though not in uncovering the inciting cause. Common to all of these entities is the problem of finding appropriate methods of defining disease activity and response to treatment. As exemplified by the improved outlook for Goodpasture's syndrome with elucidation of its underlying immunopathology, it is likely that better understanding of the immunologic basis of sarcoid and interstitial disease may be helpful in planning more effective treatment strategies. 44 references

  19. Simple flow cytometric protocol of CD4+/CD8+ lymphocyte ratio assessment in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from patients with interstitial lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpechcinski, Adam; Kopinski, Piotr; Giedronowicz, Dorota; Rozy, Adriana; Jagus, Paulina; Szolkowska, Malgorzata; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna

    2011-10-01

    To validate the fast and accurate flow cytometric (FCM) protocol using blood-standardized antibodies for alveolar lymphocyte subtyping with respect to standard immunocytochemistry (IC). FCM and IC were applied to immunophenotype T cell subsets in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids from patients with interstitial lung diseases. Diagnostic BAL specimens from 50 patients with suspected sarcoidosis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis were evaluated by both IC and FCM. In FCM, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were identified by light scatter gating with CD3 selection using basic tricolor cytometer. Relative amounts of CD4+, CD8+ T cells, and CD4+/CD8+ ratios demonstrated by the FCM showed excellent, significant correlations with IC results. FCM values did not differ significantly from IC results. However, the sensitivity and specificity of conventional IC staining were not sufficient to assess CD4+/ CD8+ ratio in most idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis cases. Additionally, performing IC immunophenotyping in BAL samples with low lymphocyte content introduced a remarkable error into CD4+/CD8+ ratio assessment. FCM allowed reliable, precise, and fast T-cell subset measurement in all BAL samples, overcoming the IC disadvantages. Our validated FCM protocol provides diagnostically relevant CD4+/CD8+ ratio determination by simple light scatter gating strategy with CD3 selection.

  20. Destaques das diretrizes de doenças pulmonares intersticiais da Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisiologia Highlights of the Brazilian Thoracic Association guidelines for interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Guedes Baldi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available As doenças pulmonares intersticiais (DPIs são afecções heterogêneas, envolvendo um elevado número de condições, cuja abordagem ainda é um grande desafio para o pneumologista. As Diretrizes de DPIs da Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisiologia, publicadas em 2012, foram estabelecidas com o intuito de fornecer aos pneumologistas brasileiros um instrumento que possa facilitar a abordagem dos pacientes com DPIs, padronizando-se os critérios utilizados para a definição diagnóstica das diferentes condições, além de orientar sobre o melhor tratamento nas diferentes situações. Esse artigo teve como objetivo descrever resumidamente os principais destaques dessas diretrizes.Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs are heterogeneous disorders, involving a large number of conditions, the approach to which continues to pose an enormous challenge for pulmonologists. The 2012 Brazilian Thoracic Association ILD Guidelines were established in order to provide Brazilian pulmonologists with an instrument that can facilitate the management of patients with ILDs, standardizing the criteria used for the diagnosis of different conditions and offering guidance on the best treatment in various situations. The objective of this article was to briefly describe the highlights of those guidelines.

  1. NT-proBNP <95 ng/l can exclude pulmonary hypertension on echocardiography at diagnostic workup in patients with interstitial lung disease

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    Charlotte Andersen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary hypertension (PH is a serious complication to interstitial lung disease (ILD and has a poor prognosis. PH is often diagnosed by screening with echocardiography followed by right heart catheterisation. A previous study has shown that a value of NT-pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP 95 ng/l for signs of PH on echocardiography were calculated. The study was approved by the Danish Health Authority. Results: In 118 patients, data from both echocardiography and measurements of NT-proBNP were available. Eleven of these were screened positive for PH on echocardiography. Sensitivity, specificity, NPV and PPV of NT-proBNP <95 ng/l for PH were 100, 44, 16 and 100%, respectively. Furthermore, no patients with left heart failure as the cause of dyspnoea were missed using this cut-off value. Conclusion: NT-proBNP <95 ng/l precludes a positive echocardiographic screen for PH in ILD patients at referral for diagnostic workup.

  2. Fibrocyte measurement in peripheral blood correlates with number of cultured mature fibrocytes in vitro and is a potential biomarker for interstitial lung disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, Søren Andreas; Lindegaard, Hanne; Hejbøl, Eva Kildall; Davidsen, Jesper Rømhild; Bjerring, Niels; Hansen, Søren Werner Karlskov; Schrøder, Henrik Daa; Hansen, Inger Marie Jensen; Barington, Torben; Nielsen, Christian

    2017-07-18

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) can be a severe extra-articular disease manifestation in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). A potential role of fibrocytes in RA associated ILD (RA-ILD) has not previously been described. We present a modified faster method for measuring circulating fibrocytes, without intracellular staining. The results are compared to the traditional culture method, where the number of monocytes that differentiate into mature fibrocytes in vitro are counted. The results are following compared to disease activity in patients with severe asthma, ILD, RA (without diagnosed ILD) and RA with verified ILD (RA-ILD). CD45 + CD34 + CD11b + (7-AAD - CD3 - CD19 - CD294 - ) cells were isolated by cell sorting and stained for pro-collagen type 1. Thirty-nine patients (10 RA, 9 ILD and 10 with severe asthma, 10 with RA-ILD) and 10 healthy controls (HC) were included. Current medication, disease activity, pulmonary function test and radiographic data were collected. Circulating fibrocytes were quantified by flow cytometry. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and cultured for 5 days and the numbers of mature fibrocytes were counted. 90.2% (mean, SD = 1.5%) of the sorted cells were pro-collagen type 1 positive and thereby fulfilled the criteria for being circulating fibrocytes. The ILD and RA-ILD groups had increased levels of circulating fibrocytes compared to HC (p time, that the level of circulating fibrocytes correlated with the number of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, that differentiated into mature fibrocytes in vitro. Reduced DLCO c was correlated with high levels of circulating and mature fibrocytes in RA, which have not been reported previously. In such, this study suggests that fibrocytes may exhibit an important role in the pathogenesis of RA-ILD, which requires further clarification in future studies. ClinicalTrials.gov : NCT02711657 , registered 13/3-2016, retrospectively registered.

  3. Doença pulmonar intersticial relacionada a miosite e a síndrome antissintetase Myositis-related interstitial lung disease and antisynthetase syndrome

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    Joshua Solomon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Em pacientes com miosite, é comum o comprometimento pulmonar, e a presença de anticorpos anti-aminoacil-RNAt sintetase (anti-ARS é preditora da presença ou do desenvolvimento de doença pulmonar intersticial (DPI. Uma entidade clínica distinta - a síndrome antissintetase - é caracterizada pela presença de anticorpos anti-ARS, miosite, DPI, artrite, fenômeno de Raynaud e "mãos de mecânico". O mais comum anticorpo anti-ARS é o anti-Jo-1. Anticorpos anti-ARS mais recentemente descritos podem conferir um fenótipo que é distinto daquele de pacientes com positividade para anti-Jo-1, sendo caracterizado por uma menor incidência de miosite e uma maior incidência de DPI. Nos pacientes com DPI relacionada à síndrome antissintetase, a resposta a medicações imunossupressoras é em geral favorável.In patients with myositis, the lung is commonly involved, and the presence of anti-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (anti-ARS antibodies marks the presence or predicts the development of interstitial lung disease (ILD. A distinct clinical entity-antisynthetase syndrome-is characterized by the presence of anti-ARS antibodies, myositis, ILD, fever, arthritis, Raynaud's phenomenon, and mechanic's hands. The most common anti-ARS antibody is anti-Jo-1. More recently described anti-ARS antibodies might confer a phenotype that is distinct from that of anti-Jo-1-positive patients and is characterized by a lower incidence of myositis and a higher incidence of ILD. Among patients with antisynthetase syndrome-related ILD, the response to immunosuppressive medications is generally, but not universally, favorable.

  4. Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema Syndrome: A New Phenotype within the Spectrum of Smoking-Related Interstitial Lung Disease

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    Karina Portillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE is a recently defined syndrome, in which centrilobular and/or paraseptal emphysemas in upper lung zones coexist with pulmonary fibrosis in lower lobes in individuals. These patients have a characteristic lung function profile, with unexpected subnormal dynamic and static lung volumes, contrasting with a significant reduction of carbon monoxide transfer (DLco and exercise hypoxemia. Pulmonary hypertension is highly prevalent in CPFE and is the leading determinant of death. Tobacco smoking has been proposed as the main factor in its etiology, though the pathophysiology and its natural history remain to be determined. High-resolution computed axial tomography is the mandatory tool to confirm the diagnosis. Currently, there is no consensus about its treatment since those published to date on this issue are limited to well-characterised series of cases; hence, a better understanding of this entity may help in the development of future therapeutic approaches.

  5. Serum IL8 and mRNA level of CD11b in circulating neutrophils are increased in clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis with active interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jing; Chen, Jie; Yan, Qingran; Guo, Qiang; Bao, Chunde

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess serum IL8 and the potential activity of circulating neutrophils on relative messenger RNA (mRNA) levels and their relationship with disease activity in clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis (CADM) associated with interstitial lung disease (ILD). We studied 18 CADM patients and compared them with 18 classic dermatomyositis (DM) patients and 18 healthy control subjects. Serum IL8 level and mRNA expressions of neutrophils (chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 1 (CXCR1), cluster of differentiation molecule 11b (CD11b), cluster of differentiation 64 (CD64), myeloid cell leukemia 1 (MCL1), interleukin-18 (IL18)) were detected. The overproduction of serum IL8 level was most significant in the CADM group with active period. The mRNA expressions of CD11b, IL18, and MCL1 were greatly increased in the neutrophils in patients with CADM compared with DM or healthy controls. Up-expressions of CD11b, IL18, and MCL1 were detected in the neutrophils in CADM patients of active period compared with remission period. A positive correlation was found between CD11b mRNA level and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) score, in CADM associated with ILD. Serum IL8 level and mRNA levels of CD11b, MCL1, and IL18 in circulating neutrophils are related with the disease activity of CADM-ILD. The mRNA level of CD11b is positively correlated with HRCT score in CADM-ILD.

  6. Treatment of intractable interstitial lung injury with alemtuzumab after lung transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohno, M; Perch, M; Andersen, E

    2011-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman underwent left single-lung transplantation for end-stage emphysema due to a1-antitrypsin deficiency in January 2010. Cyclosporine, azathioprine, and prednisolone were administered for immunosuppression and antithymocyte globulin for induction therapy at the time...... of transplantation. Routine examination of a lung biopsy, 4 months after transplantation, showed nonspecific, diffuse interstitial inflammation with alveolar septal fibrosis. The patient's clinical status and imaging studies, consistent with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis, which was considered as signs......, posttransplant antirejection drug regimen. We have since successfully treated with alemtuzumab three additional patients who developed interstitial lung injury after lung transplantation, who are also summarized in this report....

  7. Treatment of intractable interstitial lung injury with alemtuzumab after lung transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohno, M; Perch, M; Andersen, E

    2011-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman underwent left single-lung transplantation for end-stage emphysema due to α1-antitrypsin deficiency in January 2010. Cyclosporine, azathioprine, and prednisolone were administered for immunosuppression and antithymocyte globulin for induction therapy at the time...... of transplantation. Routine examination of a lung biopsy, 4 months after transplantation, showed nonspecific, diffuse interstitial inflammation with alveolar septal fibrosis. The patient's clinical status and imaging studies, consistent with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis, which was considered as signs......, posttransplant antirejection drug regimen. We have since successfully treated with alemtuzumab three additional patients who developed interstitial lung injury after lung transplantation, who are also summarized in this report....

  8. British Lung Foundation/United Kingdom Primary Immunodeficiency Network Consensus Statement on the Definition, Diagnosis, and Management of Granulomatous-Lymphocytic Interstitial Lung Disease in Common Variable Immunodeficiency Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, John R; Verma, Nisha; Lowe, David; Baxendale, Helen E; Jolles, Stephen; Kelleher, Peter; Longhurst, Hilary J; Patel, Smita Y; Renzoni, Elisabetta A; Sander, Clare R; Avery, Gerard R; Babar, Judith L; Buckland, Matthew S; Burns, Siobhan; Egner, William; Gompels, Mark M; Gordins, Pavels; Haddock, Jamanda A; Hart, Simon P; Hayman, Grant R; Herriot, Richard; Hoyles, Rachel K; Huissoon, Aarnoud P; Jacob, Joseph; Nicholson, Andrew G; Rassl, Doris M; Sargur, Ravishankar B; Savic, Sinisa; Seneviratne, Suranjith L; Sheaff, Michael; Vaitla, Prashantha M; Walters, Gareth I; Whitehouse, Joanna L; Wright, Penny A; Condliffe, Alison M

    A proportion of people living with common variable immunodeficiency disorders develop granulomatous-lymphocytic interstitial lung disease (GLILD). We aimed to develop a consensus statement on the definition, diagnosis, and management of GLILD. All UK specialist centers were contacted and relevant physicians were invited to take part in a 3-round online Delphi process. Responses were graded as Strongly Agree, Tend to Agree, Neither Agree nor Disagree, Tend to Disagree, and Strongly Disagree, scored +1, +0.5, 0, -0.5, and -1, respectively. Agreement was defined as greater than or equal to 80% consensus. Scores are reported as mean ± SD. There was 100% agreement (score, 0.92 ± 0.19) for the following definition: "GLILD is a distinct clinico-radio-pathological ILD occurring in patients with [common variable immunodeficiency disorders], associated with a lymphocytic infiltrate and/or granuloma in the lung, and in whom other conditions have been considered and where possible excluded." There was consensus that the workup of suspected GLILD requires chest computed tomography (CT) (0.98 ± 0.01), lung function tests (eg, gas transfer, 0.94 ± 0.17), bronchoscopy to exclude infection (0.63 ± 0.50), and lung biopsy (0.58 ± 0.40). There was no consensus on whether expectant management following optimization of immunoglobulin therapy was acceptable: 67% agreed, 25% disagreed, score 0.38 ± 0.59; 90% agreed that when treatment was required, first-line treatment should be with corticosteroids alone (score, 0.55 ± 0.51). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Four Corners Sign: A Specific Imaging Feature in Differentiating Systemic Sclerosis-related Interstitial Lung Disease From Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkoff, Lara; White, Darin B; Chung, Jonathan H; Asante, Dennis; Cox, Christian W

    2018-01-16

    Differentiating between systemic sclerosis-related interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is important because of the differences in workup, prognosis, and treatment. However, there is much overlap in the appearance of these 2 entities on high-resolution computed tomography. We propose that inflammation and/or fibrosis focally or disproportionately involving the bilateral anterolateral upper lobes and posterosuperior lower lobes ["Four Corners" Sign (FCS)] is specific for SSc-ILD. Randomized high-resolution computed tomography studies from 74 IPF and 73 SSc-ILD cases were evaluated by 2 thoracic radiologists blinded to all patient data. For each case the reviewers noted whether the FCS was present and assigned a confidence level on the basis of a 7-point Likert scale. The same process was then performed on a randomized external validation group of 42 SSc-ILD and 42 IPF cases. For Likert scores of 6 or 7 ("mostly agree" or "entirely agree" that the FCS is present, respectively) the sensitivity in SSc was 16.4% (95% confidence interval, 9.7%, 26.6%), specificity 100.0% (95% confidence interval, 95.1%, 100.0%). There was a significant association between a confidently present FCS and SSc compared with a confidently present FCS and IPF (P=0.0003). Analysis on an external validation group of 42 SSc and 42 IPF cases conferred similarly high specificity for SSc in cases characterized as FCS with high confidence. The FCS, a pattern of focal or disproportionate inflammation and/or fibrosis involving the bilateral anterolateral upper lobes and posterosuperior lower lobes, is specific for SSc-ILD when readers are confident of its presence.

  10. Increased Serum B Cell Activating Factor and a Proliferation-inducing Ligand Are Associated with Interstitial Lung Disease in Patients with Juvenile Dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Norimoto; Kobayashi, Ichiro; Mori, Masaaki; Sato, Shinji; Iwata, Naomi; Shigemura, Tomonari; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Yokota, Shumpei; Koike, Kenichi

    2015-12-01

    Rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease (RP-ILD) is an intractable and fatal complication of juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). This study evaluated serum levels of B cell activating factor (BAFF) and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) in JDM patients with complicating ILD, and their association with ILD phenotypes, clinical variables, and anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5). We measured the levels of BAFF, APRIL, and anti-MDA5 in the sera of 23 JDM patients with ILD [8 in the RP-ILD group and 15 in the chronic ILD (C-ILD) group], 17 JDM patients without ILD (non-ILD group), and 10 age-matched controls, using the ELISA method. ILD was identified by high-resolution computed tomography. Serum BAFF titers were significantly higher in the JDM patients with RP-ILD versus those with C-ILD (p = 0.011) and in healthy controls (p = 0.0004). The C-ILD group had significantly higher levels of BAFF versus controls (p ≤ 0.0001). Serum APRIL was markedly elevated in the RP-ILD group as compared with the C-ILD group (p = 0.003) and controls (p = 0.006). In patients with ILD, both BAFF and APRIL levels were correlated with serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 and interleukin 18. Subjects with high titer anti-MDA5 (> 200 U) had higher levels of BAFF and APRIL than those with low titer anti-MDA5 (< 100 U; p = 0.019 and p = 0.0029, respectively), which may have been due to a relationship between RP-ILD and high anti-MDA5 titer. Our findings of markedly elevated levels of BAFF and APRIL in patients with RP-ILD JDM suggest the potential importance of these cytokines in the diagnosis and treatment of RP-ILD accompanying JDM.

  11. Perfusion- and pattern-based quantitative CT indexes using contrast-enhanced dual-energy computed tomography in diffuse interstitial lung disease: relationships with physiologic impairment and prediction of prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Jung Won [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jang Pyo; Kim, Namkug; Chang, Yongjun; Seo, Joon Beom [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Yun; Lee, Kyung Soo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Man Pyo; Park, Hye Yun [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Pulmonology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To evaluate automated texture-based segmentation of dual-energy CT (DECT) images in diffuse interstitial lung disease (DILD) patients and prognostic stratification by overlapping morphologic and perfusion information of total lung. Suspected DILD patients scheduled for surgical biopsy were prospectively included. Texture patterns included ground-glass opacity (GGO), reticulation and consolidation. Pattern- and perfusion-based CT measurements were assessed to extract quantitative parameters. Accuracy of texture-based segmentation was analysed. Correlations between CT measurements and pulmonary function test or 6-minute walk test (6MWT) were calculated. Parameters of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia (IPF/UIP) and non-IPF/UIP were compared. Survival analysis was performed. Overall accuracy was 90.47 % for whole lung segmentation. Correlations between mean iodine values of total lung, 50-97.5th (%) attenuation and forced vital capacity or 6MWT were significant. Volume of GGO, reticulation and consolidation had significant correlation with DLco or SpO{sub 2} on 6MWT. Significant differences were noted between IPF/UIP and non-IPF/UIP in 6MWT distance, mean iodine value of total lung, 25-75th (%) attenuation and entropy. IPF/UIP diagnosis, GGO ratio, DILD extent, 25-75th (%) attenuation and SpO{sub 2} on 6MWT showed significant correlations with survival. DECT combined with pattern analysis is useful for analysing DILD and predicting survival by provision of morphology and enhancement. (orig.)

  12. HRCT appearances of pulmonary interstitial diseases. The pathologic basis and clinical diagnostic significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Daqing; Li Tieyi; Guan Yansheng; He Wen; Nie Yongkang

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the CT appearances, the pathologic basis and diagnostic significance of pulmonary interstitial diseases. methods: 14 isolated lungs with interstitial diseases were obtained at autopsy and surgery. The lungs were inflated and fixed. HRCT and 1 cm thin slice soft X-ray radiograph were performed and then histologic examination was done. HRCT images of 72 cases with interstitial diseases were analysed. The HRCT appearances of 10 cases were followed up for 1.5-7.0 years. Results: According to HRCT-pathologic correlation, pulmonary interstitial diseases had the following HRCT findings: (1) Intralobular interstitial thickening (33 cases, 46%), including fine linear, reticular and radiating appearances and the interface sign. (2) Interlobular septal thickening (24 cases, 33%). (3) Thickening of bronchovesicular bundles (35 cases, 49%), with coarse, blurred or smooth bundle, and nodular shape. (4) Subpleural lines (31 cases, 43%). (5) Ground-glass opacity (22 cases, 31%) with peripheral, diffuse or locular distribution. (6) Honeycombing (27 cases, 38%), having sizes: 5 mm. Of the 10 cases with follow-up, 2 cases became normal on CT and 8 cases progressing to honeycombed lung. Conclusions: The HRCT findings of pulmonary interstitial diseases represent abnormalities of axial, peripheral and septal interstitium. Interstitial fibrosis of the lung can be differentiated from that without fibrosis by HRCT. Ground-glass opacity, intralobular interstitial thickening and subpleural lines are preliminary findings of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis

  13. Interstitial pressure and lung oedema in chronic hypoxia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rivolta, I.; Lucchini, G.; Rocchetti, M.; Kolář, František; Palazzo, F.; Zaza, A.; Miserocchi, G.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 4 (2011), s. 943-949 ISSN 0903-1936 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : capillary patency * lung morphometry * microvascular permeability * pulmonary hypertension * pulmonary interstitial pressure Subject RIV: FC - Pulmology Impact factor: 5.895, year: 2011

  14. Usual interstitial pneumonia in adult-onset still's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodelo, Joaquin; Gonzalez, Luis Alonso; Velasquez, Monica Patricia; Vasquez, Gloria; Uribe, Oscar; Perez, Maria del Pilar; Ramirez, Luis Alberto

    2005-01-01

    Adult-onset still's disease (AOSD) is a multi-system inflammatory disorder of unknown origin, characterized by high spiking fevers, evanescent salmon colored rash, arthralgias or arthritis, hepatospleno-megaly, Iymphadenopathy and sore throat. It is not uncommon for AOSD to involve other organs, such as the liver, the kidney; the bone marrow and less often the lungs. Pulmonary involvement ranges from 30 to 40 % (0 to 53 %), the pulmonary manifestations of AOSD include pleurisy, acute pneumonitis and even the acute respiratory distress syndrome. We present a case of a patient with AOSD who developed an interstitial lung disease and reviewed the literature on it

  15. Interstitial lung disease - adults - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... house and kitchen. Use an electric can opener, dishwasher, and other things that will make your chores easier to do. Use cooking tools (knives, peelers, and pans) that are not heavy. To save energy: Use slow, steady motions when you do ...

  16. 99mTc-IgG-Lung Scintigraphy in the Assessment of Pulmonary Involvement in Interstitial Lung Disease and Its Comparison With Pulmonary Function Tests and High-Resolution Computed Tomography: A Preliminary Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahtouee, Mehrzad; Saberifard, Jamshid; Javadi, Hamid; Nabipour, Iraj; Malakizadeh, Hasan; Monavvarsadegh, Gholamhossein; Ilkhani Pak, Hoda; Sadeghi, Azadeh; Assadi, Majid

    2015-01-01

    The discrimination of inactive inflammatory processes from the active form of the disease is of great importance in the management of interstitial lung disease (ILD). The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of 99mTc-IgG scan for the detection of severity of disease compared to high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and pulmonary function test (PFT). Eight known cases of ILD including four cases of Mustard gas (MG) intoxication and four patients with ILD of unknown cause were included in this study. A population of six patients without lung disease was considered as the control group. The patients underwent PFT and high-resolution computed tomography, followed by 99mTc-IgG scan. They were followed up for one year. 99mTc-IgG scan assessment of IgG uptake was accomplished both qualitatively (subjectively) and semiquantitatively. All eight ILD patients demonstrated a strong increase in 99mTc-IgG uptake in the lungs, compared to the control patients. The 99mTc-IgG scan scores were higher in the patient group (0.64[95% confidence interval(CI)=0.61-0.69])) than the control group (0.35 (0.35[95% CI=0.28-0.40]), (P<0.05)). In patients, a statistically significant positive correlation was detected between 99mTc-IgG scan and HRCT scores (Spearman’s correlation coefficient = 0.92, P < 0.008). The 99mTc-Human Immunoglobulin (HIG) scores were not significantly correlated with PFT findings (including FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC), O 2 saturation and age (P values > 0.05). There were no significant correlations between 99mTc-IgG score and HRCT patterns including ground glass opacity, reticular fibrosis and honeycombing (P value > 0.05). The present results confirmed that 99mTc-IgG scan could be applied to detect the severity of pulmonary involvement, which was well correlated with HRCT findings. This data also showed that the 99mTc-IgG scan might be used as a complement to HRCT in the functional evaluation of the clinical status in ILD; however, further studies are

  17. A case of anti-MDA5-positive rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease in a patient with clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis ameliorated by rituximab, in addition to standard immunosuppressive treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koichi, Yamaguchi; Aya, Yamaguchi; Megumi, Uchida; Shunichi, Kono; Masafumi, Suzuki; Hiroaki, Masubuchi; Masahiko, Kanbe; Shinsuke, Kitahara; Manabu, Ueno; Kenichiro, Hara; Fumiaki, Aoki; Nozomi, Aoki; Toshitaka, Maeno; Masayoshi, Yamanaka; Chikako, Kishi; Yoshinao, Muro; Tatsuo, Suga; Masahiko, Kurabayashi

    2017-05-01

    Rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease (RP-ILD) in patients with clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis (CADM) associated with antibodies to melanoma differentiation-associated gene5 (MDA5) results in a high mortality rate. We experienced a case of anti-MDA5-positive RP-ILD of CADM which showed a response to rituximab, although there was no significant effect due to standard immunosuppressive treatment. This case suggests that rituximab has the potential to offer an effective agent for the treatment of anti-MDA5-positive RP-ILD of CADM.

  18. [Central lung embolism in chronic interstitial pneumopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordasini, C; Hess, B; Zimmermann, A

    1998-04-15

    An 80 year old patient with known interstitial pneumopathy of unknown etiology was hospitalized because of acute onset and rapid deterioration of dyspnea at rest within days. A foregoing neurologic investigation including CT and EEG because of prior syncopes and cramp attacks had not revealed pathologic findings. Thorax X-ray at admission showed homogenous loss of transparency on the left side, calcified basal plaques on both sides and prominent central pulmonary vessels with jumping caliber. A punctate of the leftsided pleural effusion revealed lymphocytic exsudate, normal pH, low glucose and an elevated LDH. The patient died shortly after a collapse at a bowel visit and pulmonary embolism was suspected in accordance to results from arterial blood gas analysis, ECG and chest X-ray. Neurologic symptoms could be explained by recurrent pulmonary embolism. Pleural plaques together with the punctate suggested a malignant etiology. A mesothelioma was taken into consideration, although there were no anamnestic reports on an exposition to asbestos. Autopsy revealed almost complete central embolism of the left pulmonary artery with acute cor pulmonale thus confirming the clinical suspicion. The embolus showed components of different ages of origin. Besides bronchitic and emphysematous alteration histology of the pulmonary tissue revealed interstitial and septal fibrosis with focal tissue consolidation. In one giant cell a typical asbestos body was found (in 1 out of 10 sections). In spite of missing information on an exposition to asbestos an abnormally high exposition must be taken into consideration because of the finding of an asbestos particle in relation to the amount of tissue studied. Apart from interstitial fibrosis asbestos may also cause consolidation of pulmonary tissue. Histology of plaquelike lesions revealed mesothelioma of fibrous type. This finding supports the suspicion that a major part of the pulmonary lesions was due to exposition to asbestos.

  19. Ultrasound lung comets: new echographic sign of lung interstitial fibrosis in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Giacomelli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Interstitial lung disease (ILD and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH are common complications of systemic sclerosis (SSc. Echocardiography evaluates PAH, and chest sonography detects even mild ILC as ultrasound lung comets (ULC, i.e. multiple comet-tails fanning out from the lung surface and originating from subpleural interlobular septa thickened by fibrosis. Aim: to assess ILaD and PAH by integrated cardiac and chest ultrasound in SSc. Methods: We enrolled 30 consecutive SSc patients (age= 54±13 years, 23 females in the Rheumatology Clinic of Pisa University. In all, we assessed systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (SPAP, from maximal velocity of tricuspid regurgitation flow, and ULC score with chest sonography (summing the number of ULC from each scanning space of anterior and posterior right and left chest, from second to fifth intercostal space. All patients underwent plasma assay for anti-topoisomerase antibodies (anti-Scl70, and antiicentromere associated with development of pulmonary involvement. Twenty-eight patients also underwent high resolution computed tomography, HRCT (from 0= no fibrosis to 3= honey combing. Results: ULC number - but not SPAP - was correlated to HRCT fibrosis and presence Scl-70 antibodies. ULC number was similar in localized or diffuse forms (16±20 vs 21±19, p=ns and was unrelated to SPAP (r=0.216, p=ns. Conclusions: Chest sonography assessment and ULC allow a complete, simple, radiation-free characterization of interstitial lung involvement in SSc - all in one setting and with the same instrument, same transducer and the same sonographer. In particular, ULC number is associated with HRCT evidence of lung fibrosis and presence of Scl-70 antibodies.

  20. CHANGES OF ACTIVITY INDEX AND TOTAL SEVERITY INDEX IN PATIENTS WITH SYSTEMIC SCLEROSIS AND INTERSTITIAL LUNG DISEASE OVER A 5-YEAR FOLLOW-UP PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Ovsyannikova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SS is a systemic disease, the basis for which is microcirculatory disorders, inflammation, and generalized fibrosis. Interstitial lung disease (ILD is one of the primary manifestations of SS. Assessment of SS activity and severity is hindered as it is very difficult to differentiate fibrous and inflammatory changes that are mostly interrelated and have a similar picture.Objective: to estimate activity index (AI and total severity index (TSI for the follow-up of SS patients with different variants of ILD. Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 77 patients with SS and ILD, who were followed up at the V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology; their mean age at inclusion was 46±13 years. All the patients underwent high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT of the chest and determination of TSI and AI scores at baseline and after an average of 59±12 months. According to the time course of HRCT revealed pulmonary changes over a 5-year follow-up, the patients were divided into 3 groups: 1 patients with improvement (n=16; 2 those without changes (n=39; 3 those with deterioration (n=22. The disease was regarded as active with AI scores of ≥3.Results and discussion. The mean AI scores for the entire patient cohort were low and substantially unchanged during the follow-up period, amounting to 2.1±1.55 and 2.37±1.55 (p > 0.05 at the start and at the end of the investigation, respectively. Following 5 years, only Group 3 showed AI scores of > 3. At inclusion, the groups did not differ in AI scores; however, 5 years later AI became significantly higher in Group 3 than that in Groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.004 and p=0.03, respectively. During the follow-up, TSI remained substantially unchanged and averaged 6.5±2.5 and 6.9±2.3 at inclusion and at the end of the investigation, respectively. Moreover, TSI tended to decline in Groups 1 and 2; but it significantly increased in Group 3 (p = 0.006 and at the end of the

  1. Incidence and complications of interstitial lung disease in users of tocilizumab, rituximab, abatacept and anti-tumor necrosis factor α agents, a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jeffrey R; Sarsour, Khaled; Napalkov, Pavel; Costa, Laurie A; Schulman, Kathy L

    2015-11-11

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a common extra-articular condition in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but few studies have systematically investigated its incidence and risk factors in patients receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNFα) agents or alternate mechanisms of action (MOAs) (e.g., T-cell, B-cell, and interleukin-6 inhibitors). RA patients at least 18 years old were selected from the MarketScan databases (2010-2012) if they had at least one prescription/administration of abatacept, rituximab, tocilizumab, or anti-TNF after having discontinued a different biologic agent and meeting enrollment criteria. Cox models estimated the risk of incident ILD and ILD-related hospitalization. Sensitivity analyses used an alternate ILD case definition. We identified 13,795 episodes of biologic exposure in 11,219 patients. Mean (standard deviation) follow-up was 0.7 (0.5) years. Patients receiving alternate MOA agents were more likely to have had recent exposure to steroids, prior exposure to a greater number of biologics, and history of ILD, anemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and other pulmonary conditions. When the sensitive definition was used, unadjusted ILD incidence rates (95% confidence interval, or CI) ranged from 4.0 (1.6-8.2, abatacept) to 12.2 (5.6-23.2, infliximab) per 1000 person-years. Being older (hazard ratio (HR) 3.5; 95% CI 2.1-6.0), being male (HR 3.1; 95% CI 1.2-8.4), and having another pulmonary condition (HR 4.8; 95% CI 1.7-13.7) were associated with increased ILD incidence in either sensitive and/or specific models. There were no significant differences by biologic class. Hospitalization rates (95% CI) when the sensitive definition was used ranged from 55.6 (6.7-200.7, tocilizumab) to 262.5 (71.5-672.2, infliximab). In Cox models, recent methotrexate exposure was associated with reduced ILD hospitalization (HR 0.16; 95% CI 0.06-0.46), whereas being male (HR 2.5; 95% CI 1.3-4.8) and having had a hospitalization for asthma (HR 3

  2. Pulmonary Hypertension in Parenchymal Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsangaris, Iraklis; Tsaknis, Georgios; Anthi, Anastasia; Orfanos, Stylianos E.

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) has been extensively investigated, although it represents a less common form of the pulmonary hypertension (PH) family, as shown by international registries. Interestingly, in types of PH that are encountered in parenchymal lung diseases such as interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and many other diffuse parenchymal lung diseases, some of which are very common, the available data is limited. In this paper, we try to browse in the latest available data regarding the occurrence, pathogenesis, and treatment of PH in chronic parenchymal lung diseases. PMID:23094153

  3. Diffuse Interstitial Infiltrative Lung Metastasis of Malignant Melanoma: a Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Na young; Hong, Yoo Jin; Kim, Ah Hyun; Shim, Hyo Sub; Nam, Ji Eun; Lee, Hye Jeong; Kim, Myung Joon [Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    A diffuse interstitial infiltrative pattern of lung metastasis in a patient with malignant melanoma is rare and can be confused with benign conditions such as pulmonary edema or drug-induced pneumonitis. We experienced a case of diffuse interstitial infiltrative lung metastasis in malignant melanoma in a 37-year-old man. This case was confirmed by a transbronchial lung biopsy. We herein describe the findings on CT and positron emission tomography scan

  4. Parasitic diseases of lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.C.; Rybakova, N.I.; Vinner, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Roentgenologic semiotics of the main parasitic diseases of lungs is described: echinococcosis, paragonimiasis, cysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiosis and some rarely met parasitic diseases

  5. Computed tomography of the lungs in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. An early indicator of interstitial pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartelius, H.; Gaub, J.; Jensen, L.I.; Jensen, J.; Faber, V.

    Computed tomography of the chest was performed on 42 occasions as part of the diagnostic work-up in 26 homosexual men with, or suspected of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In 17 cases both the chest radiographs and the lung scans were abnormal, and bronchoscopy and/or lung biopsy established an etiologic diagnosis in the majority of these cases. In 9 cases CT of the lungs revealed unequivocal interstitial infiltration in the presence of a normal chest radiography, and subsequently and etiologic agent was demonstrated in all these cases. In 9 cases, patients with symptoms indicative of pulmonary infection had both a normal chest radiograph and a normal lung scan, and in none of these cases did the clinical course or additional diagnostic procedures indicate the presence of current opportunistic lung infection. CT of the lungs seems to identify accurately those patients with severe HIV-related diseases in whom invasive diagnostic procedures such as bronchoalveolar lavage and/or lung biopsy should be done.

  6. Computed tomography-guided iodine-125 interstitial implantation as an alternative treatment option for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, G; Li, Z; Ding, A; Zhou, F; Jiao, W; Tang, D; Qiu, W; Yue, L; Xu, W

    2015-02-01

    The aim was to evaluate the safety, feasibility and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous interstitial brachytherapy using radioactive iodine-125 ( 125 I) seeds for the treatment of lung cancer. Included in this study were 45 male and 35 female patients aged 52-85 years (mean 72-year) who were diagnosed with lung cancer. Of the 80 cases of lung cancer, 38 were pathologically confirmed as squamous cell carcinoma, 29 as adenocarcinoma, 2 as small cell lung cancer, and 11 as metastatic lung cancer. Percutaneous interstitial implantation of radioactive 125 I seeds was performed under CT guidance. The treatment planning system was used to reconstruct three-dimensional images of the tumor to determine the quantity and distribution of 125 I seeds to be implanted. Under CT guidance, 125 I seeds were embedded into the tumor, with the matched peripheral dose set at 100-130 Gy. Follow-up CT scan was done in 2-month to explore the treatment efficacy. The procedure was successful in all patients. No major procedure-associated death occurred. The duration of follow-up was 6-month. Complete response (CR) was seen in 38 cases (47.5%), partial response (PR) in 27 cases (33.75%), stable disease (SD) in 10 cases (12.5%), and progressive disease in 5 cases (6.25%), with a local control rate (CR + PR + SD) of 93.75%. The 2-, 4- and 6-month overall response rate (CR + PR) was 78%, 83% and 81%, respectively. Implantation of CT-guided 125 I seeds is a safe and effective alternative option for the treatment of lung cancer.

  7. Pathophysiology of Pulmonary Hypertension in Chronic Parenchymal Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Inderjit; Ma, Kevin Cong; Berlin, David Adam

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension commonly complicates chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial lung disease. The association of chronic lung disease and pulmonary hypertension portends a worse prognosis. The pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension differs in the presence or absence of lung disease. We describe the physiological determinants of the normal pulmonary circulation to better understand the pathophysiological factors implicated in chronic parenchymal lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension. This review will focus on the pathophysiology of 3 forms of chronic lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and sarcoidosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. association between finger clubbing and chronic lung disease in hiv

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-11

    Nov 11, 2013 ... pulmonary diseases like cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, tuberculosis, lung abscess and lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis (2, 3). Respiratory complications in HIV-infected children are common and responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality (4 -7). Chronic lung disease is common in HIV positive ...

  9. Association of anti-aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetase antibody and anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 antibody with the therapeutic response of polymyositis/dermatomyositis-associated interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Naomi; Okamoto, Masaki; Kaieda, Shinjiro; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Ebata, Tomohiro; Tajiri, Morihiro; Nakamura, Masayuki; Tominaga, Masaki; Wakasugi, Daisuke; Kawayama, Tomotaka; Kuwana, Masataka; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Ida, Hiroaki; Hoshino, Tomoaki

    2017-01-01

    We attempted to clarify whether the presence of anti-aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetase antibody (anti-ARS Ab) or anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 antibody (anti-MDA5 Ab) is associated with the therapeutic response of polymyositis/dermatomyositis-associated interstitial lung disease (PM/DM-ILD). We retrospectively investigated 22 patients with PM/DM-ILD (10 positive for anti-ARS Ab and nine positive for anti-MDA5 Ab) for whom antibody analysis of conserved serum was possible. We assessed mortality in the first three months as the therapeutic response in the acute phase and compared changes in clinical data for up to one year considered as the chronic phase. We classified the clinical changes over the year into three groups: Improvement (increased % vital capacity [%VC] or diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide [%D LCO ]≥10 or 15%), deterioration (decreased %VC or %D LCO ≥10 or 15%), and no change (remainder of the changes). The extent of abnormality demonstrated by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) was scored. Positivity for anti-MDA5 Ab, but not for anti-ARS Ab, was associated with mortality in the first 3 months. Evaluation of the therapeutic response in the first year showed that positivity for the anti-ARS Ab, but not for the anti-MDA5 Ab, was associated with an improvement in %D LCO and a decline in the serum KL-6 levels. Positivity for the anti-ARS Ab or negativity for anti-MDA5 Ab was associated with a greater decrease in bronchial dilatation as seen by HRCT. Anti-ARS and anti-MDA5 Abs are associated with the therapeutic response of PM/DM-ILD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Lung disease - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pulmonary Disease): COPD Foundation -- www.copdfoundation.org National Emphysema Foundation -- www.emphysemafoundation.org National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute -- www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/ ...

  11. Unusual progression and subsequent improvement in cystic lung disease in a child with radiation-induced lung injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Michael S. [Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital at Vanderbilt, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Chadha, Ashley D. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Carroll, Clinton M.; Borinstein, Scott C. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Young, Lisa R. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Radiation-induced lung disease is a known complication of therapeutic lung irradiation, but the features have not been well described in children. We report the clinical, radiologic and histologic features of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in a 4-year-old child who had previously received lung irradiation as part of successful treatment for metastatic Wilms tumor. Her radiologic abnormalities and clinical symptoms developed in an indolent manner. Clinical improvement gradually occurred with corticosteroid therapy. However, the observed radiologic progression from interstitial and reticulonodular opacities to diffuse cystic lung disease, with subsequent improvement, is striking and has not been previously described in children. (orig.)

  12. Computer-Aided Tomographic Analysis of Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc. Correlation with Pulmonary Physiologic Tests and Patient-Centred Measures of Perceived Dyspnea and Functional Disability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Salaffi

    Full Text Available This study was designed (a to evaluate an improved quantitative lung fibrosis score based on a computer-aided diagnosis (CaM system in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc,-related interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD, (b to investigate the relationship between physiologic parameters (forced vital capacity [FVC] and single-breath diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide [DLCO], patient-centred measures of dyspnea and functional disability and CaM and visual reader-based (CoVR methods, and (c to identify potential surrogate measures from quantitative and visual HRCT measurement.126 patients with SSc underwent chest radiography, HRCT and PFTs. The following patient-centred measures were obtained: modified Borg Dyspnea Index (Borg score, VAS for breathing, and Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI. HRCT abnormalities were scored according to the conventional visual reader-based score (CoVR and by a CaM. The relationships among the HRCT scores, physiologic parameters (FVC and DLCO, % predicted results and patient-centred measures, were calculated using linear regression analysis and Pearson's correlation. Multivariate regression models were performed to identify the predictor variables on severity of pulmonary fibrosis.Subjects with limited cutaneous SSc had lower HAQ-DI scores than subjects with diffuse cutaneous SSc (p <0.001. CaM and CoVR scores were similar in the 2 groups. In univariate analysis, a strong correlation between CaM and CoVR was observed (p <0.0001. In multivariate analysis the CaM and CoVR scores were predicted by DLco, FVC, Borg score and HAQ-DI. Age, sex, disease duration, anti-topoisomerase antibodies and mRSS were not significantly associated with severity of pulmonary fibrosis on CaM- and CoVR methods.Although a close correlation between CaM score results and CoVR total score was found, CaM analysis showed a more significant correlation with DLco (more so than the FVC, patient-centred measures of perceived

  13. Acute interstitial pneumonia in mink kits inoculated with defined isolates of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Søren; Larsen, S; Aasted, B

    1994-01-01

    The present study addressed the causal role of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) in acute interstitial pneumonia in mink kits. All the examined isolates of ADV caused interstitial pneumonia in newborn kits, although the severity of disease and the mortality varied. These findings indicate...... that ADV is the direct causal agent of this disease in mink kits and that cofactors, which could have been present in the original ADV-K isolate, do not play a role. Acute interstitial pneumonia characterized by hypertrophy and hyperplasia of alveolar type II cells, intranuclear viral inclusions...... plasma cells in lung, liver, spleen, kidney, mesenteric lymph node, and intestine. Surviving kits also had hypertrophy of the bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue and focal subpleural, intraalveolar accumulations of large cells with foamy cytoplasm, so-called lipid pneumonia....

  14. Multiple cystic lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Angélica Ferreira Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple cystic lung disease represents a diverse group of uncommon disorders that can present a diagnostic challenge due to the increasing number of diseases associated with this presentation. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest helps to define the morphological aspects and distribution of lung cysts, as well as associated findings. The combination of appearance upon imaging and clinical features, together with extrapulmonary manifestations, when present, permits confident and accurate diagnosis of the majority of these diseases without recourse to open-lung biopsy. The main diseases in this group that are discussed in this review are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and folliculin gene-associated syndrome (Birt–Hogg–Dubé; other rare causes of cystic lung disease, including cystic metastasis of sarcoma, are also discussed. Disease progression is unpredictable, and understanding of the complications of cystic lung disease and their appearance during evolution of the disease are essential for management. Correlation of disease evolution and clinical context with chest imaging findings provides important clues for defining the underlying nature of cystic lung disease, and guides diagnostic evaluation and management.

  15. The combination of HLA-B*15:01 and DRB1*15:01 is associated with gemcitabine plus erlotinib-induced interstitial lung disease in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Meiko; Toyoda, Masanori; Takenaka, Kei; Imamura, Yoshinori; Chayahara, Naoko; Kiyota, Naomi; Mukohara, Toru; Kotake, Takeshi; Tsuji, Akihito; Saito, Kosuke; Saito, Yoshiro; Minami, Hironobu

    2016-06-01

    In a phase III study of gemcitabine plus erlotinib for advanced pancreatic cancer conducted in Canada, the incidence of interstitial lung disease (ILD) was 3.5 %. However, the incidence of ILD was reported as high as 8.5 % in a Japanese phase II study. These results suggest the influence of ethnic factors in the association of the use of gemcitabine plus erlotinib with the incidence of ILD. Here, we conducted a prospective study to analyze the relationship between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and ILD in Japanese patients with advanced pancreatic cancer receiving gemcitabine plus erlotinib. Patients were treated with gemcitabine (1000 mg/m(2); administered by intravenous infusion on days 1, 8, and 15 every 4 weeks) and erlotinib (given orally at 100 mg/day). We compared the frequencies of HLA alleles in patients who did and did not develop ILD. A total of 57 patients were treated, and 4 patients (7.0 %) developed ILD. The combination of HLA-B*15:01 and DRB1*15:01 was observed in 2 of 4 patients (50 %) with ILD and in only 1 of 53 patients without ILD (2 %) resulting in odds ratio of 52.0 (95 % CI 3.2-842.5; p = 0.011). These results suggest that the combination of HLA-B*15:01 and DRB1*15:01 is associated with ILD in Japanese patients with advanced pancreatic cancer receiving gemcitabine plus erlotinib.

  16. Severe Interstitial Lung Disease and Manic Symptoms Secondary to Corticosteroids in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Secondary Sjögren’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Silvério Serra

    2017-03-01

    We introduced monthly perfusion of cyclophosphamide for six months and later started mycophenolate mofetil 2 g/day, reducing prednisolone to 10 mg/day and maintaining hydroxychloroquine 400 mg/day, with control of disease activity.

  17. Paraseptal Emphysema: Prevalence and Distribution on CT and Association with Interstitial Lung Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Tetsuro; Nishino, Mizuki; Zazueta, Oscar E.; Gao, Wei; Dupuis, Josée; Okajima, Yuka; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Rosas, Ivan O.; Murakami, Takamichi; O’Connor, George T.; Washko, George R.; Hunninghake, Gary M.; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence and distribution of paraseptal emphysema on chest CT images in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) population, and assess its impact on pulmonary function. Also pursued was the association with interstitial lung abnormalities. Materials and Methods We assessed 2633 participants in the FHS for paraseptal emphysema on chest CT. Characteristics of participants, including age, sex, smoking status, clinical symptoms, and results of pulmonary function tests, were compared between those with and without paraseptal emphysema. The association between paraseptal emphysema and interstitial lung abnormalities was investigated. Results Of the 2633 participants, 86 (3%) had pure paraseptal emphysema (defined as paraseptal emphysema with no other subtypes of emphysema other than paraseptal emphysema or a very few centrilobular emphysema involved) in at least one lung zone. The upper zone of the lungs was almost always involved. Compared to the participants without paraseptal emphysema, those with pure paraseptal emphysema were significantly older, and were more frequently male and smokers (mean 64 years, 71% male, mean 36 pack-years, pemphysema and interstitial lung abnormalities (pemphysema was 3% in the FHS population, predominantly affects the upper lung zone, and contributes to decreased pulmonary function. Cigarette smoking, aging, and male gender were the factors associated with the presence of paraseptal emphysema. Significant association between paraseptal emphysema and interstitial lung abnormalities was observed. PMID:25868675

  18. Transbronchial cryobiopsy in diffuse parenchymal lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamonpun Ussavarungsi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of patients with diffuse parenchymal lung disease is best achieved by a multidisciplinary team approach combining clinical, radiological, and pathological information. Although a lung biopsy may be necessary to firmly establish a diagnosis, safely obtaining adequate tissue specimens in such patients remains challenging. Traditional bronchoscopic forceps biopsies are not recommended for most idiopathic interstitial pneumonias due to their low diagnostic yields, whereas a surgical lung biopsy increases the risk for serious complications, including a small but real risk of an exacerbation of the underlying interstitial lung disease and death. Bronchoscopic cryosurgical techniques (i.e., cryobiopsy is being increasingly used as an attractive compromise between the two, due to its ability to be performed under conscious sedation and its ability to obtain larger tissue fragments without crush artifacts. Although promising and increasingly employed at some academic centers, it remains untested in rigorous systematic studies. This article will review the existing literature on the diagnostic role and safety of transbronchial cryobiopsy in patients with diffuse parenchymal lung diseases.

  19. Lung Manifestations in the Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Tracy J; Dellaripa, Paul F

    2017-12-01

    Lung ailments in rheumatic diseases present unique challenges for diagnosis and management and are a source of significant morbidity and mortality for patients. Unlike the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, patients with rheumatic diseases experience lung disease in the context of a systemic disease that may make it more difficult to recognize and that may present greater risks with treatment. Despite recent advances in our awareness of these diseases, there is still a significant lack of understanding of natural history to elucidate which patients will have disease that is progressive and thus warrants treatment. What we do know is that a subset of patients with rheumatic disease experience parenchymal lung disease that can prognostically resemble idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, such as in rheumatoid arthritis, and that others can have aggressive inflammatory lung disease in the context of autoimmune myositis, systemic sclerosis, or an undifferentiated autoimmune process. As we enter into a paradigm shift where we view lung health as a cornerstone of our care of patients with rheumatic diseases, we hopefully will improve our ability to identify those patients at highest risk for pulmonary disease and progression, and offer emerging treatments which will result in better outcomes and a better quality of life. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Predicting occupational lung diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suarthana, E.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis aims at demonstrating the development, validation, and application of prediction models for occupational lung diseases. Prediction models are developed to estimate an individual’s probability of the presence or future likelihood of occurrence of an outcome (i.e. disease of interest or

  1. Dosimetric analysis of rib interference of the CTV during interstitial brachytherapy of lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Sun, Xiaoyang; Pang, Haowen; Shi, Xiangxiang; Tang, Tao; Zhang, Guangpeng; Chen, Renjin; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Hong; Lin, Sheng; Wen, Qinglian; Han, Yunwei; Wu, Jingbo

    2017-12-01

    In interstitial brachytherapy for lung tumors, the placement and alignment of the source needles are influenced by the ribs, which can affect the dose distribution. This study evaluated the change in dose to the target by comparing the dose between the actual interstitial brachytherapy plan (AIBP, what is deliverable due to anatomic constraints), and the virtual interstitial brachytherapy plan (VIBP, pretreatment-modified dose distribution). AIBPs and VIBPs were designed for 20 lung tumors. The VIBP was designed with uniform spacing between needles, regardless of the presence of ribs. The prescription dose was 30 Gy. The percentage of normal ipsilateral lung volume that received a dose ≥ 5 Gy (V 5 ), conformity index (COIN), incremental dose percentage (IDP) to the target, and the dose covering 95% (D 95 ) of the clinical target volume (CTV) were calculated. The V 5 of the VIBPs was significantly smaller than that of the AIBPs ( p 0.05). The regular geometric alignment of needles is important for increasing the target dose and limiting the normal lung dose in interstitial brachytherapy for thoracic tumors. Thus, we recommend that radiation oncologists attempt to achieve the regular alignment of needles during implantation.

  2. Dosimetric analysis of rib interference of the CTV during interstitial brachytherapy of lung tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : In interstitial brachytherapy for lung tumors, the placement and alignment of the source needles are influenced by the ribs, which can affect the dose distribution. This study evaluated the change in dose to the target by comparing the dose between the actual interstitial brachytherapy plan (AIBP, what is deliverable due to anatomic constraints, and the virtual interstitial brachytherapy plan (VIBP, pretreatment-modified dose distribution. Material and methods : AIBPs and VIBPs were designed for 20 lung tumors. The VIBP was designed with uniform spacing between needles, regardless of the presence of ribs. The prescription dose was 30 Gy. The percentage of normal ipsilateral lung volume that received a dose ≥ 5 Gy (V 5 , conformity index (COIN, incremental dose percentage (IDP to the target, and the dose covering 95% (D 95 of the clinical target volume (CTV were calculated. Results : The V 5 of the VIBPs was significantly smaller than that of the AIBPs (p 0.05. Conclusions : The regular geometric alignment of needles is important for increasing the target dose and limiting the normal lung dose in interstitial brachytherapy for thoracic tumors. Thus, we recommend that radiation oncologists attempt to achieve the regular alignment of needles during implantation.

  3. Crohn's disease: ultrastructure of interstitial cells in colonic myenteric plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johs.; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    -MP and other interstitial cells in the myenteric region of the colon are lacking for CD. In the present study, we characterized the ultrastructure of interstitial cells, nerves, and glial cells in the myenteric region in Crohn's colitis (CC). In comparison with controls, varicosities of the myenteric bundles...... were dilated and appeared to be empty. Lipid droplets and lipofuscin-bodies were prominent in glial cells and neurons. ICC-MP were scanty but, as in controls, had caveolae, prominent intermediate filaments, cytoplasmic dense bodies, and membrane-associated dense bands with a patchy basal lamina. ICC......The role of the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in chronic inflammatory bowel disease, i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), remains unclear. Ultrastructural alterations in ICC in the colonic myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) have been reported previously in UC, but descriptions of ICC...

  4. The role of fibrocytes in sickle cell lung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J Field

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung disease is a frequent complication in sickle cell disease and is characterized by vascular remodeling and interstitial fibrosis. Bone marrow-derived fibrocytes have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of other interstitial lung diseases. The goal of this study was to define the contribution of fibrocytes to the pathogenesis of sickle cell lung disease.Fibrocytes were quantified and characterized in subjects with sickle cell disease or healthy controls, and in a model of sickle cell disease, the NY1DD mouse. The role of the chemokine ligand CXCL12 in trafficking of fibrocytes and phenotype of lung disease was examined in the animal model. We found elevated concentration of activated fibrocytes in the peripheral blood of subjects with sickle cell disease, which increased further during vaso-occlusive crises. There was a similar elevations in the numbers and activation phenotype of fibrocytes in the bone marrow, blood, and lungs of the NY1DD mouse, both at baseline and under conditions of hypoxia/re-oxygenation. In both subjects with sickle cell disease and the mouse model, fibrocytes expressed a hierarchy of chemokine receptors, with CXCR4 expressed on most fibrocytes, and CCR2 and CCR7 expressed on a smaller subset of cells. Depletion of the CXCR4 ligand, CXCL12, in the mouse model resulted in a marked reduction of fibrocyte trafficking into the lungs, reduced lung collagen content and improved lung compliance and histology.These data support the notion that activated fibrocytes play a significant role in the pathogenesis of sickle cell lung disease.

  5. Paraseptal emphysema: Prevalence and distribution on CT and association with interstitial lung abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Tetsuro, E-mail: taraki@partners.org [Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Department of Radiology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-Sayama (Japan); Nishino, Mizuki [Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Zazueta, Oscar E. [The Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Gao, Wei [Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Dupuis, Josée [Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute' s Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA (United States); Okajima, Yuka [Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Latourelle, Jeanne C. [Department of Medicine and Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Rosas, Ivan O. [The Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Murakami, Takamichi [Department of Radiology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-Sayama (Japan); O’Connor, George T. [The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute' s Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA (United States); Pulmonary Center and Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Washko, George R.; Hunninghake, Gary M. [The Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The prevalence of pure paraseptal emphysema was 3% (85/2633) in the Framingham Heart Study population, predominantly affects the upper lung zone, and contributes to slightly decreased pulmonary function. • There was significant association between paraseptal emphysema and interstitial lung abnormalities, which is a novel finding. • Prevalence of paraseptal emphysema and its impact on pulmonary function could have been underestimated in the previous reports. - Abstract: Objective: To investigate the prevalence and distribution of paraseptal emphysema on chest CT images in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) population, and assess its impact on pulmonary function. Also pursued was the association with interstitial lung abnormalities. Materials and methods: We assessed 2633 participants in the FHS for paraseptal emphysema on chest CT. Characteristics of the participants, including age, sex, smoking status, clinical symptoms, and results of pulmonary function tests, were compared between those with and without paraseptal emphysema. The association between paraseptal emphysema and interstitial lung abnormalities was investigated. Results: Of the 2633 participants, 86 (3%) had pure paraseptal emphysema (defined as paraseptal emphysema with no other subtypes of emphysema other than paraseptal emphysema or a very few centrilobular emphysema involved) in at least one lung zone. The upper zone of the lungs was almost always involved. Compared to the participants without paraseptal emphysema, those with pure paraseptal emphysema were significantly older, and were more frequently male and smokers (mean 64 years, 71% male, mean 36 pack-years, P < 0.001) and had significantly decreased FEV{sub 1}/FVC% (P = 0.002), and diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO) (P = 0.002). There was a significant association between pure paraseptal emphysema and interstitial lung abnormalities (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The prevalence of pure paraseptal emphysema was 3% in the

  6. IMPORTANCE OF CYCLOPHOSPHANUM IN THE TREATMENT OF INTERSTITIAL LUNG LESION IN PATIENTS WITH SCLERODERMA SYSTEMATICA (A REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Aleksandrova Koneva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung diseases (ILD are a common manifestation of scleroderma systematica (SSD that along with pulmonary arterial hypertension remains the leading cause of death in this nosological entity. As of now, cyclophosphanum remains the only immunosuppressant recommended by the European League against Rheumatism for the treatment of ILD in SSD. The paper analyzes the papers providing evidence for the efficacy of cyclophosphanum in ILD in patients with SSD. It also considers the regimens and duration of treatment with cyclophosphanum, ways of evaluating its efficacy and effects on extrapulmonary manifestations of SSD. It is concluded that cyclophosphanum has a positive, predominantly stabilizing, effect on the course of ILD in SSD.

  7. Black lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramani, R.V.; Frantz, R.L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Coal workers` pneumoconiosis (CWP), often called Black Lung Disease is a occupational disease which results from inhalation of coal mine dust which usually contains small amounts of free crystalline silica. This chapter reviews the current knowledge of the epidemiology and clinical aspects of CWP and how it has been controlled in the USA through the 1969 Coal Mine Act and dust level standards. It describes the sampling methods used. Medical control methods and engineering control of the disease is discussed. Work of the Generic Mineral Technology Center for Respirable Dust is described. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Fungemia and interstitial lung compromise caused by Malassezia sympodialis in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Clarisa; Euliarte, Cristina; Finquelievich, Jorge; Sosa, María de los Ángeles; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    A case of fungemia with interstitial lung compromise caused by Malassezia sympodialis is reported in an obese pediatric patient on long-term treatment with inhaled corticosteroids for asthma. The patient was hospitalized due to a post-surgical complication of appendicitis. The patient was treated with amphotericin B for 3 weeks, with good clinical evolution and subsequent negative cultures. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Visual assessment of early emphysema and interstitial abnormalities on CT is useful in lung cancer risk analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wille, Mathilde M.W.; Dirksen, Asger; Shaker, Saher B. [Gentofte Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hellerup (Denmark); Thomsen, Laura H. [Hvidovre Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hvidovre (Denmark); Petersen, Jens [University of Copenhagen, Department of Computer Science, DIKU, Koebenhavn Oe (Denmark); Bruijne, Marleen de [University of Copenhagen, Department of Computer Science, DIKU, Koebenhavn Oe (Denmark); Erasmus MC -University Medical Center Rotterdam, Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pedersen, Jesper H. [Copenhagen University Hospital, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Koebenhavn Oe (Denmark)

    2016-02-15

    Screening for lung cancer should be limited to a high-risk-population, and abnormalities in low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening images may be relevant for predicting the risk of lung cancer. Our aims were to compare the occurrence of visually detected emphysema and interstitial abnormalities in subjects with and without lung cancer in a screening population of smokers. Low-dose chest CT examinations (baseline and latest possible) of 1990 participants from The Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial were independently evaluated by two observers who scored emphysema and interstitial abnormalities. Emphysema (lung density) was also measured quantitatively. Emphysema was seen more frequently and its extent was greater among participants with lung cancer on baseline (odds ratio (OR), 1.8, p = 0.017 and p = 0.002) and late examinations (OR 2.6, p < 0.001 and p < 0.001). No significant difference was found using quantitative measurements. Interstitial abnormalities were more common findings among participants with lung cancer (OR 5.1, p < 0.001 and OR 4.5, p < 0.001).There was no association between presence of emphysema and presence of interstitial abnormalities (OR 0.75, p = 0.499). Even early signs of emphysema and interstitial abnormalities are associated with lung cancer. Quantitative measurements of emphysema - regardless of type - do not show the same association. (orig.)

  10. The value of the abnormalities of bronchovascular bundles in the diagnosis of diffused lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tieyi; Ji Jingling

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the abnormalities of bronchovascular bundles in the differential diagnosis of the diffuse lung disease, seventy-two patients with diffuse lung diseases were evaluated, 15 of 72 patients were pathologically proven and the others clinically proven. Of these 72 patients, there were 33 patients with diffuse pulmonary interstitial disease, 5 patients with pulmonary parenchymal disease, 14 patients with bronchial disease, and 20 patients with disseminated disease. All patients had conventional CT scan of the chest, some also had HRCT scan. All CT images were jointly reviewed by two radiologists. The features of the abnormalities of bronchovascular bundles included: (1) Thinning of bronchovascular bundles, predominantly seen in diffuse interstitial disease of lung and chronic bronchitis; (2) thickening of bronchovascular bundles, predominantly seen in interstitial diseases and disseminated lung diseases such as sarcoidosis and lymphangitis carcinomatosis with beaded appearance of bronchovascular bundles; (3) Increased visibility of bronchovascular bundles, predominantly seen in bronchiolitis and disseminated lung diseases. CT features of the abnormalities of bronchovascular bundles are present in 80% of diffuse lung diseases. The features are not specific, but the beaded bronchovascular bundles are always seen in sarcoidosis and lymphangitis carcinomatosis. In making a distinction between idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and chronic bronchitis complicated with interstitial fibrosis, the position of diaphragm is of value in differential diagnosis, normal or elevated diaphragm is usually seen in the former, while low and flattened diaphragm in the latter. Change of the appearance of bronchovascular bundles from normality to abnormality reflects the process of development of the lung disease

  11. Visual assessment of early emphysema and interstitial abnormalities on CT is useful in lung cancer risk analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wille, Mathilde M. W.; Thomsen, Laura H.; Petersen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Screening for lung cancer should be limited to a high-risk-population, and abnormalities in low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening images may be relevant for predicting the risk of lung cancer. Our aims were to compare the occurrence of visually detected emphysema and interstitial.......499). Conclusions: Even early signs of emphysema and interstitial abnormalities are associated with lung cancer. Quantitative measurements of emphysema—regardless of type—do not show the same association. Key Points: • Visually detected emphysema on CT is more frequent in individuals who develop lung cancer...

  12. Interstital lung disease in ANCA vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Marco A; Flores-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Henderson, Ashley G; Xiao, Hong; Hu, Peiqi; Nachman, Patrick H; Falk, Ronald J; Charles Jennette, J

    2017-07-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) vasculitides are immune-mediated disorders that primarily affect small blood vessels of the airway and kidneys. Lung involvement, one of the hallmarks of microscopic polyangiitis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis, is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. In recent years, several retrospective series and case reports have described the association of interstitial lung disease (ILD) and ANCA vasculitis, particularly those positive for ANCA specific for myeloperoxidase. In the majority of these patients pulmonary fibrosis occurs concurrently or predates the diagnosis of ANCA vasculitis. More importantly, these studies have shown that ILD has an adverse impact on the long-term prognosis of ANCA vasculitis. This review focuses on the main clinical and radiologic features of pulmonary fibrosis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Major histopathology features, prognosis and therapeutic options are summarized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Unexpandable lung from pleural disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, John T; Maldonado, Fabien; Chopra, Amit; Rahman, Najib; Light, Richard

    2018-02-01

    Unexpandable lung is a common complication of malignant pleural effusions and inflammatory pleural diseases, such as pleural infection (e.g. empyema and complicated parapneumonic effusion) and noninfectious fibrinous pleuritis. Unexpandable lung due to pleural disease may be because of an active pleural process, and is referred to as malignant or inflammatory lung entrapment. An unexpandable lung may also be encountered in the setting of remote pleural inflammation resulting in a mature fibrous membrane overlying the visceral pleura preventing full expansion of the lung. This condition is termed trapped lung and may be understood as a form of defective healing of the pleural space. Trapped lung typically presents as a chronic, stable pleural effusion without evidence of active pleural disease. An unexpandable lung most often manifests itself as an inability of fully expanding the lung with pleural space drainage. Patients will either develop chest pain preventing complete drainage of the pleural space or develop a post-procedure pneumothorax. Pleural manometry and radiological imaging are useful in the assessment of an unexpandable lung. Pleural manometry can demonstrate abnormal lung expansion during drainage and imaging will demonstrate abnormal visceral pleural thickening found in trapped lung or malignant and inflammatory lung entrapment. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  14. Intersections of lung progenitor cells, lung disease and lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla F. Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of stem cell biology approaches to study adult lung progenitor cells and lung cancer has brought a variety of new techniques to the field of lung biology and has elucidated new pathways that may be therapeutic targets in lung cancer. Recent results have begun to identify the ways in which different cell populations interact to regulate progenitor activity, and this has implications for the interventions that are possible in cancer and in a variety of lung diseases. Today's better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate lung progenitor cell self-renewal and differentiation, including understanding how multiple epigenetic factors affect lung injury repair, holds the promise for future better treatments for lung cancer and for optimising the response to therapy in lung cancer. Working between platforms in sophisticated organoid culture techniques, genetically engineered mouse models of injury and cancer, and human cell lines and specimens, lung progenitor cell studies can begin with basic biology, progress to translational research and finally lead to the beginnings of clinical trials.

  15. Fetal lung interstitial tumor: the first Japanese case report and a comparison with fetal lung tissue and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Mariko; Tanaka, Mio; Gomi, Kiyoshi; Iwanaka, Tadashi; Dehner, Louis P; Tanaka, Yukichi

    2013-10-01

    Fetal lung interstitial tumor, a newly recognized lung lesion in infants, was first reported in 2010. Here, we report the first Japanese case of fetal lung interstitial tumor which was originally diagnosed as atypical congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation type 3. A 7-day-old girl was referred to our hospital with respiratory distress and a left lung mass and she subsequently underwent left lower lobectomy. The specimen showed a 5 cm solid mass with a fibrous capsule. Histological examination revealed immature airspaces and interstitium, containing bronchioles and cartilage. The epithelial and interstitial cells contained abundant glycogen granules. Immunohistochemistry showed nuclear/cytoplasmic expression of β-catenin in the epithelial and interstitial cells. β-catenin gene mutations and trisomy 8 were not detected, so a neoplastic origin could not be confirmed. The histological findings were partly consistent with normal fetal lung at the canalicular stage, pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis, and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation type 3. In this report, we compare the above conditions and discuss the pathogenesis of fetal lung interstitial tumor. © 2013 The Authors. Pathology International © 2013 Japanese Society of Pathology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. A case of Amyopathic Dermatomyositis associated with Interstitial Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugan, Y; Sahin, M; Dogru, A; Bayram, D; Ceyhan, A M; Tunc, S E

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory myopathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases with unknown etiology characterized by inflammation of the skeletal muscles and proximal muscle weakness. Dermatomyositis (DM) is an idiopathic inflammatory myopathy with characteristic cutaneous findings such as heliotrope rash, Gottron's sign, Gottron's papules, shawl sign and machinist hand. Amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM) is a rare but well-recognized clinical subtype of DM, constituting aproximately 10-20% of patients with this disease. It generally manifests only pathognomonic skin findings without clinical and laboratory evidence of muscle involvement. In this report, we present a rare case of ADM associated with interstitial pulmonary disease.

  17. Developing Optimal Parameters for Hyperpolarized Noble Gas and Inert Fluorinated Gas MRI of Lung Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Lung Transplant; Lung Resection; Lung Cancer; Asthma; Cystic Fibrosis; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Emphysema; Mesothelioma; Asbestosis; Pulmonary Embolism; Interstitial Lung Disease; Pulmonary Fibrosis; Bronchiectasis; Seasonal Allergies; Cold Virus; Lung Infection; Pulmonary Hypertension; Pulmonary Dysplasia; Obstructive Sleep Apnea

  18. Bronchoscopic cryobiopsy for the diagnosis of diffuse parenchymal lung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Kropski

    Full Text Available Although in some cases clinical and radiographic features may be sufficient to establish a diagnosis of diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD, surgical lung biopsy is frequently required. Recently a new technique for bronchoscopic lung biopsy has been developed using flexible cryo-probes. In this study we describe our clinical experience using bronchoscopic cryobiopsy for diagnosis of diffuse lung disease.A retrospective study of subjects who had undergone bronchoscopic cryobiopsy for evaluation of DPLD at an academic tertiary care center from January 1, 2012 through January 15, 2013 was performed. The procedure was performed using a flexible bronchoscope to acquire biopsies of lung parenchyma. H&E stained biopsies were reviewed by an expert lung pathologist.Twenty-five eligible subjects were identified. With a mean area of 64.2 mm(2, cryobiopsies were larger than that typically encountered with traditional transbronchial forceps biopsy. In 19 of the 25 subjects, a specific diagnosis was obtained. In one additional subject, biopsies demonstrating normal parenchyma were felt sufficient to exclude diffuse lung disease as a cause of dyspnea. The overall diagnostic yield of bronchoscopic cryobiopsy was 80% (20/25. The most frequent diagnosis was usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP (n = 7. Three of the 25 subjects ultimately required surgical lung biopsy. There were no significant complications.In patients with suspected diffuse parenchymal lung disease, bronchoscopic cryobiopsy is a promising and minimally invasive approach to obtain lung tissue with high diagnostic yield.

  19. Legionnaire's pneumonia: Is there really an interstitial disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godet, C.; Frat, J.P.; Le Moal, G.; Roblot, F.; Michalakis, G.; Cabon, E.; Tasu, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Legionella pneumonia is usually classified as 'atypical pneumonia', which suggests a predominance of interstitial patterns in chest X-rays. Based on a selection of recent clinical cases and a brief review of the literature, the aim of the study is to clarify, how far the actual radiological findings would be consistent with these expectations. Patients and methods: A retrospective analysis of 18 epidemic personal cases and a review of the literature data were performed to describe the chest X-ray findings of Legionella pneumophila (LP) community acquired pneumonia. X-ray review was performed simultaneously and in consensus by two radiologists (J.P.T., E.C.) and a physician (C.G.). Results: From our series, 17 patients had an abnormal chest X-ray on admission. Among these pathological X-ray cases, infiltrates were more often confluent (n = 16), or patchy (n = 7), rather than interstitial (n = 1). Fifteen patients had infiltrates involving the lower lung fields. Bilateral distribution of abnormalities and pleural effusion were each observed in three cases. Radiological findings deteriorated between the second and seventh days following admission, particularly in the form of patchy infiltrates with pleural effusion. The review of the literature is consistent with these findings, by reporting prevalent confluent or patchy infiltrates. Conclusions: These findings are consistent with the physiopathological particularity of this affection and incite us to avoid the classification 'atypical pneumonia' in radiologic terminology. This term is more appropriate for clinical and microbiological use

  20. Avaliação da tomografia de alta resolução versus radiografia de tórax na doença intersticial pulmonar na esclerose sistêmica High-resolution computed tomography versus chest radiography in the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis

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    Ana Beatriz Cordeiro de Azevedo

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a acurácia da tomografia de alta resolução (TCAR do tórax em relação à radiografia simples (RX do tórax no diagnóstico de doença intersticial pulmonar relacionada à esclerose sistêmica (ES. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram realizados TCAR e RX de tórax em póstero-anterior e perfil em 34 pacientes com diagnóstico de ES, segundo critérios do Colégio Americano de Reumatologia, e feita comparação entre as prevalências dos achados radiológicos sugestivos de doença intersticial pulmonar encontradas com estes dois métodos de imagem. RESULTADOS: Foram observadas alterações em 31 (91% das TCAR, enquanto 16 (47% dos RX de tórax se apresentavam alterados. Os achados mais freqüentes à TCAR foram: linhas septais (74%, faveolamento (56% e bandas parenquimatosas (26%, localizados predominantemente nas bases pulmonares. Os RX de tórax demonstraram áreas de infiltrado reticular em 32% dos casos e distorção parenquimatosa em 12% dos pacientes. Em 18 (53% pacientes com RX de tórax normal a TCAR revelou espessamento septal em 55%, vidro fosco em 44%, faveolamento em 38,5% e cistos em 33%. CONCLUSÃO: A TCAR é mais sensível que o RX de tórax para a investigação de envolvimento intersticial pulmonar inicial em pacientes com ES, justificando, em casos incipientes, tratamento com terapia imunossupressora.OBJECTIVE: To compare the accuracy of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT with chest radiography in the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis (SSc. MATERIALS AND METHODS: HRCT scans and chest radiographs in postero-anterior and lateral views were performed in 34 patients with systemic sclerosis, according to the American College of Rheumatology preliminary criteria for the diagnosis of SSc. The prevalence of radiological findings suggestive of interstitial lung disease in SSc seen on both imaging methods was compared. RESULTS: Interstitial disease was observed on HRCT images of 31 patients

  1. Elastin in lung development and disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecham, Robert P

    2018-01-11

    Elastin is expressed in most tissues that require elastic recoil. The protein first appeared coincident with the closed circulatory system, and was critical for the evolutionary success of the vertebrate lineage. Elastin is expressed by multiple cell types in the lung, including mesothelial cells in the pleura, smooth muscle cells in airways and blood vessels, endothelial cells, and interstitial fibroblasts. This highly crosslinked protein associates with fibrillin-containing microfibrils to form the elastic fiber, which is the physiological structure that functions in the extracellular matrix. Elastic fibers can be woven into many different shapes depending on the mechanical needs of the tissue. In large pulmonary vessels, for example, elastin forms continuous sheets, or lamellae, that separate smooth muscle layers. Outside of the vasculature, elastic fibers form an extensive fiber network that originates in the central bronchi and inserts into the distal airspaces and visceral pleura. The fibrous cables form a looping system that encircle the alveolar ducts and terminal air spaces and ensures that applied force is transmitted equally to all parts of the lung. Normal lung function depends on proper secretion and assembly of elastin, and either inhibition of elastin fiber assembly or degradation of existing elastin results in lung dysfunction and disease. Copyright © 2018 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Aspergillus-Related Lung Disease

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    Alia Al-Alawi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus is a ubiquitous dimorphic fungus that causes a variety of human diseases ranging in severity from trivial to life-threatening, depending on the host response. An intact host defence is important to prevent disease, but individuals with pre-existing structural lung disease, atopy, occupational exposure or impaired immunity are susceptible. Three distinctive patterns of aspergillus-related lung disease are recognized: saprophytic infestation of airways, cavities and necrotic tissue; allergic disease including extrinsic allergic alveolitis, asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, bronchocentric granulomatosis and chronic eosinophilic pneumonia; and airway and tissue invasive disease -- pseudomembranous tracheobronchitis, acute bronchopneumonia, angioinvasive aspergillosis, chronic necrotizing aspergillosis and invasive pleural disease. A broad knowledge of these clinical presentations and a high index of suspicion are required to ensure timely diagnosis and treatment of the potentially lethal manifestations of aspergillus-related pulmonary disease. In the present report, the clinical, radiographic and pathological aspects of the various aspergillus-related lung diseases are briefly reviewed.

  3. Ultrasound lung comets in systemic sclerosis: a chest sonography hallmark of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis.

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    Gargani, Luna; Doveri, Marica; D'Errico, Luigia; Frassi, Francesca; Bazzichi, Maria L; Delle Sedie, Andrea; Scali, Maria C; Monti, Simonetta; Mondillo, Sergio; Bombardieri, Stefano; Caramella, Davide; Picano, Eugenio

    2009-11-01

    To assess the correlation between ultrasound lung comets (ULCs, a recently described echographic sign of interstitial lung fibrosis) and the current undisputed gold-standard high-resolution CT (HRCT) to detect pulmonary fibrosis in patients with SSc. We enrolled 33 consecutive SSc patients (mean age 54 +/- 13 years, 30 females) in the Rheumatology Clinic of the University of Pisa. We assessed ULCs and chest HRCT within 1 week independently in all the patients. ULC score was obtained by summing the number of lung comets on the anterior and posterior chest. Pulmonary fibrosis was quantified by HRCT with a previously described 30-point Warrick score. Presence of ULCs (defined as a total number more than 10) was observed in 17 (51%) SSc patients. Mean ULC score was 37 +/- 50, higher in the diffuse than in the limited form (73 +/- 66 vs 21 +/- 35; P < 0.05). A significant positive linear correlation was found between ULCs and Warrick scores (r = 0.72; P < 0.001). ULCs are often found in SSc, are more frequent in the diffuse than the limited form and are reasonably well correlated with HRCT-derived assessment of lung fibrosis. They represent a simple, bedside, radiation-free hallmark of pulmonary fibrosis of potential diagnostic and prognostic value.

  4. Immunology of fibrotic lung disease: managing infections whilst preventing autoimmunity?

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    Thomas Hügle

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Thomas HügleDepartment of Rheumatology, Felix-Platter-Spital, University of Basel, Basel, SwitzerlandAbstract: Interstitial lung disease (ILD and lung fibrosis are characterized by different grades of fibrosis and inflammation. Persistent low-grade inflammation is believed to play a major pathogenic role, leading to an imbalance of cytokines, growth factors, and tissue proteinases. Recruited monocytes and macrophages play a pivotal role through their cytokine expression and possibly differentiation into fibrocytes, pericytes, or myofibroblasts. Atypical bacterial infections can cause ILD, although not usually in the form of usual interstitial pneumonia. On the other hand, bacterial colonization is frequently encountered in patients with chronic fibrotic lung disorders, and patients regularly undergo antibacterial treatment. As demonstrated in patients with diffuse panbronchiolitis and other chronic respiratory disorders, treatment with macrolides can be beneficial. This is partly explained by their antimicrobial effects but, for macrolides, immunomodulatory properties have been identified which might also be beneficial in patients with ILD or lung fibrosis. This article reviews the immunology of lung fibrogenesis and putative implications of macrolides for reinstallation of tolerance.Keywords: lung fibrosis, inflammation, pneumonia

  5. Cartography of Pathway Signal Perturbations Identifies Distinct Molecular Pathomechanisms in Malignant and Chronic Lung Diseases.

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    Arakelyan, Arsen; Nersisyan, Lilit; Petrek, Martin; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Lung diseases are described by a wide variety of developmental mechanisms and clinical manifestations. Accurate classification and diagnosis of lung diseases are the bases for development of effective treatments. While extensive studies are conducted toward characterization of various lung diseases at molecular level, no systematic approach has been developed so far. Here we have applied a methodology for pathway-centered mining of high throughput gene expression data to describe a wide range of lung diseases in the light of shared and specific pathway activity profiles. We have applied an algorithm combining a Pathway Signal Flow (PSF) algorithm for estimation of pathway activity deregulation states in lung diseases and malignancies, and a Self Organizing Maps algorithm for classification and clustering of the pathway activity profiles. The analysis results allowed clearly distinguish between cancer and non-cancer lung diseases. Lung cancers were characterized by pathways implicated in cell proliferation, metabolism, while non-malignant lung diseases were characterized by deregulations in pathways involved in immune/inflammatory response and fibrotic tissue remodeling. In contrast to lung malignancies, chronic lung diseases had relatively heterogeneous pathway deregulation profiles. We identified three groups of interstitial lung diseases and showed that the development of characteristic pathological processes, such as fibrosis, can be initiated by deregulations in different signaling pathways. In conclusion, this paper describes the pathobiology of lung diseases from systems viewpoint using pathway centered high-dimensional data mining approach. Our results contribute largely to current understanding of pathological events in lung cancers and non-malignant lung diseases. Moreover, this paper provides new insight into molecular mechanisms of a number of interstitial lung diseases that have been studied to a lesser extent.

  6. Tomography patterns of lung disease in systemic sclerosis

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    Bastos, Andrea de Lima; Correa, Ricardo de Amorim; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida, E-mail: andrealb@ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-09-15

    Currently, lung impairment is the leading factor responsible for the morbidity and mortality associated with systemic sclerosis. Therefore, the recognition of the various tomography patterns becomes decisive in the clinical management of these patients. In high-resolution computed tomography studies, the most common pattern is that of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. However, there are other forms of lung involvement that must also be recognized. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the main changes resulting from pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis and the corresponding radiological findings, considering the current classification of interstitial diseases. We searched the Medline (PubMed), Lilacs, and SciELO databases in order to select articles related to pulmonary changes in systemic sclerosis and published in English between 2000 and 2015. The pulmonary changes seen on computed tomography in systemic sclerosis are varied and are divided into three main categories: interstitial, alveolar, and vascular. Interstitial changes constitute the most common type of pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis. However, alveolar and vascular manifestations must also be recognized and considered in the presence of atypical clinical presentations and inadequate treatment responses. (author)

  7. Tomography patterns of lung disease in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa de Lima Bastos

    Full Text Available Abstract Currently, lung impairment is the leading factor responsible for the morbidity and mortality associated with systemic sclerosis. Therefore, the recognition of the various tomography patterns becomes decisive in the clinical management of these patients. In high-resolution computed tomography studies, the most common pattern is that of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. However, there are other forms of lung involvement that must also be recognized. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the main changes resulting from pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis and the corresponding radiological findings, considering the current classification of interstitial diseases. We searched the Medline (PubMed, Lilacs, and SciELO databases in order to select articles related to pulmonary changes in systemic sclerosis and published in English between 2000 and 2015. The pulmonary changes seen on computed tomography in systemic sclerosis are varied and are divided into three main categories: interstitial, alveolar, and vascular. Interstitial changes constitute the most common type of pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis. However, alveolar and vascular manifestations must also be recognized and considered in the presence of atypical clinical presentations and inadequate treatment responses.

  8. Metastasizing Ameloblastoma With Localized Interstitial Spread in the Lung: Report of Two Cases.

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    Chou, Yueh-Hung; Jhuang, Jie-Yang; Chang, Min-Hsiang; Huang, Wen-Chih; Hsieh, Min-Shu

    2014-06-01

    Ameloblastoma is a locally aggressive, epithelial odontogenic tumor involving mandibles and maxillas. Distant metastasis is a very rare condition and is designated as metastasizing (malignant) ameloblastoma despite its benign histological appearance. Up to now, only 27 well-documented cases of metastasizing ameloblastomas are reported in the literature, and lung is the most commonly involved organ. In previous reports of pulmonary metastasizing ameloblastomas, there was little description of the histopathologic finding. Here, the authors report 2 cases of pulmonary metastasizing ameloblastomas with special emphasis on their interesting, interstitial spread along alveolar septa, resulting in a unique 2-cell pattern under microscopic examination. Pulmonary metastasizing ameloblastoma may pose difficulty in diagnosis if the pathologist is not aware of patient's clinical history of ameloblastoma. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Bleb Point: Mimicker of Pneumothorax in Bullous Lung Disease

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    Gelabert, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In patients presenting with severe dyspnea, several diagnostic challenges arise in distinguishing the diagnosis of pneumothorax versus several other pulmonary etiologies like bullous lung disease, pneumonia, interstitial lung disease, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Distinguishing between large pulmonary bullae and pneumothorax is of the utmost importance, as the acute management is very different. While multiple imaging modalities are available, plain radiographs may be inadequate to make the diagnosis and other advanced imaging may be difficult to obtain. Ultrasound has a very high specificity for pneumothorax. We present a case where a large pulmonary bleb mimics the lung point and therefore inaccurately suggests pneumothorax. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(3:447–449.

  10. Estimation of {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine lung uptake in heart and lung diseases. With reference to lung uptake ratio and decrease of lung uptake

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    Fujii, Tadashige [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Allied Medical Sciences; Tanaka, Masao; Yazaki, Yoshikazu; Kitabayashi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Tomonori; Sekiguchi, Morie; Gomi, Tsutomu; Yano, Kesato; Itoh, Atsuko

    1997-11-01

    {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy was performed in 64 patients with heart and lung diseases. Distribution of MIBG in the chest was evaluated by planar images, using counts ratios of the heart to the mediastinum (H/M) and the unilateral lung to the mediastinum (Lu/M). Most of patients with heart diseases showed obvious lung uptake of MIBG. The ratios of H/M were 1.75{+-}0.20 in the group without heart failure and 1.55{+-}0.19 in the group with heart failure. The ratios of Lu/M in the right and left lung were 1.56{+-}0.16 and 1.28{+-}0.16 in the group without heart failure. And those were 1.45{+-}0.16 and 1.19{+-}0.15 in the group with heart failure. But 3 patients complicated with chronic pulmonary emphysema and one patient with interstitial pneumonia due to dermatomyositis showed markedly decreased lung uptake. The ratios of Lu/M in the right and left lung of these patients were 1.20, 1.17; 1.17, 1.13; 1.01, 0.97 and 1.27, 0.94, respectively. These results suggest that the lung uptake of MIBG may reflect the state of pulmonary endothelial cell function in clinical situations, considering that it has been demonstrated that MIBG may be useful as a marker of pulmonary endothelial cell function in the isolated rat lung. (author)

  11. Influence of radiation dose rate and lung dose on interstitial pneumonitis after fractionated total body irradiation: acute parotitis may predict interstitial pneumonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oya, Natsuo; Sasai, Keisuke; Tachiiri, Seiji; Sakamoto, Takashi; Nagata, Yasushi; Okada, Takashi; Yano, Shinsuke; Ishikawa, Takayuki; Uchiyama, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated patients for the influence of the dose rate and lung dose of fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) in preparation for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on the subsequent development of interstitial pneumonitis (IP). Sixty-six patients at our institute were treated with TBI followed by BMT. All of the patients received a total TBI dose of 12 Gy given in 6 fractions over 3 days and were divided into 3 groups according to the radiation dose rate and lung dose: group A, lung dose of 8 Gy (n = 18); group B, lung dose of 12 Gy at 8 cGy/min (n = 25); and group C, lung dose of 12 Gy at 19 cGy/min (n = 23). The overall survival rate, the cumulative incidence of relapse, and the cumulative incidence of IP were evaluated in relation to various potential indicators of future IP. There were no significant differences in survival and relapse rates between patient group A and combined groups B and C. Clinically significant IP occurred in 13 patients. The cumulative incidence of IP was significantly higher in patients who developed acute parotitis as indicated by either an elevation in the serum amylase level or parotid pain of grade 1 to 2. There was no difference in IP incidence among groups A, B, and C. There was no significant difference in IP incidence between lung dose values of 8 Gy (with lung shielding) and 12 Gy (without lung shielding) and between dose rate values of 8 cGy/min and 19 cGy/ min, at least when TBI was given in 6 fractions. The presence of acute parotitis during or just after TBI may be a predictor of IP.

  12. Obesity, adipokines, and lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Akshay

    2010-03-01

    This review summarizes the state of the current literature relating to the associations of lung disease on obesity and adipokines (proteins produced by adipose tissue) in humans. Obesity is an independent risk factor for asthma. Recent studies suggest that obesity is also an independent risk factor for chronic airflow obstruction, as is seen with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The mechanistic basis for these associations in humans is not established, although a possible role for adipokines has been invoked. Leptin, a proinflammatory adipokine, and adiponectin, an anti-inflammatory adipokine, are causally associated with asthma in mice. Although human studies are currently inconclusive, high-serum leptin and low-serum adiponectin concentrations predict asthma, independent of obesity, in select population groups, such as premenopausal women in the United States. In contradistinction, low-serum leptin and high-serum adiponectin concentrations are associated with stable COPD, although these associations are likely confounded by fat mass. Interestingly, leptin may promote systemic and airway inflammation in stable COPD patients. On the other hand, COPD may upregulate systemic and lung adiponectin expression. The precise mechanism and significance of the associations between these adipokines and lung disease at the current stage is confusing and frankly paradoxical in places. This area of research needs additional study that may open up novel therapeutic strategies for these lung diseases.

  13. Prevalence of asymptomatic coronary disease in fibrosing idiopathic interstitial pneumonias

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    Cassagnes, Lucie; Gaillard, Vianney [Department of Thoracic Imaging (EA 2694), Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Monge, Emmanuel [Department of Pulmonology, Center of Competence for Rare Pulmonary Diseases, Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Faivre, Jean-Baptiste [Department of Thoracic Imaging (EA 2694), Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Delhaye, Cédric [Department of Cardiology, Cardiology Hospital, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Molinari, Francesco [Department of Thoracic Imaging (EA 2694), Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Petyt, Grégory; Hossein-Foucher, Claude [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Salengro, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Wallaert, Benoit [Department of Pulmonology, Center of Competence for Rare Pulmonary Diseases, Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain [Department of Medical Statistics (EA 2694), Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Remy, Jacques [Department of Thoracic Imaging (EA 2694), Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Remy-Jardin, Martine, E-mail: martine.remy@chru-lille.fr [Department of Thoracic Imaging (EA 2694), Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France)

    2015-01-15

    Background: Because of growing body of interest on the association between fibrosing idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (f-IIP) and ischaemic heart disease, we initiated this prospective study to evaluate the prevalence of asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with f-IIP. Methods: Forty-two patients with f-IIP underwent noninvasive screening for CAD that included (a) a chest CT examination enabling calculation of the coronary artery calcium (CAC) score, then depiction of coronary artery stenosis; and (b) stress myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). Patients with significant coronary abnormalities, defined by a CAC score >400 or coronary artery stenosis >50% at CT and/or perfusion defect >5% at MPS, were referred to the cardiologist. Coronary angiography was indicated in presence of a perfusion defect >10% at MPS or significant left main or proximal left anterior descending stenosis whatever MPS findings. Results: Combining CT and MPS, significant abnormalities were detected in 32/42 patients (76%). The cardiologist: (a) did not consider further investigation in 21 patients (CT abnormalities but no ischaemia at MPS: 12/21; false-positive findings at MPS: 3/21; poor respiratory condition: 6/21); (b) proceeded to coronary angiography in 11 patients which confirmed significant stenoses in 5 patients (5/42; 12%). In the worst-case-scenario (i.e., inclusion of 6 patients with significant coronary artery abnormalities who were not investigated due to poor respiratory condition), the prevalence of CAD reached 26% (11/42). Conclusion: In the studied population of patients with f-IIP, asymptomatic CAD ranged between 12% and 26%.

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis and lung disease: from mechanisms to a practical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Fiona; Proudman, Susanna

    2014-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common chronic systemic autoimmune disease characterized by joint inflammation and, in a proportion of patients, extra-articular manifestations (EAM). Lung disease, either as an EAM of the disease, related to the drug therapy for RA, or related to comorbid conditions, is the second commonest cause of mortality. All areas of the lung including the pleura, airways, parenchyma, and vasculature may be involved, with interstitial and pleural disease and infection being the most common problems. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest forms the basis of investigation and when combined with clinical information and measures of physiology, a multidisciplinary team can frequently establish the diagnosis without the need for an invasive biopsy procedure. The most frequent patterns of interstitial lung disease (ILD) are usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), with some evidence for the prognosis being better than for the idiopathic equivalents. Risk factors depend on the type of disease but for ILD (mainly UIP and NSIP) include smoking, male gender, human leukocyte antigen haplotype, rheumatoid factor, and anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs). Citrullination of proteins in the lung, frequently thought to be incited by smoking, and the subsequent development of ACPA appear to play an important role in the development of lung and possibly joint disease. The biologic and nonbiological disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) have had a substantial impact on morbidity and mortality from RA, and although there multiple reports of drug-related lung toxicity and possible exacerbation of underlying ILD, overall these reactions are rare and should only preclude the use of DMARDs in a minority of patients. Common scenarios facing pulmonologists and rheumatologists are addressed using the current best evidence; these include screening the new patient; monitoring and choosing RA treatment in

  15. Leukocyte compartments in the mouse lung: distinguishing between marginated, interstitial, and alveolar cells in response to injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Kathryn E; Cagnina, R Elaine; Wallace, Kori L; Ramos, Susan I; Mehrad, Borna; Linden, Joel

    2012-01-31

    We developed a flow cytometry-based assay to simultaneously quantify multiple leukocyte populations in the marginated vascular, interstitial, and alveolar compartments of the mouse lung. An intravenous injection of a fluorescently labeled anti-CD45 antibody was used to label circulating and marginated vascular leukocytes. Following vascular flushing to remove non-adherent cells and collection of broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, lungs were digested and a second fluorescent anti-CD45 antibody was added ex vivo to identify cells not located in the vascular space. In the naïve mouse lung, we found about 11 million CD45+ leukocytes, of which 87% (9.5 million) were in the vascular marginated compartment, consisting of 17% NK cells, 17% neutrophils, 57% mononuclear myeloid cells (monocytes, macrophage precursors and dendritic cells), and 10% T cells (CD4+, CD8+, and invariant NKT cells). Non-vascular compartments including the interstitial compartment contained 7.7×10(5)cells, consisting of 49% NK cells, 25% dendritic cells, and 16% other mononuclear myeloid cells. The alveolar compartment was overwhelmingly populated by macrophages (5.63×10(5)cells, or 93%). We next studied leukocyte margination and extravasation into the lung following acid injury, a model of gastric aspiration. At 1 h after injury, neutrophils were markedly elevated in the blood while all other circulating leukocytes declined by an average of 79%. At 4 h after injury, there was a peak in the numbers of marginated neutrophils, NK cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and a peak in the number of alveolar NK cells. Most interstitial cells consisted of DCs, neutrophils, and CD4+ T cells, and most alveolar compartment cells consisted of macrophages, neutrophils, and NK cells. At 24 h after injury, there was a decline in the number of all marginated and interstitial leukocytes and a peak in alveolar neutrophils. In sum, we have developed a novel assay to study leukocyte margination and trafficking following

  16. The importance of determining surgical indications in cases of lung cancer and interstitial pneumonia with multiple intrapulmonary lymph nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Nakajima

    2016-01-01

    Discussion and conclusions: The greatest problem in treating pulmonary cancer complicated with interstitial pneumonia is acute exacerbation, wherein, in the absence of any surgical indications, alternative treatment is limited. Thus, contra-indicating surgery for a patient due to a diagnosis of metastasis within the lungs, based only on nodule images, should be avoided. If nodules are noted in the area of the pleura, the possibility exists that these could be intrapulmonary lymph nodes, along with metastasis within the lung, and thoracoscopic surgery should be implemented proactively while keeping these in mind.

  17. Extracellular Vesicles in Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in the pathogenesis of lung diseases. These vesicles include exosomes, ectosomes (ie, microparticles, extracellular vesicles, microvesicles, and shedding vesicles), and apoptotic bodies. Exosomes are generated by inward budding of the membrane (endocytosis), subsequent forming of multivesicular bodies, and release by exocytosis. Ectosomes are formed by outward blebbing from the plasma membrane and are then released by proteolytic cleavage from the cell surface. Apoptotic bodies are generated on apoptotic cell shrinkage and death. Extracellular vesicles are released when the cells are activated or undergo apoptosis under inflammatory conditions. The number and types of released EVs are different according to the pathophysiological status of the disease. Therefore, EVs can be novel biomarkers for various lung diseases. EVs contain several molecules, including proteins, mRNA, microRNA, and DNA; they transfer these molecules to distant recipient cells. Circulating EVs modify the targeted cells and influence the microenvironment of the lungs. For this unique capability, EVs are expected to be a new drug delivery system and a novel therapeutic target. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Correlations among disease perceptions, attitudes and self-care behaviors in patients with interstitial cystitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hui-Ling; Kuo, Hann-Chorng; Lin, Zu-Chun; Lee, Ru-Ping

    2012-02-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC) is an enigmatic disease that currently remains incurable. Failure to adopt positive self-care behaviors can exacerbate recurrent clinical symptoms and significantly affect a patient's capacity to function normally in work, family and social setting. Proper disease perception can improve patient attitudes toward disease management and positively influence behavior. This study investigated correlations between disease perceptions, attitudes and self-care behaviors in patients with interstitial cystitis. This study used a cross-sectional method and enrolled 82 outpatients currently receiving treatment for interstitial cystitis at a medical center in East Taiwan. A structured questionnaires filled out individually and submitted by mail was used for date collection. (1) The mean perception scale score was 7.6, with 63.3% providing correct responses. (2) The mean attitude score of 3.5 indicated respondents held positive attitudes. (3) The mean self-care behavior score of 3.4 indicated a leaning toward "occasional" self-care behavior. (4) Correlations among disease perception, attitude and self-care behavior in participants exhibited a significant, mild and positive correlation. (5) Higher education level correlated positively with insight and attitude toward interstitial cystitis. Participants with lower "current voiding problems" had a more positive attitude toward their disease. Participants with higher "numbers of painful sites" had better disease perception and better self care behaviors. Patients reporting "symptoms aggravated by other conditions" also had better interstitial cystitis perception. We found positive correlations among disease perceptions, attitudes and self-care behaviors in patients with interstitial cystitis. We strongly recommend that all healthcare providers evaluate patient disease perception extent. Nurses should provide patients with correct disease concepts, and encourage positive attitudes and self-caring behaviors

  19. Classification of diffuse lung diseases: why and how.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansell, David M

    2013-09-01

    The understanding of complex lung diseases, notably the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias and small airways diseases, owes as much to repeated attempts over the years to classify them as to any single conceptual breakthrough. One of the many benefits of a successful classification scheme is that it allows workers, within and between disciplines, to be clear that they are discussing the same disease. This may be of particular importance in the recruitment of individuals for a clinical trial that requires a standardized and homogeneous study population. Different specialties require fundamentally different things from a classification: for epidemiologic studies, a classification that requires categorization of individuals according to histopathologic pattern is not usually practicable. Conversely, a scheme that simply divides diffuse parenchymal disease into inflammatory and noninflammatory categories is unlikely to further the understanding about the pathogenesis of disease. Thus, for some disease groupings, for example, pulmonary vasculopathies, there may be several appropriate classifications, each with its merits and demerits. There has been an interesting shift in the past few years, from the accepted primacy of histopathology as the sole basis on which the classification of parenchymal lung disease has rested, to new ways of considering how these entities relate to each other. Some inventive thinking has resulted in new classifications that undoubtedly benefit patients and clinicians in their endeavor to improve management and outcome. The challenge of understanding the logic behind current classifications and their shortcomings are explored in various examples of lung diseases.

  20. High resolution CT in diffuse lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    High resolution CT (computerized tomography) was discussed in detail. The conclusions were HRCT is able to define lung anatomy at the secondary lobular level and define a variety of abnormalities in patients with diffuse lung diseases. Evidence from numerous studies indicates that HRCT can play a major role in the assessment of diffuse infiltrative lung disease and is indicate clinically (95 refs.)

  1. Percutaneous evacuation of diffuse pulmonary interstitial emphysema by lung puncture in a baby with extremely low birth weight: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe Masahiro

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pulmonary interstitial emphysema is a serious complication of mechanical ventilation and can become life-threatening if progression occurs. Therapeutic lung puncture is a treatment option for severe pulmonary interstitial emphysema but has a limited use in babies with extremely low birth weight. We present a case of pulmonary interstitial emphysema in a Japanese baby (1-day-old boy with extremely low birth weight. The emphysema was successfully decompressed by therapeutic lung puncture performed with a trocar catheter. Case presentation The baby was born with a weight of 420g, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the lowest reported birth weight among babies with pulmonary interstitial emphysema. A chest X-ray on postnatal day 2 revealed pulmonary interstitial emphysema, which gradually progressed to diffuse pseudocystic changes. His condition became life-threatening despite the use of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and lateral decubitus positioning. We evacuated the pulmonary interstitial emphysema by lung puncture with a trocar catheter to avoid respiratory and cardiovascular collapse. This resulted in adequate evacuation of the emphysema and a dramatic improvement in his clinical condition. Conclusions Therapeutic lung puncture performed with a trocar catheter is beneficial in babies with extremely low birth weight and diffuse pulmonary interstitial emphysema. This treatment option may be broadly applicable, especially in an emergency situation.

  2. Interstitial cells of Cajal in human gut and gastrointestinal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderwinden, J M; Rumessen, J J

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the distribution of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract, based on ultrastructural and immunohistochemical evidence. The distribution and morphology of ICC at each level of the normal GI tracts is addressed from the perspective of their fun...

  3. Chronic lung disease in newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, M Jeeva; Agarwal, Ramesh; Deorari, Ashok K; Paul, Vinod K

    2008-04-01

    Chronic lung disease (CLD) or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) occurs in preterm infants who require respiratory support in the first few days of birth. Apart from prematurity, oxygen therapy and assisted ventilation, factors like intrauterine/postnatal infections, patent ductus arteriosus, and genetic polymorphisms also contribute to its pathogenesis. The severe form of BPD with extensive inflammatory changes is rarely seen nowadays; instead, a milder form characterized by decreased alveolar septation due to arrest in lung development is more common. A multitude of strategies, mainly pharmacological and ventilatory, have been employed for prevention and treatment of BPD. Unfortunately, most of them have not been proved to be beneficial. A comprehensive protocol for management of BPD based on the current evidence is discussed here.

  4. Apoptotic effect as biomarker of disease, severity and follow-up in interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Capua-Sacoto, C; Sanchez-Llopis, A; Oconnor, J E; Martinez-Romero, A; Ruiz-Cerdá, J L

    2017-11-10

    To determine whether the apoptotic effect test could serve as a biomarker of severity in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. A prospective study was conducted between January 2010 and January 2015, which included 57 patients diagnosed with interstitial cystitis and 49 diagnosed with chronic pelvic pain of gynaecological origin. The urine was exposed to cell cultures, and the urine's capacity for inducing apoptosis in the cultures was analysed. A statistical analysis was then conducted to assess whether the apoptotic effect was associated with the symptoms. After performing an analysis of the association between the degree of apoptotic effect and the symptoms of patients with interstitial cystitis, we observed a significant increase in the mean percentages of apoptosis as the degree of symptom severity increased. After analysing the association between the apoptotic effect and symptoms, we obtained a positive correlation in the patients with interstitial cystitis and a lack of correlation in the patients with chronic pelvic pain of gynaecological origin. The rates of apoptosis increased progressively in the patients with interstitial cystitis as the symptoms increased, while the patients with chronic pelvic pain of gynaecological origin remained stable. The apoptotic effect of the urine of patients with interstitial cystitis could be a marker of disease, thus differentiating patients with interstitial cystitis from patients with chronic pelvic pain. The effect could also provide an objective measure of symptom severity. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Interstitial nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Allergic reaction to a drug (acute interstitial allergic nephritis). Autoimmune disorders, such as antitubular basement membrane disease, Kawasaki disease, Sjögren syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, or Wegener granulomatosis. Infections. Long-term use ...

  6. Surfactant administration for neonatal respiratory distress does not improve lung interstitial fluid clearance: echographic and experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattarossi, Luigi; Copetti, Roberto; Poskurica, Besa; Miserocchi, Giuseppe

    2010-09-01

    Recent ultrasonographic studies suggest that the administration of surfactant to preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) does not affect lung water clearance. The purpose of the study was also to look at clearance of lung water in preterm rabbits receiving surfactant. Lung ultrasound was performed in 73 neonates at different gestational ages (range 23-34 weeks) with radiological and clinical signs of RDS, before and after surfactant administration. In premature rabbits (28-29 days' gestational age), either receiving or not receiving surfactant, we followed the time course of lung water balance considering the wet weight/dry weight ratio, the morphology and compliance of alveoli and pulmonary interstitial pressure. In all RDS infants lung ultrasound images consistently showed a generalized increase in extravascular lung fluid which remained unchanged after surfactant administration and did not affect the rate of fluid clearance. Surfactant administration in premature rabbits did not improve the time course of lung fluid clearance. Data from ultrasound in preterm babies are confirmed by animal experiments.

  7. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis: a common cause of pulmonary disease in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suffredini, A.F.; Ognibene, F.P.; Lack, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    During a 4.4-year period, nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis was seen in 41 of 110 (38%) patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and accounted for 32% (48/152) of all episodes of clinical pneumonitis. Diffuse alveolar damage was typically a feature of nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis, but neither lung biopsy nor bronchoalveolar lavage detected a pathogen. Of these 41 patients, 13 had no associated pulmonary tumor and had not been exposed to pulmonary toxins, whereas 28 patients had either concurrent pulmonary Kaposi sarcoma, previous experimental therapies, or a history of pneumocystis pneumonia or drug abuse. Of these 41, 23 had normal chest radiographs. The clinical features of patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis were similar to those of patients with pneumocystis pneumonia, although histologic findings showed less severe alveolar damage in patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis (p less than 0.001). Pathologic evaluation and clinical follow-up suggest that many clinical episodes of pneumonitis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are due to nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis of unknown cause

  8. Lung imaging in pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taplin, G.V.; Chopra, S.K.

    1976-01-01

    Although it has been recognized for several years that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can cause lung perfusion defects which may simulate pulmonary embolism, relatively little use has been made of either the radioxenon or the radioaerosol inhalation lung imaging procedures until the last few years as a means of distinguishing pulmonary embolism (P.E.) from COPD is reported. Recent experience is reported with the use of both of these procedures in comparison with pulmonary function tests for the early detection of COPD in population studies and also in P.E. suspects. Equal emphasis is given to simultaneous aerosol ventilation-perfusion (V/P) imaging in the differential diagnosis of P.E. Finally, this paper is concerned with new developments in regional lung diffusion imaging following the inhalation of radioactive gases and rapidly absorbed radioaerosols. Their experimental basis is presented and their potential clinical applications in pulmonary embolism are discussed. As a result of these investigations, a functional (V/P) diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in patients may be possible in the near future with a sequential radioaerosol inhalation procedure alone

  9. A rare case of occupational lung disease – Talcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathish Kumar M, Dhipu Mathew, Thilagavathy, Aruna Shanmuganathan, Srinivasan R

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Talcosis/ Talcpneumoconiosis is one of the rarer forms of magnesium silicate induced lung disease, It usually occurs in the fourth decade and affects people working in talc related industries like roof, shingle, pharmaceutical companies, talcum powder industries, electric ceramics, rubber industry etc. We report a case of talc pneumoconiosis/talcosis in a 51yr old male who presented with breathlessness and dry cough for the past 5 yrs and progressively worsening for the past 5 days. Who was working in a talcum powder manufacturing company for >28yrs in the packaging section. The diagnosis was possible by history, clinical examination, Chest X-ray, PFT/DLCO, HRCT chest, Bronchoscopy & Trans bronchial lung biopsy showing interstitial fibrosis.

  10. A case of sine scleroderma with parenchymal lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Karimifar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis sine scleroderma is a subtype of scleroderma, which is characterized by involvement of visceral organs, but no characteristic skin alteration. The involved organs could be kidneys, heart, gastrointestinal system, and lungs. Interstitial lung disease (ILD is one of the pulmonary manifestations of sine scleroderma. We report a 38-year-old woman presenting with chill, fever, generalized malaise, dyspnea on exertion, and dry cough with a history of Raynaud′s phenomenon, who was evaluated by physical examination, spirometry, and computed tomography scan, that all lead to the diagnosis of ILD. Combination of high-titer positive anti-nuclear antibody, high erythrocyte sedimentation rate, positive C-reactive protein, and ILD could be explained by sine scleroderma.

  11. Mixed Herbal Medicine Induced Diffuse Infiltrative Lung Disease: The HRCT and Histopathologic Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Gyu; Shin, Eun A; Kim, Joung Sook

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the high-resolution CT (HRCT) and pathologic findings of mixed herbal medicine-induced diffuse interstitial lung disease. Eight patients (6 women and 2 men, age range: 31 to 81 years, mean age: 51.4 years) who presented with cough or dyspnea after taking mixed herbal medicine were included in this study. All the patients underwent plain chest radiography and HRCT. We obtained pathologic specimens from 7 patients via fluoroscopy guided large bore cutting needle biopsy and transbronchial lung biopsy. All the patients were treated with steroid therapy. The most common HRCT finding was bilateral diffuse ground glass opacity (n=7), followed by peribronchial consolidation (n=5) and inter- or intralobular septal thickening (n=2). For the disease distribution, the lower lung zone was dominantly involved. The pathologic results of 7 patients were nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (n=3), bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (n=2), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (n=1) and eosinophilic pneumonia (n=1). Irrespective of the pathologic results, all 8 patients improved clinically and radiologically after steroid treatment. The HRCT findings of mixed herbal medicine-induced diffuse infiltrative lung disease were mainly bilateral diffuse ground glass opacity, peribronchial consolidation and dominant involvement of the lower lung zone. Those pathologic findings were nonspecific and the differential diagnosis could include interstitial pneumonia, bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and eosinophilic pneumonia

  12. Mixed Herbal Medicine Induced Diffuse Infiltrative Lung Disease: The HRCT and Histopathologic Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Gyu; Shin, Eun A [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joung Sook [Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the high-resolution CT (HRCT) and pathologic findings of mixed herbal medicine-induced diffuse interstitial lung disease. Eight patients (6 women and 2 men, age range: 31 to 81 years, mean age: 51.4 years) who presented with cough or dyspnea after taking mixed herbal medicine were included in this study. All the patients underwent plain chest radiography and HRCT. We obtained pathologic specimens from 7 patients via fluoroscopy guided large bore cutting needle biopsy and transbronchial lung biopsy. All the patients were treated with steroid therapy. The most common HRCT finding was bilateral diffuse ground glass opacity (n=7), followed by peribronchial consolidation (n=5) and inter- or intralobular septal thickening (n=2). For the disease distribution, the lower lung zone was dominantly involved. The pathologic results of 7 patients were nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (n=3), bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (n=2), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (n=1) and eosinophilic pneumonia (n=1). Irrespective of the pathologic results, all 8 patients improved clinically and radiologically after steroid treatment. The HRCT findings of mixed herbal medicine-induced diffuse infiltrative lung disease were mainly bilateral diffuse ground glass opacity, peribronchial consolidation and dominant involvement of the lower lung zone. Those pathologic findings were nonspecific and the differential diagnosis could include interstitial pneumonia, bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and eosinophilic pneumonia

  13. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases Resources Lung Disease including Asthma and Adult Vaccination Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  14. Palliative Care in Diffuse Interstitial Lund Disease: Results of a Spanish Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barril, Silvia; Alonso, Ana; Rodríguez-Portal, José Antonio; Viladot, Margarita; Giner, Jordi; Aparicio, Francisco; Romero-Ortiz, Ana; Acosta, Orlando; Castillo, Diego

    2017-11-07

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILD) and, in particular, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, may have a significant impact on patient survival. Recent studies highlight the need for palliative care (PC) in the management of ILD patients. The aim of this study was to determine the current situation of PC in patients in Spain. A 36-question survey addressing the main aspects of PC in ILD patients was designed. The survey was sent via email to all members of the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery. Participation was voluntary. One hundred and sixty-four participants responded to the survey. Ninety-eight percent said they were interested in PC, 46% had received specific training, and 44% reported being responsible for PC in their ILD patients. Symptom control and end-of-life stage were the most frequent reasons for referral to PC teams. Regarding end-of-life, 78% reported consensual agreement with patients on the limitation of therapeutic efforts, 35% helped prepare an end-of-life advance directive, and 22% agreed on the place of death. Despite the well-known need for PC in patients with ILD and the notable interest of the survey participants in this subject, there are clear formative and organizational gaps that should be addressed to improve care in this area in ILD patients in Spain. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Contemporary challenges for specialist nursing in interstitial lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marie Russell

    2018-03-01

    To explain the similarities and differences between clinical nurse specialists (CNSs and advanced nurse practitioners (ANPs in the context of ILD specialism To review contemporary nursing specialism in the UK’s government subsidised healthcare system To stimulate discussion and debate across the European/international respiratory community regarding the clinical and academic development of the ILD CNS To identify key priorities that will support collaboration across the ILD interdisciplinary workforce in clinical practice and research

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J. Marciniak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to inhaled pollutants, including fine particulates and cigarette smoke is a major cause of lung disease in Europe. While it is established that inhaled pollutants have devastating effects on the genome, it is now recognised that additional effects on protein folding also drive the development of lung disease. Protein misfolding in the endoplasmic reticulum affects the pathogenesis of many diseases, ranging from pulmonary fibrosis to cancer. It is therefore important to understand how cells respond to endoplasmic reticulum stress and how this affects pulmonary tissues in disease. These insights may offer opportunities to manipulate such endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways and thereby cure lung disease.

  17. Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Heart Dysfunction in Chronic Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirmasoud Zangiabadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Group 3 pulmonary hypertension (PH is a common complication of chronic lung disease (CLD, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, interstitial lung disease, and sleep-disordered breathing. Development of PH is associated with poor prognosis and may progress to right heart failure, however, in the majority of the patients with CLD, PH is mild to moderate and only a small number of patients develop severe PH. The pathophysiology of PH in CLD is multifactorial and includes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, pulmonary vascular remodeling, small vessel destruction, and fibrosis. The effects of PH on the right ventricle (RV range between early RV remodeling, hypertrophy, dilatation, and eventual failure with associated increased mortality. The golden standard for diagnosis of PH is right heart catheterization, however, evidence of PH can be appreciated on clinical examination, serology, radiological imaging, and Doppler echocardiography. Treatment of PH in CLD focuses on management of the underlying lung disorder and hypoxia. There is, however, limited evidence to suggest that PH-specific vasodilators such as phosphodiesterase-type 5 inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists, and prostanoids may have a role in the treatment of patients with CLD and moderate-to-severe PH.

  18. Effect of mixing scanner types and reconstruction kernels on the characterization of lung parenchymal pathologies: emphysema, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and normal non-smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ye; van Beek, Edwin J.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Guo, Junfeng; Sonka, Milan; Hoffman, Eric

    2006-03-01

    In this study we utilize our texture characterization software (3-D AMFM) to characterize interstitial lung diseases (including emphysema) based on MDCT generated volumetric data using 3-dimensional texture features. We have sought to test whether the scanner and reconstruction filter (kernel) type affect the classification of lung diseases using the 3-D AMFM. We collected MDCT images in three subject groups: emphysema (n=9), interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) (n=10), and normal non-smokers (n=9). In each group, images were scanned either on a Siemens Sensation 16 or 64-slice scanner, (B50f or B30 recon. kernel) or a Philips 4-slice scanner (B recon. kernel). A total of 1516 volumes of interest (VOIs; 21x21 pixels in plane) were marked by two chest imaging experts using the Iowa Pulmonary Analysis Software Suite (PASS). We calculated 24 volumetric features. Bayesian methods were used for classification. Images from different scanners/kernels were combined in all possible combinations to test how robust the tissue classification was relative to the differences in image characteristics. We used 10-fold cross validation for testing the result. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated. One-way Analysis of Variances (ANOVA) was used to compare the classification result between the various combinations of scanner and reconstruction kernel types. This study yielded a sensitivity of 94%, 91%, 97%, and 93% for emphysema, ground-glass, honeycombing, and normal non-smoker patterns respectively using a mixture of all three subject groups. The specificity for these characterizations was 97%, 99%, 99%, and 98%, respectively. The F test result of ANOVA shows there is no significant difference (p <0.05) between different combinations of data with respect to scanner and convolution kernel type. Since different MDCT and reconstruction kernel types did not show significant differences in regards to the classification result, this study suggests that the 3-D AMFM can

  19. Identification of early-stage usual interstitial pneumonia from low-dose chest CT scans using fractional high-density lung distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yiting; Salvatore, Mary; Liu, Shuang; Jirapatnakul, Artit; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2017-03-01

    A fully-automated computer algorithm has been developed to identify early-stage Usual Interstitial Pneumonia (UIP) using features computed from low-dose CT scans. In each scan, the pre-segmented lung region is divided into N subsections (N = 1, 8, 27, 64) by separating the lung from anterior/posterior, left/right and superior/inferior in 3D space. Each subsection has approximately the same volume. In each subsection, a classic density measurement (fractional high-density volume h) is evaluated to characterize the disease severity in that subsection, resulting in a feature vector of length N for each lung. Features are then combined in two different ways: concatenation (2*N features) and taking the maximum in each of the two corresponding subsections in the two lungs (N features). The algorithm was evaluated on a dataset consisting of 51 UIP and 56 normal cases, a combined feature vector was computed for each case and an SVM classifier (RBF kernel) was used to classify them into UIP or normal using ten-fold cross validation. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) was used for evaluation. The highest AUC of 0.95 was achieved by using concatenated features and an N of 27. Using lung partition (N = 27, 64) with concatenated features had significantly better result over not using partitions (N = 1) (p-value < 0.05). Therefore this equal-volume partition fractional high-density volume method is useful in distinguishing early-stage UIP from normal cases.

  20. Expression Profiling in Granulomatous Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Edward S.; Moller, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Granulomatous lung diseases, such as sarcoidosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, Wegener's granulomatosis, and chronic beryllium disease, along with granulomatous diseases of known infectious etiologies, such as tuberculosis, are major causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Clinical manifestations of these diseases are highly heterogeneous, and the determinants of disease susceptibility and clinical course (e.g., resolution vs. chronic, progressive fibrosis) are largely unknow...

  1. Radiological diagnosis of lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauczor, H.U.; Heussel, C.P.; Thelen, M.

    2000-01-01

    Radiological cross-sectional imaging modalities, particularly computed tomography (CT) have become the mainstays for diagnosing lung disease in recent years. These enable morphological visualization of pathological processes with the greatest possible spatial resolution. Modern technical developments and complementary strategies have led to new applications and new functional assessments which need to be reviewed together with state-of-the-art techniques in nuclear imaging. The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism using spiral CT angiography and magnetic resonance (MR) angiography certainly belongs in this category. CT has become the an alternative modality of first choice, and it is also challenging pulmonary angiography as the gold standard. Direct visualization of patent pulmonary arteries and thromboembolic material is complemented by that of effects on the pulmonary parenchyma and right heart function; it also provides perfusion studies and MR-based flow measurement to assess hemodynamic compromise. Ventilation studies have long been a domain of nuclear imaging, and new techniques for the direct visualization of ventilation are emerging from recent developments in the field of MR imaging, for example, using hyperpolarized inert gases. New functional parameters of ventilation can be derived from these studies. For the diagnosis of metabolically active disease, such as tumor and pneumonia, CT offers very high sensitivity, for example, in screening for intrapulmonary nodules using low-dose CT and in the early detection of pulmonary infiltrates in high-risk patients. Especially for characterizing pulmonary nodules there is a need to combine nuclear medicine techniques, such as in positron-emission tomography. (orig.) [de

  2. Interstitial lung illness: Discoveries in x-ray of the thorax vs computerized tomography of high resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patino O, Maria Olga; Gomez Ramirez, Rafael

    1993-01-01

    This study wants to prove the advantages of the computerized axial tomography (TAC) of high resolution on the conventional radiography and the follow-up of the patients with interstitial pulmonary disease (IPD). 29 patients were studied with conventional RX and TAC with 17. $ % of high resolution which had normal radiography with clear abnormalities in the TAC of high resolution, the type of interstitial pulmonary disease (IPD). In the 68,9% of the cases it showed abnormality as well in TAC as in conventional RX. In the fact, that the TAC does not allow a specific etiologic diagnosis of the IPD type, as it is done in the biopsy. It allows identifying abnormality in those patients apparently normal by the radiography of the thorax and when it already exists the histopathologic diagnosis it allows the follow-up in a no invasive way

  3. Hot tub lung: an intriguing diffuse parenchymal lung disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hot Tub Lung(HTL) is a perplexing pulmonary disease attributed to the Mycobacterium Avium-intracellulare Complex (MAC). MAC is a ubiquitous atypical mycobacterium present in moist environment, and is not considered pathogenic, without the predisposing conditions like immunosuppression. However, HTL is a unique ...

  4. Differential cell reaction upon Toll-like receptor 4 and 9 activation in human alveolar and lung interstitial macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyerhans Andreas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigations on pulmonary macrophages (MΦ mostly focus on alveolar MΦ (AM as a well-defined cell population. Characteristics of MΦ in the interstitium, referred to as lung interstitial MΦ (IM, are rather ill-defined. In this study we therefore aimed to elucidate differences between AM and IM obtained from human lung tissue. Methods Human AM and IM were isolated from human non-tumor lung tissue from patients undergoing lung resection. Cell morphology was visualized using either light, electron or confocal microscopy. Phagocytic activity was analyzed by flow cytometry as well as confocal microscopy. Surface marker expression was measured by flow cytometry. Toll-like receptor (TLR expression patterns as well as cytokine expression upon TLR4 or TLR9 stimulation were assessed by real time RT-PCR and cytokine protein production was measured using a fluorescent bead-based immunoassay. Results IM were found to be smaller and morphologically more heterogeneous than AM, whereas phagocytic activity was similar in both cell types. HLA-DR expression was markedly higher in IM compared to AM. Although analysis of TLR expression profiles revealed no differences between the two cell populations, AM and IM clearly varied in cell reaction upon activation. Both MΦ populations were markedly activated by LPS as well as DNA isolated from attenuated mycobacterial strains (M. bovis H37Ra and BCG. Whereas AM expressed higher amounts of inflammatory cytokines upon activation, IM were more efficient in producing immunoregulatory cytokines, such as IL10, IL1ra, and IL6. Conclusion AM appear to be more effective as a non-specific first line of defence against inhaled pathogens, whereas IM show a more pronounced regulatory function. These dissimilarities should be taken into consideration in future studies on the role of human lung MΦ in the inflammatory response.

  5. Aeroparticles, composition and lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ivan Falcon-Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban air pollution is a serious worldwide problem due to its impact on human health. In the past sixty years, growing evidence established a correlation between exposure to air pollutants and the developing of severe respiratory diseases. Recently Particulate matter (PM is drawing more public attention to various aspects including historical backgrounds, physicochemical characteristics and its pathological role. Therefore, this review is focused on these aspects. The most famous air pollution disaster happened in London on December 1952; it has been calculated that more than 4000 deaths occurred during this event. Air pollution is a complex mix of gases and particles. Gaseous pollutants disseminate deeply into the alveoli, allowing its diffusion through the blood-air barrier to several organs. Meanwhile, PM is a mix of solid or liquid particles suspended in the air. PM is deposited at different levels of the respiratory tract, depending on its size: Coarse particles (PM10 in upper airways and fine particles (PM2.5 can be accumulated in the lung parenchyma, inducing several respiratory diseases. Additionally to size, the composition of particulate matter has been associated with different toxicological outcomes on clinical, epidemiological, as well as in vivo and in vitro animal and human studies. PM can be constituted by organic, inorganic and biological compounds. All these compounds are capable of modifying several biological activities including alterations in cytokine production, coagulation factors balance, pulmonary function, respiratory symptoms, and cardiac function. It can also generate different modifications during its passage through the airways, like inflammatory cells recruitment, with the release of cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS. These inflammatory mediators can activate different pathways such as MAP-kinases, NF-B, and stat-1, or induce DNA adducts. All these alterations can mediate obstructive or restrictive

  6. Exercise testing and training in chronic lung disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Ross

    2011-01-01

    Research examining the clinical value of exercise testing and training in patients with chronic lung disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is less robust compared with cardiac populations but nevertheless highly supportive. Functional limitations are common in these patients, and exercise testing provides important information pertaining to the degree of this limitation, disease severity, and prognosis. Moreover, exercise testing, particularly in conjunction with ventilatory expired gas analysis, serves as a valuable diagnostic tool when the mechanism of the functional limitation and abnormal exertional symptoms is uncertain. Most work with respect to the benefits of exercise training has been performed in chronic obstructive lung disease cohorts and is used to support pulmonary rehabilitation. Emerging data indicate that exercise training is likewise beneficial in patients with interstitial lung disease and PAH. This review summarizes the evidence supporting the value of exercise testing and training and provides recommendations for clinical practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Drug-induced lung disease: High-resolution CT and histological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleverley, Joanne R.; Screaton, Nicholas J.; Hiorns, Melanie P.; Flint, Julia D.A.; Mueller, Nestor L.

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To compare the parenchymal high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) appearances with histological findings in patients with drug-induced lung disease and to determine the prognostic value of HRCT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Drug history, HRCT features, histological findings and outcome at 3 months in 20 patients with drug induced-lung disease were reviewed retrospectively. The HRCT images were assessed for the pattern and distribution of abnormalities and classified as most suggestive of interstitial pneumonitis/fibrosis, diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), organizing pneumonia (OP) reaction, or a hypersensitivity reaction. RESULTS: On histopathological examination there were eight cases of interstitial pneumonitis/fibrosis, five of DAD, five of OP reactions, one of hypersensitivity reaction and one of pulmonary eosinophilia. The most common abnormalities on HRCT were ground-glass opacities (n = 17), consolidation (n = 14), interlobular septal thickening (n = 15) and centrilobular nodules (n 8). HRCT interpretation and histological diagnosis were concordant in only nine (45%) of 20 patients. The pattern, distribution, and extent of HRCT abnormalities were of limited prognostic value: all eight patients with histological findings of OP, hypersensitivity reaction, or eosinophilic infiltrate improved on follow-up compared to only five of 13 patients with interstitial pneumonitis/fibrosis or DAD. CONCLUSION: In many cases of drug-induced lung injury HRCT is of limited value in determining the histological pattern and prognosis. Cleverly, J.R. et al

  8. Periostin promotes renal cyst growth and interstitial fibrosis in polycystic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Darren P.; White, Corey; Savinkova, Lyudmyla; Nivens, Emily; Reif, Gail A.; Pinto, Cibele S.; Raman, Archana; Parnell, Stephen C.; Conway, Simon J.; Fields, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    In renal cystic diseases, sustained enlargement of fluid-filled cysts is associated with severe interstitial fibrosis and progressive loss of functioning nephrons. Periostin, a matricellular protein, is highly overexpressed in cyst-lining epithelial cells of autosomal dominant polycystic disease kidneys (ADPKD) compared to normal tubule cells. Periostin accumulates in situ within the matrix subjacent to ADPKD cysts, binds to αVβ3- and αVβ5-integrins and stimulates the integrin-linked kinase to promote cell proliferation. We knocked out periostin (Postn) in pcy/pcy mice, an orthologous model of nephronophthisis type 3, to determine whether periostin loss reduces PKD progression in a slowly progressive model of renal cystic disease. At 20 weeks of age, pcy/pcy: Postn−/− mice had a 34% reduction in kidney weight/body weight, a reduction in cyst number and total cystic area, a 69% reduction in phosphorylated S6, a downstream component of the mTOR pathway, and fewer proliferating cells in the kidneys compared to pcy/pcy: Postn+/+ mice. The pcy/pcy Postn knockout mice also had less interstitial fibrosis with improved renal function at 20 weeks and significantly longer survival (51.4 compared to 38.0 weeks). Thus, periostin adversely modifies the progression of renal cystic disease by promoting cyst epithelial cell proliferation, cyst enlargement and interstitial fibrosis, all contributing to the decline in renal function and premature death. PMID:24284511

  9. Natural antioxidant betanin protects rats from paraquat-induced acute lung injury interstitial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junyan; Ma, Deshun; Zhang, Miao; Yang, Xuelian; Tan, Dehong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of betanin on a rat paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI) model was investigated. Paraquat was injected intraperitoneally at a single dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and betanin (25 and 100 mg/kg/d) was orally administered 3 days before and 2 days after paraquat administration. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the last betanin dosage, and lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. In rats treated only with paraquat, extensive lung injury characteristic of ALI was observed, including histological changes, elevation of lung : body weight ratio, increased lung permeability, increased lung neutrophilia infiltration, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced claudin-4 and zonula occluden-1 protein levels, increased BALF interleukin (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels, reduced BALF IL-10 levels, and increased lung nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activity. In rats treated with betanin, paraquat-induced ALI was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that betanin attenuates paraquat-induced ALI possibly via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus, the potential for using betanin as an auxilliary therapy for ALI should be explored further.

  10. Black lung: the social production of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B E

    1981-01-01

    The black lung movement that erupted in West Virginia in 1968 was not simply a struggle for recognition of an occupational disease; it grew into a bitter controversy over who would control the definition of that disease. This article examines the historical background and medical politics of that controversy, arguing that black lung was socially produced and defined on several different levels. As a medical construct, the changing definitions of this disease can be traced to major shifts in the political economy of the coal industry. As an occupational disease, the history of black lung is internally related to the history of the workplace in which it is produced. As the object of a mass movement, black lung acquired a political definition that grew out of the collective experience of miners and their families. The definition of disease with which black lung activists challenged the medical establishment has historical roots and justification; their experience suggests that other health advocates may need to redefine the diseases they hope to eradicate.

  11. Qualitative aspects of exertional dyspnea in patients with restrictive lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laveneziana Pierantonio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Restrictive lung disease is a broad term encompassing a number of conditions in which lung volumes are reduced. Dyspnea is a common clinical manifestation of restrictive lung disease and frequently becomes a prominent and disabling symptom that undermines patients' ability to function and engage in activities of daily living (especially in those with more advanced restriction. Effective management of this disabling symptom awaits a better understanding of its underlying physiology. In recent decades, our understanding of the mechanisms of dyspnea in restrictive lung disease has been improved by a small, but significant, body of research. One approach to the study of dyspnea is to identify the major qualitative dimensions of the symptom in an attempt to uncover different underlying neurophysiologic mechanisms. This article will review the existing literature on the intensity and qualitative dimensions of dyspnea during exercise in patients with restrictive lung disease. The main focus will be on interstitial lung disease (ILD, since it is the prototypical restrictive disease.

  12. Asbestos-induced lung disease in small-scale clutch manufacturing workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothi, Dipti; Gahlot, Tanushree; Sah, Ram B; Saxena, Mayank; Ojha, U C; Verma, Anand K; Spalgais, Sonam

    2016-01-01

    The crocidolite variety of asbestos is banned. However, chrysotile, which is not prohibited, is still used in developing countries in making products such as clutch plate. Fourteen workers from a small-scale clutch plate-manufacturing factory were analyzed for asbestos-induced lung disease as one of their colleagues had expired due to asbestosis. This study was conducted to evaluate the awareness of workers, the prevalence and type of asbestos-induced lung disease, and the sensitivity and specificity of diffusion test. History, examination, chest radiograph, spirometry with diffusion, and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) thorax was performed in all the workers. The diagnosis of asbestos-induced lung disease was suspected on the basis of HRCT. This was subsequently confirmed on transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB). None of the workers had detailed information about asbestos and its ill effects. Eleven out of 14 (71.42%) workers had asbestos-induced lung disease. All 11 had small airway disease (SAD). Three had SAD alone, 6 had additional interstitial lung disease (ILD), and 2 patients had additional ILD and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Sensitivity and specificity of residual volume (RV) or total lung capacity (TLC) for detecting SAD was 90% and 100%, respectively, and that of diffusion capacity of lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) for detecting ILD was 100%. The awareness about asbestos in small-scale clutch-plate manufacturing industry is poor. The usage of chrysotile should be strictly regulated as morbidity and mortality is high. DLCO and RV/TLC are sensitive and specific in detecting nonmalignant asbestos induced lung disease.

  13. an intriguing diffuse parenchymal lung disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... HOT TUB LUNG: AN INTRIGUING DIFFUSE PARENCHYMAL LUNG DISEASE. Mohan Rudrappa1,2 and Laxmi Kokatnur2. Ghana Med J 2017; 51(3): 143-147 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/gmj.v51i3.8. 1Overton Brooks VA Medical Center, Shreveport. LA, USA, 2Lousiana State University Health Science ...

  14. The unexpected result of an investigation of an outbreak of occupational lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, D G

    1998-01-01

    The author describes the discovery of a cluster of cases of interstitial lung disease among employees of a textile manufacturing plant and the difficulties he and his university-hospital occupational medicine team encountered in attempting to identify the cause of the disease. At first accepted in a consultant capacity by the plant's management, the team met increasing resistance to its efforts as it uncovered evidence of a work-related cause of the disease and attempted ientists to communicate findings important to the health of the public, and the physician's overarching professional responsibility to his or her patients.

  15. Lung Surfactant and Its Use in Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Rosenberg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The review considers the present views of lung surfactant (LS functions with emphasis on its protective and barrier properties and ability to maintain local and adaptive immunity. The composition of commercial LS formulations is analyzed. Data on qualitative and quantitative LS abnormalities are presented in various diseases in neonates and adults. The results of clinical trials of different LS formulations in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults are analyzed in detail. Recent data on the results of and prospects for surfactant therapy for bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary tuberculosis are given. 

  16. Cystic lung disease: Achieving a radiologic diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trotman-Dickenson, Beatrice, E-mail: btrotmandickenson@partners.org

    2014-01-15

    Diffuse cystic lung disease represents a diverse group of uncommon disorders with characteristic appearance on high resolution CT imaging. The combination of imaging appearance with clinical features and genetic testing where appropriate permits a confident and accurate diagnosis in the majority of the diseases without recourse for open lung biopsy. The mechanism of cyst development disease is unclear but in some disorders appears to be related to small airways obstruction. These diseases are incurable, with the exception of Langerhans cell histiocytosis which may spontaneously remit or resolve on smoking cessation. Disease progression is unpredictable; in general older patients have a more benign disease, while young patients may progress rapidly to respiratory failure. An understanding of the complications of cystic lung disease and the appearance of disease progression is essential for the management of these patients. A number of these disorders are associated with malignancy, recognition of the potential tumors permits appropriate imaging surveillance. Due to the widespread use of CT, pulmonary cysts are increasingly discovered incidentally in an asymptomatic individual. The diagnostic challenge is to determine whether these cysts represent an early feature of a progressive disease or have no clinical significance. In the elderly population the cysts are unlikely to represent a progressive disease. In individuals <50 years further evaluation is recommended.

  17. Cystic lung disease: Achieving a radiologic diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotman-Dickenson, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse cystic lung disease represents a diverse group of uncommon disorders with characteristic appearance on high resolution CT imaging. The combination of imaging appearance with clinical features and genetic testing where appropriate permits a confident and accurate diagnosis in the majority of the diseases without recourse for open lung biopsy. The mechanism of cyst development disease is unclear but in some disorders appears to be related to small airways obstruction. These diseases are incurable, with the exception of Langerhans cell histiocytosis which may spontaneously remit or resolve on smoking cessation. Disease progression is unpredictable; in general older patients have a more benign disease, while young patients may progress rapidly to respiratory failure. An understanding of the complications of cystic lung disease and the appearance of disease progression is essential for the management of these patients. A number of these disorders are associated with malignancy, recognition of the potential tumors permits appropriate imaging surveillance. Due to the widespread use of CT, pulmonary cysts are increasingly discovered incidentally in an asymptomatic individual. The diagnostic challenge is to determine whether these cysts represent an early feature of a progressive disease or have no clinical significance. In the elderly population the cysts are unlikely to represent a progressive disease. In individuals <50 years further evaluation is recommended

  18. Lung involvement in systemic connective tissue diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plavec Goran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Systemic connective tissue diseases (SCTD are chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorders of unknown cause that can involve different organs and systems. Their course and prognosis are different. All of them can, more or less, involve the respiratory system. The aim of this study was to find out the frequency of respiratory symptoms, lung function disorders, radiography and high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT abnormalities, and their correlation with the duration of the disease and the applied treatment. Methods. In 47 non-randomized consecutive patients standard chest radiography, HRCT, and lung function tests were done. Results. Hypoxemia was present in nine of the patients with respiratory symptoms (20%. In all of them chest radiography was normal. In five of these patients lung fibrosis was established using HRCT. Half of all the patients with SCTD had symptoms of lung involvement. Lung function tests disorders of various degrees were found in 40% of the patients. The outcome and the degree of lung function disorders were neither in correlation with the duration of SCTD nor with therapy used (p > 0.05 Spearmans Ro. Conclusion. Pulmonary fibrosis occurs in about 10% of the patients with SCTD, and possibly not due to the applied treatment regimens. Hypoxemia could be a sing of existing pulmonary fibrosis in the absence of disorders on standard chest radiography.

  19. Lung cancer following therapy for Hodgkin's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Oliphant, Lawrie; McFadden, Robin G.

    1985-01-01

    We describe a patient in whom lung cancer developed several years after he had received combined-modality therapy for Hodgkin's disease. The literature concerning second malignant diseases, particularly thoracic tumours, that occur following combined-modality therapy for cancer is reviewed. It is important to recognize these entities, because chest symptoms or findings on x-ray films may be misinterpreted as representing late recrudescence of the first neo-plastic disease.

  20. Radioaerosol lung scanning in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and related disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong Whee Bahk; Soo Kyo Chung

    1994-01-01

    As a coordinated research project of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a multicentre joint study on radioaerosol lung scan using the BARC nebulizer has prospectively been carried out during 1988-1992 with the participation of 10 member countries in Asia [Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand]. The study was designed so that it would primarily cover chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the other related and common pulmonary diseases. The study also included normal controls and asymptomatic smokers. The purposes of this presentation are three fold: firstly, to document the usefulness of the nebulizer and the validity of user's protocol in imaging COPD and other lung diseases; secondly, to discuss scan features of the individual COPD and other disorders studied and thirdly, to correlate scan alterations with radiographic findings. Before proceeding with a systematic analysis of aerosol scan patterns in the disease groups, we documented normal pattern. The next step was the assessment of scan features in those who had been smoking for more than several years but had no symptoms or signs referable to airways. The lung diseases we analyzed included COPD [emphysema, chronic bronchitis, asthma and bronchiectasis], bronchial obstruction, compensatory overinflation and other common lung diseases such as lobar pneumonia, tuberculosis, interstitial fibrosis, diffuse panbronchiolitis, lung edema and primary and metastatic lung cancers. Lung embolism, inhalation bums and glue-sniffer's lung are separately discussed by Dr. Sundram of Singapore elsewhere in this book. The larger portion of this chapter is allocated to the discussion of COPD with a special effort made in sorting out differential scan features. Diagnostic criteria in individual COPD were defined for each category of disease and basic clinical symptoms and signs and pertinent laboratory data as well as radiographic manifestations are

  1. Welders’ lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izidor Kern

    2010-02-01

    Conclusions: h is study coni rms that longterm welders may have symptoms with no functional disorders, but with prominent morphological changes. h e key to correct diagnosis is an occupational history of the patient. Diagnostic work-up includes funda-mental procedures in suspected interstitial lung disease. h e best therapy is cessation of exposure.

  2. Lung fibrosis quantified by HRCT in scleroderma patients with different disease forms and ANA specificities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mancin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to define the prevalence of interstitial lung fibrosis in systemic sclerosis (SSc and its relationship with the different clinical forms of disease and ANA specificities. Methods: fifty patients with SSc were submitted to pulmonary high resolution computed tomography (HRCT. Lung abnormalities were evaluated according to Warrick’s score that considers both the severity and the extent of fibrotic lesions. Results: pulmonary HRCT abnormalities were observed in 84% of SSc patients. Ground glass aspects (60%, irregular pleural margins (56% and septal/subpleural lines (68% were the most common lesions. The distribution of these abnormalities favoured the posterior basilar segments of both lungs. HRCT findings were significantly more frequent in males and in patients with the cutaneous diffuse form of SSc and with the specific antibody anti-Scl70. Conclusions: HRCT is a very useful method for the diagnosis of interstitial lung fibrosis in SSc. Warrick’s score permits to quantify the HRCT findings and to evaluate their relationship with the disease clinical forms and ANA specificities.

  3. Evaluation of three-dimensional distribution of foci of diffuse lung diseases with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Masamitsu

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional distribution of foci of diffuse lung disease was evaluated by CT image, and it was examined whether each lung disease could be diagnosed by different distribution. Subjects were 120 cases (idiopathic interstitial pneumonia 15 cases, sarcoidosis 23 cases, miliary tuberculosis 10 cases, diffuse panbronchiolitis 7 cases, chronic pulmonary emphysema 6 cases, pulmonary metastasis 9 cases, SLE 6 cases, PSS 8 cases, dermatomyositis (DM) 6 cases, RA 7 cases, SjS 9 cases and others 14 cases). CT image was obtained from apex to base of lung with 10 mm gapless. The image was divided into three parts in both head-tail direction and back-front direction, and two parts in cortex medulla direction, and the ratio of foci to whole in each part was evaluated in five phases, and the part with the highest ratio was determined as the predominant side. In idiopathic interstitial pneumonia, sarcoidosis, miliary tuberculosis, diffuse panbronchiolitis, chronic pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary metastasis, PSS and DM, the predominant side was confirmed, respectively, and usefulness of differential diagnosis was recognized. Constant distribution wasn't recognized in SLE, RA and SjS, because the state of disease was not always same in the foci of these diseases. (K.H.)

  4. State-of-the-Art Imaging of the Lung for Connective Tissue Disease (CTD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Seki, Shinichiro

    2015-12-01

    Involvement of the respiratory system is common in connective tissue diseases (CTDs), and the resultant lung injury can affect every part of the lung: the pleura, alveoli, interstitium, vasculature, lymphatic tissue, and large and/or small airways. Most of the parenchymal manifestations of CTD are similar to those found in interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), especially idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, and can be classified using the same system. Although there is some overlap, each CTD is associated with a characteristic pattern of pulmonary involvement. For this reason, thin-section CT as well as pulmonary function tests and serum markers are utilized for diagnosis, disease severity assessment, and therapeutic efficacy evaluation of ILD associated with CTD. In addition, newly developed pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures have been recommended as useful alternative imaging options for patients with CTD. This review article will (1) address radiological findings for chest radiography and conventional or thin-section CT currently used for six major types of CTD, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma (progressive systemic sclerosis), polymyositis/dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren syndrome and mixed connective tissue disease; (2) briefly deal with radiation dose reduction for thin-section CT examination; and (3) discuss clinically applicable or state-of-the-art MR imaging for CTD patients.

  5. Evaluation of three-dimensional distribution of foci of diffuse lung diseases with computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwa, Masamitsu [Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Medical School

    1998-11-01

    Three-dimensional distribution of foci of diffuse lung disease was evaluated by CT image, and it was examined whether each lung disease could be diagnosed by different distribution. Subjects were 120 cases (idiopathic interstitial pneumonia 15 cases, sarcoidosis 23 cases, miliary tuberculosis 10 cases, diffuse panbronchiolitis 7 cases, chronic pulmonary emphysema 6 cases, pulmonary metastasis 9 cases, SLE 6 cases, PSS 8 cases, dermatomyositis (DM) 6 cases, RA 7 cases, SjS 9 cases and others 14 cases). CT image was obtained from apex to base of lung with 10 mm gapless. The image was divided into three parts in both head-tail direction and back-front direction, and two parts in cortex medulla direction, and the ratio of foci to whole in each part was evaluated in five phases, and the part with the highest ratio was determined as the predominant side. In idiopathic interstitial pneumonia, sarcoidosis, miliary tuberculosis, diffuse panbronchiolitis, chronic pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary metastasis, PSS and DM, the predominant side was confirmed, respectively, and usefulness of differential diagnosis was recognized. Constant distribution wasn't recognized in SLE, RA and SjS, because the state of disease was not always same in the foci of these diseases. (K.H.)

  6. Desquamative interstitial pneumonia: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovrenski Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Desquamative interstitial pneumonia is one of the rarest idiopathic interstitial pneumonias and the rarest form of smoking-related interstitial lung diseases. It was first described by Liebow in 1965. Histologically, it is characterized by the presence of eosinophilic macrophages uniformly filling airspaces which often contain a finely granular light-brown pigment that does not stain for hemosiderin. The alveolar walls are usually mildly thickened by fibrous tissue and infiltrated by a moderate number of lymphocytes. Case Outline. Our patient was a 56-year-old male, heavy smoker, with bilateral lung infiltrations of unknown etiology and several months of discomfort in the form of dry cough and shortness of breath. Lung function tests showed a moderate restrictive ventilation disorder and a severe reduction of diffusing capacity. Since bronchoscopic specimens did not reveal lung lesion etiology, an open lung biopsy of the lower left pulmonary lobe was performed, and based on the obtained surgical material the pathohistologically diagnosis of desquamative interstitial pneumonia was established. The patient was started on corticosteroid and immunosuppressive therapy, and he ceased smoking. At the last control examination, two years after the onset of symptoms, the patient was feeling well, and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT scan of the thorax showed regression of pathological changes. Conclusion. Although, as in our case, the majority of DIP patients improve on treatment, some patients still develop progressive irreversible fibrosis despite therapy.

  7. Lung cysts in chronic paracoccidioidomycosis*

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, André Nathan; Marchiori, Edson; Benard, Gil; Araújo, Mariana Sponholz; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    On HRCT scans, lung cysts are characterized by rounded areas of low attenuation in the lung parenchyma and a well-defined interface with the normal adjacent lung. The most common cystic lung diseases are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia. In a retrospective analysis of the HRCT findings in 50 patients diagnosed with chronic paracoccidioidomycosis, we found lung cysts in 5 cases (10%), indicating that patients with paracoccidioidomy...

  8. Autophagy in lung disease pathogenesis and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W. Ryter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, a cellular pathway for the degradation of damaged organelles and proteins, has gained increasing importance in human pulmonary diseases, both as a modulator of pathogenesis and as a potential therapeutic target. In this pathway, cytosolic cargos are sequestered into autophagosomes, which are delivered to the lysosomes where they are enzymatically degraded and then recycled as metabolic precursors. Autophagy exerts an important effector function in the regulation of inflammation, and immune system functions. Selective pathways for autophagic degradation of cargoes may have variable significance in disease pathogenesis. Among these, the autophagic clearance of bacteria (xenophagy may represent a crucial host defense mechanism in the pathogenesis of sepsis and inflammatory diseases. Our recent studies indicate that the autophagic clearance of mitochondria, a potentially protective program, may aggravate the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by activating cell death programs. We report similar findings with respect to the autophagic clearance of cilia components, which can contribute to airways dysfunction in chronic lung disease. In certain diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, autophagy may confer protection by modulating proliferation and cell death. In other disorders, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and cystic fibrosis, impaired autophagy may contribute to pathogenesis. In lung cancer, autophagy has multiple consequences by limiting carcinogenesis, modulating therapeutic effectiveness, and promoting tumor cell survival. In this review we highlight the multiple functions of autophagy and its selective autophagy subtypes that may be of significance to the pathogenesis of human disease, with an emphasis on lung disease and therapeutics.

  9. Vascular injury in lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, A.D.; Wyatt, J.H.; Barry, J.M.; Undery, Dawn.

    1975-10-01

    Inhaled particulates which stimulate a 'delayed', cellular mode of alveolar clearance are excreted to the airways through lymphoid foci in the bronchial bifurcations. The anatomic relations and developing pathology of the tissues adjacent to these foci, including the divisions of accompanying arteries, were studied by serial sectioning and photomicrographic modelling of rat lungs. The changes are typical of classic 'delayed' inflammatory reactions and, in the rat, the fully developed stage is characterised by fibrinoid necrosis involving all three layers of the arterial wall in a linear lesion across the leading edge of the flow divider. An hypothesis was developed to relate the injury to pulsatile forces. Recent published findings indicate that similarly placed lesions, with species-specific changes in development, are universal in both cerebral and extra-cranial arterial forks of man and animals. Possible associations of the microvascular changes with human atherosclerosis and their further significance in pulmonary and systemic effects arising from industrial and environmental contaminants are explored. (author)

  10. Quantitative stratification of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushravya Raghunath

    Full Text Available Diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs are characterized by widespread pathological changes within the pulmonary tissue that impair the elasticity and gas exchange properties of the lungs. Clinical-radiological diagnosis of these diseases remains challenging and their clinical course is characterized by variable disease progression. These challenges have hindered the introduction of robust objective biomarkers for patient-specific prediction based on specific phenotypes in clinical practice for patients with DPLD. Therefore, strategies facilitating individualized clinical management, staging and identification of specific phenotypes linked to clinical disease outcomes or therapeutic responses are urgently needed. A classification schema consistently reflecting the radiological, clinical (lung function and clinical outcomes and pathological features of a disease represents a critical need in modern pulmonary medicine. Herein, we report a quantitative stratification paradigm to identify subsets of DPLD patients with characteristic radiologic patterns in an unsupervised manner and demonstrate significant correlation of these self-organized disease groups with clinically accepted surrogate endpoints. The proposed consistent and reproducible technique could potentially transform diagnostic staging, clinical management and prognostication of DPLD patients as well as facilitate patient selection for clinical trials beyond the ability of current radiological tools. In addition, the sequential quantitative stratification of the type and extent of parenchymal process may allow standardized and objective monitoring of disease, early assessment of treatment response and mortality prediction for DPLD patients.

  11. Radiographic and microscopic correlation of diffuse interstitial and bronchointerstitial pulmonary patterns in the caudodorsal lung of adult Thoroughbred horses in race training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisner, E.R.; O'Brien, T.R.; Lakritz, J.; Pascoe, J.R.; Wilson, D.W.; Tyler, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    Complete thoracic radiographic examinations were performed on 7 horses ranging in age from 24 to 60 months, followed by in-situ lung fixation. Radiographs were examined by 3 radiologists for the presence, degree and distribution of generalised pulmonary patterns within a region of interest in the caudodorsal lung. Pulmonary tissue was obtained from 12 sites within a designated volume of interest in the caudodorsal lung, corresponding to the area of interest evaluated radiographically, and examined for the presence, character and severity of microscopic lesions. Radiographic findings within the volume of interest consisted of mild to moderate bronchial, bronchointerstitial, or interstitial pulmonary patterns. Interstitial and bronchointerstitial radiographic findings were related to severity of peribronchiolar mononuclear cell infiltrates, the degree of bronchiolar mucosal plication, and alveolar capillary and peribronchial blood vessel erythrocyte content. The severity of the interstitial radiographic pattern was inversely associated with the perceived diagnostic quality of the radiographic examinations. There was no evidence of spatial variation in the severity of the microscopic changes examined in this limited pulmonary region. Inter-rater reliability between radiologists was good in the assessment of diagnostic quality of the radiographic examinations but poor in assessing severity of the primary generalised pulmonary patterns within the radiographic region of interest

  12. The interaction of ageing and lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    This article explores the structural and physiological changes that occur in the ageing lung, and the impact that lung disease and other co-morbidities may have on it. The major changes associated with ageing are reduced lung elasticity, respiratory muscle strength and chest wall compliance, all of which may be influenced by impaired lung growth in early childhood and adolescence. The resultant reduction in diffusing capacity may not be relevant in a fit older adult, but co-morbidities may interact to cause breathlessness and impairments in quality of life. Lung function declines with age, but forced vital capacity (FVC) begins to decline later than forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) and at a slower rate. This results in a natural fall in the FEV(1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio which may result in overdiagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and hence the need to ensure the FEV(1) is less than 80% before confirming the diagnosis. As older adults probably have a diminished response to hypoxia and hypercapnia, they become more vulnerable to ventilatory failure during high-demand states such as heart failure and pneumonia and therefore to possible poorer outcomes. Poor nutritional status is likely to be an important factor, as is cognitive impairment. It is important to assess older patients using a range of clinical and physiological parameters rather than on the basis of age per se which is a poor predictor of outcome.

  13. Connexins as therapeutic targets in lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa, Davide; Chanson, Marc; Crespin, Sophie

    2011-08-01

    The lung is a mechanically active system exposed to the external environment and is particularly sensitive to injury and inflammation. Studies have identified intercellular communication pathways that promote proper lung function in response to injury and disease. These pathways involve connexins (Cxs) and gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). The functional expression of Cxs in airway epithelium and vasculature, under normal and pathological conditions, is reviewed. Inhibition of GJIC and/or silencing of Cxs have been shown to modulate the course of disease development. Cx-based channels: i) coordinate ciliary beating and fluid transport to promote clearance of particulates, ii) regulate secretion of pulmonary surfactant, in response to deep inhalation by interconnecting type I and type II alveolar epithelial cells, and iii) are key mediators of pro- and anti-inflammatory signalling by the pulmonary endothelium, in order to modulate leukocyte recruitment from the circulation. Cx-based channels play several central roles in promoting a regulated inflammatory response and facilitating lung repair, thus enabling the pulmonary epithelium and vasculature to behave as integrated systems. Several pathologies can disrupt the normal communication pathways required for proper lung function, including acute lung injury, asthma, cystic fibrosis, pulmonary fibrosis and cancer.

  14. Protein misfolding and obstructive lung disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, Catherine M

    2010-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum has evolved a number of mechanisms to manage the accumulation of incorrectly folded proteins. This results in loss of function of these proteins, but occasionally, in conditions such as α-1 antitrpysin (A1AT) deficiency, the misfolded protein can acquire a toxic gain of function promoting exaggerated ER stress responses and inflammation. Mutations leading to deficiency in a second serine proteinase inhibitor, α-1 antichymotrpysin (ACT), can induce potentially similar consequences. A1AT and ACT deficiencies are associated with chronic obstructive lung disease. Until recently, it was thought that the lung diseases associated with these conditions were entirely due to loss of antiprotease protection in the lung (i.e., loss of function), whereas gain of function was the major cause of the liver disease associated with A1AT deficiency. This paradigm is being increasingly challenged because ER stress is being recognized in bronchial epithelial cells and inflammatory cells normally resident in the lung, giving rise to an inflammatory phenotype that adds to the proteolytic burden associated with these conditions. In this article, we describe the cellular mechanisms that are activated to cope with an increasing burden of misfolded proteins within the ER in A1AT and ACT deficiency, show how these events are linked to inflammation, and outline the therapeutic strategies that can potentially interfere with production of misfolded proteins.

  15. RNAi Therapeutic Platforms for Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyoshi Kuwano

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is rapidly becoming an important method for analyzing gene functions in many eukaryotes and holds promise for the development of therapeutic gene silencing. The induction of RNAi relies on small silencing RNAs, which affect specific messenger RNA (mRNA degradation. Two types of small RNA molecules, i.e. small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs, are central to RNAi. Drug discovery studies and novel treatments of siRNAs are currently targeting a wide range of diseases, including various viral infections and cancers. Lung diseases in general are attractive targets for siRNA therapeutics because of their lethality and prevalence. In addition, the lung is anatomically accessible to therapeutic agents via the intrapulmonary route. Recently, increasing evidence indicates that miRNAs play an important role in lung abnormalities, such as inflammation and oncogenesis. Therefore, miRNAs are being targeted for therapeutic purposes. In this review, we present strategies for RNAi delivery and discuss the current state-of-the-art RNAi-based therapeutics for various lung diseases.

  16. Histopathology of fungal diseases of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roden, Anja C; Schuetz, Audrey N

    2017-11-01

    Fungal pneumonias can be a diagnostic problem. However, their recognition is important as they can pose a significant health risk, especially in the immunocompromised host. While many of these infections are accompanied by necrotizing or non-necrotizing granulomas, some might be characterized by cellular interstitial pneumonia, intra-alveolar frothy material or only minimal inflammatory change. Much of the tissue reaction is dependent on the immune status of the patient and the type of fungal organism. While many of the fungi can be identified in tissue, especially if using histochemical stains such as Grocott's Methenamine Silver (GMS) stain and/or Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) stain, in some cases, these stains are negative and the organisms can only be identified in cultures or using special techniques such as PCR or fungal serology. Some fungi can be accurately identified in tissue based on morphologic features; others require culture for exact classification. Knowledge about immune status, geographic region and social history of the patient are helpful in identifying the fungus and, therefore, detailed clinical and travel histories are important. In this manuscript we aim to describe the most common fungal infections that occur in the lung, their morphologic features, and differential diagnoses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The role of interstitial changes in the progression of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Sulikowska

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Interstitium – the renal tubulointerstitial compartment – is located between the renal tubule basement membrane and microcirculation vessels. Interstitial fibroblasts produce the extracellular matrix and constitute the structure’s cellular skeleton, regulating spatial relationships between its components (microenvironment.The tubular epithelium and endothelium cooperate within an integrated microenvironment. Structural or functional impairment of the extracellular matrix, microcirculation vessels or tubular epithelium results in disturbances of tubulointerstitial compartment components.In the course of glomerular kidney diseases, the intrarenal RAA system becomes activated and inflammatory mediators are released. Interstitial inflammation and microcirculatory disorders develop, inducing adverse consequences, manifested mainly through the process of hypoxia and inflammation.Inflammation-induced increase in interleukin-1 (TNF-α expression leads to increased concentrations of VEGF, ICAM-1, angiotensin II, IL-6 and IL-8. Cytokines activate fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and endothelial cells. Fibrosis is also triggered by HIF-1alpha pathway activation, resulting in vascular growth and fibroblast proliferation. This reaction likewise occurs through activation of NF-ĸβ, EPO, GLUT-1, IGF-1 and INOS.Interstitial fibrosis is one of the factors determining the clinical course of kidney diseases. Apart from inducing fibrosis, microcirculatory disorders lead to the progression of hypoxia.Angiogenesis is a part of the repair process accompanying fibrosis. Its determinant is the normal function and structure of endothelial cells manifested by their ability to migrate and proliferate in response to, inter alia, angiopoietins, VEGF and nitric oxide synthase.Administering a three-drug RAAS-inhibiting therapy to patients with chronic glomerulopathies improves tubular function, measured by the decrease in excretion of NAG and propeptide of type III

  18. The idiopathic interstitial pneumonias: understanding key radiological features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, S. [Department of Radiology, Churchill Hospital, Old Road, Oxford OX3 7LJ (United Kingdom); Benamore, R., E-mail: Rachel.Benamore@orh.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, Churchill Hospital, Old Road, Oxford OX3 7LJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    Many radiologists find it challenging to distinguish between the different interstitial idiopathic pneumonias (IIPs). The British Thoracic Society guidelines on interstitial lung disease (2008) recommend the formation of multidisciplinary meetings, with diagnoses made by combined radiological, pathological, and clinical findings. This review focuses on understanding typical and atypical radiological features on high-resolution computed tomography between the different IIPs, to help the radiologist determine when a confident diagnosis can be made and how to deal with uncertainty.

  19. Lung cysts in chronic paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, André Nathan; Marchiori, Edson; Benard, Gil; Araújo, Mariana Sponholz; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    On HRCT scans, lung cysts are characterized by rounded areas of low attenuation in the lung parenchyma and a well-defined interface with the normal adjacent lung. The most common cystic lung diseases are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia. In a retrospective analysis of the HRCT findings in 50 patients diagnosed with chronic paracoccidioidomycosis, we found lung cysts in 5 cases (10%), indicating that patients with paracoccidioidomycosis can present with lung cysts on HRCT scans. Therefore, paracoccidioidomycosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of cystic lung diseases.

  20. Lung cysts in chronic paracoccidioidomycosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, André Nathan; Marchiori, Edson; Benard, Gil; Araújo, Mariana Sponholz; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    On HRCT scans, lung cysts are characterized by rounded areas of low attenuation in the lung parenchyma and a well-defined interface with the normal adjacent lung. The most common cystic lung diseases are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia. In a retrospective analysis of the HRCT findings in 50 patients diagnosed with chronic paracoccidioidomycosis, we found lung cysts in 5 cases (10%), indicating that patients with paracoccidioidomycosis can present with lung cysts on HRCT scans. Therefore, paracoccidioidomycosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of cystic lung diseases. PMID:23857700

  1. Lung cysts in chronic paracoccidioidomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Nathan Costa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available On HRCT scans, lung cysts are characterized by rounded areas of low attenuation in the lung parenchyma and a well-defined interface with the normal adjacent lung. The most common cystic lung diseases are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia. In a retrospective analysis of the HRCT findings in 50 patients diagnosed with chronic paracoccidioidomycosis, we found lung cysts in 5 cases (10%, indicating that patients with paracoccidioidomycosis can present with lung cysts on HRCT scans. Therefore, paracoccidioidomycosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of cystic lung diseases.

  2. Legionnaire's pneumonia: Is there really an interstitial disease?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godet, C. [Service de Maladies Infectieuses, CHU la Miletrie, rue de la miletrie, 86021 Poitiers (France)]. E-mail: c.godet@chu-poitiers.fr; Frat, J.P. [Service de Reanimation Medicale, CHU la Miletrie, rue de la miletrie, 86021 Poitiers (France); Le Moal, G. [Service de Maladies Infectieuses, CHU la Miletrie, rue de la miletrie, 86021 Poitiers (France); Roblot, F. [Service de Maladies Infectieuses, CHU la Miletrie, rue de la miletrie, 86021 Poitiers (France); Michalakis, G. [Service de Maladies Infectieuses, CHU la Miletrie, rue de la miletrie, 86021 Poitiers (France); Cabon, E. [Service de Radiologie, CHU la Miletrie, rue de la miletrie, 86021 Poitiers (France); Tasu, J.P. [Service de Radiologie, CHU la Miletrie, rue de la miletrie, 86021 Poitiers (France)

    2007-01-15

    Objective: Legionella pneumonia is usually classified as 'atypical pneumonia', which suggests a predominance of interstitial patterns in chest X-rays. Based on a selection of recent clinical cases and a brief review of the literature, the aim of the study is to clarify, how far the actual radiological findings would be consistent with these expectations. Patients and methods: A retrospective analysis of 18 epidemic personal cases and a review of the literature data were performed to describe the chest X-ray findings of Legionella pneumophila (LP) community acquired pneumonia. X-ray review was performed simultaneously and in consensus by two radiologists (J.P.T., E.C.) and a physician (C.G.). Results: From our series, 17 patients had an abnormal chest X-ray on admission. Among these pathological X-ray cases, infiltrates were more often confluent (n = 16), or patchy (n = 7), rather than interstitial (n = 1). Fifteen patients had infiltrates involving the lower lung fields. Bilateral distribution of abnormalities and pleural effusion were each observed in three cases. Radiological findings deteriorated between the second and seventh days following admission, particularly in the form of patchy infiltrates with pleural effusion. The review of the literature is consistent with these findings, by reporting prevalent confluent or patchy infiltrates. Conclusions: These findings are consistent with the physiopathological particularity of this affection and incite us to avoid the classification 'atypical pneumonia' in radiologic terminology. This term is more appropriate for clinical and microbiological use.

  3. [Lung Cancer as an Occupational Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, X; Woitowitz, H-J

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most frequently encountered cancer types. According to the latest WHO data, about 10 % of this disease are due to occupational exposure to cancerogens. Asbestos is still the number one carcinogen. Further frequent causes include quarz and ionizing radiation (uranium mining). Probable causes of the disease can be identified only with the help of detailed occupational history taken by a medical specialist and qualified exposure assessment. Without clarifying the cause of the disease, there is neither a correct insurance procedure nor compensation for the victim, and furthermore, required preventive measures cannot be initiated. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. SLPI and inflammatory lung disease in females.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKiernan, Paul J

    2012-02-01

    During the course of certain inflammatory lung diseases, SLPI (secretory leucoprotease inhibitor) plays a number of important roles. As a serine antiprotease it functions to protect the airways from proteolytic damage due to neutrophil and other immune cell-derived serine proteases. With respect to infection it has known antimicrobial and anti-viral properties that are likely to contribute to host defence. Another of its properties is the ability to control inflammation within the lung where it can interfere with the transcriptional induction of pro-inflammatory gene expression induced by NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB). Thus, factors that regulate the expression of SLPI in the airways can impact on disease severity and outcome. Gender represents once such idiosyncratic factor. In females with CF (cystic fibrosis), it is now thought that circulating oestrogen contributes, in part, to the observed gender gap whereby females have worse disease and poorer prognosis than males. Conversely, in asthma, sufferers who are females have more frequent exacerbations at times of low-circulating oestrogen. In the present paper, we discuss how SLPI participates in these events and speculate on whether regulatory mechanisms such as post-transcriptional modulation by miRNAs (microRNAs) are important in the control of SLPI expression in inflammatory lung disease.

  5. Role of Autoantibodies in the Diagnosis of Connective-Tissue Disease ILD (CTD-ILD and Interstitial Pneumonia with Autoimmune Features (IPAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelle S. Jee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of interstitial lung disease (ILD requires meticulous evaluation for an underlying connective tissue disease (CTD, with major implications for prognosis and management. CTD associated ILD (CTD-ILD occurs most commonly in the context of an established CTD, but can be the first and/or only manifestation of an occult CTD or occur in patients who have features suggestive of an autoimmune process, but not meeting diagnostic criteria for a defined CTD—recently defined as “interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features” (IPAF. The detection of specific autoantibodies serves a critical role in the diagnosis of CTD-ILD, but there remains a lack of data to guide clinical practice including which autoantibodies should be tested on initial assessment and when or in whom serial testing should be performed. The implications of detecting autoantibodies in patients with IPAF on disease behaviour and management remain unknown. The evaluation of CTD-ILD is challenging due to the heterogeneity of presentations and types of CTD and ILD that may be encountered, and thus it is imperative that immunologic tests are interpreted in conjunction with a detailed rheumatologic history and examination and multidisciplinary collaboration between respiratory physicians, rheumatologists, immunologists, radiologists and pathologists.

  6. High-resolution CT of lymphoid interstitial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilgrain, V.; Frija, J.; Yana, C.; Couderc, L.J.; David, M.; Clauvel, J.P.; Laval-Jeantet, M.

    1989-01-01

    Three patients with lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (two HIV 1+ patients with chronic lymphadenopathic syndromes and one with a not-characterized autoimmune disease) have been studied with high-resolution computed tomography (HR-CT). This technique reveals septal lines, small reticulonodular opacities, polyhedral micronodular opacities, 'ground-glass' opacities and a dense, subpleural, curved broken line in one patient. The lesions dominate in the bases of the lungs. They are not characteristic for lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. If a patient presents with a chronic lymphadenopathic syndrome, the diagnosis of an opportunistic infection should not be automatically made, since the syndrome can be caused by lymphoid interstitial pneumonia [fr

  7. Dynamic Heterogeneity of the Heart Valve Interstitial Cell Population in Mitral Valve Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tori E. Horne

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The heart valve interstitial cell (VIC population is dynamic and thought to mediate lay down and maintenance of the tri-laminar extracellular matrix (ECM structure within the developing and mature valve throughout life. Disturbances in the contribution and distribution of valve ECM components are detrimental to biomechanical function and associated with disease. This pathological process is associated with activation of resident VICs that in the absence of disease reside as quiescent cells. While these paradigms have been long standing, characterization of this abundant and ever-changing valve cell population is incomplete. Here we examine the expression pattern of Smooth muscle α-actin, Periostin, Twist1 and Vimentin in cultured VICs, heart valves from healthy embryonic, postnatal and adult mice, as well as mature valves from human patients and established mouse models of disease. We show that the VIC population is highly heterogeneous and phenotypes are dependent on age, species, location, and disease state. Furthermore, we identify phenotypic diversity across common models of mitral valve disease. These studies significantly contribute to characterizing the VIC population in health and disease and provide insights into the cellular dynamics that maintain valve structure in healthy adults and mediate pathologic remodeling in disease states.

  8. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a complex comorbidity of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Grose, Derek; Milroy, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major burden throughout the world. It is associated with a significantly increased incidence of lung cancer and may influence treatment options and outcome. Impaired lung function confirming COPD is an independent risk factor for lung cancer. Oxidative stress and inflammation may be a key link between COPD and lung cancer, with numerous molecular markers being analysed to attempt to understand the pathway of lung cancer development. COPD negat...

  9. Evaluation of imaging of the ventilatory lung motion in pulmonary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tadashige; Kanai, Hisakata; Tanaka, Masao; Hirayama, Jiro; Handa, Kenjiro

    1988-01-01

    Using perfusion lung scintigram with 99m Tc-macroaggregated albumin at maximal expiration (E) and inspiration (I), images of the motion of the regional pulmonary areas and lung margins during ventilation ((E-I)/I) was obtained in patients with various respiratory diseases. The image of (E-I)/I consisted of positive and negative components. The former component visualized the motion of the regional pulmonary areas that corresponded with the ventilatory amplitude of the videodensigram. The sum of the positive component of (E-I)/I in both lungs correlated with the vital capacity (n = 50, r = 0.62). It was 163.5 ± 52.5 in cases with a vital capacity of more than 3.01, 94.1 ± 61.5 in primary lung cancer, 89.2 ± 44.7 in chronic obstructive lung diseases and 69.0 ± 27.5 in diffuse interstitial pneumonia. The distribution pattern of pulmonary perfusion and the positive component of (E-I)/I matched fairly in many cases, but did not match in some cases. The negative component of (E-I)/I demonstrated the ventilatory motion of the lung margin and its decreased activity was shown in cases with hypoventilation of various causes including pleural diseases. The sum of the negative component of (E-I)/I in the both lungs correlated with the vital capacity (n = 50, r = 0.44). These results suggest that this technique is useful to estimate the regional pulmonary ventilatioin and motion of the lung margins. (author)

  10. Powerful functional imaging of respiratory nuclear medicine. Is CT imaging alone really sufficient for diagnosis and pathophysiologic assessment of lung diseases?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Ventilation (V)-perfusion (Q) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides important information of functional impairment in various lung diseases, and often sensitively detects CT-undetectable lesions. V·Q SPECT also provides objective and quantitative assessment of severity of lung functional impairment. Functional-morphological correlation on V·Q SPECT-CT fusion images further facilitates these advantages of V·Q SPECT. This article describes clinical feasibility of V·Q SPECT in functional assessment and diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hypertension, interstitial lung diseases, and lung right-to-left shunt diseases. This article hopefully provides sufficient responses to the crucial query of ''Is CT imaging alone really sufficient for diagnosis and pathophysiological assessment of various lung diseases?'' (author)

  11. Diffuse lung disease in infants less than 1 year of age: Histopathological diagnoses and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Ruth; Kilner, David; Ashworth, Michael; Aurora, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) in infants is rare. Clinical and radiological features are often non-specific, and overlap with growth disorders and infection. In infants with severe respiratory compromise, lung biopsy is often necessary to guide acute management, but the risk and diagnostic yield of this procedure is incompletely understood. To retrospectively review infants undergoing open lung biopsy for suspected ILD at a large referral center; to determine morbidity and mortality related to the procedure; and to describe subsequent diagnosis and outcome. Lung biopsies performed in infants (aged Diagnoses seen were similar to those reported by the ChILD network. Histopathological diagnosis was not compatible with life in the absence of lung transplant in 6/27 (22%) of infants. Of the 14 children longitudinally followed up (median 0.5 (0.4 - 5.81) years), only four continued to require supplemental oxygen. Lung biopsy in infants with suspected ILD is safe, and histopathological diagnosis frequently assists treatment decisions, particularly with regard to withdrawal of care. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Social media use for occupational lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harber, Philip; Leroy, Gondy

    2017-04-01

    Social media have great impact on all aspects of life throughout the world. The utilization of social media for occupational lung disease, however, has been much more limited. This article summarizes recent literature concerning social media for occupational lung disease and identifies areas for additional use. Social media are used in six relevant areas: information dissemination, peer-to-peer communication, survey research data collection, participatory research and exposome data acquisition, assessing public concerns, and knowledge generation. There are very clear advantages for information dissemination from experts to workers and on a peer-to-peer basis, although variable credibility and accuracy concerns persist. For research, social media have been used for acquiring data posted for nonresearch purposes and for efficiently collecting information specifically for research. The benefits of efficiency, democracy, and very large data sources may counterbalance concerns about inadequate specification of recruitment strategies and limited control over data quality. The potential benefits of using social media for lung health-workplace interactions are much greater than the very limited current utilization.

  13. Rare Lung Diseases II: Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C Juvet

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article is the second in a series on rare lung diseases. It focuses on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP, a disorder in which lipoproteinaceous material accumulates in the alveolar space. PAP was first described in 1958, and for many years the nature of the material accumulating in the lungs was unknown. Major insights into PAP have been made in the past decade, and these have led to the notion that PAP is an autoimmume disorder in which autoantibodies interfere with signalling through the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, leading to macrophage and neutrophil dysfunction. This has spurred new therapeutic approaches to this disorder. The discussion of PAP will begin with a case report, then will highlight the classification of PAP and review recent insights into the pathogenesis of PAP. The approach to therapy and the prognosis of PAP will also be discussed.

  14. Cystic lung disease in tuberculosis: An unusual presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Ray

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cysts in the lung can arise due to large number of causes out of which tuberculosis is very rare, We report a case of tuberculosis in a young female presenting as a febrile illness and respiratory failure with radiological features of cystic lung disease. With treatment,fever and respiratory distress subsided and cysts in the lungs showed partial regression. We highlight the need to consider tuberculosis in the differential diagnoses of cystic lung disease under appropriate circumstances.

  15. Spontaneous Chitin Accumulation in Airways and Age-Related Fibrotic Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyken, Steven J; Liang, Hong-Erh; Naikawadi, Ram P; Woodruff, Prescott G; Wolters, Paul J; Erle, David J; Locksley, Richard M

    2017-04-20

    The environmentally widespread polysaccharide chitin is degraded and recycled by ubiquitous bacterial and fungal chitinases. Although vertebrates express active chitinases from evolutionarily conserved loci, their role in mammalian physiology is unclear. We show that distinct lung epithelial cells secrete acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase), which is required for airway chitinase activity. AMCase-deficient mice exhibit premature morbidity and mortality, concomitant with accumulation of environmentally derived chitin polymers in the airways and expression of pro-fibrotic cytokines. Over time, these mice develop spontaneous pulmonary fibrosis, which is ameliorated by restoration of lung chitinase activity by genetic or therapeutic approaches. AMCase-deficient epithelial cells express fibrosis-associated gene sets linked with cell stress pathways. Mice with lung fibrosis due to telomere dysfunction and humans with interstitial lung disease also accumulate excess chitin polymers in their airways. These data suggest that altered chitin clearance could exacerbate fibrogenic pathways in the setting of lung diseases characterized by epithelial cell dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Chronic bird fancier's lung: histopathological and clinical correlation. An application of the 2002 ATS/ERS consensus classification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Y; Saiki, S; Kitaichi, M; Usui, Y; Inase, N; Costabel, U; Yoshizawa, Y

    2005-08-01

    Chronic bird fancier's lung (BFL) has often been misdiagnosed as one of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs). To define the clinical and pathological characteristics of chronic BFL, 26 patients with chronic BFL from whom a surgical lung biopsy specimen was taken between October 1992 and June 2001 were evaluated. The histopathological characteristics of the surgical lung biopsy specimens were examined and correlations between the histopathology and clinical characteristics were analysed. The quality of chronic inflammatory and fibrotic changes was expressed according to the 2002 ATS/ERS consensus classification of IIPs. Two patients were diagnosed as having bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia (BOOP)-like lesions, five as having cellular non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP)-like lesions, and eight as having fibrotic NSIP-like lesions. The other 11 patients were considered to have usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP)-like lesions because of the temporal heterogeneous appearances of the fibrotic changes. However, fibrosis in these patients had developed in centrilobular as well as perilobular areas, suggestive of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Nineteen patients (73.1%) had multinucleated giant cells, often with cholesterol clefts, while only five patients (19.2%) had granulomas. Patients with BOOP-like or cellular NSIP-like lesions tended to have recurrent acute episodes, whereas patients with UIP-like lesions had an insidious onset. Patients with BOOP-like or cellular NSIP-like lesions had a more favourable outcome than those with fibrotic NSIP-like and UIP-like lesions. The qualities of chronic inflammatory and fibrotic lesions vary significantly among patients with chronic BFL but correlate with clinical features and prognosis.

  17. [Systemic sclerosis: a multisystem disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrevoets, M.A.; Markhorst, J.; Meek, I.; Ede, A.E. van; Vonk, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare, systemic autoimmune disease, characterized by inflammation, vasculopathy and fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. The disease is associated with a significantly increased morbidity and mortality, and can be rapidly progressive. Interstitial lung disease, renal

  18. Bullous lung diseases as a risk factor for lung cancer: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagorni-Obradović Ljudmila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A possible association between lung cancer and bullous lung disease has been suggested and recently supported by the results of genetic studies. Case report. A previously healthy 43-year-old man, smoker, was diagnosed with bullous lung disease at the age of 31 years. He was followed up for 12 years when lung cancer (adenocarcinoma was found at the site. In the meantime, he was treated for recurrent respiratory infections. Conclusion. There is the need for active approach in following up the patients with pulmonary bulla for potential development of lung cancer.

  19. Clinical tool for disease phenotyping in granulomatous lung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori J Silveira

    Full Text Available Exposure to beryllium may lead to granuloma formation and fibrosis in those who develop chronic beryllium disease (CBD. Although disease presentation varies from mild to severe, little is known about CBD phenotypes. This study characterized CBD disease phenotypes using longitudinal measures of lung function.Using a case-only study of 207 CBD subjects, subject-specific trajectories over time were estimated from longitudinal pulmonary function and exercise-tolerance tests. To estimate linear combinations of the 30-year values that define underlying patterns of lung function, we conducted factor analysis. Cluster analysis was then performed on all the predicted lung function values at 30 years. These estimates were used to identify underlying features and subgroups of CBD.Two factors, or composite measures, explained nearly 70% of the co-variation among the tests; one factor represented pulmonary function in addition to oxygen consumption and workload during exercise, while the second factor represented exercise tests related to gas exchange. Factors were associated with granulomas on biopsy, exposure, steroid use and lung inflammation. Three clusters of patients (n = 53, n = 59 and, n = 95 were identified based on the collection of test values. Lower levels of each of the factor composite scores and cluster membership were associated with baseline characteristics of patients.Using factor analysis and cluster analysis, we identified disease phenotypes that were associated with baseline patient characteristics, suggesting that CBD is a heterogeneous disease with varying severity. These clinical tools may be used in future basic and clinical studies to help define the mechanisms and risk factors for disease severity.

  20. Pathomechanism of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome and Mapping the Heterogeneity of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a heterogeneous syndrome which is usually characterized by urinary frequency, nocturia, and bladder pain. Several pathomechanisms have been proposed, including uroepithelial dysfunction, mast cell activation, neurogenic inflammation, autoimmunity, and occult urinary tract infections. It is possible that an inflammatory process alters regulation of urothelial homeostasis and results in dysfunction of the bladder epithelium. Different phenotypes of IC/BPS have been explored including Hunner and non-Hunner type IC, hypersensitive bladder, and bladder pain both with and without functional somatic syndrome. Different gene expressions have also been found in different IC phenotypes. Abnormal expressions of uroplakin, chondroitin sulfate and adhesive protein E-cadherin, tight junction protein zonula occludens-1 in IC/BPS bladder suggest abnormal epithelial differentiation in this bladder disease. Analysis of inflammatory proteins, or cytokines in the urine or serum provides another diagnostic foundation forIC/BPS subtypes. The involvement of IC/BPS in systemic functional somatic syndrome and other pelvic organ diseases might also subdivide subtypes of IC/BPS. Chronic inflammation, increased urothelial apoptosis, and abnormal urothelial function are closely associated in IC bladders. This article reviews recent research on the pathomechanisms of IC, which might help us in mapping the heterogeneity of the disease. PMID:27915472

  1. Advances in the Evaluation of Respiratory Pathophysiology during Exercise in Chronic Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Denis E.; Elbehairy, Amany F.; Berton, Danilo C.; Domnik, Nicolle J.; Neder, J. Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Dyspnea and exercise limitation are among the most common symptoms experienced by patients with various chronic lung diseases and are linked to poor quality of life. Our understanding of the source and nature of perceived respiratory discomfort and exercise intolerance in chronic lung diseases has increased substantially in recent years. These new mechanistic insights are the primary focus of the current review. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) provides a unique opportunity to objectively evaluate the ability of the respiratory system to respond to imposed incremental physiological stress. In addition to measuring aerobic capacity and quantifying an individual's cardiac and ventilatory reserves, we have expanded the role of CPET to include evaluation of symptom intensity, together with a simple “non-invasive” assessment of relevant ventilatory control parameters and dynamic respiratory mechanics during standardized incremental tests to tolerance. This review explores the application of the new advances in the clinical evaluation of the pathophysiology of exercise intolerance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic asthma, interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We hope to demonstrate how this novel approach to CPET interpretation, which includes a quantification of activity-related dyspnea and evaluation of its underlying mechanisms, enhances our ability to meaningfully intervene to improve quality of life in these pathologically-distinct conditions. PMID:28275353

  2. Histopathological approach to patterns of interstitial pneumonia in patient with connective tissue disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Andrew G; Colby, Thomas V; Wells, Athol U

    2002-03-01

    It is well established that some patients with connective tissue disorders will suffer from pulmonary disease at some stage in their disease progression. This article concentrates on the interstitial pneumonias, seen in association with most types of connective tissue disorder, particularly in the ligh of non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) being recognised as a distinct histological pattern. Most published articles on this subject precede recognition of NSIP and, as such, the relative incidence of patterns of interstitial pneumonia, as defined by the International Consensus Classification Committee for Interstitial Lung Disease (ICCILD), as well as the clinical and prognostic significance of these patterns is undergoing further scrutiny. In this review, the recognised histological patterns, namely usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), organising pneumonia (OP), reactive pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia, desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP) and respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease (RBILD) are reviewed systematically in relation to the various subgroups of connective tissue disorders. As yet, there are few published studies, but current evidence suggests that many cases previously classified as fibrosing alveolitis are likely to show a pattern of NSIP rather than UIP, particularly in relation to systemic sclerosis. The histological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia, the most frequently seen pattern in biopsies from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis, appears to be comparatively rare. Furthermore, any biopsy showing a combination of histological patterns, a pattern of non-specific interstitial pneumonia or a pattern of lymphoid interstitial pneumonia/follicular bronchiolitis should be thoroughly investigated for a background connective tissue disorder, if previously unsuspected. Finally, the recently published

  3. Chapter 17: Occupational immunologic lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, Bradley R; Grammer, Leslie C

    2012-01-01

    Occupational immunologic lung disease is characterized by an immunologic response in the lung to an airborne agent inhaled in the work environment and can be subdivided into immunologically mediated occupational asthma (OA) and hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). Irritant-induced OA, a separate nonimmunologic entity, can be caused by chronic exposure to inhaled irritants or reactive airways dysfunction syndrome, defined as an asthma-like syndrome that persists for >3 months and occurs abruptly after a single exposure to a high concentration of an irritating industrial agent. High-risk fields for OA include farmers, printers, woodworkers, painters, plastic workers, cleaners, spray painters, electrical workers, and health care workers. OA can be triggered by high molecular weight (HMW) proteins that act as complete allergens or low molecular weight (LMW) sensitizers that act as haptens. HMW proteins (>10 kDa) are generally derived from microorganisms (such as molds and bacteria, including thermophilic actinomycetes), plants (such as latex antigens and flour proteins), or animals (such as animal dander, avian proteins, and insect scales) and are not specifically regulated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). LMW haptens that bind to proteins in the respiratory mucosa include some OSHA-regulated substances such as isocyanates, anhydrides, and platinum. HP can present in an acute, a chronic, or a subacute form. The acute, subacute, and early chronic form is characterized by a CD4(+) T(H)1 and CD8(+) lymphocyte alveolitis. Classically, the bronchoalveolar lavage will show a CD4/CD8 ratio of <1.

  4. Blue Journal Conference. Aging and Susceptibility to Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thannickal, Victor J.; Murthy, Mahadev; Balch, William E.; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Meiners, Silke; Eickelberg, Oliver; Selman, Moisés; Pardo, Annie; White, Eric S.; Levy, Bruce D.; Busse, Paula J.; Tuder, Rubin M.; Antony, Veena B.; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2015-01-01

    The aging of the population in the United States and throughout the developed world has increased morbidity and mortality attributable to lung disease, while the morbidity and mortality from other prevalent diseases has declined or remained stable. Recognizing the importance of aging in the development of lung disease, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) highlighted this topic as a core theme for the 2014 annual meeting. The relationship between aging and lung disease was discussed in several oral symposiums and poster sessions at the annual ATS meeting. In this article, we used the input gathered at the conference to develop a broad framework and perspective to stimulate basic, clinical, and translational research to understand how the aging process contributes to the onset and/or progression of lung diseases. A consistent theme that emerged from the conference was the need to apply novel, systems-based approaches to integrate a growing body of genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data and elucidate the relationship between biologic hallmarks of aging, altered lung function, and increased susceptibility to lung diseases in the older population. The challenge remains to causally link the molecular and cellular changes of aging with age-related changes in lung physiology and disease susceptibility. The purpose of this review is to stimulate further research to identify new strategies to prevent or treat age-related lung disease. PMID:25590812

  5. Early Detection of Tubulo-Interstitial Kidney Disease in Children Using Highly Discriminating SDS-Gel Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Bashir A

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Tubulo-interstitial kidney disease is characterized by moderate proteinuria < 1 g/day of low molecular weight proteins in range of MW 10.000-50.000. Even in the physiological proteinuria of < 150 mg/day, tubulo-interstitial kidney disease may exist. Using optimized sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamid gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE according to the method of Melzer, even in proteinuria of less than 150 mg/day all relevant proteins for diagnosis of glomerular or tubulo-interstitial kidney disease can be detected. This study evaluates the tubulo-interstitial kidney disease due to polychemotherapy for different types of cancer in 115 children and in 16 children with pyelo-ureteral junction obstruction. Fifty-two and 63 children were followed up during and after chemotherapy, respectively. During therapy, renal damage was recorded in 43% of patients with leukemia, 56% with nephroblastoma, and 79% with other tumors. Tubular protein patterns were seen up to three years after termination of chemotherapy (25% in acute lymphoplastic leukemia, 35% in nephroblastoma and 62% in other tumors. Patients with persistent complete tubular proteinuria or mixed glomerular/tubular proteinuria were found to have a high risk for irreversible renal failure. Children with congenital pyelo-ureteral junction obstruction could also be classified according to SDS-PAGE protein patterns. Patients without parenchymal lesions did not need surgery. Most of those with pathologic findings in SDS-PAGE exhibited partial or complete remission after surgery. The highly discriminating SDS-PAGE permits a rapid, sensitive, reproducible, and reliable analysis of urine proteins for diagnosis and follow-up of all kinds of congenital or acquired renal parenchymal kidney diseases.

  6. Long term follow-up of patients with Cushing's disease treated by interstitial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandler, L.M.; Richards, N.T.; Carr, D.H.; Mashiter, K.; Joplin, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    The first 86 patients with Cushing's disease treated with interstitial irradiation (by needle implantation) as the sole therapy were reviewed. In the 82 patients who were reassessed 1 yr after treatment 63 (77%) achieved remission. This study comprises the outcome and complications in the 54 patients who had a remission and whom we were able to follow. The follow-up period ranged from 3-26 yr (mean, 10.5) from the time of remission. No instance of clinical or radiological relapse has occurred. Of these 54 patients, yttrium-90 alone was used in 32, of whom 12 (37%) required corticosteroid or T4 replacement therapy in a mean time of 3.5 months; in 7 of these 12 we elected to give an ablative dose. Gold-198 alone was used in 15 patients, of whom 7 (47%) developed hypopituitarism in a mean time of 76 months. Both isotopes were used in 7 patients. A diurnal serum cortisol rhythm was found in 28 of the 31 patients who were not receiving corticosteroid therapy. In 5 of the 7 patients with an initially abnormal pituitary fossa, serial radiological studies revealed remodelling in 3. There have been no complications in the last 17 years. Pituitary implantation with yttrium-90 is an effective alternative to transsphenoidal hypophysectomy, with a high remission rate, no recurrence (as yet), no operative complications, and avoidance of hormone replacement in the majority

  7. Quantitative texture-based assessment of one-year changes in fibrotic reticular patterns on HRCT in scleroderma lung disease treated with oral cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun J.; Brown, Matthew S.; Elashoff, Robert; Li, Gang; Gjertson, David W.; Lynch, David A.; Strollo, Diane C.; Kleerup, Eric; Tashkin, Donald P.; Chong, Daniel; Shah, Sumit K.; Ahmad, Shama; Abtin, Fereidoun; Goldin, Jonathan G.

    2011-01-01

    The Scleroderma Lung Study showed the efficacy of cyclophosphamide in modestly improving the forced vital capacity (FVC) compared with placebo over 1 year. Using changes in texture-based scores that quantify lung fibrosis as the percentage involvement of reticulation patterns, the effectiveness of cyclophosphamide was re-assessed by examining its impact on quantitative lung fibrosis (QLF). Axial HRCT images were acquired (1-mm slice thickness, 10-mm increments) in the prone position at inspiration. A validated model for quantifying interstitial disease patterns was applied to images from 83 subjects at baseline and 12 months. Scores were calculated for six zones (upper, mid, lower of the right/left lung) and the whole lung. Average changes were compared. Correlations were performed between QLF and physiological and clinical scores. From the most severe zones identified at baseline, QLF scores decreased by 2.6% in the cyclophosphamide group, whereas they increased by 9.1% in the placebo group, leading to ∝12% difference (p = 0.0027). Between-treatment difference in whole lung QLF was ∝5% (p = 0.0190). Significant associations were observed between changes in QLF and FVC (r = -0.33), dyspnea score (r = -0.29), and consensus visual score (p = 0.0001). QLF scores provide an objective quantitative tool for assessing treatment efficacy in scleroderma-related interstitial lung disease. (orig.)

  8. Quantitative texture-based assessment of one-year changes in fibrotic reticular patterns on HRCT in scleroderma lung disease treated with oral cyclophosphamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun J.; Brown, Matthew S. [David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Center for Computer Vision and Imaging Biomarker, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Elashoff, Robert [David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Department of Biostatistics and Biomathematics, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Li, Gang [School of Public Health, UCLA, Department of Biostatistics, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gjertson, David W. [School of Public Health and David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Department of Biostatistics and Pathology, Los Angeles (United States); Lynch, David A. [National Jewish Health, Radiology Department, Denver, CO (United States); Strollo, Diane C. [UPMC Presbyterian, Radiology Department, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kleerup, Eric; Tashkin, Donald P. [David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Department of Med-Pul and Critical Care, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Chong, Daniel; Shah, Sumit K.; Ahmad, Shama; Abtin, Fereidoun; Goldin, Jonathan G. [David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2011-12-15

    The Scleroderma Lung Study showed the efficacy of cyclophosphamide in modestly improving the forced vital capacity (FVC) compared with placebo over 1 year. Using changes in texture-based scores that quantify lung fibrosis as the percentage involvement of reticulation patterns, the effectiveness of cyclophosphamide was re-assessed by examining its impact on quantitative lung fibrosis (QLF). Axial HRCT images were acquired (1-mm slice thickness, 10-mm increments) in the prone position at inspiration. A validated model for quantifying interstitial disease patterns was applied to images from 83 subjects at baseline and 12 months. Scores were calculated for six zones (upper, mid, lower of the right/left lung) and the whole lung. Average changes were compared. Correlations were performed between QLF and physiological and clinical scores. From the most severe zones identified at baseline, QLF scores decreased by 2.6% in the cyclophosphamide group, whereas they increased by 9.1% in the placebo group, leading to {proportional_to}12% difference (p = 0.0027). Between-treatment difference in whole lung QLF was {proportional_to}5% (p = 0.0190). Significant associations were observed between changes in QLF and FVC (r = -0.33), dyspnea score (r = -0.29), and consensus visual score (p = 0.0001). QLF scores provide an objective quantitative tool for assessing treatment efficacy in scleroderma-related interstitial lung disease. (orig.)

  9. Elevated serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 in systemic sclerosis: a marker of lung fibrosis and severity of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyamine, Audrey; Heim, Xavier; Resseguier, Noémie; Bertin, Daniel; Gomez, Carine; Ebbo, Mikaël; Harlé, Jean-Robert; Kaplanski, Gilles; Rossi, Pascal; Bardin, Nathalie; Granel, Brigitte

    2018-02-17

    We aimed to assess the clinical significance of Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6) in the diagnosis and severity of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in a French cohort of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Serum KL-6 concentrations were measured with chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) in 75 SSc patients. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD versus SSc-without ILD) on chest High-Resolution Computed Tomography. Pulmonary function tests, main manifestations and severity of the lung disease (Medsger's severity scale) were collected. KL-6 serum concentrations were significantly higher in SSc-ILD patients than in those without ILD (p < 10 -4 ) and were inversely correlated with forced vital capacity, total lung capacity and diffuse lung capacity of carbon monoxide. Serum KL-6 level superior to 872 U/ml appeared as the optimal cut-off value associated with ILD. Patients with a restrictive pulmonary syndrome and dyspnoea had significant higher KL-6 serum concentrations. SSc patients with anti-topoisomerase 1 antibodies had higher KL-6 serum levels than patients with anti-centromere antibodies (p < 10 - 4 ). ILD and anti-topoisomerase 1 antibodies were independent factors associated with KL-6 in multivariate analysis. Interestingly, KL-6 serum concentrations positively increased with the patient lung severity. Our study confirms that KL-6 is an accurate biomarker for the diagnosis of SSc-ILD in a French cohort of patients. High KL-6 levels should prompt physicians to assess ILD with pulmonary imaging and pulmonary functions tests. Prospective clinical studies are still required to determine whether levels of KL-6 might predict progression of ILD as well as its usefulness in the timing of therapeutic intervention.

  10. Inflammatory and immune processes in the human lung in health and disease: evaluation by bronchoalveolar lavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunninghake, G. W.; Gadek, J. E.; Kawanami, O.; Ferrans, V. J.; Crystal, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage is an invaluable means of accurately evaluating the inflammatory and immune processes of the human lung. Although lavage recovers only those cells and proteins present on the epithelial surface of the lower respiratory tract, comparison with open lung biopsies shows that these constituents are representative of the inflammatory and immune systems of the alveolar structures. With the use of these techniques, sufficient materials are obtained from normal individuals to allow characterization of not only the types of cells and proteins present but their functions as well. Such observations have been useful in defining the inflammatory and immune capabilities of the normal lung and provide a basis for the study of lung disease. Lavage methods have been used to characterize inflammatory and immune processes of the lower respiratory tract in destructive, infectious, neoplastic, and interstitial disorders. From the data already acquired, it is apparent that bronchoalveolar lavage will yield major insights into the pathogenesis, staging, and therapy decisions involved in these disorders. (Am J Pathol 97:149--206, 1979). Images Figure 9 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 10 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 3 PMID:495693

  11. Differential diagnosis of granulomatous lung disease: clues and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichiro Ohshimo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Granulomatous lung diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders that have a wide spectrum of pathologies with variable clinical manifestations and outcomes. Precise clinical evaluation, laboratory testing, pulmonary function testing, radiological imaging including high-resolution computed tomography and often histopathological assessment contribute to make a confident diagnosis of granulomatous lung diseases. Differential diagnosis is challenging, and includes both infectious (mycobacteria and fungi and noninfectious lung diseases (sarcoidosis, necrotising sarcoid granulomatosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, hot tub lung, berylliosis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, rheumatoid nodules, talc granulomatosis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis and bronchocentric granulomatosis. Bronchoalveolar lavage, endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration, transbronchial cryobiopsy, positron emission tomography and genetic evaluation are potential candidates to improve the diagnostic accuracy for granulomatous lung diseases. As granuloma alone is a nonspecific histopathological finding, the multidisciplinary approach is important for a confident diagnosis.

  12. Inflammatory Lung Disease in Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Claudio; Rossi, Marcello; Chisci, Glauco; Lonetti, Giuseppina; Vannuccini, Laura; Spina, Donatella; Iacona, Ingrid; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Ciccoli, Lucia; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder mainly linked to mutations in the gene encoding the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Respiratory dysfunction, historically credited to brainstem immaturity, represents a major challenge in RTT. Our aim was to characterize the relationships between pulmonary gas exchange abnormality (GEA), upper airway obstruction, and redox status in patients with typical RTT (n = 228) and to examine lung histology in a Mecp2-null mouse model of the disease. GEA was detectable in ~80% (184/228) of patients versus ~18% of healthy controls, with “high” (39.8%) and “low” (34.8%) patterns dominating over “mixed” (19.6%) and “simple mismatch” (5.9%) types. Increased plasma levels of non-protein-bound iron (NPBI), F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs), intraerythrocyte NPBI (IE-NPBI), and reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH and GSSG) were evidenced in RTT with consequently decreased GSH/GSSG ratios. Apnea frequency/severity was positively correlated with IE-NPBI, F2-IsoPs, and GSSG and negatively with GSH/GSSG ratio. A diffuse inflammatory infiltrate of the terminal bronchioles and alveoli was evidenced in half of the examined Mecp2-mutant mice, well fitting with the radiological findings previously observed in RTT patients. Our findings indicate that GEA is a key feature of RTT and that terminal bronchioles are a likely major target of the disease. PMID:24757286

  13. Interstitial laser-induced thermotherapy of the lung: evaluation of the influence of ablation continuity on ablation size in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoellnast, Helmut; Monette, Sebastien; Ezell, Paula C; Keene, Andrew; Quehenberger, Franz; Erinjeri, Joseph P; Solomon, Stephen B

    2013-02-22

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between size and the continuity of energy application in interstitial laser-induced thermotherapy. Percutaneous computed tomography-guided laser ablation (30 W, 600 nm diode) of the lung was performed in 7 Yorkshire pigs; a total of 42 ablation zones were created. Twenty ablations were performed using a continuous cycle of 2 min (protocol A) and 22 ablations were performed using 4 intermittent cycles with a duration of 1 min for each cycle interrupted by a 10-s stop between the cycles (protocol B). The lung was harvested immediately after euthanasia for gross pathology and histopathologic evaluation. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student t test and the Spearman correlation coefficient. Laser ablation resulted in complete necrosis of variable size of lung. The mean ablation zone dimensions (±SD) were 1.9 (±0.4) cm × 1.4 (±0.3) cm for protocol A and 2.2 (±0.5) cm × 1.4 (±0.4) cm for protocol B. The size of the necrosis is not significantly different when comparing a continuous 2-min ablation to a 4-cycle intermittent ablation for 1 min each cycle interrupted by a 10-s stop between the cycles (P = 0.98 and 0.53, respectively).

  14. [Diffuse infiltrative lung disease in scleroderma. Analysis of radio-clinical and functional semiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khattabi, W; Afif, H; Moussali, N; Aichane, A; Abdelouafi, A; Bouayad, Z

    2013-06-01

    Scleroderma (SD) is a systemic disease that predominantly affects the skin. Diffuse infiltrative lung disease (DILD) is rare and occurs most often in the course of the disease. We analyzed seven cases of DILO of SD recorded between 2003 and 2010 among 196 PID (3.6%). Functional signs were limited to respiratory dyspnea, it was associated to dysphagia in six cases, dry syndrome in five cases and Raynaud's phenomenon in four cases. Clinical examination found crackles in the bases of the thorax in all cases and specific cutaneous signs in six cases. The chest radiograph showed that interstitial disease predominates at the lung bases in all cases with a large aspect of the pulmonary arteries in two cases. The chest CT scan confirmed the predominance of basal and peripheral damage with signs of fibrosis in six cases. The pulmonary function objectified a severe restrictive ventilatory defect in all cases. Bronchoscopy showed a normal macroscopic appearance in all cases, the broncho-alveolar lavage was predominated by neutrophilic formula in four cases. SCL 70 antibodies were positive in four cases. All patients were treated by steroids with improvement of dyspnea and stabilization of radiographs. A patient had died in an array of acute respiratory failure and one patient was lost to follow-up. DILD in scleroderma is rare and seldom reveals the disease, it affects the patient's prognosis especially when associated with arterial pulmonary hypertension. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. X-ray analysis in lung leptospira disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Shiyong; Peng Shi; He Guoman

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analysis the X-ray signs and subtype of the lung leptospira disease, and improve the undersdand, reduce the error diagnosis of this diseases. Methods: 40 cases of lung leptospira disease were evaluated about the check X-ray sings and clinical data, the check X-ray sings were dynamic observated and typed, and 40 cases had a diagnostic treatment. Results: There were various X-ray changes of lung leptospira disease. in 40 cases, 12 cases (30%) pulmonary marking, 21 cases (52%) little lesions, and 7 cases(18%) lager lesions, respectively. The patients who were correctly diagnosed made a recovery after effective treatment, the patients who were error diagnosed died because of multiple system organ damage. Conclusion: The check X-ray signs in lung leptospira disease have some characteristics. It may play an important role in improving this disease' diagnosis combining the dynamic observation of check X-ray sings with clinical data. (authors)

  16. Significance of the microbiome in obstructive lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Meilan K; Huang, Yvonne J; Lipuma, John J; Boushey, Homer A; Boucher, Richard C; Cookson, William O; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Erb-Downward, John; Lynch, Susan V; Sethi, Sanjay; Toews, Galen B; Young, Vincent B; Wolfgang, Matthew C; Huffnagle, Gary B; Martinez, Fernando J

    2012-05-01

    The composition of the lung microbiome contributes to both health and disease, including obstructive lung disease. Because it has been estimated that over 70% of the bacterial species on body surfaces cannot be cultured by currently available techniques, traditional culture techniques are no longer the gold standard for microbial investigation. Advanced techniques that identify bacterial sequences, including the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, have provided new insights into the depth and breadth of microbiota present both in the diseased and normal lung. In asthma, the composition of the microbiome of the lung and gut during early childhood development may play a key role in the development of asthma, while specific airway microbiota are associated with chronic asthma in adults. Early bacterial stimulation appears to reduce asthma susceptibility by helping the immune system develop lifelong tolerance to innocuous antigens. By contrast, perturbations in the microbiome from antibiotic use may increase the risk for asthma development. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bacterial colonisation has been associated with a chronic bronchitic phenotype, increased risk of exacerbations, and accelerated loss of lung function. In cystic fibrosis, studies utilising culture-independent methods have identified associations between decreased bacterial community diversity and reduced lung function; colonisation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been associated with the presence of certain CFTR mutations. Genomic analysis of the lung microbiome is a young field, but has the potential to define the relationship between lung microbiome composition and disease course. Whether we can manipulate bacterial communities to improve clinical outcomes remains to be seen.

  17. Smoking related idiopathic interstitial pneumonia: Results of an ERS/ATS Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Kevin R.; Fell, Charlene; Aubry, Marie-Christine; Brown, Kevin; Colby, Thomas; Costabel, Ulrich; Franks, Teri J.; Gross, Barry H; Hansell, David M.; Kazerooni, Ella; Kim, Dong Soon; King, Talmadge E.; Kitachi, Masanori; Lynch, David; Myers, Jeff; Nagai, Sonoko; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Poletti, Venerino; Raghu, Ganesh; Selman, Moises; Toews, Galen; Travis, William; Wells, Athol U.; Vassallo, Robert; Martinez, Fernando J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is a key factor in the development of numerous pulmonary diseases. Methods An international group of clinicians, radiologists, and pathologists evaluated patients with previously identified idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) to determine unique features of cigarette smoking. Phase 1 (derivation group) identified smoking related features in patients with a history of smoking (n=41). Phase 2 (validation group) determined if these features correctly predicted the smoking status of IIP patients (n=100) to participants blinded to smoking history. Finally, investigators sought to determine if a new smoking-related interstitial lung disease phenotype could be defined. Results Phase 1 suggested that preserved forced vital capacity with disproportionately reduced DLCO, various radiographic and histopathologic findings were smoking related features. In Phase 2 the kappa among clinicians was 0.16 (95% CI 0.11 – 0.21), among the pathologists 0.36 (95% CI 0.32 – 0.34) and among the radiologists 0.43 (95% CI 0.35 – 0.52) for smoking related features. Eight of the 100 cases were felt to represent a potential smoking related interstitial lung disease. Conclusion Smoking related features of interstitial lung disease were identified in a minority of smokers and are not specific for smoking. This study is limited by its retrospective design and the potential for recall bias of smoking history and lack of information on second had smoke exposure. Further research is needed to understand the relationship between smoking and interstitial lung disease. PMID:25063244

  18. Estimation of pulmonary hypertension in lung and valvular heart diseases by perfusion lung scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tadashige; Tanaka, Masao; Yazaki, Yoshikazu; Kitabayashi, Hirosi; Koizumi, Tomonori; Kubo, Keisi; Sekiguchi, Morie; Yano, Kesato

    1999-01-01

    To estimate pulmonary hypertension, we measured postural differences in pulmonary blood flow for the lateral decubitus positions on perfusion lung scintigrams with Tc-99 m macro-aggregated albumin, applying the method devised by Tanaka et al (Eur J Nucl Med 17: 320-326, 1990). Utilizing a scintillation camera coupled to a minicomputer system, changes in the distribution of pulmonary blood flow caused by gravitational effects, namely, changes in the total count ratios for the right lung versus the left lung in the right and left lateral decubitus positions (R/L), were obtained for 44 patients with lung disease, 95 patients with valvular heart disease, and 23 normal subjects. Mean standard deviation in the R/L ratios was 3.09±1.28 for the normal subjects, 1.97±0.89 for the patients with lung disease, and 1.59±0.59 for the patients with valvular heart disease. The R/L ratios correlated with mean pulmonary arterial pressure and cardio-thoracic ratios in the lung disease and valvular heart disease groups, with pulmonary arteriolar resistance in the former, and with pulmonary capillary wedge pressure in the latter. Defining pulmonary hypertension (>20 mmHg) as an R/L ratio of less than 1.81, which is the mean-1 standard deviation for normal subjects, the sensitivity and the specificity of the R/L ratio for the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension were 62.9% and 76.2%, respectively, for the lung disease patients, and 80.3% and 61.8%, respectively, for the valvular heart disease patients. This method seems to be useful for the pathophysiologic evaluation of pulmonary perfusion in cases of lung disease and valvular heart disease. (author)

  19. Combined prednisolone and pirfenidone in bleomycin-induced lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preyas J Vaidya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleomycin is a cytostatic drug commonly employed in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease, seminomas, and choriocarcinoma. Bleomycin may induce a chronic pulmonary inflammation that may progress to fibrosis. So far, only corticosteroids have been used in the treatment of bleomycin-induced lung disease with variable results. Pirfenidone is an antifibrotic drug that has been approved for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We report two cases of bleomycin-induced lung disease treated successfully with pirfenidone and oral corticosteroids.

  20. Extracellular matrix in lung development, homeostasis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Horowitz, Jeffrey C; Naba, Alexandra; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Atabai, Kamran; Balestrini, Jenna; Bitterman, Peter B; Corley, Richard A; Ding, Bi-Sen; Engler, Adam J; Hansen, Kirk C; Hagood, James S; Kheradmand, Farrah; Lin, Qing S; Neptune, Enid; Niklason, Laura; Ortiz, Luis A; Parks, William C; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; White, Eric S; Chapman, Harold A; Thannickal, Victor J

    2018-03-08

    The lung's unique extracellular matrix (ECM), while providing structural support for cells, is critical in the regulation of developmental organogenesis, homeostasis and injury-repair responses. The ECM, via biochemical or biomechanical cues, regulates diverse cell functions, fate and phenotype. The composition and function of lung ECM become markedly deranged in pathological tissue remodeling. ECM-based therapeutics and bioengineering approaches represent promising novel strategies for regeneration/repair of the lung and treatment of chronic lung diseases. In this review, we assess the current state of lung ECM biology, including fundamental advances in ECM composition, dynamics, topography, and biomechanics; the role of the ECM in normal and aberrant lung development, adult lung diseases and autoimmunity; and ECM in the regulation of the stem cell niche. We identify opportunities to advance the field of lung ECM biology and provide a set recommendations for research priorities to advance knowledge that would inform novel approaches to the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of chronic lung diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Sex Differences and Sex Steroids in Lung Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Elizabeth A.; Miller, Virginia M.

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in the biology of different organ systems and the influence of sex hormones in modulating health and disease are increasingly relevant in clinical and research areas. Although work has focused on sex differences and sex hormones in cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and neuronal systems, there is now increasing clinical evidence for sex differences in incidence, morbidity, and mortality of lung diseases including allergic diseases (such as asthma), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pulmonary fibrosis, lung cancer, as well as pulmonary hypertension. Whether such differences are inherent and/or whether sex steroids play a role in modulating these differences is currently under investigation. The purpose of this review is to define sex differences in lung structure/function under normal and specific disease states, with exploration of whether and how sex hormone signaling mechanisms may explain these clinical observations. Focusing on adult age groups, the review addresses the following: 1) inherent sex differences in lung anatomy and physiology; 2) the importance of certain time points in life such as puberty, pregnancy, menopause, and aging; 3) expression and signaling of sex steroid receptors under normal vs. disease states; 4) potential interplay between different sex steroids; 5) the question of whether sex steroids are beneficial or detrimental to the lung; and 6) the potential use of sex steroid signaling as biomarkers and therapeutic avenues in lung diseases. The importance of focusing on sex differences and sex steroids in the lung lies in the increasing incidence of lung diseases in women and the need to address lung diseases across the life span. PMID:22240244

  2. Pulmonary hypertension associated with lung diseases and hypoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttica, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary hypertension that develops in the setting of underlying lung diseases such as COPD or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is associated with decreased functional status, worsening hypoxemia and quality of life, and increased mortality. This complication of lung disease is complex in its origin and carries a unique set of diagnostic and therapeutic issues. This review attempts to provide an overview of mechanisms associated with the onset of pulmonary hypertension in COPD and IPF, touches on appropriate evaluation, and reviews the state of knowledge on treating pulmonary hypertension related to underlying lung disease.

  3. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Multiple cystic lung disease in an adolescent boy | Sogut | Pan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CT scanning of thorax is more sensitive than chest radiography in the detection and the distribution of lung cysts. Patients with cystic lung disease may be asymptomatic or present with nonspecific symptoms, such as chronic cough or shortness of breath. They are at increased risk for spontaneous pneumothorax. Surgical ...

  5. Is Previous Respiratory Disease a Risk Factor for Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denholm, Rachel; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt; Stücker, Isabelle; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Brenner, Darren R.; De Matteis, Sara; Boffetta, Paolo; Guida, Florence; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Siemiatycki, Jack; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Zaridze, David; Field, John K.; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Dumitru, Rodica Stanescu; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Kendzia, Benjamin; Peters, Susan; Behrens, Thomas; Vermeulen, Roel; Brüning, Thomas; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Previous respiratory diseases have been associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Respiratory conditions often co-occur and few studies have investigated multiple conditions simultaneously. Objectives: Investigate lung cancer risk associated with chronic bronchitis, emphysema, tuberculosis, pneumonia, and asthma. Methods: The SYNERGY project pooled information on previous respiratory diseases from 12,739 case subjects and 14,945 control subjects from 7 case–control studies conducted in Europe and Canada. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to investigate the relationship between individual diseases adjusting for co-occurring conditions, and patterns of respiratory disease diagnoses and lung cancer. Analyses were stratified by sex, and adjusted for age, center, ever-employed in a high-risk occupation, education, smoking status, cigarette pack-years, and time since quitting smoking. Measurements and Main Results: Chronic bronchitis and emphysema were positively associated with lung cancer, after accounting for other respiratory diseases and smoking (e.g., in men: odds ratio [OR], 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20–1.48 and OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.21–1.87, respectively). A positive relationship was observed between lung cancer and pneumonia diagnosed 2 years or less before lung cancer (OR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.33–4.70 for men), but not longer. Co-occurrence of chronic bronchitis and emphysema and/or pneumonia had a stronger positive association with lung cancer than chronic bronchitis “only.” Asthma had an inverse association with lung cancer, the association being stronger with an asthma diagnosis 5 years or more before lung cancer compared with shorter. Conclusions: Findings from this large international case–control consortium indicate that after accounting for co-occurring respiratory diseases, chronic bronchitis and emphysema continue to have a positive association with lung cancer. PMID:25054566

  6. Debilitating lung disease among surface coal miners with no underground mining tenure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldin, Cara N; Reed, William R; Joy, Gerald J; Colinet, Jay F; Rider, James P; Petsonk, Edward L; Abraham, Jerrold L; Wolfe, Anita L; Storey, Eileen; Laney, A Scott

    2015-01-01

    To characterize exposure histories and respiratory disease among surface coal miners identified with progressive massive fibrosis from a 2010 to 2011 pneumoconiosis survey. Job history, tenure, and radiograph interpretations were verified. Previous radiographs were reviewed when available. Telephone follow-up sought additional work and medical history information. Among eight miners who worked as drill operators or blasters for most of their tenure (median, 35.5 years), two reported poor dust control practices, working in visible dust clouds as recently as 2012. Chest radiographs progressed to progressive massive fibrosis in as few as 11 years. One miner's lung biopsy demonstrated fibrosis and interstitial accumulation of macrophages containing abundant silica, aluminum silicate, and titanium dust particles. Overexposure to respirable silica resulted in progressive massive fibrosis among current surface coal miners with no underground mining tenure. Inadequate dust control during drilling/blasting is likely an important etiologic factor.

  7. Lung cancer in Hodgkin's disease: association with previous radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    List, A.F.; Doll, D.C.; Greco, F.A.

    1985-01-01

    Seven cases of lung cancer were observed in patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) since 1970. The risk ratio for the development of lung cancer among HD patients was 5.6 times that expected in the general population. The pertinent clinical data from these patients are described and compared to 28 additional patients reported from other institutions. Small-cell lung cancer represented the predominant histologic type of lung cancer encountered in both smoking and nonsmoking patients with HD, accounting for 42% of cases overall and greater than 55% of cases reported in reviews of second malignancies. Tobacco use was noted in only 53% of patients. Twenty-eight (94%) of 30 patients developing metachronous lung cancer received supradiaphragmatic irradiation as primary therapy for HD. Nineteen (68%) of these patients received subsequent chemotherapy salvage. The median age at diagnosis of HD and lung cancer was 39 and 45 years, respectively. The interval between diagnosis of HD and metachronous lung cancer averaged seven years but appeared to vary inversely with age. HD patients treated with supradiaphragmatic irradiation or combined modality therapy may be at increased risk for developing lung cancer. The high frequency of in-field malignancies that the authors observed and the prevalence of small-cell lung cancer in both smoking and nonsmoking patients suggests that chest irradiation may influence the development of metachronous lung cancer in these patients. The finding of a mean latent interval in excess of seven years emphasizes the need for close long-term observation

  8. Is the diet of patients with interstitial cystitis related to their disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bade, JJ; Peeters, JMC; Mensink, HJA

    1997-01-01

    Objective: The dietary habits of interstitial cystitis (IC) patients compared to the average food and fluid consumption of the general population were evaluated and any spontaneous preference or avoidance of specific foodstuffs and fluids of IC patients was investigated. Methods: A verbal interview

  9. Collagenolytic Matrix Metalloproteinases in Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denzel Woode

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and lung cancer result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to the role of environmental smoke exposure in the development of both diseases, recent epidemiological studies suggests a connection between the development of COPD and lung cancer. Furthermore, individuals with concomitant COPD and cancer have a poor prognosis when compared with individuals with lung cancer alone. The modulation of molecular pathways activated during emphysema likely lead to an increased susceptibility to lung tumor growth and metastasis. This review summarizes what is known in the literature examining the molecular pathways affecting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs in this process as well as external factors such as smoke exposure that have an impact on tumor growth and metastasis. Increased expression of MMPs provides a unifying link between lung cancer and COPD.

  10. Collagenolytic Matrix Metalloproteinases in Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease and Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woode, Denzel; Shiomi, Takayuki; D’Armiento, Jeanine, E-mail: jmd12@cumc.columbia.edu [Department of Anesthesiology, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10033 (United States)

    2015-02-05

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to the role of environmental smoke exposure in the development of both diseases, recent epidemiological studies suggests a connection between the development of COPD and lung cancer. Furthermore, individuals with concomitant COPD and cancer have a poor prognosis when compared with individuals with lung cancer alone. The modulation of molecular pathways activated during emphysema likely lead to an increased susceptibility to lung tumor growth and metastasis. This review summarizes what is known in the literature examining the molecular pathways affecting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in this process as well as external factors such as smoke exposure that have an impact on tumor growth and metastasis. Increased expression of MMPs provides a unifying link between lung cancer and COPD.

  11. What Are Asbestos-Related Lung Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor will insert a thin needle or plastic tube into the space between your lungs and ... Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility Copyright and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Building 31 ...

  12. Multicentre evaluation of multidisciplinary team meeting agreement on diagnosis in diffuse parenchymal lung disease: a case-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Simon L F; Wells, Athol U; Desai, Sujal R; Poletti, Venerino; Piciucchi, Sara; Dubini, Alessandra; Nunes, Hilario; Valeyre, Dominique; Brillet, Pierre Y; Kambouchner, Marianne; Morais, António; Pereira, José M; Moura, Conceição Souto; Grutters, Jan C; van den Heuvel, Daniel A; van Es, Hendrik W; van Oosterhout, Matthijs F; Seldenrijk, Cornelis A; Bendstrup, Elisabeth; Rasmussen, Finn; Madsen, Line B; Gooptu, Bibek; Pomplun, Sabine; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuoka, Junya; Johkoh, Takeshi; Nicholson, Andrew G; Sayer, Charlie; Edmunds, Lilian; Jacob, Joseph; Kokosi, Maria A; Myers, Jeffrey L; Flaherty, Kevin R; Hansell, David M

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse parenchymal lung disease represents a diverse and challenging group of pulmonary disorders. A consistent diagnostic approach to diffuse parenchymal lung disease is crucial if clinical trial data are to be applied to individual patients. We aimed to evaluate inter-multidisciplinary team agreement for the diagnosis of diffuse parenchymal lung disease. We did a multicentre evaluation of clinical data of patients who presented to the interstitial lung disease unit of the Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust (London, UK; host institution) and required multidisciplinary team meeting (MDTM) characterisation between March 1, 2010, and Aug 31, 2010. Only patients whose baseline clinical, radiological, and, if biopsy was taken, pathological data were undertaken at the host institution were included. Seven MDTMs, consisting of at least one clinician, radiologist, and pathologist, from seven countries (Denmark, France, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Portugal, and the UK) evaluated cases of diffuse parenchymal lung disease in a two-stage process between Jan 1, and Oct 15, 2015. First, the clinician, radiologist, and pathologist (if lung biopsy was completed) independently evaluated each case, selected up to five differential diagnoses from a choice of diffuse lung diseases, and chose likelihoods (censored at 5% and summing to 100% in each case) for each of their differential diagnoses, without inter-disciplinary consultation. Second, these specialists convened at an MDTM and reviewed all data, selected up to five differential diagnoses, and chose diagnosis likelihoods. We compared inter-observer and inter-MDTM agreements on patient first-choice diagnoses using Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ). We then estimated inter-observer and inter-MDTM agreement on the probability of diagnosis using weighted kappa coefficient (κw). We compared inter-observer and inter-MDTM confidence of patient first-choice diagnosis. Finally, we evaluated the prognostic significance of a

  13. Regional distribution of ventilation-perfusion ratio in patients with interstitial pneumonia using Kr-81m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Hiroshi; Kawakami, Kenji; Shimada, Takao

    1983-01-01

    In order to know the pathophysiological change of interstitial pneumonia, it is important to detect the morphological change of vascular and air way systems in the lung. The study group consisted of 12 patients of interstitial pneumonia including IIP, PSS, RA, sarcoidosis, and hypersensitive pneumonia. The Kr-81m bolus inhalation from 3 different lung volumes were analyzed to detect regional ventilation abnormalities. The regional distribution of ventilation-perfusion ratio (V/Q) in the lung was obtained from the continuous inhalation and infusion Kr-81 m. In 7 patients, regional distribution of V/Q was also measured at rest and during exercise. In advanced stage of interstitial pneumonia, radioactivity in lower lung fields was decreased in bolus inhalation from TLC-400 ml lung volume, and present in lower lung in bolus inhalation from RV level. These findings are representing air way rigidity especially in lower lung fields. However, in early stage or reversible cases, it is difficult to detect the abnormal distribution of radioactivity in lung, in spite of decreased PO 2 . So it seems impossible to screen early stage or reversible cases of interstitial pneumonia by bolus inhalation method alone. At rest for normal subjects in the upright position, the apical zone had a high V/Q, but in the lower parts two third of V/Q distribution was relatively homogeneous. During exercise at 50W, the distribution became more uniform. In most cases of the disease, weak exercise (less than 40W) produced the same uniform V/Q distribution. It should be noted that in the disease not only was perfusion in upper lung fields increased, but that perfusion of lower lung fields was reduced. So late in the cource of extension of the disease, pulmonary vascular bed in the lower lung fields is restricted.(J.P.N.)

  14. Epimorphin expression in interstitial pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suga Moritaka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epimorphin modulates epithelial morphogenesis in embryonic mouse organs. We previously suggested that epimorphin contributes to repair of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice via epithelium-mesenchyme interactions. To clarify the role of epimorphin in human lungs, we evaluated epimorphin expression and localization in normal lungs, lungs with nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP, and lungs with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP; we also studied the effect of recombinant epimorphin on cultured human alveolar epithelial cells in vitro. Northern and Western blotting analyses revealed that epimorphin expression in NSIP samples were significantly higher than those in control lungs and lungs with UIP. Immunohistochemistry showed strong epimorphin expression in mesenchymal cells of early fibrotic lesions and localization of epimorphin protein on mesenchymal cells and extracellular matrix of early fibrotic lesions in the nonspecific interstitial pneumonia group. Double-labeled fluorescent images revealed expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 in re-epithelialized cells overlying epimorphin-positive early fibrotic lesions. Immunohistochemistry and metalloproteinase activity assay demonstrated augmented expression of metalloproteinase induced by recombinant epimorphin in human alveolar epithelial cells. These findings suggest that epimorphin contributes to repair of pulmonary fibrosis in nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, perhaps partly by inducing expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2, which is an important proteolytic factor in lung remodeling.

  15. CLINICAL EVALUATION OF THE MANIFESTATIONS OF INTERSTITIAL LUNG INJURYIN SYSTEMIC SCLERODERMA FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION COMPUTER T OMOGRAPHY DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L P Anan'eva

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion. Chest HRCT reveals the characteristic symptoms of ILI and reflects different phases of a fibrosing process in the lung. It is essential to make an in-depth examination using HRCT in all patients with SDD, irrespective of its clinical form in the earliest periods for the timely detection and treatment of ILI.

  16. Human CD56+ cytotoxic lung lymphocytes kill autologous lung cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Freeman

    Full Text Available CD56+ natural killer (NK and CD56+ T cells, from sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage of subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are more cytotoxic to highly susceptible NK targets than those from control subjects. Whether the same is true in lung parenchyma, and if NK activity actually contributes to emphysema progression are unknown. To address these questions, we performed two types of experiments on lung tissue from clinically-indicated resections (n = 60. First, we used flow cytometry on fresh single-cell suspension to measure expression of cell-surface molecules (CD56, CD16, CD8, NKG2D and NKp44 on lung lymphocytes and of the 6D4 epitope common to MICA and MICB on lung epithelial (CD326+ cells. Second, we sequentially isolated CD56+, CD8+ and CD4+ lung lymphocytes, co-cultured each with autologous lung target cells, then determined apoptosis of individual target cells using Annexin-V and 7-AAD staining. Lung NK cells (CD56+ CD3- and CD56+ T cells (CD56+ CD3+ were present in a range of frequencies that did not differ significantly between smokers without COPD and subjects with COPD. Lung NK cells had a predominantly "cytotoxic" CD56+ CD16+ phenotype; their co-expression of CD8 was common, but the percentage expressing CD8 fell as FEV1 % predicted decreased. Greater expression by autologous lung epithelial cells of the NKG2D ligands, MICA/MICB, but not expression by lung CD56+ cells of the activating receptor NKG2D, correlated inversely with FEV1 % predicted. Lung CD56+ lymphocytes, but not CD4+ or CD8+ conventional lung T cells, rapidly killed autologous lung cells without additional stimulation. Such natural cytotoxicity was increased in subjects with severe COPD and was unexplained in multiple regression analysis by age or cancer as indication for surgery. These data show that as spirometry worsens in COPD, CD56+ lung lymphocytes exhibit spontaneous cytotoxicity of autologous structural lung cells, supporting their

  17. Lung cancer in never smokers: disease characteristics and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallis, Athanasios G; Syrigos, Konstantinos N

    2013-12-01

    It is estimated that approximately 25% of all lung cancer cases are observed in never-smokers and its incidence is expected to increase due to smoking prevention programs. Risk factors for the development of lung cancer described include second-hand smoking, radon exposure, occupational exposure to carcinogens and to cooking oil fumes and indoor coal burning. Other factors reported are infections (HPV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis), hormonal and diatery factors and diabetes mellitus. Having an affected relative also increases the risk for lung cancer while recent studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with increased risk for lung cancer development in never smokers. Distinct clinical, pathology and molecular characteristics are observed in lung cancer in never smokers; more frequently is observed in females and adenocarcinoma is the predominant histology while it has a different pattern of molecular alterations. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of this disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Empowering women to tackle cattle lung disease

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    being trained on the new, cutting edge technologies in Canada. Empowering women to tackle cattle lung ... family's nutrition. We would like our cattle to be vaccinated so that we do not lose milk and the income we get from sales of milk. Halima Omar, Hidaya. Enhanced participation of women smallholder farmers in vaccine.

  19. Autopsy findings in a case of a small cell lung cancer complicated by radiotherapy induced acute interstitial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeki, Shigenori; Hirokawa, Mitsuyoshi

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe the case of a 71-year-old man who had been referred to his hospital because of a dry cough and an associated abnormality that had been detected by x-ray. Based on chest x-ray evaluations and the endoscopic bronchial biopsy findings the diagnosis was a small cell lung cancer. The patient thus received a 2 time regimen of cisplatin chemotherapy and subsequent radiotherapy (40 Gy). Two weeks after this radiotherapy, however the patient complained of an increasing dyspnea. Two days later, he was readmitted to hospital because of pneumonia and severe dyspnea, but died of respiratory failure on the same day. The autopsy findings revealed diffuse organized alveolar duct damage that had been induced by radiotherapy directed toward a relatively large area that included the right lower lung and the mediastinum. (author)

  20. Computed Tomography Measure of Lung at Risk and Lung Function Decline in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Surya P; Bodduluri, Sandeep; Hoffman, Eric A; Newell, John D; Sieren, Jessica C; Dransfield, Mark T; Reinhardt, Joseph M

    2017-09-01

    The rate of decline of lung function is greater than age-related change in a substantial proportion of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, even after smoking cessation. Regions of the lung adjacent to emphysematous areas are subject to abnormal stretch during respiration, and this biomechanical stress likely influences emphysema initiation and progression. To assess whether quantifying this penumbra of lung at risk would predict FEV 1 decline. We analyzed paired inspiratory-expiratory computed tomography images at baseline of 680 subjects participating in a large multicenter study (COPDGene) over approximately 5 years. By matching inspiratory and expiratory images voxel by voxel using image registration, we calculated the Jacobian determinant, a measure of local lung expansion and contraction with respiration. We measured the distance between each normal voxel to the nearest emphysematous voxel, and quantified the percentage of normal voxels within each millimeter distance from emphysematous voxels as mechanically affected lung (MAL). Multivariable regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between the Jacobian determinant, MAL, and FEV 1 decline. The mean (SD) rate of decline in FEV 1 was 39.0 (58.6) ml/yr. There was a progressive decrease in the mean Jacobian determinant of both emphysematous and normal voxels with increasing disease stage (P < 0.001). On multivariable analyses, the mean Jacobian determinant of normal voxels within 2 mm of emphysematous voxels (MAL 2 ) was significantly associated with FEV 1 decline. In mild-moderate disease, for participants at or above the median MAL 2 (threshold, 36.9%), the mean decline in FEV 1 was 56.4 (68.0) ml/yr versus 43.2 (59.9) ml/yr for those below the median (P = 0.044). Areas of normal-appearing lung are mechanically influenced by emphysematous areas and this lung at risk is associated with lung function decline. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT

  1. Total lung capacity estimation: comparison of radiologic and helium dilution methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, J.P.; Katariya, S.; Behera, D.; Malik, S.K.; Bansal, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    The accuracy of radiologic method in determining total lung capacity (TLC) was assessed by correlating radiologic TLC values with those obtained by helium dlution method. Total lung capacity was estimated by both the methods in 60 normal healthy adult subjects and 30 patients of obstructive and restrictive lung diseases. Excellent correlation was found between these two methods in case of normal subjects and interstitial lung disease patients. No correlation however, was found in chronic obstructive airways disease patients. (author). 17 refs

  2. Role of Apoptosis in Amplifying Inflammatory Responses in Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.P. Schmidt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is an important contributor to the pathophysiology of lung diseases such as acute lung injury (ALI and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Furthermore, the cellular environment of these acute and chronic lung diseases favors the delayed clearance of apoptotic cells. This dysfunctional efferocytosis predisposes to the release of endogenous ligands from dying cells. These so-called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs play an important role in the stimulation of innate immunity as well as in the induction of adaptive immunity, potentially against autoantigens. In this review, we explore the role of apoptosis in ALI and COPD, with particular attention to the contribution of DAMP release in augmenting the inflammatory response in these disease states.

  3. Microbiome effects on immunity, health and disease in the lung

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, Shakti D; Budden, Kurtis F; Neal, Rachael; Hansbro, Philip M

    2017-01-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis (CF), are among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. In the past decade, the interest in the role of microbiome in maintaining lung health and in respiratory diseases has grown exponentially. The advent of sophisticated multiomics techniques has enabled the identification and characterisation of microbiota and their roles in respiratory health and disease. Furth...

  4. Speech characteristics of miners with black lung disease (pneumoconiosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, H R

    1975-06-01

    Speech samples were obtained from 10 miners with diagnosed black lung disease and 10 nonminers who had never worked in a dusty environment and who had no history of respiratory diseases. Frequency, intensity and durational measures were used as a basis upon which to compare the two groups. Results indicated that four of the six pausal measures, vowel duration, vowel intensity variation and vowel perturbation differentiated the miners from the nonminers. The results indicate that black lung disease may affect not only respiratory physiology associated with speech production but also laryngeal physiology.

  5. Cellular senescence in normal and premature lung aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartling, B

    2013-10-01

    The incidence of chronic respiratory diseases (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, COPD) and interstitial lung diseases (e.g., pneumonia and lung fibrosis) increases with age. In addition to immune senescence, the accumulation of senescent cells directly in lung tissue might play a critical role in the increased prevalence of these pulmonary diseases. In the last couple of years, detailed studies have identified the presence of senescent cells in the aging lung and in diseased lungs of patients with COPD and lung fibrosis. Cellular senescence has been shown for epithelial cells of bronchi and alveoli as well as mesenchymal and vascular cells. Known risk factors for pulmonary diseases (cigarette smoke, air pollutions, bacterial infections, etc.) were identified in experimental studies as being possible mediators in the development of cellular senescence. The present findings indicate the importance of cellular senescence in normal lung aging and in premature aging of the lung in patients with COPD, lung fibrosis, and probably other respiratory diseases.

  6. Interstitial Cystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bathroom at scheduled times and using relaxation techniques. Physical therapy. People who have interstitial cystitis may have painful spasms of pelvic floor muscles. If you have muscle spasms, you can ...

  7. Heterozygous Loss-of-Function SEC61A1 Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Tubulo-Interstitial and Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease with Anemia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bolar, N. A.; Golzio, C.; Živná, M.; Hayot, G.; Van Hemelrijk, C.; Schepers, D.; Vandeweyer, G.; Hoischen, A.; Huyghe, J. R.; Raes, A.; Matthys, E.; Sys, E.; Azou, M.; Gubler, M. C.; Praet, M.; Van Camp, G.; McFadden, K.; Pediaditakis, I.; Přistoupilová, A.; Hodaňová, K.; Vyleťal, P.; Hartmannová, H.; Stránecký, V.; Hůlková, H.; Barešová, V.; Jedličková, I.; Sovová, J.; Hnízda, Aleš; Kidd, K.; Bleyer, A. J.; Spong, R. S.; Vande Walle, J.; Mortier, G.; Brunner, H.; Van Laer, L.; Kmoch, S.; Katsanis, N.; Loeys, B. L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 1 (2016), s. 174-187 ISSN 0002-9297 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Sec61 * tubulo-interstitial kidney disease * rare disease Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.025, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0002929716301999

  8. Airway-centered interstitial fibrosis: etiology, clinical findings and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranishi, Lilian Tiemi; Leslie, Kevin O; Ferreira, Rimarcs Gomes; Coletta, Ester Aparecida Ney; Storrer, Karin Mueller; Soares, Maria Raquel; de Castro Pereira, Carlos Alberto

    2015-05-09

    Airway-centered Interstitial Fibrosis (ACIF) is a common pathologic pattern observed in our practice. The objectives of this study are to describe the causes associated with ACIF in a large sample of patients and its effect on survival. A retrospective study in three centers of interstitial lung disease in São Paulo, between January of 1995 and December of 2012. The surgical lung biopsy specimens were reviewed by three pathologists. The clinical, functional and tomographic findings were analyzed by a standardized protocol. There were 68 cases of ACIF, most of them women. The mean age was 57 ± 12 yr. Dyspnea, cough, restrictive pattern at spirometry and oxygen desaturation at exercise were common. A reticular pattern with peribronchovascular infiltrates was found in 79% of the cases. The etiologies of ACIF were hypersensitivity pneumonitis in 29 (42.6%), gastroesophageal reflux disease in 17 (25.0%), collagen vascular disease in 4 (5.9%), a combination of them in 15 cases and idiopathic in 3 (4.4%). The median survival was 116 months (95% CI = 58.5 - 173.5). Lower values of oxygen saturation at rest, presence of cough and some histological findings--organizing tissue in the airways, fibroblastic foci and microscopic honeycombing--were predictors of worse survival. ACIF is an interstitial lung disease with a better survival when compared with IPF. The main etiologies are HP and GERD. The oxygen saturation at rest, the presence of cough and some histological findings are predictors of survival.

  9. Cobalt exposure and lung disease in tungsten carbide production. A cross-sectional study of current workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprince, N.L.; Oliver, L.C.; Eisen, E.A.; Greene, R.E.; Chamberlin, R.I.

    1988-01-01

    A cross-sectional study of 1,039 tungsten carbide (TC) production workers was carried out. The purposes were (1) to evaluate the prevalence of interstitial lung disease (ILD) and work-related wheezing, (2) to assess correlations between cobalt exposure and pulmonary disease, (3) to compare lung disease in grinders of hard carbide versus nongrinders, and (4) to evaluate the effects of new and previous threshold limit values for cobalt of 50 and 100 micrograms/m3. We obtained medical and occupational histories, flow-volume loops, single breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO), and chest radiographs. Time-weighted average cobalt levels were determined at every step in the production process. Work-related wheeze occurred in 113 participants (10.9%). Profusion greater than or equal to 1/0 occurred in 26 (2.6%) and interstitial lung disease (defined as profusion greater than or equal to 1M, FVC or DLCO less than or equal to 70%, and FEV1/FVC% greater than or equal to 75) in 7 (0.7%). The relative odds of work-related wheeze was 2.1 times for present cobalt exposures exceeding 50 micrograms/m3 compared with exposures less than or equal to 50 micrograms/m3. The relative odds of profusion greater than or equal to 1/0 was 5.1 times for average lifetime cobalt exposures exceeding 100 micrograms/m3 compared with exposures less than or equal to 100 micrograms/m3 in those with latency exceeding 10 yr. ILD was found in three workers with very low average lifetime exposures (less than 8 micrograms/m3) and shorter latencies. Grinders of hard carbide had lower mean DLCO than nongrinders, even though their cobalt exposures were lower

  10. Lung disease and coal mining: what pulmonologists need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Leonard H T; Krefft, Silpa D; Cohen, Robert A; Rose, Cecile S

    2016-03-01

    Coal mine workers are at risk for a range of chronic respiratory diseases including coal workers' pneumoconiosis, diffuse dust-related fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The purpose of this review is to describe coal mining processes and associated exposures to inform the diagnostic evaluation of miners with respiratory symptoms. Although rates of coal workers' pneumoconiosis declined after regulations were enacted in the 1970s, more recent data shows a reversal in this downward trend. Rapidly progressive pneumoconiosis with progressive massive fibrosis (complicated coal workers' pneumoconiosis) is being observed with increased frequency in United States coal miners, with histologic findings of silicosis and mixed-dust pneumoconiosis. There is increasing evidence of decline in lung function in individuals with pneumoconiosis. Multiple recent cohort studies suggest increased risk of lung cancer in coal miners. A detailed understanding of coal mining methods and processes allows clinicians to better evaluate and confirm chronic lung diseases caused by inhalational hazards in the mine atmosphere.

  11. Cutaneous Vasculitis, Interstitial Pneumonia with Crazy-Paving Appearance, and Positive pANCA in a Patient with Severe Crohn's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-liang; Wang, Juan; Li, Li-mei; Mo, Han-you; Ye, Shuang

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous vasculitis, interstitial pneumonia with crazy-paving appearance on high-resolution computed tomography, and repeated positive perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA) are rarely found together in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in the existing literature. We report the case of a Chinese patient previously diagnosed with cutaneous vasculitis and interstitial pneumonia, who presented with acute pain and mass in his right lower quadrant a couple of years later. The terminal ileum biopsy and postoperative pathology confirmed Crohn's disease (CD). PMID:25371834

  12. Lung structure-respiratory function relationships in experimentally-induced bronchiolitis, bronchopneumonia and interstitial pneumonia in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauderly, J.L.; Madron, E. de; Harkema, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Histopathology and respiratory function of rats with three different types and distributions of lower lung inflammation were compared to better understand lung structure-function relationships. Rats were exposed 21 h/day for 7 days to 0.8 ppm ozone (O 3 ), sham-exposed as controls, or given 5 mg/kg bacterial endotoxin either intratracheally (ITE) or intraperitoneally (IPE). Respiratory function was measured 24 h after the end of treatment, than the rats were sacrificed and the distribution of inflammation was evaluated morphometrically. Chronic centriacinar inflammation with formation of new respiratory bronchioles caused an obstructive functional impairment in the O 3 rats, which was clearly distinguished from the restrictive impairments resulting from acute inflammation in ITE and IPE rats. Only the magnitudes of changes related to the distribution of inflammation differentiated the ITE and IPE groups. Flow parameters previously thought sensitive to large airway resistance were changed in the O 3 rats. Alveolar luminal inflammatory exudate affected quasistatic compliance more than septal inflammation in ITE and IPE rats. Quasistatic chord compliance was the most sensitive of three indices of pressure-volume relationships. The findings in this study improve the basis for interpreting respiratory function changes of rats. (author)

  13. Local immune-complexes and inflammatory response in patients with chronic interstitial pulmonary disorders associated with collagen vascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H. M.; Schutte, A. J. H.; Elema, J. D.; van der Giessen, M.; Reig, R. P.; van Leeuwen, M. A.; Sluiter, H. J.; The, T. Hauw

    Evidence is accumulating that the lung injury in collagen vascular diseases (CVD) is triggered by immune complexes (IC). These reactions are neutrophil- and complement-dependent. The direct, in vivo phagocytosis of IC by bronchoalveolar lavage polymorphonuclear leucocytes (BAL-PMN), was studied in

  14. Efficacy of Bronchial Washing and Brushing Cytology in the Diagnosis of Non-Neoplastic Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahil Giti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy is often the initial technique for diagnosis of lung and bronchial tumors. Many studies have shown the high accuracy rate of bronchial washing and brushing cytology in the evaluation of neoplastic and non-neoplastic bronchopulmonary lesions. The aim of this study is to emphasize the value of the bronchial cytologic findings for diagnosis of non-neoplastic bronchopulmonary lesions. In a cross-sectional study, we retrieved all cases with bronchial washing and brushing cytology from 21 Mach 2014 to 21 December 2015. The slides of 100 patients with negative cytological reports were reviewed and concomitantly correlated with history, physical examination, clinical and pathologic documents. The cases with insufficient clinical and pathological diagnostic documents were rejected. The results classified in subgroups according to final diagnosis and cytological findings were discussed. We evaluated 100 cases that were previously had negative cytological reports.60 cases were male, and 40 cases were female with male to female ratio: 6/4. The age range was between 21 to 88 with the mean age of 57 years. Regarding lung cancer, 31% of cases were false negative. Causes of these falsely negative reports were been errors in screening, low cellularity, unsatisfactory smears and poor fixation. 23% were known cases of tuberculosis with some cytological findings including inflammation, necrotic calcified deposits, multinucleated giant cell and reserve cell hyperplasia. 19% were pneumonic patients with smears demonstrating inflammation, curschmann’s spiral and reserve cell hyperplasia. Other non-neoplastic cases included in this study were asthma, granulomatous inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, sarcoidosis, Wegener, SLE, heart failure, hydatid cyst, interstitial lung disease, and end stage renal disease. Cytological specimens from patients underwent bronchoscopic washing and brushing should be carefully examined. In situations

  15. HRCT of the lung in collagen vascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederich, S.; Roos, N.; Schmitz-Linneweber, B.; Gaubitz, M.; Peters, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    Collagen vascular diseases, representing systemic soft tissue disorders, may cause a broad spectrum of pathologic changes of the respiratory tract. The type and extent of manifestations can vary considerably among individuals and entities. This survey describes the chest radiographic and, in particular, high-resolution computed tomographic and, in particular, high-resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) findings of individual lesions of the respiratory tract. It includes fibrosing alveolitis (alveolitis, interstitial pneumonia, pulmonary fibrosis) and bronchial (bronchitis/bronchiolitis, bronchiectasis), pleural and vascular manifestations, as well as lymphadenopathy and abnormalities related to therapy. We present typical patterns of changes in progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS, scleroderma), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD, Sharp syndrome), Sjoegren syndrome, overlap syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Furthermore, we describe findings which are specific for individual entities such as esophageal involvement in PSS, acute pneumonitis and pulmonary hemorrhage in SLE, lymphoproliferative disease in Sjoegren syndrome and necrobiotic nodules in RA. (orig.) [de

  16. Psychiatric Aspects of Lung Disease in Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Yelizaveta

    2017-07-01

    Respiratory conditions are some of the most common indications for admission to critical care units. Psychiatric disorders and symptoms are highly comorbid with lung disease. They can occur as a risk factor to lung disease, as a co-occurring condition, as a consequence of a pulmonary condition, or as a treatment side effect either from medications or assistive devices. Patients can experience a myriad of mood, anxiety, and cognitive disorder symptoms and conditions in critical care units. Intensivists and psychiatrists must be aware of the interplay between pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms as well as medication effects and interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Human Lung Mononuclear Phagocytes in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Smed-Sörensen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The lungs are vulnerable to attack by respiratory insults such as toxins, allergens, and pathogens, given their continuous exposure to the air we breathe. Our immune system has evolved to provide protection against an array of potential threats without causing collateral damage to the lung tissue. In order to swiftly detect invading pathogens, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs—together termed mononuclear phagocytes (MNPs—line the respiratory tract with the key task of surveying the lung microenvironment in order to discriminate between harmless and harmful antigens and initiate immune responses when necessary. Each cell type excels at specific tasks: monocytes produce large amounts of cytokines, macrophages are highly phagocytic, whereas DCs excel at activating naïve T cells. Extensive studies in murine models have established a division of labor between the different populations of MNPs at steady state and during infection or inflammation. However, a translation of important findings in mice is only beginning to be explored in humans, given the challenge of working with rare cells in inaccessible human tissues. Important progress has been made in recent years on the phenotype and function of human lung MNPs. In addition to a substantial population of alveolar macrophages, three subsets of DCs have been identified in the human airways at steady state. More recently, monocyte-derived cells have also been described in healthy human lungs. Depending on the source of samples, such as lung tissue resections or bronchoalveolar lavage, the specific subsets of MNPs recovered may differ. This review provides an update on existing studies investigating human respiratory MNP populations during health and disease. Often, inflammatory MNPs are found to accumulate in the lungs of patients with pulmonary conditions. In respiratory infections or inflammatory diseases, this may contribute to disease severity, but in cancer patients this may

  18. Regional Lung Sound Asynchrony in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineshita, Masamichi; Kida, Hirotaka; Handa, Hiroshi; Nishine, Hiroki; Furuya, Naoki; Inoue, Takeo; Matsuoka, Shin; Miyazawa, Teruomi

    2016-01-01

    Regional lung sound distribution in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is reported to be asynchronous. Mathematical analyses using vibration response imaging (VRI), such as left and right lung asynchrony (gap index; GI) and regional lung asynchrony (asynchrony score; AS), are useful measures to evaluate lung sound asynchrony. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of lung sound asynchrony with pulmonary functions and emphysematous lesions in COPD patients. VRI recordings and pulmonary function tests were performed in 46 stable male COPD patients and in 40 healthy male smokers. Lung sound asynchrony was evaluated using GI, AS of the left and right lung (AS L-R), and AS of the upper and lower lung (AS U-L). In 38 patients, computed tomography taken within 6 months was available and analyzed. AS L-R and AS U-L were significantly higher in COPD patients than in healthy smokers, with no significant difference in GI. There were no significant correlations with either AS and pulmonary functions, excluding a negative correlation between AS U-L and diffusion capacity. Although there were no significant correlations between both AS and severity of emphysema, significant positive correlations were observed between heterogeneity of emphysematous lesions and AS L-R (ρ = 0.38, p < 0.05) or AS U-L (ρ = 0.51, p < 0.005). Regional lung sounds are distributed more asynchronously in COPD patients than in healthy smokers, which correlates with the heterogeneous distribution of emphysematous lesions. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Imaging of cystic fibrosis lung disease and clinical interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielpuetz, M.O.; Eichinger, M.; Kauczor, H.U. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine; Biederer, J. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Gross-Gerau Community Hospital (Germany). Radiologie Darmstadt; Wege, S. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Pulmonology and Respiratory Medicine; Stahl, M.; Sommerburg, O. [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Div. of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy and Cystic Fibrosis Center; Mall, M.A. [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Div. of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy and Cystic Fibrosis Center; Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Translational Pulmonology; Puderbach, M. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine; Hufeland Hospital, Bad Langensalza (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2016-09-15

    Progressive lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) is the life-limiting factor of this autosomal recessive genetic disorder. Increasing implementation of CF newborn screening allows for a diagnosis even in pre-symptomatic stages. Improvements in therapy have led to a significant improvement in survival, the majority now being of adult age. Imaging provides detailed information on the regional distribution of CF lung disease, hence longitudinal imaging is recommended for disease monitoring in the clinical routine. Chest X-ray (CXR), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are now available as routine modalities, each with individual strengths and drawbacks, which need to be considered when choosing the optimal modality adapted to the clinical situation of the patient. CT stands out with the highest morphological detail and has often been a substitute for CXR for regular severity monitoring at specialized centers. Multidetector CT data can be post-processed with dedicated software for a detailed measurement of airway dimensions and bronchiectasis and potentially a more objective and precise grading of disease severity. However, changing to CT was inseparably accompanied by an increase in radiation exposure of CF patients, a young population with high sensitivity to ionizing radiation and lifetime accumulation of dose. MRI as a cross-sectional imaging modality free of ionizing radiation can depict morphological hallmarks of CF lung disease at lower spatial resolution but excels with comprehensive functional lung imaging, with time-resolved perfusion imaging currently being most valuable.

  20. Lung Disease Associated With Marijuana Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatkin, José Miguel; Zabert, Gustavo; Zabert, Ignacio; Chatkin, Gustavo; Jiménez-Ruiz, Carlos Andrés; de Granda-Orive, Jose Ignacio; Buljubasich, Daniel; Solano Reina, Segismundo; Figueiredo, Ana; Ravara, Sofia; Riesco Miranda, Juan Antonio; Gratziou, Christina

    2017-09-01

    Marijuana is the most widely usedillegal drug in the world, with a prevalence of 2.5%-5%, and the second most commonly smoked substance after tobacco. The components of smoke from combustion of marijuana are similar to those produced by the combustion of tobacco, but they differ in terms of psychoactive components and use. Inhalation of cannabis smoke affects the respiratory tract, so the available evidence must be updated in order to provide pulmonologists with the latest scientific information. In this article, we review the impact of cannabis consumption on the lungs, taking into account that the respiratory route is the most popular route of cannabis consumption. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional outcomes after lung transplant in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón Navarro, José; de Aguiar Quevedo, Karol; Ansótegui Barrera, Emilio; Jordá Aragón, Carlos; Peñalver Cuesta, Juan Carlos; Mancheño Franch, Nuria; Vera Sempere, Francisco José; Padilla Alarcón, Jose

    2015-03-01

    Lung transplantation (LT) is a therapeutic option with controversial results in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We aimed to analyze the outcomes of transplantation in terms of lung function and to identify prognostic factors. A retrospective analysis of 107 patients with COPD receiving lung transplants in the La Fe Hospital between 1991 and 2008 was performed. Preoperative variables, pulmonary function tests before and after LT, surgical procedure variables and long-term monitoring, expressed as mean or percentage, as applicable, were analyzed. Spirometric results before and after LT were analyzed. Linear or logistic regression were used for multivariate analysis depending on the variable. Ninety-four men (87.9%) and 13 women (12.1%) were transplanted, with a mean age±standard deviation of 52.58±8.05 years; 71% of LTs were double-lung transplantations. Spirometric values improved after LT: FVC: +1.22L (+34.9%), FEV1: +1.66L (+56.7%) and FEF25-75: +1.85L (+50.8%); P=.001. This functional improvement was maintained after 5 years only in the group with BODE score >7 (P=.001). Recipient height, type of LT, use of extracorporeal circulation during the surgical procedure, presence of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and the age and cause of death of the donor significantly influenced lung function over time. LT improves lung function in COPD patients. This improvement was maintained at 5years only in patients with BODE>7. Double lung transplantation provides better functional results than single-lung transplantation. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Sickle Cell Chronic Lung Disease among Young Adult Nigerians ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Sickle cell chronic lung disease (SCLD) is often underappreciated by health care providers because its exact prevalence and methods of diagnosis ... admissions (82.4%, OR=10.02, CI=4.51–22.22) and presence of symptoms suggesting previous acute chest syndrome (dyspnoea in 58.8%, OR=33.33, ...

  3. Lung volume reduction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pathognomonic features of advanced emphysema include a markedly reduced alveolar surface area due to the formation of blebs and bullae and significantly reduced elastic recoil. The aim of lung volume reduction, which can be achieved by either surgery or endoscopic techniques, is volume loss of the targeted, diseased ...

  4. [Consumer surveys among hospitalized patients with lung disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humborstad, O T; Omenaas, E; Gulsvik, A

    2001-03-30

    The aim of our survey was to record the experiences of hospitalised patients with respiratory diseases in order to create a more patient-friendly department. Our study included 609 patients (response rate 70%) with a median age of 64 years (range 13-91) who were discharged from the Department of Thoracic Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital in October 1991, 1992, 1994, 1995 and 1996. 268 patients had obstructive lung disease, 82 had lung cancer. They answered a questionnaire with 24 questions. Patient reception to the ward and staff knowledge of the patients' illnesses, were for the physicians rated as good or better by 92% and 79% and for the nurses by 94% and 70% respectively. 16% of the patients experienced insecurity, 17% anxiety, 12% helplessness, 9% loneliness and 12% little say in the decision making process. Trend factors for these emotional experiences were female sex, old age, obstructive lung disease and long stay in hospital. Patients aged 50 to 69 years and patients with lung cancer had the lowest rate of negative emotional experiences. Despite staff awareness of the prevalence and of the patients' emotional experiences and the risk factors involved, there was no clear reduction of negative experiences in the later surveys compared to the first survey. Patients in a university hospital with respiratory diseases showed unchanged experiences of health care and personal emotions in repeated surveys over a period of five years.

  5. Lung function imaging methods in Cystic Fibrosis pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołodziej, Magdalena; de Veer, Michael J; Cholewa, Marian; Egan, Gary F; Thompson, Bruce R

    2017-05-17

    Monitoring of pulmonary physiology is fundamental to the clinical management of patients with Cystic Fibrosis. The current standard clinical practise uses spirometry to assess lung function which delivers a clinically relevant functional readout of total lung function, however does not supply any visible or localised information. High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) is a well-established current 'gold standard' method for monitoring lung anatomical changes in Cystic Fibrosis patients. HRCT provides excellent morphological information, however, the X-ray radiation dose can become significant if multiple scans are required to monitor chronic diseases such as cystic fibrosis. X-ray phase-contrast imaging is another emerging X-ray based methodology for Cystic Fibrosis lung assessment which provides dynamic morphological and functional information, albeit with even higher X-ray doses than HRCT. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-ionising radiation imaging method that is garnering growing interest among researchers and clinicians working with Cystic Fibrosis patients. Recent advances in MRI have opened up the possibilities to observe lung function in real time to potentially allow sensitive and accurate assessment of disease progression. The use of hyperpolarized gas or non-contrast enhanced MRI can be tailored to clinical needs. While MRI offers significant promise it still suffers from poor spatial resolution and the development of an objective scoring system especially for ventilation assessment.

  6. [Diffuse idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. International multidisciplinary consensus classification by the American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society, principal clinico-pathological entities, and diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottin, V; Capron, F; Grenier, P; Cordier, J-F

    2004-04-01

    The classification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias includes seven clinico-pathologic entities. The diagnosis is based on a multidisciplinary approach, integrating the clinical evaluation, the high-resolution computerised tomography, and the pathological pattern. A definitive diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis relies on the association of a suggestive clinico-radiological profile and a pathological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia is a recently described clinico-pathologic entity, with a better prognosis than that of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Cryptogenic organising pneumonia has been included in the group of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias because of its idiopathic and multifocal characteristics, although it does not predominate in the lung interstitium. Desquamative interstitial pneumonia and respiratory bronchiolitis with interstitial lung disease are rare entities with predominance in young smoking adults. Lymphoid interstitial pneumonia, usually encountered in the context of Sjögren's syndrome, is very rare in its idiopathic form. Acute interstitial pneumonia is responsible for idiopathic acute respiratory distress syndrome. The current classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias better defines the diagnostic criterias of each clinico-pathologic entity, and is expected to facilitate clinical research. This classification has clinical implications, with prognostic and therapeutic significance.

  7. Rare Lung Diseases III: Pulmonary Langerhans’ Cell Histiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C Juvet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary Langerhans’ cell histiocytosis (PLCH is an unusual cystic lung disease that is also characterized by extrapulmonary manifestations. The current review discusses the presenting features and relevant diagnostic testing and treatment options for PLCH in the context of a clinical case. While the focus of the present article is adult PLCH and its pulmonary manifestations, it is important for clinicians to distinguish the adult and pediatric forms of the disease, as well as to be alert for possible extrapulmonary complications. A major theme of the current series of articles on rare lung diseases has been the translation of insights gained from fundamental research to the clinic. Accordingly, the understanding of dendritic cell biology in this disease has led to important advances in the care of patients with PLCH.

  8. Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum - Also a Lung Disease? The Respiratory Affection of Patients with Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Pingel

    Full Text Available Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE is an autosomal-recessive mineralisation disorder caused by loss of function mutations in the ABCC6 Gen. Histological findings and data of an autopsy of a PXE-patient suggest a possible pulmonal calcification. So far, there exists no clinical data whether PXE patients actually are at high risk of developing pulmonary disorder.In a cross-sectional study, 35 PXE patients and 15 healthy controls underwent a pulmonary function testing, including spirometry, body plethysmography and carbon monoxide diffusing test. Additionally, PXE patients completed a COPD-Assessment-Test (CAT.We observed in PXE patients normal values for predicted vital capacity (VC%; 96.0±13.0%, predicted total lung capacity (TLC%; 98.2±12.0% and predicted forced expiration volume (FEV1%; 102.5±15.6%, whereas compared to healthy controls the PXE group showed significant diminished values for carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO, 7.2 ±1.4mmol/min/kPa vs. 8.6 ±1.5 mmol/min/kPa; p = 0.008 and predicted carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO%; 79.7±11.5% vs. 87.2±6.6%; p = 0.008. 11/35 (31.4% PXE patients showed pathological DLCO% values under 75% (68.5%±5.4%.PXE patients demonstrated a regular lung function testing, but nevertheless they had impaired CO diffusing parameters, which might be associated with a preclinical state of an interstitial lung disease and a risk for restrictive ventilation disorders.

  9. Predictors of end stage lung disease in a cohort of patients with scleroderma

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, C; Knight, C; Lunt, M; Black, C; Silman, A

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the incidence of severe lung disease in patients with scleroderma and identify the combination(s) of features present at first assessment which would be useful to predict future risk of severe lung disease.

  10. Microbiome effects on immunity, health and disease in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Shakti D; Budden, Kurtis F; Neal, Rachael; Hansbro, Philip M

    2017-03-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis (CF), are among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. In the past decade, the interest in the role of microbiome in maintaining lung health and in respiratory diseases has grown exponentially. The advent of sophisticated multiomics techniques has enabled the identification and characterisation of microbiota and their roles in respiratory health and disease. Furthermore, associations between the microbiome of the lung and gut, as well as the immune cells and mediators that may link these two mucosal sites, appear to be important in the pathogenesis of lung conditions. Here we review the recent evidence of the role of normal gastrointestinal and respiratory microbiome in health and how dysbiosis affects chronic pulmonary diseases. The potential implications of host and environmental factors such as age, gender, diet and use of antibiotics on the composition and overall functionality of microbiome are also discussed. We summarise how microbiota may mediate the dynamic process of immune development and/or regulation focusing on recent data from both clinical human studies and translational animal studies. This furthers the understanding of the pathogenesis of chronic pulmonary diseases and may yield novel avenues for the utilisation of microbiota as potential therapeutic interventions.

  11. Microbiome effects on immunity, health and disease in the lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Shakti D; Budden, Kurtis F; Neal, Rachael; Hansbro, Philip M

    2017-01-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis (CF), are among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. In the past decade, the interest in the role of microbiome in maintaining lung health and in respiratory diseases has grown exponentially. The advent of sophisticated multiomics techniques has enabled the identification and characterisation of microbiota and their roles in respiratory health and disease. Furthermore, associations between the microbiome of the lung and gut, as well as the immune cells and mediators that may link these two mucosal sites, appear to be important in the pathogenesis of lung conditions. Here we review the recent evidence of the role of normal gastrointestinal and respiratory microbiome in health and how dysbiosis affects chronic pulmonary diseases. The potential implications of host and environmental factors such as age, gender, diet and use of antibiotics on the composition and overall functionality of microbiome are also discussed. We summarise how microbiota may mediate the dynamic process of immune development and/or regulation focusing on recent data from both clinical human studies and translational animal studies. This furthers the understanding of the pathogenesis of chronic pulmonary diseases and may yield novel avenues for the utilisation of microbiota as potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:28435675

  12. Can mechanical ventilation strategies reduce chronic lung disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, Steven M; Sinha, Sunil K

    2003-12-01

    Chronic lung disease (CLD) continues to be a significant complication in newborn infants undergoing mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure. Although the aetiology of CLD is multifactorial, specific factors related to mechanical ventilation, including barotrauma, volutrauma and atelectrauma, have been implicated as important aetiologic mechanisms. This article discusses the ways in which these factors might be manipulated by various mechanical ventilatory strategies to reduce ventilator-induced lung injury. These include continuous positive airway pressure, permissive hypercapnia, patient-triggered ventilation, volume-targeted ventilation, proportional assist ventilation, high-frequency ventilation and real-time monitoring.

  13. Probiotics in the Management of Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Mortaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The physiology and pathology of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts are closely related. This similarity between the two organs may underlie why dysfunction in one organ may induce illness in the other. For example, smoking is a major risk factor for COPD and IBD and increases the risk of developing Crohn’s disease. Probiotics have been defined as “live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer health benefits on the host.” In model systems probiotics regulate innate and inflammatory immune responses. Commonly used probiotics include lactic acid bacteria, particularly Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Saccharomyces, and these are often used as dietary supplements to provide a health benefit in gastrointestinal diseases including infections, inflammatory bowel disease, and colon cancer. In this respect, probiotics probably act as immunomodulatory agents and activators of host defence pathways which suggest that they could influence disease severity and incidence at sites distal to the gut. There is increasing evidence that orally delivered probiotics are able to regulate immune responses in the respiratory system. This review provides an overview of the possible role of probiotics and their mechanisms of action in the prevention and treatment of respiratory diseases.

  14. Interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene welding: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brvar, Miran

    2014-01-01

    Acetylene is a colorless gas commonly used for welding. It acts mainly as a simple asphyxiant. In this paper, however, we present a patient who developed a severe interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene exposure during aluminum welding. A 44-year old man was welding with acetylene, argon and aluminum electrode sticks in a non-ventilated aluminum tank for 2 h. Four hours after welding dyspnea appeared and 22 h later he was admitted at the Emergency Department due to severe respiratory insufficiency with pO2 = 6.7 kPa. Chest X-ray showed diffuse interstitial infiltration. Pulmonary function and gas diffusion tests revealed a severe restriction (55% of predictive volume) and impaired diffusion capacity (47% of predicted capacity). Toxic interstitial pneumonitis was diagnosed and high-dose systemic corticosteroid methylprednisolone and inhalatory corticosteroid fluticasone therapy was started. Computed Tomography (CT) of the lungs showed a diffuse patchy ground-glass opacity with no signs of small airway disease associated with interstitial pneumonitis. Corticosteroid therapy was continued for the next 8 weeks gradually reducing the doses. The patient's follow-up did not show any deterioration of respiratory function. In conclusion, acetylene welding might result in severe toxic interstitial pneumonitis that improves after an early systemic and inhalatory corticosteroid therapy.

  15. Interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene welding: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acetylene is a colorless gas commonly used for welding. It acts mainly as a simple asphyxiant. In this paper, however, we present a patient who developed a severe interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene exposure during aluminum welding. A 44-year old man was welding with acetylene, argon and aluminum electrode sticks in a non-ventilated aluminum tank for 2 h. Four hours after welding dyspnea appeared and 22 h later he was admitted at the Emergency Department due to severe respiratory insufficiency with pO2 = 6.7 kPa. Chest X-ray showed diffuse interstitial infiltration. Pulmonary function and gas diffusion tests revealed a severe restriction (55% of predictive volume and impaired diffusion capacity (47% of predicted capacity. Toxic interstitial pneumonitis was diagnosed and high-dose systemic corticosteroid methylprednisolone and inhalatory corticosteroid fluticasone therapy was started. Computed Tomography (CT of the lungs showed a diffuse patchy ground-glass opacity with no signs of small airway disease associated with interstitial pneumonitis. Corticosteroid therapy was continued for the next 8 weeks gradually reducing the doses. The patient's follow-up did not show any deterioration of respiratory function. In conclusion, acetylene welding might result in severe toxic interstitial pneumonitis that improves after an early systemic and inhalatory corticosteroid therapy.

  16. Normal Lung Quantification in Usual Interstitial Pneumonia Pattern: The Impact of Threshold-based Volumetric CT Analysis for the Staging of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotsugu Ohkubo

    Full Text Available Although several computer-aided computed tomography (CT analysis methods have been reported to objectively assess the disease severity and progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, it is unclear which method is most practical. A universal severity classification system has not yet been adopted for IPF.The purpose of this study was to test the correlation between quantitative-CT indices and lung physiology variables and to determine the ability of such indices to predict disease severity in IPF.A total of 27 IPF patients showing radiological UIP pattern on high-resolution (HR CT were retrospectively enrolled. Staging of IPF was performed according to two classification systems: the Japanese and GAP (gender, age, and physiology staging systems. CT images were assessed using a commercially available CT imaging analysis workstation, and the whole-lung mean CT value (MCT, the normally attenuated lung volume as defined from -950 HU to -701 Hounsfield unit (NL, the volume of the whole lung (WL, and the percentage of NL to WL (NL%, were calculated.CT indices (MCT, WL, and NL closely correlated with lung physiology variables. Among them, NL strongly correlated with forced vital capacity (FVC (r = 0.92, P <0.0001. NL% showed a large area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for detecting patients in the moderate or advanced stages of IPF. Multivariable logistic regression analyses showed that NL% is significantly more useful than the percentages of predicted FVC and predicted diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (Japanese stage II/III/IV [odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence intervals (CI, 0.48 to 0.92; P < 0.01]; III/IV [odds ratio. 0.80; 95% CI 0.59 to 0.96; P < 0.01]; GAP stage II/III [odds ratio, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.97; P < 0.05].The measurement of NL% by threshold-based volumetric CT analysis may help improve IPF staging.

  17. Antioxidant supplementation for lung disease in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Airway infection leads to progressive damage of the lungs in cystic fibrosis and oxidative stress has been implicated in the etiology. Supplementation of antioxidant micronutrients (vitamin E, vitamin C, ß-carotene and selenium) or glutathione may therefore potentially help maintain...... an oxidant-antioxidant balance. Current literature suggests a relationship between oxidative status and lung function. OBJECTIVES: To synthesize existing knowledge of the effect of antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, ß-carotene, selenium and glutathione in cystic fibrosis lung disease. SEARCH METHODS......: The Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register and PubMed were searched using detailed search strategies. We contacted authors of included studies and checked reference lists of these studies for additional, potentially relevant studies.Last search of Cystic Fibrosis...

  18. Comparison of Shallow and Deep Learning Methods on Classifying the Regional Pattern of Diffuse Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Guk Bae; Jung, Kyu-Hwan; Lee, Yeha; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Namkug; Jun, Sanghoon; Seo, Joon Beom; Lynch, David A

    2017-10-17

    This study aimed to compare shallow and deep learning of classifying the patterns of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). Using high-resolution computed tomography images, two experienced radiologists marked 1200 regions of interest (ROIs), in which 600 ROIs were each acquired using a GE or Siemens scanner and each group of 600 ROIs consisted of 100 ROIs for subregions that included normal and five regional pulmonary disease patterns (ground-glass opacity, consolidation, reticular opacity, emphysema, and honeycombing). We employed the convolution neural network (CNN) with six learnable layers that consisted of four convolution layers and two fully connected layers. The classification results were compared with the results classified by a shallow learning of a support vector machine (SVM). The CNN classifier showed significantly better performance for accuracy compared with that of the SVM classifier by 6-9%. As the convolution layer increases, the classification accuracy of the CNN showed better performance from 81.27 to 95.12%. Especially in the cases showing pathological ambiguity such as between normal and emphysema cases or between honeycombing and reticular opacity cases, the increment of the convolution layer greatly drops the misclassification rate between each case. Conclusively, the CNN classifier showed significantly greater accuracy than the SVM classifier, and the results implied structural characteristics that are inherent to the specific ILD patterns.

  19. Commentary: research on the mechanisms of the occupational lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rom, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    In this commentary, the pathogenesis of alveolitis is examined and elucidated by animal models. The use of broncho alveolar lavage (BAL) and Ga-67 citrate whole-body scanning as a measure of the activity of alveolar inflammation in workers is discussed. Gallium scan indices have been reported to be elevated in asbestosis, silicosis, and coal workers' pneumoconiosis; diseases which may now be evaluated at earlier, potentially reversible stages. Research in emphysema and other lung diseases associated with α 1 antitrypsin deficiency may help explain why coal miners develop focal emphysema. Furthermore, investigation of genetic factors may reveal why workers with similar exposures have a different susceptibility for the development of pneumoconiosis or lung cancer. Occupational asthma may not respond to removal of the worker from exposure because reactive airways may be a predisposing factor for chronic ashthma and chronic obstructive lung disease. A continuing challenge will be disease risk in new industries such as electronics and alternate energy industries and new diseases in worker groups not previously studied, such as the variety of pneumoconioses among dental laboratory technicians who work with exotic metal alloys. 52 references

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