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Sample records for interstitial hdr brachytherapy

  1. Interstitial prostate brachytherapy. LDR-PDR-HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, Gyoergy; Hoskin, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The first comprehensive overview of interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. Written by an interdisciplinary team who have been responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Teaching Course. Discusses in detail patient selection, the results of different methods, the role of imaging, and medical physics issues. Prostate brachytherapy has been the subject of heated debate among surgeons and the proponents of the various brachytherapy methods. This very first interdisciplinary book on the subject provides a comprehensive overview of innovations in low dose rate (LDR), high dose rate (HDR), and pulsed dose rate (PDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. In addition to detailed chapters on patient selection and the use of imaging in diagnostics, treatment guidance, and implantation control, background chapters are included on related medical physics issues such as treatment planning and quality assurance. The results obtained with the different treatment options and the difficult task of salvage treatment are fully discussed. All chapters have been written by internationally recognized experts in their fields who for more than a decade have formed the teaching staff responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Prostate Brachytherapy Teaching Course. This book will be invaluable in informing residents and others of the scientific background and potential of modern prostate brachytherapy. It will also prove a useful source of up-to-date information for those who specialize in prostate brachytherapy or intend to start an interstitial brachytherapy service.

  2. The relative efficacy of HDR and LDR interstitial brachytherapy in squamous cell carcinoma of vagina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demanes, D. J.; Hsu, I-C.; Lin, S.; Ewing, T.; Rodriguez, R.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: Beginning in 1982 we performed low dose rate (LDR) interstitial template brachytherapy (ISTB) for carcinoma of the vagina. High dose rate (HDR) remote afterloading has been used exclusively since 1991. We compare the results LDR and HDR brachytherapy. Material and Methods: Between 1982 and 1994, 30 patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of vagina received external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy. The AJCC stage distribution was 3 stage I, 25 stage II, and 2 stage III. The average central pelvic EBRT dose was 35 Gy. Pelvic side wall EBRT doses ranged from 45 to 50.4 Gy. Nineteen patients had LDR treatment; 3 intracavitary brachytherapy (ICB) and 16 ISTB. Eleven patients had HDR treatment; 2 ICB and 9 ISB. The average dose delivered by LDR was 41.2 Gy usually in 2 fractions, and by HDR 32.5 Gy in 6 fractions of 500-550 cGy. Local failures were confirmed pathologically. The absolute survival (AS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method and compared with logrank statistics. Results: The mean follow-up was 77 months for LDR and 23 months for HDR. Local and regional control was achieved in 90% (27/30) of the patients. Three year AS was 84% and RFS was 87%. There was no significant difference between LDR and HDR in AS, RFS or local-regional control, (log rank p=0.85, p=0.12 and p=0.35 respectively). The single HDR local failure presented in a patient with extensive stage II disease who declined ISTB. There were fewer complications following HDR. The 1 case of extensive vaginal necrosis and the 3 cases of rectovaginal fistula that required surgery occurred only with LDR brachytherapy. Discussion: Excellent local and regional control of carcinoma of the vagina can be achieved by administering limited doses of external radiation and brachytherapy. Interstitial template implants are the best means of encompassing paravaginal disease while sparing the adjacent uninvolved normal tissues from high doses of

  3. Palliative interstitial HDR brachytherapy for recurrent rectal cancer. Implantation techniques and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolotas, C.; Roeddiger, S.; Martin, T.; Tselis, N.; Baltas, D.; Zamboglou, N.; Strassmann, G.; Aebersold, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To report the methods and clinical results of CT-based interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy procedures for the palliative treatment of recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 44 brachytherapy implants were performed in 38 patients. CT-guided catheter implants were performed in 34 patients under local anesthesia and sedation, and four patients were implanted intraoperatively. Of 40 CT-guided implants, 20 were done using metallic needles introduced via the sacrum and 20 were transperineal implants of plastic tubes in the presacral region. Postimplant CT scans were used for three-dimensional (3-D) conformal brachytherapy planning. Patients implanted with metallic needles were given a single fraction of 10-15 Gy using HDR 192 Ir, and those who received transperineal implants of plastic catheters were given fractionated brachytherapy, 5 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 30-40 Gy. The median tumor volume was 225 cm 3 with a range of 41-2,103 cm 3 . Results: After a median follow-up of 23.4 months, a total of 13/38 patients were alive. The median postbrachytherapy survival was 15 months with 18 of the 25 deaths due to distant metastases. Tumor response was as follows: 6/38 partial remission, 28/38 stable disease, and 4/38 local progression. A planning target volume (PTV) coverage > 85% was achieved in 42/44 implants. The treatment was well tolerated, and no acute complications were observed. One patient developed a fistula after 8 months. Pain relief was recorded in 34 patients (89.5%), and the median duration of this palliative effect was 5 months with a range of 1-13 months. Conclusions: Interstitial HDR brachytherapy is a valuable tool for the delivery of high doses and achieves effective palliation in recurrent rectal carcinoma. (orig.)

  4. Palliative interstitial HDR brachytherapy for recurrent rectal cancer. Implantation techniques and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolotas, C. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach Hospital, Offenbach (Germany); Dept. of Radio-Oncology, Univ. of Bern, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Roeddiger, S.; Martin, T.; Tselis, N.; Baltas, D.; Zamboglou, N. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach Hospital, Offenbach (Germany); Strassmann, G. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital, Philipps Univ., Marburg (Germany); Aebersold, D.M. [Dept. of Radio-Oncology, Univ. of Bern, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2003-07-01

    Purpose: To report the methods and clinical results of CT-based interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy procedures for the palliative treatment of recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 44 brachytherapy implants were performed in 38 patients. CT-guided catheter implants were performed in 34 patients under local anesthesia and sedation, and four patients were implanted intraoperatively. Of 40 CT-guided implants, 20 were done using metallic needles introduced via the sacrum and 20 were transperineal implants of plastic tubes in the presacral region. Postimplant CT scans were used for three-dimensional (3-D) conformal brachytherapy planning. Patients implanted with metallic needles were given a single fraction of 10-15 Gy using HDR {sup 192}Ir, and those who received transperineal implants of plastic catheters were given fractionated brachytherapy, 5 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 30-40 Gy. The median tumor volume was 225 cm{sup 3} with a range of 41-2,103 cm{sup 3}. Results: After a median follow-up of 23.4 months, a total of 13/38 patients were alive. The median postbrachytherapy survival was 15 months with 18 of the 25 deaths due to distant metastases. Tumor response was as follows: 6/38 partial remission, 28/38 stable disease, and 4/38 local progression. A planning target volume (PTV) coverage > 85% was achieved in 42/44 implants. The treatment was well tolerated, and no acute complications were observed. One patient developed a fistula after 8 months. Pain relief was recorded in 34 patients (89.5%), and the median duration of this palliative effect was 5 months with a range of 1-13 months. Conclusions: Interstitial HDR brachytherapy is a valuable tool for the delivery of high doses and achieves effective palliation in recurrent rectal carcinoma. (orig.)

  5. SU-F-T-55: Reproducibility of Interstitial HDR Brachytherapy Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S; Ellis, R; Traughber, B; Podder, T [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Treating gynecological cancers with interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy requires precise reconstruction of catheter positions to obtain accurate dosimetric plans. In this study, we investigated the degree of reproducibility of dosimetric plans for Syed HDR brachytherapy. Methods: We randomly selected five patients having cervix-vaginal cancer who were recently treated in our clinic with interstitial HDR brachytherapy with a prescription dose of 25–30 Gy in five fractions. Interstitial needles/catheters were placed under fluoroscopic guidance and intra-operative 3T MRI scan was performed to confirm the desired catheter placement for adequate target volume coverage. A CT scan was performed and fused with the MRI for delineating high-risk CTV (HR-CTV), intermediate-risk CTV (IR-CTV) and OARs. HDR treatment plans were generated using Oncentra planning software. A single plan was used for all five fractions of treatment for each patient. For this study, we took the original clinical plan and removed all the reconstructed catheters from the plan keeping the original contours unchanged. Then, we manually reconstructed all the catheters and entered the same dwell time from the first original clinical plan. The dosimetric parameters studied were: D90 for HR-CTV and IR-CV, and D2cc for bladder, rectum, sigmoid and bowel. Results: The mean of absolute differences in dosimetric coverage (D90) were (range): 1.3% (1.0–2.0%) and 2.0% (0.9–3.6%) for HR-CTV and IR-CTV, respectively. In case of OARs, the mean of absolute variations in D2cc were (range): 4.7% (0.7–8.9%) for bladder, 1.60% (0.3–3.2%) for rectum, 1.6% (0–3.9%) for sigmoid, and 1.8% (0–5.1%) for bowel. Conclusion: Overall, the reproducibility of interstitial HDR plans was within clinically acceptable limit. Observed maximum variation in D2cc for bladder. If number of catchers and dwell points were relatively low or any one catheter was heavily loaded, then reproducibility of the plan

  6. Salvage prostate HDR brachytherapy combined with interstitial hyperthermia for local recurrence after radiation therapy failure

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    Kukielka, A.M.; Hetnal, M.; Dabrowski, T.; Walasek, T.; Brandys, P.; Reinfuss, M. [Centre of Oncology, M. Sklodowska - Curie Institute, Krakow Branch, Department of Radiotherapy, Krakow (Poland); Nahajowski, D.; Kudzia, R.; Dybek, D. [Centre of Oncology, M. Sklodowska - Curie Institute, Krakow Branch, Department of Medical Physics, Department of Radiotherapy, Krakow (Poland)

    2014-02-15

    The aim of the present retrospective study is to evaluate toxicity and early clinical outcomes of interstitial hyperthermia (IHT) combined with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a salvage treatment in patients with biopsy-confirmed local recurrence of prostate cancer after previous external beam radiotherapy. Between September 2008 and March 2013, 25 patients with local recurrence of previously irradiated prostate cancer were treated. The main eligibility criteria for salvage prostate HDR brachytherapy combined with interstitial hyperthermia were biopsy confirmed local recurrence and absence of nodal and distant metastases. All patients were treated with a dose of 30 Gy in 3 fractions at 21-day intervals. We performed 62 hyperthermia procedures out of 75 planned (83 %). The aim of the hyperthermia treatment was to heat the prostate to 41-43 C for 60 min. Toxicity for the organs of the genitourinary system and rectum was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE, v. 4.03). Determination of subsequent biochemical failure was based on the Phoenix definition (nadir + 2 ng/ml). The median age was 71 years (range 62-83 years), the median initial PSA level was 16.3 ng/ml (range 6.37-64 ng/ml), and the median salvage PSA level was 2.8 ng/ml (1.044-25.346 ng/ml). The median follow-up was 13 months (range 4-48 months). The combination of HDR brachytherapy and IHT was well tolerated. The most frequent complications were nocturia, weak urine stream, urinary frequency, hematuria, and urgency. Grade 2 rectal hemorrhage was observed in 1 patient. No grade 3 or higher complications were observed. The 2-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of biochemical control after salvage treatment was 74 %. The PSA in 20 patients decreased below the presalvage level, while 11 patients achieved a PSA nadir < 0.5 ng/ml. All patients are still alive. Of the 7 patients who experienced biochemical failure, bone metastases were found in 2 patients. IHT in combination

  7. Brachytherapy for Buccal Cancer: From Conventional Low Dose Rate (LDR) or Mold Technique to High Dose Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yamazaki, Hideya; Masui, Koji; Yoshida, Ken; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Akiyama, Hironori; Murakami, Shumei; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Eiichi

    2017-12-01

    To examine the effectiveness of newly-installed high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for buccal cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 36 patients (25 men and 11 women) with buccal cancer treated with curative brachytherapy with or without external radiotherapy with a median follow-up of 99 months. A total of 15 HDR-ISBT (median 48 Gy/ 8 fractions, range=24-60 Gy) patients were compared to conventional 15 cases LDR-ISBT (70 Gy, range=42.8-110 Gy) and 7 molds techniques (15 Gy, range=9-74 Gy). A total of 31 patients also underwent external radiotherapy (30 Gy, range=24-48 Gy). They comprised of 3T1, 23 T2, 8 T3, 3 T4 including 11 node positive cases. HDR-ISBT provided 82% of local control rate at 5 years, whereas conventional brachytherapy showed 72% [p=0.44; LDR-ISBT (65%), mold therapy (85.7%)]. Patients with early lesions (T1-2 or stage I-II) showed better local control rates than those with advanced lesions (T3-4 or stage III-IV). Severe late grade 3 complications developed in two patients treated with LDR-ISBT and EBRT. There is no significant difference in toxicity grade ≤2 between conventional brachytherapy (5/15=33%) and HDR-ISBT (7/32=32%, p=0.92). HDR-ISBT achieved good and comparable local control rates to conventional brachytherapy without elevating the toxicity. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  8. Implant strategies for endocervical and interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia adjunct to HDR brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, Jeffery H; Prakash, Punit; Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J

    2011-01-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound devices provide a method to deliver 3D conformable heating integrated with HDR brachytherapy delivery. Theoretical characterization of heating patterns was performed to identify implant strategies for these devices which can best be used to apply hyperthermia to cervical cancer. A constrained optimization-based hyperthermia treatment planning platform was used for the analysis. The proportion of tissue ≥41 deg. C in a hyperthermia treatment volume was maximized with constraints T max ≤ 47 deg. C, T rectum ≤ 41.5 deg. C, and T bladder ≤ 42.5 deg. C. Hyperthermia treatment was modeled for generalized implant configurations and complex configurations from a database of patients (n = 14) treated with HDR brachytherapy. Various combinations of endocervical (360 0 or 2 x 180 0 output; 6 mm OD) and interstitial (180 0 , 270 0 , or 360 0 output; 2.4 mm OD) applicators within catheter locations from brachytherapy implants were modeled, with perfusion constant (1 or 3 kg m -3 s -1 ) or varying with location or temperature. Device positioning, sectoring, active length and aiming were empirically optimized to maximize thermal coverage. Conformable heating of appreciable volumes (>200 cm 3 ) is possible using multiple sectored interstitial and endocervical ultrasound devices. The endocervical device can heat >41 deg. C to 4.6 cm diameter compared to 3.6 cm for the interstitial. Sectored applicators afford tight control of heating that is robust to perfusion changes in most regularly spaced configurations. T 90 in example patient cases was 40.5-42.7 deg. C (1.9-39.6 EM 43deg.C ) at 1 kg m -3 s -1 with 10/14 patients ≥41 deg. C. Guidelines are presented for positioning of implant catheters during the initial surgery, selection of ultrasound applicator configurations, and tailored power schemes for achieving T 90 ≥ 41 deg. C in clinically practical implant configurations. Catheter-based ultrasound devices, when adhering to the guidelines, show

  9. SU-E-T-507: Interfractional Variation of Fiducial Marker Position During HDR Brachytherapy with Cervical Interstitial Needle Template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, S; Kim, R; Benhabib, S; Araujo, J; Burnett, L; Duan, J; Popple, R; Wu, X; Cardan, R; Brezovich, I [UniversityAlabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: HDR brachytherapy using interstitial needle template for cervical cancer is commonly delivered in 4-5 fractions. Routine verification of needle positions before each fraction is often based on radiographic imaging of implanted fiducial markers. The current study evaluated interfractional displacement of implanted fiducial markers using CT images. Methods: 9 sequential patients with cervical interstitial needle implants were evaluated. The superior and inferior borders of the target volumes were defined by fiducial markers in planning CT. The implant position was verified with kV orthogonal images before each fraction. A second CT was acquired prior 3rd fraction (one or 2 days post planning CT). Distances from inferior and superior fiducial markers to pubic symphysis plane (perpendicular to vaginal obtulator)were measured. Distance from needle tip of a reference needle (next to the inferior marker) to the pubic symphysis plane was also determined. The difference in fiducial marker distance or needle tip distance between planning CT and CT prior 3rd fraction were measured to assess markers migration and needle displacement. Results: The mean inferior marker displacement was 4.5 mm and ranged 0.9 to 11.3 mm. The mean superior marker displacement was 2.7 mm and ranged 0 to 10.4 mm. There was a good association between inferior and superior marker displacement (r=0.95). Mean averaged inferior and superior marker displacement was 3.3 mm and ranged from 0.1 to 10.9 mm, with a standard deviation of 3.2 mm. The mean needle displacement was 5.6 mm and ranged 0.2 to 15.6 mm. Needle displacements were reduced (p<0.05) after adjusting according to needle-to-fiducials distance. Conclusion: There were small fiducial marker displacements between HDR fractions. Our study suggests a target margin of 9.7 mm to cover interfractional marker displacements (in 95% cases) for pretreatment verification based on radiographic imaging.

  10. Dosimetric evaluation of a novel high dose rate (HDR) intraluminal / interstitial brachytherapy applicator for gastrointestinal and bladder cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamiri, Seyyed Mahmoud Reza; Najarian, Siamak; Jaberi, Ramin

    2010-01-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is one of the accepted treatment modalities in gastro‐intestinal tract and bladder carcinomas. Considering the shortcoming of contact brachytherapy routinely used in gastrointestinal tract in treatment of big tumors or invasive method of bladder treatment, an intraluminal applicator with the capability of insertion into the tumor depth seems to be useful. This study presents some dosimetric evaluations to introduce this applicator to the clinical use. The radiation attenuation characteristics of the applicator were evaluated by means of two dosimetric methods including well‐type chamber and radiochromic film. The proposed 110 cm long applicator has a flexible structure made of stainless steel for easy passage through lumens and a needle tip to drill into big tumors. The 2 mm diameter of the applicator is thick enough for source transition, while easy passage through any narrow lumen such as endoscope or cystoscope working channel is ensured. Well‐chamber results showed an acceptably low attenuation of this steel springy applicator. Performing absolute dosimetry resulted in a correlation coefficient of R=0.9916(p‐value≈10−7) between standard interstitial applicator and the one proposed in this article. This study not only introduces a novel applicator with acceptable attenuation but also proves the response independency of the GAFCHROMIC EBT films to energy. By applying the dose response of the applicator in the treatment planning software, it can be used as a new intraluminal / interstitial applicator. PACS number: 87.53.Bn, 87.53.Jw, 29.40.Cs

  11. Implant strategies for endocervical and interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia adjunct to HDR brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Jeffery H.; Prakash, Punit; Hsu, I.-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-07-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound devices provide a method to deliver 3D conformable heating integrated with HDR brachytherapy delivery. Theoretical characterization of heating patterns was performed to identify implant strategies for these devices which can best be used to apply hyperthermia to cervical cancer. A constrained optimization-based hyperthermia treatment planning platform was used for the analysis. The proportion of tissue >=41 °C in a hyperthermia treatment volume was maximized with constraints Tmax 200 cm3) is possible using multiple sectored interstitial and endocervical ultrasound devices. The endocervical device can heat >41 °C to 4.6 cm diameter compared to 3.6 cm for the interstitial. Sectored applicators afford tight control of heating that is robust to perfusion changes in most regularly spaced configurations. T90 in example patient cases was 40.5-42.7 °C (1.9-39.6 EM43 °C) at 1 kg m-3 s-1 with 10/14 patients >=41 °C. Guidelines are presented for positioning of implant catheters during the initial surgery, selection of ultrasound applicator configurations, and tailored power schemes for achieving T90 >= 41 °C in clinically practical implant configurations. Catheter-based ultrasound devices, when adhering to the guidelines, show potential to generate conformal therapeutic heating ranging from a single endocervical device targeting small volumes local to the cervix (directional interstitial applicators in the lateral periphery to target much larger volumes (6 cm radial), while preferentially limiting heating of the bladder and rectum.

  12. Dosimetric impact of interfraction catheter movement and organ motion on MRI/CT guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, Felipe; Chang, Chang; Mesina, Carmen; Dixit, Nayha; Kevin Teo, Boon-Keng; Lin, Lilie L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the dosimetric impact of catheter movement for MRI/CT image guided high dose rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT) for gynecologic cancers. Materials and methods: Ten patients were treated with HDR ISBT. The CTV and organs at risk were contoured using a postimplant MRI and CT. 5 fractions were delivered twice daily on 3 consecutive days. The first fraction was delivered on day 1 (d1), fraction 2–3 on d2 and fraction 4–5 on d3. MRI/CT was acquired prior to the second and fourth fractions. Four scenarios were modeled. (1) The d1 plan was applied to the d2 and d3 CT, using the updated catheter positions. (2) Replanning was performed for d2 and d3. (3) We applied the dwell positions/times from the d2 replan over the d3 CT and compared with a d3 CT replan. (4) Based on daily MRI, target volumes were recontoured and replanned. Dosimetry was analyzed for each plan and compared to the d1 dose distribution. Results: (1) When using the d1 plan on the d2 and d3 CT with the updated catheter positions, the mean CTV D90 was reduced from 93.4% on d1 to 89.3% (p = 0.08) on d2 and to 87.7% (p = 0.005) on d3. (2) Replanning on d2 and d3 compensated for catheter movement, mean CTV D90 of 95.4% on d2 and 94.6% (p = 0.36) on d3. (3) When compared to the replan of d2 applied on the d3 CT vs the d3 replan, there was no significant difference in coverage, mean CTV D90 of 90.9% (p = 0.09). (4) Reoptimization based on daily MRI, significantly improved the CTV coverage for each day. The mean D2 cc for the rectum was significantly higher with model 1 vs model 3 59.1 ± 4.7 vs 60.9 ± 4.8 (p = 0.04) Gy EQD2. There were no significant differences in D2 cc of bladder and sigmoid between models. Conclusions: Interfraction dosimetric changes significantly decreased the CTV coverage of the third day. Rather than replanning on each day, replanning on the day 2 CT before the second or third fraction would give an optimal solution that would compensate for

  13. SU-F-19A-12: Split-Ring Applicator with Interstitial Needle for Improved Volumetric Coverage in HDR Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

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    Sherertz, T; Ellis, R; Colussi, V; Mislmani, M; Traughber, B; Herrmann, K; Podder, T [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate volumetric coverage of a Mick Radionuclear titanium Split-Ring applicator (SRA) with/without interstitial needle compared to an intracavitary Vienna applicator (VA), interstitial-intracavitary VA, and intracavitary ring and tandem applicator (RTA). Methods: A 57 year-old female with FIGO stage IIB cervical carcinoma was treated following chemoradiotherapy (45Gy pelvic and 5.4Gy parametrial boost) with highdose- rate (HDR) brachytherapy to 30Gy in 5 fractions using a SRA. A single interstitial needle was placed using the Ellis Interstitial Cap for the final three fractions to increase coverage of left-sided gross residual disease identified on 3T-MRI. High-risk (HR) clinical target volume (CTV) and intermediate-risk (IR) CTV were defined using axial T2-weighted 2D and 3D MRI sequences (Philips PET/MRI unit). Organs-at-risks (OARs) were delineated on CT. Oncentra planning system was used for treatment optimization satisfying GEC-ESTRO guidelines for target coverage and OAR constraints. Retrospectively, treatment plans (additional 20 plans) were simulated using intracavitary SRA (without needle), intracavitary VA (without needle), interstitial-intracavitary VA, and intracavitary RTA with this same patient case. Plans were optimized for each fraction to maintain coverage to HR-CTV. Results: Interstitial-intracavitary SRA achieved the following combined coverage for external radiation and brachytherapy (EQD2): D90 HR-CTV =94.6Gy; Bladder-2cc =88.9Gy; Rectum-2cc =65.1Gy; Sigmoid-2cc =48.9Gy; Left vaginal wall (VW) =103Gy, Right VW =99.2Gy. Interstitial-intracavitary VA was able to achieve identical D90 HR-CTV =94.6Gy, yet Bladder-2cc =91.9Gy (exceeding GEC-ESTRO recommendations of 2cc<90Gy) and Left VW =120.8Gy and Right VW =115.5Gy. Neither the SRA nor VA without interstitial needle could cover HR-CTV adequately without exceeding dose to Bladder-2cc. Conventional RTA was unable to achieve target coverage for the HR-CTV >80Gy without severely

  14. SU-G-JeP2-14: MRI-Based HDR Prostate Brachytherapy: A Phantom Study for Interstitial Catheter Reconstruction with 0.35T MRI Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S; Kamrava, M; Yang, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of interstitial catheter reconstruction with 0.35T MRI images for MRI-based HDR prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Recently, a real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy system combining a 0.35T MRI system and three cobalt 60 heads (MRIdian System, ViewRay, Cleveland, OH, USA) was installed in our department. A TrueFISP sequence for MRI acquisition at lower field on Viewray was chosen due to its fast speed and high signal-to-noise efficiency. Interstitial FlexiGuide needles were implanted into a tissue equivalent ultrasound prostate phantom (CIRS, Norfolk, Virginia, USA). After an initial 15s pilot MRI to confirm the location of the phantom, planning MRI was acquired with a 172s TrueFISP sequence. The pulse sequence parameters included: flip angle = 60 degree, echo time (TE) =1.45 ms, repetition time (TR) = 3.37 ms, slice thickness = 1.5 mm, field of view (FOV) =500 × 450mm. For a reference image, a CT scan was followed. The CT and MR scans were then fused with the MIM Maestro (MIM software Inc., Cleveland, OH, USA) and sent to the Oncentra Brachy planning system (Elekta, Veenendaal, Netherlands). Automatic catheter reconstruction using CT and MR image intensities followed by manual reconstruction was used to digitize catheters. The accuracy of catheter reconstruction was evaluated from the catheter tip location. Results: The average difference between the catheter tip locations reconstructed from the CT and MR in the transverse, anteroposterior, and craniocaudal directions was −0.1 ± 0.1 mm (left), 0.2 ± 0.2 mm (anterior), and −2.3 ± 0.5 mm (cranio). The average distance in 3D was 2.3 mm ± 0.5 mm. Conclusion: This feasibility study proved that interstitial catheters can be reconstructed with 0.35T MRI images. For more accurate catheter reconstruction which can affect final dose distribution, a systematic shift should be applied to the MR based catheter reconstruction in HDR prostate brachytherapy.

  15. Feasibility and early results of interstitial intensity-modulated HDR/PDR brachytherapy (IMBT) with/without complementary external-beam radiotherapy and extended surgery in recurrent pelvic colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepel, J.; Bokelmann, F.; Faendrich, F.; Kremer, B.; Schmid, A.; Kovacs, G.; University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel

    2005-01-01

    Background: A new multimodality treatment concept consisting of extended resection and postoperative fractionated intensity-modulated interstitial brachytherapy (IMBT) was introduced for pelvic recurrence of colorectal carcinoma. Patients and Methods: 46 patients received extended resection and single plastic tubes were sutured directly onto the tumor bed. IMBT was started within 2 weeks postoperatively with a median dose of 24.5 Gy (5-35 Gy). Patients were treated either with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR; n=23) or with pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDR; n=23). 25 patients received complementary 45-Gy external-beam irradiation (EBRT) to the pelvic region after explanting the plastic tubes. Results: Median follow-up was 20.6 months (7-107 months) and mean patient survival 25.7±25.8 months (median 17, range 1-107 months). After 5 years overall survival, disease-free survival and local control rate were 23%, 20% and 33%, significantly influenced by the resectional state. There was a trend in favor of PDR compared to HDR, which reached statistical significance in patients who had not received additional EBRT. Conclusion: The combination of extended surgery and postoperative interstitial IMBT is feasible and offers effective interdisciplinary treatment of recurrent colorectal cancer. In this small and inhomogeneous cohort of patients PDR seems to be more effective than HDR, particularly when application of complementary EBRT is not possible. None of the patients who required resection of distant metastasis survived >2 years in this study. (orig.)

  16. Validation of a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial HDR brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Eric; Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de Physique, de Génie Physique et d’optique et Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-oncologie et Axe Oncologie du Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Gardi, Lori; Barker, Kevin; Montreuil, Jacques; Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, there is no integrated 3D ultrasound (3DUS) guidance system clinically available for breast brachytherapy. In this study, the authors present a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment. Methods: For this work, a new computer controlled robotic 3DUS system was built to perform a hybrid motion scan, which is a combination of a 6 cm linear translation with a 30° rotation at both ends. The new 3DUS scanner was designed to fit on a modified Kuske assembly, keeping the current template grid configuration but modifying the frame to allow the mounting of the 3DUS system at several positions. A finer grid was also tested. A user interface was developed to perform image reconstruction, semiautomatic segmentation of the surgical bed as well as catheter reconstruction and tracking. A 3D string phantom was used to validate the geometric accuracy of the reconstruction. The volumetric accuracy of the system was validated with phantoms using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) images. In order to accurately determine whether 3DUS can effectively replace CT for treatment planning, the authors have compared the 3DUS catheter reconstruction to the one obtained from CT images. In addition, in agarose-based phantoms, an end-to-end procedure was performed by executing six independent complete procedures with both 14 and 16 catheters, and for both standard and finer Kuske grids. Finally, in phantoms, five end-to-end procedures were performed with the final CT planning for the validation of 3DUS preplanning. Results: The 3DUS acquisition time is approximately 10 s. A paired Student t-test showed that there was no statistical significant difference between known and measured values of string separations in each direction. Both MRI and CT volume measurements were not statistically different from 3DUS volume (Student t-test: p > 0

  17. 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) interstitial brain implant: optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Anuj; Singh, Dinesh; Chitra, S.; Gupta, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The new modality of stepping source dosimetry system (SSDs) illustrates a remarkable improvement in attaining the uniform and homogeneous dose distribution within the target volume. The technique enables the physicist to correct for a certain amount of misplacement or curvature of implant geometry. The short course of brachytherapy provides good palliation in terms of functional improvements with low and acceptable toxicity in high-grade glioma. With continual refinements of the technique, brachytherapy performed by a skilled brachytherapy team offers an opportunity to improve patient survival and quality of life. Since 1997, micro selectron HDR 192 Ir treatments are done including gynecological, oesophageal, breast, surface mould, soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and brain in our hospital. In this paper, procedure of interstitial brain implant in glioma as implant technique, simulation and treatment planning will be discussed

  18. Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Quentin E.; Xu, Jinghzu; Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Li, Xing; Rockey, William R.; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Enger, Shirin A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present a novel needle, catheter, and radiation source system for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) of the prostate. I-RSBT is a promising technique for reducing urethra, rectum, and bladder dose relative to conventional interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Methods: A wire-mounted 62 GBq 153 Gd source is proposed with an encapsulated diameter of 0.59 mm, active diameter of 0.44 mm, and active length of 10 mm. A concept model I-RSBT needle/catheter pair was constructed using concentric 50 and 75 μm thick nickel-titanium alloy (nitinol) tubes. The needle is 16-gauge (1.651 mm) in outer diameter and the catheter contains a 535 μm thick platinum shield. I-RSBT and conventional HDR-BT treatment plans for a prostate cancer patient were generated based on Monte Carlo dose calculations. In order to minimize urethral dose, urethral dose gradient volumes within 0–5 mm of the urethra surface were allowed to receive doses less than the prescribed dose of 100%. Results: The platinum shield reduced the dose rate on the shielded side of the source at 1 cm off-axis to 6.4% of the dose rate on the unshielded side. For the case considered, for the same minimum dose to the hottest 98% of the clinical target volume (D 98% ), I-RSBT reduced urethral D 0.1cc below that of conventional HDR-BT by 29%, 33%, 38%, and 44% for urethral dose gradient volumes within 0, 1, 3, and 5 mm of the urethra surface, respectively. Percentages are expressed relative to the prescription dose of 100%. For the case considered, for the same urethral dose gradient volumes, rectum D 1cc was reduced by 7%, 6%, 6%, and 6%, respectively, and bladder D 1cc was reduced by 4%, 5%, 5%, and 6%, respectively. Treatment time to deliver 20 Gy with I-RSBT was 154 min with ten 62 GBq 153 Gd sources. Conclusions: For the case considered, the proposed 153 Gd-based I-RSBT system has the potential to lower the urethral dose relative to HDR-BT by 29%–44% if the clinician allows

  19. Directional interstitial brachytherapy from simulation to application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liyong

    Organs at risk (OAR) are sometimes adjacent to or embedded in or overlap with the clinical target volume (CTV) to be treated. The purpose of this PhD study is to develop directionally low energy gamma-emitting interstitial brachytherapy sources. These sources can be applied between OAR to selectively reduce hot spots in the OARs and normal tissues. The reduction of dose over undesired regions can expand patient eligibility or reduce toxicities for the treatment by conventional interstitial brachytherapy. This study covers the development of a directional source from design optimization to construction of the first prototype source. The Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to simulate the radiation transport for the designs of directional sources. We have made a special construction kit to assemble radioactive and gold-shield components precisely into D-shaped titanium containers of the first directional source. Directional sources have a similar dose distribution as conventional sources on the treated side but greatly reduced dose on the shielded side, with a sharp dose gradient between them. A three-dimensional dose deposition kernel for the 125I directional source has been calculated. Treatment plans can use both directional and conventional 125I sources at the same source strength for low-dose-rate (LDR) implants to optimize the dose distributions. For prostate tumors, directional 125I LDR brachytherapy can potentially reduce genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities and improve potency preservation for low risk patients. The combination of better dose distribution of directional implants and better therapeutic ratio between tumor response and late reactions enables a novel temporary LDR treatment, as opposed to permanent or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for the intermediate risk T2b and high risk T2c tumors. Supplemental external-beam treatments can be shortened with a better brachytherapy boost for T3 tumors. In conclusion, we have successfully finished the

  20. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of penile carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petera, J.; Odrazka, K.; Zouhar, M.; Bedrosova, J.; Dolezel, M. [Dept. of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Charles Univ. Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2004-02-01

    Background: interstitial low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy allows conservative treatment of T1-T2 penile carcinoma. High-dose-rate (HDR) is often considered to be dangerous for interstitial implants because of a higher risk of complications, but numerous reports suggest that results may be comparable to LDR. Nevertheless, there are no data in the literature available regarding HDR interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the penis. Case report: a 64-year-old man with T1 NO MO epidermoid carcinoma of the glans is reported. Interstitial HDR brachytherapy was performed using the stainless hollow needle technique and a breast template for fixation and good geometry. The dose delivered was 18 x 3 Gy twice daily. Results: after 232 days from brachytherapy, the patient was without any evidence of the tumor, experienced no serious radiation-induced complications, and had a fully functional organ. Conclusion: HDR interstitial brachytherapy is feasible in selected case of penis carcinoma, when careful planning and small single fractions are used. (orig.)

  1. Navigation system for interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strassmann, G.; Kolotas, C.; Heyd, R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the stud was to develop a computed tomography (CT) based electromagnetic navigation system for interstitial brachytherapy. This is especially designed for situations when needles have to be positioned adjacent to or within critical anatomical structures. In such instances interactive 3D visualisation of the needle positions is essential. The material consisted of a Polhemus electromagnetic 3D digitizer, a Pentium 200 MHz laptop and a voice recognition for continuous speech. In addition, we developed an external reference system constructed of Perspex which could be positioned above the tumour region and attached to the patient using a non-invasive fixation method. A specially designed needle holder and patient bed were also developed. Measurements were made on a series of phantoms in order to study the efficacy and accuracy of the navigation system. The mean navigation accuracy of positioning the 20.0 cm length metallic needles within the phantoms was in the range 2.0-4.1 mm with a maximum of 5.4 mm. This is an improvement on the accuracy of a CT-guided technique which was in the range 6.1-11.3 mm with a maximum of 19.4 mm. The mean reconstruction accuracy of the implant geometry was 3.2 mm within a non-ferromagnetic environment. We found that although the needles were metallic this did not have a significant influence. We also found for our experimental setups that the CT table and operation table non-ferromagnetic parts had no significant influence on the navigation accuracy. This navigation system will be a very useful clinical tool for interstitial brachytherapy applications, particularly when critical structures have to be avoided. It also should provide a significant improvement on our existing technique

  2. SU-E-T-574: Fessiblity of Using the Calypso System for HDR Interstitial Catheter Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J S; Ma, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: It is always a challenge to reconstruct the interstitial catheter for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy on patient CT or MR images. This work aims to investigate the feasibility of using the Calypso system (Varian Medical, CA) for HDR catheter reconstruction utilizing its accuracy on tracking the electromagnetic transponder location. Methods: Experiment was done with a phantom that has a HDR interstitial catheter embedded inside. CT scan with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm was taken for this phantom with two Calypso beacon transponders in the catheter. The two transponders were connected with a wire. The Calypso system was used to record the beacon transponders’ location in real time when they were gently pulled out with the wire. The initial locations of the beacon transponders were used for registration with the CT image and the detected transponder locations were used for the catheter path reconstruction. The reconstructed catheter path was validated on the CT image. Results: The HDR interstitial catheter was successfully reconstructed based on the transponders’ coordinates recorded by the Calypso system in real time when the transponders were pulled in the catheter. After registration with the CT image, the shape and location of the reconstructed catheter are evaluated against the CT image and the result shows an accuracy of 2 mm anywhere in the Calypso detectable region which is within a 10 cm X 10 cm X 10 cm cubic box for the current system. Conclusion: It is feasible to use the Calypso system for HDR interstitial catheter reconstruction. The obstacle for its clinical usage is the size of the beacon transponder whose diameter is bigger than most of the interstitial catheters used in clinic. Developing smaller transponders and supporting software and hardware for this application is necessary before it can be adopted for clinical use

  3. Late complications after high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizutani, Kimishige; Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Teshima, Teruki; Kakimoto, Naoya; Murakami, Shumei; Furukawa, Souhei; Fuchihata, Hajime

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this study was to analyze the treatment results and late complications of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT) for early (T1N0, T2N0) mobile tongue cancer using the microSelectron-HDR. From January 1993 through April 2001, a total of 72 patients with early squamous cell carcinomas of the mobile tongue were treated with microSelectron-HDR interstitial brachytherapy at the Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital. Of the patients, 18% were treated with a combination of prior external radiation and HDR-ISBT, and 82% were treated with HDR-ISBT alone. For HDR-ISBT alone, all cases were treated with a total dose of 54 Gy/9 fractions every 5 days or 60 Gy/10 fractions every 8 days. In combined therapy with an external dose of 30 to 40 Gy, HDR-ISBT was given at a total dose of 42-50 Gy. The Brinkman and alcohol indexes were used to analyze the incidence of late complications after HDR-ISBT. The 2- and 5-year local control rates were 85% and 82%, respectively. Fifteen of 72 patients (21%) treated with HDR-ISBT had late complications. Ten of 15 patients (67%) with late complications had a Brinkman index exceeding 600. HDR-ISBT is useful and easily applied under local anesthesia to early or superficial lesions of the mobile tongue. However, we found an increase in late complications, such as soft-tissue ulcers and bone exposure, after irradiation of tongue cancer with 60 Gy HDR-ISBT in patients with a Brinkman index greater than 600. (author)

  4. Radiobiological considerations in gynaecological HDR and LDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, M.; Schulz-Wendtland, R.

    1989-01-01

    In brachytherapy the advantages of high dose rate over low dose rate afterloading therapy were obvious. Out-patient treatment becomes possible, the position of the sources is reproducible and can be observed during the treatment and the patients have to be immobilised for only a short time, giving less psychological stress and a decreased risk of thrombosis and embolism. When changing from LDR to HDR afterloading therapy we are not yet able to evaluate its biological impact. Radiobiological considerations and our experimental data, however, give us the following clinical consequences by using HDR brachytherapy: There is a need for about 15 fractions or more and each increase in dose rate requires higher fractioning. Due to the steep dose rate decline and the inhomogeneous dose distribution, multiple equivalence factors are necessary when fractioning is not sufficiently high. Correction factors to reduce the dose close to the source are low, with increasing distance from the source they increase. If HDR radiation therapy is used, the percutaneous dose in the pelvic wall region should be reduced. The reduction of the dose in HDR brachytherapy is a compromise to limit the side effects caused by the radiation. The drawback is a small therapeutic range and reduced therapeutic effectivity at the tumour. (orig.) [de

  5. Experience of the first application of HDR brachytherapy in nasopharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega Hernandez, Manuel I.; Alfonso Laguardia, Rodolfo; Silvestre Patallo, Ileana; Roca Muchuli, Carlos; Garcia Heredia, Gilda

    2006-01-01

    A research was made by applying boost on the area of the nasopharynx relapse with high dose rate (HDR) in a diagnosis of nasopharynx carcinoma previously treated with telecobalt therapy, at a dose of 70 Gy. There was persistence of the injury. Three sessions were planned, with consecutive fractions of 6.5 Gy in 15 days, with optimization, using a personal mould of autopolymerizable acrylic. The successful possibility to apply the high rate modern brachytherapy was reaffirmed, as a treatment complementary to teletherapy in case of persistence or relapse. A Micro Selectron HDR equipment was used

  6. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of base of tongue carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takacsi-Nagy, Z.; Polgar, C.; Somogyi, A.; Major, T.; Fodor, J.; Nemeth, G. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Oberna, F. [Dept. of Maxillofacial Surgery, St. Rokus Hospital, Budapest (Hungary); Remenar, E.; Kasler, M. [Dept. of Head and Neck, Maxillofacial and Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2004-12-01

    Background and purpose: to date none of the studies examined the feasibility and efficacy of interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in the treatment of carcinoma of the tongue base. Therefore the aim of this study was to contribute to this issue. Patients and methods: between 1992 and 2000 37 patients (mean age 55 years) with T1-4 and NO-3 carcinoma of the base of tongue were presented. Neck dissection was carried out in twelve cases (32%). 30 patients with advanced stage received brachytherapy boost after 50-66.5 Gy (mean, 60 Gy) locoregional external beam irradiation (EBI) and 7 patients with early stage (T1-2, NO) were managed locally with wide tumor excision and sole brachytherapy. 4 of them underwent neck dissection and the others were subjected to 50 Gy regional EBI. The mean dose of boost and sole brachytherapy was 18 Gy and 28 Gy, respectively. Results: the median follow-up time for surviving patients was 51 months. The 7 sole brachytherapy patients are living with no evidence of disease. For patients treated with EBI and brachytherapy boost, the 5-year actuarial rate of local, locoregional recurrence-free and overall survival was 60%, 52% and 46%, respectively. For all patients in univariate analysis larger tumor size (T4 vs. T1-3) was significant negative predictor of local (RR: 7.23) and locoregional control (RR: 3.87), but nodal involvement was not. Delayed soft tissue ulceration and osteoradionecrosis occurred in 4 (13%) EBI and brachytherapy treated patients. None of the sole brachytherapy patients experienced severe late radiation toxicity. Conclusion: EBI combined with interstitial HDR brachytherapy boost result in acceptable local tumor control with low incidence of late side effects in patients with advanced disease. Fractionated sole HDR brachytherapy following tumor excision is a feasible treatment option for patients with early stage cancer and gives excellent local results. (orig.)

  7. Needle displacement during HDR brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damore, Steven J.; Syed, A.M. Nisar; Puthawala, Ajmel A.; Sharma, Anil

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: We used clinical patient data to examine implant displacement between high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy fractions for prostate cancer to determine its impact on treatment delivery. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the verification films taken prior to each fraction for 96 consecutive patients treated with HDR brachytherapy boosts as part of their radiation therapy for definitive treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer at our institution. Patients were treated with 18-24 Gy in 4 fractions of HDR delivered in 40 hours followed by 36-39.6 Gy external beam radiation to the prostate. We determined the mean and maximum displacement distances of marker seeds placed in the prostate and of the implanted needles between HDR fractions. Results: Mean and maximum displacement distances between fractions were documented up to 7.6 mm and 28.5 mm, respectively, for the implant needles and 3.6 mm and 11.4 mm, respectively, for the gold marker seeds. All displacement of implant needles occurred in the caudal direction. At least 1 cm caudal displacement of needles occurred prior to 15.5% all fractions. Manual adjustment of needles was required prior to 15% of fractions, and adjustment of the CLP only was required in 24%. Most of the displacement for both the marker seeds and needles occurred between the first and second fractions. Conclusions: There is significant caudal displacement of interstitial implant needles between HDR fractions in our prostate cancer patients. Obtaining verification films and making adjustments in the treatment volume prior to each fraction is necessary to avoid significant inaccuracies in treatment delivery

  8. WE-F-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy II: Integrating Imaging with HDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craciunescu, O [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Todor, D [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Leeuw, A de

    2014-06-15

    In recent years, with the advent of high/pulsed dose rate afterloading technology, advanced treatment planning systems, CT/MRI compatible applicators, and advanced imaging platforms, image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatments (IGABT) have started to play an ever increasing role in modern radiation therapy. The most accurate way to approach IGABT treatment is to provide the infrastructure that combines in a single setting an appropriate imaging device, a treatment planning system, and a treatment unit. The Brachytherapy Suite is not a new concept, yet the modern suites are incorporating state-of-the-art imaging (MRI, CBCT equipped simulators, CT, and /or US) that require correct integration with each other and with the treatment planning and delivery systems. Arguably, an MRI-equipped Brachytherapy Suite is the ideal setup for real-time adaptive brachytherapy treatments. The main impediment to MRI-IGABT adoption is access to MRI scanners. Very few radiation oncology departments currently house MRI scanners, and even fewer in a dedicated Brachytherapy Suite. CBCT equipped simulators are increasingly offered by manufacturers as part of a Brachytherapy Suite installation. If optimized, images acquired can be used for treatment planning, or can be registered with other imaging modalities. This infrastructure is relevant for all forms of brachytherapy, especially those utilizing multi-fractionated courses of treatment such as prostate and cervix. Moreover, for prostate brachytherapy, US imaging systems can be part of the suite to allow for real-time HDR/LDR treatments. Learning Objectives: Understand the adaptive workflow of MR-based IGBT for cervical cancer. Familiarize with commissioning aspects of a CBCT equipped simulator with emphasis on brachytherapy applications Learn about the current status and future developments in US-based prostate brachytherapy.

  9. WE-F-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy II: Integrating Imaging with HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craciunescu, O; Todor, D; Leeuw, A de

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, with the advent of high/pulsed dose rate afterloading technology, advanced treatment planning systems, CT/MRI compatible applicators, and advanced imaging platforms, image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatments (IGABT) have started to play an ever increasing role in modern radiation therapy. The most accurate way to approach IGABT treatment is to provide the infrastructure that combines in a single setting an appropriate imaging device, a treatment planning system, and a treatment unit. The Brachytherapy Suite is not a new concept, yet the modern suites are incorporating state-of-the-art imaging (MRI, CBCT equipped simulators, CT, and /or US) that require correct integration with each other and with the treatment planning and delivery systems. Arguably, an MRI-equipped Brachytherapy Suite is the ideal setup for real-time adaptive brachytherapy treatments. The main impediment to MRI-IGABT adoption is access to MRI scanners. Very few radiation oncology departments currently house MRI scanners, and even fewer in a dedicated Brachytherapy Suite. CBCT equipped simulators are increasingly offered by manufacturers as part of a Brachytherapy Suite installation. If optimized, images acquired can be used for treatment planning, or can be registered with other imaging modalities. This infrastructure is relevant for all forms of brachytherapy, especially those utilizing multi-fractionated courses of treatment such as prostate and cervix. Moreover, for prostate brachytherapy, US imaging systems can be part of the suite to allow for real-time HDR/LDR treatments. Learning Objectives: Understand the adaptive workflow of MR-based IGBT for cervical cancer. Familiarize with commissioning aspects of a CBCT equipped simulator with emphasis on brachytherapy applications Learn about the current status and future developments in US-based prostate brachytherapy

  10. HDR brachytherapy for superficial non-melanoma skin cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauden, Ruth; Pracy, Martin; Avery, Anne-Marie; Hodgetts, Ian; Gauden, Stan

    2013-01-01

    Our initial experience using recommended high dose per fraction skin brachytherapy (BT) treatment schedules, resulted in poor cosmesis. This study aimed to assess in a prospective group of patients the use of Leipzig surface applicators for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy, for the treatment of small non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) using a protracted treatment schedule. Treatment was delivered by HDR brachytherapy with Leipzig applicators. 36Gy, prescribed to between 3 to 4mm, was given in daily 3Gy fractions. Acute skin toxicity was evaluated weekly during irradiation using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Local response, late skin effects and cosmetic results were monitored at periodic intervals after treatment completion. From March 2002, 200 patients with 236 lesions were treated. Median follow-up was 66 months (range 25–121 months). A total of 162 lesions were macroscopic, while in 74 cases, BT was given after resection because of positive microscopic margins. There were 121 lesions that were basal cell carcinomas, and 115 were squamous cell carcinomas. Lesions were located on the head and neck (198), the extremities (26) and trunk (12). Local control was 232/236 (98%). Four patients required further surgery to treat recurrence. Grade 1 acute skin toxicity was detected in 168 treated lesions (71%) and grade 2 in 81 (34%). Cosmesis was good or excellent in 208 cases (88%). Late skin hypopigmentation changes were observed in 13 cases (5.5%). Delivering 36Gy over 2 weeks to superficial NMSC using HDR brachytherapy is well tolerated and provides a high local control rate without significant toxicity.

  11. Development of optimized dosimetric models for HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayalan, K.; Jagadeesan, M.

    2003-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) systems are in clinical use for more than four decades particularly in cervical cancer. Optimization is the method to produce dose distribution which assures that doses are not compromised at the treatment sites whilst reducing the risk of overdosing critical organs. Hence HDRB optimization begins with the desired dose distribution and requires the calculations of the relative weighting factors for each dwell position with out changing the source activity. The optimization for Ca. uterine cervix treatment is simply duplication of the dose distribution used for Low dose rate (LDR) applications. In the present work, two optimized dosimetric models were proposed and studied thoroughly, to suit the local clinical conditions. These models are named as HDR-C and HDR-D, where C and D represent configuration and distance respectively. These models duplicate exactly the LDR pear shaped dose distribution, which is a golden standard. The validity of these models is tested in different clinical situations and in actual patients (n=92). These models: HDR-C and HDR-D reduce bladder dose by 11.11% and 10% and rectal dose by 8% and 7% respectively. The treatment time is also reduced by 12-14%. In a busy hospital setup, these models find a place to cater large number of patients, while addressing individual patients geometry. (author)

  12. The use of nomograms in LDR-HDR prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujades, Ma Carmen; Camacho, Cristina; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Richart, José; Gimeno, Jose; Lliso, Françoise; Carmona, Vicente; Ballester, Facundo; Crispín, Vicente; Rodríguez, Silvia; Tormo, Alejandro

    2011-09-01

    The common use of nomograms in Low Dose Rate (LDR) permanent prostate brachytherapy (BT) allows to estimate the number of seeds required for an implant. Independent dosimetry verification is recommended for each clinical dosimetry in BT. Also, nomograms can be useful for dose calculation quality assurance and they could be adapted to High Dose Rate (HDR). This work sets nomograms for LDR and HDR prostate-BT implants, which are applied to three different institutions that use different implant techniques. Patients treated throughout 2010 till April 2011 were considered for this study. This example was chosen to be the representative of the latest implant techniques and to ensure consistency in the planning. A sufficient number of cases for both BT modalities, prescription dose and different work methodology (depending on the institution) were taken into account. The specific nomograms were built using the correlation between the prostate volume and some characteristic parameters of each BT modality, such as the source Air Kerma Strength, number of implanted seeds in LDR or total radiation time in HDR. For each institution and BT modality, nomograms normalized to the prescribed dose were obtained and fitted to a linear function. The parameters of the adjustment show a good agreement between data and the fitting. It should be noted that for each institution these linear function parameters are different, indicating that each centre should construct its own nomograms. Nomograms for LDR and HDR prostate brachytherapy are simple quality assurance tools, specific for each institution. Nevertheless, their use should be complementary to the necessary independent verification.

  13. The use of nomograms in LDR-HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Carmen Pujades

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The common use of nomograms in Low Dose Rate (LDR permanent prostate brachytherapy (BT allowsto estimate the number of seeds required for an implant. Independent dosimetry verification is recommended for eachclinical dosimetry in BT. Also, nomograms can be useful for dose calculation quality assurance and they could be adaptedto High Dose Rate (HDR. This work sets nomograms for LDR and HDR prostate-BT implants, which are applied tothree different institutions that use different implant techniques. Material and methods: Patients treated throughout 2010 till April 2011 were considered for this study. This examplewas chosen to be the representative of the latest implant techniques and to ensure consistency in the planning. A sufficientnumber of cases for both BT modalities, prescription dose and different work methodology (depending on theinstitution were taken into account. The specific nomograms were built using the correlation between the prostatevo lume and some characteristic parameters of each BT modality, such as the source Air Kerma Strength, numberof implanted seeds in LDR or total radiation time in HDR. Results: For each institution and BT modality, nomograms normalized to the prescribed dose were obtained andfitted to a linear function. The parameters of the adjustment show a good agreement between data and the fitting.It should be noted that for each institution these linear function parameters are different, indicating that each centreshould construct its own nomograms. Conclusions: Nomograms for LDR and HDR prostate brachytherapy are simple quality assurance tools, specific foreach institution. Nevertheless, their use should be complementary to the necessary independent verification.

  14. Low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yosuke; Dokiya, Takushi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Suzuki, Takayuki; Saito, Shiro; Monma, Tetsuo; Ohki, Takahiro [National Tokyo Medical Center (Japan); Murai, Masaru; Kubo, Atsushi

    2000-04-01

    From December 1997 through January 1999, fifteen prostatic cancer patients were treated with low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy using TRUS and perineal template guidance without external radiotherapy. Up to now, as no apparent side effects were found, the safety of this treatment is suggested. In the future, in order to treat prostatic cancer patients with interstitial brachytherapy using I-125 or Pd-103, more investigation for this low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy is needed. (author)

  15. Relocation of a nucletron microselectron-HDR brachytherapy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartrum, T; Tran, T; Freeman, N; Morales, J [St Vincents Hospital, Darlinghurst, NSW (Australia)

    2004-12-15

    Full text: For a period of four weeks, our clinical Nucletron microSelectron high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy system was pulled out of clinical use and relocated to a new building. During this period decommission tests, de-wiring of the treatment unit and its associated safety system (such as radiation detector, emergency off circuits and door interlocks), transportation of all equipment, re-wiring of this equipment in the new location and recommission tests were carried out. The decommission and recommission test program was designed upon consultation with the manufacturer's (Nucletron) acceptance test procedures and work carried out by others. The ACPSEM tolerances for remote afterloaders was used as a guideline. In addition to mandatory dosimetry, positional, workstation database and safety tests, two Australian Standard compliance tests were carried out. The compliance tests involved one for remote afterloaders and another for treatment room design. This testing program was designed and implemented with the aim of ensuring ongoing safe delivery of brachytherapy doses to the patient. The testing program consisted of two parts. The first involved a series of decommissioning tests that consisted of dosimetry tests such as source and check cable positional accuracy and source calibration tests. In addition to these tests an inventory of standard plans, patient records and system configuration information was catalogued. The second part involved a series of recommission tests and involved carrying out dosimetry tests on the brachytherapy system (positional accuracy and calibration tests), simulating common treatment scenarios (prostate, cervical, vaginal and bile duct) and checking standard plans; patient records and system configuration had remained unchanged. During this period, other tests were carried out. These included Nucletron acceptance and preventative maintenance tests, Australian Standards compliance testing and integrity of network transfer of

  16. Relocation of a nucletron microselectron-HDR brachytherapy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartrum, T.; Tran, T.; Freeman, N.; Morales, J.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: For a period of four weeks, our clinical Nucletron microSelectron high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy system was pulled out of clinical use and relocated to a new building. During this period decommission tests, de-wiring of the treatment unit and its associated safety system (such as radiation detector, emergency off circuits and door interlocks), transportation of all equipment, re-wiring of this equipment in the new location and recommission tests were carried out. The decommission and recommission test program was designed upon consultation with the manufacturer's (Nucletron) acceptance test procedures and work carried out by others. The ACPSEM tolerances for remote afterloaders was used as a guideline. In addition to mandatory dosimetry, positional, workstation database and safety tests, two Australian Standard compliance tests were carried out. The compliance tests involved one for remote afterloaders and another for treatment room design. This testing program was designed and implemented with the aim of ensuring ongoing safe delivery of brachytherapy doses to the patient. The testing program consisted of two parts. The first involved a series of decommissioning tests that consisted of dosimetry tests such as source and check cable positional accuracy and source calibration tests. In addition to these tests an inventory of standard plans, patient records and system configuration information was catalogued. The second part involved a series of recommission tests and involved carrying out dosimetry tests on the brachytherapy system (positional accuracy and calibration tests), simulating common treatment scenarios (prostate, cervical, vaginal and bile duct) and checking standard plans; patient records and system configuration had remained unchanged. During this period, other tests were carried out. These included Nucletron acceptance and preventative maintenance tests, Australian Standards compliance testing and integrity of network transfer of

  17. Fricke gel-layer dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambarini, G.; Negri, A.; Carrara, M.; Marchesini, R.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In the last decade, technological improvements in radiotherapy have been significant and consequently the use and importance of radiotherapy in cancer treatment have increased greatly. In brachytherapy, new possibilities have been opened by the impressive progresses in 3D imaging, by the development of sophisticated techniques for modern afterloaders and by the constantly increasing speed and capacity of computers. However, these methodological improvements require corresponding improvements in the dosimetry methods, in order to ensure that the values calculated with computer treatment planning systems, adopted in the clinical praxis, agree with the delivered dose distributions. Fricke gel-layer dosimeters (FGLD) are under study by our group as a reliable alternative to films, semiconductors arrays or thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). In the last years, we have significantly improved this technique by defining the FGLD best chemical composition, by optimizing the image acquisition assessment and by developing a dedicated software for image analysis. In this study, experimental measurements of planar dose distributions of a clinical 192 Ir source (Microselectron HDR, Nucletron) obtained by irradiating a series of piled-up FGL dosimeters in a tissue-equivalent phantom are presented. The obtained results were in accordance to TLD measurements and to treatment planning system (Plato, Nucletron) calculations. FGLD have proven to be a reliable tool to achieve HDR brachytherapy dose distribution measurements

  18. Prostate HDR brachytherapy catheter displacement between planning and treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, May; Hruby, George; Lovett, Aimee; Patanjali, Nitya

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: HDR brachytherapy is used as a conformal boost for treating prostate cancer. Given the large doses delivered, it is critical that the volume treated matches that planned. Our outpatient protocol comprises two 9 Gy fractions, two weeks apart. We prospectively assessed catheter displacement between CT planning and treatment delivery. Materials and methods: Three fiducial markers and the catheters were implanted under transrectal ultrasound guidance. Metal marker wires were inserted into 4 reference catheters before CT; marker positions relative to each other and to the marker wires were measured from the CT scout. Measurements were repeated immediately prior to treatment delivery using pelvic X-ray with marker wires in the same reference catheters. Measurements from CT scout and film were compared. For displacements of 5 mm or more, indexer positions were adjusted prior to treatment delivery. Results: Results are based on 48 implants, in 25 patients. Median time from planning CT to treatment delivery was 254 min (range 81–367 min). Median catheter displacement was 7.5 mm (range −2.9–23.9 mm), 67% of implants had displacement of 5 mm or greater. Displacements were predominantly caudal. Conclusions: Catheter displacement can occur in the 1–3 h between the planning CT scan and treatment. It is recommended that departments performing HDR prostate brachytherapy verify catheter positions immediately prior to treatment delivery.

  19. An overview of interstitial brachytherapy and hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, B.B.; Harney, J.

    1989-01-01

    Interstitial thermoradiotherapy, an experimental cancer treatment that combines interstitial radiation implants (brachytherapy) and interstitial hyperthermia, is in the early stages of investigation. In accordance with the procedure used in a current national trial protocol, a 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered after catheters are placed into the tumor area while the patient is under general anesthesia. This is immediately followed by loading of radioactive Iridium-192 seeds into the catheters for a defined period of time. Once the prescribed radiation dose is delivered, the radioactive sources are removed and a second, 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered. Clinical trials with hyperthermia in combination with radiation have increased in recent years. Nurses caring for these patients need to become more knowledgeable about this investigational therapy. This paper provides an overview of the biologic rationale for this therapy, as well as a description of the delivery method and clinical application. Specific related nursing interventions are defined in a nursing protocol.23 references

  20. Interstitial brachytherapy for liver metastases and assessment of response by positron emission tomography: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goura Kishor Rath

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available For liver metastases (LM, image guided percutaneous ablative procedures such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA, laser induced thermal therapy (LITT and trans-arterial chemo-embolisation (TACE are increasingly being used because they are relatively safer, less invasive and equally effective. CT scan guided interstitial brachytherapy (IBT with a single large dose of radiation by high dose rate (HDR brachytherapy is a novel technique of treating LM and has shown good results. Positron emission tomography (PET scan may provide better information for assessing the response toIBT procedures. We hereby report a case of LM that was treated by HDR IBT and PET scan was done in addition to CT scan for assessing the response.

  1. Simultaneous radiochemotherapy and endoluminal HDR brachytherapy in esophageal cancer; Simultane Radiochemotherapie mit intraluminaler HDR-Brachytherapie des Oesophaguskarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patonay, P.; Naszaly, A.; Mayer, A. [Hauptstaedtisches Zentrum fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Budapest (Hungary)

    2007-02-15

    Purpose: to study efficacy and toxicity of radiochemotherapy in esophageal cancer including initial endoluminal high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Patients and methods: between 01/1995 and 06/2005, 61 patients with esophageal cancer were treated preoperatively with definitive and palliative intent. Treatment started with intraluminal HDR-BT for recanalization of the esophagus (single fraction size of 8 Gy in 0.5 cm depth, three times, q7d) followed by external-beam radiation therapy (50 Gy total dose, 5 x 2 Gy/week, 25 fractions in 5 weeks). Chemotherapy was started simultaneously with external irradiation (three courses of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, q21d). Results: swallowing function improved in 55/61 patients (dysphagia classification according to the RTOG), and worsened in 6/61 patients, respectively. Median duration of symptomatic improvement was 11 months, median follow-up 12 months (range 3-68 months). Following simultaneous radiochemotherapy, tumor resectability was achieved in 7/25 patients of the neoadjuvant group, and the histological specimen showed complete remission in 6/7 patients. Conclusion: these results indicate a favorable effect of simultaneous radiochemotherapy starting with endoluminal HDR-after-loading-(AL-)BT in esophageal cancer. (orig.)

  2. Implementation of microsource high dose rate (mHDR) brachytherapy in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    Brachytherapy using remote afterloading of a single high dose rate 192 Ir microsource was developed in the 1970s. After its introduction to clinics, this system has spread rapidly among developed Member States and has become a highly desirable modality in cancer treatment. This technique is now gradually being introduced to the developing Member States. The 192 Ir sources are produced with a high specific activity. This results in a high dose rate (HDR) to the tumour and shorter treatment times. The high specific activity simultaneously results in a much smaller source (so-called micro source, around I mm in diameter) which may be easily inserted into tissue through a thin delivery tube, the so-called interstitial treatment, as well as easily inserted into body cavities, the so-called intracavitary or endoluminal treatment. Another advantage is the ability to change dwell time (the time a source remains in one position) of the stepping source which allows dose distribution to match the target volume more closely. The purpose of this TECDOC is to advise radiation oncologists, medical physicists and hospital administrators in hospitals which are planning to introduce 192 Ir microsource HDR (mHDR) remote afterloading systems. The document supplements IAEA-TECDOC-1040, Design and Implementation of a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects, and will facilitate implementation of this new brachytherapy technology, especially in developing countries. The operation of the system, 'how to use the system', is not within the scope of this document. This TECDOC is based on the recommendations of an Advisory Group meeting held in Vienna in April 1999

  3. Commissioning and clinical implementation of HDR brachytherapy in El Salvador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales Lopez, Jorge Luis; Castillo, Luis Frank; Castillo Bahi, Ramon del

    2009-01-01

    The Gynecologic Cancer is one of the best known malignancies in different countries of the world, with a high incidence in developing countries. In the treatment of this disease have been used multiple treatment arms among which is the high rate brachytherapy (HDR). The IAEA has put much emphasis on supporting all programs to treat this disease and in this context within the project 'Human Resource Development and Nuclear Technology Support', collaborated with the dispatch of experts on mission ELS0006 01 'Assistance to the ICES in HDR brachytherapy initiating Treatments at the Cancer Institute of El Salvador 'Dr. Narciso Diaz Bazan' in San Salvador, El Salvador. The process of commissioning and implementing clinical service Brachytherapy High Dose Rate (HDR BT) is a relatively complex process that begins with the formation of functional and technical service, based on flow patients to be treated, availability of local technological capability to install, and culminates with the preparation and implementation of protocols. Experts involved in the implementation of this service divided this task in stages organized chronologically: 1st. Study of existing infrastructure and level of training of technical personnel available, 2nd. Proposal and application of amendments in order to adapt the facility to the planned patient flow and optimal use of technological infrastructure, 3rd. Establishment of the process of securing the disposable waste materials and not required, 4th. Performance of tests of physical commissioning clinical dosimetry and instrumentation unit, surgical and therapeutic, 5th. Training of technical personnel, 6th. Preparation of clinical protocol and 7th. Initiation and development of treatment for patients. All these steps are carried out with the integration and consensus of the entire multidisciplinary team that makes up the service and with the support of the administration as a prerequisite. Within two weeks the service was modified according to

  4. Use of CT or MR dosimetry in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.; Das, R.; See, A.; Duchesne, G.M.; Van Dyk, S.; Tai, K.H.

    2003-01-01

    Brachytherapy (BT) has, in recent years, become a well-utilised treatment option for prostate cancer. Tumour control probability relies on accurate dosimetry, which in turn relies on the accurate definition of the prostate gland. In external beam radiotherapy and BT, MRI has been shown to be a superior imaging modality when delineating the prostate gland especially at the apex. To date, data on MRI planning in prostate BT has focussed mainly on permanent interstitial implants. No data currently exists comparing MRI vs CT planning in HDR BT and its subsequent impact on prostate dosimetry. To determine the effects of MRI vs CT in HDR BT with respect to prostatic volumes and normal tissue doses, with the evaluations made using dose-volume histograms (DVH). Dosimetry parameters derived using CT and MRI (T2 weighted) scans of 11 patients who had received TRUS guided implants for HDR BT, were compared using the PlatoTM computer planning system. Treatment plans were generated on volumes marked by the same radiation oncologist for each patient. Comparison was made of the treatment plans (dosimetry) between: 1. CT generated plans; 2. CT generated plans assessed using MRI marked volumes and 3. MRI generated plans. We confirm the previously reported results that CT scans can overestimate prostatic volumes compared with MRI. Variations were noted in CT and MRI based plans that may allow improved sparing of the rectum and urethra when using MRI planning. The main disadvantages of using MRI scans are access to facilities as well as identifying a dummy source to adequately define the tips of our catheters. It is feasible to utilise MRI scans for HDR BT planning. The clearer definition of anatomical structures has added advantages when contouring the prostate

  5. Remote Afterloading High Dose Rate (HDR) Endobronchial Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hyesook; Choi, Eun Kyung; Yi, Byong Yong; Kim, Won Dong; Kim, Woo Sung; Koh, Youn Suck [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-12-15

    Authors described the remote afterloading endobronchial brachytherapy (EBBT) technique using the microSelectron HDR Ir-192 and the Asan Medical Center experience. Total 28 EBBT in 9 patients were performed since November 1989 and 24 EBBT in 8 patients were employed for palliation and 3 EBBT in 1 patient was treated curatively. Authors observed a significant relief of obstructive symptom with tumor regression in 7 patients out of 8 who were treated palliatively but one of them died of pulmonary congestion in 3 weeks after EBBT. One patient with prior therapy of extensive electrocautery expired within 1 day after 2nd EBBT procedure with massive hemorrhage from the lesion. EBBT procedure has been tolerable and can be performed as an outpatient.

  6. Remote Afterloading High Dose Rate (HDR) Endobronchial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hyesook; Choi, Eun Kyung; Yi, Byong Yong; Kim, Won Dong; Kim, Woo Sung; Koh, Youn Suck

    1991-01-01

    Authors described the remote afterloading endobronchial brachytherapy (EBBT) technique using the microSelectron HDR Ir-192 and the Asan Medical Center experience. Total 28 EBBT in 9 patients were performed since November 1989 and 24 EBBT in 8 patients were employed for palliation and 3 EBBT in 1 patient was treated curatively. Authors observed a significant relief of obstructive symptom with tumor regression in 7 patients out of 8 who were treated palliatively but one of them died of pulmonary congestion in 3 weeks after EBBT. One patient with prior therapy of extensive electrocautery expired within 1 day after 2nd EBBT procedure with massive hemorrhage from the lesion. EBBT procedure has been tolerable and can be performed as an outpatient

  7. A comparison of HDR brachytherapy and IMRT techniques for dose escalation in prostate cancer: A radiobiological modeling study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatyga, M.; Williamson, J. F.; Dogan, N.; Todor, D.; Siebers, J. V.; George, R.; Barani, I.; Hagan, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, 401 College Street, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    A course of one to three large fractions of high dose rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy is an attractive alternative to intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for delivering boost doses to the prostate in combination with additional external beam irradiation for intermediate risk disease. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively compare single-fraction HDR boosts to biologically equivalent fractionated IMRT boosts, assuming idealized image guided delivery (igIMRT) and conventional delivery (cIMRT). For nine prostate patients, both seven-field IMRT and HDR boosts were planned. The linear-quadratic model was used to compute biologically equivalent dose prescriptions. The cIMRT plan was evaluated as a static plan and with simulated random and setup errors. The authors conclude that HDR delivery produces a therapeutic ratio which is significantly better than the conventional IMRT and comparable to or better than the igIMRT delivery. For the HDR, the rectal gBEUD analysis is strongly influenced by high dose DVH tails. A saturation BED, beyond which no further injury can occur, must be assumed. Modeling of organ motion uncertainties yields mean outcomes similar to static plan outcomes.

  8. Independent technique of verifying high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, Cheng B.; Korb, Leroy J.; Darnell, Brenda; Krishna, K. V.; Ulewicz, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: An independent technique for verifying high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment plans has been formulated and validated clinically. Methods and Materials: In HDR brachytherapy, dwell times at respective dwell positions are computed, using an optimization algorithm in a HDR treatment-planning system to deliver a specified dose to many target points simultaneously. Because of the variability of dwell times, concerns have been expressed regarding the ability of the algorithm to compute the correct dose. To address this concern, a commercially available low-dose rate (LDR) algorithm was used to compute the doses at defined distances, based on the dwell times obtained from the HDR treatment plans. The percent deviation between doses computed using the HDR and LDR algorithms were reviewed for HDR procedures performed over the last year. Results: In this retrospective study, the difference between computed doses using the HDR and LDR algorithms was found to be within 5% for about 80% of the HDR procedures. All of the reviewed procedures have dose differences of less than 10%. Conclusion: An independent technique for verifying HDR brachytherapy treatment plans has been validated based on clinical data. Provided both systems are available, this technique is universal in its applications and not limited to either a particular implant applicator, implant site, or implant type

  9. Quality assurance of Vari-source high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy- remote after loader and cost effectiveness of Vari-source HDR- brachytherapy: NORI, Islamabad experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, N.; Mahmood, H.; Jafri, S.R.A.

    2004-01-01

    A quality control of Vari-Source high dose rate (HDR) remote after loading brachytherapy machine was carried out and the cost effectiveness of HDR brachytherapy machine was also evaluated considering the cost of ten Iridium-192 wire sources at Nuclear Medicine, Oncology and Radiotherapy Institute (NORI), Islamabad, Pakistan. A total number of 253 intracavitary insertions were done in 98 patients from October 1996 to May 2001. The results of the quality control tests performed during 1996 to 2001 were within the acceptable limits. The cost effectiveness of Vari-Source HDR brachytherapy machine was also evaluated. The average cost per patient was calculated as US$ 491. Small number of patients was treated as the machine was used for gynecologic malignancies only. The objective was to assess the quality control status of HDR brachytherapy machine on patient treatment day, source exchange day and periodic day (monthly basis). It was found that the cost per patient can be minimized if other type of cancer patients are also treated on Vari-Source HDR machine. (author)

  10. A study of optimization techniques in HDR brachytherapy for the prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Ghana Shyam

    Several studies carried out thus far are in favor of dose escalation to the prostate gland to have better local control of the disease. But optimal way of delivery of higher doses of radiation therapy to the prostate without hurting neighboring critical structures is still debatable. In this study, we proposed that real time high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with highly efficient and effective optimization could be an alternative means of precise delivery of such higher doses. This approach of delivery eliminates the critical issues such as treatment setup uncertainties and target localization as in external beam radiation therapy. Likewise, dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy is not influenced by organ edema and potential source migration as in permanent interstitial implants. Moreover, the recent report of radiobiological parameters further strengthen the argument of using hypofractionated HDR brachytherapy for the management of prostate cancer. Firstly, we studied the essential features and requirements of real time HDR brachytherapy treatment planning system. Automating catheter reconstruction with fast editing tools, fast yet accurate dose engine, robust and fast optimization and evaluation engine are some of the essential requirements for such procedures. Moreover, in most of the cases we performed, treatment plan optimization took significant amount of time of overall procedure. So, making treatment plan optimization automatic or semi-automatic with sufficient speed and accuracy was the goal of the remaining part of the project. Secondly, we studied the role of optimization function and constraints in overall quality of optimized plan. We have studied the gradient based deterministic algorithm with dose volume histogram (DVH) and more conventional variance based objective functions for optimization. In this optimization strategy, the relative weight of particular objective in aggregate objective function signifies its importance with respect to other objectives

  11. LDR vs. HDR brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer: the view from radiobiological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Christopher R

    2002-01-01

    Permanent LDR brachytherapy and temporary HDR brachytherapy are competitive techniques for clinically localized prostate radiotherapy. Although a randomized trial will likely never be conducted comparing these two forms of brachytherapy, a comparative radiobiological modeling analysis proves useful in understanding some of their intrinsic differences, several of which could be exploited to improve outcomes. Radiobiological models based upon the linear quadratic equations are presented for fractionated external beam, fractionated (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy, and (125)I and (103)Pd LDR brachytherapy. These models incorporate the dose heterogeneities present in brachytherapy based upon patient-derived dose volume histograms (DVH) as well as tumor doubling times and repair kinetics. Radiobiological parameters are normalized to correspond to three accepted clinical risk factors based upon T-stage, PSA, and Gleason score to compare models with clinical series. Tumor control probabilities (TCP) for LDR and HDR brachytherapy (as monotherapy or combined with external beam) are compared with clinical bNED survival rates. Predictions are made for dose escalation with HDR brachytherapy regimens. Model predictions for dose escalation with external beam agree with clinical data and validate the models and their underlying assumptions. Both LDR and HDR brachytherapy achieve superior tumor control when compared with external beam at conventional doses (LDR brachytherapy as boost achieves superior tumor control than when used as monotherapy. Stage for stage, both LDR and current HDR regimens achieve similar tumor control rates, in agreement with current clinical data. HDR monotherapy with large-dose fraction sizes might achieve superior tumor control compared with LDR, especially if prostate cancer possesses a high sensitivity to dose fractionation (i.e., if the alpha/beta ratio is low). Radiobiological models support the current clinical evidence for equivalent outcomes in localized

  12. Transition from LDR to HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer: Evaluation of tumor control, survival, and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, K D; Pugh, K J; Trifiletti, D M; Libby, B; Showalter, T N

    In 2012, our institution transitioned from low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy to high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. We report clinical outcomes after brachytherapy for cervical cancer at our institution over a continuous 10-year period. From 2004 to 2014, 258 women (184 LDR and 74 HDR) were treated with tandem and ovoid brachytherapy in the multidisciplinary management of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stages IA-IVB cervical cancer. Clinical and treatment-related prognostic factors including age, stage, smoking status, relevant doses, and toxicity data were recorded. Median followup for the LDR and HDR groups was 46 months and 12 months, respectively. The majority of patients (92%) received external beam radiotherapy as well as concurrent chemotherapy (83%) before the start of brachytherapy. For all stages, the 1-year local control and overall survival (OS) rates were comparable between the LDR and HDR groups (87% vs. 81%, p = 0.12; and 75% vs. 85%, p = 0.16), respectively. Factors associated with OS on multivariate analysis include age, stage, and nodal involvement. On multivariate analysis, severe toxicity (acute or chronic) was higher with HDR than LDR (24% vs. 10%, p = 0.04). Additional prognostic factors associated with increased severe toxicity include former/current smokers and total dose to lymph nodes. This comparative retrospective analysis of a large cohort of women treated with brachytherapy demonstrates no significant difference in OS or local control between the LDR and HDR. Acute and chronic toxicity increased shortly after the implementation of HDR, highlighting the importance of continued refinement of HDR methods, including integrating advanced imaging. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Perioperative high dose rate (HDR brachytherapy in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brygida Białas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the study was to present an original technique of catheter implantation for perioperative HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy in patients after palliative operations of unresectable locally advanced pancreatic tumors and to estimate the influence of perioperative HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy on pain relief in terminal pancreatic cancer patients. Material and methods: Eight patients with pancreatic tumors located in the head of pancreas underwent palliative operations with the use of HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy. All patients qualified for surgery reported pain of high intensity and had received narcotic painkillers prior to operation. During the last phase of the surgery, the Nucletron® catheters were implanted in patients to prepare them for later perioperative brachytherapy. Since the 6th day after surgery HDR brachytherapy was performed. Before each brachytherapy fraction the location of implants were checked using fluoroscopy. A fractional dose was 5 Gy and a total dose was 20 Gy in the area of radiation. A comparative study of two groups of patients (with and without brachytherapy with stage III pancreatic cancer according to the TNM scale was taken in consideration. Results and Conclusions: The authors claim that the modification of catheter implantation using specially designed cannula, facilitates the process of inserting the catheter into the tumor, shortens the time needed for the procedure, and reduces the risk of complications. Mean survival time was 5.7 months. In the group of performed brachytherapy, the mean survival time was 6.7 months, while in the group of no brachytherapy performed – 4.4 months. In the group of brachytherapy, only one patient increased the dose of painkillers in the last month of his life. Remaining patients took constant doses of medicines. Perioperative HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy could be considered as a practical application of adjuvant therapy for pain relief in patients with an advanced pancreatic cancer.

  14. Clinical outcome of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in patients with oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho; Moon, Sung Ho; Choi, Sung Weon; Park, Joo Yong; Yun, Tak; Lee, Sang Hyun; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Chi Young

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) in patients with oral cavity cancer. Sixteen patients with oral cavity cancer treated with HDR remote-control afterloading brachytherapy using 192Ir between 2001 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Brachytherapy was administered in 11 patients as the primary treatment and in five patients as salvage treatment for recurrence after the initial surgery. In 12 patients, external beam radiotherapy (50-55 Gy/25 fractions) was combined with IBT of 21 Gy/7 fractions. In addition, IBT was administered as the sole treatment in three patients with a total dose of 50 Gy/10 fractions and as postoperative adjuvant treatment in one patient with a total of 35 Gy/7 fractions. The 5-year overall survival of the entire group was 70%. The actuarial local control rate after 3 years was 84%. All five recurrent cases after initial surgery were successfully salvaged using IBT +/- external beam radiotherapy. Two patients developed local recurrence at 3 and 5 months, respectively, after IBT. The acute complications were acceptable (< or =grade 2). Three patients developed major late complications, such as radio-osteonecrosis, in which one patient was treated by conservative therapy and two required surgical intervention. HDR IBT for oral cavity cancer was effective and acceptable in diverse clinical settings, such as in the cases of primary or salvage treatment.

  15. Poster - Thur Eve - 03: LDR to HDR: RADPOS applications in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherpak, A J; Cygler, J E; Kertzscher, G; E, C; Perry, G

    2012-07-01

    The RADPOS in vivo dosimetry system combines an electromagnetic positioning sensor and either one or five MOSFET dosimeters. The feasibility of using the system for quality control has been explored for a range of radiotherapy treatment techniques including most recently transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy and high dose rate (HDR) treatments. Dose and position information was collected by a RADPOS array detector inside a Foley catheter within patients' urethra during permanent seed implantation. Ten patients were studied, and average displacement during implantation was Δr = (1.4-5.1) mm, with movements up to 9.7 mm due to the removal of the transrectal ultrasound probe. Maximum integral dose in the prostatic urethra ranged from 110-195 Gy, and it was found that the dose can change up to 63 cGy (62.0%) depending on whether the rectal probe is in place. For HDR, a RADPOS detector was first calibrated with an Ir-192 source. A treatment was then simulated using a total of 50 dwell positions in 5 catheters in an acrylic phantom. Dwell positions ranged from 1 to 10 cm away from the RADPOS detector and dose was measured for each source position. An average calibration coefficient of 0.74±0.11 cGy/mV was calculated for the detector and the average absolute difference between measured values and expected dose was 0.7±5.4 cGy (5±20%). The demonstrated accuracy of RADPOS dose measurements along with its ability to simultaneously measure displacement makes it a powerful tool for brachytherapy treatments, where high dose gradients can present unique in vivo dosimetry challenges. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Dwell time modulation restrictions do not necessarily improve treatment plan quality for prostate HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balvert, Marleen; Gorissen, Bram L; Den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L

    2015-01-01

    Inverse planning algorithms for dwell time optimisation in interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy may produce solutions with large dwell time variations within catheters, which may result in undesirable selective high-dose subvolumes. Extending the dwell time optimisation model with a dwell time modulation restriction (DTMR) that limits dwell time differences between neighboring dwell positions has been suggested to eliminate this problem. DTMRs may additionally reduce the sensitivity for uncertainties in dwell positions that inevitably result from catheter reconstruction errors and afterloader source positioning inaccuracies. This study quantifies the reduction of high-dose subvolumes and the robustness against these uncertainties by applying a DTMR to template-based prostate HDR brachytherapy implants. Three different DTMRs were consecutively applied to a linear dose-based penalty model (LD) and a dose-volume based model (LDV), both obtained from literature. The models were solved with DTMR levels ranging from no restriction to uniform dwell times within catheters in discrete steps. Uncertainties were simulated on clinical cases using in-house developed software, and dose-volume metrics were calculated in each simulation. For the assessment of high-dose subvolumes, the dose homogeneity index (DHI) and the contiguous dose volume histogram were analysed. Robustness was measured by the improvement of the lowest D 90% of the planning target volume (PTV) observed in the simulations. For (LD), a DTMR yields an increase in DHI of approximately 30% and reduces the size of the largest high-dose volume by 2–5 cc. However, this comes at a cost of a reduction in D 90% of the PTV of 10%, which often implies that it drops below the desired minimum of 100%. For (LDV), none of the DTMRs were able to improve high-dose volume measures. DTMRs were not capable of improving robustness of PTV D 90% against uncertainty in dwell positions for both models. (paper)

  17. 3D-CT implanted interstitial brachytherapy for T2b nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Yu-Feng; Gao, Yuan-Hong; Cao, Xin-Ping; Ye, Wei-Jun; Teh, Bin S

    2010-01-01

    To compare the results of external beam radiotherapy in combination with 3D- computed tomography (CT)-implanted interstitial high dose rate brachytherapy (ERT/3D-HDR-BT) versus conventional external beam radiotherapy (ERT) for the treatment of stage T2b nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Forty NPC patients diagnosed with stage T2b NPC were treated with ERT/3D-HDR-BT under local anesthesia. These patients received a mean dose of 60 Gy, followed by 12-20 Gy administered by 3D-HDR-BT. Another 101 patients diagnosed with non-metastatic T2b NPC received a mean dose of 68 Gy by ERT alone during the same period. Patients treated with ERT/3D-HDR-BT versus ERT alone exhibited an improvement in their 5-y local failure-free survival rate (97.5% vs. 80.2%, P = 0.012) and disease-free survival rate (92.5% vs. 73.3%, P = 0.014). Using multivariate analysis, administration of 3D-HDR-BT was found to be favorable for local control (P = 0.046) and was statistically significant for disease-free survival (P = 0.021). The incidence rate of acute and chronic complications between the two groups was also compared. It is possible that the treatment modality enhances local control due to improved conformal dose distributions and the escalated radiation dose applied

  18. Clinical implementation of a quality assurance program in HDR brachytherapy by in vivo dosimetry with diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alecu, R.; Feldmeier, J.J.; Court, W.S.; Alecu, M.; Orton, C.G.

    1996-01-01

    Despite the possibilities of in vivo dosimetry with diodes (e.g. control of dose to organs at risk, recorded confirmational measurements of the dose actually delivered, check of the whole treatment chain, avoidance of misadministrations, etc.) and the fact that it has proven to be very useful as part of a departmental QA program in external beam therapy, few attempts to implement it for HDR brachytherapy procedures have been reported. The reason for this is probably that there are significant technical challenges that must be met prior to its clinical use. The purpose of this study is to investigate the practicability and usefulness of dose measurements for brachytherapy patients in daily clinical practice. In our clinic a high precision patient dosimetry method has been developed, based on the use of silicon diodes. First, calibration factors have been determined under 'reference' irradiation conditions. Secondly, correction factors have been evaluated for situations deviating from the reference conditions, i.e. for different distances from the implanted sources, tissue heterogeneities, presence of different type of applicators, etc. For certain intracavitary, interstitial and surface mold applications this procedure has proven to be sufficiently accurate to allow dose determinations with diodes to be in good agreement with the expected values, i.e. calculated by the treatment planning system (VariSource unit) and checked by ion chamber measurements. The results of in vivo measurements are discussed along with the possibilities and limitations of the employed techniques

  19. Perioperative interstitial brachytherapy for recurrent keloid scars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rio, E.; Bardet, E.; Peuvrel, P.; Martinet, L.; Perrot, P.; Baraer, F.; Loirat, Y.; Sartre, J.Y.; Malard, O.; Ferron, C.; Dreno, B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of the results of perioperative interstitial brachytherapy with low dose-rate (L.D.R.) Ir-192 in the treatment of keloid scars. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 73 histologically confirmed keloids (from 58 patients) resistant to medico surgical treated by surgical excision plus early perioperative brachytherapy. All lesions were initially symptomatic. Local control was evaluated by clinical evaluation. Functional and cosmetic results were assessed in terms of patient responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Median age was 28 years (range 13-71 years). Scars were located as follows: 37% on the face, 32% on the trunk or abdomen, 16% on the neck, and 15% on the arms or legs. The mean delay before loading was four hours (range, 1-6 h). The median dose was 20 Gy (range, 15-40 Gy). Sixty-four scars (from 53 patients) were evaluated. Local control was 86% (follow-up, 44.5 months; range, 14-150 months). All relapses occurred early within 2 years posttreatment. At 20 months, survival without recurrence was significantly lower when treated lengths were more than 6 cm long. The rate was 100% for treated scars below 4.5 cm in length, 95% (95% CI: 55-96) for those 4.5-6 cm long, and 75% (95% CI: 56-88) beyond 6 cm (p = 0.038). Of the 35 scars (28 patients) whose results were reassessed, six remained symptomatic and the esthetic results were considered to be good in 51% (18/35) and average in 37% (13/35) (median follow-up, 70 months; range, 16-181 months). Conclusion: Early perioperative L.D.R. brachytherapy delivering 20 Gy at 5 mm reduced the rate of recurrent keloids resistant to other treatments and gave good functional results. (authors)

  20. TU-C-201-00: Clinical Implementation of HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Recent use of HDR has increased while planning has become more complex often necessitating 3D image-based planning. While many guidelines for the use of HDR exist, they have not kept pace with the increased complexity of 3D image-based planning. Furthermore, no comprehensive document exists to describe the wide variety of current HDR clinical indications. This educational session aims to summarize existing national and international guidelines for the safe implementation of an HDR program. A summary of HDR afterloaders available on the market and their existing applicators will be provided, with guidance on how to select the best fit for each institution’s needs. Finally, the use of checklists will be discussed as a means to implement a safe and efficient HDR program and as a method by which to verify the quality of an existing HDR program. This session will provide the perspective of expert HDR physicists as well as the perspective of a new HDR user. Learning Objectives: Summarize national and international safety and staffing guidelines for HDR implementation Discuss the process of afterloader and applicator selection for gynecologic, prostate, breast, interstitial, surface treatments Learn about the use of an audit checklist tool to measure of quality control of a new or existing HDR program Describe the evolving use of checklists within an HDR program.

  1. Interstitial brachytherapy in carcinoma of the penis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, A.J.; Ghosh, S.; Bhalavat, R.L. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kulkarni, J.N. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Surgery; Sequeira, B.V.E. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Keeping in line with the increasing emphasis on organ preservation, we at the Tata Memorial Hospital have evaluated the role of Ir-192 interstitial implant as regards local control, functional and cosmetic outcome in early as well as locally recurrent carcinoma of the distal penis. Patients and Methods: From October 1988 to December 1996, 23 patients with histopathologically proven cancer of the penis were treated with radical radiation therapy using Ir-192 temporary interstitial implant. Our patients were in the age group of 20 to 60 years. The primary lesions were T1 and 7, T2 in 7 and recurrent in 9 patients. Only 7 patients had palpable groin nodes at presentation, all of which were pathologically negative. The median dose of implant was 50 Gy (range 40 to 60 Gy), using the LDR afterloading system and the Paris system of implant rules for dosimetry. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 117 months (median 24 months). Results: At last follow-up 18 of the 23 patients remained locally controlled with implant alone. Three patients failed only locally, 2 locoregionally and 1 only at the groin. Of the 5 patients who failed locally, 4 were successfully salvaged with partial penectomy and remained controlled when last seen. Local control with implant alone at 8 years was 70% by life table analysis. The patients had excellent functional and cosmetic outcome. We did not record any case of skin or softtissue necrosis. Only 2 patients developed meatal stenosis, both of which were treated endoscopically. Conclusion: Our results lead us to interpret that interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 offers excellent local control rates with preservation of organ and function. Penectomy can be reserved as a means for effective salvage. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Das Prinzip des Organerhalts gewinnt in der Onkologie zunehmend an Bedeutung. Ziel dieser Untersuchung war es, die Rolle der interstitiellen Brachytherapie mit Ir-192 zur Behandlung des fruehen und rezidivierten Peniskarzinoms zu

  2. Comparison of radiation shielding requirements for HDR brachytherapy using 169Yb and 192Ir sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lymperopoulou, G.; Papagiannis, P.; Sakelliou, L.; Georgiou, E.; Hourdakis, C. J.; Baltas, D.

    2006-01-01

    169 Yb has received a renewed focus lately as an alternative to 192 Ir sources for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Following the results of a recent work by our group which proved 169 Yb to be a good candidate for HDR prostate brachytherapy, this work seeks to quantify the radiation shielding requirements for 169 Yb HDR brachytherapy applications in comparison to the corresponding requirements for the current 192 Ir HDR brachytherapy standard. Monte Carlo simulation (MC) is used to obtain 169 Yb and 192 Ir broad beam transmission data through lead and concrete. Results are fitted to an analytical equation which can be used to readily calculate the barrier thickness required to achieve a given dose rate reduction. Shielding requirements for a HDR brachytherapy treatment room facility are presented as a function of distance, occupancy, dose limit, and facility workload, using analytical calculations for both 169 Yb and 192 Ir HDR sources. The barrier thickness required for 169 Yb is lower than that for 192 Ir by a factor of 4-5 for lead and 1.5-2 for concrete. Regarding 169 Yb HDR brachytherapy applications, the lead shielding requirements do not exceed 15 mm, even in highly conservative case scenarios. This allows for the construction of a lead door in most cases, thus avoiding the construction of a space consuming, specially designed maze. The effects of source structure, attenuation by the patient, and scatter conditions within an actual treatment room on the above-noted findings are also discussed using corresponding MC simulation results

  3. SU-F-BRA-04: Prostate HDR Brachytherapy with Multichannel Robotic System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, F Maria; Podder, T; Yu, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is gradually becoming popular in treating patients with prostate cancers. However, placement of the HDR needles at desired locations into the patient is challenging. Application of robotic system may improve the accuracy of the clinical procedure. This experimental study is to evaluate the feasibility of using a multichannel robotic system for prostate HDR brachytherapy. Methods: In this experimental study, the robotic system employed was a 6-DOF Multichannel Image-guided Robotic Assistant for Brachytherapy (MIRAB), which was designed and fabricated for prostate seed implantation. The MIRAB has the provision of rotating 16 needles while inserting them. Ten prostate HDR brachytherapy needles were simultaneously inserted using MIRAB into a commercially available prostate phantom. After inserting the needles into the prostate phantom at desired locations, 2mm thick CT slices were obtained for dosimetric planning. HDR plan was generated using Oncetra planning system with a total prescription dose of 34Gy in 4 fractions. Plan quality was evaluated considering dose coverage to prostate and planning target volume (PTV), with 3mm margin around prostate, as well as the dose limit to the organs at risk (OARs) following the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) guidelines. Results: From the CT scan, it is observed that the needles were inserted straight into the desired locations and they were adequately spaced and distributed for a clinically acceptable HDR plan. Coverage to PTV and prostate were about 91% (V100= 91%) and 96% (V100=96%), respectively. Dose to 1cc of urethra, rectum, and bladder were within the ABS specified limits. Conclusion: The MIRAB was able to insert multiple needles simultaneously into the prostate precisely. By controlling the MIRAB to insert all the ten utilized needles into the prostate phantom, we could achieve the robotic HDR brachytherapy successfully. Further study for assessing the system

  4. Towards real-time 3D ultrasound planning and personalized 3D printing for breast HDR brachytherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulin, Eric; Gardi, Lori; Fenster, Aaron; Pouliot, Jean; Beaulieu, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Two different end-to-end procedures were tested for real-time planning in breast HDR brachytherapy treatment. Both methods are using a 3D ultrasound (3DUS) system and a freehand catheter optimization algorithm. They were found fast and efficient. We demonstrated a proof-of-concept approach for personalized real-time guidance and planning to breast HDR brachytherapy treatments

  5. SU-E-T-124: Dosimetric Comparison of HDR Brachytherapy and Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Wu, H [IUPUI, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Das, I [Indiana University- School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is known to be able to deliver more radiation dose to tumor while minimizing radiation dose to surrounding normal tissues. Proton therapy also provides superior dose distribution due to Bragg peak. Since both HDR and Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) are beneficial for their quick dose drop off, our goal in this study is to compare the pace of dose gradient drop-off between HDR and IMPT plans based on the same CT image data-set. In addition, normal tissues sparing were also compared among HDR, IMPT and SBRT. Methods: Five cervical cancer cases treated with EBRT + HDR boost combination with Tandem and Ovoid applicator were used for comparison purpose. Original HDR plans with prescribed dose of 5.5 Gy x 5 fractions were generated and optimized. The 100% isodose line of HDR plans was converted to a dose volume, and treated as CTV for IMPT and SBRT planning. The same HDR CT scans were also used for IMPT plan and SBRT plan for direct comparison. The philosophy of the IMPT and SBRT planning was to create the same CTV coverage as HDR plans. All three modalities treatment plans were compared to each other with a set of predetermined criteria. Results: With similar target volume coverage in cervix cancer boost treatment, HDR provides a slightly sharper dose drop-off from 100% to 50% isodose line, averagely in all directions compared to IMPT. However, IMPT demonstrated more dose gradient drop-off at the junction of the target and normal tissues by providing more normal tissue sparing and superior capability to reduce integral dose. Conclusion: IMPT is capable of providing comparable dose drop-off as HDR. IMPT can be explored as replacement for HDR brachytherapy in various applications.

  6. Predictors of Toxicity After Image-guided High-dose-rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Larissa J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of grade 3-4 complications and grade 2-4 rectal toxicity after three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed for 51 women (22 with primary disease and 29 with recurrence) treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. A single interstitial insertion was performed with image guidance by computed tomography (n = 43) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 8). The median delivered dose in equivalent 2-Gy fractions was 72.0 Gy (45 Gy for external-beam radiation therapy and 24 Gy for brachytherapy). Toxicity was reported according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events. Actuarial toxicity estimates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At diagnosis, the median patient age was 62 years and the median tumor size was 3.8 cm. The median D90 and V100 were 71.4 Gy and 89.5%; the median D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 64.6 Gy, 61.0 Gy, and 52.7 Gy, respectively. The actuarial rates of all grade 3-4 complications at 2 years were 20% gastrointestinal, 9% vaginal, 6% skin, 3% musculoskeletal, and 2% lymphatic. There were no grade 3-4 genitourinary complications and no grade 5 toxicities. Grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was observed in 10 patients, and grade 3-4 complications in 4; all cases were proctitis with the exception of 1 rectal fistula. D2cc for rectum was higher for patients with grade 2-4 (68 Gy vs 57 Gy for grade 0-1, P=.03) and grade 3-4 (73 Gy vs 58 Gy for grade 0-2, P=.02) rectal toxicity. The estimated dose that resulted in a 10% risk of grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was 61.8 Gy (95% confidence interval, 51.5-72.2 Gy). Discussion: Image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy results in acceptable toxicity for women with primary or recurrent gynecologic cancer. D2cc for the rectum is a reliable predictor of late rectal complications. Three-dimensional-based treatment planning should be performed to ensure

  7. Dose optimisation in single plane interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Honoré, Henriette Benedicte

    2006-01-01

    patients,       treated for recurrent rectal and cervical cancer, flexible catheters were       sutured intra-operatively to the tumour bed in areas with compromised       surgical margin. Both non-optimised, geometrically and graphically       optimised CT -based dose plans were made. The overdose index...... on the       regularity of the implant, such that the benefit of optimisation was       larger for irregular implants. OI and HI correlated strongly with target       volume limiting the usability of these parameters for comparison of dose       plans between patients. CONCLUSIONS: Dwell time optimisation significantly......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brachytherapy dose distributions can be optimised       by modulation of source dwell times. In this study dose optimisation in       single planar interstitial implants was evaluated in order to quantify the       potential benefit in patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 14...

  8. WE-G-BRC-02: Risk Assessment for HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayadev, J. [UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) originated as an industrial engineering technique used for risk management and safety improvement of complex processes. In the context of radiotherapy, the AAPM Task Group 100 advocates FMEA as the framework of choice for establishing clinical quality management protocols. However, there is concern that widespread adoption of FMEA in radiation oncology will be hampered by the perception that implementation of the tool will have a steep learning curve, be extremely time consuming and labor intensive, and require additional resources. To overcome these preconceptions and facilitate the introduction of the tool into clinical practice, the medical physics community must be educated in the use of this tool and the ease in which it can be implemented. Organizations with experience in FMEA should share their knowledge with others in order to increase the implementation, effectiveness and productivity of the tool. This session will include a brief, general introduction to FMEA followed by a focus on practical aspects of implementing FMEA for specific clinical procedures including HDR brachytherapy, physics plan review and radiosurgery. A description of common equipment and devices used in these procedures and how to characterize new devices for safe use in patient treatments will be presented. This will be followed by a discussion of how to customize FMEA techniques and templates to one’s own clinic. Finally, cases of common failure modes for specific procedures (described previously) will be shown and recommended intervention methodologies and outcomes reviewed. Learning Objectives: Understand the general concept of failure mode and effect analysis Learn how to characterize new equipment for safety Be able to identify potential failure modes for specific procedures and learn mitigation techniques Be able to customize FMEA examples and templates for use in any clinic.

  9. WE-G-BRC-02: Risk Assessment for HDR Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayadev, J.

    2016-01-01

    Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) originated as an industrial engineering technique used for risk management and safety improvement of complex processes. In the context of radiotherapy, the AAPM Task Group 100 advocates FMEA as the framework of choice for establishing clinical quality management protocols. However, there is concern that widespread adoption of FMEA in radiation oncology will be hampered by the perception that implementation of the tool will have a steep learning curve, be extremely time consuming and labor intensive, and require additional resources. To overcome these preconceptions and facilitate the introduction of the tool into clinical practice, the medical physics community must be educated in the use of this tool and the ease in which it can be implemented. Organizations with experience in FMEA should share their knowledge with others in order to increase the implementation, effectiveness and productivity of the tool. This session will include a brief, general introduction to FMEA followed by a focus on practical aspects of implementing FMEA for specific clinical procedures including HDR brachytherapy, physics plan review and radiosurgery. A description of common equipment and devices used in these procedures and how to characterize new devices for safe use in patient treatments will be presented. This will be followed by a discussion of how to customize FMEA techniques and templates to one’s own clinic. Finally, cases of common failure modes for specific procedures (described previously) will be shown and recommended intervention methodologies and outcomes reviewed. Learning Objectives: Understand the general concept of failure mode and effect analysis Learn how to characterize new equipment for safety Be able to identify potential failure modes for specific procedures and learn mitigation techniques Be able to customize FMEA examples and templates for use in any clinic

  10. Preliminary results of study comparing HDR with LDR brachytherapy for IIIb cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippe, N.; Pellizzon, A.C.A.; Novaes, P.; Salvajoli, J.V.; Fogaroli, R.; Maia, M.A.C.; Baraldi, H.; Ferrigno, R.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1992 we have been using a Micro-Selectron HDR device, working with Iridium 192 to treat the cervical cancer and some others pathologies. With a minimum follow up of 24 months, 59 patients with cervical cancer were randomizated for one of the following schedule of treatment: EBRT - 45Gy - fx 1,8Gy plus Brachytherapy 1-HDR - 36 (61%) - 4 weekly insertions of 6,0Gy at point A 2-LDR - 29 (39%) - two insertions fifteen days apart of 17,5Gy at point A EBRT was performed with a Linac 4MV, in box arrangement and parametrial complementation of dose with AP-PA fields. For Brachytherapy Fletcher Colpostats are used in association with intrauterine tamdens, in both arms. Brachyterapy starts in HDR group after ten days of the beginning of the treatment. The total time of treatment is shortened here in two weeks. LDR brachytherapy starts only after the end of EBRT. Results - local control was 61% in 12 months and 50% in 24 months for HDR group, versus 52,6% and 47,8% for LDR group. Local failures of 39% and 50% in 12 and 24 months for HDR and 47,8% and 52,8% for LDR groups respectively. Complications were restricted to rectites and cistites - 8,3% for HDR and 13% for LDR. Conclusions - HDR brachytherapy has an equivalent local control when compared to LDR, can treat a larger number of patients in a shorter period, has possibilities of dose optimizations and decrease the radiation exposure to the staff

  11. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of HDR brachytherapy alone for T1/T2 breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wazer, David E.; Berle, Lisa; Graham, Roger; Chung, Maureen; Rothschild, Janice; Graves, Theresa; Cady, Blake; Ulin, Kenneth; Ruthazer, Robin; DiPetrillo, Thomas A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility, toxicity, cosmetic outcome, and local control of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone without whole breast external beam irradiation for early-stage breast carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and August 1999, 32 women diagnosed with a total of 33 AJCC Stage I/II breast carcinomas underwent surgical breast excision and postoperative irradiation using HDR brachytherapy interstitial implantation as part of a multi-institutional clinical Phase I/II protocol. Eligible patients included those with T1, T2, N0, N1 (≤3 nodes positive), and M0 tumors of nonlobular histologic features with negative surgical margins, no extracapsular lymph node extension, and a negative postexcision mammogram. Brachytherapy catheters were placed at the initial excision, reexcision, or either sentinel or full-axillary sampling. Direct visualization, surgical clips, and ultrasound and/or CT scan assisted in the delineation of the target volume, defined as the excision cavity plus a 2-cm margin. High-activity 192 Ir (3-10 Ci) was used to deliver 340 cGy/fraction, 2 fractions/d, for 5 consecutive days, to a total dose of 34 Gy to the target volume. Source position and dwell times were calculated using standard volume optimization techniques. Results: The median follow-up of all patients was 33 months, and the mean patient age was 63 years. The mean tumor size was 1.3 cm, and 55% had an extensive intraductal component. Three patients had positive axillary nodes. Two patients experienced moderate perioperative pain that required narcotic analgesics. No peri- or postoperative infections occurred. No wound healing problems and no significant skin reactions related to the implant developed. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring scheme was applied to the entire 33-case cohort. In the assessment of the skin, 30 cases were Grade 0-1 and 3 cases were Grade 2. Subcutaneous toxicity was scored as 11 patients with

  12. A gEUD-based inverse planning technique for HDR prostate brachytherapy: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giantsoudi, D. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Baltas, D. [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, 63069 Offenbach (Germany); Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, 15701 Athens (Greece); Karabis, A. [Pi-Medical Ltd., Athens 10676 (Greece); Mavroidis, P. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas 78299 and Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, 17176 (Sweden); Zamboglou, N.; Tselis, N. [Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, 63069 Offenbach (Germany); Shi, C. [St. Vincent' s Medical Center, 2800 Main Street, Bridgeport, Connecticut 06606 (United States); Papanikolaou, N. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas 78299 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of a new inverse planning technique based on the generalized equivalent uniform dose for image-guided high dose rate (HDR) prostate cancer brachytherapy in comparison to conventional dose-volume based optimization. Methods: The quality of 12 clinical HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate utilizing HIPO (Hybrid Inverse Planning Optimization) is compared with alternative plans, which were produced through inverse planning using the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD). All the common dose-volume indices for the prostate and the organs at risk were considered together with radiobiological measures. The clinical effectiveness of the different dose distributions was investigated by comparing dose volume histogram and gEUD evaluators. Results: Our results demonstrate the feasibility of gEUD-based inverse planning in HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate. A statistically significant decrease in D{sub 10} or/and final gEUD values for the organs at risk (urethra, bladder, and rectum) was found while improving dose homogeneity or dose conformity of the target volume. Conclusions: Following the promising results of gEUD-based optimization in intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment optimization, as reported in the literature, the implementation of a similar model in HDR brachytherapy treatment plan optimization is suggested by this study. The potential of improved sparing of organs at risk was shown for various gEUD-based optimization parameter protocols, which indicates the ability of this method to adapt to the user's preferences.

  13. Determination of the dose of traffic in HDR brachytherapy with ALANINE/R PE technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman Calcina, C. S.; Chen, F.; Almeida, A. de; Baffa, O.

    2001-01-01

    It determines, experimentally, the dose of traffic in brachytherapy for High Dose Rate (HDR), using for the first-time the Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) technique with alanine detectors. The value obtained is the published next to obtained using lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters [es

  14. Implementation of the technique of partial irradiation accelerated the breast with high doses (HDR) brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina Lopez, M. Y.; Pardo Perez, E.; Castro Novais, J.; Martinez Ortega, J.; Ruiz Maqueda, S.; Cerro Penalver, E. del

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is presents procedure carried out in our Centre for the implementation of the accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI, accelerated partial-breast irradiation) with high-rate brachytherapy (HDR), using plastic tubes as applicators. Carried out measures, the evaluation of the dosimetric parameters analyzing and presenting the results. (Author)

  15. HDR brachytherapy in carcinoma of cervix: initial experience at AWARE hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajendran, M.; Reddy, K.D.; Reddy, R.M.; Reddy, J.M.; Reddy, B.V.N.; Kiran Kumar; Gopi, S.; Dharaniraj; Janardhanan

    2002-01-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is well established in the management of gynaecological malignancies. A report on the initial results of one and half year experience with a consistent dose/fractionation schedule and procedure of planning with delivery of treatment schedule is presented

  16. Mixed integer programming improves comprehensibility and plan quality in inverse optimization of prostate HDR Brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, B.L.; den Hertog, D.; Hoffmann, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Current inverse treatment planning methods that optimize both catheter positions and dwell times in prostate HDR brachytherapy use surrogate linear or quadratic objective functions that have no direct interpretation in terms of dose-volume histogram (DVH) criteria, do not result in an optimum or

  17. Retrospective analysis of role of interstitial brachytherapy using template (MUPIT in locally advanced gynecological malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandwani Pooja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : The aim of this retrospective study was to assess treatment outcomes for patients with locally advanced gynecological malignancies being treated with interstitial brachytherapy using Martinez universal perineal interstitial template (MUPIT and to study the acute and late sequelae and survival after treatment by this technique. Materials and Methods : Ninety seven patients untreated with histopathological confirmation of carcinoma of cervix (37 vault (40 and vagina (20 were treated by combination of external beam RT (EBRT using megavoltage irradiation to pelvis to dose of 4000-5000 cGy followed by interstitial brachytherapy using MUPIT between September 2001 to March 2005. Median age was 46 years. Only those patients who were found unsuitable for conventional brachytherapy or in whom intracavitatory radiotherapy was found to be unlikely to encompass a proper dose distribution were treated by interstitial template brachytherapy using MUPIT application and were enrolled in this study. The dose of MUPIT was 1600-2400 cGy in 4-6# with 400 cGy /# and two fractions a day with minimum gap of six hours in between two fractions on micro-HDR. Criteria for inclusion of patients were as follows: Hb minimum 10 gm/dl, performance status - 70% or more (Karnofsy scale, histopathological confirmation FIGO stage IIB-IIIB (excluding frozen pelvis. Results : Among the 97 patients studied, 12 patients lost to follow-up and hence they were excluded from the study. Follow-up of rest of the patients was then done up to September 2006. The duration of follow-up was in the range of 20-60 months. Parameters studied were local control rate, complication rate, mortality rate and number of patients developing systemic metastasis. Local control was achieved in 56/85 (64.7% and complication rate was 15/85 (17.6%. Local control was better for nonbulky tumors compared bulky tumors irrespective of stage of disease. Local control was better in patients with good regression of

  18. Late change of normal tissue treated either by high dose rate or low dose rate interstitial brachytherapy. A retrospective comparative study on oral and oropharyngeal mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nose, Takayuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Kinji; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare late changes of normal tissue treated either by high dose rate (HDR) or low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy. For HDR group, 22 oropharynx cancer patients who were treated by HDR Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy with/without external beam radiotherapy in Osaka (Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases and Osaka University Hospital) during June 1994 through April 2000 and came to the follow-up clinics during July 2000 through December 2000 were studied. For LDR group, 26 oropharynx cancer patients who were treated by LDR Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy with/without external beam radiotherapy in Nancy (Centre Alexis Vautrin) during February 1989 through July 1998 and came to the follow-up clinics during April 1999 through July 1999 were studied. The standard HDR schedules were 54 Gy/9 fr/5-6 days for monotherapy and 18-24 Gy/3-4 fr/2-3 days following 45 Gy external beam radiotherapy. The standard LDR schedules were 65 Gy/5-6 days for monotherapy and 15-25 Gy/2-3 days following 50 Gy external beam radiotherapy. For evaluation of the late changes, we scored the mucosal and muscular changes inside the treated volume using the modified Dische score system and the RTOG/EORTC late radiation morbidity scoring scheme. For 6 items of the modified Dische score system, no significant difference was found between HDR and LDR groups. For the remaining 2 items (pallor, mobility impairment of faucial pillars), LDR group showed higher scores (p=0.010, 0.002). LDR group showed a trend toward higher scores for the RTOG/EORTC scheme (p=0.059). Some predict late effects by HDR interstitial brachytherapy to be severer than by LDR because no dose-rate effects can be expected. Our study, however, showed at least equivalent or even milder late changes by HDR. Appropriate fractionation schedule and extra geometrical sparing effects by optimized dose distribution of HDR group might result in milder late changes. With our

  19. Radioablation of adrenal gland malignomas with interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Efficacy and outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohnike, K. [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Magdeburg (Germany); DTZ am Frankfurter Tor, Berlin (Germany); Neumann, K.; Seidensticker, M.; Seidensticker, R.; Pech, M.; Streitparth, T.; Ricke, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Magdeburg (Germany); Hass, P.; Gademann, G. [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Magdeburg (Germany); Klose, S. [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Nieren- und Hochdruckkrankheiten, Diabetologie und Endokrinologie, Magdeburg (Germany); Garlipp, B.; Benckert, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Gefaesschirurgie, Magdeburg (Germany); Wendler, J.J.; Liehr, U.B.; Schostak, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Urologie und Kinderurologie, Magdeburg (Germany); Goeppner, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Dermatologie, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    To assess the efficacy, safety, and outcome of image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in patients with adrenal gland metastases (AGM). From January 2007 to April 2014, 37 patients (7 female, 30 male; mean age 66.8 years, range 41.5-82.5 years) with AGM from different primary tumors were treated with CT-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy (iBT). Primary endpoint was local tumor control (LTC). Secondary endpoints were time to untreatable progression (TTUP), time to progression (TTP), overall survival (OS), and safety. In a secondary analysis, risk factors with an influence on survival were identified. The median biological equivalent dose (BED) was 37.4 Gy. Mean LTC after 12 months was 88%; after 24 months this was 74%. According to CTCAE criteria, one grade 3 adverse event occurred. Median OS after first diagnosis of AGM was 18.3 months. Median OS, TTUP, and TTP after iBT treatment were 11.4, 6.6, and 3.5 months, respectively. Uni- and multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed significant influences of synchronous disease, tumor diameter, and the total number of lesions on OS or TTUP or both. Image-guided HDR-iBT is safe and effective. Treatment- and primary tumor-independent features influenced survival of patients with AGM after HDR-iBR treatment. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung der Effektivitaet, Sicherheit und Ergebnisse nach bildgefuehrter High-dose-rate-(HDR-)Brachytherapie bei Patienten mit Nebennierenmetastasen. Von Januar 2007 bis April 2014 wurden 37 Patienten (7 weiblich, 30 maennlich; mittleres Alter 66,8 Jahre, Spanne 41,5-82,5 Jahre) mit Nebennierenmetastasen verschiedener Primarien mit CT-gesteuerter interstitieller HDR-Brachytherapie (iBT) behandelt. Der primaere Endpunkt war die lokale Tumorkontrolle (LTC). Sekundaere Endpunkte umfassten die Zeit bis zum nicht mehr behandelbaren Progress (TTUP), die Zeit bis zum Progress (TTP), das Gesamtueberleben (OS) und die Sicherheit der Methode. In einer sekundaeren Analyse wurden Risikofaktoren

  20. SU-E-T-758: To Determine the Source Dwell Positions of HDR Brachytherapy Using 2D 729 Ion Chamber Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Syam [Malabar Cancer Centre, Kannur, Kerala (India); Sitha [University of Calicut, Calicut, Kerala (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Determination of source dwell positions of HDR brachytherapy using 2D 729 ion chamber array Methods: Nucletron microselectron HDR and PTW 2D array were used for the study. Different dwell positions were assigned in the HDR machine. Rigid interstitial needles and vaginal applicator were positioned on the 2D array. The 2D array was exposed for this programmed dwell positions. The positional accuracy of the source was analyzed after the irradiation of the 2D array. This was repeated for different dwell positions. Different test plans were transferred from the Oncentra planning system and irradiated with the same applicator position on the 2D array. The results were analyzed using the in house developed excel program. Results: Assigned dwell positions versus corresponding detector response were analyzed. The results show very good agreement with the film measurements. No significant variation found between the planned and measured dwell positions. Average dose response with 2D array between the planned and nearby dwell positions was found to be 0.0804 Gy for vaginal cylinder applicator and 0.1234 Gy for interstitial rigid needles. Standard deviation between the doses for all the measured dwell positions for interstitial rigid needle for 1 cm spaced positions were found to be 0.33 and 0.37 for 2cm spaced dwell positions. For intracavitory vaginal applicator this was found to be 0.21 for 1 cm spaced dwell positions and 0.06 for 2cm spaced dwell positions. Intracavitory test plans reproduced on the 2D array with the same applicator positions shows the ideal dose distribution with the TPS planned. Conclusion: 2D array is a good tool for determining the dwell position of HDR brachytherapy. With the in-house developed program in excel it is easy and accurate. The traditional way with film analysis can be replaced by this method, as the films will be more costly.

  1. SU-E-T-758: To Determine the Source Dwell Positions of HDR Brachytherapy Using 2D 729 Ion Chamber Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Syam; Sitha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Determination of source dwell positions of HDR brachytherapy using 2D 729 ion chamber array Methods: Nucletron microselectron HDR and PTW 2D array were used for the study. Different dwell positions were assigned in the HDR machine. Rigid interstitial needles and vaginal applicator were positioned on the 2D array. The 2D array was exposed for this programmed dwell positions. The positional accuracy of the source was analyzed after the irradiation of the 2D array. This was repeated for different dwell positions. Different test plans were transferred from the Oncentra planning system and irradiated with the same applicator position on the 2D array. The results were analyzed using the in house developed excel program. Results: Assigned dwell positions versus corresponding detector response were analyzed. The results show very good agreement with the film measurements. No significant variation found between the planned and measured dwell positions. Average dose response with 2D array between the planned and nearby dwell positions was found to be 0.0804 Gy for vaginal cylinder applicator and 0.1234 Gy for interstitial rigid needles. Standard deviation between the doses for all the measured dwell positions for interstitial rigid needle for 1 cm spaced positions were found to be 0.33 and 0.37 for 2cm spaced dwell positions. For intracavitory vaginal applicator this was found to be 0.21 for 1 cm spaced dwell positions and 0.06 for 2cm spaced dwell positions. Intracavitory test plans reproduced on the 2D array with the same applicator positions shows the ideal dose distribution with the TPS planned. Conclusion: 2D array is a good tool for determining the dwell position of HDR brachytherapy. With the in-house developed program in excel it is easy and accurate. The traditional way with film analysis can be replaced by this method, as the films will be more costly

  2. Interactive multiobjective optimization for anatomy-based three-dimensional HDR brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruotsalainen, Henri; Miettinen, Kaisa; Palmgren, Jan-Erik; Lahtinen, Tapani

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we present an anatomy-based three-dimensional dose optimization approach for HDR brachytherapy using interactive multiobjective optimization (IMOO). In brachytherapy, the goals are to irradiate a tumor without causing damage to healthy tissue. These goals are often conflicting, i.e. when one target is optimized the other will suffer, and the solution is a compromise between them. IMOO is capable of handling multiple and strongly conflicting objectives in a convenient way. With the IMOO approach, a treatment planner's knowledge is used to direct the optimization process. Thus, the weaknesses of widely used optimization techniques (e.g. defining weights, computational burden and trial-and-error planning) can be avoided, planning times can be shortened and the number of solutions to be calculated is small. Further, plan quality can be improved by finding advantageous trade-offs between the solutions. In addition, our approach offers an easy way to navigate among the obtained Pareto optimal solutions (i.e. different treatment plans). When considering a simulation model of clinical 3D HDR brachytherapy, the number of variables is significantly smaller compared to IMRT, for example. Thus, when solving the model, the CPU time is relatively short. This makes it possible to exploit IMOO to solve a 3D HDR brachytherapy optimization problem. To demonstrate the advantages of IMOO, two clinical examples of optimizing a gynecologic cervix cancer treatment plan are presented.

  3. Interactive multiobjective optimization for anatomy-based three-dimensional HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruotsalainen, Henri; Miettinen, Kaisa; Palmgren, Jan-Erik; Lahtinen, Tapani

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present an anatomy-based three-dimensional dose optimization approach for HDR brachytherapy using interactive multiobjective optimization (IMOO). In brachytherapy, the goals are to irradiate a tumor without causing damage to healthy tissue. These goals are often conflicting, i.e. when one target is optimized the other will suffer, and the solution is a compromise between them. IMOO is capable of handling multiple and strongly conflicting objectives in a convenient way. With the IMOO approach, a treatment planner's knowledge is used to direct the optimization process. Thus, the weaknesses of widely used optimization techniques (e.g. defining weights, computational burden and trial-and-error planning) can be avoided, planning times can be shortened and the number of solutions to be calculated is small. Further, plan quality can be improved by finding advantageous trade-offs between the solutions. In addition, our approach offers an easy way to navigate among the obtained Pareto optimal solutions (i.e. different treatment plans). When considering a simulation model of clinical 3D HDR brachytherapy, the number of variables is significantly smaller compared to IMRT, for example. Thus, when solving the model, the CPU time is relatively short. This makes it possible to exploit IMOO to solve a 3D HDR brachytherapy optimization problem. To demonstrate the advantages of IMOO, two clinical examples of optimizing a gynecologic cervix cancer treatment plan are presented.

  4. A dosimetric selectivity intercomparison of HDR brachytherapy, IMRT and helical tomotherapy in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermesse, Johanne; Biver, Sylvie; Jansen, Nicolas; Coucke, Philippe [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Liege Univ. Hospital (Belgium); Lenaerts, Eric [Dept. of Medical Physics, Liege Univ. Hospital (Belgium); De Patoul, Nathalie; Vynckier, Stefaan [Dept. of Medical Physics, St Luc Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Scalliet, Pierre [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, St Luc Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Nickers, Philippe [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Oscar Lambret Center, Lille (France)

    2009-11-15

    Background and purpose: dose escalation in order to improve the biochemical control in prostate cancer requires the application of irradiation techniques with high conformality. The dosimetric selectivity of three radiation modalities is compared: high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT), intensity-modulated radiation radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT). Patients and methods: ten patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated by a 10-Gy HDR-BT boost after external-beam radiotherapy were investigated. For each patient, HDR-BT, IMRT and HT theoretical treatment plans were realized using common contour sets. A 10-Gy dose was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV). The PTVs and critical organs' dose-volume histograms obtained were compared using Student's t-test. Results: HDR-BT delivers spontaneously higher mean doses to the PTV with smaller cold spots compared to IMRT and HT. 33% of the rectal volume received a mean HDR-BT dose of 3.86 {+-} 0.3 Gy in comparison with a mean IMRT dose of 6.57 {+-} 0.68 Gy and a mean HT dose of 5.58 {+-} 0.71 Gy (p < 0.0001). HDR-BT also enables to better spare the bladder. The hot spots inside the urethra are greater with HDR-BT. The volume of healthy tissue receiving 10% of the prescribed dose is reduced at least by a factor of 8 with HDR-BT (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: HDR-BT offers better conformality in comparison with HT and IMRT and reduces the volume of healthy tissue receiving a low dose. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of time, attendance of medical staff, and resources during interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer. DEGRO-QUIRO trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tselis, N.; Zamboglou, N.; Maurer, U.; Popp, W.; Sack, H.

    2014-01-01

    The German Society of Radiation Oncology initiated a multicenter trial to evaluate core processes and subprocesses of radiotherapy by prospective evaluation of all important procedures in the most frequent malignancies treated by radiation therapy. The aim of this analysis was to assess the required resources for interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy (BRT) based on actual time measurements regarding allocation of personnel and room occupation needed for specific procedures. Two radiotherapy centers (community hospital of Offenbach am Main and community hospital of Eschweiler) participated in this prospective study. Working time of the different occupational groups and room occupancies for the workflow of prostate BRT were recorded and methodically assessed during a 3-month period. For HDR and LDR BRT, a total of 560 and 92 measurements, respectively, were documented. The time needed for treatment preplanning was median 24 min for HDR (n=112 measurements) and 6 min for LDR BRT (n=21). Catheter implantation with intraoperative HDR real-time planning (n=112), postimplantation HDR treatment planning (n=112), and remotely controlled HDR afterloading irradiation (n=112) required median 25, 39, and 50 min, respectively. For LDR real-time planning (n=39) and LDR treatment postplanning (n=32), the assessed median duration was 91 and 11 min, respectively. Room occupancy and overall mean medical staff times were 194 and 910 min respectively, for HDR, and 113 and 371 min, respectively, for LDR BRT. In this prospective analysis, the resource requirements for the application of HDR and LDR BRT of prostate cancer were assessed methodically and are presented for first time. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of time, attendance of medical staff, and resources during interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer. DEGRO-QUIRO trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselis, N.; Zamboglou, N. [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Maurer, U. [St.-Antonius-Hospital, Strahlentherapie, Eschweiler (Germany); Popp, W. [Prime Networks AG, Basel (Switzerland); Sack, H. [University of Essen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Essen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    The German Society of Radiation Oncology initiated a multicenter trial to evaluate core processes and subprocesses of radiotherapy by prospective evaluation of all important procedures in the most frequent malignancies treated by radiation therapy. The aim of this analysis was to assess the required resources for interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy (BRT) based on actual time measurements regarding allocation of personnel and room occupation needed for specific procedures. Two radiotherapy centers (community hospital of Offenbach am Main and community hospital of Eschweiler) participated in this prospective study. Working time of the different occupational groups and room occupancies for the workflow of prostate BRT were recorded and methodically assessed during a 3-month period. For HDR and LDR BRT, a total of 560 and 92 measurements, respectively, were documented. The time needed for treatment preplanning was median 24 min for HDR (n=112 measurements) and 6 min for LDR BRT (n=21). Catheter implantation with intraoperative HDR real-time planning (n=112), postimplantation HDR treatment planning (n=112), and remotely controlled HDR afterloading irradiation (n=112) required median 25, 39, and 50 min, respectively. For LDR real-time planning (n=39) and LDR treatment postplanning (n=32), the assessed median duration was 91 and 11 min, respectively. Room occupancy and overall mean medical staff times were 194 and 910 min respectively, for HDR, and 113 and 371 min, respectively, for LDR BRT. In this prospective analysis, the resource requirements for the application of HDR and LDR BRT of prostate cancer were assessed methodically and are presented for first time. (orig.)

  7. MR-based source localization for MR-guided HDR brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beld, E.; Moerland, M. A.; Zijlstra, F.; Viergever, M. A.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Seevinck, P. R.

    2018-04-01

    For the purpose of MR-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a method for real-time localization of an HDR brachytherapy source was developed, which requires high spatial and temporal resolutions. MR-based localization of an HDR source serves two main aims. First, it enables real-time treatment verification by determination of the HDR source positions during treatment. Second, when using a dummy source, MR-based source localization provides an automatic detection of the source dwell positions after catheter insertion, allowing elimination of the catheter reconstruction procedure. Localization of the HDR source was conducted by simulation of the MR artifacts, followed by a phase correlation localization algorithm applied to the MR images and the simulated images, to determine the position of the HDR source in the MR images. To increase the temporal resolution of the MR acquisition, the spatial resolution was decreased, and a subpixel localization operation was introduced. Furthermore, parallel imaging (sensitivity encoding) was applied to further decrease the MR scan time. The localization method was validated by a comparison with CT, and the accuracy and precision were investigated. The results demonstrated that the described method could be used to determine the HDR source position with a high accuracy (0.4–0.6 mm) and a high precision (⩽0.1 mm), at high temporal resolutions (0.15–1.2 s per slice). This would enable real-time treatment verification as well as an automatic detection of the source dwell positions.

  8. Management of a HDR brachytherapy system in the Hospital Juarez of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano F, A.G.; Ramirez R, G.; Gil G, R.; Azorin N, J.; Rivera M, T.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: In the Hospital Juarez of Mexico, it is carried out a project to implement a Brachytherapy system with high dose rate (HDR) through a Management quality program. In our work center this treatment modality in patients with cervicouterine cancer is used (CaCu), and constantly it is necessary to carry out improvements in the procedures, with the purpose of optimizing them and in consequence to complete the principles of the Radiological Protection, guaranteeing this way, an attention with the quality and safety, such that allow to diminish the risks to the patients and to assure that the received dose in critical organs it finds inside the permitted therapeutic limits, without commit the radiosensitive response of healthy organs. In this work an analysis of the implementation of this system is presented, detailing the procedures so much in the technological infrastructure like human and indicating the necessary technical and operative requirements to reach an adequate practice in HDR brachytherapy. (Author)

  9. Dosimetric study of surface applicators of HDR brachytherapy GammaMed Plus equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes-Rivera, E.; Sosa, M.; Reyes, U.; Jesús Bernal-Alvarado, José de; Córdova, T.; Gil-Villegas, A.; Monzón, E.

    2014-01-01

    The cone type surface applicators used in HDR brachytherapy for treatment of small skin lesions are an alternative to be used with both electron beams and orthovoltage X-ray equipment. For a good treatment planning is necessary to know the dose distribution of these applicators, which can be obtained by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo simulation as well. In this study the dose distribution of surface applicators of 3 and 3.5 cm diameter, respectively of HDR brachytherapy GammaMed Plus equipment has been estimated using the Monte Carlo method, MCNP code. The applicators simulated were placed on the surface of a water phantom of 20 × 20 × 20 cm and the dose was calculated at depths from 0 to 3 cm with increments of 0.25 mm. The dose profiles obtained at depth show the expected gradients for surface therapy

  10. Dosimetric study of surface applicators of HDR brachytherapy GammaMed Plus equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Rivera, E., E-mail: eric-1985@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: modesto@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: uvaldoreyes@fisica.ugto.mx; Sosa, M., E-mail: eric-1985@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: modesto@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: uvaldoreyes@fisica.ugto.mx; Reyes, U., E-mail: eric-1985@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: modesto@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: uvaldoreyes@fisica.ugto.mx; Jesús Bernal-Alvarado, José de, E-mail: bernal@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: theo@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: gil@fisica.ugto.mx; Córdova, T., E-mail: bernal@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: theo@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: gil@fisica.ugto.mx; Gil-Villegas, A., E-mail: bernal@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: theo@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: gil@fisica.ugto.mx [División de Ciencias e Ingenierías, Universidad de Guanajuato, 37150 León, Gto. (Mexico); Monzón, E., E-mail: emonzon@imss.gob.mx [Unidad de Alta Especialidad No.1, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Léon, Gto. (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    The cone type surface applicators used in HDR brachytherapy for treatment of small skin lesions are an alternative to be used with both electron beams and orthovoltage X-ray equipment. For a good treatment planning is necessary to know the dose distribution of these applicators, which can be obtained by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo simulation as well. In this study the dose distribution of surface applicators of 3 and 3.5 cm diameter, respectively of HDR brachytherapy GammaMed Plus equipment has been estimated using the Monte Carlo method, MCNP code. The applicators simulated were placed on the surface of a water phantom of 20 × 20 × 20 cm and the dose was calculated at depths from 0 to 3 cm with increments of 0.25 mm. The dose profiles obtained at depth show the expected gradients for surface therapy.

  11. IPIP: A new approach to inverse planning for HDR brachytherapy by directly optimizing dosimetric indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siauw, Timmy; Cunha, Adam; Atamtuerk, Alper; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean; Goldberg, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Many planning methods for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy require an iterative approach. A set of computational parameters are hypothesized that will give a dose plan that meets dosimetric criteria. A dose plan is computed using these parameters, and if any dosimetric criteria are not met, the process is iterated until a suitable dose plan is found. In this way, the dose distribution is controlled by abstract parameters. The purpose of this study is to develop a new approach for HDR brachytherapy by directly optimizing the dose distribution based on dosimetric criteria. Methods: The authors developed inverse planning by integer program (IPIP), an optimization model for computing HDR brachytherapy dose plans and a fast heuristic for it. They used their heuristic to compute dose plans for 20 anonymized prostate cancer image data sets from patients previously treated at their clinic database. Dosimetry was evaluated and compared to dosimetric criteria. Results: Dose plans computed from IPIP satisfied all given dosimetric criteria for the target and healthy tissue after a single iteration. The average target coverage was 95%. The average computation time for IPIP was 30.1 s on an Intel(R) Core TM 2 Duo CPU 1.67 GHz processor with 3 Gib RAM. Conclusions: IPIP is an HDR brachytherapy planning system that directly incorporates dosimetric criteria. The authors have demonstrated that IPIP has clinically acceptable performance for the prostate cases and dosimetric criteria used in this study, in both dosimetry and runtime. Further study is required to determine if IPIP performs well for a more general group of patients and dosimetric criteria, including other cancer sites such as GYN.

  12. Is there any place for LDR brachytherapy for head and neck carcinomas in HDR era?

    OpenAIRE

    Fijuth, Jacek

    2009-01-01

    In Poland, the classical LDR brachytherapy for head and neck carcinomas with Ir-192 wires or hairpins has completely disappeared some time ago after 30 years of successful clinical use. Can this technique be fully and safely replaced by HDR or PDR application? This option seems attractive because of new possibilities of 3D reconstruction and computer real-time treatment planning and optimization. However, in my opinion, long time is needed to get a clinical and scientific experience that has ...

  13. Application of the Monte Carlo integration method in calculations of dose distributions in HDR-Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltas, D; Geramani, K N; Ioannidis, G T; Kolotas, C; Zamboglou, N [Strahlenklinik, Stadtische Kliniken Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Giannouli, S [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    1999-12-31

    Source anisotropy is a very important factor in brachytherapy quality assurance of high dose rate HDR Ir 192 afterloading stepping sources. If anisotropy is not taken into account then doses received by a brachytherapy patient in certain directions can be in error by a clinically significant amount. Experimental measurements of anisotropy are very labour intensive. We have shown that within acceptable limits of accuracy, Monte Carlo integration (MCI) of a modified Sievert integral (3D generalisation) can provide the necessary data within a much shorter time scale than can experiments. Hence MCI can be used for routine quality assurance schedules whenever a new design of HDR or PDR Ir 192 is used for brachytherapy afterloading. Our MCI calculation results are comparable with published experimental data and Monte Carlo simulation data for microSelectron and VariSource Ir 192 sources. We have shown not only that MCI offers advantages over alternative numerical integration methods, but also that treating filtration coefficients as radial distance-dependent functions improves Sievert integral accuracy at low energies. This paper also provides anisotropy data for three new Ir 192 sources, one for microSelectron-HDR and two for the microSelectron-PDR, for which data currently is not available. The information we have obtained in this study can be incorporated into clinical practice.

  14. Impact of using linear optimization models in dose planning for HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, Aasa; Larsson, Torbjoern; Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Dose plans generated with optimization models hitherto used in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy have shown a tendency to yield longer dwell times than manually optimized plans. Concern has been raised for the corresponding undesired hot spots, and various methods to mitigate these have been developed. The hypotheses upon this work is based are (a) that one cause for the long dwell times is the use of objective functions comprising simple linear penalties and (b) that alternative penalties, as these are piecewise linear, would lead to reduced length of individual dwell times. Methods: The characteristics of the linear penalties and the piecewise linear penalties are analyzed mathematically. Experimental comparisons between the two types of penalties are carried out retrospectively for a set of prostate cancer patients. Results: When the two types of penalties are compared, significant changes can be seen in the dwell times, while most dose-volume parameters do not differ significantly. On average, total dwell times were reduced by 4.2%, with a reduction of maximum dwell times by 25%, when the alternative penalties were used. Conclusions: The use of linear penalties in optimization models for HDR brachytherapy is one cause for the undesired long dwell times that arise in mathematically optimized plans. By introducing alternative penalties, a significant reduction in dwell times can be achieved for HDR brachytherapy dose plans. Although various measures for mitigating the long dwell times are already available, the observation that linear penalties contribute to their appearance is of fundamental interest.

  15. Radioactive seed immobilization techniques for interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, K.; Podder, T.; Buzurovic, I.; Hu, Y.; Dicker, A.; Valicenti, R.; Yu, Y.; Messing, E.; Rubens, D.; Sarkar, N.; Ng, W.

    2008-01-01

    In prostate brachytherapy, seeds can detach from their deposited sites and move locally in the pelvis or migrate to distant sites including the pulmonary and cardiac regions. Undesirable consequences of seed migration include inadequate dose coverage of the prostate and tissue irradiation effects at the site of migration. Thus, it is clinically important to develop seed immobilization techniques. We first analyze the possible causes for seed movement, and propose three potential techniques for seed immobilization: (1) surgical glue, (2) laser coagulation and (3) diathermy coagulation. The feasibility of each method is explored. Experiments were carried out using fresh bovine livers to investigate the efficacy of seed immobilization using surgical glue. Results have shown that the surgical glue can effectively immobilize the seeds. Evaluation of the radiation dose distribution revealed that the non-immobilized seed movement would change the planned isodose distribution considerably; while by using surgical glue method to immobilize the seeds, the changes were negligible. Prostate brachytherapy seed immobilization is necessary and three alternative mechanisms are promising for addressing this issue. Experiments for exploring the efficacy of the other two proposed methods are ongoing. Devices compatible with the brachytherapy procedure will be designed in future. (orig.)

  16. Dosimetry experience of 192IR sources used In HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daci, Lulzime; Myrku, Rodina Cela

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The 192IR Sources are the most commonly used in radiotherapy treatments HDR worldwide. According to international recommendations on quality assurance in HDR brachytherapy, an acceptance test based on the determination of the source strength of any new source shall be carried out before first application to verify the manufacturer’s calibration data. The present paper gives the experimental determination of the source strength for our brachytherapy sources used until now in brachytherapy treatments. Materials/Methods: At Mother Teresa University Hospital we have a cost-effective gynecological brachytherapy unit from Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG named GyneSource® that is a five channel HDR after loader equipped with an 192IR source. The software used is HDR plus™ 2.5 that delivers an optimized treatment plan and makes the process especially fast and we use intracavitary BEBIG applicators. From April 2009 up to December 2012, we have imported nine HDR 192IR Sources. The exchange of the source and acceptance test is done by the physicist of the clinic once the source is imported. The measurements are done with a Well-type ionization chamber HDR1000 Plus and the electrometer used is MAX4000. Only seven sources are compared as we miss the dosimetry data of the first source, and the forth source was not measured and not used because the machine was not working in that time. Results/Conclusions: Eight sources were accepted for clinically use as the measurement were within the tolerance. The source number four with e deviation of -1.92% has been double checked compared with a free in-air measurement with farmer type chamber that gave a deviation to source certificate of 4% that is still inside the tolerance to accept a source for clinical use. The deviations of measured Air Kerma rate to the value of the sources certificates of all our used 192IR sources are less than 2%, which are within the tolerance. The checked value of updated source strength in

  17. Developing A Directional High-Dose Rate (d-HDR) Brachytherapy Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Athena Yvonne

    Conventional sources used in brachytherapy provide nearly isotropic or radially symmetric dose distributions. Optimizations of dose distributions have been limited to varied dwell times at specified locations within a given treatment volume, or manipulations in source position for seed implantation techniques. In years past, intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) has been used to reduce the amount of radiation to surrounding sensitive structures in select intracavitary cases by adding space or partial shields. Previous work done by Lin et al., at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has shown potential improvements in conformality for brachytherapy treatments using a directionally shielded low dose rate (LDR) source for treatments in breast and prostate. Directional brachytherapy sources irradiate approximately half of the radial angles around the source, and adequately shield a quarter of the radial angles on the opposite side, with sharp gradient zones between the treated half and shielded quarter. With internally shielded sources, the radiation can be preferentially emitted in such a way as to reduce toxicities in surrounding critical organs. The objective of this work is to present findings obtained in the development of a new directional high dose rate (d-HDR) source. To this goal, 103Pd (Z = 46) is reintroduced as a potential radionuclide for use in HDR brachytherapy. 103Pd has a low average photon energy (21 keV) and relatively short half -life (17 days), which is why it has historically been used in low dose rate applications and implantation techniques. Pd-103 has a carrier-free specific activity of 75000 Ci/g. Using cyclotron produced 103Pd, near carrier-free specific activities can be achieved, providing suitability for high dose rate applications. The evolution of the d-HDR source using Monte Carlo simulations is presented, along with dosimetric parameters used to fully characterize the source. In addition, a discussion on how to obtain elemental

  18. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: The feasibility and cosmetic outcome of a fractionated outpatient delivery scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, Matthew A.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.; Arnfield, Mark R.; Amir, Cyrus; Zwicker, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, potential toxicity, and cosmetic outcome of fractionated interstitial high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for the management of patients with breast cancer at increased risk for local recurrence. Methods and Materials: From 1994 to 1996, 18 women with early stage breast cancer underwent conventionally fractionated whole breast radiotherapy (50-50.4 Gy) followed by interstitial HDR brachytherapy boost. All were considered to be at high risk for local failure. Seventeen had pathologically confirmed final surgical margins of less than 2 mm or focally positive. Brachytherapy catheter placement and treatment delivery were conducted on an outpatient basis. Preplanning was used to determine optimal catheter positions to enhance dose homogeneity of dose delivery. The total HDR boost dose was 15 Gy delivered in 6 fractions of 2.5 Gy over 3 days. Local control, survival, late toxicities (LENT-SOMA), and cosmetic outcome were recorded in follow-up. In addition, factors potentially influencing cosmesis were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. Results: The minimum follow-up is 40 months with a median 50 months. Sixteen patients were alive without disease at last follow-up. There have been no in-breast failures observed. One patient died with brain metastases, and another died of unrelated causes without evidence of disease. Grade 1-2 late toxicities included 39% with hyperpigmentation, 56% with detectable fibrosis, 28% with occasional discomfort, and 11% with visible telangiectasias. Grade 3 toxicity was reported in one patient as persistent discomfort. Sixty-seven percent of patients were considered to have experienced good/excellent cosmetic outcomes. Factors with a direct relationship to adverse cosmetic outcome were extent of surgical defect (p = 0.00001), primary excision volume (p = 0.017), and total excision volume (p = 0.015). Conclusions: For high risk patients who may benefit from increased doses, interstitial HDR

  19. Time to PSA rise differentiates the PSA bounce after HDR and LDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchardt, Wojciech; Skowronek, Janusz

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the differences in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce (PB) after high-dose-rate (HDR-BT) or low-dose-rate (LDR-BT) brachytherapy alone in prostate cancer patients. Ninety-four patients with localized prostate cancer (T1-T2cN0), age ranged 50-81 years, were treated with brachytherapy alone between 2008 and 2010. Patients were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, Gleason score ≤ 7. The LDR-BT total dose was 144-145 Gy, in HDR-BT - 3 fractions of 10.5 or 15 Gy. The initial PSA level (iPSA) was assessed before treatment, then PSA was rated every 3 months over the first 2 years, and every 6 months during the next 3 years. Median follow-up was 3.0 years. Mean iPSA was 7.8 ng/ml. In 58 cases, PSA decreased gradually without PB or biochemical failure (BF). In 24% of patients, PB was observed. In 23 cases (24%), PB was observed using 0.2 ng/ml definition; in 10 cases (11%), BF was diagnosed using nadir + 2 ng/ml definition. The HDR-BT and LDR-BT techniques were not associated with higher level of PB (26 vs. 22%, p = 0.497). Time to the first PSA rise finished with PB was significantly shorter after HDR-BT then after LDR-BT (median, 10.5 vs. 18.0 months) during follow-up. Predictors for PB were observed only after HDR-BT. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and higher Gleason score decreased the risk of PB (HR = 0.11, p = 0.03; HR = 0.51, p = 0.01). The higher PSA nadir and longer time to PSA nadir increased the risk of PB (HR 3.46, p = 0.02; HR 1.04, p = 0.04). There was no predictors for PB after LDR-BT. HDR-BT and LDR-BT for low and intermediate risk prostate cancer had similar PB rate. The PB occurred earlier after HDR-BT than after LDR-BT. ADT and higher Gleason score decreased, and higher PSA nadir and longer time to PSA nadir increased the risk of PB after HDR-BT.

  20. 3-D conformal HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.; Baltas, D.; Kurek, R.; Roeddiger, S.; Kontova, M.; Anagnostopoulos, G.; Skazikis, G.; Zamboglou, N.; Dannenberg, T.; Buhleier, T.; Tunn, U.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: pilot study to evaluate feasibility, acute toxicity and conformal quality of three-dimensional (3-D) conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer using intraoperative real-time planning. Patients and methods: between 05/2002 and 05/2003, 52 patients with prostate cancer, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤ 10 ng/ml, Gleason score ≤ 7 and clinical stage ≤ T2a were treated. Median PSA was 6.4 ng/ml and median Gleason score 5. 24/52 patients had stage T1c and 28/52 stage T2a. For transrectal ultrasound-(TRUS-)guided transperineal implantation of flexible plastic needles into the prostate, the real-time HDR planning system SWIFT trademark was used. After implantation, CT-based 3-D postplanning was performed. All patients received one implant for four fractions of HDR brachytherapy in 48 h using a reference dose (D ref ) of 9.5 Gy to a total dose of 38.0 Gy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed to evaluate the conformal quality of each implant using D 90 , D 10 urethra, and D 10 rectum. Acute toxicity was evaluated using the CTC (common toxicity criteria) scales. Results: median D 90 was 106% of D ref (range: 93-115%), median D 10 urethra 159% of D ref (range: 127-192%), and median D 10 rectum 55% of D ref (range: 35-68%). Median follow-up is currently 8 months. In 2/52 patients acute grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was observed. No gastrointestinal toxicity > grade 1 occurred. Conclusion: 3-D conformal HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy using intraoperative real-time planning is a feasible and highly conformal treatment for localized prostate cancer associated with minimal acute toxicity. Longer follow-up is needed to evaluate late toxicity and biochemical control. (orig.)

  1. Effectiveness of two different HDR brachytherapy regimens with the same BED value in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Vashistha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the effectiveness of biologically effective dose (BED in two different regimens of HDR brachytherapy keeping the same total BED to point A and to compare the relationship of overall treatment time in terms of local control and bladder and rectal complications.Material and methods: The study included two groups comprising a total of 90 cervical cancer patients who underwent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT followed by HDR intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT. EBRT treatment was delivered by a Co-60 teletherapy unit to a prescribed dose of 45 Gy with 1.8 Gy per fraction in 25 fractions over a period of five weeks. Parallel opposed anterior–posterior (AP/PA fields with no central shielding were used, followed by the HDR ICBT dose, to point A, of either two fractions of 9.5 Gy with a gap of 10 days, or three fractions of 7.5 Gy with a gap of 7 days between the fractions. Gemcitabine (dose of 150 mg/m2 was given weekly to all the patients as a radiosensitizer. The calculate BED3 to point A was almost the same in both groups to keep the same late complication rates. The doses, and BED10 and BED3, were calculated at different bladder and rectal point as well as at the lymphatictrapezoid points. During and after treatment patients were evaluated for local control and complications for 24 months.Results and Conclusions: Doses and BEDs at different bladder, rectal and lymphatic trapezoid points, local control, and complications in both HDR ICBT groups did not have statistically significant differences (p > 0.05. Both HDR ICBT schedules are well tolerable and equally effective.

  2. Introduction of a hybrid treatment delivery system used for quality assurance in multi-catheter interstitial brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallis, Karoline; Kreppner, Stephan; Lotter, Michael; Fietkau, Rainer; Strnad, Vratislav; Bert, Christoph

    2018-05-01

    Multi-catheter interstitial brachytherapy (iBT) is a treatment option for breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery. Typically, only a few additional quality interventions after the first irradiation have been introduced to ensure the planned treatment delivery. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to show the possibilities of an electromagnetic tracking (EMT) system integrated into the afterloader for quality assurance (QA) in high-dose rate (HDR) iBT of patients with breast cancer. The hybrid afterloader system equipped with an electromagnetic sensor was used for all phantom and patient measurements. Phantom measurements were conducted to estimate the quality of different evaluation schemes. After a coherent point drift registration of the EMT traces to the reconstructed catheters based on computed tomograms the dwell positions (DP) were defined. Different fitting and interpolation methods were analyzed for the reconstruction of DPs. All estimated DPs were compared to the DPs defined in treatment planning. Until now, the implant geometry of 20 patients treated with HDR brachytherapy was acquired and explored. Regarding the reconstruction techniques, both fitting and interpolation were able to detect manually introduced shifts and swaps. Nonetheless, interpolation showed superior results (RMSE  =  1.27 mm), whereas fitting seemed to be more stable to distortion and motion. The EMT system proved to be beneficial for QA in brachytherapy and furthermore, clinical feasibility was proven.

  3. Computed tomography-guided interstitial high dose rate brachytherapy for centrally located liver tumours: a single institution study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselis, Nikolaos; Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Kolotas, Christos [Hirslanden Medical Center, Institute for Radiotherapy, Aarau (Switzerland); Milickovic, Natasa; Baltas, Dimos [Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Offenbach am Main (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial (IRT) high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BRT) in the treatment of unresectable primary and secondary liver malignancies. This report updates and expands our previously described experience with this treatment technique. Forty-one patients with 50 tumours adjacent to the liver hilum and bile duct bifurcation were treated in 59 interventions of CT-guided IRT HDR BRT. The tumours were larger than 4 cm with a median volume of 84 cm{sup 3} (38-1,348 cm{sup 3}). The IRT HDR BRT delivered a median total physical dose of 20.0 Gy (7.0-32.0 Gy) in twice daily fractions of median 7.0 Gy (4.0-10.0 Gy) in 19 patients and in once daily fractions of median 8.0 Gy (7.0-14.0 Gy) in 22 patients. With a median follow-up of 12.4 months, the local control for metastatic hepatic tumours was 89 %, 73 % and 63 % at 6, 12 and 18 months respectively. The local control for primary hepatic tumours was 90 %, 81 % and 50 % at 6, 12 and 18 months respectively. Severe side effects occurred in 5.0 % of interventions with no treatment-related deaths. CT-guided IRT HDR BRT is a promising procedure for the radiation treatment of centrally located liver malignancies. (orig.)

  4. Genitourinary Toxicity After High-Dose-Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy Combined With Hypofractionated External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: An Analysis to Determine the Correlation Between Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters in HDR Brachytherapy and Severity of Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Kitano, Masashi; Satoh, Takefumi; Kotani, Shouko; Uemae, Mineko; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Okusa, Hiroshi; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Baba, Shiro; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the severity of genitourinary (GU) toxicity in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and to explore factors that might affect the severity of GU toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 100 Japanese men with prostate cancer underwent 192 Ir HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Mean (SD) dose to 90% of the planning target volume was 6.3 (0.7) Gy per fraction of HDR. After 5 fractions of HDR treatment, EBRT with 10 fractions of 3 Gy was administrated. The urethral volume receiving 1-15 Gy per fraction in HDR brachytherapy (V1-V15) and the dose to at least 5-100% of urethral volume in HDR brachytherapy (D5-D100) were compared between patients with Grade 3 toxicity and those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Prostate volume, patient age, and International Prostate Symptom Score were also compared between the two groups. Results: Of the 100 patients, 6 displayed Grade 3 acute GU toxicity, and 12 displayed Grade 3 late GU toxicity. Regarding acute GU toxicity, values of V1, V2, V3, and V4 were significantly higher in patients with Grade 3 toxicity than in those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Regarding late GU toxicity, values of D70, D80, V12, and V13 were significantly higher in patients with Grade 3 toxicity than in those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Conclusions: The severity of GU toxicity in HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT for prostate cancer was relatively high. The volume of prostatic urethra was associated with grade of acute GU toxicity, and urethral dose was associated with grade of late GU toxicity.

  5. Increasing Fractional Doses Increases the Probability of Benign PSA Bounce in Patients Undergoing Definitive HDR Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauck, Carlin R.; Ye, Hong; Chen, Peter Y.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Limbacher, Amy; Krauss, Daniel J., E-mail: Daniel.krauss@beaumont.edu

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce is a temporary elevation of the PSA level above a prior nadir. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the frequency of a PSA bounce following high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer is associated with individual treatment fraction size. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2014, 554 patients underwent treatment of low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer with definitive HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy and had ≥3 subsequent PSA measurements. Four different fraction sizes were used: 950 cGy × 4 fractions, 1200 cGy × 2 fractions, 1350 cGy × 2 fractions, 1900 cGy × 1 fraction. Four definitions of PSA bounce were applied: ≥0.2, ≥0.5, ≥1.0, and ≥2.0 ng/mL above the prior nadir with a subsequent return to the nadir. Results: The median follow-up period was 3.7 years. The actuarial 3-year rate of PSA bounce for the entire cohort was 41.3%, 28.4%, 17.4%, and 6.8% for nadir +0.2, +0.5, +1.0, and +2.0 ng/mL, respectively. The 3-year rate of PSA bounce >0.2 ng/mL was 42.2%, 32.1%, 41.0%, and 59.1% for the 950-, 1200-, 1350-, and 1900-cGy/fraction levels, respectively (P=.002). The hazard ratio for bounce >0.2 ng/mL for patients receiving a single fraction of 1900 cGy compared with those receiving treatment in multiple fractions was 1.786 (P=.024). For patients treated with a single 1900-cGy fraction, the 1-, 2-, and 3-year rates of PSA bounce exceeding the Phoenix biochemical failure definition (nadir +2 ng/mL) were 4.5%, 18.7%, and 18.7%, respectively, higher than the rates for all other administered dose levels (P=.025). Conclusions: The incidence of PSA bounce increases with single-fraction HDR treatment. Knowledge of posttreatment PSA kinetics may aid in decision making regarding management of potential biochemical failures.

  6. Increasing Fractional Doses Increases the Probability of Benign PSA Bounce in Patients Undergoing Definitive HDR Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauck, Carlin R.; Ye, Hong; Chen, Peter Y.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Limbacher, Amy; Krauss, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce is a temporary elevation of the PSA level above a prior nadir. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the frequency of a PSA bounce following high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer is associated with individual treatment fraction size. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2014, 554 patients underwent treatment of low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer with definitive HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy and had ≥3 subsequent PSA measurements. Four different fraction sizes were used: 950 cGy × 4 fractions, 1200 cGy × 2 fractions, 1350 cGy × 2 fractions, 1900 cGy × 1 fraction. Four definitions of PSA bounce were applied: ≥0.2, ≥0.5, ≥1.0, and ≥2.0 ng/mL above the prior nadir with a subsequent return to the nadir. Results: The median follow-up period was 3.7 years. The actuarial 3-year rate of PSA bounce for the entire cohort was 41.3%, 28.4%, 17.4%, and 6.8% for nadir +0.2, +0.5, +1.0, and +2.0 ng/mL, respectively. The 3-year rate of PSA bounce >0.2 ng/mL was 42.2%, 32.1%, 41.0%, and 59.1% for the 950-, 1200-, 1350-, and 1900-cGy/fraction levels, respectively (P=.002). The hazard ratio for bounce >0.2 ng/mL for patients receiving a single fraction of 1900 cGy compared with those receiving treatment in multiple fractions was 1.786 (P=.024). For patients treated with a single 1900-cGy fraction, the 1-, 2-, and 3-year rates of PSA bounce exceeding the Phoenix biochemical failure definition (nadir +2 ng/mL) were 4.5%, 18.7%, and 18.7%, respectively, higher than the rates for all other administered dose levels (P=.025). Conclusions: The incidence of PSA bounce increases with single-fraction HDR treatment. Knowledge of posttreatment PSA kinetics may aid in decision making regarding management of potential biochemical failures.

  7. Patient-based dosimetric comparison of interstitial and intracavitary brachytherapy in cases of cancer cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansal, Anil K.; Julka, P.K.; Sharma, D.N.; Rustogi, Ashish; Subramani, V.; Prabhakar, R.; Rath, G.K.; Semwal, Manoj K.; Thulkar, S.

    2008-01-01

    Brachytherapy in the form of High Dose Rate (HDR) intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT) along with external beam radiotherapy(EBRT) is the main treatment in cancer cervix. Of late, some large centres have started practicing template based transperineal interstitial brachytherapy (TIB) for advanced/ bulky cancer cervix. Usually, TIB is given for patients with advanced disease/ distorted anatomy or recurrent disease for better lateral target coverage. CT/MRI/USG based planning has made volumetric dosimetry possible for the target and the organs at risk (OARs). This has resulted in better correlation between dose received and treatment outcome in terms of tumour control and late toxicities as against the point dosimetry system. It has been shown by many studies that ICRU based point dose reporting may not represent the actual doses received by the OARs. Though it is expected that TIB gives better target coverage and OAR sparing in advanced/ bulky cancer cervix cases as compared to ICRT, detailed patient studies on the subject have not been reported. We have carried out dosimetric comparison between ICRT and TIB for cancer cervix patients undergoing treatment at our centre in terms of treated volume and doses to OARs

  8. A multicentre ‘end to end’ dosimetry audit for cervix HDR brachytherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, Antony L.; Diez, Patricia; Gandon, Laura; Wynn-Jones, Andrea; Bownes, Peter; Lee, Chris; Aird, Edwin; Bidmead, Margaret; Lowe, Gerry; Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To undertake the first multicentre fully ‘end to end’ dosimetry audit for HDR cervix brachytherapy, comparing planned and delivered dose distributions around clinical treatment applicators, with review of local procedures. Materials and methods: A film-dosimetry audit was performed at 46 centres, including imaging, applicator reconstruction, treatment planning and delivery. Film dose maps were calculated using triple-channel dosimetry and compared to RTDose data from treatment planning systems. Deviations between plan and measurement were quantified at prescription Point A and using gamma analysis. Local procedures were also discussed. Results: The mean difference between planned and measured dose at Point A was −0.6% for plastic applicators and −3.0% for metal applicators, at standard uncertainty 3.0% (k = 1). Isodose distributions agreed within 1 mm over a dose range 2–16 Gy. Mean gamma passing rates exceeded 97% for plastic and metal applicators at 3% (local) 2 mm criteria. Two errors were found: one dose normalisation error and one applicator library misaligned with the imaged applicator. Suggestions for quality improvement were also made. Conclusions: The concept of ‘end to end’ dosimetry audit for HDR brachytherapy has been successfully implemented in a multicentre environment, providing evidence that a high level of accuracy in brachytherapy dosimetry can be achieved

  9. Quality control of the breast cancer treatments on Hdr brachytherapy with TLD-100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres H, F. [Universidad de Cordoba, Materials and Applied Physics Group, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia); De la Espriella V, N. [Universidad de Cordoba, Grupo Avanzado de Materiales y Sistemas Complejos, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia); Sanchez C, A., E-mail: franciscotorreshoyos@yahoo.com [Universidad de Cordoba, Departamento de Enfermeria, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia)

    2014-07-01

    An anthropomorphic Phantom, a female trunk, was built with a natural bone structure and experimental material coated, glycerin and water-based material called JJT to build soft tissue equivalent to the muscle of human tissue, and a polymer (styrofoam) to build the lung as critical organ to simulate the treatment of breast cancer, with high dose rate brachytherapy (Hdr) and sources of Ir-192. The treatments were planned and calculated for the critical organ: Lung, and injury of 2 cm in diameter in breast with Micro Selectron Hdr system and the software Plato Brachytherapy V 14.1 of the Nucletron (Netherlands) which uses the standard protocol of radiotherapy for brachytherapy treatments. The dose experimentally measured with dosimeters TLD-100 LiF: Mg; Ti, which were previously calibrated, were placed in the same positions and bodies mentioned above, with less than 5% uncertainty. The reading dosimeters was carried out in a Harshaw TLD 4500. The results obtained for calculated treatments, using the standard simulator, and the experimental with TLD-100, show a high concordance, as they are on average a ± 1.1% making process becomes in a quality control of this type of treatments. (Author)

  10. Variability of Marker-Based Rectal Dose Evaluation in HDR Cervical Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhou; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Malhotra, Harish K.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    In film-based intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer, position of the rectal markers may not accurately represent the anterior rectal wall. This study was aimed at analyzing the variability of rectal dose estimation as a result of interfractional variation of marker placement. A cohort of five patients treated with multiple-fraction tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was studied. The cervical os point and the orientation of the applicators were matched among all fractional plans for each patient. Rectal points obtained from all fractions were then input into each clinical treated plan. New fractional rectal doses were obtained and a new cumulative rectal dose for each patient was calculated. The maximum interfractional variation of distances between rectal dose points and the closest source positions was 1.1 cm. The corresponding maximum variability of fractional rectal dose was 65.5%. The percentage difference in cumulative rectal dose estimation for each patient was 5.4%, 19.6%, 34.6%, 23.4%, and 13.9%, respectively. In conclusion, care should be taken when using rectal markers as reference points for estimating rectal dose in HDR cervical brachytherapy. The best estimate of true rectal dose for each fraction should be determined by the most anterior point among all fractions.

  11. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, J. A. M.; Hsu, I-C.; Pouliot, J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V 100 Prostate >90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V 75 Bladder 75 Rectum 125 Urethra <<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of catheter insertion. In addition, alternative catheter

  12. Evaluation of the Kerma at the entrance of the labyrin thin in facilities with Co-60 HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujades, M. C.; Granero, D.; Ballester, F.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Vijande, J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the kerma's collision at the entrance of the labyrinth adapting the methodology of the NCRP-151 to a bunker of brachytherapy with Co-60, similar to the one carried out in a previous work with HDR Ir-192. To validate the result is simulated using techniques Monte Carlo (MC) two typical designs of HDR with Co-60 bunker. (Author)

  13. Dosimetric comparison between the microSelectron HDR 192Ir v2 source and the BEBIG 60Co source for HDR brachytherapy using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwarul Islam, M.; Akramuzzaman, M.M.; Zakaria, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Manufacturing of miniaturized high activity 192 Ir sources have been made a market preference in modern brachytherapy. The smaller dimensions of the sources are flexible for smaller diameter of the applicators and it is also suitable for interstitial implants. Presently, miniaturized 60 Co HDR sources have been made available with identical dimensions to those of 192 Ir sources. 60 Co sources have an advantage of longer half life while comparing with 192 Ir source. High dose rate brachytherapy sources with longer half life are logically pragmatic solution for developing country in economic point of view. This study is aimed to compare the TG-43U1 dosimetric parameters for new BEBIG 60 Co HDR and new microSelectron 192 Ir HDR sources. Dosimetric parameters are calculated using EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo simulation code accordance with the AAPM TG-43 formalism for microSelectron HDR 192 Ir v2 and new BEBIG 60 Co HDR sources. Air-kerma strength per unit source activity, calculated in dry air are 9.698x10 -8 ± 0.55% U Bq -1 and 3.039x10 -7 ± 0.41% U Bq -1 for the above mentioned two sources, respectively. The calculated dose rate constants per unit air-kerma strength in water medium are 1.116±0.12% cGy h -1 U -1 and 1.097±0.12% cGy h -1 U -1 , respectively, for the two sources. The values of radial dose function for distances up to 1 cm and more than 22 cm for BEBIG 60 Co HDR source are higher than that of other source. The anisotropic values are sharply increased to the longitudinal sides of the BEBIG 60 Co source and the rise is comparatively sharper than that of the other source. Tissue dependence of the absorbed dose has been investigated with vacuum phantom for breast, compact bone, blood, lung, thyroid, soft tissue, testis, and muscle. No significant variation is noted at 5 cm of radial distance in this regard while comparing the two sources except for lung tissues. The true dose rates are calculated with considering photon as well as electron transport using

  14. Inverse treatment planning based on MRI for HDR prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Citrin, Deborah; Ning, Holly; Guion, Peter; Li Guang; Susil, Robert C.; Miller, Robert W.; Lessard, Etienne; Pouliot, Jean; Xie Huchen; Capala, Jacek; Coleman, C. Norman; Camphausen, Kevin; Menard, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and optimize a technique for inverse treatment planning based solely on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and materials: Phantom studies were performed to verify the spatial integrity of treatment planning based on MRI. Data were evaluated from 10 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer who had undergone two high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy boosts under MRI guidance before and after pelvic radiotherapy. Treatment planning MRI scans were systematically evaluated to derive a class solution for inverse planning constraints that would reproducibly result in acceptable target and normal tissue dosimetry. Results: We verified the spatial integrity of MRI for treatment planning. MRI anatomic evaluation revealed no significant displacement of the prostate in the left lateral decubitus position, a mean distance of 14.47 mm from the prostatic apex to the penile bulb, and clear demarcation of the neurovascular bundles on postcontrast imaging. Derivation of a class solution for inverse planning constraints resulted in a mean target volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose of 95.69%, while maintaining a rectal volume receiving 75% of the prescribed dose of <5% (mean 1.36%) and urethral volume receiving 125% of the prescribed dose of <2% (mean 0.54%). Conclusion: Systematic evaluation of image spatial integrity, delineation uncertainty, and inverse planning constraints in our procedure reduced uncertainty in planning and treatment

  15. Evaluation of radiation doses on critical organs in the treatment of cancer of the cervix using HDR-brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Taciana; Jansem, Teresa

    2000-01-01

    High dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is one type of treatment of the cervix carcinoma. During the planning for this therapy, especial attention is given to proximal normal organs such as bladder and rectum. In fact, due to their radiosensibility and localization, bladder and rectum are considered as critical organs. In this work we have studied the influence of the positioning of patient legs in the dose delivered to these critical organs in the treatment of cancer of the cervix using HDR-brachytherapy. (author)

  16. HDR intralumenal brachytherapy in bronchial cancer: review of our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, P.; Ravo, V.; Muschera, R.

    1996-01-01

    The main indications for brachytherapy in the treatment of endobronchial cancer are dyspnea. postobstructive pneumonia and atelectasis, cough and hemoptysis resulting from broncus obstruction by exophytic intralumenal tumor growth. High Dose Rate intralumenal brachytherapy (HDRBT) may be combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), in particular as almost all tumors are too large for HDRBT alone. From January 1992 to September 1995 we treated 268 patients affected by bronchial cancer, with EBRT combined with HDRBT. All patients were staged as IIIa-IIIb-IV but KPS was >60 and expectancy of life > than 3 months. After bronchoscopy and Tc simulation we found that almost 10% of patients were downstaged. Treatment was always realized delivering 60 Gy to the tumour volume and 50 Gy to the mediastinal structures with EBRT. Brachytherapy was performed during the radiotherapy course. In 38 patients HDRBT was realized just one time, at the beginning of EBRT, with a dose of 10 Gy calculated at 1cm from the central axis of the catheter. In 47 HDRBT was performed twice (at the beginning and at the end of EBRT) with a dose of 7 Gy calculated at 1 cm from the central axis. From 1994 we started a 3 fractions protocol (Timing: days 1.15.30) with a dose of 5 Gy calculated at 0.5 cm from the axis. Of the 183 patients introduced in the protocol 170 received the three fractions of HDRBT and 13 were excluded from the study for personal or clinical reasons. In 97% of cases the application did not need general anesthesia; local anesthesia has been sufficient supplemented by some drug for sedation and coughing. Anyway both bronchoscopy and HDRBT (with anterior-posterior and lateral chest X-ray) are performed in the same shielded room without the necessity of displacing the patient. In almost 60% of treatments we used just one endobronchial applicator. In case of tumor involvement of the carina, two applicators were introduced. By this a larger tumor volume can be treated with adequate

  17. Is there any place for LDR brachytherapy for head and neck carcinomas in HDR era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijuth, Jacek

    2009-03-01

    In Poland, the classical LDR brachytherapy for head and neck carcinomas with Ir-192 wires or hairpins has completely disappeared some time ago after 30 years of successful clinical use. Can this technique be fully and safely replaced by HDR or PDR application? This option seems attractive because of new possibilities of 3D reconstruction and computer real-time treatment planning and optimization. However, in my opinion, long time is needed to get a clinical and scientific experience that has been accumulated for decades with the use of LDR technique.

  18. Is there any advantage of CT based 3-dimensional conformal planning over conventional orthogonal x-ray based planning in HDR brachytherapy in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswal, B.M.; Idris, N.R.; Zakaria, A.B.; Khairul, N.

    2003-01-01

    The conventional brachytherapy dose calculation is based on a particular brachytherapy rule or individual dosimetry based on the reconstruction of the sources from the orthogonal films. In the recent years many centers are using CT based 3D conformal brachytherapy in order to improve the dosimetric outcome of a given plan. Here we would like to present our experience on the use of both techniques to deliver HDR interstitial brachytherapy as boost in early breast cancer. From January 2001 to January 2003, we treated 4 breast cancer patients using conventional orthogonal x-rays and CT scan in 3 cases for the treatment plan. All patients received an external beam radiotherapy dose of 46 Gy in 23 fractions over 4.5 weeks to the whole breast using 6 MV photon beam. Subsequently the primary lesion was supplimented with HDR brachytherapy to a dose of 2.5 Gy BID for 3 consecutive days using a (192)Ir microSelectronHDR. The dose prescription was individualized to encompass the tumor volume with a 10 mm margin. The differences of the dosimetric outcome were compared. All patients completed above schedule of radiotherapy. The primary was implanted with single plane in 3 patients and multiplane implant in 4 patients. Orthogonal x-ray based localization was performed in 4 patients and CT scan based localization in 3 cases. Three patients were implanted single plane and 4 patients with multiplane implants with a median catheter number of 9 (range 6-14). The 3D conformal dose optimization was performed using Nucletron planning system (Plato). The mean 100% and 150% isodose volume was 67.3 cm 3 and 31.25cm 3 respectively. The identification of primary tumor volume, organ at risk, and identification of afterloading catheters were superior in CT based plan than conventional planning. CT scan based 3D conformal brachytherapy planning give better identification of tumor volume and its curvature, decrease the time to identify the sources and evaluate the radiation dose to organs at

  19. Dose rate constant and energy spectrum of interstitial brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhe; Nath, Ravinder

    2001-01-01

    In the past two years, several new manufacturers have begun to market low-energy interstitial brachytherapy seeds containing 125 I and 103 Pd. Parallel to this development, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has implemented a modification to the air-kerma strength (S K ) standard for 125 I seeds and has also established an S K standard for 103 Pd seeds. These events have generated a considerable number of investigations on the determination of the dose rate constants (Λ) of interstitial brachytherapy seeds. The aim of this work is to study the general properties underlying the determination of Λ and to develop a simple method for a quick and accurate estimation of Λ. As the dose rate constant of clinical seeds is defined at a fixed reference point, we postulated that Λ may be calculated by treating the seed as an effective point source when the seed's source strength is specified in S K and its source characteristics are specified by the photon energy spectrum measured in air at the reference point. Using a semi-analytic approach, an analytic expression for Λ was derived for point sources with known photon energy spectra. This approach enabled a systematic study of Λ as a function of energy. Using the measured energy spectra, the calculated Λ for 125 I model 6711 and 6702 seeds and for 192 Ir seed agreed with the AAPM recommended values within ±1%. For the 103 Pd model 200 seed, the agreement was 5% with a recently measured value (within the ±7% experimental uncertainty) and was within 1% with the Monte Carlo simulations. The analytic expression for Λ proposed here can be evaluated using a programmable calculator or a simple spreadsheet and it provides an efficient method for checking the measured dose rate constant for any interstitial brachytherapy seed once the energy spectrum of the seed is known

  20. Neodadjuvante und adjuvante Kurzzeit-Hormontherapie in Kombination mit konformaler HDR-Brachytherapie beim Prostatakarzinom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin T

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Zielsetzung: Auswertung der Behandlungsergebnisse der neoadjuvanten und adjuvanten Kurzzeit-Hormontherapie kombiniert mit konformaler HDR-Brachytherapie und externer Radiotherapie beim Prostatakarzinom. Patienten und Methoden: Von 01/97 bis 09/99 behandelten wir 102 Patienten mit Prostatakarzinomen im Stadium T1–3 N0 M0. Im Stadium T1–2 befanden sich 71, im Stadium T3 31 Patienten. Der mediane prätherapeutische PSA-Wert betrug 15,3 ng/ml. Nach ultraschallgesteuerter transrektaler Implantation von vier Afterloadingnadeln erfolgte die CT-gestützte 3D-Brachytherapie- Planung. Alle Patienten erhielten vier HDR-Implantate mit einer Referenzdosis von 5 Gy oder 7 Gy pro Implantat. Die Zeit zwischen jedem Implantat betrug jeweils 14 Tage. Nach der Brachytherapie folgte die externe Radiotherapie bis 39,6 Gy oder 45,0 Gy. Alle Patienten erhielten eine neoadjuvante und adjuvante Kurzzeit-Hormontherapie, die 2–19 Monate vor der Brachytherapie eingeleitet und 3 Monate nach Abschluß der externen Radiotherapie abgesetzt wurde (mediane Dauer: 9 Monate. Ergebnisse: Die mediane Nachbeobachtungszeit war 2,6 Jahre (range: 2,0–4,1 Jahre. Die biochemische Kontrollrate betrug 82 % nach 3 Jahren. Bei 14/102 Patienten registrierten wir ein biochemisches Rezidiv, bei 5/102 Patienten ein klinisches Rezidiv. Das Gesamtüberleben betrug 90 %, das krankheitsspezifische Überleben 98,0 % nach 3 Jahren. Ein Patient entwickelte eine prostato-urethro-rektale Fistel als späte Grad 4-Toxizität. Akute Grad-3 Toxizitäten traten bei 4 %, späte Grad-3 Toxizitäten bei 5 % der Patienten auf. Schlußfolgerung: Die neoadjuvante und adjuvante Kurzzeit-Hormontherapie kombiniert mit konformaler HDR-Brachytherapie und externer Radiotherapie erweist sich als sichere und wirksame Behandlungsmodalität beim Prostatakarzinom mit minimalen behandlungsbedingten Toxizitäten und einer vielversprechenden biochemischen Kontrollrate nach medianer Nachbeobachtungszeit von 2,6 Jahren.

  1. Dosimetric intercomparison of permanent Ho-166 seed's implants and HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro; Nogueira, Luciana Batista; Trindade, Bruno; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    To provide a comparative dosimetric analysis of permanent implants of Ho(166)-seeds and temporary HDR Ir(192)-brachytherapy through computational simulation. Brachytherapy with Ir(192)-HDR or LDR based on temporary wires or permanent radioactive seed implants can be used as dose reinforcement for breast radiation therapy. Permanent breast implants have not been a practical clinical routine; although, I(125) and Pd(103)-seeds have already been reported. Biodegradable Ho(166)-ceramic-seeds have been addressed recently. Simulations of implants of nine Ho(166)-seeds and equivalent with HDR Ir(192)-brachytherapy were elaborated in MCNP5, shaped in a computational multivoxel simulator which reproduced a female thorax phantom. Spatial dose rate distributions and dose-volume histograms were generated. Protocol's analysis involving exposure time, seed's activities and dose were performed. Permanent Ho(166)-seed implants presented a maximum dose rate per unit of contained activity (MDR) of 1.1601 μGy h(-1) Bq(-1); and, a normalized MDR in standard points (8 mm, equidistant to 03-seeds - SP1, 10 mm - SP2) of 1.0% (SP1) and 0.5% (SP2), respectively. Ir(192)-brachytherapy presented MDR of 4.3945 × 10(-3) μGy h(-1) Bq(-1); and, 30% (SP1), and 20% (SP2). Therefore, seed's implant activities of 333 MBq (Ho(166)) and 259 GBq (Ir(192)) produced prescribed doses of 58 Gy (SP1; 5d) and 56 Gy (SP1, 5 fractions, 6 min), respectively. Breast Ho(166)-implants of 37-111 MBq are attractive due to the high dose rate near 6-10 mm from seeds, equivalent to Ir(192)-brachytherapy of 259 GBq (3 fractions, 6 min) providing similar dose in standard points at a week; however, with spatial dose distribution better confined. The seed positioning can be adjusted for controlling the breast tumor, in stages I and II, in flat and deep tumors, without any breast volumetric limitation.

  2. Source position verification and dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy using an EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R. L.; Taylor, M. L.; McDermott, L. N.; Franich, R. D.; Haworth, A.; Millar, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate treatment delivery in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy requires correct source dwell positions and dwell times to be administered relative to each other and to the surrounding anatomy. Treatment delivery inaccuracies predominantly occur for two reasons: (i) anatomical movement or (ii) as a result of human errors that are usually related to incorrect implementation of the planned treatment. Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were originally developed for patient position verification in external beam radiotherapy and their application has been extended to provide dosimetric information. The authors have characterized the response of an EPID for use with an 192 Ir brachytherapy source to demonstrate its use as a verification device, providing both source position and dosimetric information.Methods: Characterization of the EPID response using an 192 Ir brachytherapy source included investigations of reproducibility, linearity with dose rate, photon energy dependence, and charge build-up effects associated with exposure time and image acquisition time. Source position resolution in three dimensions was determined. To illustrate treatment verification, a simple treatment plan was delivered to a phantom and the measured EPID dose distribution compared with the planned dose.Results: The mean absolute source position error in the plane parallel to the EPID, for dwells measured at 50, 100, and 150 mm source to detector distances (SDD), was determined to be 0.26 mm. The resolution of the z coordinate (perpendicular distance from detector plane) is SDD dependent with 95% confidence intervals of ±0.1, ±0.5, and ±2.0 mm at SDDs of 50, 100, and 150 mm, respectively. The response of the EPID is highly linear to dose rate. The EPID exhibits an over-response to low energy incident photons and this nonlinearity is incorporated into the dose calibration procedure. A distance (spectral) dependent dose rate calibration procedure has been developed. The

  3. Management of a HDR brachytherapy system in the Hospital Juarez of Mexico; Gestion de un sistema de braquiterapia HDR een el Hospital Juarez de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano F, A.G.; Ramirez R, G.; Gil G, R. [Hospital Juarez de Mexico, Av. l.P.N. 5160, Col. Magdalena de las Salinas, 07760 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Azorin N, J. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria del IPN, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    Full text: In the Hospital Juarez of Mexico, it is carried out a project to implement a Brachytherapy system with high dose rate (HDR) through a Management quality program. In our work center this treatment modality in patients with cervicouterine cancer is used (CaCu), and constantly it is necessary to carry out improvements in the procedures, with the purpose of optimizing them and in consequence to complete the principles of the Radiological Protection, guaranteeing this way, an attention with the quality and safety, such that allow to diminish the risks to the patients and to assure that the received dose in critical organs it finds inside the permitted therapeutic limits, without commit the radiosensitive response of healthy organs. In this work an analysis of the implementation of this system is presented, detailing the procedures so much in the technological infrastructure like human and indicating the necessary technical and operative requirements to reach an adequate practice in HDR brachytherapy. (Author)

  4. Interactive, multi-modality image registrations for combined MRI/MRSI-planned HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galen Reed

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study presents the steps and criteria involved in the series of image registrations used clinically during the planning and dose delivery of focal high dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy of the prostate. Material and methods: Three imaging modalities – Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI, and Computed Tomography (CT – were used at different steps during the process. MRSI is used for identification of dominant intraprosatic lesions (DIL. A series of rigid and nonrigid transformations were applied to the data to correct for endorectal-coil-induced deformations and for alignment with the planning CT. Mutual information was calculated as a morphing metric. An inverse planning optimization algorithm was applied to boost dose to the DIL while providing protection to the urethra, penile bulb, rectum, and bladder. Six prostate cancer patients were treated using this protocol. Results: The morphing algorithm successfully modeled the probe-induced prostatic distortion. Mutual information calculated between the morphed images and images acquired without the endorectal probe showed a significant (p = 0.0071 increase to that calculated between the unmorphed images and images acquired without the endorectal probe. Both mutual information and visual inspection serve as effective diagnostics of image morphing. The entire procedure adds less than thirty minutes to the treatment planning. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the utility of image transformations and registrations to HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer.

  5. Factors affecting radiation injury after interstitial brachytherapy for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibel, S.A.; Gutin, P.H.; Davis, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of brachytherapy on normal brain tissue are not easily delineated in the clinical setting because of the presence of concurrent radiation-induced changes in the coexistent brain tumor. Sequential morphologic studies performed after the implantation of radioactive sources into the brains of experimental animals have provided a better understanding of the character and magnitude of the structural changes produced by interstitial irradiation on normal brain tissue. Furthermore, the clinical experience accumulated thus far provides not only relevant information, but also some guidelines for future treatment policies. In this paper, the authors summarize the experimental findings and review the pathologic and clinical features of brain injury caused by interstitial brachytherapy. A number of studies in the older literature examined the effects of radioisotopes such as radium-226 (38--43), radon-22 (44--46), gold-198 (29,47--50), tantalum-182 (29,51,52) yttrium-9- (50,53,54), and cobalt-60 (29,50,55). This review is restricted to low- and high-activity encapsulated iodine-125 ( 125 I) and iridium-192 ( 192 Ir), the isotopes that are most commonly used in current clinical practice

  6. NOTE: Monte Carlo evaluation of kerma in an HDR brachytherapy bunker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Calatayud, J.; Granero, D.; Ballester, F.; Casal, E.; Crispin, V.; Puchades, V.; León, A.; Verdú, G.

    2004-12-01

    In recent years, the use of high dose rate (HDR) after-loader machines has greatly increased due to the shift from traditional Cs-137/Ir-192 low dose rate (LDR) to HDR brachytherapy. The method used to calculate the required concrete and, where appropriate, lead shielding in the door is based on analytical methods provided by documents published by the ICRP, the IAEA and the NCRP. The purpose of this study is to perform a more realistic kerma evaluation at the entrance maze door of an HDR bunker using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The Monte Carlo results were validated experimentally. The spectrum at the maze entrance door, obtained with Monte Carlo, has an average energy of about 110 keV, maintaining a similar value along the length of the maze. The comparison of results from the aforementioned values with the Monte Carlo ones shows that results obtained using the albedo coefficient from the ICRP document more closely match those given by the Monte Carlo method, although the maximum value given by MC calculations is 30% greater.

  7. Independent verification of the delivered dose in High-Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portillo, P.; Feld, D.; Kessler, J.

    2009-01-01

    An important aspect of a Quality Assurance program in Clinical Dosimetry is an independent verification of the dosimetric calculation done by the Treatment Planning System for each radiation treatment. The present paper is aimed at creating a spreadsheet for the verification of the dose recorded at a point of an implant with radioactive sources and HDR in gynecological injuries. An 192 Ir source automatic differed loading equipment, GammaMedplus model, Varian Medical System with HDR installed at the Angel H. Roffo Oncology Institute has been used. The planning system implemented for getting the dose distribution is the BraquiVision. The sources coordinates as well as those of the calculation point (Rectum) are entered into the Excel-devised verification program by assuming the existence of a point source in each one of the applicators' positions. Such calculation point has been selected as the rectum is an organ at risk, therefore determining the treatment planning. The dose verification is performed at points standing at a sources distance having at least twice the active length of such sources, so they may be regarded as point sources. Most of the sources used in HDR brachytherapy with 192 Ir have a 5 mm active length for all equipment brands. Consequently, the dose verification distance must be at least of 10 mm. (author)

  8. High dose rate interstitial brachytherapy with external beam irradiation for localized prostate cancer. Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiratsuka, Junichi; Jo, Yoshimasa; Yoden, Eisaku; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Imajo, Yoshinari [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Nagase, Naomi; Narihiro, Naomasa; Kubota, Juichi

    2000-12-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the biochemical and pathological results of combined external beam radiotherapy and high dose rate Ir-192 brachytherapy (HDR-Ir192) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Between October 1997 and August 1999, 39 evaluable patients with adenocarcinoma of prostate diagnosed by biopsy were treated with interstitial and external beam irradiation. Patients ranged in age from 58-82 years, with a mean of 69.7 years. T1c, T2 and T3 tumors, according to the UICC classification system (1997), were found in 7, 21 and 11 cases respectively. The mean initial pre-treatment PSA was 35.9 ng/ml (median 13.2), with 77% of the patients having had a pre-treatment PSA greater than 10 ng/ml. Of all patients, 17 had received pre-treatment hormonal therapy. Hormonal pretreatment was stopped at the beginning of radiotherapy in all cases. External beam four-field box irradiation was given to the small pelvis to a dose of 45 Gy/25 fractions. Three HDR-Ir192 treatments were given over a 30-h period, with 5.5 Gy per fraction at the circumference of the prostate gland over the course of this study. Biochemical failure was defined as a PSA level >1.5 ng/ml and rising on three consecutive values. If serial post-treatment PSA levels showed a continuous downward trend, failure was not scored. The patient with clinical evidence of progression was classified as a clinical failure. The median follow-up at the time of evaluation was 19.6 months. A post-treatment PSA level {<=}1.0 ng/ml was seen in 26 (67%) patients, and values from >1.0 to {<=}2.0 ng/ml were seen in 10 (26%) patients. Biochemical failure was not seen in 38 patients except for one patient who developed a distant bone metastasis with negative prostatic biopsy 15 months after treatment. Biochemical control rate was 100% (38/38) except for the patient with bone metastasis classified as clinical failure. Negative biopsies 18 months after treatment were found in 93% (14/15) of patients. Only one patient

  9. Evaluation of water-mimicking solid phantom materials for use in HDR and LDR brachytherapy dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A.; Thieben, Maike; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Chofor, Ndimofor

    2017-12-01

    In modern HDR or LDR brachytherapy with photon emitters, fast checks of the dose profiles generated in water or a water-equivalent phantom have to be available in the interest of patient safety. However, the commercially available brachytherapy photon sources cover a wide range of photon emission spectra, and the range of the in-phantom photon spectrum is further widened by Compton scattering, so that the achievement of water-mimicking properties of such phantoms involves high requirements on their atomic composition. In order to classify the degree of water equivalence of the numerous commercially available solid water-mimicking phantom materials and the energy ranges of their applicability, the radial profiles of the absorbed dose to water, D w, have been calculated using Monte Carlo simulations in these materials and in water phantoms of the same dimensions. This study includes the HDR therapy sources Nucletron Flexisource Co-60 HDR (60Co), Eckert und Ziegler BEBIG GmbH CSM-11 (137Cs), Implant Sciences Corporation HDR Yb-169 Source 4140 (169Yb) as well as the LDR therapy sources IsoRay Inc. Proxcelan CS-1 (131Cs), IsoAid Advantage I-125 IAI-125A (125I), and IsoAid Advantage Pd-103 IAPd-103A (103Pd). Thereby our previous comparison between phantom materials and water surrounding a Varian GammaMed Plus HDR therapy 192Ir source (Schoenfeld et al 2015) has been complemented. Simulations were performed in cylindrical phantoms consisting of either water or the materials RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, Plastic Water LR, Original Plastic Water (2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, polystyrene and PMMA. While for 192Ir, 137Cs and 60Co most phantom materials can be regarded as water equivalent, for 169Yb the materials Plastic Water LR, Plastic Water DT and RW1 appear as water equivalent. For the low-energy sources 106Pd, 131Cs and 125I, only Plastic Water LR can be classified as water equivalent.

  10. SU-E-T-169: Characterization of Pacemaker/ICD Dose in SAVI HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalavagunta, C; Lasio, G; Yi, B; Zhou, J; Lin, M [Univ. of Maryland School Of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It is important to estimate dose to pacemaker (PM)/Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) before undertaking Accelerated Partial Breast Treatment using High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Kim et al. have reported HDR PM/ICD dose using a single-source balloon applicator. To the authors knowledge, there have so far not been any published PM/ICD dosimetry literature for the Strut Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI, Cianna Medical, Aliso Viejo, CA). This study aims to fill this gap by generating a dose look up table (LUT) to predict maximum dose to the PM/ICD in SAVI HDR brachytherapy. Methods: CT scans for 3D dosimetric planning were acquired for four SAVI applicators (6−1-mini, 6−1, 8−1 and 10−1) expanded to their maximum diameter in air. The CT datasets were imported into the Elekta Oncentra TPS for planning and each applicator was digitized in a multiplanar reconstruction window. A dose of 340 cGy was prescribed to the surface of a 1 cm expansion of the SAVI applicator cavity. Cartesian coordinates of the digitized applicator were determined in the treatment leading to the generation of a dose distribution and corresponding distance-dose prediction look up table (LUT) for distances from 2 to 15 cm (6-mini) and 2 to 20 cm (10–1).The deviation between the LUT doses and the dose to the cardiac device in a clinical case was evaluated. Results: Distance-dose look up table were compared to clinical SAVI plan and the discrepancy between the max dose predicted by the LUT and the clinical plan was found to be in the range (−0.44%, 0.74%) of the prescription dose. Conclusion: The distance-dose look up tables for SAVI applicators can be used to estimate the maximum dose to the ICD/PM, with a potential usefulness for quick assessment of dose to the cardiac device prior to applicator placement.

  11. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy: 12-year update of a prospective clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polgar, Csaba; Major, Tibor; Fodor, Janos; Sulyok, Zoltan; Somogyi, Andras; Loevey, Katalin; Nemeth, Gyoergy; Kasler, Miklos

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report the 12-year updated results of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) using multicatheter interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT). Patients and methods: Forty-five prospectively selected patients with T1N0-N1mi, nonlobular breast cancer without the presence of an extensive intraductal component and with negative surgical margins were treated with APBI after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) using interstitial HDR BT. A total dose of 30.3 Gy (n = 8) and 36.4 Gy (n = 37) in seven fractions within 4 days was delivered to the tumour bed plus a 1-2 cm margin. The median follow-up time was 133 months for surviving patients. Local and regional control, disease-free (DFS), cancer-specific (CSS), and overall survival (OS), as well as late side effects, and cosmetic results were assessed. Results: Four (8.9%) ipsilateral breast tumour recurrences were observed, for a 5-, 10-, and 12-year actuarial rate of 4.4%, 9.3%, and 9.3%, respectively. A total of two regional nodal failures were observed for a 12-year actuarial rate of 4.4%. The 12-year DFS, CSS, and OS was 75.3%, 91.1%, and 88.9%, respectively. Grade 3 fibrosis was observed in one patient (2.2%). No patient developed grade 3 teleangiectasia. Fat necrosis requiring surgical intervention occurred in one woman (2.2%). Cosmetic results were rated excellent or good in 35 patients (77.8%). Conclusions: Twelve-year results with APBI using HDR multicatheter interstitial implants continue to demonstrate excellent long-term local tumour control, survival, and cosmetic results with a low-rate of late side effects.

  12. On-line implant reconstruction in HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.; Kruijf, Wilhelmus J.M. de; Levendag, Peter C.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of on-line planning in an Integrated Brachytherapy Unit (IBU) using dedicated image distortion correction algorithms, correcting the geometric distortion and magnetic distortion separately, and to determine the effect of the reconstruction accuracy on clinical treatment plans in terms of deviations in treatment time and dose. Patients and methods: The reconstruction accuracy has been measured using 20 markers, positioned at well known locations in a QA phantom. Treatment plans of two phantoms representing clinical implant geometries, have been compared with reference plans to determine the effect of the reconstruction accuracy on the treatment plan. Before clinical introduction, treatment plans of three representative patients, based on on-line reconstruction, have been compared with reference plans. Results: The average reconstruction error for 10 in. images reduces from -0.6 mm (range -2.6 to +1.0 mm) to -0.2 mm (range -1.2 to +0.6 mm) after image distortion correction and for 15 in. images from 0.8 mm (range -0.5 to +3.0 mm) to 0.0 mm (range -0.8 to +0.8 mm). The error in case of eccentric positioning of the phantom, i.e. 0.8 mm (range -1.0 to +3.3 mm), reduces to 0.1 mm (range -0.5 to +0.9 mm). Correction of the image distortions reduces the deviation in the calculated treatment time of maximally 2.7% to less than 0.8% in case of eccentrically positioned clinical phantoms. The deviation in the treatment time or reference dose in the plans based on on-line reconstruction with image distortion correction of the three patient examples is smaller than 0.3%. Conclusions: Accurate on-line implant reconstruction using the IBU localiser and dedicated correction algorithms separating the geometric distortion and the magnetic distortion is possible. The results fulfill the minimum requirements as imposed by the Netherlands Commission on Radiation Dosimetry (NCS) without limitations regarding the usable range of the field

  13. SU-E-J-270: Study of PET Response to HDR Brachytherapy of Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, R; Le, Y; Armour, E; Efron, J; Azad, N; Wahl, R; Gearhart, S; Herman, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose-response studies in radiation therapy are typically using single response values for tumors across ensembles of tumors. Using the high dose rate (HDR) treatment plan dose grid and pre- and post-therapy FDG-PET images, we look for correlations between voxelized dose and FDG uptake response in individual tumors. Methods: Fifteen patients were treated for localized rectal cancer using 192Ir HDR brachytherapy in conjunction with surgery. FDG-PET images were acquired before HDR therapy and 6–8 weeks after treatment (prior to surgery). Treatment planning was done on a commercial workstation and the dose grid was calculated. The two PETs and the treatment dose grid were registered to each other using non-rigid registration. The difference in PET SUV values before and after HDR was plotted versus absorbed radiation dose for each voxel. The voxels were then separated into bins for every 400 cGy of absorbed dose and the bin average values plotted similarly. Results: Individual voxel doses did not correlate with PET response; however, when group into tumor subregions corresponding to dose bins, eighty percent of the patients showed a significant positive correlation (R2 > 0) between PET uptake difference in the targeted region and the absorbed dose. Conclusion: By considering larger ensembles of voxels, such as organ average absorbed dose or the dose bins considered here, valuable information may be obtained. The dose-response correlations as measured by FDG-PET difference potentially underlines the importance of FDG-PET as a measure of response, as well as the value of voxelized information.

  14. Interstitial brachytherapy for eyelid carcinoma. Outcome analysis in 60 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krengli, M.; Deantonio, L. [University Hospital ' ' Maggiore della Carita' ' , Division of Radiotherapy, Novara (Italy); University of ' ' Piemonte Orientale' ' , Department of Translational Medicine, Novara (Italy); Masini, L.; Filomeno, A.; Gambaro, G. [University Hospital ' ' Maggiore della Carita' ' , Division of Radiotherapy, Novara (Italy); Comoli, A.M. [University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Ophthalmology, Novara (Italy); Negri, E. [University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Medical Physics, Novara (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    Eyelid cancer is a therapeutic challenge due to the cosmetic and functional implications of this anatomical region and the objectives of therapy are tumor control, functional and cosmetic outcome. The present study was performed to analyze local control, toxicity, functional and cosmetic results in patients with eyelid carcinoma treated by interstitial brachytherapy. In this study 60 patients with eyelid carcinoma were treated by interstitial brachytherapy using iridium ({sup 192}Ir) wires with a linear activity of 1.2-1.7 mCi/cm. The prescription dose was 51-70 Gy (mean 65 Gy, median 66 Gy). Of the 60 patients 51 (85.0 %) had received no prior treatment, 4 (6.7 %) had received previous surgery with positive or close margins and 5 (8.3 %) had suffered local recurrence after surgery. Of the tumors 52 (86.7 %) were basal cell carcinoma, 7 (11.7 %) squamous cell carcinoma and 1 (1.7 %) Merkel cell carcinoma. Clinical stage of the 51 previously untreated tumors was 38 T1N0, 12 T2N0 and 1 T3N0. Mean follow-up was 92 months (range 6-253 months). Local control was maintained in 96.7 % of patients. Late effects higher than grade 2 were observed in 3.0 % of cases. Functional and cosmetic outcomes were optimal in 68.4 % of patients. Interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the eyelid can achieve local control, cosmetic and functional results comparable to those of surgery. (orig.) [German] Das Karzinom des Augenlids stellt aufgrund der funktionellen und kosmetischen Beeintraechtigungen dieser anatomischen Region eine therapeutische Herausforderung dar. Ziele der Therapie sind sowohl die Tumorkontrolle als auch ein gutes funktionelles und kosmetisches Ergebnis. Lokale Kontrolle, Toxizitaet sowie funktionelle und kosmetische Ergebnisse bei Patienten mit Karzinom des Augenlids, die mit interstitieller Brachytherapie behandelt wurden, sollten analysiert werden. Sechzig Patienten mit Karzinom des Augenlids wurden mit interstitieller Brachytherapie mit Iridium-192-Draehten

  15. Toward a 3D transrectal ultrasound system for verification of needle placement during high-dose-rate interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Jessica Robin; Surry, Kathleen; Leung, Eric; D'Souza, David; Fenster, Aaron

    2017-05-01

    Treatment for gynecologic cancers, such as cervical, recurrent endometrial, and vaginal malignancies, commonly includes external-beam radiation and brachytherapy. In high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy, radiation treatment is delivered via hollow needles that are typically inserted through a template on the perineum with a cylinder placed in the vagina for stability. Despite the need for precise needle placement to minimize complications and provide optimal treatment, there is no standard intra-operative image-guidance for this procedure. While some image-guidance techniques have been proposed, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, X-ray computed tomography (CT), and two-dimensional (2D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), these techniques have not been widely adopted. In order to provide intra-operative needle visualization and localization during interstitial brachytherapy, we have developed a three-dimensional (3D) TRUS system. This study describes the 3D TRUS system and reports on the system validation and results from a proof-of-concept patient study. To obtain a 3D TRUS image, the system rotates a conventional 2D endocavity transducer through 170 degrees in 12 s, reconstructing the 2D frames into a 3D image in real-time. The geometry of the reconstruction was validated using two geometric phantoms to ensure the accuracy of the linear measurements in each of the image coordinate directions and the volumetric accuracy of the system. An agar phantom including vaginal and rectal canals, as well as a model uterus and tumor, was designed and used to test the visualization and localization of the interstitial needles under idealized conditions by comparing the needles' positions between the 3D TRUS scan and a registered MR image. Five patients undergoing HDR interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy were imaged using the 3D TRUS system following the insertion of all needles. This image was manually, rigidly registered to the clinical

  16. American Brachytherapy Society consensus report for accelerated partial breast irradiation using interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T; Arthur, Douglas; Shaitelman, Simona; Polgár, Csaba; Todor, Dorin; Zoberi, Imran; Kamrava, Mitchell; Major, Tibor; Yashar, Catheryn; Wazer, David E

    To develop a consensus report for the quality practice of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy (IMB). The American Brachytherapy Society Board appointed an expert panel with clinical and research experience with breast brachytherapy to provide guidance for the current practice of IMB. This report is based on a comprehensive literature review with emphasis on randomized data and expertise of the panel. Randomized trials have demonstrated equivalent efficacy of APBI using IMB compared with whole breast irradiation for select patients with early-stage breast cancer. Several techniques for placement of interstitial catheters are described, and importance of three-dimensional planning with appropriate optimization is reviewed. Optimal target definition is outlined. Commonly used dosing schemas include 50 Gy delivered in pulses of 0.6-0.8 Gy/h using pulsed-dose-rate technique and 34 Gy in 10 fractions, 32 Gy in eight fractions, or 30 Gy in seven fractions using high-dose-rate technique. Potential toxicities and strategies for toxicity avoidance are described in detail. Dosimetric constraints include limiting whole breast volume that receives ≥50% of prescription dose to 0.75 (>0.85 preferred), V 150  < 45 cc, and V 200  < 14 cc. Using an optimal implant technique coupled with optimal planning and appropriate dose constraints, a low rate of toxicity and a good-to-excellent cosmetic outcome of ≥90% is expected. IMB is an effective technique to deliver APBI for appropriately selected women with early-stage breast cancer. This consensus report has been created to assist clinicians in the appropriate practice of APBI using IMB. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Mao, Hui; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  18. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofeng, E-mail: xyang43@emory.edu; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Mao, Hui [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  19. After low and high dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy followed by IMRT radiotherapy for intermediate and high risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Satoshi; Murakami, Naoya; Inaba, Koji; Wakita, Akihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuma; Takahashi, Kana; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Umezawa, Rei; Morota, Madoka; Sumi, Minako; Igaki, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshinori; Itami, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to compare urinary symptoms in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer after a combination of either low-dose-rate or high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy along with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (LDR-ISBT + IMRT or HDR-ISBT + IMRT). From June 2009 to April 2014, 16 and 22 patients were treated with LDR-ISBT + IMRT and HDR-ISBT + IMRT, respectively. No patient from these groups was excluded from this study. The prescribed dose of LDR-ISBT, HDR-ISBT, and IMRT was 115 Gy, 20 Gy in 2 fractions, and 46 Gy in 23 fractions, respectively. Obstructive and irritative urinary symptoms were assessed by the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) examined before and after treatments. After ISBT, IPSS was evaluated in the 1st and 4th weeks, then every 2–3 months for the 1st year, and every 6 months thereafter. The median follow-up of the patients treated with LDR-ISBT + IMRT and HDR-ISBT + IMRT was 1070.5 days and 1048.5 days, respectively (p = 0.321). The IPSS-increment in the LDR-ISBT + IMRT group was greater than that in the HDR-ISBT + IMRT between 91 and 180 days after ISBT (p = 0.015). In the LDR-ISBT + IMRT group, the IPSS took longer time to return to the initial level than in the HDR-ISBT + IMRT group (in LDR-ISBT + IMRT group, the recovery time was 90 days later). The dose to urethra showed a statistically significant association with the IPSS-increment in the irritative urinary symptoms (p = 0.011). Clinical outcomes were comparable between both the groups. Both therapeutic modalities are safe and well suited for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer; however, it took patients longer to recover from LDR-ISBT + IMRT than from HDR-ISBT + IMRT. It is possible that fast dose delivery induced early symptoms and early recovery, while gradual dose delivery induced late symptoms and late recovery. Urethral dose reductions were associated with small increments in IPSS

  20. Accurate assessment of the distortions produced by the transit dose in HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nani, E.K.; Kyere, A.W.K.; Tetteh, K.

    2001-01-01

    Current polynomial methods used in the modelling of the dose distributions in HDR brachytherapy have been reformulated to improve accuracy. An example is provided to show the effects of the transit dose on the output. The transit dose, which is neglected by current computer software for calculating doses, can result in significant dosimetric errors. These additional unrecognised doses imply over-dosing and distortions in the dose distributions within the irradiated volume. Assessment of dose to critical and radiosensitive organs is therefore inaccurate. These could increase late tissue complications as predicted by the Linear Quadratic Model. Our model works very well for straight catheters and is highly recommended for the evaluation of the transit dose around such catheters. (author)

  1. HDR Brachytherapy in the Management of High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Masson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy is used with increasing frequency for the treatment of prostate cancer. It is a technique which allows delivery of large individual fractions to the prostate without exposing adjacent normal tissues to unacceptable toxicity. This approach is particularly favourable in prostate cancer where tumours are highly sensitive to dose escalation and to increases in radiotherapy fraction size, due to the unique radiobiological behaviour of prostate cancers in contrast with other malignancies. In this paper we discuss the rationale and the increasing body of clinical evidence for the use of this technique in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, where it is combined with external beam radiotherapy. We highlight practical aspects of delivering treatment and discuss toxicity and limitations, with particular reference to current practice in the United Kingdom.

  2. Preliminary results of intersticial HDR brachytherapy in association with conservative surgery for soft tissue sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellizzon, A.C.A; Ferrigno, R.; Trippe, N.; Novaes, P.; Salvajoli, J.V.; Fogareli, R.; Maja, M.A.C.; Baraldi, H.

    1996-01-01

    From january 1994 to january 1995 seven patients were treated with conservative surgery in association to postoperative HDR brachytherapy through Micro-Selectron HDR. Four patients were male and three female, the ages ranged from 20 to 60 years old and the main site of the tumor were at the extremities and just one had a perineal lesion. The follow up ranged from 4 to 24 months. Most of the implants were done through single plane technic. Definition of the treatment volume was based on CT scans and metallic clips inserted during the surgery. The prescribed dose was at 10mm from the implant plane. The patient with perineal lesion had a volumetric implant and the dose prescription was based on Paris System, in which the total volume of the tumor bed must be included in a 85% isodose curve. The number of catheters used ranged from 6 to 14 and the active length from 20 to 150mm, placed intraoperatively. The volumetric implant was performed through perineal template to guide the needles in number of nine and an active length of 60mm. The prescribed dose ranged from 20 to 25Gy when associated with EBRT and 30 to 35Gy when brachytherapy alone was used. Results: All patients had local control. Acute complications were observed only in the skin, limited to mild erytema and dry descanation. Conclusions: Although the number of the patients is small, this procedure has been shown to be effective in local control when associated to conservative surgery, can be easily and safely done and gives the possibilities of dose optimization

  3. Dosimetric analysis at ICRU reference points in HDR-brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich, H T; Haverkamp, U; Micke, O; Prott, F J; Müller, R P

    2000-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry in bladder and rectum as well as determining doses on suggested reference points following the ICRU report 38 contribute to quality assurance in HDR-brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma, especially to minimize side effects. In order to gain information regarding the radiation exposure at ICRU reference points in rectum, bladder, ureter and regional lymph nodes those were calculated (digitalisation) by means of orthogonal radiographs of 11 applications in patients with cervical carcinoma, who received primary radiotherapy. In addition, the doses at the ICRU rectum reference point was compared to the results of in vivo measurements in the rectum. The in vivo measurements were by factor 1.5 below the doses determined for the ICRU rectum reference point (4.05 +/- 0.68 Gy versus 6.11 +/- 1.63 Gy). Reasons for this were: calibration errors, non-orthogonal radiographs, movement of applicator and probe in the time span between X-ray and application, missing connection of probe and anterior rectal wall. The standard deviation of calculations at ICRU reference points was on average +/- 30%. Possible reasons for the relatively large standard deviation were difficulties in defining the points, identifying them on radiographs and the different locations of the applicators. Although 3 D CT, US or MR based treatment planning using dose volume histogram analysis is more and more established, this simple procedure of marking and digitising the ICRU reference points lengthened treatment planning only by 5 to 10 minutes. The advantages of in vivo dosimetry are easy practicability and the possibility to determine rectum doses during radiation. The advantages of computer-aided planning at ICRU reference points are that calculations are available before radiation and that they can still be taken into account for treatment planning. Both methods should be applied in HDR-brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma.

  4. Toxicity and cosmetic result of partial breast high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for conservatively operated early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiu Xia; Tripuraneni Prabhakar; Giap Huan; Lin Ray; Chu Colin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Objective To study the method, side effects and cosmetic outcome of high- dose-rate (HDR) accelerated partial breast interstitial irradiation (APBI) alone in early stage breast cancer' after conservative surgery. Methods: From February 2002 to June 2003,47 breast cancer lesions from 46 patients suffering from stage I/II breast cancer were treated with HDR 192 Ir APBI after conservative surgery. All patients were over 40 year-old, with T1-2N0-1 (≤3 lymph nodes positive), surgical margin > 1-2 mm, but those having lobular or inflammatory breast cancer were excluded. HDR brachytherapy with 34 Gy, 10 fractions/5 days was used after surgery, toxic reaction and cosmetic outcome were observed in one month, 6 and 12 months respectively. Results: Follow up of 1846 months, 34 months was carried out for the whole group. During the treatment, acute reactions including: erythema, edema, tenderness and infection, all under I-II grade, none of III-IV grade were observed in 21 patients(46%); late toxicity reactions: skin fibrosis, breast tenderness, fat necrosis, and telangiectasia, totally 20 patients (43%) were observed: 2 patients in III grade but one patient received 6 cycle chemotherapy. The result of cosmetic outcome evaluation was excellent or good, at 6 months 95% and 12 months 98%, respectively, but there was no recurfence. Conclusions: Excellent and favorable cosmetic results are noted after APBI by interstitial alone. Acute and late reactions are few. Long term observation is necessary for the rate of' local control. (authors)

  5. A study on applying Ra needle interstitial brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Shunichi; Komiya, Yoshiaki; Uchida, Ikuhiro; Tashiro, Kazuyoshi

    1999-01-01

    To investigate applicability of Ra needle interstitial brachytherapy, 93 cases of oral squamous carcinoma were examined. The patients underwent Ra needle interstitial brachytherapy as thorough therapy in our hospital. The criteria of applying Ra needle interstitial brachytherapy was diameter of within 5 cm and depth within 2 cm of tumor size. Ra needle interstitial brachytherapy was applied to 82 cases of tongue, 10 cases of oral floor and one case of lower lip carcinomas. The local control rate was 92.5%, and secondary neck metastasis was 32.3% in all cases applied Ra needle interstitial brachytherapy. The results were not bad compared with surgical treatment. However, the 5-year cumulative survival rate was 64.9%, which was not good enough at the result to obtain a good local control rate and secondary neck metastasis rate. The result was relative to low treatment result of local recurrence cases with Ra needle interstitial brachytherapy. To improve the result, it is important to distinguish local recurrence from radioinduced ulcer, and to start early secondary treatment. The cases in which cervical lymph node metastasis was found as the first examination underwent neck dessection after Ra needle interstitial brachytherapy. The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 83.3% in N1 cases and 40.6% in N2 cases, and the result of N2 cases was poorer than N1 cases with a significant difference. The results indicate that a needle having a diameter of within 5 cm, depth of within 2 cm and less than N1 can be applied during Ra needle interstitial brachytherapy for complete cure of cancer. (author)

  6. Comparison between Japanese and French interstitial brachytherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nose, Takayuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Kinji; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2001-01-01

    Interstitial brachytherapy is the optimal radiotherapy modality for head and neck cancer because the highest dose conformity can be achieved, and implanted tubes can move synchronously with the tumor movement. Compared with radical surgery, interstitial brachytherapy can achieve equivalent local control with less morbidity and less functional deficit. In Japan, because of technical limitations, interstitial brachytherapy has been confined to treatment of small tongue cancers. To improve our head and neck cancer treatment, technical limitations should be eliminated and a wider indication for interstitial brachytherapy should be achieved. In France, interstitial brachytherapy has been technically more developed and widely indicated than in Japan. We analyzed the differences between Japanese (Osaka) and French (Lyon and Nancy) techniques, to improve our interstitial brachytherapy. Implant devices and techniques: French applicators (Longcip 1) are more flexible and more suitable for loop techniques of the soft palate, the base of the tongue, and the vallecula, than applicators available in Japan. Various implant techniques are established especially for the oropharynx in France. Mandibular protection: Lead blocks used in France can more effectively shield the mandible than our silicone spacers. We showed the dosimetric results in an experimental treatment setting. Dose specification: The five-mm dose specification method used in Japan can work only for easy cases, such as small oral tongue cancers and mouth floor cancers. For complicated implants, such as for the oropharynx, the CTV-based dose specification method used in France is essential for sufficient irradiation. Indications: The indication for head and neck interstitial brachytherapy in Japan is limited mostly to small oral tongue cancers. The indication in France is wider, including the oral cavity, the oropharynx, and postoperative cases. We can refine our head and neck cancer treatment if we combine French

  7. NPIP: A skew line needle configuration optimization system for HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siauw, Timmy; Cunha, Adam; Berenson, Dmitry; Atamtürk, Alper; Hsu, I-Chow; Goldberg, Ken; Pouliot, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors introduce skew line needle configurations for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and needle planning by integer program (NPIP), a computational method for generating these configurations. NPIP generates needle configurations that are specific to the anatomy of the patient, avoid critical structures near the penile bulb and other healthy structures, and avoid needle collisions inside the body. Methods: NPIP consisted of three major components: a method for generating a set of candidate needles, a needle selection component that chose a candidate needle subset to be inserted, and a dose planner for verifying that the final needle configuration could meet dose objectives. NPIP was used to compute needle configurations for prostate cancer data sets from patients previously treated at our clinic. NPIP took two user-parameters: a number of candidate needles, and needle coverage radius, δ. The candidate needle set consisted of 5000 needles, and a range of δ values was used to compute different needle configurations for each patient. Dose plans were computed for each needle configuration. The number of needles generated and dosimetry were analyzed and compared to the physician implant. Results: NPIP computed at least one needle configuration for every patient that met dose objectives, avoided healthy structures and needle collisions, and used as many or fewer needles than standard practice. These needle configurations corresponded to a narrow range of δ values, which could be used as default values if this system is used in practice. The average end-to-end runtime for this implementation of NPIP was 286 s, but there was a wide variation from case to case. Conclusions: The authors have shown that NPIP can automatically generate skew line needle configurations with the aforementioned properties, and that given the correct input parameters, NPIP can generate needle configurations which meet dose objectives and use as many or fewer

  8. Accuracy Evaluation of Oncentra™ TPS in HDR Brachytherapy of Nasopharynx Cancer Using EGSnrc Monte Carlo Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, K.; Zohrevand, M.; Faghihi, R.; Sedighi Pashaki, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background HDR brachytherapy is one of the commonest methods of nasopharyngeal cancer treatment. In this method, depending on how advanced one tumor is, 2 to 6 Gy dose as intracavitary brachytherapy is prescribed. Due to high dose rate and tumor location, accuracy evaluation of treatment planning system (TPS) is particularly important. Common methods used in TPS dosimetry are based on computations in a homogeneous phantom. Heterogeneous phantoms, especially patient-specific voxel phantoms can increase dosimetric accuracy. Materials and Methods In this study, using CT images taken from a patient and ctcreate-which is a part of the DOSXYZnrc computational code, patient-specific phantom was made. Dose distribution was plotted by DOSXYZnrc and compared with TPS one. Also, by extracting the voxels absorbed dose in treatment volume, dose-volume histograms (DVH) was plotted and compared with Oncentra™ TPS DVHs. Results The results from calculations were compared with data from Oncentra™ treatment planning system and it was observed that TPS calculation predicts lower dose in areas near the source, and higher dose in areas far from the source relative to MC code. Absorbed dose values in the voxels also showed that TPS reports D90 value is 40% higher than the Monte Carlo method. Conclusion Today, most treatment planning systems use TG-43 protocol. This protocol may results in errors such as neglecting tissue heterogeneity, scattered radiation as well as applicator attenuation. Due to these errors, AAPM emphasized departing from TG-43 protocol and approaching new brachytherapy protocol TG-186 in which patient-specific phantom is used and heterogeneities are affected in dosimetry. PMID:25973408

  9. Occupational exposure of professionals during interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirraco, R.; Pereira, A.; Viterbo, T.; Cavaco, A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Introduction: In this study we present dose measurements for professionals exposed during interstitial 125 I permanent prostate brachytherapy implants. Methods and Materials: The implant technique used was intra operative real time using strand and loose seeds. The professionals inside the operating room are an oncologist, a radiologist, a physicist, a nurse and an anesthesiologist. The oncologist and the physicist contact directly the loaded needle with radioactive seeds and two types of measurements were taken: total body and extremities (finger) dose. The rest of the team operates at long distances, but measurements were made. To measure total body equivalent dose we use a Berthold Umo LB 123 coupled with a LB 1236-H10 detector, and we recorded dose, time and distance from implant location. Finger dosemeters are thermo -luminescent dosimeter (TLD) rings that were controlled over one month. Results: 50 cases (average number of applications per year) were analysed for extremities measurements and 9 cases for total body measurements (in this case, the results were extrapolated for 50 cases), with an average of 26.1 mCi total activity per implant (in a range of 17.4 - 40.3 mCi). The finger dose was 1.8 mSv for the oncologist and 1.9 mSv for the physicist. The interpolation of total body equivalent dose for the oncologist was 24 mSv, for the radiologist 6 mSv and 9 mSv for the physicist. The rest of the team did not receive anything but background radiation. The annual national limit dose for workers is 20 mSv for total body irradiation, and 500 mSv for extremities. Conclusion: In conclusion we may say that during interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy implants, total doses received for all groups are not significant when compared to annual limits for Portuguese laws 1. Even so, our main goal is always to get the less possible dose (ALARA principle). References: 1. Decreto Lei n. 180/2002 de 8 de Agosto. (authors)

  10. Occupational exposure of professionals during interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirraco, R.; Pereira, A.; Viterbo, T.; Cavaco, A. [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro R egional de Oncologia do Porto, SA, Porto (Portugal)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Introduction: In this study we present dose measurements for professionals exposed during interstitial 125 I permanent prostate brachytherapy implants. Methods and Materials: The implant technique used was intra operative real time using strand and loose seeds. The professionals inside the operating room are an oncologist, a radiologist, a physicist, a nurse and an anesthesiologist. The oncologist and the physicist contact directly the loaded needle with radioactive seeds and two types of measurements were taken: total body and extremities (finger) dose. The rest of the team operates at long distances, but measurements were made. To measure total body equivalent dose we use a Berthold Umo LB 123 coupled with a LB 1236-H10 detector, and we recorded dose, time and distance from implant location. Finger dosemeters are thermo -luminescent dosimeter (TLD) rings that were controlled over one month. Results: 50 cases (average number of applications per year) were analysed for extremities measurements and 9 cases for total body measurements (in this case, the results were extrapolated for 50 cases), with an average of 26.1 mCi total activity per implant (in a range of 17.4 - 40.3 mCi). The finger dose was 1.8 mSv for the oncologist and 1.9 mSv for the physicist. The interpolation of total body equivalent dose for the oncologist was 24 mSv, for the radiologist 6 mSv and 9 mSv for the physicist. The rest of the team did not receive anything but background radiation. The annual national limit dose for workers is 20 mSv for total body irradiation, and 500 mSv for extremities. Conclusion: In conclusion we may say that during interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy implants, total doses received for all groups are not significant when compared to annual limits for Portuguese laws 1. Even so, our main goal is always to get the less possible dose (ALARA principle). References: 1. Decreto Lei n. 180/2002 de 8 de Agosto. (authors)

  11. Retrospective study of 87 interstitial brachytherapy for facial skin carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berland, E.; Bolla, M.; Saillard, F.; Beani, J.C.; Lebeau, J.; Fillon, J.P.; Vrousos, C.

    1996-01-01

    From 1977 to 1983, 83 patients (pts) with 87 facial skin carcinomas (FSC) were treated with interstitial brachytherapy (BT) in our department. Median age was 70 years (43-97 y). There was 61 basal cell carcinomas and 26 squamous cell carcinomas. 28 of them corresponded to local relapse of FSC initially treated without BT. TNM stadification was as following: T1+rT1=72,4%; T2+rT2=23%; T3+rT3=2,3%; T4+rT4=2,3%. The median follow-up was 53 months (8 months to 15 years). Different techniques were used:hypodermic needles,plastic tubes, Raynal method. A dose of 60 Gy was prescribed on the reference isodose, according to the PARIS system. Specific overall survival was 98,8% at 5 and 10 y. Local control at 5 and 10 y was 100 and 90% for FSC treated in first intention, and 81,2% for recurrent FSC. This was highly significant (p=0,002 Logrank test) Functional sequelae were appreciated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale: 29 occurred in 21 pts.60% of them were depigmentation ((11(29))) and epilation ((6(29))). Among the 21 FSC of the eyelid, one lacrimal stenosis occurred (4,8%) Cosmetic results were judged 'good' or 'very good' for 83% of the pts (BONVALLOT criteria). Bad results occured more frequently for recurrent FSC According to the litterature, our study shows that interstitial BT is a good alternative to surgery for facial skin carcinoma for elderly patients

  12. Acute genitourinary toxicity after high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer: Correlation between the urethral dose in HDR brachytherapy and the severity of acute genitourinary toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Ito, Kazuto; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Noda, Shin-ei; Harashima, Koichi; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Nakayama, Yuko; Yamamoto, Takumi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Nakano, Takashi; Niibe, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Several investigations have revealed that the α/β ratio for prostate cancer is atypically low, and that hypofractionation or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy regimens using appropriate radiation doses may be expected to yield tumor control and late sequelae rates that are better or at least as favorable as those achieved with conventional radiation therapy. In this setting, we attempted treating localized prostate cancer patients with HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using this approach, with special emphasis on the relationship between the severity of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity and the urethral dose calculated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of HDR brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and December 2003, 70 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated by iridium-192 HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT at the Gunma University Hospital. Hypofractionated EBRT was administered in fraction doses of 3 Gy, three times per week; a total dose of 51 Gy was delivered to the prostate gland and the seminal vesicles using the four-field technique. No elective pelvic irradiation was performed. After the completion of EBRT, all the patients additionally received transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided HDR brachytherapy. The fraction size and the number of fractions in HDR brachytherapy were prospectively changed, whereas the total radiation dose for EBRT was fixed at 51 Gy. The fractionation in HDR brachytherapy was as follows: 5 Gy x 5, 7 Gy x 3, 9 Gy x 2, administered twice per day, although the biologic effective dose (BED) for HDR brachytherapy combined with EBRT, assuming that the α/β ratio is 3, was almost equal to 138 in each fractionation group. The planning target volume was defined as the prostate gland with 5-mm margin all around, and the planning was conducted based on

  13. SU-F-T-11: Scintillator Based Quality Assurance Device for HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozsef, G [New York University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To build a test device for HDR afterloaders capable of checking source positions, times at positions and estimate the activity of the source. Methods: A catheter is taped on a plastic scintillation sheet. When a source travels through the catheter, the scintillator sheet lights up around the source. The sheet is monitored with a video camera, and records the movement of the light spot. The center of the spot on each image on the video provides the source location, and the time stamps of the images can provide the dwell time the source spend in each location. Finally, the brightness of the light spot is related to the activity of the source. A code was developed for noise removal, calibrate the scale of the image to centimeters, eliminate the distortion caused by the oblique view angle, identifying the boundaries of the light spot, transforming the image into binary and detect and calculate the source motion, positions and times. The images are much less noisy if the camera is shielded. That requires that the light spot is monitored in a mirror, rather than directly. The whole assembly is covered from external light and has a size of approximately 17×35×25cm (H×L×W) Results: A cheap camera in BW mode proved to be sufficient with a plastic scintillator sheet. The best images were resulted by a 3mm thick sheet with ZnS:Ag surface coating. The shielding of the camera decreased the noise, but could not eliminate it. A test run even in noisy condition resulted in approximately 1 mm and 1 sec difference from the planned positions and dwell times. Activity tests are in progress. Conclusion: The proposed method is feasible. It might simplify the monthly QA process of HDR Brachytherapy units.

  14. An automated optimization tool for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy with divergent needle pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borot de Battisti, M.; Maenhout, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Hautvast, G.; Binnekamp, D.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; van Vulpen, M.; Moerland, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Focal high-dose-rate (HDR) for prostate cancer has gained increasing interest as an alternative to whole gland therapy as it may contribute to the reduction of treatment related toxicity. For focal treatment, optimal needle guidance and placement is warranted. This can be achieved under MR guidance. However, MR-guided needle placement is currently not possible due to space restrictions in the closed MR bore. To overcome this problem, a MR-compatible, single-divergent needle-implant robotic device is under development at the University Medical Centre, Utrecht: placed between the legs of the patient inside the MR bore, this robot will tap the needle in a divergent pattern from a single rotation point into the tissue. This rotation point is just beneath the perineal skin to have access to the focal prostate tumor lesion. Currently, there is no treatment planning system commercially available which allows optimization of the dose distribution with such needle arrangement. The aim of this work is to develop an automatic inverse dose planning optimization tool for focal HDR prostate brachytherapy with needle insertions in a divergent configuration. A complete optimizer workflow is proposed which includes the determination of (1) the position of the center of rotation, (2) the needle angulations and (3) the dwell times. Unlike most currently used optimizers, no prior selection or adjustment of input parameters such as minimum or maximum dose or weight coefficients for treatment region and organs at risk is required. To test this optimizer, a planning study was performed on ten patients (treatment volumes ranged from 8.5 cm3to 23.3 cm3) by using 2-14 needle insertions. The total computation time of the optimizer workflow was below 20 min and a clinically acceptable plan was reached on average using only four needle insertions.

  15. HDR and LDR Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Lip Cancer: the Experience of the Catalan Institute of Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerra, Arrate Querejeta; Mena, Estefanía Palacios; Fabregas, Joan Pera; Miguelez, Cristina Gutiérrez; Guedea, Ferran

    2010-03-01

    Lip cancer can be treated by surgery, external radiotherapy, and/or brachytherapy (BT). In recent years, BT has become increasingly favored for this type of cancer. The aim of the present study was to analyze local control and survival of patients treated at our institution between July 1989 and June 2008. We performed a retrospective study of 121 patients (109 males and 12 females) who underwent lip cancer brachytherapy from July 1989 to June 2008. Median age was 67 years and median follow-up was 31.8 months (range 20-188 months). Out of 121 patients, 100 (82.6%) were treated with low dose rate (LDR) BT while the remaining 21 patients (17.4%) received high dose rate (HDR) BT. The most common cell type was squamous cell carcinoma (115 cases; 95%) and most tumors were located on the lower lip (107 patients; 88.4%). Most cases were either stage T1 (62 patients; 51.2%), or T2 (44 cases; 36.4%). After 15 years of follow-up, overall survival was 89.5%, cause-specific survival 97.8%, and disease-free survival 86.6%. Local, regional, and distant control at 15 years were 90%, 92%, and 98.8%, respectively. Grade 3 mucosal toxicity was observed in 23% of patients treated with LDR compared to 33% of HDR patients, and grade 4 mucosal toxicity in 9% versus 0% in the HDR group. Our findings confirm that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for lip cancer. The results from our series are in line with those published elsewhere. Based on our limited data, HDR appears to be equally as good as LDR, although this needs to be confirmed by further studies.

  16. Effect and toxicity of endoluminal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in centrally located tumors of the upper respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, W.; Wannenmacher, M.; Becker, H.; Herth, F.; Fritz, P.

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To assess effect an toxicity of high-dose-rate afterloading (HDR) alone or in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in centrally located tumors of the upper respiratory tract. Patients and Methods: From 1987 to 1996, 55 patients were treated. Twenty-one patients (group A1: 17 non-small-cell lung cancer [NSCLC], A2: 4 metastases from other malignancies) were treated using HDR alone due to a relapse after external beam irradiation. In 34 previously untreated and inoperable patients (group B1: 27 NSCLC, B2: 7 metastases from other malignancies) HDR was given as a boost after EBRT (30 to 60 Gy, median 50). HDR was carried out with a 192 Ir source (370 GBq). The brachytherapy dose (group A: 5 to 27 Gy, median 20; B: 10 to 20 Gy, median 15) was prescribed to 1 cm distance from the source axis. A distanciable applicator was used in 39/55 patients. Results: In group A1, a response rate (CR, PR) of 53% (group B1: 77%) was reached. The median survival (Kaplan-Meier) was 5 months in group A1 (B1: 20 months). The 1-, 3- and 5-year local progression free survival rates (Kaplan-Meier) were 66% (15%), 52% (0%), and 37% (0%) in group B1 (group A1). Prognostic favorable factors in group B1 were a tumor diameter 70. Grade-1 or 2 toxicity (RTOG/EORTC) occurred in 0% in group A and in 6% in group B. We observed no Grad-3 or 4 toxicity. Complications caused by persistent or progressive local disease occurred in 3 patients in goup A (fatal hemorrhage, tracheomediastinal fistula, hemoptysis) and in 2 patients in group B (fatal hemorrhage, hemoptysis). Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy is an effective treatment with moderate side effects. In combination with external beam irradiation long-term remissions can be reached in one third of the patients. (orig.) [de

  17. Commissioning of a well type chamber for HDR and LDR brachytherapy applications: a review of methodology and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukwada, Godfrey; Neveri, Gabor; Alkhatib, Zaid; Waterhouse, David K; Ebert, Martin

    2016-03-01

    For safe and accurate dose delivery in brachytherapy, associated equipment is subject to commissioning and ongoing quality assurance (QA). Many centres depend on the use of a well-type chamber ('well chamber') for performing brachytherapy dosimetry. Documentation of well chamber commissioning is scarce despite the important role the chamber plays in the whole brachytherapy QA process. An extensive and structured commissioning of the HDR 1000 plus well chamber (Standard Imaging Inc, Middleton WI) for HDR and LDR dosimetry was undertaken at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital. The methodology and outcomes of this commissioning is documented and presented as a guideline to others involved in brachytherapy. The commissioning tests described include mechanical integrity, leakage current, directional dependence, response, length of uniform response, the influence of insert holders, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, accuracy of measured air kerma strength (S(K)) or reference air kerma rate (K(R)) and baseline setting (for ongoing constancy checks). For the HDR 1000 plus well chamber, some of the insert holders modify the response curve. The measured sweet length was 2.5 cm which is within 0.5% of that specified by the manufacturer. Correction for polarity was negligible (0.9999) and ion recombination was small (0.9994). Directional dependence was small (less than 0.2%) and leakage current was negligible. The measured K(R) for (192)Ir agreed within 0.11% compared with a second well chamber of similar model and was within 0.5% of that determined via a free-in-air measurement method. Routine constancy checks over a year agreed with the baseline within 0.4%.

  18. The influence of the dwell time deviation constraint (DTDC) parameter on dosimetry with IPSA optimisation for HDR prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Ryan L.; Millar, Jeremy L.; Panettieri, Vanessa; Mason, Natasha; Lancaster, Craig; Francih, Rick D.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate how the dwell time deviation constraint (DTDC) parameter, applied to inverse planning by simulated annealing (IPSA) optimisation limits large dwell times from occurring in each catheter and to characterise the effect on the resulting dosimetry for prostate high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment plans. An unconstrained IPSA optimised treatment plan, using the Oncentra Brachytherapy treatment planning system (version 4.3, Nucletron an Elekta company, Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden), was generated for 20 consecutive HDR prostate brachytherapy patients, with the DTDC set to zero. Successive constrained optimisation plans were also created for each patient by increasing the DTDC parameter by 0.2, up to a maximum value of 1.0. We defined a “plan modulation index”, to characterise the change of dwell time modulation as the DTDC parameter was increased. We calculated the dose volume histogram indices for the PTV (D90, V100, V150, V200%) and urethra (D10%) to characterise the effect on the resulting dosimetry. The average PTV D90% decreases as the DTDC is applied, on average by only 1.5 %, for a DTDC = 0.4. The measures of high dose regions in the PTV, V150 and V200%, increase on average by less than 5 and 2 % respectively. The net effect of DTDC on the modulation of dwell times has been characterised by the introduction of the plan modulation index. DTDC applied during IPSA optimisation of HDR prostate brachytherapy plans reduce the occurrence of large isolated dwell times within individual catheters. The mechanism by which DTDC works has been described and its effect on the modulation of dwell times has been characterised. The authors recommend using a DTDC parameter no greater than 0.4 to obtain a plan with dwell time modulation comparable to a geometric optimised plan. This yielded on average a 1.5 % decrease in PTV coverage and an acceptable increase in V150%, without compromising the urethral dose.

  19. Monte Carlo characterization of the Gamma-Med Hdr plus Ir-192 brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, E.; Sosa, M. A.; Gil V, A. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Av. Insurgentes 2354, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Monzon, E., E-mail: eric_1985@fisica.ugto.mx [IMSS, Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad No. 1, Av. Adolfo Lopez Mateos 1813, 37340 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: The MCNP4C Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the dosimetry around the Gamma-Med Hdr Plus iridium-192 brachytherapy source in both air/vacuum and water environments. Dosimetry data in water was calculated and are presented into an away-along table. All dosimetric quantities recommended by the AAPM Task Group 43 report have been also calculated. These quantities are air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function. The obtained data are compared to this source reference data, finding results in good agreement with them. In this study, recommendations of the AAPM TG-43U1 report have been followed and comply with the most recent AAPM and ESTRO physics committee recommendations about Monte Carlo techniques. The data in the present study complement published data and can be used as input in the Tps or as benchmark data to verify the results of the treatment planning systems as well as a means of comparison with other datasets from this source. (Author)

  20. Monte Carlo characterization of the Gamma-Med Hdr plus Ir-192 brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, E.; Sosa, M. A.; Gil V, A.; Monzon, E.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: The MCNP4C Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the dosimetry around the Gamma-Med Hdr Plus iridium-192 brachytherapy source in both air/vacuum and water environments. Dosimetry data in water was calculated and are presented into an away-along table. All dosimetric quantities recommended by the AAPM Task Group 43 report have been also calculated. These quantities are air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function. The obtained data are compared to this source reference data, finding results in good agreement with them. In this study, recommendations of the AAPM TG-43U1 report have been followed and comply with the most recent AAPM and ESTRO physics committee recommendations about Monte Carlo techniques. The data in the present study complement published data and can be used as input in the Tps or as benchmark data to verify the results of the treatment planning systems as well as a means of comparison with other datasets from this source. (Author)

  1. An in vivo investigative protocol for HDR prostate brachytherapy using urethral and rectal thermoluminescence dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toye, Warren; Das, Ram; Kron, Tomas; Franich, Rick; Johnston, Peter; Duchesne, Gillian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an in vivo dosimetry based investigative action level relevant for a corrective protocol for HDR brachytherapy boost treatment. Methods and materials: The dose delivered to points within the urethra and rectum was measured using TLD in vivo dosimetry in 56 patients. Comparisons between the urethral and rectal measurements and TPS calculations showed differences, which are related to the relative position of the implant and TLD trains, and allowed shifts of implant position relative to the prostate to be estimated. Results and conclusions: Analysis of rectal dose measurements is consistent with implant movement, which was previously only identified with the urethral data. Shift corrected doses were compared with results from the TPS. Comparison of peak doses to the urethra and rectum has been assessed against the proposed corrective protocol to limit overdosing these critical structures. An initial investigative level of 20% difference between measured and TPS peak dose was established, which corresponds to 1/3 of patients which was practical for the caseload. These patients were assessed resulting in corrective action being applied for one patient. Multiple triggering for selective investigative action is outlined. The use of a single in vivo measurement in the first fraction optimizes patient benefit at acceptable cost.

  2. Intraoperative HDR brachytherapy for rectal cancer using a flexible intraoperative template: standard plans versus individual planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Hanssens, Patrick E.J.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2004-01-01

    HDR intraoperative brachytherapy (IOBT) is applied to locally advanced rectal tumors using a 5 mm thick flexible intraoperative template (FIT). To reduce the procedure time, treatment planning is performed using standard plans that neglect the curvature of the FIT. We have calculated the individual treatment plan, based on the real geometry of the FIT, and the dose at clips placed during surgery. A mean treatment dose of 9.55±0.21 Gy was found for the individual plan, compared to the prescribed 10 Gy (P<0.0001). The mean central dose was 10.03±0.10 Gy in the standard plan and 9.20±0.32 Gy in the individual plan (P<0.0001). The mean dose at the corners of the FIT was 10.3 Gy in the standard plan and ranged between 10.3 and 10.5 Gy in the individual plan. In 63% of the clips, the dose was larger than 15.0 Gy, which is equivalent to a gap between the FIT and the target smaller than 5 mm. In 18% of the clips, the dose was smaller than 13.0 Gy indicating that locally the gap was larger than 5 mm. Clinical practice will have to prove if these small dose deviations influence the clinical outcome

  3. Multiobjective anatomy-based dose optimization for HDR-brachytherapy with constraint free deterministic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milickovic, N.; Lahanas, M.; Papagiannopoulou, M.; Zamboglou, N.; Baltas, D.

    2002-01-01

    In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, conventional dose optimization algorithms consider multiple objectives in the form of an aggregate function that transforms the multiobjective problem into a single-objective problem. As a result, there is a loss of information on the available alternative possible solutions. This method assumes that the treatment planner exactly understands the correlation between competing objectives and knows the physical constraints. This knowledge is provided by the Pareto trade-off set obtained by single-objective optimization algorithms with a repeated optimization with different importance vectors. A mapping technique avoids non-feasible solutions with negative dwell weights and allows the use of constraint free gradient-based deterministic algorithms. We compare various such algorithms and methods which could improve their performance. This finally allows us to generate a large number of solutions in a few minutes. We use objectives expressed in terms of dose variances obtained from a few hundred sampling points in the planning target volume (PTV) and in organs at risk (OAR). We compare two- to four-dimensional Pareto fronts obtained with the deterministic algorithms and with a fast-simulated annealing algorithm. For PTV-based objectives, due to the convex objective functions, the obtained solutions are global optimal. If OARs are included, then the solutions found are also global optimal, although local minima may be present as suggested. (author)

  4. Air-kerma evaluation at the maze entrance of HDR brachytherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujades, M C; Granero, D; Vijande, J; Ballester, F; Perez-Calatayud, J; Papagiannis, P; Siebert, F A

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of procedures for evaluating the design of brachytherapy (BT) facilities for radiation protection purposes, the methodology used for external beam radiotherapy facilities is often adapted. The purpose of this study is to adapt the NCRP 151 methodology for estimating the air-kerma rate at the door in BT facilities. Such methodology was checked against Monte Carlo (MC) techniques using the code Geant4. Five different facility designs were studied for 192 Ir and 60 Co HDR applications to account for several different bunker layouts. For the estimation of the lead thickness needed at the door, the use of transmission data for the real spectra at the door instead of the ones emitted by 192 Ir and 60 Co will reduce the lead thickness by a factor of five for 192 Ir and ten for 60 Co. This will significantly lighten the door and hence simplify construction and operating requirements for all bunkers. The adaptation proposed in this study to estimate the air-kerma rate at the door depends on the complexity of the maze: it provides good results for bunkers with a maze (i.e. similar to those used for linacs for which the NCRP 151 methodology was developed) but fails for less conventional designs. For those facilities, a specific Monte Carlo study is in order for reasons of safety and cost-effectiveness. (paper)

  5. Air-kerma evaluation at the maze entrance of HDR brachytherapy facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujades, M C; Granero, D; Vijande, J; Ballester, F; Perez-Calatayud, J; Papagiannis, P; Siebert, F A

    2014-12-01

    In the absence of procedures for evaluating the design of brachytherapy (BT) facilities for radiation protection purposes, the methodology used for external beam radiotherapy facilities is often adapted. The purpose of this study is to adapt the NCRP 151 methodology for estimating the air-kerma rate at the door in BT facilities. Such methodology was checked against Monte Carlo (MC) techniques using the code Geant4. Five different facility designs were studied for (192)Ir and (60)Co HDR applications to account for several different bunker layouts.For the estimation of the lead thickness needed at the door, the use of transmission data for the real spectra at the door instead of the ones emitted by (192)Ir and (60)Co will reduce the lead thickness by a factor of five for (192)Ir and ten for (60)Co. This will significantly lighten the door and hence simplify construction and operating requirements for all bunkers.The adaptation proposed in this study to estimate the air-kerma rate at the door depends on the complexity of the maze: it provides good results for bunkers with a maze (i.e. similar to those used for linacs for which the NCRP 151 methodology was developed) but fails for less conventional designs. For those facilities, a specific Monte Carlo study is in order for reasons of safety and cost-effectiveness.

  6. Characterization of commercial MOSFET detectors and their feasibility for in-vivo HDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phurailatpam, Reena; Upreti, Rituraj; Nojin Paul, Siji; Jamema, Swamidas V; Deshpande, Deepak D

    2016-01-01

    The present study was to investigate the use of MOSFET as an vivo dosimeter for the application of Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy treatments. MOSFET was characterized for dose linearity in the range of 50-1000 cGy, depth dose dependence from 2 to 7 cm, angular dependence. Signal fading was checked for two weeks. Dose linearity was found to be within 2% in the dose range (50-1000 cGy). The response varied within 8.07% for detector-source distance of 2-7 cm. The response of MOSFET with the epoxy side facing the source (0 degree) is the highest and the lowest response was observed at 90 and 270 degrees. Signal was stable during the study period. The detector showed high dose linearity and insignificant fading. But due to angular and depth dependence, care should be taken and corrections must be applied for clinical dosimetry. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Results in patients treated with high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for oral tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Michinori; Shirane, Makoto; Ueda, Tsutomu; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2006-01-01

    Eight patients were treated with high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for oral tongue cancer between September 2000 and August 2004. The patient distribution was 1 T1, 5 T2, 1 T3, and 1 T4a. Patients received 50-60 Gy in 10 fractions over seven days with high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Six of the eight patients were treated with a combination of external beam radiotherapy (20-30 Gy) and interstitial brachytherapy. The two-year primary local control rate was 83% for initial case. High-dose-rate brachytherapy was performed safely even for an aged person, and was a useful treatment modality for oral tongue cancer. (author)

  8. Radiation protection after interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirraco, R.; Pereira, A.; Cavaco, A. [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil - Centro R egional de Oncologia do Porto, SA, Porto (Portugal)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In this study we measure patients radiation exposure dose after interstitial {sup 125}I permanent prostate Brachytherapy implants, and correlate it with dose limits for public, total activity implanted, patient preoperative weight(1), distance between prostate walls and anterior skin surface. Methods and Material: We analyse 20 patients who were implanted with {sup 125}I seeds. The instrument used to measure radiation is a calibrated Berthold Umo LB 123 aco-plated to a LB 1236-H10 detector. Three measurements were taken: at the perineal and anterior pelvic zones on contact with the skin and at 1 m from the patient. The maximum value was taken for all measurements. The dose at a distance of one meter is obtained at anterior pelvic zone, perpendicular to the skin, according to the recommendations of A.A.P.M.(1). The distance between prostate walls was determined using post -operative CT images. Results: The doses at the perineal zone have determined an average of 186 {mu}Sv/h (range: 110 340 {mu}Sv/h) and at surface pelvic zone of 41 {mu}Sv/h (range: 15 103 {mu}Sv/h). The dose at a distance of 1 meter has an average value of 0.4 {mu}Sv/h (range: 0.2 1.0 {mu}Sv/h). The average total activity implanted was 25 mCi (range: 17 38 mCi). The distance between prostate walls and skin pelvic surface of the patients has an average value of 8.9 cm (range: 6.6 -11.5 cm). At a distance of 1 meter from the pelvic zone the dose measured is very low and below dose limits imposed by the European Directive EURATOM 2 and the Portuguese law. For general public to reach annual dose limit (EURATOM - 1 mSv/year) when contacting the pelvic zone, we extrapolate that 4 days (range: 1.6 11.1 days) would be needed, assuming a daily contact period of 6 hours. Conclusion: We established a correlation between the distance of prostate walls to the skin perineal surface and the total dose, but we find no correlation between measured doses, total activity implanted

  9. Value of palliation and improvement in quality of life in oesophageal cancer patients treated with iridium - 192 HDR fractionated brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaias, B.; Kaleta, R.; Fijaikowski, M.

    1996-01-01

    During December 1992 - November 1995 twenty-two patients with oesophageal cancer were treated with palliative HDR brachytherapy. Sixteen patients had local recurrence or progression after external radiotherapy and the remaining six patients were treated with brachytherapy alone. All patients received fractions of 7.5 Gy at the reference point 2 - 4 time weekly. Reference point was calculated at 0.5 cm distance from applicator surface. Microselectron HDR device with Iridium-192 source were used. Criteria for palliative effect were as follow: relive of symptoms time of occurrence and duration of palliative effect. Quality of life during and after treatment were evaluated by patients and staff independently. In majority of patients both palliative effect and significant improvement of quality of life were noted. Detail results include: - improvement in swallowing in 63,6% ((14(22))); - increase in body weight in 45% ((10(22))); - pain relive 70% ((12(17))); - appearance of palliation 1 hour - 8 days; - duration of palliation - 3-12 mo. (median 5 mo.); Quality of live - improvement - 59% ((13(22))); - no improvement - 27.3% ((6(22))); - worsening - 13.7% ((3(22))); No improvement or worsening in quality of life were observed only in patients who obtained radical radiotherapy previously. Brachytherapy is an effective method of palliative treatment for as well primary and recurrent oesophageal cancer

  10. Fast, automatic, and accurate catheter reconstruction in HDR brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Eric; Racine, Emmanuel; Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de physique, de génie physique et d’optique et Centre de recherche sur le cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de radio-oncologie et Axe Oncologie du Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Binnekamp, Dirk [Integrated Clinical Solutions and Marketing, Philips Healthcare, Veenpluis 4-6, Best 5680 DA (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this technical note is to evaluate the accuracy and the robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for automated and real-time catheter reconstruction. Methods: For this preclinical study, a total of ten catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a 18G biopsy needle, used as an EM stylet and equipped with a miniaturized sensor, and the second generation Aurora{sup ®} Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system provides position and orientation value with precisions of 0.7 mm and 0.2°, respectively. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical computed tomography (CT) system with a spatial resolution of 89 μm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, five catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 s, leading to a total reconstruction time inferior to 3 min for a typical 17-catheter implant. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.66 ± 0.33 mm and 1.08 ± 0.72 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be more accurate. A maximum difference of less than 0.6 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusions: The EM reconstruction was found to be more accurate and precise than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators.

  11. Fast, automatic, and accurate catheter reconstruction in HDR brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulin, Eric; Racine, Emmanuel; Beaulieu, Luc; Binnekamp, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this technical note is to evaluate the accuracy and the robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for automated and real-time catheter reconstruction. Methods: For this preclinical study, a total of ten catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a 18G biopsy needle, used as an EM stylet and equipped with a miniaturized sensor, and the second generation Aurora ® Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system provides position and orientation value with precisions of 0.7 mm and 0.2°, respectively. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical computed tomography (CT) system with a spatial resolution of 89 μm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, five catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 s, leading to a total reconstruction time inferior to 3 min for a typical 17-catheter implant. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.66 ± 0.33 mm and 1.08 ± 0.72 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be more accurate. A maximum difference of less than 0.6 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusions: The EM reconstruction was found to be more accurate and precise than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators

  12. Implementation of the technique of partial irradiation accelerated the breast with high doses (HDR) brachytherapy; Puesta en marcha de la tecnica de irradiacion parcial acelerada de la mama con braquterapia de alta tasa de dosis (HDR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina Lopez, M. Y.; Pardo Perez, E.; Castro Novais, J.; Martinez Ortega, J.; Ruiz Maqueda, S.; Cerro Penalver, E. del

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work is presents procedure carried out in our Centre for the implementation of the accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI, accelerated partial-breast irradiation) with high-rate brachytherapy (HDR), using plastic tubes as applicators. Carried out measures, the evaluation of the dosimetric parameters analyzing and presenting the results. (Author)

  13. INTERSTITIAL BRACHYTHERAPY USING TEMPLATE FOR LOCALLY ADVANCED GYNAECOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES- REVISITING THE FORGOTTEN CLASSICAL ART- A SINGLE INSTITUTE EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatharaju Swarna Kumari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Brachytherapy is an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of locally advanced gynaecologic (GYN cancers despite evolution of different newer radiotherapy techniques like high-dose-rate and image-guided BT. Despite being used in the management of advanced gynaecological cancer, currently there is a scarcity of studies and data on interstitial BT in Indian context. This is a retrospective analysis on 71 patients with locally advanced gynaecological malignancies treated in the period of 2010 to 2016 to assess the local tumour control, survival, and complications with the template (Syed-Neblett guided interstitial technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS The patients with a median age of 51 years treated from July 2010 to May 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. This study included previously unirradiated 71 patients with advance stage of gynaecological malignancies, not suitable for intracavitary brachytherapy due to distorted anatomy or extensive disease stage. Histologically all patients had squamous cell carcinoma (cervix= 56, vault= 9, vagina= 6 and treated by whole pelvis external beam radiation therapy (EBRT up to a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions. These patients were further treated by high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy using SyedNeblett dedicated vaginal plastic template. During treatment all these patients were re-optimised and a dose of 15-21 Gy was delivered in 3 fractions with a minimum gap of 6 hours between fractions using Varisource iX HDR unit. RESULTS Out of 71 patients 5 were lost to followup during study period and they were excluded from the final analysis. The average followup duration ranged between 6-71 months and median followup was 20 months. This study included parameters like local disease control, acute/late complications and distant metastasis. Out of 66 patients, local disease control was seen in 54 (81.81% patients, whereas local recurrence was observed in 12 patients (18.18%. Distant

  14. Estimation of distance error by fuzzy set theory required for strength determination of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Datta, D; Sharma, S D; Chourasiya, G; Babu, D A R; Sharma, D N

    2014-04-01

    Verification of the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of institutional quality assurance program. Either reference air-kerma rate (RAKR) or air-kerma strength (AKS) is the recommended quantity to specify the strength of gamma-emitting brachytherapy sources. The use of Farmer-type cylindrical ionization chamber of sensitive volume 0.6 cm(3) is one of the recommended methods for measuring RAKR of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. While using the cylindrical chamber method, it is required to determine the positioning error of the ionization chamber with respect to the source which is called the distance error. An attempt has been made to apply the fuzzy set theory to estimate the subjective uncertainty associated with the distance error. A simplified approach of applying this fuzzy set theory has been proposed in the quantification of uncertainty associated with the distance error. In order to express the uncertainty in the framework of fuzzy sets, the uncertainty index was estimated and was found to be within 2.5%, which further indicates that the possibility of error in measuring such distance may be of this order. It is observed that the relative distance li estimated by analytical method and fuzzy set theoretic approach are consistent with each other. The crisp values of li estimated using analytical method lie within the bounds computed using fuzzy set theory. This indicates that li values estimated using analytical methods are within 2.5% uncertainty. This value of uncertainty in distance measurement should be incorporated in the uncertainty budget, while estimating the expanded uncertainty in HDR (192)Ir source strength measurement.

  15. Interstitial high-dose rate brachytherapy as boost for anal canal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Alexander Tuan; Claren, Audrey; Benezery, Karen; François, Eric; Gautier, Mathieu; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    To assess clinical outcomes of patients treated with a high-dose rate brachytherapy boost for anal canal cancer (ACC). From August 2005 to February 2013, 28 patients presenting an ACC treated by split-course external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and HDR brachytherapy with or without chemotherapy in a French regional cancer center in Nice were retrospectively analyzed. Median age was 60.6 years [34 – 83], 25 patients presented a squamous cell carcinoma and 3 an adenocarcinoma; 21 received chemotherapy. Median dose of EBRT was 45 Gy [43.2 – 52]. Median dose of HDR brachytherapy was 12 Gy [10 - 15] with a median duration of 2 days. Median overall treatment time was 63 days and median delay between EBRT and brachytherapy was 20 days. Two-year local relapse free, metastatic free, disease free and overall survivals were 83%, 81.9%, 71.8% and 87.7% respectively. Acute toxicities were frequent but not severe with mostly grade 1 toxicities: 37% of genito-urinary, 40.7% of gastro-intestinal and 3.7% of cutaneous toxicities. Late toxicities were mainly G1 (43.1%) and G2 (22%). Two-year colostomy-free survival was 75.1%, one patient had a definitive sphincter amputation. High-dose rate brachytherapy for anal canal carcinoma as boost represents a feasible technique compared to low or pulsed-dose rate brachytherapy. This technique remains an excellent approach to precisely boost the tumor in reducing the overall treatment time

  16. Stereotactic interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of oligodendroglial brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Majdoub, Faycal; Neudorfer, Clemens; Maarouf, Mohammad [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); University of Witten/Herdecke, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Center of Neurosurgery, Cologne-Merheim Medical Center (CMMC), Cologne (Germany); Blau, Tobias; Deckert, Martina [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Neuropathology, Cologne (Germany); Hellmich, Martin [University Hospital of Cologne, Institute of Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology, Cologne (Germany); Buehrle, Christian [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); Sturm, Volker [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); University Hospital of Wurzburg, Department of Neurosurgery, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    We evaluated the treatment of oligodendroglial brain tumors with interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) using {sup 125}iodine seeds ({sup 125}I) and analyzed prognostic factors. Between January 1991 and December 2010, 63 patients (median age 43.3 years, range 20.8-63.4 years) suffering from oligodendroglial brain tumors were treated with {sup 125}I IBT either as primary, adjuvantly after incomplete resection, or as salvage therapy after tumor recurrence. Possible prognostic factors influencing disease progression and survival were retrospectively investigated. The actuarial 2-, 5-, and 10-year overall and progression-free survival rates after IBT for WHO II tumors were 96.9, 96.9, 89.8 % and 96.9, 93.8, 47.3 %; for WHO III tumors 90.3, 77, 54.9 % and 80.6, 58.4, 45.9 %, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated complete remission in 2 patients, partial remission in 13 patients, stable disease in 17 patients and tumor progression in 31 patients. Median time to progression for WHO II tumors was 87.6 months and for WHO III tumors 27.8 months. Neurological status improved in 10 patients and remained stable in 20 patients, while 9 patients deteriorated. There was no treatment-related mortality. Treatment-related morbidity was transient in 11 patients. WHO II, KPS ≥ 90 %, frontal location, and tumor surface dose > 50 Gy were associated with increased overall survival (p ≤ 0.05). Oligodendroglioma and frontal location were associated with a prolonged progression-free survival (p ≤ 0.05). Our study indicates that IBT achieves local control rates comparable to surgery and radio-/chemotherapy treatment, is minimally invasive, and safe. Due to the low rate of side effects, IBT may represent an attractive option as part of a multimodal treatment schedule, being supplementary to microsurgery or as a salvage therapy after chemotherapy and conventional irradiation. (orig.) [German] Die Behandlung oligodendroglialer Hirntumoren durch die interstitielle Brachytherapie

  17. SU-E-T-362: Automatic Catheter Reconstruction of Flap Applicators in HDR Surface Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzurovic, I; Devlin, P; Hansen, J; O'Farrell, D; Bhagwat, M; Friesen, S; Damato, A; Lewis, J; Cormack, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Catheter reconstruction is crucial for the accurate delivery of radiation dose in HDR brachytherapy. The process becomes complicated and time-consuming for large superficial clinical targets with a complex topology. A novel method for the automatic catheter reconstruction of flap applicators is proposed in this study. Methods: We have developed a program package capable of image manipulation, using C++class libraries of The-Visualization-Toolkit(VTK) software system. The workflow for automatic catheter reconstruction is: a)an anchor point is placed in 3D or in the axial view of the first slice at the tip of the first, last and middle points for the curved surface; b)similar points are placed on the last slice of the image set; c)the surface detection algorithm automatically registers the points to the images and applies the surface reconstruction filter; d)then a structured grid surface is generated through the center of the treatment catheters placed at a distance of 5mm from the patient's skin. As a result, a mesh-style plane is generated with the reconstructed catheters placed 10mm apart. To demonstrate automatic catheter reconstruction, we used CT images of patients diagnosed with cutaneous T-cell-lymphoma and imaged with Freiburg-Flap-Applicators (Nucletron™-Elekta, Netherlands). The coordinates for each catheter were generated and compared to the control points selected during the manual reconstruction for 16catheters and 368control point Results: The variation of the catheter tip positions between the automatically and manually reconstructed catheters was 0.17mm(SD=0.23mm). The position difference between the manually selected catheter control points and the corresponding points obtained automatically was 0.17mm in the x-direction (SD=0.23mm), 0.13mm in the y-direction (SD=0.22mm), and 0.14mm in the z-direction (SD=0.24mm). Conclusion: This study shows the feasibility of the automatic catheter reconstruction of flap applicators with a high

  18. Rectal complications associated with transperineal interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Potters, Louis

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: As transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (TIPPB) grows in acceptance as an option in the treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer, its associated toxicities are being defined. This clinical report documents rectal toxicity from a large cohort of men treated by a single practitioner for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: Eight hundred twenty-five men were treated from September 1992 to September 1998 with TIPPB. One hundred-forty were treated in conjunction with external beam irradiation (EBRT) and 685 with TIPPB alone. All patients were implanted under real-time ultrasound guidance. No dose-volume histogram analysis was performed for this study. All patients were followed at 5 weeks after the procedure, then every 3-6 months thereafter. Rectal morbidity was graded by a modified RTOG toxicity scale. Therapy to control symptoms was recommended on an individual basis. Results: The median follow-up for the cohort is 48 months. A total of 77 patients (9.4%) reported Grade 1 toxicity at some time following an implant whereas 54 patients (6.6%) reported Grade 2 toxicity. The peak post-TIPPB time for experiencing rectal toxicity was 8 months at which time Grade 1 and 2 rectal toxicity was reported in 9.5% of the patients. This improved over the subsequent months and resolved in all patients by 3((1)/(2)) years. Four patients (0.5%) reported Grade 3 rectal toxicity with rectal ulceration identified on colonoscopy at 1 year from implant. Two of the four patients had colonic manipulation in the radiated portion of the colon which subsequently caused it to bleed. None of the patients required blood product transfusion. In 3 of the 4 patients the Grade 3 rectal toxicity has resolved spontaneously and 1 patient continues to heal at the time of this report. No patient required hospitalization or surgical intervention. Conclusion: TIPPB is a tolerable and acceptable treatment option when used alone in early-stage, organ

  19. Poster - 07: Investigations of the Advanced Collapsed-cone Engine for HDR Brachytherapy Scalp Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cawston-Grant, Brie; Morrison, Hali; Sloboda, Ron; Menon, Geetha [Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To present an investigation of the Advanced Collapsed-cone Engine (ACE) in Oncentraê Brachy (OcB) v4.5 using a tissue equivalent phantom modeling scalp brachytherapy (BT) treatments. Methods: A slab phantom modeling the skin, skull, brain and mold was used. A dose of 400cGy was prescribed to just above the skull layer using TG-43 and was delivered using an HDR afterloader. Measurements were made using Gafchromic™ EBT3 film at four depths within the phantom. The TG-43 planned and film measured doses were compared to the standard (sACE) and high (hACE) accuracy ACE options in OcB between the surface and below the skull. Results: The average difference between the TG-43 calculated and film measured doses was −11.25±3.38% when there was no air gap between the mold and skin; sACE and hACE doses were on average lower than TG-43 calculated doses by 3.41±0.03% and 2.45±0.03%, respectively. With a 3mm air gap between the mold and skin, the difference between the TG-43 calculated and measured doses was −8.28±5.76%; sACE and hACE calculations yielded average doses 1.87±0.03% and 1.78±0.04% greater than TG-43, respectively. Conclusions: TG-43, sACE, and hACE were found to overestimate doses below the skull layer compared to film. With a 3mm air gap between the mold and skin, sACE and hACE more accurately predicted the film dose to the skin surface than TG-43. More clinical variations and their implications are currently being investigated.

  20. Poster - 07: Investigations of the Advanced Collapsed-cone Engine for HDR Brachytherapy Scalp Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawston-Grant, Brie; Morrison, Hali; Sloboda, Ron; Menon, Geetha

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To present an investigation of the Advanced Collapsed-cone Engine (ACE) in Oncentraê Brachy (OcB) v4.5 using a tissue equivalent phantom modeling scalp brachytherapy (BT) treatments. Methods: A slab phantom modeling the skin, skull, brain and mold was used. A dose of 400cGy was prescribed to just above the skull layer using TG-43 and was delivered using an HDR afterloader. Measurements were made using Gafchromic™ EBT3 film at four depths within the phantom. The TG-43 planned and film measured doses were compared to the standard (sACE) and high (hACE) accuracy ACE options in OcB between the surface and below the skull. Results: The average difference between the TG-43 calculated and film measured doses was −11.25±3.38% when there was no air gap between the mold and skin; sACE and hACE doses were on average lower than TG-43 calculated doses by 3.41±0.03% and 2.45±0.03%, respectively. With a 3mm air gap between the mold and skin, the difference between the TG-43 calculated and measured doses was −8.28±5.76%; sACE and hACE calculations yielded average doses 1.87±0.03% and 1.78±0.04% greater than TG-43, respectively. Conclusions: TG-43, sACE, and hACE were found to overestimate doses below the skull layer compared to film. With a 3mm air gap between the mold and skin, sACE and hACE more accurately predicted the film dose to the skin surface than TG-43. More clinical variations and their implications are currently being investigated.

  1. Identifying afterloading PDR and HDR brachytherapy errors using real-time fiber-coupled Al2O3:C dosimetry and a novel statistical error decision criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Andersen, Claus E.; Siebert, Frank-Andre; Nielsen, Soren Kynde; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Tanderup, Kari

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: The feasibility of a real-time in vivo dosimeter to detect errors has previously been demonstrated. The purpose of this study was to: (1) quantify the sensitivity of the dosimeter to detect imposed treatment errors under well controlled and clinically relevant experimental conditions, and (2) test a new statistical error decision concept based on full uncertainty analysis. Materials and methods: Phantom studies of two gynecological cancer PDR and one prostate cancer HDR patient treatment plans were performed using tandem ring applicators or interstitial needles. Imposed treatment errors, including interchanged pairs of afterloader guide tubes and 2-20 mm source displacements, were monitored using a real-time fiber-coupled carbon doped aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 :C) crystal dosimeter that was positioned in the reconstructed tumor region. The error detection capacity was evaluated at three dose levels: dwell position, source channel, and fraction. The error criterion incorporated the correlated source position uncertainties and other sources of uncertainty, and it was applied both for the specific phantom patient plans and for a general case (source-detector distance 5-90 mm and position uncertainty 1-4 mm). Results: Out of 20 interchanged guide tube errors, time-resolved analysis identified 17 while fraction level analysis identified two. Channel and fraction level comparisons could leave 10 mm dosimeter displacement errors unidentified. Dwell position dose rate comparisons correctly identified displacements ≥5 mm. Conclusion: This phantom study demonstrates that Al 2 O 3 :C real-time dosimetry can identify applicator displacements ≥5 mm and interchanged guide tube errors during PDR and HDR brachytherapy. The study demonstrates the shortcoming of a constant error criterion and the advantage of a statistical error criterion.

  2. The use of disposable vascular catheters in interstitial brachytherapy of skin cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, N.J.; Malissard, L.; Douchez, J.; Combes, P.F.

    1978-01-01

    Technical improvements dealing with interstitial brachytherapy (Ir 192 ) of skin cancers are presented. Fine disposable plastic tubes fitted with mandril, which allow loading of light radioactive material in any case are used. Short term results are discussed according to 101 applications [fr

  3. Preliminary results of interstitial [sup 192]Ir brachytherapy for malignant gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Kengo; Nakagawa, Minoru; Higashi, Hisato [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; and others

    1992-09-01

    Twenty-six patients with recurrent or unremovable malignant gliomas were treated by interstitial brachytherapy with iridium-192 seeds. Stereotactic implantation of the afterloading catheters using the Brown-Roberts-Wells computed tomography (CT)-guided stereotactic system was performed in 24 patients and surgical CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and clinical examination. Tumor regression was seen in 17 patients 1-3 months after implantation. Tumor progression was seen in only three patients. After interstitial brachytherapy, the most commonly observed CT finding was central low density. Median survival time was 18 months after implantation. Autopsies in five patients revealed the delayed effects of radiation injury such as typical vascular changes, microcalcification, and coagulative necrosis in the implant area and tumor recurrence at the periphery. The results suggest that brachytherapy is not curative but prolonged the median survival time by 6 months. (author).

  4. A multicentre audit of HDR/PDR brachytherapy absolute dosimetry in association with the INTERLACE trial (NCT015662405)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, P.; Aird, E. G. A.; Sander, T.; Gouldstone, C. A.; Sharpe, P. H. G.; Lee, C. D.; Lowe, G.; Thomas, R. A. S.; Simnor, T.; Bownes, P.; Bidmead, M.; Gandon, L.; Eaton, D.; Palmer, A. L.

    2017-12-01

    A UK multicentre audit to evaluate HDR and PDR brachytherapy has been performed using alanine absolute dosimetry. This is the first national UK audit performing an absolute dose measurement at a clinically relevant distance (20 mm) from the source. It was performed in both INTERLACE (a phase III multicentre trial in cervical cancer) and non-INTERLACE brachytherapy centres treating gynaecological tumours. Forty-seven UK centres (including the National Physical Laboratory) were visited. A simulated line source was generated within each centre’s treatment planning system and dwell times calculated to deliver 10 Gy at 20 mm from the midpoint of the central dwell (representative of Point A of the Manchester system). The line source was delivered in a water-equivalent plastic phantom (Barts Solid Water) encased in blocks of PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) and charge measured with an ion chamber at 3 positions (120° apart, 20 mm from the source). Absorbed dose was then measured with alanine at the same positions and averaged to reduce source positional uncertainties. Charge was also measured at 50 mm from the source (representative of Point B of the Manchester system). Source types included 46 HDR and PDR 192Ir sources, (7 Flexisource, 24 mHDR-v2, 12 GammaMed HDR Plus, 2 GammaMed PDR Plus, 1 VS2000) and 1 HDR 60Co source, (Co0.A86). Alanine measurements when compared to the centres’ calculated dose showed a mean difference (±SD) of  +1.1% (±1.4%) at 20 mm. Differences were also observed between source types and dose calculation algorithm. Ion chamber measurements demonstrated significant discrepancies between the three holes mainly due to positional variation of the source within the catheter (0.4%-4.9% maximum difference between two holes). This comprehensive audit of absolute dose to water from a simulated line source showed all centres could deliver the prescribed dose to within 5% maximum difference between measurement and calculation.

  5. An Eight-Year Experience of HDR Brachytherapy Boost for Localized Prostate Cancer: Biopsy and PSA Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachand, Francois; Martin, Andre-Guy; Beaulieu, Luc; Harel, Francois M.Sc.; Vigneault, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS), the 2-year biopsy outcome and the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce in patients with localized prostate cancer treated with an inversely planned high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost. Materials and methods: Data were collected from 153 patients treated between 1999 and 2006 with external beam pelvic radiation followed by an HDR Ir-192 prostate boost. These patients were given a boost of 18 to 20 Gy using inverse-planning with simulated annealing (IPSA).We reviewed and analyzed all prostate-specific antigen levels and control biopsies. Results: The median follow-up was 44 months (18-95 months). When categorized by risk of progression, 74.5% of patients presented an intermediate risk and 14.4% a high one. Prostate biopsies at 2 years posttreatment were negative in 86 of 94 patients (91.5%), whereas two biopsies were inconclusive. Biochemical control at 60 months was at 96% according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and the Phoenix consensus definitions. A PSA bounce (PSA values of 2 ng/mL or more above nadir) was observed in 15 patients of 123 (9.8%). The median time to bounce was 15.2 months (interquartile range, 11.0-17.7) and the median bounce duration 18.7 months (interquartile range, 12.1-29). The estimate of overall survival at 60 months was 97.1% (95% CI, 91.6-103%). Conclusions: Considering that inverse planned HDR brachytherapy prostate boosts led to an excellent biochemical response, with a 2-year negative biopsy rate, we recommend a conservative approach in face of a PSA bounce even though it was observed in 10% of patients

  6. Comparison of high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone. The preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippe, Nivaldo; Novaes, P.E.; Ferrigno, R.; Pellizzon, A.C.; Salvajoli, J.V.; Fogaroli, R.C.; Maia, M.A.C.; Baraldi, H.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To compare the results between HDR and LDR brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone through a prospective and randomized trial. Materials and Methods: From September 1992 to December 1993, 65 patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer were randomized to one of the following treatment schedule according to the brachytherapy used to complement the dose of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT): 1 - High dose rate (HDR) - 36 patients - 4 weekly insertions of 6,0 Gy at point A 2 - Low dose rate (LDR) - 29 patients - 2 insertions two weeks apart of 17,5 Gy at point A The External Beam radiotherapy was performed through a Linac 4MV, in box arrangement for whole pelvis and in AP-PA fields for parametrial complementation of dose. The dose at the whole pelvis was 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1,8 Gy and the parametrial dose was 16 Gy. The brachytherapy was realized with Fletcher colpostats and intrauterine tandem, in both arms. The HDR brachytherapy was realized through a Micro-Selectron device, working with Iridium-192 with initial activity of 10 Ci and started ten days after the beginning of EBRT. The total treatment time was shortened in two weeks for this group. The LDR brachytherapy started only after the end of EBRT. Results: With the minimum follow up of 24 months and medium of 31 months, the disease free survival was 50% among the 36 patients in HDR group and 47,8% among the 29 patients in LDR group. Local failures occurred in 50% and 52,8% respectively. Grade I and II complications were restricted to rectites and cistites and the incidence of them was 8,3% for HDR group and 13% for LDR group. Until the time of evaluation there were no grade III complications in any group. Conclusions: Although the number of patients is small and the time of follow up still short, these preliminary results suggest that the HDR brachytherapy has an equivalent efficiency in local control as the LDR in the treatment of stage IIIB

  7. Fat necrosis in women with early-stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budrukkar, Ashwini; Jagtap, Vikas; Kembhavi, Seema; Munshi, Anusheel; Jalali, Rakesh; Seth, Tanuja; Parmar, Vani; Raj Upreti, Ritu; Badwe, Rajendra; Sarin, Rajiv

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence of clinical, pathological and radiological fat necrosis (FN) in women treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using interstitial brachytherapy (BRT) for early-stage breast cancer and to study certain variables associated with it. Methods and materials: Between May 2000 and August 2008, 171 women were treated with APBI using high dose rate (HDR) BRT. Patients were treated to a dose of 34 Gy/10 fractions/1 week with two fractions/day after intraoperative/postoperative placement of catheters. Results: At a median follow up of 48 months (SD: 28) 20 women developed FN with median time to detection being 24 months (range: 4–62 months, SD: 20). Actuarial 5 and 7 year FN rate was 18% and 23%, respectively. Grade 1 FN was seen in 4, grade 2 in 8 and grade 4 in 8 women. Additional investigations such as aspiration/biopsy were done in 9 patients. Volume of excision was the only significant factor affecting FN (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Actuarial FN rate of 18% at 5 years in our study was comparable to other reported series of FN. Median time of detection of FN was 24 months. Higher volume of excision resulted in an increased incidence of fat necrosis.

  8. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Souhei

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  9. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer.

  10. Joint deformable liver registration and bias field correction for MR-guided HDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Marko; König, Tim; Tönnies, Klaus D; Walke, Mathias; Ricke, Jens; Wybranski, Christian

    2017-12-01

    In interstitial high-dose rate brachytherapy, liver cancer is treated by internal radiation, requiring percutaneous placement of applicators within or close to the tumor. To maximize utility, the optimal applicator configuration is pre-planned on magnetic resonance images. The pre-planned configuration is then implemented via a magnetic resonance-guided intervention. Mapping the pre-planning information onto interventional data would reduce the radiologist's cognitive load during the intervention and could possibly minimize discrepancies between optimally pre-planned and actually placed applicators. We propose a fast and robust two-step registration framework suitable for interventional settings: first, we utilize a multi-resolution rigid registration to correct for differences in patient positioning (rotation and translation). Second, we employ a novel iterative approach alternating between bias field correction and Markov random field deformable registration in a multi-resolution framework to compensate for non-rigid movements of the liver, the tumors and the organs at risk. In contrast to existing pre-correction methods, our multi-resolution scheme can recover bias field artifacts of different extents at marginal computational costs. We compared our approach to deformable registration via B-splines, demons and the SyN method on 22 registration tasks from eleven patients. Results showed that our approach is more accurate than the contenders for liver as well as for tumor tissues. We yield average liver volume overlaps of 94.0 ± 2.7% and average surface-to-surface distances of 2.02 ± 0.87 mm and 3.55 ± 2.19 mm for liver and tumor tissue, respectively. The reported distances are close to (or even below) the slice spacing (2.5 - 3.0 mm) of our data. Our approach is also the fastest, taking 35.8 ± 12.8 s per task. The presented approach is sufficiently accurate to map information available from brachytherapy pre-planning onto interventional data. It

  11. A fast inverse treatment planning strategy facilitating optimized catheter selection in image-guided high-dose-rate interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthier, Christian V; Damato, Antonio L; Hesser, Juergen W; Viswanathan, Akila N; Cormack, Robert A

    2017-12-01

    Interstitial high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of locally advanced gynecologic (GYN) cancers. The outcome of this therapy is determined by the quality of dose distribution achieved. This paper focuses on a novel yet simple heuristic for catheter selection for GYN HDR brachytherapy and their comparison against state of the art optimization strategies. The proposed technique is intended to act as a decision-supporting tool to select a favorable needle configuration. The presented heuristic for catheter optimization is based on a shrinkage-type algorithm (SACO). It is compared against state of the art planning in a retrospective study of 20 patients who previously received image-guided interstitial HDR brachytherapy using a Syed Neblett template. From those plans, template orientation and position are estimated via a rigid registration of the template with the actual catheter trajectories. All potential straight trajectories intersecting the contoured clinical target volume (CTV) are considered for catheter optimization. Retrospectively generated plans and clinical plans are compared with respect to dosimetric performance and optimization time. All plans were generated with one single run of the optimizer lasting 0.6-97.4 s. Compared to manual optimization, SACO yields a statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05) improved target coverage while at the same time fulfilling all dosimetric constraints for organs at risk (OARs). Comparing inverse planning strategies, dosimetric evaluation for SACO and "hybrid inverse planning and optimization" (HIPO), as gold standard, shows no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). However, SACO provides the potential to reduce the number of used catheters without compromising plan quality. The proposed heuristic for needle selection provides fast catheter selection with optimization times suited for intraoperative treatment planning. Compared to manual optimization, the

  12. A Prospective Longitudinal Clinical Trial Evaluating Quality of Life After Breast-Conserving Surgery and High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Deshields, Teresa L. [Department of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Margenthaler, Julie A.; Cyr, Amy E. [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Naughton, Michael [Department of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Aft, Rebecca [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Surgery, John Cochran Veterans Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Matesa, Melissa A.; Ochoa, Laura L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Zoberi, Imran, E-mail: izoberi@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively examine quality of life (QOL) of patients with early stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and December 2008, 151 patients with early stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients included those with Tis-T2 tumors measuring ≤3 cm excised with negative surgical margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. QOL was measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30, version 3.0, and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires were evaluated during pretreatment and then at 6 to 8 weeks, 3 to 4 months, 6 to 8 months, and 1 and 2 years after treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 55 months. Breast symptom scores remained stable in the months after treatment, and they significantly improved 6 to 8 months after treatment. Scores for emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective showed significant improvement 2 years after treatment. Symptomatic fat necrosis was associated with several changes in QOL, including increased pain, breast symptoms, systemic treatment side effects, dyspnea, and fatigue, as well as decreased role functioning, emotional functioning, and social functioning. Conclusions: HDR multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy was well tolerated, with no significant detrimental effect on measured QOL scales/items through 2 years of follow-up. Compared to pretreatment scores, there was improvement in breast symptoms, emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective 2 years after treatment.

  13. A Prospective Longitudinal Clinical Trial Evaluating Quality of Life After Breast-Conserving Surgery and High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd A.; Deshields, Teresa L.; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Cyr, Amy E.; Naughton, Michael; Aft, Rebecca; Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy; Matesa, Melissa A.; Ochoa, Laura L.; Zoberi, Imran

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively examine quality of life (QOL) of patients with early stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and December 2008, 151 patients with early stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients included those with Tis-T2 tumors measuring ≤3 cm excised with negative surgical margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. QOL was measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30, version 3.0, and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires were evaluated during pretreatment and then at 6 to 8 weeks, 3 to 4 months, 6 to 8 months, and 1 and 2 years after treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 55 months. Breast symptom scores remained stable in the months after treatment, and they significantly improved 6 to 8 months after treatment. Scores for emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective showed significant improvement 2 years after treatment. Symptomatic fat necrosis was associated with several changes in QOL, including increased pain, breast symptoms, systemic treatment side effects, dyspnea, and fatigue, as well as decreased role functioning, emotional functioning, and social functioning. Conclusions: HDR multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy was well tolerated, with no significant detrimental effect on measured QOL scales/items through 2 years of follow-up. Compared to pretreatment scores, there was improvement in breast symptoms, emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective 2 years after treatment

  14. Electromagnetic tracking for treatment verification in interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bert, Christoph; Kellermeier, Markus; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic tracking (EMT) is used in several medical fields to determine the position and orientation of dedicated sensors, e.g., attached to surgical tools. Recently, EMT has been introduced to brachytherapy for implant reconstruction and error detection. The manuscript briefly summarizes...

  15. Assessing patient characteristics and radiation-induced non-targeted effects in vivo for high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Christine; Timotin, Emilia; Wong, Raimond; Sur, Ranjan K; Hayward, Joseph E; Farrell, Thomas J; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    To test whether blood, urine, and tissue based colony-forming assays are a useful clinical detection tool for assessing fractionated treatment responses and non-targeted radiation effects in bystander cells. To assess patients' responses to radiation treatments, blood serum, urine, and an esophagus explant-based in vivo colony-forming assay were used from oesophageal carcinoma patients. These patients underwent three fractions of high dose rate (HDR) intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT). Human keratinocyte reporters exposed to blood sera taken after the third fraction of brachytherapy had a significant increase in cloning efficiency compared to baseline samples (p fractions for the blood sera data only. Patient characteristics such as gender had no statistically significant effect (p > 0.05). Large variability was observed among the patients' tissue samples, these colony-forming assays showed no significant changes throughout fractionated brachytherapy (p > 0.05). Large inter-patient variability was found in the urine and tissue based assays, so these techniques were discontinued. However, the simple blood-based assay had much less variability. This technique may have future applications as a biological dosimeter to predict treatment outcome and assess non-targeted radiation effects.

  16. Vaginal tolerance of CT based image-guided high-dose rate interstitial brachytherapy for gynecological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Naoya; Inaba, Koji; Morota, Madoka; Ito, Yoshinori; Itami, Jun; Kasamatsu, Takahiro; Sumi, Minako; Yoshimura, Ryoichi; Harada, Ken; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Yoshio, Kotaro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of this study was to identify predictors of vaginal ulcer after CT based three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for gynecologic malignancies. Records were reviewed for 44 female (14 with primary disease and 30 with recurrence) with gynecological malignancies treated with HDR-ISBT with or without external beam radiation therapy. The HDR-ISBT applicator insertion was performed with image guidance by trans-rectal ultrasound and CT. The median clinical target volume was 35.5 ml (2.4-142.1 ml) and the median delivered dose in equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD 2 ) for target volume D 90 was 67.7 Gy (48.8-94.2 Gy, doses of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy were combined). For re-irradiation patients, median EQD 2 of D 2cc for rectum and bladder, D 0.5cc , D 1cc , D 2cc , D 4cc , D 6cc and D 8cc for vaginal wall was 91.1 Gy, 100.9 Gy, 260.3 Gy, 212.3 Gy, 170.1 Gy, 117.1 Gy, 105.2 Gy, and 94.7 Gy, respectively. For those without prior radiation therapy, median EQD 2 of D 2cc for rectum and bladder, D 0.5cc , D 1cc , D 2cc , D 4cc , D 6cc and D 8cc for vaginal wall was 56.3 Gy, 54.3 Gy, 147.4 Gy, 126.2 Gy, 108.0 Gy, 103.5 Gy, 94.7 Gy, and 80.7 Gy, respectively. Among five patients with vaginal ulcer, three had prior pelvic radiation therapy in their initial treatment and three consequently suffered from fistula formation. On univariate analysis, re-irradiation and vaginal wall D 2cc in EQD 2 was the clinical predictors of vaginal ulcer (p = 0.035 and p = 0.025, respectively). The ROC analysis revealed that vaginal wall D 2cc is the best predictor of vaginal ulcer. The 2-year incidence rates of vaginal ulcer in the patients with vaginal wall D 2cc in EQD 2 equal to or less than 145 Gy and over 145 Gy were 3.7% and 23.5%, respectively, with a statistically significant difference (p = 0.026). Re-irradiation and vaginal D 2cc is a significant predictor of vaginal ulcer after HDR-ISBT for gynecologic

  17. Advantages of high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molokov, A. A.; Vanina, E. A.; Tseluyko, S. S.

    2017-09-01

    One of the modern methods of preserving organs radiation treatment is brachytherapy. This article analyzes the results of prostate brachytherapy. These studies of the advantages of high dose brachytherapy lead to the conclusion that this method of radiation treatment for prostate cancer has a favorable advantage in comparison with remote sensing methods, and is competitive, preserving organs in comparison to surgical methods of treatment. The use of the method of polyfocal transperineal biopsy during the brachytherapy session provides information on the volumetric spread of prostate cancer and adjust the dosimetry plan taking into account the obtained data.

  18. Interstitial brachytherapy with 192-IR in treatment of recurrent malignant primary brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenes, R.; Martinez, R.; Victoria, C.; Nunez, L.; Clavo, B.; Sancedo, G.

    1994-01-01

    Seven patients with recurrent malignant primary brain tumors after surgery and radiation therapy were treated at the Clinica Puerta de Hierro (Madrid) by interstitial brachytherapy with 192-Ir sources. Implantations were performed using computerized tomography and dose prescription were determined following the Paris system rules for interstitial implants. The means dose deliberated was 50 to 65 Gy to the reference isodoses. At the last follow-up all patients except for one are alive and without evidence of progression of the disease. (Author) 35 refs

  19. SU-F-T-08: Brachytherapy Film Dosimetry in a Water Phantom for a Ring and Tandem HDR Applicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B; Grelewicz, Z; Kang, Z; Cutright, D; Gopalakrishnan, M; Sathiaseelan, V; Zhang, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The feasibility of dose measurement using new generation EBT3 film was explored in a water phantom for a ring and tandem HDR applicator for measurements tracking mucosal dose during cervical brachytherapy. Methods: An experimental fixture was assembled to position the applicator in a water phantom. Prior to measurement, calibration curves for EBT3 film in water and in solidwater were verified. EBT3 film was placed at different known locations around the applicator in the water tank. A CT scan of the phantom with applicator was performed using clinical protocol. A typical cervical cancer treatment plan was then generated by Oncentra brachytherapy planning system. A dose of 500 cGy was prescribed to point A (2 cm, 2 cm). Locations measured by film included the outer surface of the ring, measurement point A-m (2.2 cm, 2.2 cm), and profiles extending from point A-m parallel to the tandem. Three independent measurements were conducted. The doses recorded by film were carefully analyzed and compared with values calculated by the treatment planning system. Results: Assessment of the EBT3 films indicate that the dose at point A matches the values predicted by the planning system. Dose to the point A-m was 411.5 cGy, and the outer circumferential surface dose of the ring was between 500 and 1150 cGy. It was found that from the point A-m, the dose drops 60% within 4.5 cm on the line parallel to the tandem. The measurement doses agree with the treatment planning system. Conclusion: Use of EBT3 film is feasible for in-water measurements for brachytherapy. A carefully machined apparatus will likely improve measurement accuracy. In a typical plan, our study found that the ring surface dose can be 2.5 times larger than the point A prescription dose. EBT3 film can be used to monitor mucosal dose in brachytherapy treatments.

  20. SU-F-T-08: Brachytherapy Film Dosimetry in a Water Phantom for a Ring and Tandem HDR Applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B; Grelewicz, Z; Kang, Z; Cutright, D; Gopalakrishnan, M; Sathiaseelan, V; Zhang, H [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The feasibility of dose measurement using new generation EBT3 film was explored in a water phantom for a ring and tandem HDR applicator for measurements tracking mucosal dose during cervical brachytherapy. Methods: An experimental fixture was assembled to position the applicator in a water phantom. Prior to measurement, calibration curves for EBT3 film in water and in solidwater were verified. EBT3 film was placed at different known locations around the applicator in the water tank. A CT scan of the phantom with applicator was performed using clinical protocol. A typical cervical cancer treatment plan was then generated by Oncentra brachytherapy planning system. A dose of 500 cGy was prescribed to point A (2 cm, 2 cm). Locations measured by film included the outer surface of the ring, measurement point A-m (2.2 cm, 2.2 cm), and profiles extending from point A-m parallel to the tandem. Three independent measurements were conducted. The doses recorded by film were carefully analyzed and compared with values calculated by the treatment planning system. Results: Assessment of the EBT3 films indicate that the dose at point A matches the values predicted by the planning system. Dose to the point A-m was 411.5 cGy, and the outer circumferential surface dose of the ring was between 500 and 1150 cGy. It was found that from the point A-m, the dose drops 60% within 4.5 cm on the line parallel to the tandem. The measurement doses agree with the treatment planning system. Conclusion: Use of EBT3 film is feasible for in-water measurements for brachytherapy. A carefully machined apparatus will likely improve measurement accuracy. In a typical plan, our study found that the ring surface dose can be 2.5 times larger than the point A prescription dose. EBT3 film can be used to monitor mucosal dose in brachytherapy treatments.

  1. A comprehensive study on HDR brachytherapy treatments of cervical cancers: using the first Co-60 BEBIG Multisource Unit in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naheed Rukhsana

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The report presents an extraordinary synthesis of customer acceptance procedures (CAP, quality assurance tests (QA in the treatment of cervical cancer patients, using the first Co-60 Multisource Unit® in Bangladesh. The QA and commissioning required measurements and emergency tests verifying the functional limits of parameters acceptable for the new HDR afterloader. Acceptable limits were: 1 the deviation between specified and measured source strength: ± 3%; 2 the positional accuracy and uniformity: ± 1 mm; 3 the temporal accuracy (i.e. timer error and linearity and end error: ± 1% or 30 sec.; 4 treatment planning system (digitizer and localization software: ± 3% or 1 mm; 5 the distance from line to first dwell position and all the others: 5 mm and 10 mm (± 1 mm. Material and methods: Till February 2011, 47 patients were treated with HDR with more than 140 insertions applied. Amongst them, 12 patients were in stage IIB and IIIB, 22 were postoperative (IA and IB while the remaining 13 patients were with unknown stage. All the cases with stage IIB and IIIB received concurrent chemo-radiation and brachytherapy. Postoperative patients received EBRT (50 Gy and HDR according to the institutional protocol. CT scans were completed before HDR-plus planning with a good reproducibility (± 2% and were documented in repeating the plan for the same set up of a patient. Absorbed dose (Gy to a point P, at a distance of “r” in centimeters from a source of the Reference Air Kerma Rate (RAKR has been utilized for the QA of the source, where source strength measurement was accomplished. Results: All methods and analysis applicable to the QA and commissioning of Co-60 have been investigated and systematically analyzed, measured and documented before the treatment of a patient. Studies and safety requirements of this HDR remote afterloader were carried out. Acceptance and the QA were imperative to justify functionality and dependability in

  2. A comprehensive study on HDR brachytherapy treatments of cervical cancers: using the first Co-60 BEBIG Multisource Unit in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sadiq R; Banu, Parvin A; Rukhsana, Naheed

    2011-06-01

    The report presents an extraordinary synthesis of customer acceptance procedures (CAP), quality assurance tests (QA) in the treatment of cervical cancer patients, using the first Co-60 Multisource Unit ® in Bangladesh. The QA and commissioning required measurements and emergency tests verifying the functional limits of parameters acceptable for the new HDR afterloader. Acceptable limits were: 1) the deviation between specified and measured source strength: ± 3%; 2) the positional accuracy and uniformity: ± 1 mm; 3) the temporal accuracy (i.e. timer error and linearity and end error): ± 1% or 30 sec.; 4) treatment planning system (digitizer and localization software): ± 3% or 1 mm; 5) the distance from line to first dwell position and all the others: 5 mm and 10 mm (± 1 mm). Till February 2011, 47 patients were treated with HDR with more than 140 insertions applied. Amongst them, 12 patients were in stage IIB and IIIB, 22 were postoperative (IA and IB) while the remaining 13 patients were with unknown stage. All the cases with stage IIB and IIIB received concurrent chemo-radiation and brachytherapy. Postoperative patients received EBRT (50 Gy and HDR) according to the institutional protocol. CT scans were completed before HDR-plus planning with a good reproducibility (± 2%) and were documented in repeating the plan for the same set up of a patient. Absorbed dose (Gy) to a point P, at a distance of "r" in centimeters from a source of the Reference Air Kerma Rate (RAKR) has been utilized for the QA of the source, where source strength measurement was accomplished. All methods and analysis applicable to the QA and commissioning of Co-60 have been investigated and systematically analyzed, measured and documented before the treatment of a patient. Studies and safety requirements of this HDR remote afterloader were carried out. Acceptance and the QA were imperative to justify functionality and dependability in delivering the treatment. Implications of these studies

  3. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis, E-mail: acapellizzon@hcancer.org.br [A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia

    2016-05-15

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. (author)

  4. Adaptive error detection for HDR/PDR brachytherapy: Guidance for decision making during real-time in vivo point dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir; Andersen, Claus E.; Tanderup, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:This study presents an adaptive error detection algorithm (AEDA) for real-timein vivo point dosimetry during high dose rate (HDR) or pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy (BT) where the error identification, in contrast to existing approaches, does not depend on an a priori reconstruction ......, and the AEDA’s capacity to distinguish between true and false error scenarios. The study further shows that the AEDA can offer guidance in decision making in the event of potential errors detected with real-time in vivo point dosimetry....... of the dosimeter position reconstruction. Given its nearly exclusive dependence on stable dosimeter positioning, the AEDA allows for a substantially simplified and time efficient real-time in vivo BT dosimetry implementation. Methods:In the event of a measured potential treatment error, the AEDA proposes the most...

  5. Evaluation of Wall Correction Factor of INER's Air-Kerma Primary Standard Chamber and Dose Variation by Source Displacement for HDR 192Ir Brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to estimate the wall effect of the self-made spherical graphite-walled cavity chamber with the Monte Carlo method for establishing the air-kerma primary standard of high-dose-rate (HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan. The Monte Carlo method established in this paper was also employed to respectively simulate wall correction factors of the 192Ir air-kerma standard chambers used at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL, UK for comparisons and verification. The chamber wall correction calculation results will be incorporated into INER's HDR 192Ir primary standard in the future. For the brachytherapy treatment in the esophagus or in the bronchi, the position of the isotope may have displacement in the cavity. Thus the delivered dose would differ from the prescribed dose in the treatment plan. We also tried assessing dose distribution due to the position displacement of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source in a phantom with a central cavity by the Monte Carlo method. The calculated results could offer a clinical reference for the brachytherapy within the human organs with cavity.

  6. SU-G-201-07: Dosimetric Verification of a 3D Printed HDR Skin Brachytherapy Applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, K; Stanley, D; Eng, T; Kirby, N; Gutierrez, A; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States); Baumgarten, A; Pelletier, C; Jung, J; Feng, Y; Huang, Z; Ju, A [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Corbett, M [Greenville Health System, Greenville, SC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The use of radiation as a treatment modality for skin cancer has increased significantly over the last decade with standardized applicators. Utilizing 3D printing, the ability to make applicators specifically designed for each patient’s anatomy has become economically feasible. With this in mind it was the aim of this study to determine the dosimetric accuracy of a 3-D printed HDR brachytherapy applicator for the skin. Methods: A CT reference image was used to generate a custom applicator based on an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom. To create the applicator a 1cm expansion anteriorly with 0.5cmX0.5cm trenches on the outer surface that were spaced 1cm sup-inf to accommodate standard 6F flexible catheters. The applicator was printed using PLA material using a printrbot simple printer. A treatment plan optimized to deliver a clinically representative volume was created in Oncentra and delivered with a nucletron afterloader. Measurements were made using TLDs and EBT3 gafchromic film that were placed between the applicator and the phantom’s forehead. An additional piece of film was also used to qualitatively asses the dose distribution in the transverse plane. Using a standard vaginal cylinder and bolus, a standardized curve correlating TLD and film exposure-to-radiation dose was established by irradiating film to known doses (200,500,700 cGy) at a 3.5 cm radius distance. Results: Evaluated TLDs showed the absolute dose delivered to the skin surface using the 3-D printed bolus was 615cGy±6%, with a mean predicted TPS value in the measured area of 617.5±7%. Additionally, planar dose distributions had good qualitative agreement with calculated TPS isodoses. Conclusion: This work demonstrates patient specific 3-D printed HDR brachytherapy applicators for skin cancer treatments are practical and accurate in TPS calculations but additional measurements are needed to verify additional sites and dose at depth.

  7. SU-G-201-07: Dosimetric Verification of a 3D Printed HDR Skin Brachytherapy Applicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, K; Stanley, D; Eng, T; Kirby, N; Gutierrez, A; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N; Baumgarten, A; Pelletier, C; Jung, J; Feng, Y; Huang, Z; Ju, A; Corbett, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The use of radiation as a treatment modality for skin cancer has increased significantly over the last decade with standardized applicators. Utilizing 3D printing, the ability to make applicators specifically designed for each patient’s anatomy has become economically feasible. With this in mind it was the aim of this study to determine the dosimetric accuracy of a 3-D printed HDR brachytherapy applicator for the skin. Methods: A CT reference image was used to generate a custom applicator based on an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom. To create the applicator a 1cm expansion anteriorly with 0.5cmX0.5cm trenches on the outer surface that were spaced 1cm sup-inf to accommodate standard 6F flexible catheters. The applicator was printed using PLA material using a printrbot simple printer. A treatment plan optimized to deliver a clinically representative volume was created in Oncentra and delivered with a nucletron afterloader. Measurements were made using TLDs and EBT3 gafchromic film that were placed between the applicator and the phantom’s forehead. An additional piece of film was also used to qualitatively asses the dose distribution in the transverse plane. Using a standard vaginal cylinder and bolus, a standardized curve correlating TLD and film exposure-to-radiation dose was established by irradiating film to known doses (200,500,700 cGy) at a 3.5 cm radius distance. Results: Evaluated TLDs showed the absolute dose delivered to the skin surface using the 3-D printed bolus was 615cGy±6%, with a mean predicted TPS value in the measured area of 617.5±7%. Additionally, planar dose distributions had good qualitative agreement with calculated TPS isodoses. Conclusion: This work demonstrates patient specific 3-D printed HDR brachytherapy applicators for skin cancer treatments are practical and accurate in TPS calculations but additional measurements are needed to verify additional sites and dose at depth.

  8. Interstitial hyperthermia using 8 MHz radiofrequency and stereotaxic brachytherapy for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Satoshi

    1990-01-01

    As a preliminary study of the interstitial hyperthermia combined with interstitial irradiation (brachytherapy) for the treatment of malignant brain tumors, we performed an experiment of interstitial hyperthermia of brain tissue of dogs. Nine afterloading tubes, four for needle electrodes and five for thermisters, were inserted in the brain tissue of dogs. Rise and stability of temperature were ascertained, and clinical safety was confirmed. Thereafter this combined therapy was applied on seven cases, in which three were malignant gliomas and four were metastatic tumors. Through the guide tubes, 192 Ir thin wires were implanted stereotaxically, and interstitial irradiation was carried out. After removal of 192 Ir wires, needle electrodes were inserted through the same tubes, and also a thermister was guided at the center of electrodes. And interstitial hyperthermia using 8 MHz radiofrequency was carried out. The results of the treatment were evaluated with CT scan based on criteria of the Japan Neurological Society. In cases of malignant gliomas, 2 PRs (partial remission), and 1 NC (no change) were obtained. In cases of metastatic tumors, 1 CR (complete remission), 2 PRs, 1 NC were obtaind. In cases of NCs, progression of tumors have been suppressed for 10 and 17 months, and still alive. As complication, transient worsening of neurological symptoms were observed in four cases (increased paresis: two cases, nausea and vomiting: two cases). The author have had an impression that interstitial hyperthermia combined with interstitial irradiation might become an effective means of treatment of brain tumors. (author)

  9. Biological effective dose evaluation in gynaecological brachytherapy: LDR and HDR treatments, dependence on radiobiological parameters, and treatment optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, C; Botta, F; Conte, L; Vanoli, P; Cerizza, L

    2008-10-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the biological efficacy of different high-dose-rate (HDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) treatments of gynaecological lesions, to identify the causes of possible nonuniformity and to optimise treatment through customised calculation. The study considered 110 patients treated between 2001 and 2006 with external beam radiation therapy and/or brachytherapy with either LDR (afterloader Selectron, (137)Cs) or HDR (afterloader microSelectron Classic, (192)Ir). The treatments were compared in terms of biologically effective dose (BED) to the tumour and to the rectum (linear-quadratic model) by using statistical tests for comparisons between independent samples. The difference between the two treatments was statistically significant in one case only. However, within each technique, we identified considerable nonuniformity in therapeutic efficacy due to differences in fractionation schemes and overall treatment time. To solve this problem, we created a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet allowing calculation of the optimal treatment for each patient: best efficacy (BED(tumour)) without exceeding toxicity threshold (BED(rectum)). The efficacy of a treatment may vary as a result of several factors. Customised radiobiological evaluation is a useful adjunct to clinical evaluation in planning equivalent treatments that satisfy all dosimetric constraints.

  10. SU-C-202-02: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Adaptive Daily Planning for Cervical Cancer HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerschaert, R; Paul, A; Zhuang, L [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Division, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Nalichowski, A [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Division, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI (United States); Burmeister, J; Miller, A [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Division, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Division, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate adaptive daily planning for cervical cancer patients who underwent high-dose-rate intra-cavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT). Methods: This study included 22 cervical cancer patients who underwent 5 fractions of HDR ICBT. Regions of interest (ROIs) including high-risk clinical tumor volume (HR-CTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs) were manually contoured on daily CT images. All patients were treated with adaptive daily plans, which involved ROI delineation and dose optimization at each treatment fraction. Single treatment plans were retrospectively generated by applying the first treatment fraction’s dwell times adjusted for decay and dwell positions of the applicator to subsequent treatment fractions. Various existing similarity metrics were calculated for the ROIs to quantify interfractional organ variations. A novel similarity score (JRARM) was established, which combined both volumetric overlap metrics (DSC, JSC, and RVD) and distance metrics (ASD, MSD, and RMSD). Linear regression was performed to determine a relationship between inter-fractional organ variations of various similarity metrics and D2cc variations from both plans. Wilcoxon Signed Rank Tests were used to assess adaptive daily plans and single plans by comparing EQD2 D2cc (α/β=3) for OARs. Results: For inter-fractional organ variations, the sigmoid demonstrated the greatest variations based on the JRARM and DSC similarity metrics. Comparisons between paired ROIs showed differences in JRARM scores and DSCs at each treatment fraction. RVD, MSD, and RMSD were found to be significantly correlated to D2cc variations for bladder and sigmoid. The comparison between plans found that adaptive daily planning provided lower EQD2 D2cc of OARs than single planning, specifically for the sigmoid (p=0.015). Conclusion: Substantial inter-fractional organ motion can occur during HDR-BT, which may significantly affect D2cc of OARs. Adaptive daily planning provides improved dose sparing for OARs

  11. Accelerated partial breast irradiation: An analysis of variables associated with late toxicity and long-term cosmetic outcome after high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wazer, David E.; Kaufman, Seth; Cuttino, Laurie; Di Petrillo, Thomas; Arthur, Douglas W.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a detailed analysis of variables associated with late tissue effects of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in a large cohort of patients with prolonged follow-up. Methods and Materials: Beginning in 1995, 75 women with Stage I/II breast cancer were enrolled in identical institutional trials evaluating APBI as monotherapy after lumpectomy. Patients eligible included those with T1-2, N0-1 (≤3 nodes positive), M0 tumors of nonlobular histology with negative surgical margins, no extracapsular nodal extension, and negative results on postexcision mammogram. All patients underwent surgical excision and postoperative irradiation with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. The planning target volume was defined as the excision cavity plus a 2-cm margin. Treatment was delivered with a high-activity Ir-192 source at 3.4 Gy per fraction twice daily for 5 days to a total dose of 34 Gy. Dosimetric analyses were performed with three-dimensional postimplant dose and volume reconstructions. All patients were evaluated at 3-6-month intervals and assessed with a standardized cosmetic rating scale and according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late normal tissue toxicity scoring criteria. Clinical and therapy-related features were analyzed for their relationship to cosmetic outcome and toxicity rating. Clinical features analyzed included age, volume of resection, history of diabetes or hypertension, extent of axillary surgery, and systemic therapies. Therapy-related features analyzed included volume of tissue encompassed by the 100%, 150%, and 200% isodose lines (V100, V150, and V200, respectively), the dose homogeneity index (DHI), number of source dwell positions, and planar separation. Results: The median follow-up of all patients was 73 months (range, 43-118 months). The cosmetic outcome at last follow-up was rated as excellent, good, and fair/poor in 67%, 24%, and 9% of patients, respectively

  12. Dose rate considerations in brachytherapy: biological equivalence of LDR and HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, C.G.

    1994-01-01

    The linear-quadratic model for cell survival and bioeffect doses is discussed and equations for low dose rate (LDR), high dose rate (HDR) and intermediate situations are presented. The model, when used to define LDR and single fractions of HDR, shows, that these correspond to irradiations lasting longer than about 14 hours or shorter than about 0.7 hours, respectively. It is shown that, for HDR to be as safe and effective as LDR, the dose-rate effect of LDR has to be replaced by the fractionation-effect of HDR. This is necessary in order to take advantage of the differential repair characteristics between late-reacting normal tissue and tumor cells at low doses and low dose rates. Using the linear-quadratic model to simulate repair mathematically, it is shown that the number of fractions required is highly dependent upon what parameters are assumed for normal tissues and tumor, as well as whether or not there is any physical advantage gained by conversion from LDR to HDR. (author). 20 refs., 7 figs

  13. A comparison study on various low energy sources in interstitial prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Bakhshabadi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Low energy sources are routinely used in prostate brachytherapy. 125 I is one of the most commonly used sources. Low energy 131 Cs source was introduced recently as a brachytherapy source. The aim of this study is to compare dose distributions of 125 I, 103 Pd, and 131 Cs sources in interstitial brachytherapy of prostate. Material and methods: ProstaSeed 125 I brachytherapy source was simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Additionally, two hypothetical sources of 103 Pd and 131 Cs were simulated with the same geometry as the ProstaSeed 125 I source, while having their specific emitted gamma spectra. These brachytherapy sources were simulated with distribution of forty-eight seeds in a phantom including prostate. The prostate was considered as a sphere with radius of 1.5 cm. Absolute and relative dose rates were obtained in various distances from the source along the transverse and longitudinal axes inside and outside the tumor. Furthermore, isodose curves were plotted around the sources. Results : Analyzing the initial dose profiles for various sources indicated that with the same time duration and air kerma strength, 131 Cs delivers higher dose to tumor. However, relative dose rate inside the tumor is higher and outside the tumor is lower for the 103 Pd source. Conclusions : The higher initial absolute dose in cGy/(h.U of 131 Cs brachytherapy source is an advantage of this source over the others. The higher relative dose inside the tumor and lower relative dose outside the tumor for the 103 Pd source are advantages of this later brachytherapy source. Based on the total dose the 125 I source has advantage over the others due to its longer half-life.

  14. A comparison study on various low energy sources in interstitial prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshabadi, Mahdi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Khosroabadi, Mohsen; Knaup, Courtney; Meigooni, Ali S

    2016-02-01

    Low energy sources are routinely used in prostate brachytherapy. (125)I is one of the most commonly used sources. Low energy (131)Cs source was introduced recently as a brachytherapy source. The aim of this study is to compare dose distributions of (125)I, (103)Pd, and (131)Cs sources in interstitial brachytherapy of prostate. ProstaSeed (125)I brachytherapy source was simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Additionally, two hypothetical sources of (103)Pd and (131)Cs were simulated with the same geometry as the ProstaSeed (125)I source, while having their specific emitted gamma spectra. These brachytherapy sources were simulated with distribution of forty-eight seeds in a phantom including prostate. The prostate was considered as a sphere with radius of 1.5 cm. Absolute and relative dose rates were obtained in various distances from the source along the transverse and longitudinal axes inside and outside the tumor. Furthermore, isodose curves were plotted around the sources. Analyzing the initial dose profiles for various sources indicated that with the same time duration and air kerma strength, (131)Cs delivers higher dose to tumor. However, relative dose rate inside the tumor is higher and outside the tumor is lower for the (103)Pd source. The higher initial absolute dose in cGy/(h.U) of (131)Cs brachytherapy source is an advantage of this source over the others. The higher relative dose inside the tumor and lower relative dose outside the tumor for the (103)Pd source are advantages of this later brachytherapy source. Based on the total dose the (125)I source has advantage over the others due to its longer half-life.

  15. Additional androgen deprivation makes the difference. Biochemical recurrence-free survival in prostate cancer patients after HDR brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffmann, Jonas; Tennstedt, Pierre; Beyer, Burkhard; Boehm, Katharina; Tilki, Derya; Salomon, Georg; Graefen, Markus; Lesmana, Hans; Platz, Volker; Petersen, Cordula; Kruell, Andreas; Schwarz, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    The role of additional androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in prostate cancer (PCa) patients treated with combined HDR brachytherapy (HDR-BT) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is still unknown. Consecutive PCa patients classified as D'Amico intermediate and high-risk who underwent HDR-BT and EBRT treatment ± ADT at our institution between January 1999 and February 2009 were assessed. Multivariable Cox regression models predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) were performed. BCR-free survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analyses. Overall, 392 patients were assessable. Of these, 221 (56.4 %) underwent trimodality (HDR-BT and EBRT and ADT) and 171 (43.6 %) bimodality (HDR-BT and EBRT) treatment. Additional ADT administration reduced the risk of BCR (HR: 0.4, 95 % CI: 0.3-0.7, p < 0.001). D'Amico high-risk patients had superior BCR-free survival when additional ADT was administered (log-rank p < 0.001). No significant difference for BCR-free survival was recorded when additional ADT was administered to D'Amico intermediate-risk patients (log-rank p = 0.2). Additional ADT administration improves biochemical control in D'Amico high-risk patients when HDR-BT and EBRT are combined. Physicians should consider the oncological benefit of ADT administration for these patients during the decision-making process. (orig.) [de

  16. SU-G-201-15: Nomogram as an Efficient Dosimetric Verification Tool in HDR Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, J; Todor, D [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Nomogram as a simple QA tool for HDR prostate brachytherapy treatment planning has been developed and validated clinically. Reproducibility including patient-to-patient and physician-to-physician variability was assessed. Methods: The study was performed on HDR prostate implants from physician A (n=34) and B (n=15) using different implant techniques and planning methodologies. A nomogram was implemented as an independent QA of computer-based treatment planning before plan execution. Normalized implant strength (total air kerma strength Sk*t in cGy cm{sup 2} divided by prescribed dose in cGy) was plotted as a function of PTV volume and total V100. A quadratic equation was used to fit the data with R{sup 2} denoting the model predictive power. Results: All plans showed good target coverage while OARs met the dose constraint guidelines. Vastly different implant and planning styles were reflected on conformity index (entire dose matrix V100/PTV volume, physician A implants: 1.27±0.14, physician B: 1.47±0.17) and PTV V150/PTV volume ratio (physician A: 0.34±0.09, physician B: 0.24±0.07). The quadratic model provided a better fit for the curved relationship between normalized implant strength and total V100 (or PTV volume) than a simple linear function. Unlike the normalized implant strength versus PTV volume nomogram which differed between physicians, a unique quadratic model based nomogram (Sk*t)/D=−0.0008V2+0.0542V+1.1185 (R{sup 2}=0.9977) described the dependence of normalized implant strength on total V100 over all the patients from both physicians despite two different implant and planning philosophies. Normalized implant strength - total V100 model also generated less deviant points distorting the smoothed ones with a significantly higher correlation. Conclusion: A simple and universal, excel-based nomogram was created as an independent calculation tool for HDR prostate brachytherapy. Unlike similar attempts, our nomogram is insensitive to implant

  17. Verification and optimization of HDR surface mould brachytherapy plans using GAFCHROMIC EBT2 film: the ideal geometric case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolewski, Matthew; Haque, Mamoon

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Surface mould brachytherapy is used to treat superficial cancers due to conformal dose distributions and rapid dose fall-off with depth. In this work, we determine the effect of varying catheter number and prescription distance on dose distributions for surface mould plans using radiochromic film. Eight surface mould plans were generated using PLATO BPS (Version 14.3.2). Measurements were taken with Gafchromic EBT2 film over depths of 5-30 mm with an Ir-192 HDR source. Films were scanned using an Epson Expression 10000 XL flatbed scanner and analysed using RIT 113 software. The EBT2 films showed good agreement with an average difference of 2.8% compared to the planning system. The dose gradient in the interval ranging ±5 mm from the prescription point showed an 80% increase from the plan with maximum catheters (II) to the minimum (3). The size and extent of local dose maxima increased when fewer catheters were used. Increasing prescription distance decreased the dose gradient with a 20% reduction in dose occurring 4 mm superficially to the prescription point when prescription distance increased from 5 to 20 mm. Gafchromic EBT2 was used successfully to evaluate surface mould brachytherapy plans and is a useful tool for dose verification checks. High dose regions ne,u' to the catheter plane can be reduced by using a larger number of catheters and the prescription distance should be adjusted as a function of treatment depth varied by mould thickness.

  18. Rectal doses during LDR and HDR intracavitary brachytherapy of gyneacological malignancies: comparison of direct measurement with that of calculated from radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougule, Arun; Agarwal, D.P.

    2001-01-01

    In the present study rectal doses using CaSO 4 :Dy powder has been measured in 14 cases of cancer cervix treated by LDR brachytherapy and 20 cases of cancer cervix treated by HDR brachytherapy. The maximum rectal dose in LDR varied from 1073-1856 cGy for point A dose of 3000 cGy. The maximum rectal dose was found to be at 6-8 cm from the anal verge. The results of the calculation and actual measurements has been compared

  19. SU-G-201-01: An Automated Treatment Plan Quality Assurance Program for High-Dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy with a VaginalCylinder Applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y; Tan, J; Jiang, S; Albuquerque, K; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Plan specific quality assurance (QA) is an important step in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy to ensure the integrity of a treatment plan. The conventional approach is to assemble a set of plan screen-captures in a document and have an independent plan-checker to verify it. Not only is this approach cumbersome and time-consuming, using a document also limits the items that can be verified, hindering plan quality and patient safety. We have initiated efforts to develop a web-based HDR brachytherapy QA system called AutoBrachy QA, for comprehensive and efficient QA. This abstract reports a new plugin in this system for the QA of a cylinder HDR brachytherapy treatment. Methods: A cylinder plan QA module was developed using Python. It was plugged into our AutoBrachy QA system. This module extracted information from CT images and treatment plan. Image processing techniques were employed to obtain geometric parameters, e.g. cylinder diameter. A comprehensive set of eight geometrical and eight dosimetric features of the plan were validated against user specified planning parameter, such as prescription value, treatment depth and length, etc. A PDF document was generated, consisting of a summary QA sheet with all the QA results, as well as images showing plan details. Results: The cylinder QA program has been implemented in our clinic. To date, it has been used in 11 patient cases and was able to successfully perform QA tests in all of them. The QA program reduced the average plan QA time from 7 min using conventional manual approach to 0.5 min. Conclusion: Being a new module in our AutoBrachy QA system, an automated treatment plan QA module for cylinder HDR brachytherapy has been successfully developed and clinically implemented. This module improved clinical workflow and plan integrity compared to the conventional manual approach.

  20. SU-G-201-01: An Automated Treatment Plan Quality Assurance Program for High-Dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy with a VaginalCylinder Applicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Y; Tan, J; Jiang, S; Albuquerque, K; Jia, X

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Plan specific quality assurance (QA) is an important step in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy to ensure the integrity of a treatment plan. The conventional approach is to assemble a set of plan screen-captures in a document and have an independent plan-checker to verify it. Not only is this approach cumbersome and time-consuming, using a document also limits the items that can be verified, hindering plan quality and patient safety. We have initiated efforts to develop a web-based HDR brachytherapy QA system called AutoBrachy QA, for comprehensive and efficient QA. This abstract reports a new plugin in this system for the QA of a cylinder HDR brachytherapy treatment. Methods: A cylinder plan QA module was developed using Python. It was plugged into our AutoBrachy QA system. This module extracted information from CT images and treatment plan. Image processing techniques were employed to obtain geometric parameters, e.g. cylinder diameter. A comprehensive set of eight geometrical and eight dosimetric features of the plan were validated against user specified planning parameter, such as prescription value, treatment depth and length, etc. A PDF document was generated, consisting of a summary QA sheet with all the QA results, as well as images showing plan details. Results: The cylinder QA program has been implemented in our clinic. To date, it has been used in 11 patient cases and was able to successfully perform QA tests in all of them. The QA program reduced the average plan QA time from 7 min using conventional manual approach to 0.5 min. Conclusion: Being a new module in our AutoBrachy QA system, an automated treatment plan QA module for cylinder HDR brachytherapy has been successfully developed and clinically implemented. This module improved clinical workflow and plan integrity compared to the conventional manual approach.

  1. Influence of 125I seed interstitial brachytherapy on recovery of facial nerve function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Tieli; Zheng Lei; Zhang Jie; Cai Zhigang; Yang Zhaohui; Yu Guangyan; Zhang Jianguo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of 125 I seed interstitial brachytherapy in parotid region on the recovery of facial nerve function. Methods: A total of the data of 21 patients with primary parotid carcinoma were treated with resection and 125 I interstitial brachytherapy. All the patients had no facial palsy before operation and the prescribed dose was 60 Gy. During 4 years of follow-up, the House-Brackmann grading scales and ENoG were used to evaluate the function of facial nerve. According to the modified regional House-Brackmann grading scales, the facial nerve branches of patients in affected side were divided into normal and abnormal groups, and were compared with those in contra-lateral side. Results: Post-operation facial palsy occurred in all the patients, but the facial palsy recovered within 6 months. The latency time differences between affected side and contralateral side were statistically significant in abnormal group from 1 week to 6 months after treatment (t=2.362, P=0.028), and were also different in normal group 1 week after treatment (t=2.522, P=0.027). Conclusions: 125 I interstitital brachytherapy has no influence on recovery of facial nerve function after tumor resection and no delayed facial nerve damage. (authors)

  2. Edema worsens target coverage in high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy of mobile tongue cancer: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ken; Yamazaki, Hideya; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Akiyama, Hironori; Takenaka, Tadashi; Masui, Koji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Uesugi, Yasuo; Shimbo, Taiju; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiko; Yoshioka, Hiroto; Arika, Takumi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Narumi, Yoshifumi

    2017-02-01

    We report our study on two patients to highlight the risk of underdosage of the clinical target volume (CTV) due to edema during high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) of mobile tongue cancer. To treat the lateral side of the CTV, flexible applicator tubes were implanted on the mouth floor. Two-dimensional planning was performed using X-ray images for Case 1, and three-dimensional (3D) planning was performed using computed tomography (CT) for Case 2. Prescribed doses for both cases were 54 Gy in nine fractions. Case 1 was treated for cancer of the right lateral border of the tongue in 2005. Tongue edema occurred after implantation, and part of the lateral border of the tongue protruded between the applicator tubes. Acute mucosal reaction abated in the protruded area earlier than in the other parts of the CTV. In this case, the tumor recurred in this area 5 months after the treatment. Case 2 was treated for cancer of the left lateral border of the tongue. Because tongue edema occurred in this case also, plastic splints were inserted between the applicator tubes to push the edematous region into the irradiated area. The mucosal surface of the CTV was covered by the 70% isodose, and 100% isodose line for before and after splint insertion. Local control of the tumor was achieved 4 years after treatment. To ensure sufficient target coverage, 3D image-based planning using CT should be performed, followed by re-planning using repeated CT as needed. Also, the development of devices to prevent protrusion of the edematous tissue outside the target area will help to ensure the full dosing of CTV.

  3. Calculated organ doses using Monte Carlo simulations in a reference male phantom undergoing HDR brachytherapy applied to localized prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candela-Juan, Cristian; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to obtain equivalent doses in radiosensitive organs (aside from the bladder and rectum) when applying high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to a localized prostate carcinoma using 60 Co or 192 Ir sources. These data are compared with results in a water phantom and with expected values in an infinite water medium. A comparison with reported values from proton therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is also provided. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed using a voxelized phantom described in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 110, which reproduces masses and shapes from an adult reference man defined in ICRP Publication 89. Point sources of 60 Co or 192 Ir with photon energy spectra corresponding to those exiting their capsules were placed in the center of the prostate, and equivalent doses per clinical absorbed dose in this target organ were obtained in several radiosensitive organs. Values were corrected to account for clinical circumstances with the source located at various positions with differing dwell times throughout the prostate. This was repeated for a homogeneous water phantom. Results: For the nearest organs considered (bladder, rectum, testes, small intestine, and colon), equivalent doses given by 60 Co source were smaller (8%–19%) than from 192 Ir. However, as the distance increases, the more penetrating gamma rays produced by 60 Co deliver higher organ equivalent doses. The overall result is that effective dose per clinical absorbed dose from a 60 Co source (11.1 mSv/Gy) is lower than from a 192 Ir source (13.2 mSv/Gy). On the other hand, equivalent doses were the same in the tissue and the homogeneous water phantom for those soft tissues closer to the prostate than about 30 cm. As the distance increased, the differences of photoelectric effect in water and soft tissue, and appearance of other materials such as air, bone, or lungs, produced

  4. Simultaneous treatment of tongue cancer with interstitial brachytherapy and bleomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watarai, Jiro; Itagaki, Takatomo; Yamaguchi, Kouichi

    1983-01-01

    During a period of 5 years, from 1977 to 1982, twenty five patients with tongue cancer were treated by radium needle implantation and bleomycin at Yamagata University Hospital. In this paper, authors analysed seventeen patients followed over two years. All had biopsy proven squamous cell carcinoma. According to the TNM system (UICC, 1978), primary tumor was classified into 4 cases of T1, 8 cases of T2 and 5 cases of T3. The main purpose of this study was to obtain a high local control rate and reduce subsequent regional lymphnode metastasis. Our curative treatment method was simultaneous combination of 70 Gy of brachy-therapy and 40 mg of bleomycin. The results of this study were as follows: 1. A control rate in the primary lesion was 91% (10/11) in survivors having survived more than 2 years. 2. Radioosteonecrosis of mandible was found in 6% (1/17) and transient ulcer formation in the primary site was observed in 35% (6/17) of patients treated. However, all patients were cured by conservative treatment. 3. This treatment method did not reduce subsequent lymph node metastasis. (author)

  5. Dose optimization in simulated permanent interstitial implant of prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Fernando Pereira de

    2006-01-01

    Any treatment of cancer that uses some modality of radiotherapy is planned before being executed. In general the goal in radiotherapy is to irradiate the target to be treated minimizing the incidence of radiation in healthy surrounding tissues. The planning differ among themselves according to the modality of radiotherapy, the type of cancer and where it is located. This work approaches the problem of dose optimization for the planning of prostate cancer treatment through the modality of low dose-rate brachytherapy with Iodine 125 or Palladium 103 seeds. An algorithm for dose calculation and optimization was constructed to find the seeds configuration that better fits the relevant clinical criteria such as as the tolerated dose by the urethra and rectum and the desired dose for prostate. The algorithm automatically finds this configuration from the prostate geometry established in two or three dimensions by using images of ultrasound, magnetic resonance or tomography and from the establishment of minimum restrictions to the positions of the seeds in the prostate and needles in a template. Six patterns of seeds distribution based on clinical criteria were suggested and tested in this work. Each one of these patterns generated a space of possible seeds configurations for the prostate tested by the dose calculation and optimization algorithm. The configurations that satisfied the clinical criteria were submitted to a test according to an optimization function suggested in this work. The configuration that produced maximum value for this function was considered the optimized one. (author)

  6. Time, dose and volume factors in interstitial brachytherapy combined with external irradiation for oral tongue carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yorozu, Atsunori

    1996-01-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 136 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of stages I and II of the oral tongue who were treated with interstitial brachytherapy alone or in combination with external irradiation between 1976 and 1991. Control of the primary lesion and the occurrence of late complications were analyzed with respect to dose, time and tumor size with the Cox hazard model. The 5-year survival rates for stages I and II were 84.5% and 75.6%. The 5-year primary control rate was 91.3% for stage I and 77.3% for stage II (p 50 Gy compared with a brachytherapy dose 30 mm. Late complications should be reduced by using a spacer, improvements in dental and oral hygiene, and a sophisticated implant method. (author)

  7. HDR brachytherapy. An option for preventing nonmalignant obstruction in patients after lung transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, A.; Karstens, J.H.; Christiansen, H. [Medical School Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Warszawski-Baumann, A.; Baumann, R. [Medical School Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Medical Practice for Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Gottlieb, J.; Welte, T. [Medical School Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Respiratory Medicine

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Interventional bronchoscopy is the main treatment modality in managing benign airway obstructions following lung transplantation. We analyzed the effect of intraluminal brachytherapy on preventing recurrence of hyperplastic tissue. Patients and methods: From September 2002 to September 2004, a total of 24 intraluminal brachytherapy applications were carried out on 12 lung transplant patients in 15 different locations. A single dose of 3 Gy was calculated at a 5-mm distance from the catheter surface; the target volume included a stenosis plus safety interval of 0.5-1.0 cm. Results: All patients had a mean 10.6 local interventions (Argon plasma coagulation, balloon dilatations, stenting) over 4.4 months before the first application of endobronchial brachytherapy, with a mean amount of 2.4 applications per month. The mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was 2,219 ml in the 3 months before application of brachytherapy. After endobronchial brachytherapy, all patients experienced improvement in clinical status and respiratory function. The mean level of FEV1 in the 3 months after application was 2,435 ml (p = 0.02), and the number of invasive interventions dropped to a mean rate of 5.2 interventions in the 5.1 months after the first intervention, with an amount of 1 application per month. No treatment-related complications were seen. Four patients were treated twice, 1 patient three times, and 1 patient four times at the same localization. Conclusions: Recurrent symptomatic benign airway obstruction from hyperplastic tissue in the bronchus after lung transplantation can be successfully treated with intraluminal high-dose-rate brachytherapy with a dose of 3 Gy at a 5-mm distance from the catheter surface and a longitudinal safety margin of 1 cm. (orig.)

  8. HDR brachytherapy. An option for preventing nonmalignant obstruction in patients after lung transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, A.; Karstens, J.H.; Christiansen, H.; Gottlieb, J.; Welte, T.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Interventional bronchoscopy is the main treatment modality in managing benign airway obstructions following lung transplantation. We analyzed the effect of intraluminal brachytherapy on preventing recurrence of hyperplastic tissue. Patients and methods: From September 2002 to September 2004, a total of 24 intraluminal brachytherapy applications were carried out on 12 lung transplant patients in 15 different locations. A single dose of 3 Gy was calculated at a 5-mm distance from the catheter surface; the target volume included a stenosis plus safety interval of 0.5-1.0 cm. Results: All patients had a mean 10.6 local interventions (Argon plasma coagulation, balloon dilatations, stenting) over 4.4 months before the first application of endobronchial brachytherapy, with a mean amount of 2.4 applications per month. The mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was 2,219 ml in the 3 months before application of brachytherapy. After endobronchial brachytherapy, all patients experienced improvement in clinical status and respiratory function. The mean level of FEV1 in the 3 months after application was 2,435 ml (p = 0.02), and the number of invasive interventions dropped to a mean rate of 5.2 interventions in the 5.1 months after the first intervention, with an amount of 1 application per month. No treatment-related complications were seen. Four patients were treated twice, 1 patient three times, and 1 patient four times at the same localization. Conclusions: Recurrent symptomatic benign airway obstruction from hyperplastic tissue in the bronchus after lung transplantation can be successfully treated with intraluminal high-dose-rate brachytherapy with a dose of 3 Gy at a 5-mm distance from the catheter surface and a longitudinal safety margin of 1 cm. (orig.)

  9. High dose rate versus low dose rate interstitial radiotherapy for carcinoma of the floor of mouth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Yamazaki, Hideya; Koizumi, Masahiko; Kagawa, Kazufumi; Yoshida, Ken; Shiomi, Hiroya; Imai, Atsushi; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Tanaka, Eichii; Nose, Takayuki; Teshima, Teruki; Furukawa, Souhei; Fuchihata, Hajime

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with cancer of the floor of mouth are treated with radiation because of functional and cosmetic reasons. We evaluate the treatment results of high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) interstitial radiation for cancer of the floor of mouth. Methods and Materials: From January 1980 through March 1996, 41 patients with cancer of the floor of mouth were treated with LDR interstitial radiation using 198 Au grains, and from April 1992 through March 1996 16 patients with HDR interstitial radiation. There were 26 T1 tumors, 30 T2 tumors, and 1 T3 tumor. For 21 patients treated with interstitial radiation alone, a total radiation dose of interstitial therapy was 60 Gy/10 fractions/6-7 days in HDR and 85 Gy within 1 week in LDR. For 36 patients treated with a combination therapy, a total dose of 30 to 40 Gy of external radiation and a total dose of 48 Gy/8 fractions/5-6 days in HDR or 65 Gy within 1 week in LDR were delivered. Results: Two- and 5-year local control rates of patients treated with HDR interstitial radiation were 94% and 94%, and those with LDR were 75% and 69%, respectively. Local control rate of patients treated with HDR brachytherapy was slightly higher than that with 198 Au grains (p = 0.113). For late complication, bone exposure or ulcer occurred in 6 of 16 (38%) patients treated with HDR and 13 of 41 (32%) patients treated with LDR. Conclusion: HDR fractionated interstitial brachytherapy can be an alternative to LDR brachytherapy for cancer of the floor of mouth and eliminate radiation exposure for the medical staff

  10. Clinical implementation of a new HDR brachytherapy device for partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Yashar, Catheryn; Rice, Roger; Pawlicki, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To present the clinical implementation of a new HDR device for partial breast irradiation, the Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI), at the University of California, San Diego. Methods and materials: The SAVI device has multiple peripheral struts that can be differentially loaded with the HDR source. Planning criteria used for evaluation of the treatment plans included the following dose volume histogram (DVH) criteria: V90 >90%, V150 <50 cc and V200 <20 cc. Results: SAVI has been used on 20 patients to date at UC San Diego. In each case, the dose was modulated according to patient-specific anatomy to cover the tumor bed, while sparing normal tissues. The dosimetric data show that we can achieve greater than 90% coverage with respect to V90 (median of 95.3%) and also keep a low V150 and V200 dose at 24.5 and 11.2 cc, respectively. Complete treatment can be done within a 30-min time slot, which includes implant verification, setup, and irradiation time as well as wound dressing. Conclusion: SAVI has been implemented at UC San Diego for accelerated partial breast irradiation with excellent tumor bed conformance and minimal normal tissue exposure. Patient positioning is the key to identifying any inter-fraction device motion. Device asymmetry or tissue conformance has been shown to resolve itself 24 h after the device implantation. The device can be implemented into an existing HDR program with minimal effort

  11. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Hardev; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peggy and Charles Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

    2012-10-23

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem and ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  12. High dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) interstitial irradiation (IRT) of the rat spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, Lucas A.M.; Plas, Mirjam van der; Skwarchuk, Mark W.; Hanssen, Alex E.J.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a newly developed technique to study radiation tolerance of rat spinal cord to continuous interstitial irradiation (IRT) at different dose rates. Material and methods: Two parallel catheters are inserted just laterally on each side of the vertebral bodies from the level of Th 10 to L 4 . These catheters are afterloaded with two 192 Ir wires of 4 cm length each (activity 1-2.3 mCi/cm) for the low dose rate (LDR) IRT or connected to the HDR micro-Selectron for the high dose rate (HDR) IRT. Spinal cord target volume is located at the level of Th 12 -L 2 . Due to the rapid dose fall-off around the implanted sources, a dose inhomogeneity across the spinal cord thickness is obtained in the dorso-ventral direction. Using the 100% reference dose (rate) at the ventral side of the spinal cord to prescribe the dose, experiments have been carried out to obtain complete dose response curves at average dose rates of 0.49, 0.96 and 120 Gy/h. Paralysis of the hind-legs after 5-6 months and histopathological examination of the spinal cord of each irradiated rat are used as experimental endpoints. Results: The histopathological damage seen after irradiation is clearly reflected the inhomogeneous dose distribution around the implanted catheters, with the damage predominantly located in the dorsal tract of the cord or dorsal roots. With each reduction in average dose rate, spinal cord radiation tolerance is significantly increased. When the dose is prescribed at the 100% reference dose rate, the ED 50 (induction of paresis in 50% of the animals) for the HDR-IRT is 17.3 Gy. If the average dose rate is reduced from 120 Gy/h to 0.96 or 0.49 Gy/h, a 2.9- or 4.7-fold increase in the ED 50 values to 50.3 Gy and 80.9 Gy is observed; for the dose prescribed at the 150% reference dose rate (dorsal side of cord) ED 50 values are 26.0, 75.5 and 121.4 Gy, respectively. Using different types of analysis and in dependence of the dose prescription and reference dose rate, the

  13. Acute genitourinary toxicity after high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer: Second analysis to determine the correlation between the urethral dose in HDR brachytherapy and the severity of acute genitourinary toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Noda, Shin-ei; Ito, Kazuto; Yamamoto, Takumi; Kashiwagi, Bunzo; Nakano, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We have been treating localized prostate cancer with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) at our institution. We recently reported the existence of a correlation between the severity of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity and the urethral radiation dose in HDR brachytherapy by using different fractionation schema. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of the urethral dose in the development of acute GU toxicity more closely than in previous studies. For this purpose, we conducted an analysis of patients who had undergone HDR brachytherapy with a fixed fractionation schema combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Methods and Materials: Among the patients with localized prostate cancer who were treated by 192-iridium HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT at Gunma University Hospital between August 2000 and November 2004, we analyzed 67 patients who were treated by HDR brachytherapy with the fractionation schema of 9 Gy x two times combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Hypofractionated EBRT was administered at a fraction dose of 3 Gy three times weekly, and a total dose of 51 Gy was delivered to the prostate gland and seminal vesicles using the four-field technique. No elective pelvic irradiation was performed. After the completion of EBRT, all the patients additionally received transrectal ultrasonography-guided HDR brachytherapy. The planning target volume was defined as the prostate gland with a 5-mm margin all around, and the planning was conducted based on computed tomography images. The tumor stage was T1c in 13 patients, T2 in 31 patients, and T3 in 23 patients. The Gleason score was 2-6 in 12 patients, 7 in 34 patients, and 8-10 in 21 patients. Androgen ablation was performed in all the patients. The median follow-up duration was 11 months (range 3-24 months). The toxicities were graded based on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organization

  14. Posttreatment biopsy results following interstitial brachytherapy in early-stage prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prestidge, Bradley R.; Hoak, David C.; Grimm, Peter D.; Ragde, Haakon; Cavanagh, William; Blasko, John C.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess pathologic control rates for prostatic carcinoma as determined by postimplant prostate biopsy in a large series of consecutive patients who have received permanent interstitial brachytherapy using a contemporary transrectal ultrasound-directed, transperineal, computer generated, volume technique. Methods and Materials: Four hundred and two patients received permanent 125 I or 103 Pd interstitial brachytherapy as primary treatment for early stage prostatic carcinoma at the Northwest Tumor Institute between January 1988 and January 1994. Of these, 201 have consented to biopsy 12 or more months postimplant with a median follow-up of 40 months (range: 12-83 months). None had received homonal manipulation. A total of 361 biopsies was performed on 201 patients with a range of one to six annual biopsies per patient (91 received multiple, serial biopsies). Of the 161 patients more than 12 months postimplant who have not been biopsied, most have been unwilling or unable to submit to biopsy. Only six patients with biochemical progression have not been biopsied. There was no difference in the presenting characteristics or implant parameters between those patients biopsied and those that were not. One hundred and forty-three received 125 I (71%) prescribed to a MPD of 160 Gy with a median activity of 35.5 mCi, and 58 (29%) received 103 Pd prescribed to a MPD of 115 Gy with a median activity of 123 mCi. Multiple biopsies were performed under transrectal ultrasound guidance, and all specimens were classified as either negative, indeterminate, or positive. Results: At the time of last biopsy, 161 (80%) have achieved negative pathology, 34 (17%) remain indeterminate, and 6 (3%) have been positive. Only 2 of the 186 patients with a PSA < 4.0 ng/ml at the time of biopsy were positive. Among those 33 indeterminate patients with a subsequent biopsy, 28 have converted to negative, 2 to positive, and 3 remain unchanged to date. Conclusions: These data demonstrate at

  15. Computed Tomography–Guided Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in Combination With Regional Positive Lymph Node Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Peripheral Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Li; Zhang, Jian-wen; Lin, Sheng; Luo, Hui-Qun; Wen, Qing-Lian; He, Li-Jia; Shang, Chang-Ling; Ren, Pei-Rong; Yang, Hong-Ru; Pang, Hao-Wen; Yang, Bo; He, Huai-Lin [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Chen, Yue, E-mail: chenyue5523@126.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Wu, Jing-Bo, E-mail: wjb6147@163.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the technical safety, adverse events, and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in combination with regional positive lymph node intensity modulated radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced peripheral non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled in a prospective, officially approved phase 1 trial. Primary tumors were treated with HDR brachytherapy. A single 30-Gy dose was delivered to the 90% isodose line of the gross lung tumor volume. A total dose of at least 70 Gy was administered to the 95% isodose line of the planning target volume of malignant lymph nodes using 6-MV X-rays. The patients received concurrent or sequential chemotherapy. We assessed treatment efficacy, adverse events, and radiation toxicity. Results: The median follow-up time was 28 months (range, 7-44 months). There were 3 cases of mild pneumothorax but no cases of hemothorax, dyspnea, or pyothorax after the procedure. Grade 3 or 4 acute hematologic toxicity was observed in 5 patients. During follow-up, mild fibrosis around the puncture point was observed on the CT scans of 2 patients, but both patients were asymptomatic. The overall response rates (complete and partial) for the primary mass and positive lymph nodes were 100% and 92.3%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 90.9% and 67%, respectively, with a median OS of 22.5 months. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that HDR brachytherapy is safe and feasible for peripheral locally advanced NSCLC, justifying a phase 2 clinical trial.

  16. SU-F-T-65: AutomaticTreatment Planning for High-Dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy with a VaginalCylinder Applicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Y; Tan, J; Jiang, S; Albuquerque, K; Jia, X

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning is conventionally performed in a manual fashion. Yet it is highly desirable to perform computerized automated planning to improve treatment planning efficiency, eliminate human errors, and reduce plan quality variation. The goal of this research is to develop an automatic treatment planning tool for HDR brachytherapy with a cylinder applicator for vaginal cancer. Methods: After inserting the cylinder applicator into the patient, a CT scan was acquired and was loaded to an in-house developed treatment planning software. The cylinder applicator was automatically segmented using image-processing techniques. CTV was generated based on user-specified treatment depth and length. Locations of relevant points (apex point, prescription point, and vaginal surface point), central applicator channel coordinates, and dwell positions were determined according to their geometric relations with the applicator. Dwell time was computed through an inverse optimization process. The planning information was written into DICOM-RT plan and structure files to transfer the automatically generated plan to a commercial treatment planning system for plan verification and delivery. Results: We have tested the system retrospectively in nine patients treated with vaginal cylinder applicator. These cases were selected with different treatment prescriptions, lengths, depths, and cylinder diameters to represent a large patient population. Our system was able to generate treatment plans for these cases with clinically acceptable quality. Computation time varied from 3–6 min. Conclusion: We have developed a system to perform automated treatment planning for HDR brachytherapy with a cylinder applicator. Such a novel system has greatly improved treatment planning efficiency and reduced plan quality variation. It also served as a testbed to demonstrate the feasibility of automatic HDR treatment planning for more complicated cases.

  17. SU-F-T-65: AutomaticTreatment Planning for High-Dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy with a VaginalCylinder Applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y; Tan, J; Jiang, S; Albuquerque, K; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning is conventionally performed in a manual fashion. Yet it is highly desirable to perform computerized automated planning to improve treatment planning efficiency, eliminate human errors, and reduce plan quality variation. The goal of this research is to develop an automatic treatment planning tool for HDR brachytherapy with a cylinder applicator for vaginal cancer. Methods: After inserting the cylinder applicator into the patient, a CT scan was acquired and was loaded to an in-house developed treatment planning software. The cylinder applicator was automatically segmented using image-processing techniques. CTV was generated based on user-specified treatment depth and length. Locations of relevant points (apex point, prescription point, and vaginal surface point), central applicator channel coordinates, and dwell positions were determined according to their geometric relations with the applicator. Dwell time was computed through an inverse optimization process. The planning information was written into DICOM-RT plan and structure files to transfer the automatically generated plan to a commercial treatment planning system for plan verification and delivery. Results: We have tested the system retrospectively in nine patients treated with vaginal cylinder applicator. These cases were selected with different treatment prescriptions, lengths, depths, and cylinder diameters to represent a large patient population. Our system was able to generate treatment plans for these cases with clinically acceptable quality. Computation time varied from 3–6 min. Conclusion: We have developed a system to perform automated treatment planning for HDR brachytherapy with a cylinder applicator. Such a novel system has greatly improved treatment planning efficiency and reduced plan quality variation. It also served as a testbed to demonstrate the feasibility of automatic HDR treatment planning for more complicated cases.

  18. Dose-volume analysis for quality assurance of interstitial brachytherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Kestin, Larry L.; Edmundson, Gregory K.; Jaffray, David A.; Wong, John W.; Kini, Vijay R.; Chen, Peter Y.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The use of brachytherapy in the management of breast cancer has increased significantly over the past several years. Unfortunately, few techniques have been developed to compare dosimetric quality and target volume coverage concurrently. We present a new method of implant evaluation that incorporates computed tomography-based three-dimensional (3D) dose-volume analysis with traditional measures of brachytherapy quality. Analyses performed in this fashion will be needed to ultimately assist in determining the efficacy of breast implants. Methods and Materials: Since March of 1993, brachytherapy has been used as the sole radiation modality after lumpectomy in selected protocol patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Eight patients treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy who had surgical clips outlining the lumpectomy cavity and underwent computed tomography (CT) scanning after implant placement were selected for this study. For each patient, the postimplant CT dataset was transferred to a 3D treatment planning system. The lumpectomy cavity, target volume (lumpectomy cavity plus a 1-cm margin), and entire breast were outlined on each axial slice. Once all volumes were entered, the programmed HDR brachytherapy source positions and dwell times were imported into the 3D planning system. Using the tools provided by the 3D planning system, the implant dataset was then registered to the visible implant template in the CT dataset. The distribution of the implant dose was analyzed with respect to defined volumes via dose-volume histograms (DVH). Isodose surfaces, the dose homogeneity index, and dosimetric coverage of the defined volumes were calculated and contrasted. All patients received 32 Gy to the entire implanted volume in 8 fractions of 4 Gy over 4 days. Results: Three-plane implants were used for 7 patients and a two-plane implant for 1 patient. The median number of needles per implant was 16.5 (range

  19. Evaluation of linear array MOSFET detectors for in vivo dosimetry to measure rectal dose in HDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughey, Aisling; Coalter, George; Mugabe, Koki

    2011-09-01

    The study aimed to assess the suitability of linear array metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor detectors (MOSFETs) as in vivo dosimeters to measure rectal dose in high dose rate brachytherapy treatments. The MOSFET arrays were calibrated with an Ir192 source and phantom measurements were performed to check agreement with the treatment planning system. The angular dependence, linearity and constancy of the detectors were evaluated. For in vivo measurements two sites were investigated, transperineal needle implants for prostate cancer and Fletcher suites for cervical cancer. The MOSFETs were inserted into the patients' rectum in theatre inside a modified flatus tube. The patients were then CT scanned for treatment planning. Measured rectal doses during treatment were compared with point dose measurements predicted by the TPS. The MOSFETs were found to require individual calibration factors. The calibration was found to drift by approximately 1% ±0.8 per 500 mV accumulated and varies with distance from source due to energy dependence. In vivo results for prostate patients found only 33% of measured doses agreed with the TPS within ±10%. For cervix cases 42% of measured doses agreed with the TPS within ±10%, however of those not agreeing variations of up to 70% were observed. One of the most limiting factors in this study was found to be the inability to prevent the MOSFET moving internally between the time of CT and treatment. Due to the many uncertainties associated with MOSFETs including calibration drift, angular dependence and the inability to know their exact position at the time of treatment, we consider them to be unsuitable for in vivo dosimetry in rectum for HDR brachytherapy.

  20. Limb sparing surgery and boost with high dose rate interstitial brachytherapy in treatment of soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, P.; Miziara, M.; Soares, C.; Fogaroli, R.; Baraldi, H.; Pellizoni, A.; Borba, G.

    2003-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcoma, a rare neoplasia with high aggressively, accounts for approximately 0,7% of the malignant tumors and occurs more often with youngest. Because of the potential risk of local recurrence, theoretically surgical resection, encompassing macroscopic tumor with a margin of macroscopically noninvolved tissue is the right way to perform, with a wide 'en bloc' resection, amputation, with bad functional results. The aim of conservative treatment is combined modality therapy as surgical resection and irradiation to obtain a local control rate as high as possible while preserving functional results. A retrospective review of 31 patients treated with high dose rate (HDR) Brachytherapy in the Radiotherapy Department Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho Cancer Institute. Methods: Between April 1995 and August 1999, 31 patients who underwent a combine therapy; examined the results on multivariate analysis of conservative surgery and brachytherapy follow/or not by external beam radiation (EBRT). The 31 patients treated, 17 ( 54,8%) females and 14(45,2%) males have a median age of 48 years ( range,19 to 77 years). Most of the tumors was located in the lower limb (17/31 - 54,8%) . The other sites were the upper limb (10/31-32,3%), thoracic wall and abdomen (3/31-9,7%).Classification of the tumors, according to the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) staging was T1 5 patients (16%), T2 (24/31-77%). Median size of the tumors was 9,2cm ( ranged, 2,5 to 24cm). Most of the tumors being malignant fibrous histiocytomas (9/31-29%) and the histological grade II (14/31-45%). Twenty-two (71%) patients had intraoperative implants and the insertion of the radioactive source was delayed 24 to 120 hours. Eight patients (25,8%) had postoperative and received HDRB 45 to 60 days after the surgery . Guide needles were placed in the tumor bed, perpendicular to the scar, systematically in a single plane, the implant volume being defined by radiotherapist . A minimum safety margin of 2 cm

  1. 3D-navigation for interstitial stereotactic brachytherapy; 3D-Navigation in der interstitiellen stereotaktischen Brachytherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auer, T.; Hensler, E.; Eichberger, P.; Bluhm, A.; Lukas, P. [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Gunkel, A.; Freysinger, W.; Bale, R.; Thumfart, W.F. [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Klinik fuer HNO-Krankheiten; Gaber, O. [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Anatomie

    1998-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the adaption of 3D-navigation for interstitial brachytherapy. The new method leads to prospective and therefore improved planning of the therapy (position of the needle and dose distribution) and to the possibility of a virtual simulation (control if vessels or nerves are on the pathway of the needle). The EasyGuide Neuro {sup trademark} navigation system (Philips) was adapted in the way, that needles for interstitial bracachytherapy were made connectable to the pointer and correctly displayed on the screen. To determine the positioning accuracy, several attempts were performed to hit defined targets on phantoms. Two methods were used: `Free navigation`, where the needle was under control of the navigation system, and the `guided navigation` where an aligned template was used additionally to lead the needle to the target. In addition a mask system was tested, whether it met the requirements of stable and reproducible positioning. The potential of applying this method is clinical practice was tested with an anatomical specimen. About 91% of all attempts lied within 5 mm. There were even better results on the more rigid table (94%<4 mm). No difference could be seen between both application methods (`free navigation` and `navigation with template`), they showed the same accuracy. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Es war das Ziel dieser Arbeit, ein 3D-Infrarotnavigationssystem fuer die Anforderungen der interstitiellen stereotaktischen Brachytherapie zu adaptieren. Damit wird die Planung der Therapie verbessert (prospektive Planung der Nadelpositionen und der Dosisverteilung), und eine virtuelle Simulation wird realisierbar (Kontrolle des vorgeplanten Zugangs bezueglich Verletzungsmoeglichkeit von Gefaessen oder Nerven). Das EasyGuide-Neuro {sup trademark} -Navigagationssystem (Philips) wurde so veraendert, dass Nadeln, die in der Brachytherapie Verwendung finden, am Pointer befestigt werden konnten und am Bildschirm angezeigt wurden. Um die

  2. SU-E-T-149: Brachytherapy Patient Specific Quality Assurance for a HDR Vaginal Cylinder Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbiere, J; Napoli, J; Ndlovu, A [Hackensack Univ Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Commonly Ir-192 HDR treatment planning system commissioning is only based on a single absolute measurement of source activity supplemented by tabulated parameters for multiple factors without independent verification that the planned distribution corresponds to the actual delivered dose. The purpose on this work is to present a methodology using Gafchromic film with a statistically valid calibration curve that can be used to validate clinical HDR vaginal cylinder cases by comparing the calculated plan dose distribution in a plane with the corresponding measured planar dose. Methods: A vaginal cylinder plan was created with Oncentra treatment planning system. The 3D dose matrix was exported to a Varian Eclipse work station for convenient extraction of a 2D coronal dose plane corresponding to the film position. The plan was delivered with a sheet of Gafchromic EBT3 film positioned 1mm from the catheter using an Ir-192 Nucletron HDR source. The film was then digitized with an Epson 10000 XL color scanner. Film analysis is performed with MatLab imaging toolbox. A density to dose calibration curve was created using TG43 formalism for a single dwell position exposure at over 100 points for statistical accuracy. The plan and measured film dose planes were registered using a known dwell position relative to four film marks. The plan delivered 500 cGy to points 2 cm from the sources. Results: The distance to agreement of the 500 cGy isodose between the plan and film measurement laterally was 0.5 mm but can be as much as 1.5 mm superior and inferior. The difference between the computed plan dose and film measurement was calculated per pixel. The greatest errors up to 50 cGy are near the apex. Conclusion: The methodology presented will be useful to implement more comprehensive quality assurance to verify patient-specific dose distributions.

  3. Constraints in the use of repair half times and mathematical modelling for the clinical application of HDR and PDR treatment schedules as an alternative for LDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, L.A.M.; Broek, J.F.C.M. van den; Visser, A.G.; Kogel, A.J. van der

    1996-01-01

    Using theoretical models based on radiobiological principles for the design of new treatment schedules for HDR and PDR brachytherapy, it is important to realise the impact of assumptions regarding the kinetics of repair. Extrapolations based on longer repair half times in a continuous LDR reference scheme may lead to the calculation of dangerously high doses for alternative HDR and PDR treatment schedules. We used the clinical experience obtained with conventional ERT and LDR brachytherapy in head and neck cancer as a clinical guideline to check the impact of the radiobiological parameters used. Biologically equivalent dose (BED) values for the in clinical practice of LDR brachytherapy recommended dose of 65-70 Gy (prescribed at a dose rate between 30-50 cGy/h) are calculated as a function of the repair half time. These BED values are compared with the biological effect of a clinical reference dose of conventional ERT with 2 Gy/day and complete repair between the fractions. From this comparison of LDR and ERT treatment schedules, a range of values for the repair half times of acute or late responding tissues is demarcated with a reasonable fit to the clinical data. For the acute effects (or tumor control) the best fits are obtained for repair half times of about 0.5 h, while for late effects the repair half times are at least 1 h and can be as high as 3 h. Within these ranges of repair half times for acute and late effects, the outcome of 'alternative' HDR or PDR treatment schedules are discussed. It is predominantly the late reacting normal tissue with the longer repair half time for which problems will be encountered and no or only marginal gain is to be expected of decreasing the dose rate per pulse in PDR brachytherapy

  4. The IPEM code of practice for determination of the reference air kerma rate for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources based on the NPL air kerma standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidmead, A M; Sander, T; Nutbrown, R F; Locks, S M; Lee, C D; Aird, E G A; Flynn, A

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains the recommendations of the high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy working party of the UK Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM). The recommendations consist of a Code of Practice (COP) for the UK for measuring the reference air kerma rate (RAKR) of HDR 192 Ir brachytherapy sources. In 2004, the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) commissioned a primary standard for the realization of RAKR of HDR 192 Ir brachytherapy sources. This has meant that it is now possible to calibrate ionization chambers directly traceable to an air kerma standard using an 192 Ir source (Sander and Nutbrown 2006 NPL Report DQL-RD 004 (Teddington: NPL) http://publications.npl.co.uk). In order to use the source specification in terms of either RAKR, .K R (ICRU 1985 ICRU Report No 38 (Washington, DC: ICRU); ICRU 1997 ICRU Report No 58 (Bethesda, MD: ICRU)), or air kerma strength, S K (Nath et al 1995 Med. Phys. 22 209-34), it has been necessary to develop algorithms that can calculate the dose at any point around brachytherapy sources within the patient tissues. The AAPM TG-43 protocol (Nath et al 1995 Med. Phys. 22 209-34) and the 2004 update TG-43U1 (Rivard et al 2004 Med. Phys. 31 633-74) have been developed more fully than any other protocol and are widely used in commercial treatment planning systems. Since the TG-43 formalism uses the quantity air kerma strength, whereas this COP uses RAKR, a unit conversion from RAKR to air kerma strength was included in the appendix to this COP. It is recommended that the measured RAKR determined with a calibrated well chamber traceable to the NPL 192 Ir primary standard is used in the treatment planning system. The measurement uncertainty in the source calibration based on the system described in this COP has been reduced considerably compared to other methods based on interpolation techniques.

  5. Spectral CT evaluation of interstitial brachytherapy in pancreatic carcinoma xenografts: preliminary animal experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shudong [Jiangsu University, Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Renmin Hospital, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Shanghai Jiao tong University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai (China); Huang, Wei; Song, Qi; Lin, Xiaozhu; Wang, Zhongmin; Chen, Kemin [Shanghai Jiao tong University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai (China); Chen, Yerong [Jiangsu University, Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Renmin Hospital, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China)

    2014-09-15

    We sought to evaluate the capability of spectral CT to detect the therapeutic response to {sup 125}I interstitial brachytherapy in a pancreatic carcinoma xenograft nude mouse model. Twenty mice bearing SWl990 human pancreatic cancer cell xenografts were randomly separated into two groups: experimental (n = 10; 1.0 mCi) and control (n = 10; 0 mCi). After a two-week treatment, spectral CT was performed. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and iodine concentration (IC) in the lesions were measured and normalized to the muscle tissue, and nIC CD31 immunohistochemistry was used to measure microvessel density (MVD). The relationships between the nIC and MVD of the tumours were analysed. The nIC of the experimental group was significantly lower than that of the control group during the multiphase examination. A significant difference in the MVD was observed between the two groups (P <0.001). The nIC values of the three-phase scans have a certain positive correlation with MVD (r = 0.57, p < 0.0001; r = 0.48, p = 0.002; r = 0.63, p = 0.0017 in the 10, 25, and 60 s phase, respectively). Spectral CT can be a useful non-invasive imaging modality in evaluating the therapeutic effect of {sup 125}I interstitial brachytherapy to a pancreatic carcinoma. (orig.)

  6. Outcome of treatment of upper third vaginal recurrences of cervical and endometrial carcinomas with interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charra, C.; Roy, P.; Coquard, R.; Romestaing, P.; Ardiet, J.M.; Gerard, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To describe an original brachytherapy technique using a dedicated intravaginal template for the treatment of vaginal vault recurrences and to evaluate the results of such a treatment. Methods and Materials: Between 1978 and 1993, 78 patients with isolated recurrence of cervical or endometrial carcinoma located in the vaginal vault have been treated in Lyon. Initial treatment was surgery alone in 49 cases and irradiation with surgery in 37 cases. Treatment of the vaginal recurrence was performed with interstitial Iridium 192 brachytherapy combined with pelvic external beam radiation therapy in 34 patients. The tumor was implanted with a dedicated intravaginal plastic template. Six parallel metallic needles were implanted in the vaginal vault and afterloaded with Iridium 192 wires of 4 to 6 cm long. The mucosa of the upper half of the vagina received the same dose as the one encompassing the tumor on the 85% isodose of the Paris system. Results: At 5 years the local control rate was 70% and the overall survival rate 56%. Grade 3 complications occurred in 10% of the cases and only in patients who had received irradiation during the initial treatment of the primary tumor. Conclusions: This brachytherapy technique makes it possible to perform Iridium 192 implants in a difficult situation with a favorable long-term control rate and an acceptable rate of complications

  7. Combined transperineal radiofrequency (RF) interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer (PC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urakami, Shinji; Gonda, Nobuko; Kikuno, Nobuyuki

    2001-01-01

    Hyperthermia has been used effectively as a radiation sensitizer. Interstitial hyperthermoradiotherapy has been therefore utilized as a minimal invasive therapy in attempts to improve local tumor control for various cancers, but not for urological cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety and feasibility of transperineal hyperthermoradiotherapy for localized PC. Based on our basic study of hyperthermoradiotherapy, we devised the procedure of combined transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Two patients with localized PC underwent transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia combined with brachytherapy operation the 192-Ir remote after-loading system (RALS). Under transrectal ultrasound guidance, a total number of 12-18 stainless steel needles for 192-Ir RALS were implanted into the prostatic gland and seminal vesicles (SV) in an optimized pattern. Eight of the needles were used as electrodes for hyperthermia, and were electrically insultated using the vinyl catheter along the length of the subdermal fatty tissue to protect from overheating. Three other needles were utilized for continuous temperature mapping in the prostate. Rectal temperature was also monitored. Total radiation doses of 70 Gy to the prostate and SV were planned as a combination of brachytherapy (24 Gy/4 fraction) and external irradiation using a four-field box technique (46 Gy/23 fraction). Hyperthermic treatment (goal of 42 to 43 deg C for 60 minutes) was performed twice following the 1st and 4th brachytherapy at an interval of more than 48 hours for the recovery of cancer cells from thermotolerance. Both patients reached the treatment goal of all intraprostatic temperatures >43.0 deg C, which was considered favorable for hyperthermia, and the rectal temperatures of both patients remained <38 deg C during hyperthermia. In serial PSA measurements of both patients, serum PSA was less than 1.0 ng/ml within 3 months and has since

  8. Additional androgen deprivation makes the difference. Biochemical recurrence-free survival in prostate cancer patients after HDR brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffmann, Jonas; Tennstedt, Pierre; Beyer, Burkhard; Boehm, Katharina; Tilki, Derya; Salomon, Georg; Graefen, Markus [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martini-Clinic Prostate Cancer Center, Hamburg (Germany); Lesmana, Hans; Platz, Volker; Petersen, Cordula; Kruell, Andreas; Schwarz, Rudolf [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Radiation oncology, Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    The role of additional androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in prostate cancer (PCa) patients treated with combined HDR brachytherapy (HDR-BT) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is still unknown. Consecutive PCa patients classified as D'Amico intermediate and high-risk who underwent HDR-BT and EBRT treatment ± ADT at our institution between January 1999 and February 2009 were assessed. Multivariable Cox regression models predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) were performed. BCR-free survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analyses. Overall, 392 patients were assessable. Of these, 221 (56.4 %) underwent trimodality (HDR-BT and EBRT and ADT) and 171 (43.6 %) bimodality (HDR-BT and EBRT) treatment. Additional ADT administration reduced the risk of BCR (HR: 0.4, 95 % CI: 0.3-0.7, p < 0.001). D'Amico high-risk patients had superior BCR-free survival when additional ADT was administered (log-rank p < 0.001). No significant difference for BCR-free survival was recorded when additional ADT was administered to D'Amico intermediate-risk patients (log-rank p = 0.2). Additional ADT administration improves biochemical control in D'Amico high-risk patients when HDR-BT and EBRT are combined. Physicians should consider the oncological benefit of ADT administration for these patients during the decision-making process. (orig.) [German] Der Nutzen einer zusaetzlichen Hormonentzugstherapie (ADT, ''androgen deprivation therapy'') fuer Patienten mit Prostatakarzinom (PCa), welche mit einer Kombination aus HDR-Brachytherapie (HDR-BT) und perkutaner Bestrahlung (EBRT) behandelt werden, ist weiterhin ungeklaert. Fuer diese Studie wurden konsekutive, nach der D'Amico-Risikoklassifizierung in ''intermediate'' und ''high-risk'' eingeteilte Patienten ausgewaehlt, die zwischen Januar 1999 und Februar 2009 in unserem Institut eine kombinierte Therapie aus HDR-BT, EBRT ± ADT erhalten haben. Eine

  9. Results of combined photodynamic therapy (PDT) and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) in treatment of obstructive endobronchial non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Benjamin D.; Allison, Ron R.; Sibata, Claudio; Parent, Teresa; Downie, Gordon

    2009-06-01

    We reviewed the outcome of combined photodynamic therapy (PDT) and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) for patients with symptomatic obstruction from endobronchial non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Nine patients who received combined PDT and HDR for endobronchial cancers were identified and their charts reviewed. The patients were eight males and one female aged 52-73 at diagnosis, initially presenting with various stages of disease: stage IA (N=1), stage IIA (N=1), stage III (N=6), and stage IV (N=1). Intervention was with HDR (500 cGy to 5 mm once weekly for 3 weeks) and PDT (2 mg/kg Photofrin, followed by 200 J/cm2 illumination 48 hours post infusion). Treatment group 1 (TG-1, N=7) received HDR first; Treatment group 2 (TG-2, N=2) received PDT first. Patients were followed by regular bronchoscopies. Results: Treatments were well tolerated, all patients completed therapy, and none were lost to follow-up. In TG-1, local tumor control was achieved in six of seven patients for: 3 months (until death), 15 months, 2+ years (until death), 2+ years (ongoing), and 5+ years (ongoing, N=2). In TG-2, local control was achieved in only one patient, for 84 days. Morbidities included: stenosis and/or other reversible benign local tissue reactions (N=8); photosensitivity reaction (N=2), and self-limited pleural effusion (N=2). Conclusions: Combined HDR/PDT treatment for endobronchial tumors is well tolerated and can achieve prolonged local control with acceptable morbidity when PDT follows HDR and when the spacing between treatments is one month or less. This treatment regimen should be studied in a larger patient population.

  10. Pelvic interstitial brachytherapy - improving the therapeutic ratio with magnetic resonance imaging and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, Patrick S.; Hricak, Hedvig; Forstner, Rosemary; Powell, C. Bethan; Purser, Phil; Weaver, Keith; Phillips, Theodore L.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction Interstitial brachytherapy in the pelvic region is often hampered by the radiation oncologist's inability to precisely differentiate tumor versus normal tissue during the planning and implantation procedures, often resulting in either excessive or incomplete coverage of tumor volume. The marked improvement in pelvic imaging seen with magnetic resonance, in conjunction with isodose optimization programs for remote-afterloading units, has created an opportunity to significantly improve the therapeutic ratio. Methods From 1992-1995, 23 interstitial perineal templates were performed in 22 patients with pelvic malignancies, using the pulsed low-dose-rate Selectron with dose optimization. MR imaging was performed immediately prior to the implant, with a MUPIT placed against the perineum and a vaginal obturator in place. These images were used for tumor volume measurements, determination of the number, depth and angle of needles required for the implant, and identification of position of normal tissues (rectum, small bowel, bladder) relative to the tumor. After implantation of stainless steel needles, orthogonal radiographs were obtained for isodose calculation, and planning carried out with isodose optimization. Patients were followed closely on a routine schedule, until time of last visit or until death. Every effort possible was made to assess local disease status at time of death. Results Sixteen patients with primary disease (14 cervix, 1 vulva, 1 vagina) and 6 with recurrent (2 with prior radiation) were implanted, all but 3 with curative intent. Nine patients with advanced cervix or vulvar cancer received concomitant chemotherapy (5FU + platinum or mitomycin-C) with the external beam therapy. At a median follow-up of 18.1 months for all cases, only three patients have failed locally for an actuarial local control of 85% at 1.5 years. Nine patients are alive and free of disease, 8 are alive with distant disease only (mean follow-up of 19.1 months), 2

  11. Long-Term Outcome for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Lief, Jonathan; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To present the largest series of prostate cancer brachytherapy patients treated with modern brachytherapy techniques and postimplant day 0 dosimetric evaluation. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and July 2006, 1,656 consecutive patients were treated with permanent interstitial brachytherapy. Risk group stratification was carried out according to the Mt. Sinai guidelines. Median follow-up was 7.0 years. The median day 0 minimum dose covering at least 90% of the target volume was 118.8% of the prescription dose. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated for impact on the evaluated survival parameters. Results: At 12 years, biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort was 95.6%, 98.2%, and 72.6%, respectively. For low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, bPFS was 98.6%, 96.5%, and 90.5%; CSS was 99.8%, 99.3%, and 95.2%; and OS was 77.5%, 71.1%, and 69.2%, respectively. For biochemically controlled patients, the median posttreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration was 0.02 ng/ml. bPFS was most closely related to percent positive biopsy specimens and risk group, while Gleason score was the strongest predictor of CSS. OS was best predicted by patient age, hypertension, diabetes, and tobacco use. At 12 years, biochemical failure and cause-specific mortality were 1.8% and 0.2%, 5.1% and 2.1%, and 10.4% and 7.1% for Gleason scores 5 to 6 and 7 and ≥8, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent long-term outcomes are achievable with high-quality brachytherapy for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. These results compare favorably to alternative treatment modalities including radical prostatectomy.

  12. Design and implementation of a film dosimetry audit tool for comparison of planned and delivered dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Antony L.; Lee, Chris; Ratcliffe, Ailsa J.; Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    A novel phantom is presented for ‘full system’ dosimetric audit comparing planned and delivered dose distributions in HDR gynaecological brachytherapy, using clinical treatment applicators. The brachytherapy applicator dosimetry test object consists of a near full-scatter water tank with applicator and film supports constructed of Solid Water, accommodating any typical cervix applicator. Film dosimeters are precisely held in four orthogonal planes bisecting the intrauterine tube, sampling dose distributions in the high risk clinical target volume, points A and B, bladder, rectum and sigmoid. The applicator position is fixed prior to CT scanning and through treatment planning and irradiation. The CT data is acquired with the applicator in a near clinical orientation to include applicator reconstruction in the system test. Gamma analysis is used to compare treatment planning system exported RTDose grid with measured multi-channel film dose maps. Results from two pilot audits are presented, using Ir-192 and Co-60 HDR sources, with a mean gamma passing rate of 98.6% using criteria of 3% local normalization and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). The mean DTA between prescribed dose and measured film dose at point A was 1.2 mm. The phantom was funded by IPEM and will be used for a UK national brachytherapy dosimetry audit.

  13. Design and implementation of a film dosimetry audit tool for comparison of planned and delivered dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, Antony L; Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew; Lee, Chris; Ratcliffe, Ailsa J

    2013-01-01

    A novel phantom is presented for ‘full system’ dosimetric audit comparing planned and delivered dose distributions in HDR gynaecological brachytherapy, using clinical treatment applicators. The brachytherapy applicator dosimetry test object consists of a near full-scatter water tank with applicator and film supports constructed of Solid Water, accommodating any typical cervix applicator. Film dosimeters are precisely held in four orthogonal planes bisecting the intrauterine tube, sampling dose distributions in the high risk clinical target volume, points A and B, bladder, rectum and sigmoid. The applicator position is fixed prior to CT scanning and through treatment planning and irradiation. The CT data is acquired with the applicator in a near clinical orientation to include applicator reconstruction in the system test. Gamma analysis is used to compare treatment planning system exported RTDose grid with measured multi-channel film dose maps. Results from two pilot audits are presented, using Ir-192 and Co-60 HDR sources, with a mean gamma passing rate of 98.6% using criteria of 3% local normalization and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). The mean DTA between prescribed dose and measured film dose at point A was 1.2 mm. The phantom was funded by IPEM and will be used for a UK national brachytherapy dosimetry audit. (paper)

  14. Intraluminal wallstent +/- HDR brachytherapy in palliation of obstructive pancreatic and bile duct cancers: first report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonetta, A.; Ricci, E.; Mortilla, M.G.; Conigliaro, R.; Zingoni, A.; Armaroli, L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To report the first data of the Reggio Emilia Trial on tolerance and effectiveness of the High Dose Rate brachytherapy in the palliative treatment of extrahepatic bile ducts obstructions. The endpoints of this study are to assess if the endoluminal irradiation can delay the biliary tract re-occlusion and prolong the survival. Material and methods: All patients were treated positioning the Wallstent prosthesis by endoscopic route in the stenotic biliary tract; then they were randomised between observation and endoluminal brachytherapy. From 6/1994, 11 patients with bilio-pancreatic locally advanced cancer (8 pancreas, 3 biliary tract) were admitted to this study: 6 in the control arm and 5 in the brachytherapy group. The radiotherapy was performed by naso-biliary route, in the same day of the stenting, using a High Dose Rate Unit (Iridium 192 source) and prescribing the dose (14 Gy) at 1 cm from the catheter axis. The treatment was always performed in only one day, in 2 fractions with 8 hours split. Clinical data and haematological tests were recorded at 1 st , 7 th , 30 th days and every 3 months. Results: All patients had a complete regression of the jaundice; haematological tests (on 7 th and 30 th day) showed bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, transaminases (SGOT, SGPT), and leukocytosis normalisation. Pancreatic or hepatic acute side effects, cholangitis (due to the endoscopy), actinic erosive gastroduodenitis, radiotherapy local necrosis, peritoneal reactions or naso-biliary tube intolerance were not observed. The average follow up is 144 days (30-476). So far, 8 patients are alive without symptoms and 3 patients died at 476,104, 87 days; 1 for cancer and 2 for other causes. Re-obstructions of the biliary tract did not occur. Conclusions: Wallstent prosthesis is highly efficient in jaundice palliation. The brachytherapy does not increase the toxicity of the disobstrucive treatments. So far, the overall and symptoms free survivals are not significantly

  15. Ten years experience in organ preservation using HDR brachytherapy boost for nodal negative, locally advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, G.; Wirth, B.; Bertermann, H.; Galalae, R.; Kohr, P.; Wilhelm, R.; Kimmig, B.

    1996-01-01

    Objectives: In 1986 Bertermann and Brix established the combined external beam (EBT) and HDR brachytherapy (BT) boost treatment for localized prostate cancer. The aim of this analysis is to judge the results of this method after 10 years experience. Material and methods: The treatment and follow-up data of 158 histologically proven, localized (N- by imaging) prostate cancer patients were analyzed. Tumor stages (using transrectal ultrasound/TRUS/) ranged from A2 (T1b) in two, to B (T2) in 105 and C (T3) in 51 cases. Tumor grading: 21 highly differentiated (G1), 79 moderately differentiated (G2) as well as 52 poorly differentiated (G3) and one undifferentiated (G4) tumor. Forty-four patients (pts) had previous surgery on the bladder neck. Forty-eight pts had transitory androgen deprivation or antiandrogen treatment prior to radiation, which lasted for a max. of 6 months and was finished before radiation. Initial PSA was known in 126 cases. In 13% values under 4 ng/ml (Hybritech), as well as 46% not above 20 ng/ml and 40 % above 20 ng/ml, respectively. Ultrasound guided conformal BT treatment planning was carried out. The 2x 15 Gy HDR-BT boost was integrated into the EBT schedule, the total dose was 50 Gy for subclinical disease and 70 Gy for the prostate in 6-7 weeks. Regular follow-up by clinical examination, TRUS + volumetry, PSA, bone scan and after 12 months biopsy. Median follow-up 55 months (6-144 months). Results: Eight of 158 pts died of prostate cancer, 15 of intercurrent disease. Clinical progression in 18 cases (12 systemic, 5 local, 1 both syst. + local). All cases of clinical progression with PSA elevation. All pts, whose PSA did not decrease under 1 ng/ml developed progression (p<0.001). Progression developed in 11% of the 107 organ-confined (T1-2 or A2-B) and 7 (14%) of the advanced tumors (T3 or C). The relation between tumor grading and total progression (clinical + PSA) was as follows: four out of 26 G1 tumors, 9 out of 79 G2 tumors and 21 of the 53

  16. Dosimetric Consequences of Interobserver Variability in Delineating the Organs at Risk in Gynecologic Interstitial Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damato, Antonio L., E-mail: adamato@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Townamchai, Kanopkis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Albert, Michele [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint Anne' s Hospital Regional Cancer Center, Fall River, Massachusetts (United States); Bair, Ryan J. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Cormack, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Jang, Joanne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kovacs, Arpad [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lee, Larissa J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mak, Kimberley S.; Mirabeau-Beale, Kristina L.; Mouw, Kent W.; Phillips, John G.; Pretz, Jennifer L.; Russo, Andrea L. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lewis, John H.; Viswanathan, Akila N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric variability associated with interobserver organ-at-risk delineation differences on computed tomography in patients undergoing gynecologic interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: The rectum, bladder, and sigmoid of 14 patients treated with gynecologic interstitial brachytherapy were retrospectively contoured by 13 physicians. Geometric variability was calculated using κ statistics, conformity index (CI{sub gen}), and coefficient of variation (CV) of volumes contoured across physicians. Dosimetric variability of the single-fraction D{sub 0.1cc} and D{sub 2cc} was assessed through CV across physicians, and the standard deviation of the total EQD2 (equivalent dose in 2 Gy per fraction) brachytherapy dose (SD{sup TOT}) was calculated. Results: The population mean ± 1 standard deviation of κ, CI{sub gen}, and volume CV were, respectively: 0.77 ± 0.06, 0.70 ± 0.08, and 20% ± 6% for bladder; 0.74 ± 06, 0.67 ± 0.08, and 20% ± 5% for rectum; and 0.33 ± 0.20, 0.26 ± 0.17, and 82% ± 42% for sigmoid. Dosimetric variability was as follows: for bladder, CV = 31% ± 19% (SD{sup TOT} = 72 ± 64 Gy) for D{sub 0.1cc} and CV = 16% ± 10% (SD{sup TOT} = 9 ± 6 Gy) for D{sub 2cc}; for rectum, CV = 11% ± 5% (SD{sup TOT} = 16 ± 17 Gy) for D{sub 0.1cc} and CV = 7% ± 2% (SD{sup TOT} = 4 ± 3 Gy) for D{sub 2cc}; for sigmoid, CV = 39% ± 28% (SD{sup TOT} = 12 ± 18 Gy) for D{sub 0.1cc} and CV = 34% ± 19% (SD{sup TOT} = 4 ± 4 Gy) for D{sub 2cc.} Conclusions: Delineation of bladder and rectum by 13 physicians demonstrated substantial geometric agreement and resulted in good dosimetric agreement for all dose-volume histogram parameters except bladder D{sub 0.1cc.} Small delineation differences in high-dose regions by the posterior bladder wall may explain these results. The delineation of sigmoid showed fair geometric agreement. The higher dosimetric variability for sigmoid compared with rectum and bladder did not correlate with

  17. Dosimetric Consequences of Interobserver Variability in Delineating the Organs at Risk in Gynecologic Interstitial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damato, Antonio L.; Townamchai, Kanopkis; Albert, Michele; Bair, Ryan J.; Cormack, Robert A.; Jang, Joanne; Kovacs, Arpad; Lee, Larissa J.; Mak, Kimberley S.; Mirabeau-Beale, Kristina L.; Mouw, Kent W.; Phillips, John G.; Pretz, Jennifer L.; Russo, Andrea L.; Lewis, John H.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric variability associated with interobserver organ-at-risk delineation differences on computed tomography in patients undergoing gynecologic interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: The rectum, bladder, and sigmoid of 14 patients treated with gynecologic interstitial brachytherapy were retrospectively contoured by 13 physicians. Geometric variability was calculated using κ statistics, conformity index (CI gen ), and coefficient of variation (CV) of volumes contoured across physicians. Dosimetric variability of the single-fraction D 0.1cc and D 2cc was assessed through CV across physicians, and the standard deviation of the total EQD2 (equivalent dose in 2 Gy per fraction) brachytherapy dose (SD TOT ) was calculated. Results: The population mean ± 1 standard deviation of κ, CI gen , and volume CV were, respectively: 0.77 ± 0.06, 0.70 ± 0.08, and 20% ± 6% for bladder; 0.74 ± 06, 0.67 ± 0.08, and 20% ± 5% for rectum; and 0.33 ± 0.20, 0.26 ± 0.17, and 82% ± 42% for sigmoid. Dosimetric variability was as follows: for bladder, CV = 31% ± 19% (SD TOT = 72 ± 64 Gy) for D 0.1cc and CV = 16% ± 10% (SD TOT = 9 ± 6 Gy) for D 2cc ; for rectum, CV = 11% ± 5% (SD TOT = 16 ± 17 Gy) for D 0.1cc and CV = 7% ± 2% (SD TOT = 4 ± 3 Gy) for D 2cc ; for sigmoid, CV = 39% ± 28% (SD TOT = 12 ± 18 Gy) for D 0.1cc and CV = 34% ± 19% (SD TOT = 4 ± 4 Gy) for D 2cc. Conclusions: Delineation of bladder and rectum by 13 physicians demonstrated substantial geometric agreement and resulted in good dosimetric agreement for all dose-volume histogram parameters except bladder D 0.1cc. Small delineation differences in high-dose regions by the posterior bladder wall may explain these results. The delineation of sigmoid showed fair geometric agreement. The higher dosimetric variability for sigmoid compared with rectum and bladder did not correlate with higher variability in the total brachytherapy dose but rather may be due to the

  18. Development and implementation of a remote audit tool for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 brachytherapy using optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Kevin E.; Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Alvarez, Paola; Lawyer, Ann [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to create a mailable phantom with measurement accuracy suitable for Radiological Physics Center (RPC) audits of high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources at institutions participating in National Cancer Institute-funded cooperative clinical trials. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) were chosen as the dosimeter to be used with the phantom.Methods: The authors designed and built an 8 × 8 × 10 cm{sup 3} prototype phantom that had two slots capable of holding Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSLDs (nanoDots; Landauer, Glenwood, IL) and a single channel capable of accepting all {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy sources in current clinical use in the United States. The authors irradiated the phantom with Nucletron and Varian {sup 192}Ir HDR sources in order to determine correction factors for linearity with dose and the combined effects of irradiation energy and phantom characteristics. The phantom was then sent to eight institutions which volunteered to perform trial remote audits.Results: The linearity correction factor was k{sub L}= (−9.43 × 10{sup −5}× dose) + 1.009, where dose is in cGy, which differed from that determined by the RPC for the same batch of dosimeters using {sup 60}Co irradiation. Separate block correction factors were determined for current versions of both Nucletron and Varian {sup 192}Ir HDR sources and these vendor-specific correction factors differed by almost 2.6%. For the Nucletron source, the correction factor was 1.026 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.023–1.028], and for the Varian source, it was 1.000 (95% CI = 0.995–1.005). Variations in lateral source positioning up to 0.8 mm and distal/proximal source positioning up to 10 mm had minimal effect on dose measurement accuracy. The overall dose measurement uncertainty of the system was estimated to be 2.4% and 2.5% for the Nucletron and Varian sources, respectively (95% CI). This uncertainty was sufficient to establish a ±5% acceptance

  19. Development and implementation of a remote audit tool for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 brachytherapy using optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, Kevin E.; Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Alvarez, Paola; Lawyer, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to create a mailable phantom with measurement accuracy suitable for Radiological Physics Center (RPC) audits of high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources at institutions participating in National Cancer Institute-funded cooperative clinical trials. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) were chosen as the dosimeter to be used with the phantom.Methods: The authors designed and built an 8 × 8 × 10 cm 3 prototype phantom that had two slots capable of holding Al 2 O 3 :C OSLDs (nanoDots; Landauer, Glenwood, IL) and a single channel capable of accepting all 192 Ir HDR brachytherapy sources in current clinical use in the United States. The authors irradiated the phantom with Nucletron and Varian 192 Ir HDR sources in order to determine correction factors for linearity with dose and the combined effects of irradiation energy and phantom characteristics. The phantom was then sent to eight institutions which volunteered to perform trial remote audits.Results: The linearity correction factor was k L = (−9.43 × 10 −5 × dose) + 1.009, where dose is in cGy, which differed from that determined by the RPC for the same batch of dosimeters using 60 Co irradiation. Separate block correction factors were determined for current versions of both Nucletron and Varian 192 Ir HDR sources and these vendor-specific correction factors differed by almost 2.6%. For the Nucletron source, the correction factor was 1.026 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.023–1.028], and for the Varian source, it was 1.000 (95% CI = 0.995–1.005). Variations in lateral source positioning up to 0.8 mm and distal/proximal source positioning up to 10 mm had minimal effect on dose measurement accuracy. The overall dose measurement uncertainty of the system was estimated to be 2.4% and 2.5% for the Nucletron and Varian sources, respectively (95% CI). This uncertainty was sufficient to establish a ±5% acceptance criterion for source strength audits under a

  20. A method of quality audit for treatment planning system for intracavitary HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.D.; Vandana, S.; Philomina, A.; Kannan, S.; Rituraj, U.

    2007-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy is a multipurpose modality. Quality audit (QAu) is an independent examination and evaluation of quality assurance activities and results of an institution. Both clinical and physical aspects of patient treatments must be subjected to careful control and planning to achieve a high degree of accuracy in radiation therapy treatments. Comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programmes should be established to cover all steps from dose prescription to dose delivery. These programmes should include detailed internal checks performed by the radiotherapy centres and external audits made by independent bodies. A systematic and independent examination and evaluation to determine whether quality activities and results comply with planned arrangements and whether the arrangements are implemented effectively and are suitable to achieve objectives is called quality audit. One purpose of a quality audit (QAu) is to evaluate the need for improvement or corrective action

  1. Dose verification in HDR brachytherapy and IMRT with Fricke gel-layer dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambarini, G.; Negri, A.; Bartesaghi, G.; Pirola, L.; Carrara, M.; Gambini, I.; Tomatis, S.; Fallai, C.; Zonca, G.; Stokucova, J.

    2009-10-01

    At the Department of Physics of the Universita degli Studi di Milano in collaboration with the Medical Physics Unit and the Radiotherapy Unit of the Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano the research of a dosimetric technique based on Fricke gel layers and optical analysis in under study. In fact, Fricke gel layer dosimeters (FGLD) have various advantages such as the tissue-equivalence for photons in the clinical energy interval, the possibility to obtain the spatial information about continuous dose distribution and not only a point dose distribution as it is for example in the case of ionization chambers, TLD or diodes and the possibility to obtain the information about 3D dose distributions. In this work, specific applications of FGLD to absolute dosimetry in radiotherapy have been studied, i.e. in-phantom measurements of complex intensity modulated radiation therapy fields (IMRT) and complex brachytherapy fields. (Author)

  2. Comparison between beta radiation dose distribution due to LDR and HDR ocular brachytherapy applicators using GATE Monte Carlo platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Laoues; Rachid, Khelifi; Ahmed, Sidi Moussa

    2016-08-01

    Eye applicators with 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta-ray sources are generally used in brachytherapy for the treatment of eye diseases as uveal melanoma. Whenever, radiation is used in treatment, dosimetry is essential. However, knowledge of the exact dose distribution is a critical decision-making to the outcome of the treatment. The Monte Carlo technique provides a powerful tool for calculation of the dose and dose distributions which helps to predict and determine the doses from different shapes of various types of eye applicators more accurately. The aim of this work consisted in using the Monte Carlo GATE platform to calculate the 3D dose distribution on a mathematical model of the human eye according to international recommendations. Mathematical models were developed for four ophthalmic applicators, two HDR 90Sr applicators SIA.20 and SIA.6, and two LDR 106Ru applicators, a concave CCB model and a flat CCB model. In present work, considering a heterogeneous eye phantom and the chosen tumor, obtained results with the use of GATE for mean doses distributions in a phantom and according to international recommendations show a discrepancy with respect to those specified by the manufacturers. The QC of dosimetric parameters shows that contrarily to the other applicators, the SIA.20 applicator is consistent with recommendations. The GATE platform show that the SIA.20 applicator present better results, namely the dose delivered to critical structures were lower compared to those obtained for the other applicators, and the SIA.6 applicator, simulated with MCNPX generates higher lens doses than those generated by GATE. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of Ir192 interstitial brachytherapy for an equine malignant dermal schwannoma : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Saulez

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old Hanoverian mare was evaluated for a right buccal swelling that recurred 3 months following surgical resection. Ultrasonographic examination showed a broadly pedunculated subcutaneous mass at the level of 106-109 and 406-409 cheek teeth associated with an erosive mucosal lesion on the inside of the cheek. Histological examination of a biopsy specimen revealed a well-demarcated, malignant, dermal schwannoma. Following subcutaneous placement of platinum coated Ir192 wires under general anaesthesia, low-dose radiation of 5 gray per day was delivered for 14 days. Short-term complications included loss of patency of the right nasolacrimal duct, erythema, dermatitis, leukotrichia and left-sided deviation of the muzzle. Ten months later, there has been no tumour recurrence. Findings suggest that the use of interstitial brachytherapy should be considered for a malignant, dermal schwannoma that has recurred or is not amenable to surgery.

  4. Neuro-oncology update: radiation safety and nursing care during interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, T.M.; Drake, D.K.; Sewchand, W.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation control and safety are major considerations for nursing personnel during the care of patients receiving brachytherapy. Since the theory and practice of radiation applications are not part of the routine curriculum of nursing programs, the education of nurses and other health care professionals in radiation safety procedures is important. Regulatory agencies recommend that an annual safety course be given to all persons frequenting, using, or associated with patients containing radioactive materials. This article presents pertinent aspects of the principles and procedures of radiation safety, the role of personnel dose-monitoring devices, and the value of additional radiation control features, such as a lead cubicle, during interstitial brain implants. One institution's protocol and procedures for the care of high-intensity iridium-192 brain implants are discussed. Preoperative teaching guidelines and nursing interventions included in the protocol focus on radiation control principles

  5. A Dose-Volume Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Aided High-Dose-Rate Image-Based Interstitial Brachytherapy for Uterine Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Ken; Yamazaki, Hideya; Takenaka, Tadashi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshida, Mineo; Furuya, Seiichi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Uegaki, Tadaaki; Kuriyama, Keiko; Matsumoto, Hisanobu; Yamada, Shigetoshi; Ban, Chiaki

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of our novel image-based high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for uterine cervical cancer, we evaluated the dose-volume histogram (DVH) according to the recommendations of the Gynecological GEC-ESTRO Working Group for image-based intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). Methods and Materials: Between June 2005 and June 2007, 18 previously untreated cervical cancer patients were enrolled. We implanted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-available plastic applicators by our unique ambulatory technique. Total treatment doses were 30-36 Gy (6 Gy per fraction) combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Treatment plans were created based on planning computed tomography with MRI as a reference. DVHs of the high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV), intermediate-risk CTV (IR CTV), and the bladder and rectum were calculated. Dose values were biologically normalized to equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD 2 ). Results: The median D90 (HR CTV) and D90 (IR CTV) per fraction were 6.8 Gy (range, 5.5-7.5) and 5.4 Gy (range, 4.2-6.3), respectively. The median V100 (HR CTV) and V100 (IR CTV) were 98.4% (range, 83-100) and 81.8% (range, 64-93.8), respectively. When the dose of EBRT was added, the median D90 and D100 of HR CTV were 80.6 Gy (range, 65.5-96.6) and 62.4 Gy (range, 49-83.2). The D 2cc of the bladder was 62 Gy (range, 51.4-89) and of the rectum was 65.9 Gy (range, 48.9-76). Conclusions: Although the targets were advanced and difficult to treat effectively by ICBT, MRI-aided image-based ISBT showed favorable results for CTV and organs at risk compared with previously reported image-based ICBT results.

  6. A dose-volume analysis of magnetic resonance imaging-aided high-dose-rate image-based interstitial brachytherapy for uterine cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ken; Yamazaki, Hideya; Takenaka, Tadashi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshida, Mineo; Furuya, Seiichi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Uegaki, Tadaaki; Kuriyama, Keiko; Matsumoto, Hisanobu; Yamada, Shigetoshi; Ban, Chiaki

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility of our novel image-based high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for uterine cervical cancer, we evaluated the dose-volume histogram (DVH) according to the recommendations of the Gynecological GEC-ESTRO Working Group for image-based intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). Between June 2005 and June 2007, 18 previously untreated cervical cancer patients were enrolled. We implanted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-available plastic applicators by our unique ambulatory technique. Total treatment doses were 30-36 Gy (6 Gy per fraction) combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Treatment plans were created based on planning computed tomography with MRI as a reference. DVHs of the high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV), intermediate-risk CTV (IR CTV), and the bladder and rectum were calculated. Dose values were biologically normalized to equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD(2)). The median D90 (HR CTV) and D90 (IR CTV) per fraction were 6.8 Gy (range, 5.5-7.5) and 5.4 Gy (range, 4.2-6.3), respectively. The median V100 (HR CTV) and V100 (IR CTV) were 98.4% (range, 83-100) and 81.8% (range, 64-93.8), respectively. When the dose of EBRT was added, the median D90 and D100 of HR CTV were 80.6 Gy (range, 65.5-96.6) and 62.4 Gy (range, 49-83.2). The D(2cc) of the bladder was 62 Gy (range, 51.4-89) and of the rectum was 65.9 Gy (range, 48.9-76). Although the targets were advanced and difficult to treat effectively by ICBT, MRI-aided image-based ISBT showed favorable results for CTV and organs at risk compared with previously reported image-based ICBT results. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancer with salvage interstitial pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy. Long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strnad, Vratislav; Lotter, Michael; Kreppner, Stephan; Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-01-10

    To assess the long-term results of protocol-based interstitial pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy as reirradiation combined with simultaneous chemotherapy and interstitial hyperthermia in selected patients with recurrent head and neck tumors. A total of 104 patients with biopsy-proven recurrent head and neck cancer were treated with interstitial PDR brachytherapy. Salvage surgery had also been undergone by 53/104 (51 %) patients (R1 or R2 resection in > 80 % of patients). Salvage brachytherapy alone was administered in 81 patients (78 %), with a median total dose of 56.7 Gy. Salvage brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was performed in 23/104 patients (32 %), using a median total dose of D{sub REF} = 24 Gy. Simultaneously to PDR brachytherapy, concomitant chemotherapy was administered in 58/104 (55.8 %) patients. A single session of interstitial hyperthermia was also used to treat 33/104 (31.7 %) patients. The analysis was performed after a median follow-up of 60 months. Calculated according to Kaplan-Meier, local tumor control rates after 2, 5, and 10 years were 92.5, 82.4, and 58.9 %, respectively. Comparing results of salvage PDR brachytherapy with or without simultaneous chemotherapy, the 10-year local control rates were 76 vs. 39 % (p= 0014), respectively. No other patient- or treatment-related parameters had a significant influence on treatment results. Soft tissue necrosis or bone necrosis developed in 18/104 (17.3 %) and 11/104 (9.6 %) patients, respectively, but only 3 % of patients required surgical treatment. PDR interstitial brachytherapy with simultaneous chemotherapy is a very effective and, in experienced hands, also a safe treatment modality in selected patients with head and neck cancer in previously irradiated areas. (orig.) [German] Es erfolgte die Analyse der Langzeitergebnisse einer protokollbasierten interstitiellen Brachytherapie (Re-Bestrahlung) mit simultaner Chemotherapie und interstitieller Hyperthermie

  8. Dose optimization of intra-operative high dose rate interstitial brachytherapy implants for soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamema Swamidas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : A three dimensional (3D image-based dosimetric study to quantitatively compare geometric vs. dose-point optimization in combination with graphical optimization for interstitial brachytherapy of soft tissue sarcoma (STS. Materials and Methods : Fifteen consecutive STS patients, treated with intra-operative, interstitial Brachytherapy, were enrolled in this dosimetric study. Treatment plans were generated using dose points situated at the "central plane between the catheters", "between the catheters throughout the implanted volume", at "distances perpendicular to the implant axis" and "on the surface of the target volume" Geometrically optimized plans had dose points defined between the catheters, while dose-point optimized plans had dose points defined at a plane perpendicular to the implant axis and on the target surface. Each plan was graphically optimized and compared using dose volume indices. Results : Target coverage was suboptimal with coverage index (CI = 0.67 when dose points were defined at the central plane while it was superior when the dose points were defined at the target surface (CI=0.93. The coverage of graphically optimized plans (GrO was similar to non-GrO with dose points defined on surface or perpendicular to the implant axis. A similar pattern was noticed with conformity index (0.61 vs. 0.82. GrO were more conformal and less homogeneous compared to non-GrO. Sum index was superior for dose points defined on the surface of the target and relatively inferior for plans with dose points at other locations (1.35 vs. 1.27. Conclusions : Optimization with dose points defined away from the implant plane and on target results in superior target coverage with optimal values of other indices. GrO offer better target coverage for implants with non-uniform geometry and target volume.

  9. The role of interstitial brachytherapy in the treatment of vaginal and vulvar malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, A.R.; Windschall, A.; Lotter, M.; Sauer, R.; Strnad, V.; Mehlhorn, G.; Beckmann, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Background: irradiation has established itself as a treatment for vulvar and vaginal malignancies. Due to the sensitive nature of the vulvar and vaginal tissues, interstitial brachytherapy (iBT) provides an effective, gentle and individualized therapy. Patients and Methods: patients with vulvar (nine of 22) and vaginal (13 of 22) malignancies were treated using interstitial pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDR-iBT). Twelve out of 22 patients were additionally treated using external-beam therapy to the pelvis and regional lymph nodes. The median total dose of PDR-iBT administered to patients with vulvar carcinoma was 55.0 Gy. The median total PDR dose administered to patients with vaginal malignancies amounted to 20.25 Gy. Results: the median follow-up time for patients with vulvar cancer was 19 months and for patients with vaginal malignancies 27 months. Acute mucositis or skin reactions during iBT were observed in 15 of 22 patients. Two of 22 patients showed delayed side effects. After 6 months, 77.8% of the patients with vulvar cancer (seven out of nine) and 100% of the patients with vaginal malignancies (13 out of 13) achieved complete local remission. One patient out of nine with vulvar carcinoma developed local recurrence, four out of nine regional recurrence, and two out of nine developed regional recurrence and had local tumor following therapy. In patients with malignancies of the vagina, no cases of local recurrence were observed, but distant metastases were found in five out of 13 patients. At the time of analysis, eleven out of 22 patients with vulvar or vaginal carcinoma were still alive. Conclusion: IBT achieved good local control without serious delayed side effects in both localizations. However, survival is limited by regional or distant metastases. (orig.)

  10. Ultrasound-guided interstitial brachytherapy in the treatment of advanced vaginal recurrences from cervical and endometrial carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitmann, H.D.; Knocke, T.H.; Waldhaeusl, C.; Poetter, R. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-01

    Background: in advanced vaginal recurrences of cervical and endometrial carcinomas therapeutic options are rare because of preceding therapy. Patients and methods: 23 patients developing advanced vaginal recurrences of cervical and endometrial carcinomas were included. 15 patients started with external-beam therapy to the pelvis and eight patients after preceding radiotherapy underwent brachytherapy alone. All patients had ultrasound-guided implantation of transvaginal or transperineal interstitial needles for brachytherapy. Median prescribed total dose was 64 Gy. Results: 18 patients (78%) achieved complete remission. Six patients are alive without tumor and one with tumor after a median follow-up of 64 months. 14 patients died of tumor and two of intercurrent disease. 5-year disease-specific survival and local control rate were 43% and 47%, respectively, in patients with complete remission. Univariate analysis found time to relapse > 2 years, initial diameter {<=} 4 cm, initial volume < 15 cm{sup 3}, no extension to the pelvic side wall, volume before brachytherapy < 7.5 cm{sup 3}, brachytherapy coverage index > 0.8, and prescribed total dose > 64 Gy being positive predictors for local control and survival. Conclusion: the use of ultrasound guidance for placement of interstitial needles in template-based brachytherapy of advanced recurrent gynecologic malignancies is a feasible, safe, and cheap method with encouraging results. Today, ultrasound imaging can be also used to some extent for treatment planning which requires further development. Patient- and treatment-related prognostic factors can be defined. (orig.)

  11. Dosimetric perturbations of a lead shield for surface and interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candela-Juan, Cristian; Granero, Domingo; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Rivard, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    In surface and interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy with either 60 Co, 192 Ir, or 169 Yb sources, some radiosensitive organs near the surface may be exposed to high absorbed doses. This may be reduced by covering the implants with a lead shield on the body surface, which results in dosimetric perturbations. Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed for the three radionuclides placed at a single dwell position. Four different shield thicknesses (0, 3, 6, and 10 mm) and three different source depths (0, 5, and 10 mm) in water were considered, with the lead shield placed at the phantom surface. Backscatter dose enhancement and transmission data were obtained for the lead shields. Results were corrected to account for a realistic clinical case with multiple dwell positions. The range of the high backscatter dose enhancement in water is 3 mm for 60 Co and 1 mm for both 192 Ir and 169 Yb. Transmission data for 60 Co and 192 Ir are smaller than those reported by Papagiannis et al (2008 Med. Phys. 35 4898–4906) for brachytherapy facility shielding; for 169 Yb, the difference is negligible. In conclusion, the backscatter overdose produced by the lead shield can be avoided by just adding a few millimetres of bolus. Transmission data provided in this work as a function of lead thickness can be used to estimate healthy organ equivalent dose saving. Use of a lead shield is justified. (paper)

  12. Phase III trial of high and low dose rate interstitial radiotherapy for early oral tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Teshima, Teruki; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Fuchihata, Hajime; Furukawa, Souhei

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Oral tongue carcinomas are highly curable with radiotherapy. In the past, patients with tongue carcinoma have usually been treated with low dose rate (LDR) interstitial radiation. This Phase III study was designed to compare the treatment results obtained with LDR with those obtained with high dose rate (HDR) interstitial radiotherapy for tongue carcinoma. Methods and Materials: The criteria for patient selection for the Phase III study were: (a) presence of a T1T2N0 tumor that could be treated with single-plane implantation, (b) localization of tumor at the lateral tongue border, (c) tumor thickness of 10 mm or less, (d) performance status between O and 3, and (e) absence of any severe concurrent disease. From April 1992 through December 1993, 15 patients in the LDR group (70 Gy/4 to 9 days) and 14 patients in the HDR group (60 Gy/10 fractions/6 days) were accrued. The time interval between two fractions of the HDR brachytherapy was more than 6 h. Results: Local recurrence occurred in two patients treated with LDR brachytherapy but in none of the patients treated with HDR. One- and 2-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were both 86%, compared with 100% in the HDR group (p = 0.157). There were four patients with nodal metastasis in the LDR group and three in the HDR group. Local recurrence occurred in two of the four patients with nodal metastases in the LDR group. One- and 2-year nodal control rates for patients in the LDR group are were 85%, compared with 79% in the HDR group. Conclusion: HDR fractionated interstitial brachytherapy can be an alternative to traditional LDR brachytherapy for early tongue cancer and eliminate the radiation exposure for medical staffs

  13. TU-H-CAMPUS-JeP3-05: Adaptive Determination of Needle Sequence HDR Prostate Brachytherapy with Divergent Needle-By-Needle Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borot de Battisti, M; Maenhout, M; Lagendijk, J J W; Van Vulpen, M; Moerland, M A; Denis de Senneville, B; Hautvast, G; Binnekamp, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a new method which adaptively determines the optimal needle insertion sequence for HDR prostate brachytherapy involving divergent needle-by-needle dose delivery by e.g. a robotic device. A needle insertion sequence is calculated at the beginning of the intervention and updated after each needle insertion with feedback on needle positioning errors. Methods: Needle positioning errors and anatomy changes may occur during HDR brachytherapy which can lead to errors in the delivered dose. A novel strategy was developed to calculate and update the needle sequence and the dose plan after each needle insertion with feedback on needle positioning errors. The dose plan optimization was performed by numerical simulations. The proposed needle sequence determination optimizes the final dose distribution based on the dose coverage impact of each needle. This impact is predicted stochastically by needle insertion simulations. HDR procedures were simulated with varying number of needle insertions (4 to 12) using 11 patient MR data-sets with PTV, prostate, urethra, bladder and rectum delineated. Needle positioning errors were modeled by random normally distributed angulation errors (standard deviation of 3 mm at the needle’s tip). The final dose parameters were compared in the situations where the needle with the largest vs. the smallest dose coverage impact was selected at each insertion. Results: Over all scenarios, the percentage of clinically acceptable final dose distribution improved when the needle selected had the largest dose coverage impact (91%) compared to the smallest (88%). The differences were larger for few (4 to 6) needle insertions (maximum difference scenario: 79% vs. 60%). The computation time of the needle sequence optimization was below 60s. Conclusion: A new adaptive needle sequence determination for HDR prostate brachytherapy was developed. Coupled to adaptive planning, the selection of the needle with the largest dose coverage impact

  14. SU-F-T-37: Dosimetric Evaluation of Planned Versus Decay Corrected Treatment Plans for the Treatment of Tandem-Based Cervical HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, M [Texas Oncology, PA, Fort Worth, TX (United States); Shobhit University, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh (India); Manjhi, J; Rai, D [Shobhit University, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh (India); Kehwar, T [Pinnacle Health Cancer Center, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Barker, J; Heintz, B; Shide, K [Texas Oncology, PA, Fort Worth, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study evaluated dosimetric parameters for actual treatment plans versus decay corrected treatment plans for cervical HDR brachytherapy. Methods: 125 plans of 25 patients, who received 5 fractions of HDR brachytherapy, were evaluated in this study. Dose was prescribed to point A (ICRU-38) and High risk clinical tumor volume (HR-CTV) and organs at risk (OAR) were, retrospectively, delineated on original CT images by treating physician. First HDR plan was considered as reference plan and decay correction was applied to calculate treatment time for subsequent fractions, and was applied, retrospectively, to determine point A, HR-CTV D90, and rectum and bladder doses. Results: The differences between mean point A reference doses and the point A doses of the plans computed using decay times were found to be 1.05%±0.74% (−2.26% to 3.26%) for second fraction; −0.25%±0.84% (−3.03% to 3.29%) for third fraction; 0.04%±0.70% (−2.68% to 2.56%) for fourth fraction and 0.30%±0.81% (−3.93% to 2.67%) for fifth fraction. Overall mean point A dose difference, for all fractions, was 0.29%±0.38% (within ± 5%). Mean rectum and bladder dose differences were calculated to be −3.46%±0.12% and −2.47%±0.09%, for points, respectively, and −1.72%±0.09% and −0.96%±0.06%, for D2cc, respectively. HR-CTV D90 mean dose difference was found to be −1.67% ± 0.11%. There was no statistically significant difference between the reference planned point A doses and that calculated using decay time to the subsequent fractions (p<0.05). Conclusion: This study reveals that a decay corrected treatment will provide comparable dosimetric results and can be utilized for subsequent fractions of cervical HDR brachytherapy instead of actual treatment planning. This approach will increase efficiency, decrease workload, reduce patient observation time between applicator insertion and treatment delivery. This would be particularly useful for institutions with limited

  15. Dosimetric impact of prostate volume change between CT-based HDR brachytherapy fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yongbok; Hsu, I-C.; Lessard, Etienne; Vujic, Jasmina; Pouliot, Jean

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The objective is to evaluate the prostate volume change and its dosimetric consequences after the insertion of catheters for high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: For 13 consecutive patients, a spiral CT scan was acquired before each of the 2 fractions, separated on average by 20 hours. The coordinates of the catheters were obtained on 3 axial CT slices corresponding to apex, mid portion, and base portion of the prostate. A mathematical expansion model was used to evaluate the change of prostate volumes between the 2 fractions. It is based on the difference in the cube of the average distance between the centroid and catheter positions. The variation of implant dose-volume histograms between fractions was computed for plans produced by either inverse planning based on simulated annealing or geometric optimization. Results: The average magnitude of either increase or reduction in prostate volume was 7.8% (range, 2-17%). This volume change corresponds to an average prostate radius change of only 2.5% (range, 0.7-5.4%). For 5 patients, the prostate volume increased on average by 9% (range, 2-17%), whereas a reduction was observed for 8 patients by an average of 7% (range, 2-13%). More variation was observed at the prostate base than at mid or apex gland. The comparison of implant dose-volume histograms showed a small reduction of V100 receiving the prescription dose, with an average of 3.5% (range, 0.5-12%) and 2.2% (range, 1-6%) for inverse planning based on our simulated annealing and geometric optimization plans, respectively. Conclusion: Small volume change was observed between treatment fractions. This translates into small changes in dose delivered to the prostate volume

  16. TU-AB-201-07: Image Guided Endorectal HDR Brachytherapy Using a Compliant Balloon Applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, G; Goodman, K [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: High dose rate endorectal brachytherapy is an option to deliver a focal, high-dose radiotherapy to rectal tumors for patients undergoing non-operative management. We investigate a new multichannel, MR compatible applicator with a novel balloon-based design to provide improved treatment geometry. We report on the initial clinical experience using this applicator. Methods: Patients were enrolled on an IRB-approved, dose-escalation protocol evaluating the use of the anorectal (AR-1) applicator (Ancer Medical, Hialeah, FL), a multichannel applicator with two concentric balloons. The inner balloon supports 8 source lumens; the compliant outer balloon expands to separate the normal rectal wall and the source lumens, yet deforms around a firm, exophytic rectal mass, leading to dose escalation to tumor while sparing normal rectum. Under general anesthesia, gold fiducial markers were inserted above and below the tumor, and the AR applicator was placed in the rectum. MRI-based treatment plans were prepared to deliver 15 Gy in 3 weekly fractions to the target volume while sparing healthy rectal tissue, bladder, bowel and anal muscles. Prior to each treatment, CBCT/Fluoroscopy were used to place the applicator in the treatment position and confirm the treatment geometry using rigid registration of the CBCT and planning MRI. After registration of the applicator images, positioning was evaluated based on the match of the gold markers. Results: Highly conformal treatment plans were achieved. MR compatibility of the applicator enabled good tumor visualization. In spite of the non-rigid nature of the applicators and the fact that a new applicator was used at each treatment session, treatment geometry was reproducible to within 2.5 mm. Conclusions: This is the first report on using the AR applicator in patients. Highly conformal plans, confidence in MRI target delineation, in combination with reproducible treatment geometry provide encouraging feedback for continuation with

  17. TU-F-BRF-02: MR-US Prostate Registration Using Patient-Specific Tissue Elasticity Property Prior for MR-Targeted, TRUS-Guided HDR Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X; Rossi, P; Ogunleye, T; Jani, A; Curran, W; Liu, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has become a popular treatment modality for prostate cancer. Conventional transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate HDR brachytherapy could benefit significantly from MR-targeted, TRUS-guided procedure where the tumor locations, acquired from the multiparametric MRI, are incorporated into the treatment planning. In order to enable this integration, we have developed a MR-TRUS registration with a patient-specific biomechanical elasticity prior. Methods: The proposed method used a biomechanical elasticity prior to guide the prostate volumetric B-spline deformation in the MRI and TRUS registration. The patient-specific biomechanical elasticity prior was generated using ultrasound elastography, where two 3D TRUS prostate images were acquired under different probe-induced pressures during the HDR procedure, which takes 2-4 minutes. These two 3D TRUS images were used to calculate the local displacement (elasticity map) of two prostate volumes. The B-spline transformation was calculated by minimizing the Euclidean distance between the normalized attribute vectors of the prostate surface landmarks on the MR and TRUS. This technique was evaluated through two studies: a prostate-phantom study and a pilot study with 5 patients undergoing prostate HDR treatment. The accuracy of our approach was assessed through the locations of several landmarks in the post-registration and TRUS images; our registration results were compared with the surface-based method. Results: For the phantom study, the mean landmark displacement of the proposed method was 1.29±0.11 mm. For the 5 patients, the mean landmark displacement of the surface-based method was 3.25±0.51 mm; our method, 1.71±0.25 mm. Therefore, our proposed method of prostate registration outperformed the surfaced-based registration significantly. Conclusion: We have developed a novel MR-TRUS prostate registration approach based on patient-specific biomechanical elasticity prior

  18. SU-C-BRD-02: A Team Focused Clinical Implementation and Failure Mode and Effects Analysis of HDR Skin Brachytherapy Using Valencia and Leipzig Surface Applicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayler, E; Harrison, A; Eldredge-Hindy, H; Dinome, J; Munro, S; Anne, R; Comber, E; Lockamy, V

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: and Leipzig applicators (VLAs) are single-channel brachytherapy surface applicators used to treat skin lesions up to 2cm diameter. Source dwell times can be calculated and entered manually after clinical set-up or ultrasound. This procedure differs dramatically from CT-based planning; the novelty and unfamiliarity could lead to severe errors. To build layers of safety and ensure quality, a multidisciplinary team created a protocol and applied Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) to the clinical procedure for HDR VLA skin treatments. Methods: team including physicists, physicians, nurses, therapists, residents, and administration developed a clinical procedure for VLA treatment. The procedure was evaluated using FMEA. Failure modes were identified and scored by severity, occurrence, and detection. The clinical procedure was revised to address high-scoring process nodes. Results: Several key components were added to the clinical procedure to minimize risk probability numbers (RPN): -Treatments are reviewed at weekly QA rounds, where physicians discuss diagnosis, prescription, applicator selection, and set-up. Peer review reduces the likelihood of an inappropriate treatment regime. -A template for HDR skin treatments was established in the clinical EMR system to standardize treatment instructions. This reduces the chances of miscommunication between the physician and planning physicist, and increases the detectability of an error during the physics second check. -A screen check was implemented during the second check to increase detectability of an error. -To reduce error probability, the treatment plan worksheet was designed to display plan parameters in a format visually similar to the treatment console display. This facilitates data entry and verification. -VLAs are color-coded and labeled to match the EMR prescriptions, which simplifies in-room selection and verification. Conclusion: Multidisciplinary planning and FMEA increased delectability and

  19. 3D dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy resonance imaging nuclear magnetic (b= 0.2 t) using a base acrylic gel (MAGIC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista Hernandez, Guillermo; Velez, Graciela R.; Schurrer, Clemar

    2009-01-01

    Dosimetry gels using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been extended in recent literature. Our study presents the preparation, calibration IRM of acrylic gel (MAGIC) and its application in measuring dose in a 3D distribution HDR Brachytherapy with 192Ir source. The first gels used were the type Fricke gels based on the relationship of dose and time T1 relaxation. In 2001, Fong presented a new normoxic gel known as MAGIC whose main components are Methacrylic Acid (polymerizing), and Hydroquinone (inhibitor of self-curing) based on the relationship of dose and T2 relaxation time. Subsequent studies make changes in the concentrations component of the MAGIC (Methacrylic Acid and Hydroquinone in particular) to observe the behavior of the sensitivity of the gel with respect to its components and beam magnetic resonance equipment using magnetic fields higher to 0.5 T. This is done with equipment available to the staff of a Radiotherapy clinic setting. MAGIC gel is prepared according to composition by Crescenti (6% methacrylic acid), is calibrated with a 60Co unit TERADI INVAP 8002c (Argentina). Was raised shooting in a Siemens MRI scanner of 0.2 T Magnetom Concerto irradiated with a team of Brachytherapy High Dose Rate (HDR) Micro selectron Nucletron's V2 HDR for comparison with dose distributions provided by the planning system from Nucletron PLATO Sunrise. Was obtained a calibration curve for doses ranging from 0 to 8.0 Gy and a field strength 0.2 T magnetic We compared the sensitivity obtained in our calibration (Slope of the calibration curve) with those presented in the literature. Two phantoms were prepared for measurement in brachytherapy: a PMMA and a PVC. It was noted that MAGIC gel reacts chemically with PMMA and cured prior to irradiation. The phantom of PVC (no reactions) were irradiated with Micro selectron equipment and measured the dose distribution in 3D MRI. Were measured doses at the points specified by the Planning System and PLATO Sunrise compared

  20. Dose Reduction Study in Vaginal Balloon Packing Filled With Contrast for HDR Brachytherapy Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Amarjit S.; Zhang, Geoffrey G.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Biagioli, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Vaginal balloon packing is a means to displace organs at risk during high dose rate brachytherapy of the uterine cervix. We tested the hypothesis that contrast-filled vaginal balloon packing reduces radiation dose to organs at risk, such as the bladder and rectum, in comparison to water- or air-filled balloons. Methods and Materials: In a phantom study, semispherical vaginal packing balloons were filled with air, saline solution, and contrast agents. A high dose rate iridium-192 source was placed on the anterior surface of the balloon, and the diode detector was placed on the posterior surface. Dose ratios were taken with each material in the balloon. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, by use of the MC computer program DOSXYZnrc, were performed to study dose reduction vs. balloon size and contrast material, including commercially available iodine- and gadolinium-based contrast agents. Results: Measured dose ratios on the phantom with the balloon radius of 3.4 cm were 0.922 ± 0.002 for contrast/saline solution and 0.808 ± 0.001 for contrast/air. The corresponding ratios by MC simulations were 0.895 ± 0.010 and 0.781 ± 0.010. The iodine concentration in the contrast was 23.3% by weight. The dose reduction of contrast-filled balloon ranges from 6% to 15% compared with water-filled balloon and 11% to 26% compared with air-filled balloon, with a balloon size range between 1.4 and 3.8 cm, and iodine concentration in contrast of 24.9%. The dose reduction was proportional to the contrast agent concentration. The gadolinium-based contrast agents showed less dose reduction because of much lower concentrations in their solutions. Conclusions: The dose to the posterior wall of the bladder and the anterior wall of the rectum can be reduced if the vaginal balloon is filled with contrast agent in comparison to vaginal balloons filled with saline solution or air.

  1. WE-DE-201-02: A Statistical Analysis Tool for Plan Quality Verification in HDR Brachytherapy Forward Planning for Cervix Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, R; Zhu, X; Li, S; Zheng, D; Lei, Y; Wang, S; Verma, V; Bennion, N; Wahl, A; Zhou, S [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy forward planning is principally an iterative process; hence, plan quality is affected by planners’ experiences and limited planning time. Thus, this may lead to sporadic errors and inconsistencies in planning. A statistical tool based on previous approved clinical treatment plans would help to maintain the consistency of planning quality and improve the efficiency of second checking. Methods: An independent dose calculation tool was developed from commercial software. Thirty-three previously approved cervical HDR plans with the same prescription dose (550cGy), applicator type, and treatment protocol were examined, and ICRU defined reference point doses (bladder, vaginal mucosa, rectum, and points A/B) along with dwell times were collected. Dose calculation tool then calculated appropriate range with a 95% confidence interval for each parameter obtained, which would be used as the benchmark for evaluation of those parameters in future HDR treatment plans. Model quality was verified using five randomly selected approved plans from the same dataset. Results: Dose variations appears to be larger at the reference point of bladder and mucosa as compared with rectum. Most reference point doses from verification plans fell between the predicted range, except the doses of two points of rectum and two points of reference position A (owing to rectal anatomical variations & clinical adjustment in prescription points, respectively). Similar results were obtained for tandem and ring dwell times despite relatively larger uncertainties. Conclusion: This statistical tool provides an insight into clinically acceptable range of cervical HDR plans, which could be useful in plan checking and identifying potential planning errors, thus improving the consistency of plan quality.

  2. Clinical Investigations of a CT-based reconstruction and 3D-Treatment planning system in interstitial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolotas, C; Zamboglou, N [Strahlenklinik, Stadtische Kliniken Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)

    1999-12-31

    Purpose: Development, application and evaluation of a CT-guided implantation technique and a fully CT based treatment planning procedure for brachytherapy. Methods and Materials : A brachytherapy procedure based on CT-guided implantation technique and CT based treatment planning has been developed and clinically evaluated. For this purpose a software system (PROMETHEUS) for the 3D reconstruction of brachytherapy catheters and patient anatomy using only CT scans has been developed. An interface for the Nucletron Plato BPS treatment planning system for the optimisation and calculation of dose distribution has been devised. The planning target volume(s) are defined as sets of points using contouring tools and are for optimisation of the 3D dose distribution. Dose-volume histogram-based analysis of the dose distribution enables a clinically realistic evaluation of the brachytherapy application to be made. The CT-guided implantation of catheters and the CT-based treatment planning procedure has been performed for interstitial brachytherapy and for different tumour and anatomical localizations in 197 patients between 1996 and 1997. Results : The accuracy of the CT reconstruction was tested using a quality assurance phantom an an interstitial implant of 12 needles and compared with the results of reconstruction using radiographs[hs. Both methods give comparable results with regard to accuracy. The CT based reconstruction was faster. Clinical feasibility has been proven in pre-irradiated recurrences of brain tumour, in pre-treated recurrences or metastatic disease, and in breast carcinomas. The tumour volume treated ranged from 5.1 - 2741 cm3. Analysis of the implant quality showed a slight significant lower COIN value for the bone implants, but no differences in respect to the planning target volume. Conclusions : With the integration of CT imaging in the treatment planning and documentation of brachytherapy, we have a new CT based quality assurance method to evaluate

  3. Clinical Investigations of a CT-based reconstruction and 3D-Treatment planning system in interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolotas, C.; Zamboglou, N.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Development, application and evaluation of a CT-guided implantation technique and a fully CT based treatment planning procedure for brachytherapy. Methods and Materials : A brachytherapy procedure based on CT-guided implantation technique and CT based treatment planning has been developed and clinically evaluated. For this purpose a software system (PROMETHEUS) for the 3D reconstruction of brachytherapy catheters and patient anatomy using only CT scans has been developed. An interface for the Nucletron Plato BPS treatment planning system for the optimisation and calculation of dose distribution has been devised. The planning target volume(s) are defined as sets of points using contouring tools and are for optimisation of the 3D dose distribution. Dose-volume histogram-based analysis of the dose distribution enables a clinically realistic evaluation of the brachytherapy application to be made. The CT-guided implantation of catheters and the CT-based treatment planning procedure has been performed for interstitial brachytherapy and for different tumour and anatomical localizations in 197 patients between 1996 and 1997. Results : The accuracy of the CT reconstruction was tested using a quality assurance phantom an an interstitial implant of 12 needles and compared with the results of reconstruction using radiographs[hs. Both methods give comparable results with regard to accuracy. The CT based reconstruction was faster. Clinical feasibility has been proven in pre-irradiated recurrences of brain tumour, in pre-treated recurrences or metastatic disease, and in breast carcinomas. The tumour volume treated ranged from 5.1 - 2741 cm3. Analysis of the implant quality showed a slight significant lower COIN value for the bone implants, but no differences in respect to the planning target volume. Conclusions : With the integration of CT imaging in the treatment planning and documentation of brachytherapy, we have a new CT based quality assurance method to evaluate

  4. Salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for local prostate cancer recurrence after radical radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Solodkiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies salvage interstitial radiation therapy for recurrent prostate cancer, launched at the end of the XX century. In recent years, more and more attention is paid to high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT as a method of treating local recurrence.The purpose of research – preliminary clinical results of salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy applied in cases of suspected local recurrence or of residual tumour after radiotherapy.Preliminary findings indicate the possibility of using HDR-BT, achieving local tumor control with low genitourinary toxicity.

  5. Evaluation of an active magnetic resonance tracking system for interstitial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei, E-mail: wwang21@partners.org [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N.; Damato, Antonio L.; Cormack, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Chen, Yue; Tse, Zion [Department of Engineering, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Pan, Li [Siemens Healthcare USA, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Tokuda, Junichi; Schmidt, Ehud J. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Seethamraju, Ravi T. [Siemens Healthcare USA, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Dumoulin, Charles L. [Radiology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In gynecologic cancers, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the modality of choice for visualizing tumors and their surroundings because of superior soft-tissue contrast. Real-time MR guidance of catheter placement in interstitial brachytherapy facilitates target coverage, and would be further improved by providing intraprocedural estimates of dosimetric coverage. A major obstacle to intraprocedural dosimetry is the time needed for catheter trajectory reconstruction. Herein the authors evaluate an active MR tracking (MRTR) system which provides rapid catheter tip localization and trajectory reconstruction. The authors assess the reliability and spatial accuracy of the MRTR system in comparison to standard catheter digitization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT. Methods: The MRTR system includes a stylet with microcoils mounted on its shaft, which can be inserted into brachytherapy catheters and tracked by a dedicated MRTR sequence. Catheter tip localization errors of the MRTR system and their dependence on catheter locations and orientation inside the MR scanner were quantified with a water phantom. The distances between the tracked tip positions of the MRTR stylet and the predefined ground-truth tip positions were calculated for measurements performed at seven locations and with nine orientations. To evaluate catheter trajectory reconstruction, fifteen brachytherapy catheters were placed into a gel phantom with an embedded catheter fixation framework, with parallel or crossed paths. The MRTR stylet was then inserted sequentially into each catheter. During the removal of the MRTR stylet from within each catheter, a MRTR measurement was performed at 40 Hz to acquire the instantaneous stylet tip position, resulting in a series of three-dimensional (3D) positions along the catheter’s trajectory. A 3D polynomial curve was fit to the tracked positions for each catheter, and equally spaced dwell points were then generated along the curve. High

  6. Evaluation of an active magnetic resonance tracking system for interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Damato, Antonio L.; Cormack, Robert A.; Chen, Yue; Tse, Zion; Pan, Li; Tokuda, Junichi; Schmidt, Ehud J.; Seethamraju, Ravi T.; Dumoulin, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In gynecologic cancers, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the modality of choice for visualizing tumors and their surroundings because of superior soft-tissue contrast. Real-time MR guidance of catheter placement in interstitial brachytherapy facilitates target coverage, and would be further improved by providing intraprocedural estimates of dosimetric coverage. A major obstacle to intraprocedural dosimetry is the time needed for catheter trajectory reconstruction. Herein the authors evaluate an active MR tracking (MRTR) system which provides rapid catheter tip localization and trajectory reconstruction. The authors assess the reliability and spatial accuracy of the MRTR system in comparison to standard catheter digitization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT. Methods: The MRTR system includes a stylet with microcoils mounted on its shaft, which can be inserted into brachytherapy catheters and tracked by a dedicated MRTR sequence. Catheter tip localization errors of the MRTR system and their dependence on catheter locations and orientation inside the MR scanner were quantified with a water phantom. The distances between the tracked tip positions of the MRTR stylet and the predefined ground-truth tip positions were calculated for measurements performed at seven locations and with nine orientations. To evaluate catheter trajectory reconstruction, fifteen brachytherapy catheters were placed into a gel phantom with an embedded catheter fixation framework, with parallel or crossed paths. The MRTR stylet was then inserted sequentially into each catheter. During the removal of the MRTR stylet from within each catheter, a MRTR measurement was performed at 40 Hz to acquire the instantaneous stylet tip position, resulting in a series of three-dimensional (3D) positions along the catheter’s trajectory. A 3D polynomial curve was fit to the tracked positions for each catheter, and equally spaced dwell points were then generated along the curve. High

  7. Assessment of dose homogeneity in conformal interstitial breast brachytherapy with special respect to ICRU recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Major

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To present the results of dose homogeneity analysis for breast cancer patients treated with image-basedconformal interstitial brachytherapy, and to investigate the usefulness of the ICRU recommendations. Material and methods: Treatment plans of forty-nine patients who underwent partial breast irradiation with interstitialbrachytherapy were analyzed. Quantitative parameters were used to characterize dose homogeneity. Dose nonuniformityratio (DNR, dose homogeneity index (DHI, uniformity index (UI and quality index (QI were calculated.Furthermore, parameters recommended by the ICRU 58 such as minimum target dose (MTD, mean central dose (MCD,high dose volume, low dose volume and the spread between local minimum doses were determined. Correlationsbetween the calculated homogeneity parameters and usefulness of the ICRU parameters in image-based brachytherapywere investigated. Results: Catheters with mean number of 15 (range: 6-25 were implanted in median 4 (range: 3-6 planes. The volu -me of the PTV ranged from 15.5 cm3 to 176 cm3. The mean DNR was 0.32, the DHI 0.66, the UI 1.49 and the QI 1.94. Relatedto the prescribed dose, the MTD was 69% and the MCD 135%. The mean high dose volume was 8.1 cm3 (10%, whilethe low dose volume was 63.8 cm3 (96%. The spread between minimum doses in central plane ranged from –14% to+20%. Good correlation was found between the DNR and the DHI (R2 = 0.7874, and the DNR correlated well with theUI (R2 = 0.7615 also. No correlation was found between the ICRU parameters and any other volumetric parameters. Conclusions: To characterize the dose uniformity in high-dose rate breast implants, DVH-related homogeneityparameters representing the full 3D dose distributions are mandatory to be used. In many respects the current re commendationsof the ICRU Report 58 are already outdated, and it is well-timed to set up new recommendations, whichare more feasible for image-guided conformal interstitial brachytherapy.

  8. SU-F-BRA-05: Utility of the Combined Use of Two Types of HDR Sources with the Direction Modulation Brachytherapy (DMBT) Tandem Applicator for Cervical Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safigholi, H; Soliman, A; Song, W [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, U of T, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Han, D [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, U of T, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Meigooni, A Soleimani [Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Scanderbeg, D [UCSD Medical Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To maximize the dose to HRCTV while minimizing dose to the OARs, the combination of two HDR brachytherapy sources, 192-Ir and 169-Yb, used in combination with the recently-proposed novel direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator were examined. Methods: The DMBT tandem, made from nonmagnetic tungsten-alloy rod, with diameter of 5.4mm, has 6 symmetric peripheral holes of 1.3mm diameter. The 0.3mm thick bio-compatible plastic tubing wraps the tandem. MCNPX v.2.6 was used to simulate the mHDR 192-Ir V2 and 4140 HDR 169-Yb sources inside the DMBT applicator. Thought was by combining the higher energy 192-Ir (380keV) and lower energy 169-Yb (92.7keV) sources could create unprecedented level of dose conformality when combined with the high-degree intensity modulation capable DMBT tandem applicator. 3D dose matrices, with 1 mm3 resolution, were imported into an in-house-coded inverse optimization planning system to evaluate plan quality of 19 clinical patient cases. Prescription dose was 15Gy. All plans were normalized to receive the same HRCTV D90. Results: Generally, the use of dual sources produced better plans than using either of the sources alone, with significantly better performance in some patients. The mean D2cc for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 11.65±2.30Gy, 7.47±3.05Gy, and 9.84±2.48Gy for 192-Ir-only, respectively. For 169 -Yb-only, they were 11.67±2.26Gy, 7.44±3.02Gy, and 9.83±2.38Gy, respectively. The corresponding data for the dual sources were 11.51±2.24Gy, 7.30±3.00Gy, and 9.68 ±2.39Gy, respectively. The HRCTV D98 and V100 were 16.37±1.86Gy and 97.37±1.92Gy for Ir-192-only, respectively. For 169-Yb-only, they were 16.43±1.86Gy, and 97.51±1.91Gy, respectively. For the dual source, they were 16.42±1.87Gy and 97.47±1.93Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The plan quality improves, in some cases quite significantly, for when dual 192-Ir and 169-Yb sources are used in combination with highly intensity modulation capable

  9. Feasibility of salvage interstitial microwave thermal therapy for prostate carcinoma following failed brachytherapy: studies in a tissue equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCann, Claire; Kumaradas, J Carl; Gertner, Mark R; Davidson, Sean R H; Dolan, Alfred M; Sherar, Michael D

    2003-01-01

    Thermal therapy is an experimental treatment to destroy solid tumours by heating them to temperatures ranging from 55 deg C to 90 deg C, inducing thermal coagulation and necrosis of the tumour. We are investigating the feasibility of interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment for prostate cancer patients with local recurrence following failed brachytherapy. Due to the electrical and thermal conductivity of the brachytherapy seeds, we hypothesized that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy and cause unpredictable heating. To investigate this, a 915 MHz helical antenna was inserted into a muscle-equivalent phantom with and without brachytherapy seeds. Following a 10 W, 5 s input to the antenna, the temperature rise was used to calculate absorbed power, also referred to as specific absorption rate (SAR). Plane wave models based on Maxwell's equations were also used to characterize the electromagnetic scattering effect of the seeds. In addition, the phantom was heated with 8 W for 5 min to quantify the effect of the seeds on the temperature distribution during extended heating. SAR measurements indicated that the seeds had no significant effect on the shape and size of the SAR pattern of the antenna. However, the plane wave simulations indicated that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy resulting in hot spots at the seed edges. Lack of experimental evidence of these hot spots was probably due to the complex polarization of the microwaves emitted by the helical antenna. Extended heating experiments also demonstrated that the seeds had no significant effect on the temperature distributions and rates of temperature rise measured in the phantom. The results indicate that brachytherapy seeds are not a technical impediment to interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment following failed brachytherapy

  10. Comparison of Oncentra® Brachy IPSA and graphical optimisation techniques: a case study of HDR brachytherapy head and neck and prostate plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, Michael G; Ohanessian, Lucy; Batumalai, Vikneswary; Patel, Virendra; Holloway, Lois C

    2015-01-01

    There are a number of different dwell positions and time optimisation options available in the Oncentra® Brachy (Elekta Brachytherapy Solutions, Veenendaal, The Netherlands) brachytherapy treatment planning system. The purpose of this case study was to compare graphical (GRO) and inverse planning by simulated annealing (IPSA) optimisation techniques for interstitial head and neck (HN) and prostate plans considering dosimetry, modelled radiobiology outcome and planning time. Four retrospective brachytherapy patients were chosen for this study, two recurrent HN and two prostatic boosts. Manual GRO and IPSA plans were generated for each patient. Plans were compared using dose–volume histograms (DVH) and dose coverage metrics including; conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity number (CN). Logit and relative seriality models were used to calculate tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Approximate planning time was also recorded. There was no significant difference between GRO and IPSA in terms of dose metrics with mean CI of 1.30 and 1.57 (P > 0.05) respectively. IPSA achieved an average HN TCP of 0.32 versus 0.12 for GRO while for prostate there was no significant difference. Mean GRO planning times were greater than 75 min while average IPSA planning times were less than 10 min. Planning times for IPSA were greatly reduced compared to GRO and plans were dosimetrically similar. For this reason, IPSA makes for a useful planning tool in HN and prostate brachytherapy

  11. SU-E-T-615: Investigation of the Dosimetric Impact of Tandem Loading in the Treatment of Cervical Cancer for HDR Brachytherapy Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel, C; Patton, L; Nelson, K; Lin, B [Cancer Care Centers of South Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of the tandem loading in the treatment of cervical cancer for HDR brachytherapy procedures. Methods: Ten patients were evaluated, each of whom received 5 fractions of treatment. Tandem and ovoid sets were inserted into the uterine cavity based on institutional protocols and procedures. Following insertion and stabilization, CT image sets of 1.5mm slice thickness were acquired and sent to the Oncentra V4.3 Treatment Planning System. Critical structures such as the CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and bowel were contoured and a fractional dose of 5.5Gy was prescribed to Point A for each patient. Six different treatment plans were created for each fraction using varying tandem weightings; from 0.5 to 1.4 times that of the ovoids. Surface dose evaluation of various ovoid diameters, 2.0-3.5cm, at the vaginal fornices was also investigated. Results: Critical structures were evaluated based on varying dose and volume constraints, in particular the 2.0 cc volume recommendation cited by the gynecological GEC-ESTRO working group. Based on dose volume histogram evaluation, a reduction of dose to the critical structures was most often discovered when the tandem weighting was increased. CTV coverage showed little change as the tandem weighting was varied. Ovoid surface dose decreased by 50-65% as the tandem weighting increased. Conclusion: The advantage of 3D planning with HDR brachytherapy is the dose optimization for each individual treatment plan. This investigation shows that by utilizing large tandem weightings, 1.4 times greater than the ovoid, one can still achieve adequate coverage of the CTV and relatively low doses to the critical structures. In some cases, one would still have to optimize further per individual case. In addition, the ovoid surface dose was greatly decreased when large tandem weighting was utilized; especially for small ovoid diameters.

  12. SU-F-T-29: The Important of Each Fraction Image-Guided Planning for Postoperative HDR-Brachytherapy in Endometrial Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piriyasang, D; Pattaranutaporn, P; Manokhoon, K [Ramathibodi Hospital, Rachatewi, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Cylindrical applicators are often used for postoperative HDRbrachytherapy in endometrial carcinoma. It has been considered that dosimetric variation between fractions for this treatment is minimal and might not be necessary to perform treatment planning for every fractions. At our institute, it is traditional to perform treatment planning with CT simulation on the first fraction and uses this plan for the rest of treatment. This study was aim to evaluate the errors of critical structure doses between the fractions when simulation and planning were done for first fraction only. Methods: Treatment plans of 10 endometrial carcinoma patients who received postoperative HDR-brachytherapy and underwent CT-simulation for every HDR-fractions at our department were retrospectively reviewed. All of these patients were treated with cylindrical applicator and prescribed dose 15Gy in 3 fractions to 0.5cm from vaginal surface. The treatment plan from the first fraction was used to simulate in second and third CT-simulation. Radiation dose for critical structures in term of Dose-to-2cc (D2cc) were evaluated and compared between planning CT. Results: The D2cc for bladder and rectum were evaluated. For bladder, the mean error of D2cc estimation for second and third fractions was 7.6% (0.1–20.1%, SD=5.7). And the mean error for D2cc of rectum was 8.5% (0.1–29.4%, SD=8.5). Conclusion: The critical structure doses could be significant difference between fractions which may affects treatment outcomes or toxicities. From our data, image-guided brachytherapy at least with CT-Simulation should be done for every treatment fractions.

  13. Comparison of different treatment planning optimization methods for vaginal HDR brachytherapy with multichannel applicators: A reduction of the high doses to the vaginal mucosa is possible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Mauro; Cusumano, Davide; Giandini, Tommaso; Tenconi, Chiara; Mazzarella, Ester; Grisotto, Simone; Massari, Eleonora; Mazzeo, Davide; Cerrotta, Annamaria; Pappalardi, Brigida; Fallai, Carlo; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2017-12-01

    A direct planning approach with multi-channel vaginal cylinders (MVCs) used for HDR brachytherapy of vaginal cancers is particularly challenging. Purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric performances of different forward and inverse methods used for the optimization of MVC-based vaginal treatments for endometrial cancer, with a particular attention to the definition of strategies useful to limit the high doses to the vaginal mucosa. Twelve postoperative vaginal HDR brachytherapy treatments performed with MVCs were considered. Plans were retrospectively optimized with three different methods: Dose Point Optimization followed by Graphical Optimization (DPO + GrO), Inverse Planning Simulated Annealing with two different class solutions as starting conditions (surflPSA and homogIPSA) and Hybrid Inverse Planning Optimization (HIPO). Several dosimetric parameters related to target coverage, hot spot extensions and sparing of organs at risk were analyzed to evaluate the quality of the achieved treatment plans. Dose homogeneity index (DHI), conformal index (COIN) and a further parameter quantifying the proportion of the central catheter loading with respect to the overall loading (i.e., the central catheter loading index: CCLI) were also quantified. The achieved PTV coverage parameters were highly correlated with each other but uncorrelated with the hot spot quantifiers. HomogIPSA and HIPO achieved higher DHIs and CCLIs and lower volumes of high doses than DPO + GrO and surflPSA. Within the investigated optimization methods, HIPO and homoglPSA showed the highest dose homogeneity to the target. In particular, homogIPSA resulted also the most effective in reducing hot spots to the vaginal mucosa. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. SU-E-T-615: Investigation of the Dosimetric Impact of Tandem Loading in the Treatment of Cervical Cancer for HDR Brachytherapy Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esquivel, C; Patton, L; Nelson, K; Lin, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of the tandem loading in the treatment of cervical cancer for HDR brachytherapy procedures. Methods: Ten patients were evaluated, each of whom received 5 fractions of treatment. Tandem and ovoid sets were inserted into the uterine cavity based on institutional protocols and procedures. Following insertion and stabilization, CT image sets of 1.5mm slice thickness were acquired and sent to the Oncentra V4.3 Treatment Planning System. Critical structures such as the CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and bowel were contoured and a fractional dose of 5.5Gy was prescribed to Point A for each patient. Six different treatment plans were created for each fraction using varying tandem weightings; from 0.5 to 1.4 times that of the ovoids. Surface dose evaluation of various ovoid diameters, 2.0-3.5cm, at the vaginal fornices was also investigated. Results: Critical structures were evaluated based on varying dose and volume constraints, in particular the 2.0 cc volume recommendation cited by the gynecological GEC-ESTRO working group. Based on dose volume histogram evaluation, a reduction of dose to the critical structures was most often discovered when the tandem weighting was increased. CTV coverage showed little change as the tandem weighting was varied. Ovoid surface dose decreased by 50-65% as the tandem weighting increased. Conclusion: The advantage of 3D planning with HDR brachytherapy is the dose optimization for each individual treatment plan. This investigation shows that by utilizing large tandem weightings, 1.4 times greater than the ovoid, one can still achieve adequate coverage of the CTV and relatively low doses to the critical structures. In some cases, one would still have to optimize further per individual case. In addition, the ovoid surface dose was greatly decreased when large tandem weighting was utilized; especially for small ovoid diameters

  15. Imaging of implant needles for real-time HDR-brachytherapy prostate treatment using biplane ultrasound transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Frank-André; Hirt, Markus; Niehoff, Peter; Kovács, György

    2009-08-01

    Ultrasound imaging is becoming increasingly important in prostate brachytherapy. In high-dose-rate (HDR) real-time planning procedures the definition of the implant needles is often performed by transrectal ultrasound. This article describes absolute measurements of the visibility and accuracy of manual detection of implant needle tips and compares measurement results of different biplane ultrasound systems in transversal and longitudinal (i.e., sagittal) ultrasound modes. To obtain a fixed coordinate system and stable conditions the measurements were carried out in a water tank using a dedicated marker system. Needles were manually placed in the phantom until the observer decided by the real-time ultrasound image that the zero position was reached. A comparison of three different ultrasound systems yielded an offset between 0.8 and 3.1 mm for manual detection of the needle tip in ultrasound images by one observer. The direction of the offset was discovered to be in the proximal direction, i.e., the actual needle position was located more distally compared to the ultrasound-based definition. In the second part of the study, the ultrasound anisotropy of trocar implant needles is reported. It was shown that the integrated optical density in a region of interest around the needle tip changes with needle rotation. Three peaks were observed with a phase angle of 120 degrees. Peaks appear not only in transversal but also in longitudinal ultrasound images, with a phase shift of 60 degrees. The third section of this study shows results of observer dependent influences on needle tip detection in sagittal ultrasound images considering needle rotation. These experiments were carried out using the marker system in a water tank. The needle tip was placed exactly at the position z=0 mm. It was found that different users tend to differently interpret the same ultrasound images. The needle tip was manually detected five times in the ultrasound images by three experienced observers

  16. Variations of intracavitary applicator geometry during multiple HDR brachytherapy insertions in carcinoma cervix and its influence on reporting as per ICRU report 38

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, Niloy Ranjan; Kumar, Shaleen; Das, Koilpillai Joseph Maria; Pandey, Chandra Mani; Halder, Shikha; Ayyagari, Sunder

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: This paper examines the extent of variation in the applicator geometry during multiple high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) applications and its impact on reporting as per ICRU report 38. Materials and methods: Eighty orthogonal radiographs from 20 consecutive patients of carcinoma cervix (FIGO stages, IIA-IIIB) having four HDR ICBT applications of 6 Gy each at weekly intervals following teletherapy were evaluated. The applicator consisted of a flexible intrauterine tandem (IUT) independent of the ovoid assembly. The applicator geometry was evaluated in terms of: α angle, β angle, intrauterine length (IUTL), interovoid (IOV), os to right ovoid (ORT) and os to left ovoid (OLT) distances along with vertical (VDL) and anteroposterior displacements (ADL) of the os with respect to the ovoids. The Cartesian co-ordinates (X, Y, and Z) of the IUT tip, centre of both ovoids and os were also measured. Doses to right point A (ARD), left point A (ALD), along with a reference volume of 6 Gy for ICRU height (IRH), width (IRW), thickness (IRT) and volume (IRV) were estimated for each application. Results: Highly significant differences (P<0.001) between four insertions in any given patient across 20 patients for α angle, β angle, IUTL, IOV, ORT, VDL, co-ordinates of the IUT, ovoids and os were observed, except for ADL (P=0.041) and OLT (P=0.247). As a consequence, variations were observed in ARD (P=0.027), ALD (P=0.017); IRH, IRW, IRT and IRV (all P<0.001). Applicator factors which influenced the various dose specification parameters were: β angle and ORT for both ARD and ALD; UTLN, VDL and ORT for IRH; UTLN and IOV for IRW; UTLN for IRT and VDL for the 6 Gy IRV. Conclusions: A significant variation of the applicator geometry and its movement was observed in patients undergoing multiple HDR ICBT. This could have implications for reporting dose and volume specifications as required by ICRU report 38

  17. The usefulness of metal markers for CTV-based dose prescription in high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Ken; Mitomo, Masanori; Nose, Takayuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Kinji; Yoshida, Mineo

    2002-01-01

    We employ a clinical target volume (CTV)-based dose prescription for high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. However, it is not easy to define CTV and organs at risk (OAR) from X-ray film or CT scanning. To solve this problem, we have utilized metal markers since October 1999. Moreover, metal markers can help modify dose prescription. By regulating the doses to the metal markers, refining the dose prescription can easily be achieved. In this research, we investigated the usefulness of the metal markers. Between October 1999 and May 2001, 51 patients were implanted with metal markers at Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases (OMCC), Osaka National Hospital (ONH) and Sanda City Hospital (SCH). Forty-nine patients (head and neck: 32; pelvis: 11; soft tissue: 3; breast: 3) using metal markers were analyzed. During operation, we implanted 179 metal markers (49 patients) to CTV and 151 markers (26 patients) to OAR. At treatment planning, CTV was reconstructed judging from the metal markers, applicator position and operation records. Generally, we prescribed the tumoricidal dose to an isodose surface that covers CTV. We also planned to limit the doses to OAR lower than certain levels. The maximum normal tissue doses were decided 80%, 150%, 100%, 50% and 200% of the prescribed doses for the rectum, the urethra, the mandible, the skin and the large vessel, respectively. The doses to the metal markers using CTV-based dose prescription were generated. These were compared with the doses theoretically calculated with the Paris system. Treatment results were also investigated. The doses to the 158 metal markers (42 patients) for CTV were higher than ''tumoricidal dose''. In 7 patients, as a result of compromised dose prescription, 9 markers were lower than the tumoricidal dose. The other 12 markers (7%) were excluded from dose evaluation because they were judged as miss-implanted. The doses to the 142 metal markers (24 patients) for OAR were lower

  18. A comparison between tandem and ovoids and interstitial gynecologic template brachytherapy dosimetry using a hypothetical computer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, I-Chow J.; Speight, Joycelyn; Hai, Jenny; Vigneault, Eric; Phillips, Theodore; Pouliot, Jean

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dose distribution within the clinical target volume between two gynecologic brachytherapy systems - the tandem and ovoids and the Syed-Neblett gynecologic template - using a hypothetical computer model. Methods and Materials: Source positions of an intracavitary system (tandem and ovoids) and an interstitial system (GYN template) were digitized into the Nucletron Brachytherapy Planning System. The GYN template is composed of a 13-catheter implant (12 catheters plus a tandem) based on the Syed-Neblett gynecologic template. For the tandem and ovoids, the dwell times of all sources were evenly weighted to produce a pear-shaped isodose distribution. For the GYN template, the dwell times were determined using volume optimization. The prescribed dose was then normalized to point A in the intracavitary system and to a selected isodose line in the interstitial system. The treated volume in the two systems was kept approximately the same, and a cumulative dose-volume histogram of the treated volume was then generated with the Nucletron Brachytherapy Planning System to use for comparison. To evaluate the dose to a hypothetical target, in this case the cervix, a 2-cm-long, 3-cm-diameter cylinder centered along the tandem was digitized as the clinical target volume. The location of this hypothetical cervix was based on the optimal application of the brachytherapy system. A visual comparison of clinical target coverage by the treated volume on three different orthogonal planes through the treated volume was performed. The percentage dose-volume histograms of the target were generated for comparison. Multiple midline points were also placed at 5-mm intervals away from the tandem in the plane of the cervix to simulate the location of potential bladder and rectal dose points. Doses to these normal structures were calculated for comparison. Results: Although both systems covered the hypothetical cervix adequately, the interstitial system had a better

  19. Prospective randomized trial of HDR brachytherapy as a sole modality in palliation of advanced esophageal carcinoma--an International Atomic Energy Agency study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sur, Ranjan K.; Levin, C. Victor; Donde, Bernard; Sharma, Vinay; Miszczyk, Leszek; Nag, Subir

    2002-01-01

    Background: Previous studies from South Africa have established that fractionated high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy gives the best results in terms of palliation and survival in advanced esophageal cancer. A multicenter, prospective randomized study was therefore conducted under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency to evaluate two HDR regimens. Methods and Materials: Surgically inoperable patients with histologically proven squamous cell cancer of the esophagus, tumor >5 cm in length on barium swallow and/or endoscopy, Karnofsky performance score >50, age 17-70 years, primary disease in the thoracic esophagus, no prior malignancy within the past 5 years, and any N or M status were included in the study. Exclusion criteria included cervical esophagus location, tumor extending 0.05). The overall survival was 7.9 months for the whole group (Group A, 9.1 months; Group B, 6.9 months; p>0.05). On univariate analysis, the presenting weight (p=0.0083), gender (p=0.0038), race (p=0.0105), the presenting dysphagia score (p=0.0083), the treatment center (p=0.0029), and tumor grade (p=0.0029) had an impact on the dysphagia-free survival, and gender (p=0.0011) and performance score (p=0.0060) had an impact on dysphagia-free survival on multivariate analysis. Only age had an impact on overall survival on both univariate (p=0.0430) and multivariate (p=0.0331) analysis. The incidence of strictures (Group A, n=12; Group B, n=13; p>0.05) and fistulas (Group A, n=11; Group B, n=12; p>0.05) was similar in both groups. Conclusion: Fractionated HDR brachytherapy alone is an effective method of palliating advanced esophageal cancers, surpassing the results of any other modality of treatment presently available. Dose fractions of 6 Gy x 3 and 8 Gy x 2 give similar results for dysphagia-free survival, overall survival, strictures, and fistulas and are equally effective in palliation of advanced esophageal cancer

  20. SU-G-TeP1-01: A Simulation Study to Investigate Maximum Allowable Deformations of Implant Geometry Before Plan Objectives Are Violated in Prostate HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babier, A [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Joshi, C [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Cancer Center of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In prostate HDR brachytherapy dose distributions are highly sensitive to changes in prostate volume and catheter displacements. We investigate the maximum deformations in implant geometry before planning objectives are violated. Methods: A typical prostate Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy reference plan was calculated on the Oncentra planning system, which used CT images from a tissue equivalent prostate phantom (CIRS Model 053S) embedded inside a pelvis wax phantom. The prostate was deformed and catheters were displaced in simulations using a code written in MATLAB. For each deformation dose distributions were calculated, based on TG43 methods, using the MATLAB code. The calculations were validated through comparison with Oncentra calculations for the reference plan, and agreed within 0.12%SD and 0.3%SD for dose and volume, respectively. Isotropic prostate volume deformations of up to +34% to −27% relative to its original volume, and longitudinal catheter displacements of 7.5 mm in superior and inferior directions were simulated. Planning objectives were based on American Brachytherapy Society guidelines for prostate and urethra volumes. A plan violated the planning objectives when less than 90% of the prostate volume received the prescribed dose or higher (V{sub 100}), or the urethral volume receiving 125% of prescribed dose or higher was more than 1 cc (U{sub 125}). Lastly, the dose homogeneity index (DHI=1-V{sub 150}/V{sub 100}) was evaluated; a plan was considered sub-optimal when the DHI fell below 0.62. Results and Conclusion: Planning objectives were violated when the prostate expanded by 10.7±0.5% or contracted by 11.0±0.2%; objectives were also violated when catheters were displaced by 4.15±0.15 mm and 3.70±0.15 mm in the superior and inferior directions, respectively. The DHI changes did not affect the plan optimality, except in the case of prostate compression. In general, catheter displacements have a significantly larger impact on plan

  1. Quality of Life of Oral Cancer Patients After Low-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Ryo-ichi; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Miura, Masahiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ayukawa, Fumio; Hayashi, Keiji; Toda, Kazuma

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the quality of life (QOL) of oral cancer patients treated with low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (LDR-BT) alone. Methods and Materials: Between June 2005 and July 2006, a total of 56 patients with oral cancer were enrolled in this prospective study. QOL was assessed by means of the core questionnaire and head and neck questionnaire module of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 [QLQ-C30] and QLQ Head and Neck 35 [H and N35]). The questionnaires were distributed to the patients before the start of treatment and 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after the start of LDR-BT. Results: It was possible to analyze the results for 20 of the initial 56 patients because they did not experience metastasis or recurrence during this study. No functions or symptoms asked about in the QLQ-C30 deteriorated during the first year. The emotional function score steadily and significantly increased. No symptoms in the QLQ-H and N35 significantly deteriorated. The scores for pain, trouble with social eating, and weight loss on the QLQ-H and N35 steadily and significantly decreased. Age, gender, and LDR-BT source had no effect on the change in QOL during the first year, but T-stage significantly affected the change in global health status, tumor site affected the changes in swallowing, sensory problems, sticky saliva, and complications affected the changes in pain, swallowing, and mouth opening. Conclusions: QOL of oral cancer patients treated with LDR-BT is high. However, tumor stage, tumor site, and complications affected the changes in a few functions and symptoms during the first year

  2. PSA bounce phenomenon after transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Masashi; Lederer, J.L.; Fukagai, Takashi; Yoshida, Hideki; Shimada, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    We described the temporarily increase phenomenon in prostate-specific antigen level (PSA bounce) after transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (TIPPB) for localized prostate cancer. From December 1998 to May 2003, 500 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with TIPPB using iodine-125 or palladium-103. We examined 200 patients who have more than 2-year PSA follow-up. Median follow-up length was 1,069 days (range, 712-1,411 days). No patient received neoadjuvant or adjuvant hormone therapy. PSA determinations were performed every 3 months for the first 2 years after procedure, and every 6 months hereafter. PSA bounce was defined as an increase of 0.1 ng/ml or greater above the preceding PSA level after implant followed by a subsequent decrease below that level. The American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) consensus panel criteria 1996 were used to define biochemical failure. PSA bounce was observed in 40% (80/200) of the cases receiving TIPPB. The median time to PSA bounce was 13 months from the day of implant. The median magnitude of the PSA bounce was 0.3 ng/ml from the pre-bounce level. Twelve cases demonstrated biochemical failure according to the ASTRO consensus guidelines of three consecutive rises in PSA. Ten of these subsequently showed a drop in PSA, consistent with biologic control of their disease. Two cases remain classified as apparent biochemical failures. A transient rise in the PSA following TIPPB, the so-called ''bounce'' is a common occurrence. The apparent PSA control of ten of twelve cases failing by the ASTRO criteria raises some concern. Further observation will be necessary to determine ways to discriminate these from true disease progression. (author)

  3. WE-DE-201-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY): A Fast Multi-Target Inverse Treatment Planning Strategy Optimizing Dosimetric Measures for High-Dose-Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthier, C [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Damato, A; Viswanathan, A; Cormack, R [Dana Farber Cancer Institut/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hesser, J [University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Inverse treatment planning (ITP) for interstitial HDR brachytherapy of gynecologic cancers seeks to maximize coverage of the clinical target volumes (tumor and vagina) while respecting dose-volume-histogram related dosimetric measures (DMs) for organs at risk (OARs). Commercially available ITP tools do not support DM-based planning because it is computationally too expensive to solve. In this study we present a novel approach that allows fast ITP for gynecologic cancers based on DMs for the first time. Methods: This novel strategy is an optimization model based on a smooth DM-based objective function. The smooth approximation is achieved by utilizing a logistic function for the evaluation of DMs. The resulting nonconvex and constrained optimization problem is then optimized with a BFGS algorithm. The model was evaluated using the implant geometry extracted from 20 patient treatment plans under an IRB-approved retrospective study. For each plan, the final DMs were evaluated and compared to the original clinical plans. The CTVs were the contoured tumor volume and the contoured surface of the vagina. Statistical significance was evaluated with a one-sided paired Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: As did the clinical plans, all generated plans fulfilled the defined DMs for OARs. The proposed strategy showed a statistically significant improvement (p<0.001) in coverage of the tumor and vagina, with absolute improvements of related DMs of (6.9 +/− 7.9)% and (28.2 +/− 12.0)%, respectively. This was achieved with a statistically significant (p<0.01) decrease of the high-dose-related DM for the tumor. The runtime of the optimization was (2.3 +/− 2.0) seconds. Conclusion: We demonstrated using clinical data that our novel approach allows rapid DM-based optimization with improved coverage of CTVs with fewer hot spots. Being up to three orders of magnitude faster than the current clinical practice, the method dramatically shortens planning time.

  4. WE-DE-201-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY): A Fast Multi-Target Inverse Treatment Planning Strategy Optimizing Dosimetric Measures for High-Dose-Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthier, C; Damato, A; Viswanathan, A; Cormack, R; Hesser, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Inverse treatment planning (ITP) for interstitial HDR brachytherapy of gynecologic cancers seeks to maximize coverage of the clinical target volumes (tumor and vagina) while respecting dose-volume-histogram related dosimetric measures (DMs) for organs at risk (OARs). Commercially available ITP tools do not support DM-based planning because it is computationally too expensive to solve. In this study we present a novel approach that allows fast ITP for gynecologic cancers based on DMs for the first time. Methods: This novel strategy is an optimization model based on a smooth DM-based objective function. The smooth approximation is achieved by utilizing a logistic function for the evaluation of DMs. The resulting nonconvex and constrained optimization problem is then optimized with a BFGS algorithm. The model was evaluated using the implant geometry extracted from 20 patient treatment plans under an IRB-approved retrospective study. For each plan, the final DMs were evaluated and compared to the original clinical plans. The CTVs were the contoured tumor volume and the contoured surface of the vagina. Statistical significance was evaluated with a one-sided paired Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: As did the clinical plans, all generated plans fulfilled the defined DMs for OARs. The proposed strategy showed a statistically significant improvement (p<0.001) in coverage of the tumor and vagina, with absolute improvements of related DMs of (6.9 +/− 7.9)% and (28.2 +/− 12.0)%, respectively. This was achieved with a statistically significant (p<0.01) decrease of the high-dose-related DM for the tumor. The runtime of the optimization was (2.3 +/− 2.0) seconds. Conclusion: We demonstrated using clinical data that our novel approach allows rapid DM-based optimization with improved coverage of CTVs with fewer hot spots. Being up to three orders of magnitude faster than the current clinical practice, the method dramatically shortens planning time.

  5. SU-F-T-31: Shape and Isodose Distributions in Co60 HDR Brachytherapy for Different Utero-Vaginal Time Ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Sprinberg, G [Faculty of Sciences, Montevideo, Montevideo (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Piriz, G [Hospital Pereyra Rossell, Montevideo, Montevideo (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To optimize the dose in bladder and rectum and show the different shapes of the isodose volumes in Co60-HDR brachytherapy, considering different utero and vaginal sources dwell ratio times (TU:TV). Methods: Besides Ir192-HDR, new Co60-HDR sources are being incorporated. We considered different TU:TV times and computed the dosis in bladder, rectum and at the reference points of the Manchester system. Also, we calculated the isodose volume and shape in each case. We used a EZAG-BEBIG Co0.A86 model with TPS HDRplus3.0.4. and LCT42-7, LCT42-2(R,L) applicators. A reference dose RA= 1.00 Gy was given to the A-right point. We considered the TU:TV dwell time ratios 1:0.25, 1:0.33, 1:0.5, 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, and 1:4. Given TU:TV, the stop time at each dwell position is fixed for each applicator. Results: Increasing TU:TV systematically results in a decreasing of the dose in bladder and rectum, e.g. 9% and 27% reduction were found in 1:0.25 with respect to 1:1, while 12% and 34% increase were found in 1:4 with respect to 1:1. Also, the isodose volume parameters height (h), width (w), thickness (t) and volume (hwt) increased from the 1:0.25 case to the 1:4 value: hwt is 25% lower and 31% higher than the 1:1 reference volume in these cases. Also w decreased for higher TU:TV and may compromise the tumoral volume coverage, decreasing 17% in the 1:0.25 case compared to the 1:1 case. The shape of the isodose volume was obtained for the different TU:TV considered. Conclusion: We obtained the shape of isodose volumes for different TU:TV values in gynecological Co60-HDR. We studied the dose reduction in bladder and rectum for different TU:TV ratios. The volume parameters and hwt are strongly dependent on this ratio. This information is useful for a quantitative check of the TPS and as a starting point towards optimization.

  6. Evaluation of failure modes of computerized planning phase of interstitial implants with high dose rate brachytherapy using HFMEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biazotto, Bruna; Tokarski, Marcio

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates the failure modes of the computerized planning step in interstitial implants with high dose rate brachytherapy. The prospective tool of risk management Health Care Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HFMEA) was used. Twelve subprocesses were identified, and 33 failure modes of which 21 justified new safety actions, and 9 of them were intolerable risks. The method proved itself useful in identifying failure modes, but laborious and subjective in their assessment. The main risks were due to human factors, which require training and commitment of management to their mitigation. (author)

  7. Brachytherapy in head and neck cancers; Curietherapie des cancers de la sphere ORL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazeron, J.J.; Noel, G.; Simon, J.M.; Racadot, S.; Jauffret, E. [Groupe Hospitalier la Pitie-Salpetriere, Centre des Tumeurs, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-02-01

    Experience accumulated over several decades with radiation of Head and Neck tumours by irradiation has demonstrated the need for a high tumour dose to achieve local control. With external beam irradiation alone, it is difficult to spare adjacent normal tissues, resulting in undesirable late effects on the salivary glands; mandible, and muscles of mastication. Interstitial implantation is ideally suited to deliver a high dose limited to the volume of the primary tumor, thus minimizing sequels. A large experience has been accumulated with low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy in treatment of carcinoma of oral cavity, oropharynx, and nasopharynx. Recent analysis of large clinical series provided data indicating that modalities of low dose rate brachytherapy should be optimized in treating these tumors for increasing therapeutic ratio. Low dose rate brachytherapy is now challenged by high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy. Preliminary results obtained with these two last modalities are discussed regarding to those of low dose rate brachytherapy. (authors)

  8. Endoscope-guided interstitial intensity-modulated brachytherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy as boost radiation for primary early T stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Bo Wan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT is usually applied as boost radiotherapy for superficial residual of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC after primary extern-beam radiptherapy (ERT. Here, we evaluated the outcome of endoscope-guided interstitial intensity-modulated brachytherapy (IMBT boost radiation for deep-seated residual NPC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two hundred and thirteen patients with residual NPC who were salvaged with brachytherapy boost radiation during 2005-2009 were analyzed retrospectively. Among these patients, 171 patients had superficial residual NPC (≤1 cm below the nasopharyngeal epithelium were treated with ICBT boost radiation, and interstitial IMBT boost radiation was delivered to 42 patients with deep-seated residual NPC (>1 cm below the nasopharyngeal epithelium. We found that IMBT boost subgroup had a higher ratio of T2b (81.0% VS 34.5%, P<0.001 and stage II (90.5% VS 61.4%, P = 0.001 than that of ICBT boost subgroup. The dosage of external-beam radiotherapy in the nasopharyngeal (63.0±3.8 VS 62.6±4.3 Gray (Gy, P = 0.67 and regional lymph nodes (55.8±5.0 VS 57.5±5.7 Gy, P = 0.11 was comparable in both groups. For brachytherapy, IMBT subgroup had a lower boost radiation dosage than ICBT subgroup (11.0±2.9 VS 14.8±3.2 Gy, P<0.01. Though the IMBT group had deeper residual tumors and received lower boost radiation dosages, both subgroups had the similar 5-year actuarial overall survival rate (IMBT VS ICBT group: 96.8% VS 93.6%, P = 0.87, progression-free survival rate (92.4% VS 86.5%, P = 0.41 and distant metastasis-free survival rate (94.9% VS 92.7%, P = 0.64. Moreover, IMBT boost radiation subgroup had a similar local (97.4% VS 94.4%, P = 0.57 and regional (95.0% VS 97.2%, P = 0.34 control to ICBT subgroup. The acute and late toxicities rates were comparable between the both subgroups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: IMBT boost radiation may be a promising therapeutic

  9. Treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy of breast cancer – from Paris system to anatomy-based inverse planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Major

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial breast brachytherapy has evolved considerably from fluoroscopy-based 2D to anatomy-based 3D planning. To plan the right positions of the catheters, ultrasound or computed tomography (CT imaging can be used, but the treatment plan is always based on postimplant CT images. With CT imaging, the 3D target volume can be defined more precisely and delineation of the organs at risk volumes is also possible. Consequently, parameters calculated from dose-volume histogram can be used for quantitative plan evaluation. The catheter reconstruction is also easier and faster on CT images compared to X-ray films. In high dose rate brachytherapy, using a stepping source, a number of forward dose optimization methods (manual, geometrical, on dose points, graphical are available to shape the dose distribution to the target volume, and these influence dose homogeneities to different extent. Currently, inverse optimization algorithms offer new possibilities to improve dose distributions further considering the requirements for dose coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk simultaneously and automatically. In this article, the evolvement of treatment planning for interstitial breast implants is reviewed, different forward optimization methods are discussed, and dose-volume parameters used for quantitative plan evaluation are described. Finally, some questions of the inverse optimization method are investigated and initial experiences of the authors are presented.

  10. Comparison between external beam radiotherapy (70 Gy/74 Gy) and permanent interstitial brachytherapy in 890 intermediate risk prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldner, Gregor; Pötter, Richard; Battermann, Jan J.; Kirisits, Christian; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Sljivic, Samir; Vulpen, Marco van

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Aim of this analysis was to compare biochemical no evidence of disease (bNED) rates in intermediate-risk prostate-cancer patients treated at two centres of excellence using different approaches: permanent interstitial brachytherapy (BT) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Materials and methods: A total of 890 intermediate-risk prostate-cancer patients, who were treated from 1998 to 2008, were identified in the two local databases. In Utrecht 601 patients received I-125 BT applying a dose of 144 Gy. In Vienna 289 patients were treated by EBRT, applying a local dose of 70 Gy in 105 patients and 74 Gy in 184 patients. bNED-rates (Phoenix-definition) were assessed. Results: Median follow-up was 48 months (1–150). 5-Year actuarial bNED-rates were 81% for BT-patients and 75% for EBRT-patients (67% for 70 Gy and 82% for 74 Gy), respectively. In univariate analysis no difference between BT and EBRT could be detected. In multivariate analysis including tumour-stage, GleasonScore, initial PSA, hormonal therapy and treatment-centre (BT vs. EBRT) only T-stage, GleasonScore and PSA were found to be significant. Additional analysis including radiation dose showed the same outcome. Conclusions: Intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated by permanent interstitial brachytherapy show biochemical tumour-control-rates which are comparable to EBRT of 74 Gy.

  11. Radioablation of liver malignancies with interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Complications and risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohnike, Konrad; Wolf, Steffen; Damm, Robert; Seidensticker, Max; Seidensticker, Ricarda; Fischbach, Frank; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens [Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Magdeburg (Germany); Peters, Nils; Hass, Peter; Gademann, Guenther [Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Magdeburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    To evaluate complications and identify risk factors for adverse events in patients undergoing high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (iBT). Data from 192 patients treated in 343 CT- or MRI-guided interventions from 2006-2009 at our institution were analyzed. In 41 %, the largest tumor treated was ≥ 5 cm, 6 % of the patients had tumors ≥ 10 cm. Prior to iBT, 60 % of the patients had chemotherapy, 22 % liver resection, 19 % thermoablation or transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). Safety was the primary endpoint; survival data were obtained as the secondary endpoints. During follow-up, MRI or CT imaging was performed and clinical and laboratory parameters were obtained. The rate of major complications was below 5 %. Five major bleedings (1.5 %) occurred. The frequency of severe bleeding was significantly higher in patients with advanced liver cirrhosis. One patient developed signs of a nonclassic radiation-induced liver disease. In 3 patients, symptomatic gastrointestinal (GI) ulcers were detected. A dose exposure to the GI wall above 14 Gy/ml was a reliable threshold to predict ulcer formation. A combination of C-reactive protein ≥ 165 mg/l and/or leukocyte count ≥ 12.7 Gpt/l on the second day after the intervention predicted infection (sensitivity 90.0 %; specificity 92.8 %.) Two patients (0.6 %) died within 30 days. Median overall survival after the first liver treatment was 20.1 months for all patients and the local recurrence-free surviving proportion was 89 % after 12 months. Image-guided iBT yields a low rate of major complications and is effective. (orig.) [German] Evaluierung der Komplikationsrate und Identifizierung von Risikofaktoren fuer Komplikationen und Nebenwirkungen bei Patienten mit Lebermalignomen, die mit der hochdosierten interstitiellen Brachytherapie (iBT) behandelt wurden. Von 2006 bis 2009 wurden 192 Patienten in 343 CT- oder MRT-gefuehrten Interventionen behandelt und deren Daten ausgewertet. Der groesste behandelte Tumor war in

  12. High dose rate versus low dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervical cancer, and the importance of brachytherapy timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petereit, Daniel G.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Czyzewski, Ann; Buchler, Dolores A.

    1996-01-01

    LDR brachytherapy for the treatment of Stage IIIB cervical cancer patients suggest lower survival and pelvic control for the HDR approach. Potential reasons for this include very high pelvic control rates in the LDR group, different patient cohorts with a higher TBS in the HDR group and performing the first HDR insertion before adequate tumor shrinkage. This trend became apparent over one year ago and dramatic changes in the HDR approach for Stage IIIB patients were implemented. These changes include performing the first insertion after 45 to 50 Gy of EBR, dose escalation to an LDR equivalent of 90 Gy and performing HDR fractionated interstitial brachytherapy in tumors that are poorly regressing. It appears that timing of the first HDR insertion with the EBR may be critical, and HDR brachytherapy should start only after adequate tumor shrinkage, possibly 45 Gy at a minimum. Finally, the literature at this point does not indicate that HDR is inferior to LDR in the treatment of Stage IIIB cervical cancer patients, and a high TBS at presentation may warrant more aggressive therapy

  13. CT-guided brachytherapy. A novel percutaneous technique for interstitial ablation of liver malignancies; CT-gesteuerte Brachytherapie. Eine neue perkutane Technik zur interstitiellen Ablation von Lebermetastasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricke, J.; Wust, P.; Stohlmann, A.; Beck, A.; Cho, C.H.; Pech, M.; Wieners, G.; Spors, B.; Werk, M.; Rosner, C.; Haenninen, E.L.; Felix, R. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    Purpose: to assess safety and efficacy of CT-guided brachytherapy of liver malignancies. Patients and methods: 21 patients with 21 liver malignancies (19 metastases, two primary liver tumors) were treated with interstitial CT-guided brachytherapy applying a {sup 192}Ir source. In all patients, the use of image-guided thermal tumor ablation such as by radiofrequency or laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) was impeded either by tumor size {>=} 5 cm in seven, adjacent portal or hepatic vein in ten, or adjacent bile duct bifurcation in four patients. Dosimetry was performed using three-dimensional CT data sets acquired after CT-guided positioning of the brachytherapy catheters. Results: the mean tumor diameter was 4.6 cm (2.5-11 cm). The mean minimal tumor dose inside the tumor margin amounted to 17 Gy (12-20 Gy). The proportion of the liver parenchyma exposed to > 5 gy was 18% (5-39%) of total liver parenchyma minus tumor volume. Nausea and vomiting were observed in six patients after brachytherapy (28%). One patient demonstrated obstructive jaundice due to tumor edema after irradiation of a metastasis adjacent to the bile duct bifurcation. We commonly encountered asymptomatic increases of liver enzymes. Local control rates after 6 and 12 months were 87% and 70%, respectively. Conclusion: CT-guided brachytherapy is safe and effective. This technique displays broader indications compared to image-guided thermal ablation by radiofrequency or LITT with respect to tumor size or localization. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Analyse der Sicherheit und Effektivitaet CT-gesteuerter Brachytherapie zur Ablation von Lebermalignomen. Patienten und Methodik: 21 Patienten mit 21 Lebermalignomen (19 Metastasen, zwei primaere Lebermalignome) wurden mit perkutaner, CT-gesteuerter interstitieller Brachytherapie mit {sup 192}Ir behandelt. Alle Patienten wiesen Umstaende auf, die eine bildgefuehrte thermische Ablation mit Radiofrequenz oder laserinduzierter Thermotherapie (LITT) einschraenkten

  14. SU-G-TeP2-07: Dosimetric Characterization of a New HDR Multi-Channel Esophageal Applicator for Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, A; Gao, S; Greskovich, J; Wilkinson, D [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Diener, T [Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the dose distribution of a new multi-channel esophageal applicator for brachytherapy HDR treatment, and particularly the effect of the presence of air or water in the applicator’s expansion balloon. Methods: A new multi-channel (6) inflatable applicator for esophageal HDR has been developed in house and tested in a simple water phantom. CT image sets were obtained under several balloon expansions (80ml of air, 50 cc of water), and channel loadings and used with the Oncentra (Elekta) planning system based on TG43 formalism. 400 cGy was prescribed to a plane 1cm away from the applicator. Planar dose distributions were measured for that plane and one next to the applicator using Gafchromic EBT3 film and scanned by a Vidar VXR-12 film digitizer. Film and TPS generated dose distributions of film were sent to OmniPro I’mRT (iba DOSIMETRY) for analysis. 2D dose profiles in both X and Y directions were compared and gamma analysis performed. Results: Film dose measurement of the air-inflated applicator is lower than the TPS calculated dose by as much as 60%. Only 80.8% of the pixels passed the gamma criteria (3%/3mm). For the water-inflated applicator, the measured film dose is fairly close to the TPS calculated dose (typically within <3%). 99.84% of the pixels passed the gamma criteria (3%/3mm). Conclusion: TG43 based calculations worked well when water was used in the expansion balloon. However, when air is present in that balloon, the neglect of heterogeneity corrections in the TG43 calculation results in large differences between calculated and measured doses. This could result in severe underdosing when used in a patient. This study illustrates the need for a TPS with an advanced algorithm which can account for heterogeneity. Supported by Innovations Department, Cleveland Clinic.

  15. Correlation of conventional simulation x-ray films and CT images for HDR-brachytherapy catheters reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajendran, M.; Reddy, K.D.; Reddy, R.M.; Reddy, J.M.; Reddy, B.V.N.; Kiran Kumar; Gopi, S.; Dharaniraj; Janardhanan

    2002-01-01

    In order to plan a brachytherapy implant, it is imperative that implant reconstruction is done accurately. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate whether implant reconstruction done with transverse CT images is comparable to reconstruction done with conventional x-ray films

  16. WE-A-17A-10: Fast, Automatic and Accurate Catheter Reconstruction in HDR Brachytherapy Using An Electromagnetic 3D Tracking System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, E; Racine, E; Beaulieu, L [CHU de Quebec - Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Binnekamp, D [Integrated Clinical Solutions and Marketing, Philips Healthcare, Best, DA (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), actual catheter reconstruction protocols are slow and errors prompt. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for improved catheter reconstruction in HDR-B protocols. Methods: For this proof-of-principle, a total of 10 catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a Philips-design 18G biopsy needle (used as an EM stylet) and the second generation Aurora Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system exploits alternating current technology and generates 3D points at 40 Hz. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical CT system with a resolution of 0.089 mm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, 5 catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 seconds or less. This would imply that for a typical clinical implant of 17 catheters, the total reconstruction time would be less than 3 minutes. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.92 ± 0.37 mm and 1.74 ± 1.39 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be significantly more accurate (unpaired t-test, p < 0.05). A mean difference of less than 0.5 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusion: The EM reconstruction was found to be faster, more accurate and more robust than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators. We would like to disclose that the equipments, used in this study, is coming from a collaboration with Philips Medical.

  17. SU-F-T-14: Dosimetric Impacts of Various Uncertainties in Cervical Cancer HDR Brachytherapy: Are Conventional Point Doses Good Surrogates for 3D Dosimetry?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, X; Li, Z [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Zheng, D [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Zhang, X; Narayanasamy, G; Morrill, S; Penagaricano, J; Paudel, N [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2016-06-15

    cervical HDR brachytherapy.

  18. WE-A-17A-10: Fast, Automatic and Accurate Catheter Reconstruction in HDR Brachytherapy Using An Electromagnetic 3D Tracking System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulin, E; Racine, E; Beaulieu, L; Binnekamp, D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), actual catheter reconstruction protocols are slow and errors prompt. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for improved catheter reconstruction in HDR-B protocols. Methods: For this proof-of-principle, a total of 10 catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a Philips-design 18G biopsy needle (used as an EM stylet) and the second generation Aurora Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system exploits alternating current technology and generates 3D points at 40 Hz. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical CT system with a resolution of 0.089 mm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, 5 catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 seconds or less. This would imply that for a typical clinical implant of 17 catheters, the total reconstruction time would be less than 3 minutes. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.92 ± 0.37 mm and 1.74 ± 1.39 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be significantly more accurate (unpaired t-test, p < 0.05). A mean difference of less than 0.5 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusion: The EM reconstruction was found to be faster, more accurate and more robust than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators. We would like to disclose that the equipments, used in this study, is coming from a collaboration with Philips Medical

  19. High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-IC) in treatment of cervical carcinoma: 5-year results and implication of increased low-grade rectal complication on initiation of an HDR-IC fractionation scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chongjong; Wan Leung, Stephen; Chen Huichun; Sun Limin; Fang Fumin; Changchien Chanchao; Huang Engyen; Wu Jiaming; Chen Chuhnchih

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To report the treatment results and rectal/bladder complications of cervical carcinoma radically treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-IC). The current policy of using three-fraction scheme was examined. Methods and Materials: Between November 1987 and August 1990, 173 patients with cervical carcinoma were treated with curative-intent radiation therapy. Whole pelvic irradiation was administered with 10-MV X ray. Dose to the central cervix was 40-44 Gy in 20-22 fractions, following by pelvic wall boost 6-14 Gy in three to seven fractions with central shielding. 60 Co sources were used for HDR-IC, and 7.2 Gy was given to Point A for three applications, 1-2 weeks apart. Duration of follow-up was 5-7.8 years. Results: Twenty-eight patients (16%) developed central-regional recurrences. Overall 5-year actuarial pelvic control rate was 83%. By stage, 5-year actuarial pelvic control rates were 94%, 87%, and 72% for Stages IB + IIA, IIB + IIIA, and IIIB + IVA, respectively. Thirty-one patients (18%) developed distant metastasis. Overall 5-year actuarial survival rate was 58%. By stage, 5-year actuarial survival rates were 79%, 59%, and 41% for Stages IB + IIA, IIB + IIIA, and IIIB + IVA, respectively. Sixty-six (38%) and 19 patients (11%) developed rectal and bladder complications, respectively. For rectal complication, the overall actuarial rate was 38% at 5 years. By grade, 5-year actuarial rectal complication rates were 24%, 15%, 4%, and 3% for Grades 1-4, respectively. Overall prevalence of rectal complications was 37% and 14% at 2 and 5 years, respectively. Prevalence of low-grade rectal complication (Grades 1 and 2) was dominant at 2 years (30%), but declined to 8% at 5 years. Prevalence of high-grade, severe rectal complication (Grades 3 and 4) remained steady at 2 and 5 years (7% and 6%, respectively). Five-year actuarial bladder complication was 9%. Five-year prevalence of bladder complication was 2%. Conclusion: Using a three

  20. Successful treatment of a 67-year-old woman with urethral adenocarcinoma with the use of external beam radiotherapy and image guided adaptive interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mujkanovic, Jasmin; Tanderup, Kari; Agerbæk, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Primary urethral cancer (PUC) is a very rare disease. This case report illustrates a successful treatment approach of a 67-year-old woman with a urethral adenocarcinoma selected for an organ preserving treatment with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and interstitial brachytherapy (BT) boost, using...

  1. Accuracy of applicator tip reconstruction in MRI-guided interstitial 192Ir-high-dose-rate brachytherapy of liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wybranski, Christian; Eberhardt, Benjamin; Fischbach, Katharina; Fischbach, Frank; Walke, Mathias; Hass, Peter; Röhl, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Kosiek, Ortrud; Kaiser, Mandy; Pech, Maciej; Lüdemann, Lutz; Ricke, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the reconstruction accuracy of brachytherapy (BT) applicators tips in vitro and in vivo in MRI-guided 192 Ir-high-dose-rate (HDR)-BT of inoperable liver tumors. Materials and methods: Reconstruction accuracy of plastic BT applicators, visualized by nitinol inserts, was assessed in MRI phantom measurements and in MRI 192 Ir-HDR-BT treatment planning datasets of 45 patients employing CT co-registration and vector decomposition. Conspicuity, short-term dislocation, and reconstruction errors were assessed in the clinical data. The clinical effect of applicator reconstruction accuracy was determined in follow-up MRI data. Results: Applicator reconstruction accuracy was 1.6 ± 0.5 mm in the phantom measurements. In the clinical MRI datasets applicator conspicuity was rated good/optimal in ⩾72% of cases. 16/129 applicators showed not time dependent deviation in between MRI/CT acquisition (p > 0.1). Reconstruction accuracy was 5.5 ± 2.8 mm, and the average image co-registration error was 3.1 ± 0.9 mm. Vector decomposition revealed no preferred direction of reconstruction errors. In the follow-up data deviation of planned dose distribution and irradiation effect was 6.9 ± 3.3 mm matching the mean co-registration error (6.5 ± 2.5 mm; p > 0.1). Conclusion: Applicator reconstruction accuracy in vitro conforms to AAPM TG 56 standard. Nitinol-inserts are feasible for applicator visualization and yield good conspicuity in MRI treatment planning data. No preferred direction of reconstruction errors were found in vivo

  2. Implementation of 3D-virtual brachytherapy in the management of breast cancer: a description of a new method of interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Jaffray, David A.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Edmundson, Gregory K.; DeBiose, David A.; Kini, Vijay R.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: We present the initial description of a new technique of interstitial breast brachytherapy in which a computer-generated image of an implant template is applied virtually to serial-computed tomography (CT) scan images of a patient's breast. Optimal placement of the virtual template around the CT images of the proposed target volume provides the physician with a preplan for improved positioning of implant needles around the actual target volume intraoperatively. Methods and Materials: Since March of 1993, 110 patients with early-stage breast cancer were entered onto a protocol of low or high dose rate brachytherapy as the sole radiation modality for part of their breast-conserving therapy. To improve the accuracy and reproducibility of target volume coverage in patients with a closed lumpectomy cavity, 11 of these implants were performed using the virtual brachytherapy technique. The virtual implant procedure was performed by first placing radiopaque skin markers on the breast surface for reference on the CT image and ultimately as intraoperative landmarks for the placement of implant needles. A CT scan of the breast was then performed and the target volume outlined on each CT scan slice by the physician. A virtual image of the brachytherapy template was then positioned around the CT image of the target volume to achieve an idealized implant with optimal coverage. The projected entrance and exit points of all needles on the skin of the breast (from the idealized virtual implant) were then identified (by perspective rendering of multiple 3D views) and hard-copy images taken to the operating room. The implant was then constructed by referencing the virtual implant images (needle entrance and exit points) to the radiopaque skin markers on the breast. After the implant was completed, a CT scan of the breast with the template catheters or needles in position was taken for comparison of the actual target volume coverage with the virtual implant generated

  3. Combined curative radiotherapy including HDR brachytherapy and androgen deprivation in localized prostate cancer: A prospective assessment of acute and late treatment toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlgren, Thomas; Nilsson, Sten; Ryberg, Marianne; Brandberg, Yvonne; Lennernaes, Bo

    2005-01-01

    Self-reported symptoms including urinary, bowel and sexual side effects were investigated prospectively at multiple assessment points before and after combined radiotherapy of prostate cancer including HDR brachytherapy and neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. Between April 2000 and June 2003, patients with predominantly advanced localized prostate tumours subjected to this treatment were asked before treatment and on follow-up visits to complete a questionnaire covering urinary, bowel and sexual problems. The mainly descriptive analyses included 525 patients, responding to at least one questionnaire before or during the period 2-34 months after radiotherapy. Adding androgen deprivation before radiotherapy significantly worsened sexual function. During radiotherapy, urinary, bowel and sexual problems increased and were reported at higher levels up to 34 months, although there seemed to be a general tendency to less pronounced irritative bowel and urinary tract symptoms over time. No side effects requiring surgery were reported. Classic late irradiation effects such as mucosal bleeding were demonstrated mainly during the second year after therapy, but appear less pronounced in comparison with dose escalated EBRT series. In conclusion, despite the high radiation dose given, the toxicity seemed comparable with that of other series but long term (5-10 years) symptom outcome has to be determined

  4. Inverse planning anatomy-based dose optimization for HDR-brachytherapy of the prostate using fast simulated annealing algorithm and dedicated objective function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessard, Etienne; Pouliot, Jean

    2001-01-01

    An anatomy-based dose optimization algorithm is developed to automatically and rapidly produce a highly conformal dose coverage of the target volume while minimizing urethra, bladder, and rectal doses in the delivery of an high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for the treatment of prostate cancer. The dwell times are optimized using an inverse planning simulated annealing algorithm (IPSA) governed entirely from the anatomy extracted from a CT and by a dedicated objective function (cost function) reflecting clinical prescription and constraints. With this inverse planning approach, the focus is on the physician's prescription and constraint instead of on the technical limitations. Consequently, the physician's control on the treatment is improved. The capacity of this algorithm to represent the physician's prescription is presented for a clinical prostate case. The computation time (CPU) for IPSA optimization is less than 1 min (41 s for 142 915 iterations) for a typical clinical case, allowing fast and practical dose optimization. The achievement of highly conformal dose coverage to the target volume opens the possibility to deliver a higher dose to the prostate without inducing overdosage of urethra and normal tissues surrounding the prostate. Moreover, using the same concept, it will be possible to deliver a boost dose to a delimited tumor volume within the prostate. Finally, this method can be easily extended to other anatomical sites

  5. Effect of geometrical optimization on the treatment volumes and the dose homogeneity of biplane interstitial brachytherapy implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anacak, Yavuz; Esassolak, Mustafa; Aydin, Ayhan; Aras, Arif; Olacak, Ibrahim; Haydaroglu, Ayfer

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: The isodose distributions of HDR stepping source brachytherapy implants can be modified by changing dwell times and this procedure is called optimization. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of geometrical optimization on the brachytherapy volumes and the dose homogeneity inside the implant and to compare them with non-optimized counterparts. Material and methods: A set of biplane breast implants consisting of 84 different configurations have been digitized by the planning computer and volumetric analysis was performed for both non-optimized and geometrically optimized implants. Treated length (T L ), treated volume (V 100 ), irradiated volume (V 50 ), overdose volume (V 200 ) and quality index (QI) have been calculated for every non-optimized implant and compared to its corresponding geometrically optimized implant having a similar configuration and covering the same target length. Results: The mean T L was 74.48% of the active length (A L ) for non-optimized implants and was 91.87% for optimized implants (P 50 /V 100 value was 2.71 for non-optimized implants and 2.65 for optimized implants (P 200 /V 100 value was 0.09 for non-optimized implants and 0.10 for optimized implants (P < 0.001). Conclusions: By performing geometrical optimization it is possible to implant shorter needles for a given tumour to adequately cover the target volume with the reference isodose and thus surgical damage is reduced. The amount of healthy tissues outside the target receiving considerable radiation is significantly reduced due to the decrease in irradiated volume. Dose homogeneity inside the implant is significantly improved. Although there is a slight increase of overdose volume inside the implant, this increase is considered to be negligible in clinical applications

  6. Monte Carlo modeling of 60 Co HDR brachytherapy source in water and in different solid water phantom materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahoo S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The reference medium for brachytherapy dose measurements is water. Accuracy of dose measurements of brachytherapy sources is critically dependent on precise measurement of the source-detector distance. A solid phantom can be precisely machined and hence source-detector distances can be accurately determined. In the present study, four different solid phantom materials such as polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA, polystyrene, Solid Water, and RW1 are modeled using the Monte Carlo methods to investigate the influence of phantom material on dose rate distributions of the new model of BEBIG 60 Co brachytherapy source. The calculated dose rate constant is 1.086 ± 0.06% cGy h−1 U−1 for water, PMMA, polystyrene, Solid Water, and RW1. The investigation suggests that the phantom materials RW1 and Solid Water represent water-equivalent up to 20 cm from the source. PMMA and polystyrene are water-equivalent up to 10 cm and 15 cm from the source, respectively, as the differences in the dose data obtained in these phantom materials are not significantly different from the corresponding data obtained in liquid water phantom. At a radial distance of 20 cm from the source, polystyrene overestimates the dose by 3% and PMMA underestimates it by about 8% when compared to the corresponding data obtained in water phantom.

  7. TU-AB-201-05: Automatic Adaptive Per-Operative Re-Planning for HDR Prostate Brachytherapy - a Simulation Study On Errors in Needle Positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borot de Battisti, M; Maenhout, M; Lagendijk, J J W; Van Vulpen, M; Moerland, M A; Senneville, B Denis de; Hautvast, G; Binnekamp, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop adaptive planning with feedback for MRI-guided focal HDR prostate brachytherapy with a single divergent needle robotic implant device. After each needle insertion, the dwell positions for that needle are calculated and the positioning of remaining needles and dosimetry are both updated based on MR imaging. Methods: Errors in needle positioning may occur due to inaccurate needle insertion (caused by e.g. the needle’s bending) and unpredictable changes in patient anatomy. Consequently, the dose plan quality might dramatically decrease compared to the preplan. In this study, a procedure was developed to re-optimize, after each needle insertion, the remaining needle angulations, source positions and dwell times in order to obtain an optimal coverage (D95% PTV>19 Gy) without exceeding the constraints of the organs at risk (OAR) (D10% urethra<21 Gy, D1cc bladder<12 Gy and D1cc rectum<12 Gy). Complete HDR procedures with 6 needle insertions were simulated for a patient MR-image set with PTV, prostate, urethra, bladder and rectum delineated. Random angulation errors, modeled by a Gaussian distribution (standard deviation of 3 mm at the needle’s tip), were generated for each needle insertion. We compared the final dose parameters for the situations (I) without re-optimization and (II) with the automatic feedback. Results: The computation time of replanning was below 100 seconds on a current desk computer. For the patient tested, a clinically acceptable dose plan was achieved while applying the automatic feedback (median(range) in Gy, D95% PTV: 19.9(19.3–20.3), D10% urethra: 13.4(11.9–18.0), D1cc rectum: 11.0(10.7–11.6), D1cc bladder: 4.9(3.6–6.8)). This was not the case without re-optimization (median(range) in Gy, D95% PTV: 19.4(14.9–21.3), D10% urethra: 12.6(11.0–15.7), D1cc rectum: 10.9(8.9–14.1), D1cc bladder: 4.8(4.4–5.2)). Conclusion: An automatic guidance strategy for HDR prostate brachytherapy was developed to compensate

  8. Clinical Use of the Utrecht Applicator for Combined Intracavitary/Interstitial Brachytherapy Treatment in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomden, Christel N.; Leeuw, Astrid A.C. de; Moerland, Marinus A.; Roesink, Judith M.; Tersteeg, Robbert J.H.A.; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina Maria

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to investigate the benefit of the Utrecht interstitial CT/MR applicator for combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC/IS) approach, using magnetic resonance imaging—guided brachytherapy, over the intracavitary approach alone in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer and to analyze the clinical use of needles. Methods and Materials: This study includes the first 20 patients treated with the new applicator. Brachytherapy consisted of two pulsed dose rate applications, and the second application was performed with the IC/IS approach. The number of needles, chosen guiding holes through the ovoids, and insertion depths were based on the dose distribution and dosimetric shortcomings of the first application (IC alone). We investigated the dosimetric gain by comparing the clinical interstitial optimized plan (IC/IS clinical ) with an additionally generated optimized plan without needle use (IC study ). Furthermore, we studied the relation of the inserted needles and their source loading patterns with the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV). Results: A total of 54 needles (range, 1–6 per application) were applied with an average depth of 25 mm. The chosen needle positions corresponded with the location of the HR-CTV extensions. The total and individual needle treatment times per application were on average 19% (range, 4–35%) and 7% (range, 2–14%) of the implant treatment time, respectively. The total (external-beam radiotherapy + brachytherapy) D90 HR-CTV for the IC study and the IC/IS clinical were on average 79.5 (SD 7.4) Gy α/β10 and 83.9 (SD 6.7) Gy α/β10 , respectively, with an average gain of 4.4 (SD 2.3) Gy α/β10 for the second application. Conclusions: Needle placement was feasible in all patients and resulted in a gain in dose and better coverage of HR-CTV. Defining the location of HR-CTV protrusions and analyzing the associated needles has given us deeper understanding of the possibilities in magnetic

  9. Predictive factors for acute and late urinary toxicity after permanent interstitial brachytherapy in Japanese patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Ryuta; Bekku, Kensuke; Katayama, Norihisa

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the frequency of and to determine predictive factors associated with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group urinary toxicity in prostate brachytherapy patients. From January 2004 to April 2011, 466 consecutive Japanese patients underwent permanent iodine-125-seed brachytherapy (median follow up 48 months). International Prostate Symptom Score and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity data were prospectively collected. Prostate volume, International Prostate Symptom Score before and after brachytherapy, and postimplant analysis were examined for an association with urinary toxicity, defined as Radiation Therapy Oncology Group urinary toxicity of Grade 1 or higher. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with urinary toxicity. The rate of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group urinary toxicity grade 1 or higher at 1, 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 months was 67%, 40%, 21%, 31%, 27% and 28%, respectively. Grade 2 or higher urinary toxicity was less than 1% at each time-point. International Prostate Symptom Score was highest at 3 months and returned to normal 12 months after brachytherapy. On multivariate analysis, patients with a larger prostate size, greater baseline International Prostate Symptom Score, higher prostate V100, higher prostate V150, higher prostate D90 and a greater number of seeds had more acute urinary toxicities at 1 month and 12 months after brachytherapy. On multivariate analysis, significant predictors for urinary toxicity at 1 month and 12 months were a greater baseline International Prostate Symptom Score and prostate V100. Most urinary symptoms are tolerated and resolved within 12 months after prostate brachytherapy. Acute and late urinary toxicity after brachytherapy is strongly related to the baseline International Prostate Symptom Score and prostate V100. (author)

  10. Experimental determination of dosimetric characterization of a newly designed encapsulated interstitial brachytherapy source of 103Pd-model Pd-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, Ravinder; Yue Ning; Roa, Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    A newly designed encapsulated 103 Pd source has been introduced (BrachySeed trade mark sign -Pd-103, also named Model Pd-1, manufactured by DRAXIMAGE Inc. and distributed by Cytogen Corp.) for interstitial brachytherapy to provide more isotropic dose distributions. In this work, the dosimetric characteristics of the 103 Pd source were measured with micro LiF TLD chips and dosimetry parameters were characterized based upon the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 formalism. The dose rate constant of the sources was determined to be 0.66±0.05 cGy h-1 U-1. The radial dose function was measured and was found to be similar to that of the Theragenics Model 200 103 Pd source. The anisotropy constant for the Model Pd-1 source was determined to be 1.03

  11. Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the use of a type of energy, called ionizing radiation, to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. External ... In all cases of brachytherapy, the source of radiation is encapsulated ... non-radioactive metallic capsule. This prevents the radioactive materials ...

  12. Projector-based augmented reality for intuitive intraoperative guidance in image-guided 3D interstitial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krempien, Robert; Hoppe, Harald; Kahrs, Lüder; Daeuber, Sascha; Schorr, Oliver; Eggers, Georg; Bischof, Marc; Munter, Marc W; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study is to implement augmented reality in real-time image-guided interstitial brachytherapy to allow an intuitive real-time intraoperative orientation. The developed system consists of a common video projector, two high-resolution charge coupled device cameras, and an off-the-shelf notebook. The projector was used as a scanning device by projecting coded-light patterns to register the patient and superimpose the operating field with planning data and additional information in arbitrary colors. Subsequent movements of the nonfixed patient were detected by means of stereoscopically tracking passive markers attached to the patient. In a first clinical study, we evaluated the whole process chain from image acquisition to data projection and determined overall accuracy with 10 patients undergoing implantation. The described method enabled the surgeon to visualize planning data on top of any preoperatively segmented and triangulated surface (skin) with direct line of sight during the operation. Furthermore, the tracking system allowed dynamic adjustment of the data to the patient's current position and therefore eliminated the need for rigid fixation. Because of soft-part displacement, we obtained an average deviation of 1.1 mm by moving the patient, whereas changing the projector's position resulted in an average deviation of 0.9 mm. Mean deviation of all needles of an implant was 1.4 mm (range, 0.3-2.7 mm). The developed low-cost augmented-reality system proved to be accurate and feasible in interstitial brachytherapy. The system meets clinical demands and enables intuitive real-time intraoperative orientation and monitoring of needle implantation.

  13. Projector-Based Augmented Reality for Intuitive Intraoperative Guidance in Image-Guided 3D Interstitial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krempien, Robert; Hoppe, Harald; Kahrs, Lueder; Daeuber, Sascha; Schorr, Oliver; Eggers, Georg; Bischof, Marc; Munter, Marc W.; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to implement augmented reality in real-time image-guided interstitial brachytherapy to allow an intuitive real-time intraoperative orientation. Methods and Materials: The developed system consists of a common video projector, two high-resolution charge coupled device cameras, and an off-the-shelf notebook. The projector was used as a scanning device by projecting coded-light patterns to register the patient and superimpose the operating field with planning data and additional information in arbitrary colors. Subsequent movements of the nonfixed patient were detected by means of stereoscopically tracking passive markers attached to the patient. Results: In a first clinical study, we evaluated the whole process chain from image acquisition to data projection and determined overall accuracy with 10 patients undergoing implantation. The described method enabled the surgeon to visualize planning data on top of any preoperatively segmented and triangulated surface (skin) with direct line of sight during the operation. Furthermore, the tracking system allowed dynamic adjustment of the data to the patient's current position and therefore eliminated the need for rigid fixation. Because of soft-part displacement, we obtained an average deviation of 1.1 mm by moving the patient, whereas changing the projector's position resulted in an average deviation of 0.9 mm. Mean deviation of all needles of an implant was 1.4 mm (range, 0.3-2.7 mm). Conclusions: The developed low-cost augmented-reality system proved to be accurate and feasible in interstitial brachytherapy. The system meets clinical demands and enables intuitive real-time intraoperative orientation and monitoring of needle implantation

  14. Quality assurance in breast cancer brachytherapy: geographic miss in the interstitial boost treatment of the tumor bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmayer, F; Rahim, H B; Kogelnik, H D; Menzel, C; Merz, F; Deutschmann, H; Kranzinger, M

    1996-03-15

    To assess the role of geographic misses in the interstitial boost treatment of breast cancer patients and to evaluate methods of optimizing breast implants in design, performance, and dosimetry. During lumpectomy, the tumor excision sites of 89 patients were marked by five hemoclips. Postoperative radiographs demonstrated the clips' positions with respect to the extension of the surgical cavity, which was demarcated by air and hematoseroma. Twenty-seven selected patients received interstitial boosts to the tumor bed. The implant was first designed according to the clinical assumptions of the tumor bed's topography and then compared with the radiological findings. Prior to brachytherapy, the planning of the implant's dimension and the needle guidance was performed under simulator control. Dose distributions were first calculated following the Paris System and then electively optimized for the target volume by changing source positions and dwell times. Compared to clinical estimations, the radiological determination of the tumor bed's location revealed an overall potential of topographic errors of 51.8% (14 out of 27 patients), rising up to 78.5% in patients with large adipose breasts (11 out of 13 patients). This observation was due to a high mobility of the tissue, leading to varying tumor site projections at the time of mammography, surgery, and brachytherapy. In all patients, the presimulation of the implant resulted in an adequate coverage of the target volume. In 17 of the 27 treated patients, dose distributions were modified to achieve a higher dose delivery in zones where a higher residual tumor load was expected (boost-in-boost). Breast implants have a high potential of geographic misses that can be avoided by intraoperative clip demarcation. The delineation of the tumor bed allows for dose reports actually referring to the target volume and not to the implant system to be obtained. In addition, modern afterloading techniques offer possibilities of

  15. Quality assurance in breast cancer brachytherapy: geographic miss in the interstitial boost treatment of the tumor bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlmayer, Felix; Rahim, Hassan B. K.; Kogelnik, H. Dieter; Menzel, Christian; Merz, Florian; Deutschmann, Heinz; Kranzinger, Manfred

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of geographic misses in the interstitial boost treatment of breast cancer patients and to evaluate methods of optimizing breast implants in design, performance, and dosimetry. Methods and Materials: During lumpectomy, the tumor excision sites of 89 patients were marked by five hemoclips. Postoperative radiographs demonstrated the clips' positions with respect to the extension of the surgical cavity, which was demarcated by air and hematoseroma. Twenty-seven selected patients received interstitial boosts to the tumor bed. The implant was first designed according to the clinical assumptions of the tumor bed's topography and then compared with the radiological findings. Prior to brachytherapy, the planning of the implant's dimension and the needle guidance was performed under simulator control. Dose distributions were first calculated following the Paris System and then electively optimized for the target volume by changing source positions and dwell times. Results: Compared to clinical estimations, the radiological determination of the tumor bed's location revealed an overall potential of topographic errors of 51.8% (14 out of 27 patients), rising up to 78.5% in patients with large adipose breasts (11 out of 13 patients). This observation was due to a high mobility of the tissue, leading to varying tumor site projections at the time of mammography, surgery, and brachytherapy. In all patients, the presimulation of the implant resulted in an adequate coverage of the target volume. In 17 of the 27 treated patients, dose distributions were modified to achieve a higher dose delivery in zones where a higher residual tumor load was expected (boost-in-boost). Conclusion: Breast implants have a high potential of geographic misses that can be avoided by intraoperative clip demarcation. The delineation of the tumor bed allows for dose reports actually referring to the target volume and not to the implant system to be obtained. In addition, modern

  16. Perioperative interstitial brachytherapy for recurrent keloid scars; La curietherapie interstitielle perioperatoire dans le traitement des cicatrices cheloides recidivantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rio, E; Bardet, E; Peuvrel, P [CRLCC Nantes-Atlantique, Service de radiotherapie, 44 - Nantes-St-Herblain (France); Martinet, L; Perrot, P [CHU Hotel-Dieu, Service de chirurgie plastique, 44 - Nantes (France); Baraer, F; Loirat, Y [Clinique Breteche, Service de chirurgie plastique, 44 - Nantes (France); Sartre, J Y [Clinique Jules-Verne, Service de chirurgie plastique, 44 - Nantes (France); Malard, O; Ferron, C [CHU Hotel-Dieu, Service de Chirurgie ORL, 44 - Nantes (France); Dreno, B [CHU Hotel-Dieu, Service de dermatologie, 44 - Nantes (France)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Evaluation of the results of perioperative interstitial brachytherapy with low dose-rate (L.D.R.) Ir-192 in the treatment of keloid scars. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 73 histologically confirmed keloids (from 58 patients) resistant to medico surgical treated by surgical excision plus early perioperative brachytherapy. All lesions were initially symptomatic. Local control was evaluated by clinical evaluation. Functional and cosmetic results were assessed in terms of patient responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Median age was 28 years (range 13-71 years). Scars were located as follows: 37% on the face, 32% on the trunk or abdomen, 16% on the neck, and 15% on the arms or legs. The mean delay before loading was four hours (range, 1-6 h). The median dose was 20 Gy (range, 15-40 Gy). Sixty-four scars (from 53 patients) were evaluated. Local control was 86% (follow-up, 44.5 months; range, 14-150 months). All relapses occurred early within 2 years posttreatment. At 20 months, survival without recurrence was significantly lower when treated lengths were more than 6 cm long. The rate was 100% for treated scars below 4.5 cm in length, 95% (95% CI: 55-96) for those 4.5-6 cm long, and 75% (95% CI: 56-88) beyond 6 cm (p = 0.038). Of the 35 scars (28 patients) whose results were reassessed, six remained symptomatic and the esthetic results were considered to be good in 51% (18/35) and average in 37% (13/35) (median follow-up, 70 months; range, 16-181 months). Conclusion: Early perioperative L.D.R. brachytherapy delivering 20 Gy at 5 mm reduced the rate of recurrent keloids resistant to other treatments and gave good functional results. (authors)

  17. Matched-pair analysis and dosimetric variations of two types of software for interstitial permanent brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi, E-mail: hishiyam@kitasato-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Nakamura, Ryuji [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate (Japan); Satoh, Takefumi [Department of Urology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Tanji, Susumu [Department of Urology, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate (Japan); Teh, Bin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Uemae, Mineko [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Baba, Shiro [Department of Urology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether identical dosimetric results could be achieved using different planning software for permanent interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Data from 492 patients treated with brachytherapy were used for matched-pair analysis. Interplant and Variseed were used as software for ultrasound-based treatment planning. Institution, neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, prostate volume, and source strength were used for factors to match the 2 groups. The study population comprised of 126 patients with treatment planning using Interplant software and 127 matched patients using Variseed software. Dosimetric results were compared between the 2 groups. The Variseed group showed significantly higher values for dose covering 90% of prostate volume (pD90), prostate volume covered by 150% of prescription dose (pV150), and dose covering 30% of the urethra (uD30) compared with the Interplant group. Our results showed that use of different software could lead to different dosimetric results, which might affect the clinical outcomes.

  18. Monte Carlo-aided dosimetry of the new Bebig IsoSeed registered 103Pd Interstitial Brachytherapy Seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daskalov, George M.; Williamson, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    A new model 103 Pd interstitial brachytherapy source, the IsoSeed registered 103 Pd, was recently introduced by Bebig Isotopentechnik und Umweltdiagnostik GmbH for permanent implant applications. This study presents the first quantitative theoretical study of the seed's dosimetric quantities. Monte Carlo photon transport (MCPT) simulation techniques have been used to evaluate the dose-rate distributions around the model IsoSeed registered 103 Pd source in liquid water and air phantoms. These results have been used to calculate and tabulate the anisotropy function, F(r,θ), radial dose function, g(r), and anisotropy factors, φ(r), and dose-rate constant as defined by AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) Report. Cartesian 'away' and 'along' tables, giving the dose rates per unit air-kerma strength in water in the range 0.1-3 cm distance around the seed have also been tabulated. The dose-rate constant, Λ, was evaluated by simulating the wide-angle, free-air chamber (WAFAC) calibration geometry recently implemented by NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) to realize the primary standard of air-kerma strength (S K,N99 ) for low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources. The dose-rate constant has been found to be Λ=0.660±0.017 in units of dose-rate per unit air-kerma strength (cGy·h-1·U-1)

  19. Outcomes of Node-positive Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Via Multicatheter Interstitial Brachytherapy: The Pooled Registry of Multicatheter Interstitial Sites (PROMIS) Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrava, Mitchell; Kuske, Robert R; Anderson, Bethany; Chen, Peter; Hayes, John; Quiet, Coral; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Veruttipong, Darlene; Snyder, Margaret; Demanes, David J

    2018-06-01

    To report outcomes for breast-conserving therapy using adjuvant accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy in node-positive compared with node-negative patients. From 1992 to 2013, 1351 patients (1369 breast cancers) were treated with breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant APBI using interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy. A total of 907 patients (835 node negative, 59 N1a, and 13 N1mic) had >1 year of data available and nodal status information and are the subject of this analysis. Median age (range) was 59 years old (22 to 90 y). T stage was 90% T1 and ER/PR/Her2 was positive in 87%, 71%, and 7%. Mean number of axillary nodes removed was 12 (SD, 6). Cox multivariate analysis for local/regional control was performed using age, nodal stage, ER/PR/Her2 receptor status, tumor size, grade, margin, and adjuvant chemotherapy/antiestrogen therapy. The mean (SD) follow-up was 7.5 years (4.6). The 5-year actuarial local control (95% confidence interval) in node-negative versus node-positive patients was 96.3% (94.5-97.5) versus 95.8% (87.6-98.6) (P=0.62). The 5-year actuarial regional control in node-negative versus node-positive patients was 98.5% (97.3-99.2) versus 96.7% (87.4-99.2) (P=0.33). The 5-year actuarial freedom from distant metastasis and cause-specific survival were significantly lower in node-positive versus node-negative patients at 92.3% (82.4-96.7) versus 97.8% (96.3-98.7) (P=0.006) and 91.3% (80.2-96.3) versus 98.7% (97.3-99.3) (P=0.0001). Overall survival was not significantly different. On multivariate analysis age 50 years and below, Her2 positive, positive margin status, and not receiving chemotherapy or antiestrogen therapy were associated with a higher risk of local/regional recurrence. Patients who have had an axillary lymph node dissection and limited node-positive disease may be candidates for treatment with APBI. Further research is ultimately needed to better define specific criteria for APBI

  20. Brachytherapy for prostate cancer: Comparative characteristics of procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kanaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of interstitial radiation sources is the «youngest» of the radical method of treatment of patients with prostate cancer (PC. The high level of efficiency comparable to prostatectomy at a significantly lower rate of complications causes rapid growth of clinical use of brachytherapy (BT. Depending on the radiation source and the mode of administration into the prostate gland are two types BT – high-dose rate (temporary (HDR-BT and low-dose rate (permanent (LDR-BT brachytherapy. At the heart of these two methods are based on a single principle of direct effect of the quantum gamma radiation on the area of interest. However, the differences between the characteristics of isotopes used and technical aspects of the techniques cause the difference in performance and complication rates for expression HDR-BT and LDR-BT.

  1. SU-F-BRF-09: A Non-Rigid Point Matching Method for Accurate Bladder Dose Summation in Cervical Cancer HDR Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H; Zhen, X; Zhou, L; Zhong, Z; Pompos, A; Yan, H; Jiang, S; Gu, X

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To propose and validate a deformable point matching scheme for surface deformation to facilitate accurate bladder dose summation for fractionated HDR cervical cancer treatment. Method: A deformable point matching scheme based on the thin plate spline robust point matching (TPSRPM) algorithm is proposed for bladder surface registration. The surface of bladders segmented from fractional CT images is extracted and discretized with triangular surface mesh. Deformation between the two bladder surfaces are obtained by matching the two meshes' vertices via the TPS-RPM algorithm, and the deformation vector fields (DVFs) characteristic of this deformation is estimated by B-spline approximation. Numerically, the algorithm is quantitatively compared with the Demons algorithm using five clinical cervical cancer cases by several metrics: vertex-to-vertex distance (VVD), Hausdorff distance (HD), percent error (PE), and conformity index (CI). Experimentally, the algorithm is validated on a balloon phantom with 12 surface fiducial markers. The balloon is inflated with different amount of water, and the displacement of fiducial markers is benchmarked as ground truth to study TPS-RPM calculated DVFs' accuracy. Results: In numerical evaluation, the mean VVD is 3.7(±2.0) mm after Demons, and 1.3(±0.9) mm after TPS-RPM. The mean HD is 14.4 mm after Demons, and 5.3mm after TPS-RPM. The mean PE is 101.7% after Demons and decreases to 18.7% after TPS-RPM. The mean CI is 0.63 after Demons, and increases to 0.90 after TPS-RPM. In the phantom study, the mean Euclidean distance of the fiducials is 7.4±3.0mm and 4.2±1.8mm after Demons and TPS-RPM, respectively. Conclusions: The bladder wall deformation is more accurate using the feature-based TPS-RPM algorithm than the intensity-based Demons algorithm, indicating that TPS-RPM has the potential for accurate bladder dose deformation and dose summation for multi-fractional cervical HDR brachytherapy. This work is supported

  2. Objective method to report planner-independent skin/rib maximal dose in balloon-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yongbok; Trombetta, Mark G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: An objective method was proposed and compared with a manual selection method to determine planner-independent skin and rib maximal dose in balloon-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning. Methods: The maximal dose to skin and rib was objectively extracted from a dose volume histogram (DVH) of skin and rib volumes. A virtual skin volume was produced by expanding the skin surface in three dimensions (3D) external to the breast with a certain thickness in the planning computed tomography (CT) images. Therefore, the maximal dose to this volume occurs on the skin surface the same with a conventional manual selection method. The rib was also delineated in the planning CT images and its maximal dose was extracted from its DVH. The absolute (Abdiff=|D max Man -D max DVH |) and relative (Rediff[%]=100x(|D max Man -D max DVH |)/D max DVH ) maximal skin and rib dose differences between the manual selection method (D max Man ) and the objective method (D max DVH ) were measured for 50 balloon-based HDR (25 MammoSite and 25 Contura) patients. Results: The average±standard deviation of maximal dose difference was 1.67%±1.69% of the prescribed dose (PD). No statistical difference was observed between MammoSite and Contura patients for both Abdiff and Rediff[%] values. However, a statistically significant difference (p value max >90%) compared with lower dose range (D max <90%): 2.16%±1.93% vs 1.19%±1.25% with p value of 0.0049. However, the Rediff[%] analysis eliminated the inverse square factor and there was no statistically significant difference (p value=0.8931) between high and low dose ranges. Conclusions: The objective method using volumetric information of skin and rib can determine the planner-independent maximal dose compared with the manual selection method. However, the difference was <2% of PD, on average, if appropriate attention is paid to selecting a manual dose point in 3D planning CT images.

  3. Description of new techniques on interstitial brachytherapy in head and neck (oral cavity)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsiglia, H.

    1990-01-01

    Several case of epidermoid carcinomas in buccal cavity treated by brachytherapy associated with others therapeutic techniques are described, including the results using different therapeutical methods and the clinical and technical parameters considered on the evolution of the disease. (C.G.C.)

  4. Open magnetic resonance imaging using titanium-zirconium needles: improved accuracy for interstitial brachytherapy implants?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popowski, Youri; Hiltbrand, Emile; Joliat, Dominique; Rouzaud, Michel

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the benefit of using an open magnetic resonance (MR) machine and new MR-compatible needles to improve the accuracy of brachytherapy implants in pelvic tumors. Methods and Materials: The open MR machine, foreseen for interventional procedures, allows direct visualization of the pelvic structures that are to be implanted. For that purpose, we have developed MR- and CT-compatible titanium-zirconium (Ti-Zr) brachytherapy needles that allow implantations to be carried out under the magnetic field. In order to test the technical feasibility of this new approach, stainless steel (SS) and Ti-Zr needles were first compared in a tissue-equivalent phantom. In a second step, two patients implanted with Ti-Zr needles in the brachytherapy operating room were scanned in the open MR machine. In a third phase, four patients were implanted directly under open MR control. Results: The artifacts induced by both materials were significantly different, strongly favoring the Ti-Zr needles. The implantation in both first patients confirmed the excellent quality of the pictures obtained with the needles in vivo and showed suboptimal implant geometry in both patients. In the next 4 patients, the tumor could be punctured with excellent accuracy, and the adjacent structures could be easily avoided. Conclusion: We conclude that open MR using MR-compatible needles is a very promising tool in brachytherapy, especially for pelvic tumors

  5. Perioperative Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent Keloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Ping; Baumann, René; Dunst, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively evaluate high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of therapy-resistant keloids and report first results, with emphasis on feasibility and early treatment outcome. METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 2009 to 2014, 24 patients with 32 recurrent keloids were treated with immed...

  6. WE-DE-201-11: Sensitivity and Specificity of Verification Methods Based On Total Reference Air Kerma (TRAK) Or On User Provided Dose Points for Graphically Planned Skin HDR Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damato, A; Devlin, P; Bhagwat, M; Buzurovic, I; Hansen, J; O’Farrell, D; Cormack, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the sensitivity and specificity of a novel verification methodology for image-guided skin HDR brachytherapy plans using a TRAK-based reasonableness test, compared to a typical manual verification methodology. Methods: Two methodologies were used to flag treatment plans necessitating additional review due to a potential discrepancy of 3 mm between planned dose and clinical target in the skin. Manual verification was used to calculate the discrepancy between the average dose to points positioned at time of planning representative of the prescribed depth and the expected prescription dose. Automatic verification was used to calculate the discrepancy between TRAK of the clinical plan and its expected value, which was calculated using standard plans with varying curvatures, ranging from flat to cylindrically circumferential. A plan was flagged if a discrepancy >10% was observed. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated using as a criteria for true positive that >10% of plan dwells had a distance to prescription dose >1 mm different than prescription depth (3 mm + size of applicator). All HDR image-based skin brachytherapy plans treated at our institution in 2013 were analyzed. Results: 108 surface applicator plans to treat skin of the face, scalp, limbs, feet, hands or abdomen were analyzed. Median number of catheters was 19 (range, 4 to 71) and median number of dwells was 257 (range, 20 to 1100). Sensitivity/specificity were 57%/78% for manual and 70%/89% for automatic verification. Conclusion: A check based on expected TRAK value is feasible for irregularly shaped, image-guided skin HDR brachytherapy. This test yielded higher sensitivity and specificity than a test based on the identification of representative points, and can be implemented with a dedicated calculation code or with pre-calculated lookup tables of ideally shaped, uniform surface applicators.

  7. WE-DE-201-11: Sensitivity and Specificity of Verification Methods Based On Total Reference Air Kerma (TRAK) Or On User Provided Dose Points for Graphically Planned Skin HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damato, A; Devlin, P; Bhagwat, M; Buzurovic, I; Hansen, J; O’Farrell, D; Cormack, R [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the sensitivity and specificity of a novel verification methodology for image-guided skin HDR brachytherapy plans using a TRAK-based reasonableness test, compared to a typical manual verification methodology. Methods: Two methodologies were used to flag treatment plans necessitating additional review due to a potential discrepancy of 3 mm between planned dose and clinical target in the skin. Manual verification was used to calculate the discrepancy between the average dose to points positioned at time of planning representative of the prescribed depth and the expected prescription dose. Automatic verification was used to calculate the discrepancy between TRAK of the clinical plan and its expected value, which was calculated using standard plans with varying curvatures, ranging from flat to cylindrically circumferential. A plan was flagged if a discrepancy >10% was observed. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated using as a criteria for true positive that >10% of plan dwells had a distance to prescription dose >1 mm different than prescription depth (3 mm + size of applicator). All HDR image-based skin brachytherapy plans treated at our institution in 2013 were analyzed. Results: 108 surface applicator plans to treat skin of the face, scalp, limbs, feet, hands or abdomen were analyzed. Median number of catheters was 19 (range, 4 to 71) and median number of dwells was 257 (range, 20 to 1100). Sensitivity/specificity were 57%/78% for manual and 70%/89% for automatic verification. Conclusion: A check based on expected TRAK value is feasible for irregularly shaped, image-guided skin HDR brachytherapy. This test yielded higher sensitivity and specificity than a test based on the identification of representative points, and can be implemented with a dedicated calculation code or with pre-calculated lookup tables of ideally shaped, uniform surface applicators.

  8. The non-uniformity correction factor for the cylindrical ionization chambers in dosimetry of an HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, Bishnu; Patel, Narayan Prasad; Vijayan, V.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to derive the non-uniformity correction factor for the two therapy ionization chambers for the dose measurement near the brachytherapy source. The two ionization chambers of 0.6 cc and 0.1 cc volume were used. The measurement in air was performed for distances between 0.8 cm and 20 cm from the source in specially designed measurement jig. The non-uniformity correction factors were derived from the measured values. The experimentally derived factors were compared with the theoretically calculated non-uniformity correction factors and a close agreement was found between these two studies. The experimentally derived non-uniformity correction factor supports the anisotropic theory. (author)

  9. Placement of empty catheters for an HDR-emulating LDR prostate brachytherapy technique: comparison to standard intraoperative planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermayr, Thomas R; Nguyen, Paul L; Murciano-Goroff, Yonina R; Kovtun, Konstantin A; Neubauer Sugar, Emily; Cail, Daniel W; O'Farrell, Desmond A; Hansen, Jorgen L; Cormack, Robert A; Buzurovic, Ivan; Wolfsberger, Luciant T; O'Leary, Michael P; Steele, Graeme S; Devlin, Philip M; Orio, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine whether placing empty catheters within the prostate and then inverse planning iodine-125 seed locations within those catheters (High Dose Rate-Emulating Low Dose Rate Prostate Brachytherapy [HELP] technique) would improve concordance between planned and achieved dosimetry compared with a standard intraoperative technique. We examined 30 consecutive low dose rate prostate cases performed by standard intraoperative technique of planning followed by needle placement/seed deposition and compared them to 30 consecutive low dose rate prostate cases performed by the HELP technique. The primary endpoint was concordance between planned percentage of the clinical target volume that receives at least 100% of the prescribed dose/dose that covers 90% of the volume of the clinical target volume (V100/D90) and the actual V100/D90 achieved at Postoperative Day 1. The HELP technique had superior concordance between the planned target dosimetry and what was actually achieved at Day 1 and Day 30. Specifically, target D90 at Day 1 was on average 33.7 Gy less than planned for the standard intraoperative technique but was only 10.5 Gy less than planned for the HELP technique (p 0.05). Placing empty needles first and optimizing the plan to the known positions of the needles resulted in improved concordance between the planned and the achieved dosimetry to the target, possibly because of elimination of errors in needle placement. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The American brachytherapy society survey of brachytherapy practice for carcinoma of the cervix in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, S; Orton, C; Young, D; Erickson, B

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the brachytherapy practice for cervical cancer in the United States. The Clinical Research Committee of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) performed a retrospective survey of individual physicians of the ABS and American Society of Therapeutic Radiologists and Oncologists regarding the details of the brachytherapy techniques they personally used in the treatment of cervical cancer patients for the year 1995. The replies (some of which may have been an estimate only) were tabulated. The scope of this survey did not allow us to verify the data by chart audits. A total of about 3500 questionnaires were mailed out; 521 responses were received. Of these responders, 206 (40%) did not perform any brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix in 1995. Of the other 315 responders reporting a total of 4892 patients treated in 1995, 88% used low dose rate (LDR) while 24% used high dose rate (HDR). There was a wide variation in the doses used. For LDR treatments, the median total external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) dose was 45 and 50 Gy and the LDR dose was 42 and 45 Gy for early and advanced cancers, respectively. For HDR treatments, the median EBRT dose was 48 and 50 Gy and the median HDR dose was 29 and 30 Gy for early and advanced cancers, respectively. The median dose per fraction was 6 Gy for a median of five fractions. Interstitial brachytherapy was used as a component of the treatment in 6% of the patients by 21% of responders. Very few responders treated with pulsed or medium dose rates. This retrospective survey showed the current brachytherapy practice pattern in the treatment of cervical cancer in the United States and can serve as a basis for future prospective national brachytherapy data registry. There was wide variation in the practice pattern, emphasizing the urgent need for consensus on these issues. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  11. Exploitation of secondary standard for calibration in units of Dw,1cm and assessment of several HDR brachytherapy planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabris, F.; Zeman, J.; Valenta, J.; Gabris, F.; Selbach, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    A secondary standard of the BEV, calibrated at the PTB in terms of D w,1c m, was used for calibration of the well-type chamber-based measuring systems used in clinics. In addition to the calibration, we tried to employ it for assessment of treatment planning systems (TPS) used for each particular after-loader. The dose to water at 1 cm distance from the source position was calculated by the TPS, using reference data from the source producer certificate. The values were compared directly with the dose measured at the same distance from the source. The comparison has been carried out for GammaMed Plus and MicroSelectron HDR sources. Differences of secondary standard measurements and TPS calculations were lower than ±5%, which is below the achievable uncertainty of both dose measurement and dose determination by the TPS. Nevertheless, it is higher than generally accepted in the case of external beam radiotherapy. Additional direct measurements in terms of D w,1c m may improve the safety and reliability of patient treatment. (authors)

  12. SU-E-T-297: Dosimetric Assessment of An Air-Filled Balloon Applicator in HDR Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy Using the Monte Carlo Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, H; Lee, Y; Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As an alternative to cylindrical applicators, air inflated balloon applicators have been introduced into HDR vaginal cuff brachytherapy treatment to achieve sufficient dose to vagina mucosa as well as to spare rectum and bladder. In general, TG43 formulae based treatment planning systems do not take into account tissue inhomogeneity, and air in the balloon applicator can cause higher delivered dose to mucosa than treatment plan reported. We investigated dosimetric effect of air in balloon applicator using the Monte Carlo method. Methods: The thirteen-catheter Capri applicator with a Nucletron Ir-192 seed was modeled for various balloon diameters (2cm to 3.5cm) using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. Ir-192 seed was placed in both central and peripheral catheters to replicate real patient situations. Existence of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) with air balloon was evaluated by comparing kerma and dose at various distances (1mm to 70mm) from surface of air-filled applicator. Also mucosa dose by an air-filled applicator was compared with by a water-filled applicator to evaluate dosimetry accuracy of planning system without tissue inhomogeneity correction. Results: Beyond 1mm from air/tissue interface, the difference between kerma and dose was within 2%. CPE (or transient CPE) condition was deemed existent, and in this region no electron transport was necessary in Monte Carlo simulations. At 1mm or less, the deviation of dose from kerma became more apparent. Increase of dose to mucosa depended on diameter of air balloon. The increment of dose to mucosa was 2.5% and 4.3% on average for 2cm and 3.5cm applicators, respectively. Conclusion: After introduction of air balloon applicator, CPE fails only at the proximity of air/tissue interface. Although dose to mucosa is increased, there is no significant dosimetric difference (<5%) between air and water filled applicators. Tissue inhomogeneity correction is not necessary for air-filled applicators.

  13. SU-E-T-297: Dosimetric Assessment of An Air-Filled Balloon Applicator in HDR Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy Using the Monte Carlo Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, H; Lee, Y; Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: As an alternative to cylindrical applicators, air inflated balloon applicators have been introduced into HDR vaginal cuff brachytherapy treatment to achieve sufficient dose to vagina mucosa as well as to spare rectum and bladder. In general, TG43 formulae based treatment planning systems do not take into account tissue inhomogeneity, and air in the balloon applicator can cause higher delivered dose to mucosa than treatment plan reported. We investigated dosimetric effect of air in balloon applicator using the Monte Carlo method. Methods: The thirteen-catheter Capri applicator with a Nucletron Ir-192 seed was modeled for various balloon diameters (2cm to 3.5cm) using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. Ir-192 seed was placed in both central and peripheral catheters to replicate real patient situations. Existence of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) with air balloon was evaluated by comparing kerma and dose at various distances (1mm to 70mm) from surface of air-filled applicator. Also mucosa dose by an air-filled applicator was compared with by a water-filled applicator to evaluate dosimetry accuracy of planning system without tissue inhomogeneity correction. Results: Beyond 1mm from air/tissue interface, the difference between kerma and dose was within 2%. CPE (or transient CPE) condition was deemed existent, and in this region no electron transport was necessary in Monte Carlo simulations. At 1mm or less, the deviation of dose from kerma became more apparent. Increase of dose to mucosa depended on diameter of air balloon. The increment of dose to mucosa was 2.5% and 4.3% on average for 2cm and 3.5cm applicators, respectively. Conclusion: After introduction of air balloon applicator, CPE fails only at the proximity of air/tissue interface. Although dose to mucosa is increased, there is no significant dosimetric difference (<5%) between air and water filled applicators. Tissue inhomogeneity correction is not necessary for air-filled applicators

  14. SU-E-T-263: Point Dose Variation Using a Single Ir-192 HDR Brachytherapy Plan for Two Treatments with a Single Tandem-Ovoid Insertion for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, X; Morrill, S; Hardee, M; Han, E; Penagaricano, J; Zhang, X; Vaneerat, R [University of Arkansas Medical Science, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the point dose variations between Ir-192 HDR treatments on two consecutive days using a single tandem-ovoid insertion without replanning in cervical cancer patients. Methods: This study includes eleven cervical cancer patients undergoing HDR brachytherapy with a prescribed dose of 28 Gy in 4 fractions. Each patient had two tandemovoid insertions one week apart. Each insertion was treated on consecutive days with rescanning and replanning prior to each treatment. To study the effect of no replanning for day 2 treatments, the day 1 plan dwell position and dwell time with decay were applied to the day 2 CT dataset. The point dose variations on the prescription point H (defined according to American Brachytherapy Society), and normal tissue doses at point B, bladder, rectum and vaginal mucosa (based on ICRU Report 38) were obtained. Results: Without replanning, the mean point H dose variation was 4.6 ± 10.7% on the left; 2.3 ± 2.9% on the right. The mean B point variation was 3.8 ± 4.9% on the left; 3.6 ± 4.7% on the right. The variation in the left vaginal mucosal point was 12.2 ± 10.7%; 9.5 ± 12.5% on the right; the bladder point 5.5 ± 7.4%; and the rectal point 7.9 ± 9.1%. Conclusion: Without replanning, there are variations both in the prescription point and the normal tissue point doses. The latter can vary as much as 10% or more. This is likely due to the steep dose gradient from brachytherapy compounded by shifts in the positions of the applicator in relationship to the patients anatomy. Imaging prior to each treatment and replanning ensure effective and safe brachytherapy are recommended.

  15. Low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy preserves good quality of life in buccal mucosa cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayier, A.; Hayashi, Keiji; Yoshimura, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the results and long-term changes in radiation toxicity of stage I-II buccal mucosa cancer patients treated by low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy with 198 Au grains. A total of 133 stage I-II buccal mucosa carcinomas patients received 198 Au grain implantation brachytherapy between January 1982 and July 2005: 75 of them were treated by 198 Au grain implantation alone and 58 were treated by 198 Au implantation in combination with external irradiation. The average 198 Au-grain dose was 70 Gy in 7 days. Gross tumor areas ranged from 2.4 cm 2 to 9 cm 2 , and the clinical target areas ranged from 6 cm 2 to 15 cm 2 . The follow-up periods ranged from 3 months to 20 years (mean: 5 years 11 months and median: 5 years 1 months). Failure at the site of the primary lesion occurred in 17 patients. Post-treatment mucosal ulceration developed in 15 patients, and all were cured within 25 months by conservative treatment. Osteoradionecrosis was diagnosed in 8 patients, but only one patient required surgical treatment. No severe complications or aggravation of complications developed more than 10 years after treatment. The results of low-dose-rate (LDR)-brachytherapy (BT) alone and LDR-BT in combination with external irradiation at a total dose of 25 Gy were acceptable from the standpoint of cure rate and quality of life (QOL). (author)

  16. Study on interstitial brachytherapy using 103Pd seeds on tumor-bearing rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Huiru; Zhang Jingming; Tian Jiahe; Ding Weimin; Bai Hongsheng; Jin Xiaohai

    2003-01-01

    The effects of low-dose-rate brachytherapy are investigated in tumor-bearing rat. Walker 256 cells are transplanted subcutaneously with a trocar in the left leg of rats (Wistar). Two weeks later, rats with a tumor of 10 mm in mean diameter are divided into three groups (10 per group). Two groups are given 1 seed and 2 seeds implantation of 103 Pd, respectively, the third group is as an untreated control. Tumor size is measured twice a week until the 25th day when the rats are killed. Tumor is monitored either by palpation or further confirmed by histopathology. Kaplan-Meier statistic method is performed for survival analysis. The results show that the average weight of rats in untreated group is lower than in radiation groups (P 0.05). Tumor volumes in all treatment groups increase more obviously than in control till 16 days post-implantation. Tumor regression rate in 1 seed group is higher than in control group and in 2 seeds group. Although survival analysis show that the median survival time in 1 seed, 2 seeds and control groups are 24±0, 21±2 and 19±2 days with survival rate of 80%, 60% and 50% respectively, no significant differences are seen in all groups. So, brachytherapy with 103 Pd seed is effective on tumor-bearing rats. The implantation of seed can cause tumor edema in a self-limited way. A reasonable doses chosen for brachytherapy may play a role in treatment success

  17. Distant Metastases Following Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy for Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recent publications have suggested high-risk patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have a lower risk of distant metastases and improved cause-specific survival (CSS) than patients receiving definitive external beam radiation therapy (XRT). To date, none of these studies has compared distant metastases and CSS in brachytherapy patients. In this study, we evaluate such parameters in a consecutive cohort of brachytherapy patients. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to June 2007, 1,840 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with brachytherapy. Risk groups were stratified according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network ( (www.nccn.org)) guidelines. Subgroups of 658, 893, and 289 patients were assigned to low, intermediate, and high-risk categories. Median follow-up was 7.2 years. Along with brachytherapy implantation, 901 (49.0%) patients received supplemental XRT, and 670 (36.4%) patients received androgen deprivation therapy (median duration, 4 months). The mode of failure (biochemical, local, or distant) was determined for each patient for whom therapy failed. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on outcome. Results: For the entire cohort, metastases-free survival (MFS) and CSS at 12 years were 98.1% and 98.2%, respectively. When rates were stratified by low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, the 12-year MFS was 99.8%, 98.1%, and 93.8% (p < 0.001), respectively. CSS rates were 99.8%, 98.0%, and 95.3% (p < 0.001) for low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, respectively. Biochemical progression-free survival was 98.7%, 95.9% and 90.4% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients, respectively (p < 0.001). In multivariate Cox-regression analysis, MFS was mostly closely related to Gleason score and year of treatment, whereas CSS was most closely associated with Gleason score. Conclusions: Excellent CSS and MFS rates are achievable with high

  18. Image guided adaptive brachytherapy with combined intracavitary and interstitial technique improves the therapeutic ratio in locally advanced cervical cancer: Analysis from the retroEMBRACE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LU, Fokdal; Sturdza, Alina; Mazeron, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) using intracavitary applicators (IC) has led to a significant improvement of local control in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Further improvement has been obtained with combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC/IS) applicat...... IC/IS brachytherapy improves the therapeutic ratio in LACC by enabling a tumour specific dose escalation resulting in significantly higher local control in large tumours without adding treatment related late morbidity.......Background and purpose Image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) using intracavitary applicators (IC) has led to a significant improvement of local control in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Further improvement has been obtained with combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC....../IS) applicators. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the impact on local control and late morbidity of application of combined IS/IC brachytherapy in a large multicentre population. Material/methods 610 patients with LACC from the retroEMBRACE study were included. Patients were divided into an IC group (N...

  19. Dosimetric analysis of urethral strictures following HDR 192Ir brachytherapy as monotherapy for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díez, Patricia; Mullassery, Vinod; Dankulchai, Pittaya; Ostler, Peter; Hughes, Robert; Alonzi, Roberto; Lowe, Gerry; Hoskin, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate dosimetric parameters related to urethral strictures following high dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) alone for prostate cancer. Material and methods: Ten strictures were identified in 213 patients treated with HDRBT alone receiving 34 Gy in four fractions, 36 Gy in four fractions, 31.5 Gy in 3 fractions or 26 Gy in 2 fractions. A matched-pair analysis used 2 controls for each case matched for dose fractionation schedule, pre-treatment IPSS score, number of needles used and clinical target volume. The urethra was divided into membranous urethra and inferior, mid and superior thirds of the prostatic urethra. Results: Stricture rates were 3% in the 34 Gy group, 4% in the 36 Gy group, 6% in the 31.5 Gy group and 4% in the 26 Gy group. The median time to stricture formation was 26 months (range 8–40). The dosimetric parameters investigated were not statistically different between cases and controls. No correlation was seen between stricture rate and fractionation schedule. Conclusions: Urethral stricture is an infrequent complication of prostate HDRBT when used to deliver high doses as sole treatment, with an overall incidence in this cohort of 10/213 (4.7%). In a matched pair analysis no association with dose schedule or urethral dosimetry was identified, but the small number of events limits definitive conclusions

  20. Postoperative HDR afterloading brachytherapy: Vaginal tumor recurrence rates in patients with endometrial carcinoma dependent on treatment volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloetzer, K.H.; Guenther, R.; Wendt, T.

    1997-01-01

    Patients and Method: At Jena University, Department of Radiotherapy, from 1981 to 1990 108 patients with endometrical carcinoma were postoperatively treated with high dose radiation brachytherapy of the vagina without additional percutaneous radiotherapy. Histology showed more or less differenciated adenocarcinoma in 90% of all patients, all patients were postoperatively stage I or II without proven lymphatic metastases. Dependent on individual figures patients were distributed to 3 different gorups: group A: 4 x 10 Gy, tissue-thickness of 1 cm (vaginal apex) respectively 0.5 cm (lower vaginal walls); group B: 4 x 10 Gy, tissue thickness of 1 cm (upper vaginal wall); group C: 4 x 10 Gy, tissue-thickness of 0.5 cm (both excluding the lower vaginal walls). Results: Both 3-year survival rates (group A: 96.6%, group B: 96.9%, group C: 97.7%) and tumor relapse rates of the vaginal apex (group A: 0, group B: 3.1%, group C: 2.2%) don't show significant differences. No case of local tumor recurrence was seen in the upper 2/3 of the vagina and the pelvic walls. Late side effects concerning bladder and rectum (grade III to IV, EORTC/RTOG) could be minimized by reducing the treatment volume (group A: 6.8%/12.6%, group B: 6,2%/3.1%, group C: 2.2%/0). (orig./AJ) [de

  1. Definitive radiotherapy based on HDR brachytherapy with iridium 192 in uterine cervix carcinoma: report on the Vienna University Hospital findings (1993-1997) compared to the preceding period in the context of ICRU 38 recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, R.; Knocke, T.H.; Fellner, C.; Baldass, M.; Reinthaller, A.; Kucera, H.

    2000-01-01

    According to the reports described in the literature, fractionated HDR brachytherapy seems to represent one option for the primary treatment of cervical carcinoma. In order to render such treatment transparent and comparable for those interested in the field, we have attempted to report our recent experience obtained in Vienna from 1993-1997 using the terminology proposed by the ICRU report 38, focusing in particular on dose and volume reporting and a linear-quadratic model. Based on these parameters, a comparison with the preceding period in Vienna (LDR/HDR) has been made, with an attempt to correlate different methods and parameters with outcome. One hundred and eighty-nine patients (mean age 67 years) were treated with curative intent (stage la: 2,lb: 11, II a:11, IIb: 79, IIIa: 59, IVa: 5, IVb: 3 patients) using a combination of intra-cervical high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy (ring-tandem applicator) and a box technique for external-beam therapy (EBT: 48.6-50 Gy, linac 25 MV). Small tumors were treated with 5-6 fractions of 7 Gy at point A and 50 Gy EBT (25 Gy in the brachytherapy reference volume) which is iso-effective to 76-86 Gy at point A. Large tumors received 3-4 fractions of 7 Gy after 50 Gy EBT with open fields, which is iso-effective to 82-92 Gy ar point A. TRAK varied from mean 1.4 cGy (3 fractions) to 2.8 Gy (6 fractions) at one meter. 3-D treatment planning for brachytherapy was based on conventional X-rays and in 181/189 patients on computed tomography (CT) with the applicator in place. Computer-calculated volumes of the brachytherapy reference isodose (7 Gy/fraction) ranged from 46-155 ccm (mean 87 ccm); the respective mean hwt-volume (height x width x thickness) was 180 ccm. The 60 Gy HWT volumes (25 Gy from EBT) for the irradiation of small tumors ranged from 240 to 407 ccm (mean 337 ccm) and for larger tumors (50 Gy for EBT) from 452 to 785 ccm (mean 607 ccm). The beam dose for brachytherapy was 16.2 Gy (6.2-37.8 Gy) at the ICRU rectum

  2. Incidence of seed migration to the chest, abdomen, and pelvis after transperineal interstitial prostate brachytherapy with loose 125I seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Akitomo; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Nakashima, Jun; Kunieda, Etsuo; Nagata, Hirohiko; Mizuno, Ryuichi; Seki, Satoshi; Shiraishi, Yutaka; Kouta, Ryuichi; Oya, Mototsugu

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to determine the incidence of seed migration not only to the chest, but also to the abdomen and pelvis after transperineal interstitial prostate brachytherapy with loose 125 I seeds. We reviewed the records of 267 patients who underwent prostate brachytherapy with loose 125 I seeds. After seed implantation, orthogonal chest radiographs, an abdominal radiograph, and a pelvic radiograph were undertaken routinely to document the occurrence and sites of seed migration. The incidence of seed migration to the chest, abdomen, and pelvis was calculated. All patients who had seed migration to the abdomen and pelvis subsequently underwent a computed tomography scan to identify the exact location of the migrated seeds. Postimplant dosimetric analysis was undertaken, and dosimetric results were compared between patients with and without seed migration. A total of 19,236 seeds were implanted in 267 patients. Overall, 91 of 19,236 (0.47%) seeds migrated in 66 of 267 (24.7%) patients. Sixty-nine (0.36%) seeds migrated to the chest in 54 (20.2%) patients. Seven (0.036%) seeds migrated to the abdomen in six (2.2%) patients. Fifteen (0.078%) seeds migrated to the pelvis in 15 (5.6%) patients. Seed migration occurred predominantly within two weeks after seed implantation. None of the 66 patients had symptoms related to the migrated seeds. Postimplant prostate D90 was not significantly different between patients with and without seed migration. We showed the incidence of seed migration to the chest, abdomen and pelvis. Seed migration did not have a significant effect on postimplant prostate D90

  3. Natural History of Clinically Staged Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Monotherapeutic Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Wallner, Kent E.; Butler, Wayne M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history of clinically staged low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with permanent interstitial seed implants as monotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and May 2005, 463 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer underwent brachytherapy as the sole definitive treatment. Men who received supplemental external beam radiotherapy or androgen deprivation therapy were excluded. Dosimetric implant quality was determined based on the minimum dose that covered 90% of the target volume and the volume of the prostate gland receiving 100% of the prescribed dose. Multiple parameters were evaluated as predictors of treatment outcomes. Results: The 12-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates for the entire cohort were 97.1%, 99.7%, and 75.4%, respectively. Only pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, percent positive biopsy cores, and minimum dose that covered 90% of the target volume were significant predictors of biochemical recurrence. The bPFS, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 97.4%, 99.6%, and 76.2%, respectively, for low-risk patients and 96.4%, 100%, and 74.0%, respectively, for intermediate-risk patients. The bPFS rate was 98.8% for low-risk patients with high-quality implants versus 92.1% for those with less adequate implants (p < 0.01), and it was 98.3% for intermediate-risk patients with high-quality implants versus 86.4% for those with less adequate implants (p < 0.01). Conclusions: High-quality brachytherapy implants as monotherapy can provide excellent outcomes for men with clinically staged low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. For these men, a high-quality implant can achieve results comparable to high-quality surgery in the most favorable pathologically staged patient subgroups.

  4. Iodine-125 thin seeds decrease prostate swelling during transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beydoun, Nadine; Bucci, Joseph A.; Chin, Yaw S.; Malouf, David

    2014-01-01

    Prostate swelling following seed implantation is a well-recognised phenomenon. The purpose of this intervention was to assess whether using thinner seeds reduces post-implant swelling with permanent prostate brachytherapy. Eighteen consecutive patients eligible for prostate seed brachytherapy underwent seed implantation using iodine-125 (I-125) thin seeds. Operative time, dosimetry, prostate swelling and toxicity were assessed and compared with standard I-125 stranded seed controls, sourced from the department's brachytherapy database. A learning curve was noted with the thin seeds in terms of greater bending and deviation of needles from their intended path. This translated into significantly longer total operative time (88 vs 103 minutes; P=0.009, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.1-24.3) and time per needle insertion (2.6 vs 3.7 minutes; P<0.001, 95% CI 0.5-1.3) for the thin seeds. Day 30 prostate volumes were significantly smaller in the thin seed group compared with standard seeds (40.9cc vs 46.8cc; P=0.001, 95% CI 1.5-5.6). The ratio of preoperative transrectal ultrasound to day 30 post-implant CT volume was also smaller in the thin seed group (1.2±0.1 for standard seeds vs 1.1±0.1 for thin seeds). Post-implant dosimetric parameters were comparable for both groups. No significant differences were seen in acute urinary morbidity or quality of life between the two groups. I-125 thin seeds are associated with an initial learning curve, with longer operative time, even for experienced brachytherapists. The significant reduction in day 30 prostate volumes with the thin seeds has useful implications in terms of optimising dose coverage to the prostate in the early period post-implantation, as well as improving the accuracy of post-implant dosimetric assessments.

  5. Impact of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control after permanent interstitial brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe (Jay); Roberts, Kenneth; Decker, Roy; Pathare, Pradip; Rockwell, Sara; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the procedure-induced prostate edema during permanent interstitial brachytherapy (PIB) can cause significant variations in the dose delivered to the prostate gland. Because the clinical impact of edema-induced dose variations depends strongly on the magnitude of the edema, the temporal pattern of its resolution and its interplay with the decay of radioactivity and the underlying biological processes of tumor cells (such as tumor potential doubling time), we investigated the impact of edema-induced dose variations on the tumor cell survival and tumor control probability after PIB with the 131Cs, 125I and 103Pd sources used in current clinical practice. The exponential edema resolution model reported by Waterman et al. (Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41, 1069–1077–1998) was used to characterize the edema evolutions observed previously during clinical PIB for prostate cancer. The concept of biologically effective dose (BED), taking into account tumor cell proliferation and sublethal damage repair during dose delivery, was used to characterize the effects of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control probability. Our calculation indicated that prostate edema, if not taken into account appropriately, can increase the cell survival and decrease the probability of local control of PIB. The edema-induced increase in cell survival increased with increasing edema severity, decreasing half-life for radioactive decay and decreasing energy of the photons energy emitted by the source. At the doses currently prescribed for PIB and for prostate cancer cells characterized by nominal radiobiology parameters recommended by AAPM TG-137, PIB using 125I sources was less affected by edema than PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd sources due to the long radioactive decay half-life of 125I. The effect of edema on PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd was similar. The effect of edema on 103Pd PIB was slightly greater, even though the decay half-life of 103Pd (17 days

  6. The impact of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control after permanent interstitial brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth; Decker, Roy; Pathare, Pradip; Rockwell, Sara; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that procedure-induced prostate edema during permanent interstitial brachytherapy (PIB) can cause significant variations in the dose delivered to the prostate gland. Because the clinical impact of edema-induced dose variations strongly depends on the magnitude of the edema, the temporal pattern of its resolution and its interplay with the decay of radioactivity and the underlying biological processes of tumor cells (such as tumor potential doubling time), we investigated the impact of edema-induced dose variations on the tumor cell survival and tumor control probability after PIB with the 131 Cs, 125 I and 103 Pd sources used in current clinical practice. The exponential edema resolution model reported by Waterman et al (1998 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41 1069-77) was used to characterize the edema evolutions previously observed during clinical PIB for prostate cancer. The concept of biologically effective dose, taking into account tumor cell proliferation and sublethal damage repair during dose delivery, was used to characterize the effects of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control probability. Our calculation indicated that prostate edema, if not appropriately taken into account, can increase the cell survival and decrease the probability of local control of PIB. The magnitude of an edema-induced increase in cell survival increased with increasing edema severity, decreasing half-life of radioactive decay and decreasing photon energy emitted by the source. At the doses currently prescribed for PIB and for prostate cancer cells characterized by nominal radiobiology parameters recommended by AAPM TG-137, PIB using 125 I sources was less affected by edema than PIB using 131 Cs or 103 Pd sources due to the long radioactive decay half-life of 125 I. The effect of edema on PIB using 131 Cs or 103 Pd was similar. The effect of edema on 103 Pd PIB was slightly greater, even though the decay half-life of 103 Pd (17 days) is

  7. On the use of a novel Ferrous Xylenol-orange gelatin dosimeter for HDR brachytherapy commissioning and quality assurance testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Eleftherios P; Peppa, Vasiliki; Hourdakis, Costas J; Karaiskos, Pantelis; Papagiannis, Panagiotis

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate a commercially available Ferrous-Xylenol Orange-Gel (FXG) dosimeter (TrueView™) coupled with Optical-Computed Tomography (OCT) read out, for 3D dose verification in an Ir-192 superficial brachytherapy application. Two identical polyethylene containers filled with gel from the same batch were used. One was irradiated with an 18 MeV electron field to examine the dose-response linearity and obtain a calibration curve. A flap surface applicator was attached to the other to simulate treatment of a skin lesion. The dose distribution in the experimental set up was calculated with the TG-43 and the model based dose calculation (MBCA) algorithms of a commercial treatment planning system (TPS), as well as Monte Carlo (MC) simulation using the MCNP code. Measured and calculated dose distributions were spatially registered and compared. Apart from a region close to the container's neck, where gel measurements exhibited an over-response relative to MC calculations (probably due to stray light perturbation), an excellent agreement was observed between measurements and simulations. More than 97% of points within the 10% isodose line (80 cGy) met the gamma index criteria established from uncertainty analysis (5%/2 mm). The corresponding passing rates for the comparison of experiment to calculations using the TG-43 and MBDCA options of the TPS were 57% and 92%, respectively. TrueView™ is suitable for the quality assurance of demanding radiotherapy applications. Experimental results of this work confirm the advantage of the studied MBDCA over TG-43, expected from the improved account of scatter radiation in the treatment geometry. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. MO-B-BRC-02: Ultrasound Based Prostate HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions

  9. MO-B-BRC-02: Ultrasound Based Prostate HDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Z. [Duke University Medical Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions.

  10. MO-B-BRC-04: MRI-Based Prostate HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourtada, F.

    2016-01-01

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions

  11. MO-B-BRC-03: CT-Based Prostate HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoberi, J.

    2016-01-01

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions

  12. MO-B-BRC-04: MRI-Based Prostate HDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourtada, F. [Christiana Care Hospital (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions.

  13. MO-B-BRC-03: CT-Based Prostate HDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoberi, J. [Washington University School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions.

  14. WE-G-17A-05: Real-Time Catheter Localization Using An Active MR Tracker for Interstitial Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W; Damato, A; Viswanathan, A; Cormack, R [Dana Farber Cancer Institute / Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Penzkofer, T; Schmidt, E [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Pan, L; Gilson, W [Siemens Corporation, Corporate Technology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Seethamraju, R [Siemens Healthcare, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel active MR-tracking system which can provide accurate and rapid localization of brachytherapy catheters, and assess its reliability and spatial accuracy in comparison to standard catheter digitization using MR images. Methods: An active MR tracker for brachytherapy was constructed by adding three printed-circuit micro-coils to the shaft of a commercial metallic stylet. A gel phantom with an embedded framework was built, into which fifteen 14-Gauge catheters were placed, following either with parallel or crossed paths. The tracker was inserted sequentially into each catheter, with MR-tracking running continuously. Tracking was also performed during the tracker's removal from each catheter. Catheter trajectories measured from the insertion and the removal procedures using the same micro-coil were compared, as well as trajectories obtained using different micro-coils. A 3D high-resolution MR image dataset of the phantom was acquired and imported into a treatment planning system (TPS) for catheter digitization. A comparison between MR-tracked positions and positions digitized from MR images by TPS was performed. Results: The MR tracking shows good consistency for varying catheter paths and for all micro-coils (mean difference ∼1.1 mm). The average distance between the MR-tracking trajectory and catheter digitization from the MR images was 1.1 mm. Ambiguity in catheter assignment from images due to crossed paths was resolved by active tracking. When tracking was interleaved with imaging, real-time images were continuously acquired at the instantaneous tip positions and displayed on an external workstation. Conclusion: The active MR tracker may be used to provide an independent measurement of catheter location in the MR environment, potentially eliminating the need for subsequent CT. It may also be used to control realtime imaging of catheter placement. This will enable MR-based brachytherapy planning of interstitial implants without

  15. WE-G-17A-05: Real-Time Catheter Localization Using An Active MR Tracker for Interstitial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W; Damato, A; Viswanathan, A; Cormack, R; Penzkofer, T; Schmidt, E; Pan, L; Gilson, W; Seethamraju, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel active MR-tracking system which can provide accurate and rapid localization of brachytherapy catheters, and assess its reliability and spatial accuracy in comparison to standard catheter digitization using MR images. Methods: An active MR tracker for brachytherapy was constructed by adding three printed-circuit micro-coils to the shaft of a commercial metallic stylet. A gel phantom with an embedded framework was built, into which fifteen 14-Gauge catheters were placed, following either with parallel or crossed paths. The tracker was inserted sequentially into each catheter, with MR-tracking running continuously. Tracking was also performed during the tracker's removal from each catheter. Catheter trajectories measured from the insertion and the removal procedures using the same micro-coil were compared, as well as trajectories obtained using different micro-coils. A 3D high-resolution MR image dataset of the phantom was acquired and imported into a treatment planning system (TPS) for catheter digitization. A comparison between MR-tracked positions and positions digitized from MR images by TPS was performed. Results: The MR tracking shows good consistency for varying catheter paths and for all micro-coils (mean difference ∼1.1 mm). The average distance between the MR-tracking trajectory and catheter digitization from the MR images was 1.1 mm. Ambiguity in catheter assignment from images due to crossed paths was resolved by active tracking. When tracking was interleaved with imaging, real-time images were continuously acquired at the instantaneous tip positions and displayed on an external workstation. Conclusion: The active MR tracker may be used to provide an independent measurement of catheter location in the MR environment, potentially eliminating the need for subsequent CT. It may also be used to control realtime imaging of catheter placement. This will enable MR-based brachytherapy planning of interstitial implants without

  16. TH-AB-BRA-04: Dosimetric Evaluation of MR-Guided HDR Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamio, Y; Barkati, M; Beliveau-Nadeau, D [CHUM Notre Dame Hospital, Montreal, QC, CA (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective study on 16 patients that had both CT and T2-weighted MR scans done at first fraction using the Utrecht CT/MR applicator (Elekta Brachytherapy) in order to evaluate uncertainties associated with an MR-only planning workflow. Methods: MR-workflow uncertainties were classified in three categories: reconstruction, registration and contouring. A systematic comparison of the CT and MR contouring, manual reconstruction and optimization process was performed to evaluate the impact of these uncertainties on the recommended GEC ESTRO DVH parameters: D90% and V100% for HR-CTV as well as D2cc for bladder, rectum, sigmoid colon and small bowel. This comparison was done using the following four steps: 1. Catheter reconstruction done on MR images with original CT-plan contours and dwell times. 2. OAR contours adjusted on MR images with original CT-plan reconstruction and dwell times. 3. Both reconstruction and contours done on MR images with original CT-plan dwell times. 4. Entire MR-based workflow optimized dwell times reimported to the original CT-plan. Results: The MR-based reconstruction process showed average D2cc deviations of 4.5 ± 3.0%, 1.5 ± 2.0%, 2.5 ± 2.0% and 2.0 ± 1.0% for the bladder, rectum, sigmoid colon and small bowels respectively with a maximum of 10%, 6%, 6% and 4%. The HR-CTV’s D90% and V100% average deviations was found to be 4.0 ± 3.0%, and 2.0 ± 2.0% respectively with a maximum of 10% and 6%. Adjusting contours on MR-images was found to have a similar impact. Finally, the optimized MR-based workflow dwell times were found to still give acceptable plans when re-imported to the original CT-plan which validated the entire workflow. Conclusion: This work illustrates a systematic validation method for centers wanting to move towards an MR-only workflow. This work will be expanded to model based reconstruction, PD-weighted images and other types of applicators.

  17. TH-AB-BRA-04: Dosimetric Evaluation of MR-Guided HDR Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamio, Y; Barkati, M; Beliveau-Nadeau, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective study on 16 patients that had both CT and T2-weighted MR scans done at first fraction using the Utrecht CT/MR applicator (Elekta Brachytherapy) in order to evaluate uncertainties associated with an MR-only planning workflow. Methods: MR-workflow uncertainties were classified in three categories: reconstruction, registration and contouring. A systematic comparison of the CT and MR contouring, manual reconstruction and optimization process was performed to evaluate the impact of these uncertainties on the recommended GEC ESTRO DVH parameters: D90% and V100% for HR-CTV as well as D2cc for bladder, rectum, sigmoid colon and small bowel. This comparison was done using the following four steps: 1. Catheter reconstruction done on MR images with original CT-plan contours and dwell times. 2. OAR contours adjusted on MR images with original CT-plan reconstruction and dwell times. 3. Both reconstruction and contours done on MR images with original CT-plan dwell times. 4. Entire MR-based workflow optimized dwell times reimported to the original CT-plan. Results: The MR-based reconstruction process showed average D2cc deviations of 4.5 ± 3.0%, 1.5 ± 2.0%, 2.5 ± 2.0% and 2.0 ± 1.0% for the bladder, rectum, sigmoid colon and small bowels respectively with a maximum of 10%, 6%, 6% and 4%. The HR-CTV’s D90% and V100% average deviations was found to be 4.0 ± 3.0%, and 2.0 ± 2.0% respectively with a maximum of 10% and 6%. Adjusting contours on MR-images was found to have a similar impact. Finally, the optimized MR-based workflow dwell times were found to still give acceptable plans when re-imported to the original CT-plan which validated the entire workflow. Conclusion: This work illustrates a systematic validation method for centers wanting to move towards an MR-only workflow. This work will be expanded to model based reconstruction, PD-weighted images and other types of applicators.

  18. Comparison of methods for the measurement of radiation dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: Ge-doped optical fiber, EBT3 Gafchromic film, and PRESAGE® radiochromic plastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, A. L.; Di Pietro, P.; Alobaidli, S.; Issa, F.; Doran, S.; Bradley, D.; Nisbet, A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Dose distribution measurement in clinical high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is challenging, because of the high dose gradients, large dose variations, and small scale, but it is essential to verify accurate treatment planning and treatment equipment performance. The authors compare and evaluate three dosimetry systems for potential use in brachytherapy dose distribution measurement: Ge-doped optical fibers, EBT3 Gafchromic film with multichannel analysis, and the radiochromic material PRESAGE ® with optical-CT readout. Methods: Ge-doped SiO 2 fibers with 6 μm active core and 5.0 mm length were sensitivity-batched and their thermoluminescent properties used via conventional heating and annealing cycles. EBT3 Gafchromic film of 30 μm active thickness was calibrated in three color channels using a nominal 6 MV linear accelerator. A 48-bit transmission scanner and advanced multichannel analysis method were utilized to derive dose measurements. Samples of the solid radiochromic polymer PRESAGE ® , 60 mm diameter and 100 mm height, were analyzed with a parallel beam optical CT scanner. Each dosimetry system was used to measure the dose as a function of radial distance from a Co-60 HDR source, with results compared to Monte Carlo TG-43 model data. Each system was then used to measure the dose distribution along one or more lines through typical clinical dose distributions for cervix brachytherapy, with results compared to treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. Purpose-designed test objects constructed of Solid Water and held within a full-scatter water tank were utilized. Results: All three dosimetry systems reproduced the general shape of the isolated source radial dose function and the TPS dose distribution. However, the dynamic range of EBT3 exceeded those of doped optical fibers and PRESAGE ® , and the latter two suffered from unacceptable noise and artifact. For the experimental conditions used in this study, the useful range from an isolated

  19. Comparison of methods for the measurement of radiation dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: Ge-doped optical fiber, EBT3 Gafchromic film, and PRESAGE® radiochromic plastic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, A L; Di Pietro, P; Alobaidli, S; Issa, F; Doran, S; Bradley, D; Nisbet, A

    2013-06-01

    Dose distribution measurement in clinical high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is challenging, because of the high dose gradients, large dose variations, and small scale, but it is essential to verify accurate treatment planning and treatment equipment performance. The authors compare and evaluate three dosimetry systems for potential use in brachytherapy dose distribution measurement: Ge-doped optical fibers, EBT3 Gafchromic film with multichannel analysis, and the radiochromic material PRESAGE(®) with optical-CT readout. Ge-doped SiO2 fibers with 6 μm active core and 5.0 mm length were sensitivity-batched and their thermoluminescent properties used via conventional heating and annealing cycles. EBT3 Gafchromic film of 30 μm active thickness was calibrated in three color channels using a nominal 6 MV linear accelerator. A 48-bit transmission scanner and advanced multichannel analysis method were utilized to derive dose measurements. Samples of the solid radiochromic polymer PRESAGE(®), 60 mm diameter and 100 mm height, were analyzed with a parallel beam optical CT scanner. Each dosimetry system was used to measure the dose as a function of radial distance from a Co-60 HDR source, with results compared to Monte Carlo TG-43 model data. Each system was then used to measure the dose distribution along one or more lines through typical clinical dose distributions for cervix brachytherapy, with results compared to treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. Purpose-designed test objects constructed of Solid Water and held within a full-scatter water tank were utilized. All three dosimetry systems reproduced the general shape of the isolated source radial dose function and the TPS dose distribution. However, the dynamic range of EBT3 exceeded those of doped optical fibers and PRESAGE(®), and the latter two suffered from unacceptable noise and artifact. For the experimental conditions used in this study, the useful range from an isolated HDR source was 5-40 mm for

  20. Dosimetric Evaluation of High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy Boost Treatments for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehlich, Georgina; Agoston, Peter; Loevey, Jozsef; Somogyi, Andras; Fodor, Janos; Polgar, Csaba; Major, Tibor

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: to quantitatively evaluate the dose distributions of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate implants regarding target coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk. Material and methods: treatment plans of 174 implants were evaluated using cumulative dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The planning was based on transrectal ultrasound (US) imaging, and the prescribed dose (100%) was 10 Gy. The tolerance doses to rectum and urethra were 80% and 120%, respectively. Dose-volume parameters for target (V90, V100, V150, V200, D90, D min ) and quality indices (DNR [dose nonuniformity ratio], DHI [dose homogeneity index], CI [coverage index], COIN [conformal index]) were calculated. Maximum dose in reference points of rectum (D r ) and urethra (D u ), dose to volume of 2 cm 3 of the rectum (D 2ccm ), and 0.1 cm 3 and 1% of the urethra (D 0.1ccm and D1) were determined. Nonparametric correlation analysis was performed between these parameters. Results: the median number of needles was 16, the mean prostate volume (V p ) was 27.1 cm 3 . The mean V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 90%, 97%, 39% and 13%, respectively. The mean D90 was 109%, and the D min was 87%. The mean doses in rectum and urethra reference points were 75% and 119%, respectively. The mean volumetric doses were D 2ccm = 49% for the rectum, D 0.1ccm = 126%, and D1 = 140% for the urethra. The mean DNR was 0.37, while the DHI was 0.60. The mean COIN was 0.66. The Spearman rank order correlation coefficients for volume doses to rectum and urethra were R(D r , D 2ccm ) = 0.69, R(D u , D 0.1ccm ) = 0.64, R(D u , D1) = 0.23. Conclusion: US-based treatment plans for HDR prostate implants based on the real positions of catheters provided acceptable dose distributions. In the majority of the cases, the doses to urethra and rectum were kept below the defined tolerance levels. For rectum, the dose in reference points correlated well with dose-volume parameters. For urethra dose characterization, the use of D1 volumetric

  1. Dosimetric Evaluation of High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy Boost Treatments for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehlich, Georgina [Semmelweis Univ., Budapest (Hungary); Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Agoston, Peter; Loevey, Jozsef; Somogyi, Andras; Fodor, Janos; Polgar, Csaba; Major, Tibor [Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: to quantitatively evaluate the dose distributions of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate implants regarding target coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk. Material and methods: treatment plans of 174 implants were evaluated using cumulative dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The planning was based on transrectal ultrasound (US) imaging, and the prescribed dose (100%) was 10 Gy. The tolerance doses to rectum and urethra were 80% and 120%, respectively. Dose-volume parameters for target (V90, V100, V150, V200, D90, D{sub min}) and quality indices (DNR [dose nonuniformity ratio], DHI [dose homogeneity index], CI [coverage index], COIN [conformal index]) were calculated. Maximum dose in reference points of rectum (D{sub r}) and urethra (D{sub u}), dose to volume of 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectum (D{sub 2ccm}), and 0.1 cm{sup 3} and 1% of the urethra (D{sub 0.1ccm} and D1) were determined. Nonparametric correlation analysis was performed between these parameters. Results: the median number of needles was 16, the mean prostate volume (V{sub p}) was 27.1 cm{sup 3}. The mean V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 90%, 97%, 39% and 13%, respectively. The mean D90 was 109%, and the D{sub min} was 87%. The mean doses in rectum and urethra reference points were 75% and 119%, respectively. The mean volumetric doses were D{sub 2ccm} = 49% for the rectum, D{sub 0.1ccm} = 126%, and D1 = 140% for the urethra. The mean DNR was 0.37, while the DHI was 0.60. The mean COIN was 0.66. The Spearman rank order correlation coefficients for volume doses to rectum and urethra were R(D{sub r}, D{sub 2ccm}) = 0.69, R(D{sub u}, D{sub 0.1ccm}) = 0.64, R(D{sub u}, D1) = 0.23. Conclusion: US-based treatment plans for HDR prostate implants based on the real positions of catheters provided acceptable dose distributions. In the majority of the cases, the doses to urethra and rectum were kept below the defined tolerance levels. For rectum, the dose in reference points correlated well with dose

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy boost treatments for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Georgina; Agoston, Péter; Lövey, József; Somogyi, András; Fodor, János; Polgár, Csaba; Major, Tibor

    2010-07-01

    To quantitatively evaluate the dose distributions of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate implants regarding target coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk. Treatment plans of 174 implants were evaluated using cumulative dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The planning was based on transrectal ultrasound (US) imaging, and the prescribed dose (100%) was 10 Gy. The tolerance doses to rectum and urethra were 80% and 120%, respectively. Dose-volume parameters for target (V90, V100, V150, V200, D90, D(min)) and quality indices (DNR [dose nonuniformity ratio], DHI [dose homogeneity index], CI [coverage index], COIN [conformal index]) were calculated. Maximum dose in reference points of rectum (D(r)) and urethra (D(u)), dose to volume of 2 cm(3) of the rectum (D(2ccm)), and 0.1 cm(3) and 1% of the urethra (D(0.1ccm) and D1) were determined. Nonparametric correlation analysis was performed between these parameters. The median number of needles was 16, the mean prostate volume (V(p)) was 27.1 cm(3). The mean V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 99%, 97%, 39%, and 13%, respectively. The mean D90 was 109%, and the D(min) was 87%. The mean doses in rectum and urethra reference points were 75% and 119%, respectively. The mean volumetric doses were D(2ccm) = 49% for the rectum, D(0.1ccm) = 126%, and D1 = 140% for the urethra. The mean DNR was 0.37, while the DHI was 0.60. The mean COIN was 0.66. The Spearman rank order correlation coefficients for volume doses to rectum and urethra were R(D(r),D(2ccm)) = 0.69, R(D(u),D0.(1ccm)) = 0.64, R(D(u),D1) = 0.23. US-based treatment plans for HDR prostate implants based on the real positions of catheters provided acceptable dose distributions. In the majority of the cases, the doses to urethra and rectum were kept below the defined tolerance levels. For rectum, the dose in reference points correlated well with dose-volume parameters. For urethra dose characterization, the use of D1 volumetric parameter is recommended.

  3. Comparison of prostate contours between conventional stepping transverse imaging and Twister-based sagittal imaging in permanent interstitial prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Shogo; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Satoh, Takefumi; Tsumura, Hideyasu; Sekiguchi, Akane; Takenaka, Kouji; Tabata, Ken-Ichi; Iwamura, Masatsugu; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2017-08-01

    To compare prostate contours on conventional stepping transverse image acquisitions with those on twister-based sagittal image acquisitions. Twenty prostate cancer patients who were planned to have permanent interstitial prostate brachytherapy were prospectively accrued. A transrectal ultrasonography probe was inserted, with the patient in lithotomy position. Transverse images were obtained with stepping movement of the transverse transducer. In the same patient, sagittal images were also obtained through rotation of the sagittal transducer using the "Twister" mode. The differences of prostate size among the two types of image acquisitions were compared. The relationships among the difference of the two types of image acquisitions, dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters on the post-implant computed tomography (CT) analysis, as well as other factors were analyzed. The sagittal image acquisitions showed a larger prostate size compared to the transverse image acquisitions especially in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction ( p transverse image acquisitions was correlated to DVH parameters such as D 90 ( R = 0.518, p = 0.019), and V 100 ( R = 0.598, p = 0.005). There were small but significant differences in the prostate contours between the transverse and the sagittal planning image acquisitions. Furthermore, our study suggested that the differences between the two types of image acquisitions might correlated to dosimetric results on CT analysis.

  4. SU-E-T-580: On the Significance of Model Based Dosimetry for Breast and Head and Neck 192Ir HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peppa, V; Pappas, E; Pantelis, E; Papagiannis, P [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Major, T; Polgar, C [National Institute of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric and radiobiological differences between TG43-based and model-based dosimetry in the treatment planning of {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy for breast and head and neck cancer. Methods: Two cohorts of 57 Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) and 22 head and neck (H&N) patients with oral cavity carcinoma were studied. Dosimetry for the treatment plans was performed using the TG43 algorithm of the Oncentra Brachy v4.4 treatment planning system (TPS). Corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using MCNP6 with input files automatically prepared by the BrachyGuide software tool from DICOM RT plan data. TG43 and MC data were compared in terms of % dose differences, Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) and related indices of clinical interest for the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and the Organs-At-Risk (OARs). A radiobiological analysis was also performed using the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD), mean survival fraction (S) and Tumor Control Probability (TCP) for the PTV, and the Normal Tissue Control Probability (N TCP) and the generalized EUD (gEUD) for the OARs. Significance testing of the observed differences performed using the Wilcoxon paired sample test. Results: Differences between TG43 and MC DVH indices, associated with the increased corresponding local % dose differences observed, were statistically significant. This is mainly attributed to their consistency however, since TG43 agrees closely with MC for the majority of DVH and radiobiological parameters in both patient cohorts. Differences varied considerably among patients only for the ipsilateral lung and ribs in the APBI cohort, with a strong correlation to target location. Conclusion: While the consistency and magnitude of differences in the majority of clinically relevant DVH indices imply that no change is needed in the treatment planning practice, individualized dosimetry improves accuracy and addresses instances of inter-patient variability observed. Research

  5. SU-E-T-580: On the Significance of Model Based Dosimetry for Breast and Head and Neck 192Ir HDR Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peppa, V; Pappas, E; Pantelis, E; Papagiannis, P; Major, T; Polgar, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric and radiobiological differences between TG43-based and model-based dosimetry in the treatment planning of 192 Ir HDR brachytherapy for breast and head and neck cancer. Methods: Two cohorts of 57 Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) and 22 head and neck (H&N) patients with oral cavity carcinoma were studied. Dosimetry for the treatment plans was performed using the TG43 algorithm of the Oncentra Brachy v4.4 treatment planning system (TPS). Corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using MCNP6 with input files automatically prepared by the BrachyGuide software tool from DICOM RT plan data. TG43 and MC data were compared in terms of % dose differences, Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) and related indices of clinical interest for the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and the Organs-At-Risk (OARs). A radiobiological analysis was also performed using the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD), mean survival fraction (S) and Tumor Control Probability (TCP) for the PTV, and the Normal Tissue Control Probability (N TCP) and the generalized EUD (gEUD) for the OARs. Significance testing of the observed differences performed using the Wilcoxon paired sample test. Results: Differences between TG43 and MC DVH indices, associated with the increased corresponding local % dose differences observed, were statistically significant. This is mainly attributed to their consistency however, since TG43 agrees closely with MC for the majority of DVH and radiobiological parameters in both patient cohorts. Differences varied considerably among patients only for the ipsilateral lung and ribs in the APBI cohort, with a strong correlation to target location. Conclusion: While the consistency and magnitude of differences in the majority of clinically relevant DVH indices imply that no change is needed in the treatment planning practice, individualized dosimetry improves accuracy and addresses instances of inter-patient variability observed. Research co

  6. Prostate preservation by combined external beam and hdr brachytherapy at nodal negative prostate cancer patients - an intermediate analysis after ten years experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, G.; Wirth, B.; Bertermann, H.; Galalae, R.; Kohr, P.; Wilhelm, R.; Kimmig, B.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The combined external beam (EBT) and HDR brachytherapy (HBT) boost treatment for localized prostate cancer was established in 1986. The aim of this analysis is to judge the results of this method after 10 years experience. Material and Methods: The treatment and follow-up data of 171 histologically proven, localized (N-staging by imaging) prostate cancer patients were analyzed. Average age of the patients was 68.2 years with a median of 69 years (44-84 years). Tumor stages (using transrectal ultrasound /TRUS/) ranged from A2 (T1b) in two, to B (T2) in 110 and C (T3) in 59 cases. Tumor grading: 27 highly differentiated (G1), 86 moderately differentiated (G2) as well as 57 poorly differentiated (G3) and one undifferentiated (G4) tumor. Follow-up lasted 13-114 months (mean: 53; median: 55 months). Forty-six patients had previous surgery on the bladder neck. Sixty-one patients had transitory androgen deprivation or antiandrogen treatment prior to radiation, which lasted for a max. of 6 months and was finished before radiation with the exception of 13 patients who continued the hormone deprivation after radiotherapy. Initial PSA was known in 126 cases, 86 of them had not received previous androgen deprivation. In 13% values under 4 ng/ml (Hybritech), as well as 46% not above 20 ng/ml and 40 % above 20 ng/ml, respectively. Those cases in which PSA began to rise without having been fallen under a level of 1 ng/ml were considered as PSA progression as well as those cases in which PSA rose to a value twice the PSA nadir we found be essential (2 ng/ml) after it had fallen to a minimum under 1 ng/ml. Ultrasound guided conformal HBT treatment planning was carried out. The 2x 15 Gy HBT boost was integrated into the EBT schedule, total dose was 50 Gy for subclinical disease and 70 Gy for the prostate in 6-7 weeks. Regular follow-up by clinical examination, TRUS + volumetry, PSA, bone scan and after 12 months biopsy. Results: Ten of 171 patients died of

  7. Post-treatment biopsy results following permanent transrectal ultrasound-guided interstitial brachytherapy in early stage prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prestidge, Bradley R.; Blasko, John C.; Grimm, Peter D.; Hoak, David C.; Cavanagh, Bill; Ragde, Haakon

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: Although some controversy remains, most authors agree that post-treatment prostatic biopsy is the best measure of local control in prostate cancer. Brachytherapy series reporting post-implant biopsy results have been few in number, limited in size, and involving older open or combined external beam techniques. The present study was undertaken to assess local control rates as determined by post-implant prostate biopsy in a large series of consecutive patients who have received permanent interstitial brachytherapy using a contemporary transrectal ultrasound directed, transperineal, computer generated, volume technique. METHOD/MATERIALS: From January 1988 to January 1994, 402 patients received permanent I-125 (285, 71%) or Pd-103 (117, 29%) interstitial brachytherapy as primary treatment for prostatic carcinoma at the Northwest Tumor Institute. Of these, 201 have consented to prostatic biopsy at least 12 months post-implant with a median follow-up of 40 months (range of 12 to 83 months). None had received hormone manipulation. A total of 361 biopsies were performed on 201 patients with a range of 1 to 6 yearly biopsies per patient; 91 receiving multiple biopsies. The other 201 patients were either unable (for geographic reasons) or unwilling to submit for biopsy. However, all patients with a rising PSA or clinical suspicion of recurrence underwent biopsy when possible. The 201 biopsy patients presented with a median age of 69 (range 47 to 89). Stages included 51 T1 (25%), 125 T2a (62%), 22 T2b (11%), and 3 T2c (1%). Gleason sums included 69 2-4 (34%), 117 5-6 (58%), 15 7-10 (7%), and 2 ungraded (1%). The initial PSA was 6.6 (range 0.7 to 74.6). There was no significant difference in the presenting characteristics or implant parameters between those patients biopsied and those that were not. 143 received I-125 (71%) prescribed to a minimum peripheral dose of 160 Gy with a median activity of 35.5 mCi, and 58 (29%) received Pd-103 prescribed to a

  8. Guidelines for optimization of planar HDR implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwicker, R.D.; Schmidt-Ullrich, R.

    1996-01-01

    from the linear quadratic model on the other hand show a shift toward higher equivalent doses for HDR implants treated with a small number of fractions. Studies were carried out to determine the number of fractions required to equate the HDR early and late effects with those obtained with a conventional LDR implant, assuming the effects are directly related to the position of the DVD peak region as defined by the volume-weighted average dose inside the target volume. The results show that fewer fractions can be used than are expected from a direct comparison of target reference doses only. Conclusions: The availability of individually programmable dwell times on remote afterloading brachytherapy units can lead to significant improvements in the planning and execution of interstitial implants. Variable dwell times can yield excellent dose uniformity from planar implants if the appropriate guidelines for source placement are followed. This can reduce significantly the volume of tissue treated at higher dose