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Sample records for international pulsar timing

  1. Ensemble Pulsar Time Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Dong-shan; Gao, Yu-ping; Zhao, Shu-hong

    2017-07-01

    Millisecond pulsars can generate another type of time scale that is totally independent of the atomic time scale, because the physical mechanisms of the pulsar time scale and the atomic time scale are quite different from each other. Usually the pulsar timing observations are not evenly sampled, and the internals between two data points range from several hours to more than half a month. Further more, these data sets are sparse. All this makes it difficult to generate an ensemble pulsar time scale. Hence, a new algorithm to calculate the ensemble pulsar time scale is proposed. Firstly, a cubic spline interpolation is used to densify the data set, and make the intervals between data points uniform. Then, the Vondrak filter is employed to smooth the data set, and get rid of the high-frequency noises, and finally the weighted average method is adopted to generate the ensemble pulsar time scale. The newly released NANOGRAV (North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves) 9-year data set is used to generate the ensemble pulsar time scale. This data set includes the 9-year observational data of 37 millisecond pulsars observed by the 100-meter Green Bank telescope and the 305-meter Arecibo telescope. It is found that the algorithm used in this paper can reduce effectively the influence caused by the noises in pulsar timing residuals, and improve the long-term stability of the ensemble pulsar time scale. Results indicate that the long-term (> 1 yr) stability of the ensemble pulsar time scale is better than 3.4 × 10-15.

  2. Pulsar Ephemerides for Timing LAT Pulsars

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Timing pulsars with the LAT requires the use of an ephemeris that covers the time period being analyzed. Below are several resources to provide this useful input to...

  3. Increasing Pulsar Timing Array Sensitivity Through Addition of Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCesar, Megan E.; Crawford, Fronefield; Ferrara, Elizabeth; Lynch, Ryan; Mingarelli, Chiara; Levin Preston, Lina; Ransom, Scott; Romano, Joseph; Simon, Joseph; Spiewak, Renee; Stovall, Kevin; Swiggum, Joe; Taylor, Stephen; Green Bank North Celestial Cap Pulsar Survey, Fermi LAT Collaboration, Fermi Pulsar Search Consortium

    2018-01-01

    Siemens et al. (2013) and Taylor et al. (2016) demonstrated the importance of increasing the number of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) in order to increase the sensitivity of the array and decrease the time-to-detection of a gravitational wave background (GWB). In particular, they predict that adding four MSPs per year to the NANOGrav and International PTAs will likely yield a GWB detection in less than a decade. A more even distribution of MSPs across the sky is also important for discriminating a GWB signal from a non-quadrupolar background (Sampson et al., in prep). Pulsar surveys and targeted searches have consistently led to additions of 4 or more MSPs per year to PTAs. I will describe these ongoing efforts, particularly in the context of the Green Bank North Celestial Cap pulsar survey and Fermi-guided searches at Green Bank and Arecibo that seek to find MSPs in low-pulsar-density regions of the sky.

  4. Search for Millisecond Pulsars for the Pulsar Timing Array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, S.

    2012-03-01

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating highly magnetised neutron stars (i.e. ultra dense stars, where about one solar mass is concentrated in a sphere with a radius of ~ 10 km), which irradiate radio beams in a fashion similar to a lighthouse. As a consequence, whenever the beams cut our line of sight we perceive a radio pulses, one (or two) per pulsar rotation, with a frequency up to hundred of times a second. Owing to their compact nature, rapid spin and high inertia, pulsars are in general fairly stable rotators, hence the Times of Arrival (TOAs) of the pulses at a radio telescope can be used as the ticks of a clock. This holds true in particular for the sub­class of the millisecond pulsars (MSPs), having a spin period smaller than the conventional limit of 30 ms, whose very rapid rotation and relatively older age provide better rotational stability than the ordinary pulsars. Indeed, some MSPs rotate so regularly that they can rival the best atomic clocks on Earth over timespan of few months or years.This feature allows us to use MSPs as tools in a cosmic laboratory, by exploiting a procedure called timing, which consists in the repeated and regular measurement of the TOAs from a pulsar and then in the search for trends in the series of the TOAs over various timespans, from fraction of seconds to decades.For example the study of pulsars in binary systems has already provided the most stringent tests to date of General Relativity in strong gravitational fields and has unambiguously showed the occurrence of the emission of gravitational waves from a binary system comprising two massive bodies in a close orbit. In last decades a new exciting perspective has been opened, i.e. to use pulsars also for a direct detection of the so far elusive gravitational waves and thereby applying the pulsar timing for cosmological studies. In fact, the gravitational waves (GWs) going across our Galaxy pass over all the Galactic pulsars and the Earth, perturbing the space­time at the

  5. Millisecond Pulsar Timing Precision with NICER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneva, Julia; Ray, Paul S.; Ransom, Scott; Wood, Kent S.; Kerr, Matthew T.; Lommen, Andrea; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Black, Kevin; Gendreau, Keith C.; Lewandowska, Natalia; Markwardt, Craig B.; Price, Samuel; Winternitz, Luke

    2018-01-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is an array of 56 X-ray detectors mounted on the outside of the International Space Station. It allows high-precision timing of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) without the pulse broadening effects due to dispersion and scattering by the interstellar medium that plague radio timing. We present initial timing results from four months of NICER data on the MSPs B1937+21, B1821-24, and J0218+4232, and compare them to simulations and theoretical models for X-ray times-of-arrival, and radio observations.

  6. THE TIMING OF NINE GLOBULAR CLUSTER PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Ryan S. [Physics Department, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Freire, Paulo C. C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Ransom, Scott M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-4325 (United States); Jacoby, Bryan A., E-mail: rlynch@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: pfreire@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: sransom@nrao.edu, E-mail: bryan.jacoby@gmail.com [Aerospace Corporation, 15049 Conference Center Drive, Chantilly, VA 20151-3824 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    We have used the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope to time nine previously known pulsars without published timing solutions in the globular clusters (GCs) M62, NGC 6544, and NGC 6624. We have full timing solutions that measure the spin, astrometric, and (where applicable) binary parameters for six of these pulsars. The remaining three pulsars (reported here for the first time) were not detected enough to establish solutions. We also report our timing solutions for five pulsars with previously published solutions, and find good agreement with other authors, except for PSR J1701-3006B in M62. Gas in this system is probably responsible for the discrepancy in orbital parameters, and we have been able to measure a change in the orbital period over the course of our observations. Among the pulsars with new solutions we find several binary pulsars with very low mass companions (members of the so-called 'black widow' class) and we are able to place constraints on the mass-to-light ratio in two clusters. We confirm that one of the pulsars in NGC 6624 is indeed a member of the rare class of non-recycled pulsars found in GCs. We have also measured the orbital precession and Shapiro delay for a relativistic binary in NGC 6544. If we assume that the orbital precession can be described entirely by general relativity, which is likely, we are able to measure the total system mass (2.57190(73) M{sub Sun }) and companion mass (1.2064(20) M{sub Sun }), from which we derive the orbital inclination (sin i = 0.9956(14)) and the pulsar mass (1.3655(21) M{sub Sun }), the most precise such measurement ever obtained for a millisecond pulsar. The companion is the most massive known around a fully recycled pulsar.

  7. Pulsar timing and general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, D. C.; Hellings, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques are described for accounting for relativistic effects in the analysis of pulsar signals. Design features of instrumentation used to achieve millisecond accuracy in the signal measurements are discussed. The accuracy of the data permits modeling the pulsar physical characteristics from the natural glitches in the emissions. Relativistic corrections are defined for adjusting for differences between the pulsar motion in its spacetime coordinate system relative to the terrestrial coordinate system, the earth's motion, and the gravitational potentials of solar system bodies. Modifications of the model to allow for a binary pulsar system are outlined, including treatment of the system as a point mass. Finally, a quadrupole model is presented for gravitational radiation and techniques are defined for using pulsars in the search for gravitational waves.

  8. Pulsars Probe the Low-Frequency Gravitational Sky: Pulsar Timing Arrays Basics and Recent Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiburzi, Caterina

    2018-03-01

    Pulsar Timing Array experiments exploit the clock-like behaviour of an array of millisecond pulsars, with the goal of detecting low-frequency gravitational waves. Pulsar Timing Array experiments have been in operation over the last decade, led by groups in Europe, Australia, and North America. These experiments use the most sensitive radio telescopes in the world, extremely precise pulsar timing models and sophisticated detection algorithms to increase the sensitivity of Pulsar Timing Arrays. No detection of gravitational waves has been made to date with this technique, but Pulsar Timing Array upper limits already contributed to rule out some models of galaxy formation. Moreover, a new generation of radio telescopes, such as the Five hundred metre Aperture Spherical Telescope and, in particular, the Square Kilometre Array, will offer a significant improvement to the Pulsar Timing Array sensitivity. In this article, we review the basic concepts of Pulsar Timing Array experiments, and discuss the latest results from the established Pulsar Timing Array collaborations.

  9. DETECTING GRAVITATIONAL WAVE MEMORY WITH PULSAR TIMING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordes, J. M.; Jenet, F. A.

    2012-01-01

    We compare the detectability of gravitational bursts passing through the solar system with those passing near each millisecond pulsar in an N-pulsar timing array. The sensitivity to Earth-passing bursts can exploit the correlation expected in pulse arrival times while pulsar-passing bursts, though uncorrelated between objects, provide an N-fold increase in overall time baseline that can compensate for the lower sensitivity. Bursts with memory from mergers of supermassive black holes produce step functions in apparent spin frequency that are the easiest to detect in pulsar timing. We show that the burst rate and amplitude distribution, while strongly dependent on inadequately known cosmological evolution, may favor detection in the pulsar terms rather than the Earth timing perturbations. Any contamination of timing data by red spin noise makes burst detection more difficult because both signals grow with the length of the time data span T. Furthermore, the different bursts that could appear in one or more data sets of length T ≈ 10 yr also affect the detectability of the gravitational wave stochastic background that, like spin noise, has a red power spectrum. A burst with memory is a worthwhile target in the timing of multiple pulsars in a globular cluster because it should produce a correlated signal with a time delay of less than about 10 years in some cases.

  10. Detecting Gravitational Wave Memory with Pulsar Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, J. M.; Jenet, F. A.

    2012-06-01

    We compare the detectability of gravitational bursts passing through the solar system with those passing near each millisecond pulsar in an N-pulsar timing array. The sensitivity to Earth-passing bursts can exploit the correlation expected in pulse arrival times while pulsar-passing bursts, though uncorrelated between objects, provide an N-fold increase in overall time baseline that can compensate for the lower sensitivity. Bursts with memory from mergers of supermassive black holes produce step functions in apparent spin frequency that are the easiest to detect in pulsar timing. We show that the burst rate and amplitude distribution, while strongly dependent on inadequately known cosmological evolution, may favor detection in the pulsar terms rather than the Earth timing perturbations. Any contamination of timing data by red spin noise makes burst detection more difficult because both signals grow with the length of the time data span T. Furthermore, the different bursts that could appear in one or more data sets of length T ≈ 10 yr also affect the detectability of the gravitational wave stochastic background that, like spin noise, has a red power spectrum. A burst with memory is a worthwhile target in the timing of multiple pulsars in a globular cluster because it should produce a correlated signal with a time delay of less than about 10 years in some cases.

  11. A Gravitational Wave Pulsar Timing Backend for DSN Telescopes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop a state-of-the-art pulsar timing processor to be installed at the DSN to demonstrate precision pulsar timing capability along with a novel signal processing...

  12. Improved pulsar timing via principal component mode tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Hsien; Masui, Kiyoshi; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B.

    2018-03-01

    We present a principal component analysis method that tracks and compensates for short-time-scale variability in pulsar profiles, with a goal of improving pulsar timing precision. We couple this with a fast likelihood technique for determining pulse time of arrival, marginalizing over the principal component amplitudes. This allows accurate estimation of timing errors in the presence of pulsar variability. We apply the algorithm to the slow pulsar PSR J2139+0040 using an archived set of untargeted raster-scan observations at arbitrary epochs across four years, obtaining an improved timing solution. The method permits accurate pulsar timing in data sets with short contiguous on-source observations, opening opportunities for commensality between pulsar timing and mapping surveys.

  13. THE PULSAR SEARCH COLLABORATORY: DISCOVERY AND TIMING OF FIVE NEW PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, R.; Swiggum, J.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Yun, M.; Boyles, J. [West Virginia University, White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Heatherly, S. A.; Scoles, S. [NRAO, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Lynch, R. [McGill University, Rutherford Physics Building, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Kondratiev, V. I. [ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Ransom, S. M. [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Moniot, M. L.; Thompson, C. [James River High School, 9906 Springwood Road, Buchanan, VA 24066 (United States); Cottrill, A.; Raycraft, M. [Lincoln High School, 100 Jerry Toth Drive, Shinnston, WV 26431 (United States); Weaver, M. [Broadway High School, 269 Gobbler Drive, Broadway, VA 22815 (United States); Snider, A. [Sherando High School, 185 South Warrior Drive, Stephens City, VA 22655 (United States); Dudenhoefer, J.; Allphin, L. [Hedgesville High School, 109 Ridge Road North, Hedgesville, WV 25427 (United States); Thorley, J., E-mail: Rachel.Rosen@mail.wvu.edu [Strasburg High School, 250 Ram Drive, Strasburg, VA 22657 (United States); and others

    2013-05-01

    We present the discovery and timing solutions of five new pulsars by students involved in the Pulsar Search Collaboratory, a NSF-funded joint program between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and West Virginia University designed to excite and engage high-school students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) and related fields. We encourage students to pursue STEM fields by apprenticing them within a professional scientific community doing cutting edge research, specifically by teaching them to search for pulsars. The students are analyzing 300 hr of drift-scan survey data taken with the Green Bank Telescope at 350 MHz. These data cover 2876 deg{sup 2} of the sky. Over the course of five years, more than 700 students have inspected diagnostic plots through a web-based graphical interface designed for this project. The five pulsars discovered in the data have spin periods ranging from 3.1 ms to 4.8 s. Among the new discoveries are PSR J1926-1314, a long period, nulling pulsar; PSR J1821+0155, an isolated, partially recycled 33 ms pulsar; and PSR J1400-1438, a millisecond pulsar in a 9.5 day orbit whose companion is likely a white dwarf star.

  14. Gravitational wave detection and data analysis for pulsar timing arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasteren, Rutger van

    2011-01-01

    Long-term precise timing of Galactic millisecond pulsars holds great promise for measuring long-period (months-to-years) astrophysical gravitational waves. In this work we develop a Bayesian data analysis method for projects called pulsar timing arrays; projects aimed to detect these gravitational

  15. Tying Pulsar Timing in Radio and X-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, W.

    2017-10-01

    Millisecond pulsars are a class of radio pulsars with extremely stable rotations. The excellent timing stability of millisecond pulsars can be used to study a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena in both radio and X-ray. We have developed a precision pulsar timing capability at NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN), which is deployed on large 70-m dishes. This program is now capable of producing precision pulsar timing of a large number of millisecond pulsars in radio. Often though there is a need to tie the pulse profiles of pulsars from radio to shorter wavelengths, for instance in X-ray timing campaigns. This poses special challenges that include the knowledge of absolute time in both detectors, pulse profile frequency evolution, dispersion measure monitoring, and systematic offsets across the frequency spectrum. We have recently initiated a high cadence timing program of the Crab pulsar to provide essential timing ephemerides for NASA's NICER mission. In this presentation, we will describe some of the challenges, including some early results of this campaign. This research was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under the Research and Technology Development Program, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  16. Pulsars today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham-Smith, F.

    1990-01-01

    The theory concerning pulsars is reviewed, with particular attention to possible evolution, life cycle, and rejuvenation of these bodies. Quantum liquids, such as neutron superfluids, and evidence for the existence of superfluid vortices and other internal phenomena are considered with particular attention to the Crab pulsar. Rate of change of the rotation rate is measured and analyzed for the Crab pulsar and the implications of deviations in the pulse times from those of a perfect rotator are examined. Glitches, the sudden increase in rotation rate of a pulsar that has previously exhibited a steady slowdown, are discussed and it is suggested that the movement of the superfluid core relative to the crust is responsible for this phenomenon. It is noted that radio waves from pulsars can be used to determine the intensity and structure of interplanetary and interstellar gas turbulence and to provide a direct measure of the strength of the interstellar magnetic field

  17. No pulsar left behind - I. Timing, pulse-sequence polarimetry and emission morphology for 12 pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Casey; Freire, Paulo C. C.; Rankin, Joanna; Stovall, Kevin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we study a set of 12 pulsars that previously had not been characterized. Our timing shows that eleven of them are `normal' isolated pulsars, with rotation periods between 0.22 and 2.65 s, characteristic ages between 0.25 Myr and 0.63 Gyr, and estimated magnetic fields ranging from 0.05 to 3.8 × 1012 G. The youngest pulsar in our sample, PSR J0627+0706, is located near the Monoceros supernova remnant (SNR G205.5+0.5), but it is not the pulsar most likely to be associated with it. We also confirmed the existence of a candidate from an early Arecibo survey, PSR J2053+1718, its subsequent timing and polarimetry are also presented here. It is an isolated pulsar with a spin period of 119 ms, a relatively small magnetic field of 5.8 × 109 G and a characteristic age of 6.7 Gyr; this suggests the pulsar was mildly recycled by accretion from a companion star, which became unbound when that companion became a supernova. We report the results of single-pulse and average Arecibo polarimetry at both 327 and 1400 MHz aimed at understanding the basic emission properties and beaming geometry of these pulsars. Three of them (PSRs J0943+2253, J1935+1159 and J2050+1259) have strong nulls and sporadic radio emission, several others exhibit interpulses (PSRs J0627+0706 and J0927+2345) and one shows regular drifting subpulses (J1404+1159).

  18. TIMING OF 29 PULSARS DISCOVERED IN THE PALFA SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophys., School of Phys. and Astr., Univ. of Manchester, Manch., M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bogdanov, S. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia Univ., New York, NY 10027 (United States); Ferdman, R. D.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lynch, R. [Dept. of Physics and McGill Space Institute, McGill Univ., Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Freire, P. C. C.; Lazarus, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Knispel, B.; Allen, B. [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M. [Dept. of Astronomy, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Camilo, F. [SKA South Africa, Pinelands, 7405 (South Africa); Cardoso, F. [Physics Dept., Univ. of Wisconsin—Milwaukee, 3135 N. Maryland Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Crawford, F. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, PA 17604-3003 (United States); Deneva, J. S. [National Research Council, resident at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Hessels, J. W. T.; Leeuwen, J. van [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Jenet, F. A. [Center for Gravitational Wave Astronomy, Univ. Texas—Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); and others

    2017-01-10

    We report on the discovery and timing observations of 29 distant long-period pulsars found in the ongoing Arecibo L-band Feed Array pulsar survey. Following discovery with the Arecibo Telescope, confirmation and timing observations of these pulsars over several years at Jodrell Bank Observatory have yielded high-precision positions and measurements of rotation and radiation properties. We have used multi-frequency data to measure the interstellar scattering properties of some of these pulsars. Most of the pulsars have properties that mirror those of the previously known pulsar population, although four show some notable characteristics. PSRs J1907+0631 and J1925+1720 are young and are associated with supernova remnants or plerionic nebulae: J1907+0631 lies close to the center of SNR G40.5−0.5, while J1925+1720 is coincident with a high-energy Fermi γ -ray source. One pulsar, J1932+1500, is in a surprisingly eccentric, 199 day binary orbit with a companion having a minimum mass of 0.33 M {sub ⊙}. Several of the sources exhibit timing noise, and two, PSRs J0611+1436 and J1907+0631, have both suffered large glitches, but with very different post-glitch rotation properties. In particular, the rotational period of PSR J0611+1436 will not recover to its pre-glitch value for about 12 years, a far greater recovery timescale than seen following any other large glitches.

  19. Testing General Relativity with Pulsar Timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stairs Ingrid H.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulsars of very different types, including isolated objects and binaries (with short- and long-period orbits, and white-dwarf and neutron-star companions provide the means to test both the predictions of general relativity and the viability of alternate theories of gravity. This article presents an overview of pulsars, then discusses the current status of and future prospects for tests of equivalence-principle violations and strong-field gravitational experiments.

  20. PINT, A Modern Software Package for Pulsar Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jing; Ransom, Scott M.; Demorest, Paul; Ray, Paul S.; Stovall, Kevin; Jenet, Fredrick; Ellis, Justin; van Haasteren, Rutger; Bachetti, Matteo; NANOGrav PINT developer team

    2018-01-01

    Pulsar timing, first developed decades ago, has provided an extremely wide range of knowledge about our universe. It has been responsible for many important discoveries, such as the discovery of the first exoplanet and the orbital period decay of double neutron star systems. Currently pulsar timing is the leading technique for detecting low frequency (about 10^-9 Hertz) gravitational waves (GW) using an array of pulsars as the detectors. To achieve this goal, high precision pulsar timing data, at about nanoseconds level, is required. Most high precision pulsar timing data are analyzed using the widely adopted software TEMPO/TEMPO2. But for a robust and believable GW detection, it is important to have independent software that can cross-check the result. In this poster we present the new generation pulsar timing software PINT. This package will provide a robust system to cross check high-precision timing results, completely independent of TEMPO and TEMPO2. In addition, PINT is designed to be a package that is easy to extend and modify, through use of flexible code architecture and a modern programming language, Python, with modern technology and libraries.

  1. Pulsar timing arrays: the promise of gravitational wave detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommen, Andrea N

    2015-12-01

    We describe the history, methods, tools, and challenges of using pulsars to detect gravitational waves. Pulsars act as celestial clocks detecting gravitational perturbations in space-time at wavelengths of light-years. The field is poised to make its first detection of nanohertz gravitational waves in the next 10 years. Controversies remain over how far we can reduce the noise in the pulsars, how many pulsars should be in the array, what kind of source we will detect first, and how we can best accommodate our large bandwidth systems. We conclude by considering the important question of how to plan for a post-detection era, beyond the first detection of gravitational waves.

  2. Optimal Frequency Ranges for Sub-Microsecond Precision Pulsar Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Michael Timothy; McLaughlin, Maura; Cordes, James; Chatterjee, Shami; Lazio, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    Precision pulsar timing requires optimization against measurement errors and astrophysical variance from the neutron stars themselves and the interstellar medium. We investigate optimization of arrival time precision as a function of radio frequency and bandwidth. We find that increases in bandwidth that reduce the contribution from receiver noise are countered by the strong chromatic dependence of interstellar effects and intrinsic pulse-profile evolution. The resulting optimal frequency range is therefore telescope and pulsar dependent. We demonstrate the results for five pulsars included in current pulsar timing arrays and determine that they are not optimally observed at current center frequencies. We also find that arrival-time precision can be improved by increases in total bandwidth. Wideband receivers centered at high frequencies can reduce required overall integration times and provide significant improvements in arrival time uncertainty by a factor of $\\sim$$\\sqrt{2}$ in most cases, assuming a fixed integration time. We also discuss how timing programs can be extended to pulsars with larger dispersion measures through the use of higher-frequency observations.

  3. Searching Ultra-compact Pulsar Binaries with Abnormal Timing Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, B. P.; Li, Y. P.; Yuan, J. P.; Tian, J.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Li, D.; Jiang, B.; Li, X. D.; Wang, H. G.; Zou, Y. C.; Shao, L. J.

    2018-03-01

    Ultra-compact pulsar binaries are both ideal sources of gravitational radiation for gravitational wave detectors and laboratories for fundamental physics. However, the shortest orbital period of all radio pulsar binaries is currently 1.6 hr. The absence of pulsar binaries with a shorter orbital period is most likely due to technique limit. This paper points out that a tidal effect occurring on pulsar binaries with a short orbital period can perturb the orbital elements and result in a significant change in orbital modulation, which dramatically reduces the sensitivity of the acceleration searching that is widely used. Here a new search is proposed. The abnormal timing residual exhibited in a single pulse observation is simulated by a tidal effect occurring on an ultra-compact binary. The reproduction of the main features represented by the sharp peaks displayed in the abnormal timing behavior suggests that pulsars like PSR B0919+06 could be a candidate for an ultra-compact binary of an orbital period of ∼10 minutes and a companion star of a white dwarf star. The binary nature of such a candidate is further tested by (1) comparing the predicted long-term binary effect with decades of timing noise observed and (2) observing the optical counterpart of the expected companion star. Test (1) likely supports our model, while more observations are needed in test (2). Some interesting ultra-compact binaries could be found in the near future by applying such a new approach to other binary candidates.

  4. Pulsar searching and timing with the Parkes telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C. W. Y.

    2014-11-01

    Pulsars are highly magnetised, rapidly rotating neutron stars that radiate a beam of coherent radio emission from their magnetic poles. An introduction to the pulsar phenomenology is presented in Chapter 1 of this thesis. The extreme conditions found in and around such compact objects make pulsars fantastic natural laboratories, as their strong gravitational fields provide exclusive insights to a rich variety of fundamental physics and astronomy. The discovery of pulsars is therefore a gateway to new science. An overview of the standard pulsar searching technique is described in Chapter 2, as well as a discussion on notable pulsar searching efforts undertaken thus far with various telescopes. The High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) Pulsar Survey conducted with the 64-m Parkes radio telescope in Australia forms the bulk of this PhD. In particular, the author has led the search effort of the HTRU low-latitude Galactic plane project part which is introduced in Chapter 3. We discuss the computational challenges arising from the processing of the petabyte-sized survey data. Two new radio interference mitigation techniques are introduced, as well as a partially-coherent segmented acceleration search algorithm which aims to increase our chances of discovering highly-relativistic short-orbit binary systems, covering a parameter space including the potential pulsar-black hole binaries. We show that under a linear acceleration approximation, a ratio of ~0.1 of data length over orbital period results in the highest effectiveness for this search algorithm. Chapter 4 presents the initial results from the HTRU low-latitude Galactic plane survey. From the 37 per cent of data processed thus far, we have re-detected 348 previously known pulsars and discovered a further 47 pulsars. Two of which are fast-spinning pulsars with periods less than 30 ms. PSR J1101-6424 is a millisecond pulsar (MSP) with a heavy white dwarf companion while its short spin period of 5 ms indicates

  5. Versatile directional searches for gravitational waves with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, D. R.; Zhu, X.-J.; Hobbs, G.; Coles, W.; Shannon, R. M.; Wang, J. B.; Tiburzi, C.; Manchester, R. N.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Dai, S.; Dempsey, J.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Lasky, P.; Levin, Y.; Osłowski, S.; Ravi, V.; Reardon, D.; Rosado, P.; Spiewak, R.; van Straten, W.; Toomey, L.; Wen, L.; You, X.

    2016-02-01

    By regularly monitoring the most stable millisecond pulsars over many years, pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are positioned to detect and study correlations in the timing behaviour of those pulsars. Gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are an exciting potentially detectable source of such correlations. We describe a straightforward technique by which a PTA can be `phased-up' to form time series of the two polarization modes of GWs coming from a particular direction of the sky. Our technique requires no assumptions regarding the time-domain behaviour of a GW signal. This method has already been used to place stringent bounds on GWs from individual SMBHBs in circular orbits. Here, we describe the methodology and demonstrate the versatility of the technique in searches for a wide variety of GW signals including bursts with unmodelled waveforms. Using the first six years of data from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, we conduct an all-sky search for a detectable excess of GW power from any direction. For the lines of sight to several nearby massive galaxy clusters, we carry out a more detailed search for GW bursts with memory, which are distinct signatures of SMBHB mergers. In all cases, we find that the data are consistent with noise.

  6. Time of arrival estimation in pulsar-based navigation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabakchiev, Chr.; Behar, V.; Buist, P.; Garvanov, I.; Kabakchieva, D.; Bentum, Marinus Jan

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the Time of Arrival (TOA) estimation problem related to new application of pulsar signals for airplane-based navigation. The aim of the paper is to propose and evaluate a possible algorithm for TOA estimation that consists of epoch folding, filtering, CFAR detection,

  7. Frequency-dependent Dispersion Measures and Implications for Pulsar Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, J. M.; Shannon, R. M.; Stinebring, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, is shown to be frequency dependent because of multipath scattering from small-scale electron-density fluctuations. DMs vary between propagation paths whose transverse extent varies strongly with frequency, yielding arrival times that deviate from the high-frequency scaling expected for a cold, uniform, unmagnetized plasma (1/frequency2). Scaling laws for thin phase screens are verified with simulations; extended media are also analyzed. The rms DM difference across an octave band near 1.5 GHz is ˜ 4 × 10-5 pc cm-3 for pulsars at ˜1 kpc distance. The corresponding arrival-time variations are a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for DM ≲ 30 pc cm-3 but increase rapidly to microseconds or more for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges. Chromatic DMs introduce correlated noise into timing residuals with a power spectrum of “low pass” form. The correlation time is roughly the geometric mean of the refraction times for the highest and lowest radio frequencies used, ranging from days to years, depending on the pulsar. We discuss implications for methodologies that use large frequency separations or wide bandwidth receivers for timing measurements. Chromatic DMs are partially mitigable by including an additional chromatic term in arrival time models. Without mitigation, an additional term in the noise model for pulsar timing is implied. In combination with measurement errors from radiometer noise, an arbitrarily large increase in total frequency range (or bandwidth) will yield diminishing benefits and may be detrimental to overall timing precision.

  8. Pulsar timing irregularities and the imprint of magnetic field evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, J. A.; Viganò, D.; Geppert, U.

    2012-11-01

    Context. The rotational evolution of isolated neutron stars is dominated by the magnetic field anchored to the solid crust of the star. Assuming that the core field evolves on much longer timescales, the crustal field evolves mainly though Ohmic dissipation and the Hall drift, and it may be subject to relatively rapid changes with remarkable effects on the observed timing properties. Aims: We investigate whether changes of the magnetic field structure and strength during the star evolution may have observable consequences in the braking index n. This is the most sensitive quantity to reflect small variations of the timing properties that are caused by magnetic field rearrangements. Methods: We performed axisymmetric, long-term simulations of the magneto-thermal evolution of neutron stars with state-of-the-art microphysical inputs to calculate the evolution of the braking index. Relatively rapid magnetic field modifications can be expected only in the crust of neutron stars, where we focus our study. Results: We find that the effect of the magnetic field evolution on the braking index can be divided into three qualitatively different stages depending on the age and the internal temperature: a first stage that may be different for standard pulsars (with n ~ 3) or low field neutron stars that accreted fallback matter during the supernova explosion (systematically n 3 is expected; in the third stage, at late times, when the interior temperature has dropped to very low values, Hall oscillatory modes in the neutron star crust result in braking indices of a high absolute value and both positive and negative signs. Conclusions: Current magneto-thermal evolution models predict a large contribution to the timing noise and, in particular, to the braking index, from temporal variations of the magnetic field. Models with strong (≳ 1014 G) multipolar or toroidal components, even with a weak (~1012 G) dipolar field are consistent with the observed trend of the timing properties.

  9. Null stream analysis of Pulsar Timing Array data: localisation of resolvable gravitational wave sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Janna; Veitch, John; Sesana, Alberto; Vecchio, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    Super-massive black hole binaries are expected to produce a gravitational wave (GW) signal in the nano-Hertz frequency band which may be detected by pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) in the coming years. The signal is composed of both stochastic and individually resolvable components. Here we develop a generic Bayesian method for the analysis of resolvable sources based on the construction of `null-streams' which cancel the part of the signal held in common for each pulsar (the Earth-term). For an array of N pulsars there are N - 2 independent null-streams that cancel the GW signal from a particular sky location. This method is applied to the localisation of quasi-circular binaries undergoing adiabatic inspiral. We carry out a systematic investigation of the scaling of the localisation accuracy with signal strength and number of pulsars in the PTA. Additionally, we find that source sky localisation with the International PTA data release one is vastly superior than what is achieved by its constituent regional PTAs.

  10. The gravitational-wave discovery space of pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Curt; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Vallisneri, Michele; Lazio, Joseph; Majid, Walid

    2014-02-01

    Recent years have seen a burgeoning interest in using pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) as gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. To date, that interest has focused mainly on three particularly promising source types: supermassive black hole binaries, cosmic strings, and the stochastic background from early-Universe phase transitions. In this paper, by contrast, our aim is to investigate the PTA potential for discovering unanticipated sources. We derive significant constraints on the available discovery space based solely on energetic and statistical considerations: we show that a PTA detection of GWs at frequencies above ˜10-5 Hz would either be an extraordinary coincidence or violate "cherished beliefs;" we show that for PTAs GW memory can be more detectable than direct GWs, and that, as we consider events at ever higher redshift, the memory effect increasingly dominates an event's total signal-to-noise ratio. The paper includes also a simple analysis of the effects of pulsar red noise in PTA searches, and a demonstration that the effects of periodic GWs in the ˜10-7-10-4.5 Hz band would not be degenerate with small errors in standard pulsar parameters (except in a few narrow bands).

  11. A 24 hr global campaign to assess precision timing of the millisecond pulsar J1713+0747

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolch, T.; Lam, M. T.; Cordes, J.; Chatterjee, S. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Bassa, C.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Janssen, G.; Kondratiev, V. [ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Bhattacharyya, B.; Jordan, C.; Keith, M. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Champion, D. J.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Cognard, I. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l' Environnement et de l' Espace, LPC2E UMR 6115 CNRS, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 02, and Station de radioastronomie de Nançay, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS/INSU, F-18330 Nançay (France); Crowter, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Demorest, P. B. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Jenet, F. A. [Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy, University of Texas, Rio Grande Valley, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); Jones, G., E-mail: tdolch@astro.cornell.edu [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); and others

    2014-10-10

    The radio millisecond pulsar J1713+0747 is regarded as one of the highest-precision clocks in the sky and is regularly timed for the purpose of detecting gravitational waves. The International Pulsar Timing Array Collaboration undertook a 24 hr global observation of PSR J1713+0747 in an effort to better quantify sources of timing noise in this pulsar, particularly on intermediate (1-24 hr) timescales. We observed the pulsar continuously over 24 hr with the Arecibo, Effelsberg, GMRT, Green Bank, LOFAR, Lovell, Nançay, Parkes, and WSRT radio telescopes. The combined pulse times-of-arrival presented here provide an estimate of what sources of timing noise, excluding DM variations, would be present as compared to an idealized √N improvement in timing precision, where N is the number of pulses analyzed. In the case of this particular pulsar, we find that intrinsic pulse phase jitter dominates arrival time precision when the signal-to-noise ratio of single pulses exceeds unity, as measured using the eight telescopes that observed at L band/1.4 GHz. We present first results of specific phenomena probed on the unusually long timescale (for a single continuous observing session) of tens of hours, in particular interstellar scintillation, and discuss the degree to which scintillation and profile evolution affect precision timing. This paper presents the data set as a basis for future, deeper studies.

  12. Real-Time RFI Mitigation in Pulsar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Emily; Joslyn, Nick; Prestage, Richard; Whitehead, Mark; Lam, Michael Timothy; Blattner, Tim; Hawkins, Luke; Viou, Cedric; Masson, Jessica

    2018-01-01

    As the use of wireless technology has increased around the world, Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) has become more and more of a problem for radio astronomers. Preventative measures exist to limit the presence of RFI, and programs exist to remove it from saved data, but the routine use of algorithms to detect and remove RFI as an observation is occurring is much less common. Such a method would be incredibly useful for observations in which the data must undergo several rounds of processing before being saved, as in pulsar timing studies. Strategies for real-time mitigation have been discussed and tested with simulated data (Buch et al., 2016), but ideally the results of any approach would be validated by a detailed comparison of the final data products - for pulsar timing, the variance in the pulse times of arrival (TOAs) - with and without mitigation applied. The goal of this project is to develop an RFI mitigation approach based on the previously suggested strategies and test this program on actual data from the observation of pulsar J1713+0747. We use a Median Absolute Deviation (MAD) filter to identify interference in the observation and replace the compromised data with random Gaussian noise to match a characteristic radio signal from space. In order to verify our results, we analyze the pulsar’s TOAs obtained both from the mitigated data and from the unmitigated data processed through offline RFI removal software. Comparing the two, our preliminary findings indicate that our program is able to improve the quality of timing results from the observation.

  13. The NANOGrav 11-year Data Set: High-precision Timing of 45 Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzoumanian, Zaven; Brazier, Adam; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Chamberlin, Sydney; Chatterjee, Shami; Christy, Brian; Cordes, James M.; Cornish, Neil J.; Crawford, Fronefield; Thankful Cromartie, H.; Crowter, Kathryn; DeCesar, Megan E.; Demorest, Paul B.; Dolch, Timothy; Ellis, Justin A.; Ferdman, Robert D.; Ferrara, Elizabeth C.; Fonseca, Emmanuel; Garver-Daniels, Nathan; Gentile, Peter A.; Halmrast, Daniel; Huerta, E. A.; Jenet, Fredrick A.; Jessup, Cody; Jones, Glenn; Jones, Megan L.; Kaplan, David L.; Lam, Michael T.; Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Levin, Lina; Lommen, Andrea; Lorimer, Duncan R.; Luo, Jing; Lynch, Ryan S.; Madison, Dustin; Matthews, Allison M.; McLaughlin, Maura A.; McWilliams, Sean T.; Mingarelli, Chiara; Ng, Cherry; Nice, David J.; Pennucci, Timothy T.; Ransom, Scott M.; Ray, Paul S.; Siemens, Xavier; Simon, Joseph; Spiewak, Renée; Stairs, Ingrid H.; Stinebring, Daniel R.; Stovall, Kevin; Swiggum, Joseph K.; Taylor, Stephen R.; Vallisneri, Michele; van Haasteren, Rutger; Vigeland, Sarah J.; Zhu, Weiwei; The NANOGrav Collaboration

    2018-04-01

    We present high-precision timing data over time spans of up to 11 years for 45 millisecond pulsars observed as part of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) project, aimed at detecting and characterizing low-frequency gravitational waves. The pulsars were observed with the Arecibo Observatory and/or the Green Bank Telescope at frequencies ranging from 327 MHz to 2.3 GHz. Most pulsars were observed with approximately monthly cadence, and six high-timing-precision pulsars were observed weekly. All were observed at widely separated frequencies at each observing epoch in order to fit for time-variable dispersion delays. We describe our methods for data processing, time-of-arrival (TOA) calculation, and the implementation of a new, automated method for removing outlier TOAs. We fit a timing model for each pulsar that includes spin, astrometric, and (for binary pulsars) orbital parameters; time-variable dispersion delays; and parameters that quantify pulse-profile evolution with frequency. The timing solutions provide three new parallax measurements, two new Shapiro delay measurements, and two new measurements of significant orbital-period variations. We fit models that characterize sources of noise for each pulsar. We find that 11 pulsars show significant red noise, with generally smaller spectral indices than typically measured for non-recycled pulsars, possibly suggesting a different origin. A companion paper uses these data to constrain the strength of the gravitational-wave background.

  14. The NANOGrav Eleven-year Data Set: High-precision timing of 45 Millisecond Pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Arzoumanian, Zaven; Brazier, Adam; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Chamberlin, Sydney; Chatterjee, Shami; Christy, Brian; Cordes, James M.; Cornish, Neil J.; Crawford, Fronefield; Cromartie, H. Thankful; Crowter, Kathryn; DeCesar, Megan E.; Demorest, Paul B.; Dolch, Timothy; Ellis, Justin A.

    2017-01-01

    We present high-precision timing data over timespans of up to 11 years for 45 millisecond pulsars observed as part of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) project, aimed at detecting and characterizing low-frequency gravitational waves. The pulsars were observed with the Arecibo Observatory and/or the Green Bank Telescope at frequencies ranging from 327 MHz to 2.3 GHz. Most pulsars were observed with approximately monthly cadence, with six high--timing-p...

  15. Improved timing of the millisecond pulsar PSR 1937+21 using real-time coherent dedispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankins, T.H.; Stinebring, D.R.; Rawley, L.A.; Princeton Univ., NJ)

    1987-01-01

    Profiles of the millisecond pulsar PSR 1937+21 have been obtained with 6-micron resolution using a real-time hardware dispersion removal device. This dedisperser has a potential resolution of better than 0.5 microsec and is immune to time-of-arrival jitter caused by scintillation-induced spectral gradients across the receiver passband. It significantly reduces the time-of-arrival residuals when compared with the timing technique currently in use. This increased timing accuracy, when utilized in a long-term timing program of millisec pulsars, will improve the solar system ephemeris and will substantially improve the detection limit of a gravitational wave background. 27 references

  16. 19 Years of high precision timing of the millisecond pulsar J1713+0747

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiwei

    2013-03-01

    We report the analysis of a 19-year span of timing data on PSR J1713+0747 taken by the Arecibo and Green Bank telescopes. PSR J1713+0747 is one of the best high-timing-precision pulsars monitored by the NANOGrav project for the purpose of detecting gravitational waves. The timing precision of this pulsar can be regarded as the benchmark of NANOGrav timing instruments. We show the precision improvement achieved by multi-generation instruments including the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument (GUPPI) and its counterpart in Arecibo. The new timing solution we found improves the measurement of the pulsars mass, its orbital and geometric parameters, sets new limits on alternative gravitational theories, and may provide a high-quality single pulsar gravitational wave upper limit.

  17. On the internal structure of the current sheet in the pulsar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokofev, V. V.; Arzamasskiy, L. I.; Beskin, V. S.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the internal structure of the current sheet in the pulsar wind within force-free and two-fluid MHD approximations. Within the force-free approximation we obtain general asymptotic solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation for quasi-spherical pulsar wind up to the second order in small parameter ɛ = (Ωr/c)-1. The solution allows an arbitrary latitudinal structure of the radial magnetic field, including that obtained in the numerical simulations of oblique rotators. It is also shown that the shape of the current sheet does not depend on the latitudinal structure. For the internal region of the current sheet outside the fast magnetosonic surface where the force-free approximation is not valid we use two-fluid MHD approximation. Carrying out calculations in the comoving reference frame, we succeed in determining intrinsic electric and magnetic fields of a sheet. It allows us to analyse time-dependent effects which were not investigated up to now. In particular, we estimate the efficiency of the particle acceleration inside the sheet. Finally, after investigating the motion of individual particles in the time-dependent current sheet, we find the width of the sheet and its time evolution self-consistent.

  18. A dynamical approach in exploring the unknown mass in the Solar system using pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y. J.; Lee, K. J.; Caballero, R. N.

    2018-04-01

    The error in the Solar system ephemeris will lead to dipolar correlations in the residuals of pulsar timing array for widely separated pulsars. In this paper, we utilize such correlated signals, and construct a Bayesian data-analysis framework to detect the unknown mass in the Solar system and to measure the orbital parameters. The algorithm is designed to calculate the waveform of the induced pulsar-timing residuals due to the unmodelled objects following the Keplerian orbits in the Solar system. The algorithm incorporates a Bayesian-analysis suit used to simultaneously analyse the pulsar-timing data of multiple pulsars to search for coherent waveforms, evaluate the detection significance of unknown objects, and to measure their parameters. When the object is not detectable, our algorithm can be used to place upper limits on the mass. The algorithm is verified using simulated data sets, and cross-checked with analytical calculations. We also investigate the capability of future pulsar-timing-array experiments in detecting the unknown objects. We expect that the future pulsar-timing data can limit the unknown massive objects in the Solar system to be lighter than 10-11-10-12 M⊙, or measure the mass of Jovian system to a fractional precision of 10-8-10-9.

  19. Timing noise of radio pulsars and implications to neutron star's interior structure and gravitational wave detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Xie, Yi

    Abstract: Radio pulsars are the most stable natural clocks in the universe, yet timing irregularities or noises can still be substantial when the times of arrivals of their pulses are fitted with some well accepted spin-down models or templates of pulsars. In this talk, I will review our recent work on modeling the timing noises of radio pulsars. Our model includes a long-term power-law decay modulated by periodic oscillations of the surface magnetic fields of neutron stars. Our model can explain the statistical properties of their timing noises. We find that the spin-down evolutions of young and old pulsars are dominated by the power-law decay and periodic oscillations, respectively. By applying our model to the individual spin-down evolutions of several well-measured radio pulsars, we find evidence for Hall drifts and Hall waves in the crusts of neutron stars. The relaxation behaviors of both classical and slow glitches can also be modeled as evolution of their surface magnetic fields, but with opposite trends. Finally we also attempt to improve the sensitivity of detecting gravitational waves with pulsars by applying our model to reduce the timing residuals of millisecond radio pulsars. Our main publications related to this talk are: 2012, ApJ, 757, 153; 2012, ApJ, 761, 102; 2013, ApJ, 778, 31; arXiv:1307.6413, 1312.3049.

  20. Influence of a stochastic background of gravitational waves on the timing of pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashhoon, Bahram

    1985-01-01

    The theory of the influence of a random and isotropic cosmic background of gravitational radiation on the timing analysis of pulsars is further developed. General expressions are derived for the correlation functions of frequency shifts and timing residuals of pulsars due to a stochastic background. The coherence properties of the background are discussed, and it is shown that the timing analysis of an ensemble of Earth-pulsar systems may be used to establish upper limits on the energy density of an incoherent background for frequencies νsub(g) -8 Hz. (author)

  1. Pulsar astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyne, A.G.; Graham-Smith, F.

    1990-01-01

    This account of the properties of pulsars tells an exciting story of discovery in modern astronomy. Pulsars, discovered in 1967, now take their place in a very wide range of astrophysics. They are one of the endpoints of stellar evolution, in which the core of a star collapses to a rapidly spinning neutron star a few kilometres in size. This book is an introductory account for those entering the field. It introduces the circumstances of the discovery and gives an overview of pulsar astrophysics. There are chapters on search techniques, distances, pulse timing, the galactic population of pulsars, binary and millisecond pulsars, geometry and physics of the emission regions, and applications to the interstellar medium. An important feature of this book is the inclusion of an up-to-date catalogue of all known pulsars. (author)

  2. X-Ray Pulsar Based Navigation and Time Determination, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcosm will build on the Phase I X-ray pulsar-based navigation and timing (XNAV) feasibility assessment to develop a detailed XNAV simulation capability to...

  3. The radio-gamma time delay of the Crab pulsar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masnou, J. L.; Agrinier, B.; Barouch, E.; Comte, R.; Costa, E.; Christy, J. C.; Cusumano, G.; Gerardi, G.; Lemoine, D.; Mandrou, P.; Massaro, E.; Matt, G.; Mineo, T.; Niel, M.; Olive, J. F.; Parlier, B.; Sacco, B.; Salvati, M.; Scarsi, L.

    1994-10-01

    Gamma-ray observations of the pulsar of the Crab nebula, PSR0531+21, have been performed in the low energy range (0.15-4.0 MeV) with FIGARO II, a large area balloon borne NaI(Tl) detector, during two flights performed on 1986 July 11 and 1990 July 9. A Kernel estimator built from the phases of the individual gamma-ray arrival times has allowed an accurate derivation of the radio-gamma time delay from those short duration gamma-ray observations. The gamma-ray pulse is found ahead of the radio pulse by 600+/-145μs and 375+/-148μs for the 1986 and 1990 observations respectively. Both radio-gamma delays could be attributed to variability of the interstellar dispersion since dispersion measures are available from radio measurements respectively two months before the 1986 flight and six days after the 1990 flight. An alternative explanation, particularly from the 1990 observation, could be that maximum gamma-ray and radio emissions originate from spatially different regions of the magnetosphere, distant by about 100 km.

  4. Quantum vacuum influence on pulsars spindown evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Dupays, Arnaud; Rizzo, Carlo; Giovanni Fabrizio, Bignami

    2012-01-01

    International audience; In this letter we show that Quantum Vacuum Friction (QVF) should play an important role in neutron star evolution. Taking into account this effect we show that magnetars could be understood as a natural evolution of standard pulsars. For the Crab pulsar, of which the characteristic age is known, we present the first completely coherent time evolution for its period and braking index. For this pulsar we also give the predicted value of the current first derivative of th...

  5. Detection of long nulls in PSR B1706-16, a pulsar with large timing irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Arun; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Manoharan, P. K.; Krishnakumar, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    Single pulse observations, characterizing in detail, the nulling behaviour of PSR B1706-16 are being reported for the first time in this paper. Our regular long duration monitoring of this pulsar reveals long nulls of 2-5 h with an overall nulling fraction of 31 ± 2 per cent. The pulsar shows two distinct phases of emission. It is usually in an active phase, characterized by pulsations interspersed with shorter nulls, with a nulling fraction of about 15 per cent, but it also rarely switches to an inactive phase, consisting of long nulls. The nulls in this pulsar are concurrent between 326.5 and 610 MHz. Profile mode changes accompanied by changes in fluctuation properties are seen in this pulsar, which switches from mode A before a null to mode B after the null. The distribution of null durations in this pulsar is bimodal. With its occasional long nulls, PSR B1706-16 joins the small group of intermediate nullers, which lie between the classical nullers and the intermittent pulsars. Similar to other intermediate nullers, PSR B1706-16 shows high timing noise, which could be due to its rare long nulls if one assumes that the slowdown rate during such nulls is different from that during the bursts.

  6. Real-Time Signal Processor for Pulsar Studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... This instrument is designed to handle a wide variety of Pulsar observations with the Giant Metre Wave Radio Telescope (GMRT), and is flexible enough to be used in many other high-speed, signal processing applications. The technology used includes field-programmable-gate-array(FPGA) based ...

  7. Modeling Gravitational Wave Sources For Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs) are galactic-scale low-frequency (nHz - μHz) gravitational wave (GW) observatories, which aim to directly detect GWs from binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) (≥ 107 M⊙). Binary SMBHs are predicted products of galaxy mergers, and are a crucial step in galaxy formation theories. Understanding the link between binary SMBHs and the gravitational radiation detected by PTAs is crucial to the community's capability of making meaningful scientific statements using PTA observations. Recent PTA upper limits on the gravitational radiation in the nanohertz frequency band are impacting our understanding of the binary SMBH population. But as upper limits grow more constraining, what can be implied about galaxy evolution? In this talk, I will provide insights into this question with investigations into which astrophysical parameters have the largest impact on GW predictions, direct translations between PTA limits and measured values for the parameters of galaxy evolution, and explorations into how the use of different galaxy evolution parameters effects the characterization of the GW signal.The inspiral of binary SMBHs creates extended interaction between the black holes and their host galaxy, and there is the potential for many electromagnetic tracers to accompany the binary's evolution. This talk will also highlight work incorporating models of electromagnetic radiation from binary SMBHs to investigate the potential for jointly detecting a binary's electromagnetic and gravitational radiation. The detection of a single `multi-messenger' source would provide a unique window into a pivotal stage of galaxy evolution, and would revolutionize the understanding of late-stage galaxy evolution.

  8. The High Time Resolution Universe Pulsar Survey - XIII. PSR J1757-1854, the most accelerated binary pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, A. D.; Champion, D. J.; Kramer, M.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Bassa, C. G.; Bhandari, S.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burgay, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Eatough, R. P.; Flynn, C. M. L.; Freire, P. C. C.; Jameson, A.; Johnston, S.; Karuppusamy, R.; Keith, M. J.; Levin, L.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Ng, C.; Petroff, E.; Possenti, A.; Ridolfi, A.; Stappers, B. W.; van Straten, W.; Tauris, T. M.; Tiburzi, C.; Wex, N.

    2018-03-01

    We report the discovery of PSR J1757-1854, a 21.5-ms pulsar in a highly-eccentric, 4.4-h orbit with a neutron star (NS) companion. PSR J1757-1854 exhibits some of the most extreme relativistic parameters of any known pulsar, including the strongest relativistic effects due to gravitational-wave damping, with a merger time of 76 Myr. Following a 1.6-yr timing campaign, we have measured five post-Keplerian parameters, yielding the two component masses (mp = 1.3384(9) M⊙ and mc = 1.3946(9) M⊙) plus three tests of general relativity, which the theory passes. The larger mass of the NS companion provides important clues regarding the binary formation of PSR J1757-1854. With simulations suggesting 3-σ measurements of both the contribution of Lense-Thirring precession to the rate of change of the semimajor axis and the relativistic deformation of the orbit within ˜7-9 yr, PSR J1757-1854 stands out as a unique laboratory for new tests of gravitational theories.

  9. Geriatric Pulsar Still Kicking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    The oldest isolated pulsar ever detected in X-rays has been found with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This very old and exotic object turns out to be surprisingly active. The pulsar, PSR J0108-1431 (J0108 for short) is about 200 million years old. Among isolated pulsars -- ones that have not been spun-up in a binary system -- it is over 10 times older than the previous record holder with an X-ray detection. At a distance of 770 light years, it is one of the nearest pulsars known. Pulsars are born when stars that are much more massive than the Sun collapse in supernova explosions, leaving behind a small, incredibly weighty core, known as a neutron star. At birth, these neutron stars, which contain the densest material known in the Universe, are spinning rapidly, up to a hundred revolutions per second. As the rotating beams of their radiation are seen as pulses by distant observers, similar to a lighthouse beam, astronomers call them "pulsars". Astronomers observe a gradual slowing of the rotation of the pulsars as they radiate energy away. Radio observations of J0108 show it to be one of the oldest and faintest pulsars known, spinning only slightly faster than one revolution per second. The surprise came when a team of astronomers led by George Pavlov of Penn State University observed J0108 in X-rays with Chandra. They found that it glows much brighter in X-rays than was expected for a pulsar of such advanced years. People Who Read This Also Read... Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes Milky Way’s Giant Black Hole Awoke from Slumber 300 Years Ago Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself Celebrate the International Year of Astronomy Some of the energy that J0108 is losing as it spins more slowly is converted into X-ray radiation. The efficiency of this process for J0108 is found to be higher than for any other known pulsar. "This pulsar is pumping out high-energy radiation much more efficiently than its younger cousins," said Pavlov. "So, although it

  10. THE NANOGRAV NINE-YEAR DATA SET: EXCESS NOISE IN MILLISECOND PULSAR ARRIVAL TIMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, M. T.; Jones, M. L.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Pennucci, T. T. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Cordes, J. M.; Chatterjee, S. [Department of Astronomy and Cornell Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Arzoumanian, Z. [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology and X-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Crowter, K.; Fonseca, E.; Gonzalez, M. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Demorest, P. B. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM, 87801 (United States); Dolch, T. [Department of Physics, Hillsdale College, 33 E. College Street, Hillsdale, MI 49242 (United States); Ellis, J. A [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena CA, 91109 (United States); Ferdman, R. D. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue Universite, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Jones, G. [Department of Physics, Columbia University, 550 W. 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Levin, L. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Madison, D. R.; Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Nice, D. J. [Department of Physics, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042 (United States); Shannon, R. M., E-mail: michael.lam@mail.wvu.edu [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Box 76, Epping NSW 1710 (Australia); and others

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) astronomy using a pulsar timing array requires high-quality millisecond pulsars (MSPs), correctable interstellar propagation delays, and high-precision measurements of pulse times of arrival. Here we identify noise in timing residuals that exceeds that predicted for arrival time estimation for MSPs observed by the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves. We characterize the excess noise using variance and structure function analyses. We find that 26 out of 37 pulsars show inconsistencies with a white-noise-only model based on the short timescale analysis of each pulsar, and we demonstrate that the excess noise has a red power spectrum for 15 pulsars. We also decompose the excess noise into chromatic (radio-frequency-dependent) and achromatic components. Associating the achromatic red-noise component with spin noise and including additional power-spectrum-based estimates from the literature, we estimate a scaling law in terms of spin parameters (frequency and frequency derivative) and data-span length and compare it to the scaling law of Shannon and Cordes. We briefly discuss our results in terms of detection of GWs at nanohertz frequencies.

  11. Pulsar Timing and Its Application for Navigation and Gravitational Wave Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Werner; Kramer, Michael; Sesana, Alberto

    2018-02-01

    Pulsars are natural cosmic clocks. On long timescales they rival the precision of terrestrial atomic clocks. Using a technique called pulsar timing, the exact measurement of pulse arrival times allows a number of applications, ranging from testing theories of gravity to detecting gravitational waves. Also an external reference system suitable for autonomous space navigation can be defined by pulsars, using them as natural navigation beacons, not unlike the use of GPS satellites for navigation on Earth. By comparing pulse arrival times measured on-board a spacecraft with predicted pulse arrivals at a reference location (e.g. the solar system barycenter), the spacecraft position can be determined autonomously and with high accuracy everywhere in the solar system and beyond. We describe the unique properties of pulsars that suggest that such a navigation system will certainly have its application in future astronautics. We also describe the on-going experiments to use the clock-like nature of pulsars to "construct" a galactic-sized gravitational wave detector for low-frequency (f_{GW}˜ 10^{-9} - 10^{-7} Hz) gravitational waves. We present the current status and provide an outlook for the future.

  12. Modeling Gravitational-Wave Sources for Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Joseph J.

    The recent direct detections of gravitational waves (GWs) from merging black holes by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) marks the beginning of the era of GW astronomy and promises to transform fundamental physics. In the coming years, there is hope for detections across the mass scale of binary black holes. Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs) are galactic-scale low-frequency (nHz - muHz) GW observatories, which aim to directly detect GWs from binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) (≥ 107M solar masses). The frequency and black hole mass range that PTAs are sensitive to is orders of magnitude different from those LIGO is observing, making PTAs a comparable observatory on the GW spectrum. Understanding the link between binary SMBHs and the gravitational radiation detected by PTAs is crucial to the community's capability of making meaningful scientific statements using PTA observations. This dissertation discusses the creation of a state-of-the-art observational-based simulation framework built to provide critical answers to many open questions surrounding the link between PTA data and binary SMBHs. Binary SMBHs are predicted products of galaxy mergers, and are a crucial step in galaxy formation theories. Recent PTA upper limits on the gravitational radiation in the nanohertz frequency band are impacting our understanding of the binary SMBH population. But as upper limits grow more constraining, what can be implied about galaxy evolution? In this dissertation, I will provide insights into this question by investigating which astrophysical parameters have the largest impact on GW predictions, developing direct translations between PTA limits and measured values for the parameters of galaxy evolution, and exploring how the use of different galaxy evolution parameters effects the characterization of the GW signal. During the extended interaction between SMBHs and their host galaxy throughout inspiral, there is the potential for many

  13. Observing the dynamics of supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingarelli, C M F; Grover, K; Sidery, T; Smith, R J E; Vecchio, A

    2012-08-24

    Pulsar timing arrays are a prime tool to study unexplored astrophysical regimes with gravitational waves. Here, we show that the detection of gravitational radiation from individually resolvable supermassive black hole binary systems can yield direct information about the masses and spins of the black holes, provided that the gravitational-wave-induced timing fluctuations both at the pulsar and at Earth are detected. This in turn provides a map of the nonlinear dynamics of the gravitational field and a new avenue to tackle open problems in astrophysics connected to the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes. We discuss the potential, the challenges, and the limitations of these observations.

  14. The impact of a stochastic gravitational-wave background on pulsar timing parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J. A.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Verbiest, J. P. W.

    2011-11-01

    Gravitational waves are predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity as well as other theories of gravity. The rotational stability of the fastest pulsars means that timing of an array of these objects can be used to detect and investigate gravitational waves. Simultaneously, however, pulsar timing is used to estimate spin period, period derivative, astrometric and binary parameters. Here we calculate the effects that a stochastic background of gravitational waves has on pulsar timing parameters through the use of simulations and data from the millisecond pulsars PSR J0437-4715 and PSR J1713+0747. We show that the reported timing uncertainties become underestimated with increasing background amplitude by up to a factor of ˜10 for a stochastic gravitational-wave background amplitude of A= 5 × 10-15, where A is the amplitude of the characteristic strain spectrum at one-year gravitational wave periods. We find evidence for prominent low-frequency spectral leakage in simulated data sets including a stochastic gravitational-wave background. We use these simulations along with independent very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements of parallax to set a 2σ upper limit of A≤ 9.1 × 10-14. We find that different supermassive black hole assembly scenarios do not have a significant effect on the calculated upper limits. We also test the effects that ultralow-frequency (10-12 to 10-9 Hz) gravitational waves have on binary pulsar parameter measurements and find that the corruption of these parameters is less than those due to 10-9 to 10-7 Hz gravitational waves.

  15. UV Timing and Spectroscopy of the Crab Nebula Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Lunqvist, Peter; Sollerman, Jesper; Lindler, Don; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have used the Hubble Space Telescope and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph to obtain Near Ultraviolet (NUV) (1600-3200 Angstroms) and Far Ultraviolet (FUV) (1140-1720 Angstroms) spectra and pulse profiles of the Crab Nebula's pulsar. The pulse period agrees well with the radio predictions. The NUV and FUV pulse profiles are little changed from the visible wavelength profile. Spectra obtained with the Nordic Optical Telescope were combined with the UV spectra for full coverage from 1140-9250Angstoms. Dereddening the spectrum with a standard extinction curve achieves a flat spectrum for E(B-V)=0.52, R=3.1. Lyman alpha absorption indicates a column density of 3.0=/-0.5 x 10(exp 21) cm -2, consistent with the E(B-V) of 0.52. The dereddened spectrum can be fitted by a power law with spectral index alpha=0.11+/-0.04. A broad, blueshifted absorption is seen in CIV (1550Angstroms), reaching a velocity of about 2500 kilometer per second.

  16. Deep Chandra Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud. II. Timing Analysis of X-Ray Pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, JaeSub; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Drake, Jeremy J.; Plucinsky, Paul P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Haberl, Frank [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbach straße, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Sasaki, Manami [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Sternwartstrasse 7, 96049 Bamberg (Germany); Laycock, Silas, E-mail: jaesub@head.cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, MA 01854 (United States)

    2017-09-20

    We report the timing analysis results of X-ray pulsars from a recent deep Chandra survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We analyzed a total exposure of 1.4 Ms from 31 observations over a 1.2 deg{sup 2} region in the SMC under a Chandra X-ray Visionary Program. Using the Lomb–Scargle and epoch-folding techniques, we detected periodic modulations from 20 pulsars and a new candidate pulsar. The survey also covered 11 other pulsars with no clear sign of periodic modulation. The 0.5–8 keV X-ray luminosity ( L {sub X} ) of the pulsars ranges from 10{sup 34} to 10{sup 37} erg s{sup −1} at 60 kpc. All of the Chandra sources with L {sub X} ≳ 4 × 10{sup 35} erg s{sup −1} exhibit X-ray pulsations. The X-ray spectra of the SMC pulsars (and high-mass X-ray binaries) are in general harder than those of the SMC field population. All but SXP 8.02 can be fitted by an absorbed power-law model with a photon index of Γ ≲ 1.5. The X-ray spectrum of the known magnetar SXP 8.02 is better fitted with a two-temperature blackbody model. Newly measured pulsation periods of SXP 51.0, SXP 214, and SXP 701, are significantly different from the previous XMM-Newton and RXTE measurements. This survey provides a rich data set for energy-dependent pulse profile modeling. Six pulsars show an almost eclipse-like dip in the pulse profile. Phase-resolved spectral analysis reveals diverse spectral variations during pulsation cycles: e.g., for an absorbed power-law model, some exhibit an (anti)-correlation between absorption and X-ray flux, while others show more intrinsic spectral variation (i.e., changes in photon indices).

  17. Building X-ray pulsar timing model without the use of radio parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai-feng; Sun, Xiong; Fang, Hai-yan; Shen, Li-rong; Cong, Shao-peng; Liu, Yan-ming; Li, Xiao-ping; Bao, Wei-min

    2018-02-01

    This paper develops a timing solution for the X-ray pulsar timing model without the use of the initial radio model parameters. First, we address the problem of phase ambiguities for the pre-fit residuals in the construction of pulsar timing model. To improve the estimation accuracy of the pulse time of arrival (TOA), we have deduced the general form of test statistics in Fourier transform, and discussed their estimation performances. Meanwhile, a fast maximum likelihood (FML) technique is presented to estimate the pulse TOA, which outperforms cross correlation (CC) estimator and exhibits a performance comparable with maximum likelihood (ML) estimator in spite of a much less reduced computational complexity. Depending on the strategy of the difference minimum of pre-fit residuals, we present an effective forced phase-connected technique to achieve initial model parameters. Then, we use the observations with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and X-ray pulsar navigation-I (XPNAV-1) satellites for experimental studies, and discuss main differences for the root mean square (RMS) residuals calculated with the X-ray and radio ephemerides. Finally, a chi-square value (CSV) of pulse profiles is presented as a complementary indicator to the RMS residuals for evaluating the model parameters. The results show that the proposed timing solution is valid and effective, and the obtained model parameters can be a reasonable alternative to the radio ephemeris.

  18. OPTIMAL STRATEGIES FOR CONTINUOUS GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION IN PULSAR TIMING ARRAYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Creighton, J. D. E.

    2012-01-01

    Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are expected to emit a continuous gravitational wave signal in the pulsar timing array (PTA) frequency band (10 –9 to 10 –7 Hz). The development of data analysis techniques aimed at efficient detection and characterization of these signals is critical to the gravitational wave detection effort. In this paper, we leverage methods developed for LIGO continuous wave gravitational searches and explore the use of the F-statistic for such searches in pulsar timing data. Babak and Sesana have used this approach in the context of PTAs to show that one can resolve multiple SMBHB sources in the sky. Our work improves on several aspects of prior continuous wave search methods developed for PTA data analysis. The algorithm is implemented fully in the time domain, which naturally deals with the irregular sampling typical of PTA data and avoids spectral leakage problems associated with frequency domain methods. We take into account the fitting of the timing model and have generalized our approach to deal with both correlated and uncorrelated colored noise sources. We also develop an incoherent detection statistic that maximizes over all pulsar-dependent contributions to the likelihood. To test the effectiveness and sensitivity of our detection statistics, we perform a number of Monte Carlo simulations. We produce sensitivity curves for PTAs of various configurations and outline an implementation of a fully functional data analysis pipeline. Finally, we present a derivation of the likelihood maximized over the gravitational wave phases at the pulsar locations, which results in a vast reduction of the search parameter space.

  19. Noise Budget and Interstellar Medium Mitigation Advances in the NANOGrav Pulsar Timing Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolch, T.; NANOGrav Collaboration; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Demorest, P. B.; Ellis, J. A.; Jones, M. L.; Lam, M. T.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Levin, L.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Palliyaguru, N. T.; Stinebring, D. R.

    2018-02-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) detection with pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) requires accurate noise characterization. The noise of our Galactic-scale GW detector has been systematically evaluated by the Noise Budget and Interstellar Medium Mitigation working groups within the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) collaboration. Intrinsically, individual radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) used by NANOGrav can have some degree of achromatic red spin noise, as well as white noise due to pulse phase jitter. Along any given line-of-sight, the ionized interstellar medium contributes chromatic noise through dispersion measure (DM) variations, interstellar scintillation, and scattering. These effects contain both red and white components. In the future, with wideband receivers, the effects of frequency-dependent DM will become important. Having anticipated and measured these diverse sources of detector noise, the NANOGrav PTA remains well-poised to detect low-frequency GWs.

  20. Recognizing Axionic Dark Matter by Compton and de Broglie Scale Modulation of Pulsar Timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, Ivan; Broadhurst, Tom; Tye, S-H Henry; Chiueh, Tzihong; Schive, Hsi-Yu; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2017-12-01

    Light axionic dark matter, motivated by string theory, is increasingly favored for the "no weakly interacting massive particle era". Galaxy formation is suppressed below a Jeans scale of ≃10^{8}  M_{⊙} by setting the axion mass to m_{B}∼10^{-22}  eV, and the large dark cores of dwarf galaxies are explained as solitons on the de Broglie scale. This is persuasive, but detection of the inherent scalar field oscillation at the Compton frequency ω_{B}=(2.5  months)^{-1}(m_{B}/10^{-22}  eV) would be definitive. By evolving the coupled Schrödinger-Poisson equation for a Bose-Einstein condensate, we predict the dark matter is fully modulated by de Broglie interference, with a dense soliton core of size ≃150  pc, at the Galactic center. The oscillating field pressure induces general relativistic time dilation in proportion to the local dark matter density and pulsars within this dense core have detectably large timing residuals of ≃400  nsec/(m_{B}/10^{-22}  eV). This is encouraging as many new pulsars should be discovered near the Galactic center with planned radio surveys. More generally, over the whole Galaxy, differences in dark matter density between pairs of pulsars imprints a pairwise Galactocentric signature that can be distinguished from an isotropic gravitational wave background.

  1. High School Student Scientists Researching Pulsars at the CGWA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Zermeno, Adrienne

    2006-12-01

    Modern astronomy offers the means to excite high school students about science. During the 21st Century Astronomy Ambassadors program high school students experienced what it is like to be a scientist by becoming a part of the international effort to detect gravitational waves using pulsar timing. This summer enrichment program enabled the Center for Gravitational Wave Astronomy(CGWA) to actively engage students through research experiences. Online databases played an important role in the students’ research projects. Actual pulse profiles were downloaded from the European Pulsar Network, while information about physical properties of radio pulsars was obtained from the Australia Telescope National Facility pulsar catalogue. The teams used the data to study the pulsar pulse morphology and analyze the polarization properties of radio pulsars. This connection to a real world astronomy problem was a powerful experience for these students.

  2. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE 350 MHz DRIFT-SCAN SURVEY II: DATA ANALYSIS AND THE TIMING OF 10 NEW PULSARS, INCLUDING A RELATIVISTIC BINARY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Ryan S.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Archibald, Anne M.; Karako-Argaman, Chen [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Boyles, Jason; Lorimer, Duncan R.; McLaughlin, Maura A.; Cardoso, Rogerio F. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, 111 White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Ransom, Scott M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Stairs, Ingrid H.; Berndsen, Aaron; Cherry, Angus; McPhee, Christie A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Hessels, Jason W. T.; Kondratiev, Vladislav I.; Van Leeuwen, Joeri [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990-AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Epstein, Courtney R. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Pennucci, Tim [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Roberts, Mallory S. E. [Eureka Scientific Inc., 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 94602 (United States); Stovall, Kevin, E-mail: rlynch@physics.mcgill.ca [Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    We have completed a 350 MHz Drift-scan Survey using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope with the goal of finding new radio pulsars, especially millisecond pulsars that can be timed to high precision. This survey covered {approx}10,300 deg{sup 2} and all of the data have now been fully processed. We have discovered a total of 31 new pulsars, 7 of which are recycled pulsars. A companion paper by Boyles et al. describes the survey strategy, sky coverage, and instrumental setup, and presents timing solutions for the first 13 pulsars. Here we describe the data analysis pipeline, survey sensitivity, and follow-up observations of new pulsars, and present timing solutions for 10 other pulsars. We highlight several sources-two interesting nulling pulsars, an isolated millisecond pulsar with a measurement of proper motion, and a partially recycled pulsar, PSR J0348+0432, which has a white dwarf companion in a relativistic orbit. PSR J0348+0432 will enable unprecedented tests of theories of gravity.

  3. Gravitational-wave limits from pulsar timing constrain supermassive black hole evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, R M; Ravi, V; Coles, W A; Hobbs, G; Keith, M J; Manchester, R N; Wyithe, J S B; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Khoo, J; Levin, Y; Osłowski, S; Sarkissian, J M; van Straten, W; Verbiest, J P W; Wang, J-B

    2013-10-18

    The formation and growth processes of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are not well constrained. SMBH population models, however, provide specific predictions for the properties of the gravitational-wave background (GWB) from binary SMBHs in merging galaxies throughout the universe. Using observations from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, we constrain the fractional GWB energy density (Ω(GW)) with 95% confidence to be Ω(GW)(H0/73 kilometers per second per megaparsec)(2) formation model implemented in the Millennium Simulation Project is inconsistent with our limit with 50% probability.

  4. Constraints on the Dynamical Environments of Supermassive Black-Hole Binaries Using Pulsar-Timing Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephen R; Simon, Joseph; Sampson, Laura

    2017-05-05

    We introduce a technique for gravitational-wave analysis, where Gaussian process regression is used to emulate the strain spectrum of a stochastic background by training on population-synthesis simulations. This leads to direct Bayesian inference on astrophysical parameters. For pulsar timing arrays specifically, we interpolate over the parameter space of supermassive black-hole binary environments, including three-body stellar scattering, and evolving orbital eccentricity. We illustrate our approach on mock data, and assess the prospects for inference with data similar to the NANOGrav 9-yr data release.

  5. Assessing pulsar timing array sensitivity to gravitational wave bursts with memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madison, D. R.; Cordes, J. M.; Chatterjee, S.

    2014-01-01

    Highly energetic astrophysical phenomena like supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) mergers are predicted to emit prodigious amounts of gravitational waves (GWs). An anticipated component of the gravitational waveform known as 'memory' is permanent and nonoscillatory. For SMBHB mergers, the memory is created primarily during the most violent moments of the inspiral immediately preceding the final plunge and ring-down when the strongest gravitational fields are at work and the nonlinearities of general relativity are most pronounced. The essentially time-domain nature of memory makes it forbiddingly difficult to detect with ground based GW detectors, leaving pulsar timing array (PTA) experiments as the most promising means by which it may be detected and studied. In this paper, we discuss how GW bursts with memory (BWMs) influence pulsar timing experiments and develop methods to assess how sensitive modern timing efforts are to such GW events. We discuss how PTA searches for BWMs can be used to constrain the rate of BWMs and how these constraints relate to information regarding the population of SMBHBs.

  6. Assessing Pulsar Timing Array Sensitivity to Gravitational Wave Bursts with Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, D. R.; Cordes, J. M.; Chatterjee, S.

    2014-06-01

    Highly energetic astrophysical phenomena like supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) mergers are predicted to emit prodigious amounts of gravitational waves (GWs). An anticipated component of the gravitational waveform known as "memory" is permanent and nonoscillatory. For SMBHB mergers, the memory is created primarily during the most violent moments of the inspiral immediately preceding the final plunge and ring-down when the strongest gravitational fields are at work and the nonlinearities of general relativity are most pronounced. The essentially time-domain nature of memory makes it forbiddingly difficult to detect with ground based GW detectors, leaving pulsar timing array (PTA) experiments as the most promising means by which it may be detected and studied. In this paper, we discuss how GW bursts with memory (BWMs) influence pulsar timing experiments and develop methods to assess how sensitive modern timing efforts are to such GW events. We discuss how PTA searches for BWMs can be used to constrain the rate of BWMs and how these constraints relate to information regarding the population of SMBHBs.

  7. Outlook for Detecting Gravitational Waves with Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    and conservative assumptions are made for merger rates (blue and red lines, respectively) and environmental conditions (solid and dashed lines, respectively). [Taylor et al. 2016]Taylor and collaborators statistically analyzed the detection probability for each of the projects as a function of their observing time, based on the projects estimated sensitivities and both conservative and optimistic assumptions about merger rates and environmental influences.First the bad news: based on the authors estimates, small arrays which contain only a few pulsars that each have minimal timing noise will not be likely to detect gravitational waves within the next two decades. These arrays are more useful for setting upper limits on the amplitude of the gravitational-wave background.On the other hand, large pulsar timing arrays have far more promising detection probabilities. These include the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, the European Pulsar Timing Array, andNANOGrav which each targettens ofpulsars,withthe intent toadd more in the future as well as the International Pulsar Timing Array, which combines the efforts of all three of these projects. There is an 80% chance that, within the next decade, these projects will successfully detect the gravitational-wave background created by orbiting supermassive black holes.Based on this study, the outlook for these large arrays remains optimistic even in non-ideal conditions (such as if supermassive-black-hole merger rates are lower than we thought). So, though we may still have to wait a few years, the possibility of probing an otherwise inaccessible range of frequencies continues to make pulsar timing arrays a promising avenue of study for gravitational waves.CitationS. R. Taylor et al 2016 ApJ 819 L6. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/819/1/L6

  8. The gravitational wave background from massive black hole binaries in Illustris: spectral features and time to detection with pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Blecha, Laura; Hernquist, Lars; Sesana, Alberto; Taylor, Stephen R.

    2017-11-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) around the world are using the incredible consistency of millisecond pulsars to measure low-frequency gravitational waves from (super)massive black hole (MBH) binaries. We use comprehensive MBH merger models based on cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to predict the spectrum of the stochastic gravitational wave background (GWB). We use real time-of-arrival specifications from the European, NANOGrav, Parkes, and International PTA (IPTA) to calculate realistic times to detection of the GWB across a wide range of model parameters. In addition to exploring the parameter space of environmental hardening processes (in particular: stellar scattering efficiencies), we have expanded our models to include eccentric binary evolution which can have a strong effect on the GWB spectrum. Our models show that strong stellar scattering and high characteristic eccentricities enhance the GWB strain amplitude near the PTA-sensitive `sweet-spot' (near the frequency f = 1 yr-1), slightly improving detection prospects in these cases. While the GWB amplitude is degenerate between cosmological and environmental parameters, the location of a spectral turnover at low frequencies (f ≲ 0.1 yr-1) is strongly indicative of environmental coupling. At high frequencies (f ≳ 1 yr-1), the GWB spectral index can be used to infer the number density of sources and possibly their eccentricity distribution. Even with merger models that use pessimistic environmental and eccentricity parameters, if the current rate of PTA expansion continues, we find that the IPTA is highly likely to make a detection within about 10 yr.

  9. Ultra Light Axionic Dark Matter: Galactic Halos and Implications for Observations with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan de Martino

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The cold dark matter (CDM paradigm successfully explains the cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshifts. However, it fails when probing the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way’s dwarf galaxy satellites. Moreover, the lack of experimental detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP favors alternative candidates such as light axionic dark matter that naturally arise in string theory. Cosmological N-body simulations have shown that axionic dark matter forms a solitonic core of size of ≃150 pc in the innermost region of the galactic halos. The oscillating scalar field associated to the axionic dark matter halo produces an oscillating gravitational potential that induces a time dilation of the pulse arrival time of ≃400 ns/(m B /10 − 22 eV for pulsar within such a solitonic core. Over the whole galaxy, the averaged predicted signal may be detectable with current and forthcoming pulsar timing array telescopes.

  10. Timing Studies and QPO Detection for Transient Xray Pulsar 4u 0115+634 by RXTE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram Dugair, Moti; Jaaffrey, S. N. A.

    We present results of timing analysis of data of the transient X-ray pulsar 4U 0115+634 (Neu-tron star with fast spin entry) taken by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) space satellite. We first time observed the occurrence of 3 QPOs of 3 m Hz, 8 m Hz and 60 m Hz of the X-ray outburst of 2008. In particular the frequencies of the QPO's may be attributed to those of oscillations of disturbance occuring in the inner region of the accreted disk of the neutron star during the truncation of viscous circum stellar disc around the Be-star. The role of the interaction between the neutron star and the circumstellar is very important. Appearance of three QPOs in X-ray Binary system is a new phenomenon and difficult to understand.

  11. NATURE OF CYCLICAL CHANGES IN THE TIMING RESIDUALS FROM THE PULSAR B1642 - 03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabanova, T. V.

    2009-01-01

    We report an analysis of timing data for the pulsar B1642-03 (J1645 - 0317) gathered over the 40-year time span between 1969 and 2008. During this interval, the pulsar experienced eight glitch-like events with a fractional increase in the rotation frequency Δν/ν ∼ (0.9-2.6) x 10 -9 . We have revealed two important relations in the properties of these peculiar glitches. The first result shows that there is a strong linear correlation between the amplitude of the glitch and the time interval to the next glitch with a slope of about 0.0026 x 10 -9 Hz day -1 . This relation allows us to predict epochs of new glitches. The second result shows that the amplitude of the glitches is modulated by a periodic large-scale sawtooth-like function. As a result of this modulation, the glitch amplitude varies discretely from glitch to glitch with a step of 1.5 x 10 -9 Hz in the range (2.4-6.9) x 10 -9 Hz. The post-glitch time interval also varies discretely with a step of ∼ 600 days in the range 900-2700 days. An analysis of the data showed that three modulation schemes with modulation periods of 43 years, 53 years, and 60 years are possible. The best model is the 60-year modulation scheme including 12 glitches. We make a conclusion that the nature of the observed cyclical changes in the timing residuals from PSR B1642 - 03 is a continuous generation of peculiar glitches whose amplitudes are modulated by a periodic large-scale sawtooth-like function. As the modulation function is periodical, the picture of cyclical timing residuals will be exactly repeated in each modulation period or every 60 years.

  12. Single Sources in the Low-Frequency Gravitational Wave Sky:properties and time to detection by pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Blecha, Laura; Hernquist, Lars; Sesana, Alberto; Taylor, Stephen R.

    2018-03-01

    We calculate the properties, occurrence rates and detection prospects of individually resolvable `single sources' in the low frequency gravitational wave (GW) spectrum. Our simulations use the population of galaxies and massive black hole binaries from the Illustris cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, coupled to comprehensive semi-analytic models of the binary merger process. Using mock pulsar timing arrays (PTA) with, for the first time, varying red-noise models, we calculate plausible detection prospects for GW single sources and the stochastic GW background (GWB). Contrary to previous results, we find that single sources are at least as detectable as the GW background. Using mock PTA, we find that these `foreground' sources (also `deterministic'/`continuous') are likely to be detected with ˜ 20 yr total observing baselines. Detection prospects, and indeed the overall properties of single sources, are only moderately sensitive to binary evolution parameters—namely eccentricity & environmental coupling, which can lead to differences of ˜ 5 yr in times to detection. Red noise has a stronger effect, roughly doubling the time to detection of the foreground between a white-noise only model (˜ 10 - 15 yr) and severe red noise (˜20 - 30 yr). The effect of red noise on the GWB is even stronger, suggesting that single source detections may be more robust. We find that typical signal-to-noise ratios for the foreground peak near f = 0.1 yr-1, and are much less sensitive to the continued addition of new pulsars to PTA.

  13. Pulsar slow-down epochs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintzmann, H.; Novello, M.

    1981-01-01

    The relative importance of magnetospheric currents and low frequency waves for pulsar braking is assessed and a model is developed which tries to account for the available pulsar timing data under the unifying aspect that all pulsars have equal masses and magnetic moments and are born as rapid rotators. Four epochs of slow-down are distinguished which are dominated by different braking mechanisms. According to the model no direct relationship exists between 'slow-down age' and true age of a pulsar and leads to a pulsar birth-rate of one event per hundred years. (Author) [pt

  14. Post-Outburst Observations of the Magnetically Active Pulsar J1846-0258: A New Braking Index, Increased Timing Noise, and Radiative Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Margaret A.; Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Gavriil, Fotis P.; Gotthelf, E. V.

    2010-01-01

    The approx.800yr-old pulsar J1846-0258 is a unique transition object between rotation-powered pulsars and magnetars: though behaving like a rotation-powered pulsar most of the time, in 2006 it exhibited a distinctly magnetar-like outburst accompanied by a large glitch. Here we present X-ray timing observations taken with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer over a 2.2-yr period after the X-ray outburst and glitch had recovered. We observe that the braking index of the pulsar, previously measured to be n = 2.65+/-0.01, is now n = 2.16+/-0.13, a decrease of 18+/-5%. We also note a persistent increase in the timing noise relative to the pre-outburst level. Despite the timing changes, a 2009 Chandra X-ray Observatory observation shows that the X-ray flux and spectrum of the pulsar and its wind nebula are consistent with the quiescent levels observed in 2000. Subject headings: pulsars: general pulsars: individual (PSR J1846-0258) supernovae: individual (Kes 75 X-rays: stars)

  15. Nonlinear interglitch dynamics, the braking index of the Vela pulsar and the time to the next glitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbal, O.; Alpar, M. A.; Buchner, S.; Pines, D.

    2017-08-01

    The interglitch timing of the Vela pulsar is characterized by a constant second derivative of the rotation rate. This takes over after the post-glitch exponential relaxation and is completed at about the time of the next glitch. The vortex creep model explains the second derivatives in terms of nonlinear response to the glitch. We present interglitch timing fits to the present sample covering 16 large glitches, taking into account the possibility that in some glitches part of the step in the spin-down rate may involve a `persistent shift', as observed in the Crab pulsar. Modifying the expression for the time between glitches with this hypothesis leads to better agreement with the observed interglitch time intervals. We extrapolate the interglitch model fits to obtain spin-down rates just prior to each glitch and use these to calculate the braking index n = 2.81 ± 0.12. The next glitch should occur around 2017 December 22, ±197 d if no persistent shift is involved, but could occur as early as 2016 July 27, ±152 d if the 2013 glitch gave rise to a typical Vela persistent shift. Note added: Literally while we were submitting the first version of this paper on 2016 December 12, we saw ATel #9847 announcing a Vela pulsar glitch which has arrived 138 d after our prediction with a persistent shift, within the 1σ uncertainty of 152 d.

  16. Pulsar magnetospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asseo, E.; Beaufils, D.; Pellat, R. (Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Centre de Physique Theorique)

    1984-07-15

    Static and dynamic solutions of the aligned rotator model introduced for pulsars by Goldreich and Julian (1969 Astrophys. J. 157,869) are examined. A cold and force-free pulsar plasma atmosphere, finite in extent is first studied. The possible existence of charged beams above the pulsar polar caps is then considered. A configuration in which particles are exchanged between the neutron-star surface and a force-free magnetospheric plasma is investigated.

  17. Perspectives on Constraining a Cosmological Constant-Type Parameter with Pulsar Timing in the Galactic Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Independent tests aiming to constrain the value of the cosmological constant Λ are usually difficult because of its extreme smallness ( Λ ≃ 1 × 10 - 52 m - 2 , or 2 . 89 × 10 - 122 in Planck units . Bounds on it from Solar System orbital motions determined with spacecraft tracking are currently at the ≃ 10 - 43 – 10 - 44 m - 2 ( 5 – 1 × 10 - 113 in Planck units level, but they may turn out to be optimistic since Λ has not yet been explicitly modeled in the planetary data reductions. Accurate ( σ τ p ≃ 1 – 10 μ s timing of expected pulsars orbiting the Black Hole at the Galactic Center, preferably along highly eccentric and wide orbits, might, at least in principle, improve the planetary constraints by several orders of magnitude. By looking at the average time shift per orbit Δ δ τ ¯ p Λ , an S2-like orbital configuration with e = 0 . 8839 , P b = 16 yr would permit a preliminarily upper bound of the order of Λ ≲ 9 × 10 - 47 m - 2 ≲ 2 × 10 - 116 in Planck units if only σ τ p were to be considered. Our results can be easily extended to modified models of gravity using Λ -type parameters.

  18. Constraining Nonperturbative Strong-Field Effects in Scalar-Tensor Gravity by Combining Pulsar Timing and Laser-Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijing Shao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulsar timing and laser-interferometer gravitational-wave (GW detectors are superb laboratories to study gravity theories in the strong-field regime. Here, we combine these tools to test the mono-scalar-tensor theory of Damour and Esposito-Farèse (DEF, which predicts nonperturbative scalarization phenomena for neutron stars (NSs. First, applying Markov-chain Monte Carlo techniques, we use the absence of dipolar radiation in the pulsar-timing observations of five binary systems composed of a NS and a white dwarf, and eleven equations of state (EOSs for NSs, to derive the most stringent constraints on the two free parameters of the DEF scalar-tensor theory. Since the binary-pulsar bounds depend on the NS mass and the EOS, we find that current pulsar-timing observations leave scalarization windows, i.e., regions of parameter space where scalarization can still be prominent. Then, we investigate if these scalarization windows could be closed and if pulsar-timing constraints could be improved by laser-interferometer GW detectors, when spontaneous (or dynamical scalarization sets in during the early (or late stages of a binary NS (BNS evolution. For the early inspiral of a BNS carrying constant scalar charge, we employ a Fisher-matrix analysis to show that Advanced LIGO can improve pulsar-timing constraints for some EOSs, and next-generation detectors, such as the Cosmic Explorer and Einstein Telescope, will be able to improve those bounds for all eleven EOSs. Using the late inspiral of a BNS, we estimate that for some of the EOSs under consideration, the onset of dynamical scalarization can happen early enough to improve the constraints on the DEF parameters obtained by combining the five binary pulsars. Thus, in the near future, the complementarity of pulsar timing and direct observations of GWs on the ground will be extremely valuable in probing gravity theories in the strong-field regime.

  19. Probing the assembly history and dynamical evolution of massive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Siyuan; Middleton, Hannah; Sesana, Alberto; Del Pozzo, Walter; Vecchio, Alberto

    2017-06-01

    We consider the inverse problem in pulsar timing array (PTA) analysis, investigating what astrophysical information about the underlying massive black hole binary (MBHB) population can be recovered from the detection of a stochastic gravitational wave background (GWB). We employ a physically motivated model that connects the GWB spectrum to a series of parameters describing the underlying redshift evolution of the MBHB mass function and to the typical eccentricity they acquire while interacting with the dense environment of post-merger galactic nuclei. This allows the folding in of information about the spectral shape of the GWB into the analysis. The priors on the model parameters are assumed to be uninformative and consistent with the current lack of secure observations of sub-parsec MBHBs. We explore the implications of current upper limits and of future detections with a variety of PTA configurations. We confirm our previous finding that current upper limits can only place an upper bound on the overall MBHB merger rate. Depending on the properties of the array, future detections can also constrain several MBHB population models at different degrees of fidelity. In particular, a simultaneous detection of a steepening of the spectrum at high frequency and a bending at low frequency will place strong constraints on both the MBHB mass function and on the typical eccentricity of inspiralling MBHBs, providing insights into MBHB astrophysics unlikely to be achievable by any other means.

  20. Gravitational waves from a supercooled electroweak phase transition and their detection with pulsar timing arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobakhidze, Archil; Lagger, Cyril; Manning, Adrian [University of Sydney, ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, School of Physics, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Yue, Jason [National Taiwan Normal University, Department of Physics, Taipei (China)

    2017-08-15

    We investigate the properties of a stochastic gravitational wave background produced by a first-order electroweak phase transition in the regime of extreme supercooling. We study a scenario whereby the percolation temperature that signifies the completion of the transition, T{sub p}, is as low as a few MeV (nucleosynthesis temperature), while most of the true vacuum bubbles are formed much earlier at the nucleation temperature, T{sub n} ∝ 50 GeV. This implies that the gravitational wave spectrum is mainly produced by the collisions of large bubbles and characterised by a large amplitude and a peak frequency as low as f ∝ 10{sup -9}-10{sup -7} Hz. We show that such a scenario can occur in (but not limited to) a model based on a non-linear realisation of the electroweak gauge group, so that the Higgs vacuum configuration is altered by a cubic coupling. In order to carefully quantify the evolution of the phase transition of this model over such a wide temperature range we go beyond the usual fast transition approximation, taking into account the expansion of the Universe as well as the behaviour of the nucleation probability at low temperatures. Our computation shows that there exists a range of parameters for which the gravitational wave spectrum lies at the edge between the exclusion limits of current pulsar timing array experiments and the detection band of the future Square Kilometre Array observatory. (orig.)

  1. First Demonstration of Pulsar Positioning System (PPS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Carry out first time demonstration of a global positioning system using pulsars as celestial clocks. Pulsars are rotating neutron stars that emit clock-like pulses...

  2. Testing the Binary Hypothesis: Pulsar Timing Constraints on Supermassive Black Hole Binary Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesana, Alberto; Haiman, Zoltán; Kocsis, Bence; Kelley, Luke Zoltan

    2018-03-01

    The advent of time domain astronomy is revolutionizing our understanding of the universe. Programs such as the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS) or the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) surveyed millions of objects for several years, allowing variability studies on large statistical samples. The inspection of ≈250 k quasars in CRTS resulted in a catalog of 111 potentially periodic sources, put forward as supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) candidates. A similar investigation on PTF data yielded 33 candidates from a sample of ≈35 k quasars. Working under the SMBHB hypothesis, we compute the implied SMBHB merger rate and we use it to construct the expected gravitational wave background (GWB) at nano-Hz frequencies, probed by pulsar timing arrays (PTAs). After correcting for incompleteness and assuming virial mass estimates, we find that the GWB implied by the CRTS sample exceeds the current most stringent PTA upper limits by almost an order of magnitude. After further correcting for the implicit bias in virial mass measurements, the implied GWB drops significantly but is still in tension with the most stringent PTA upper limits. Similar results hold for the PTF sample. Bayesian model selection shows that the null hypothesis (whereby the candidates are false positives) is preferred over the binary hypothesis at about 2.3σ and 3.6σ for the CRTS and PTF samples respectively. Although not decisive, our analysis highlights the potential of PTAs as astrophysical probes of individual SMBHB candidates and indicates that the CRTS and PTF samples are likely contaminated by several false positives.

  3. Algebraically special space-time in relativity, black holes, and pulsar models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, R. J.; Sheffield, C.

    1973-01-01

    The entire field of astronomy is in very rapid flux, and at the center of interest are problems relating to the very dense, rotating, neutron stars observed as pulsars. the hypothesized collapsed remains of stars known as black holes, and quasars. Degenerate metric form, or Kerr-Schild metric form, was used to study several problems related to intense gravitational fields.

  4. Real-Time Signal Processor for Pulsar Studies P. S. Ramkumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    odically, much like a rotating beacon, resulting in a periodic train of narrow pulses of broad-band radiation, which can be detected ... Pulsar signals appear as a train of highly periodic pulses, with period typically in the range of a ..... An interrupt service routine in the DSP routine gets activated immediately and removes the ...

  5. Three Dozen Pulsars Over a Dozen+ Years in Terzan 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Scott M.; Stairs, Ingrid; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Freire, Paulo; Bilous, Anna; Prager, Brian; Ho, Anna; Cadelano, Mario; Wang, David; Scott Ransom

    2018-01-01

    The massive and rich globular cluster Terzan 5 contains at least 37 millisecond pulsars -- the most of any globular cluster. We have been timing these pulsars in the radio since 2004 using the Green Bank Telescope, and the individual and combined properties have provided a wealth of science. We have measured long-term accelerations and "jerks" of almost all of the pulsars, allowing a unique probe of the physical parameters of the cluster, completely independent from optical/IR measurements. We have directly measured the absolute proper motion of cluster and see evidence for internal velocity dispersion. Numerous post-Keplerian (i.e. relativistic) orbital parameters are significant, allowing measurements or constraints on the neutron star masses for nine systems. Ensemble flux density, dispersion measure, and polarization measurements constrain the pulsar luminosity function and the interstellar medium. Finally, we observe many interesting properties of and long-term variabilty from several eclipsing systems.

  6. Pulsar glitch dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, P. D.

    2018-01-01

    We discuss pulsar glitch dynamics from three different viewpoints: statistical description, neutron star equation of state description and finally an electromagnetic field description. For the latter, the pulsar glitch recovery times are the dissipation time constants of sheet surface currents created in response to the glitch-induced crustal magnetic field disruption. We mathematically derive these glitch time constants (Ohmic time constant and Hall sheet current time constant) from a perturbation analysis of the electromagnetic induction equation. Different crustal channels will carry the sheet surface current and their different electron densities determine the time constants.

  7. Pulsars as tools for fundamental physics & astrophysics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordes, J.M.; Kramer, M.; Lazio, T.J.W.; Stappers, B.W.; Backer, D.C.; Johnston, S.

    2004-01-01

    The sheer number of pulsars discovered by the SKA, in combination with the exceptional timing precision it can provide, will revolutionize the field of pulsar astrophysics. The SKA will provide a complete census of pulsars in both the Galaxy and in Galactic globular clusters that can be used to

  8. Pulsar lensing geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siqi; Pen, Ue-Li; Macquart, J.-P.; Brisken, Walter; Deller, Adam

    2016-05-01

    We test the inclined sheet pulsar scintillation model (Pen & Levin) against archival very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data on PSR 0834+06 and show that its scintillation properties can be precisely reproduced by a model in which refraction occurs on two distinct lens planes. These data strongly favour a model in which grazing-incidence refraction instead of diffraction off turbulent structures is the primary source of pulsar scattering. This model can reproduce the parameters of the observed diffractive scintillation with an accuracy at the percent level. Comparison with new VLBI proper motion results in a direct measure of the ionized interstellar medium (ISM) screen transverse velocity. The results are consistent with ISM velocities local to the PSR 0834+06 sight-line (through the Galaxy). The simple 1-D structure of the lenses opens up the possibility of using interstellar lenses as precision probes for pulsar lens mapping, precision transverse motions in the ISM, and new opportunities for removing scattering to improve pulsar timing. We describe the parameters and observables of this double screen system. While relative screen distances can in principle be accurately determined, a global conformal distance degeneracy exists that allows a rescaling of the absolute distance scale. For PSR B0834+06, we present VLBI astrometry results that provide (for the first time) a direct measurement of the distance of the pulsar. For most of the recycled millisecond pulsars that are the targets of precision timing observations, the targets where independent distance measurements are not available. The degeneracy presented in the lens modelling could be broken if the pulsar resides in a binary system.

  9. THE DISTURBANCE OF A MILLISECOND PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon, R. M.; Kerr, M.; Dai, S.; Hobbs, G.; Manchester, R. N.; Reardon, D. J.; Toomey, L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Lentati, L. T. [Astrophysics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Bailes, M.; Osłowski, S.; Rosado, P. A.; Van Straten, W. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Bhat, N. D. R. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102 (Australia); Coles, W. A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Dempsey, J. [CSIRO Information Management and Technology, Box 225, Dickson, ACT 2602 (Australia); Keith, M. J. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Lasky, P. D.; Levin, Y. [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Ravi, V. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Spiewak, R., E-mail: ryan.shannon@csiro.au [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); and others

    2016-09-01

    Pulsar timing has enabled some of the strongest tests of fundamental physics. Central to the technique is the assumption that the detected radio pulses can be used to accurately measure the rotation of the pulsar. Here, we report on a broadband variation in the pulse profile of the millisecond pulsar J1643−1224. A new component of emission suddenly appears in the pulse profile, decays over four months, and results in a permanently modified pulse shape. Profile variations such as these may be the origin of timing noise observed in other millisecond pulsars. The sensitivity of pulsar-timing observations to gravitational radiation can be increased by accounting for this variability.

  10. Pulsar magnetospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asseo, E.; Beaufils, D.; Pellat, R.

    1984-07-01

    Some static and dynamic solutions of the aligned rotator model for pulsars are examined. Attention is given to three different configurations of the pulsar magnetosphere including a finite, cold, force-free pulsar plasma atmosphere; a field of charged beams above the pulsar polar caps; and an alternative configuration in which particles are exchanged between the neutron-star surface and a force-free magnetospheric plasma. Two conclusions were drawn on the basis of inconsistencies found in these configurations: (1) an (axisymmetric) vacuum gap separating a noncorotating force-free magnetospheric plasma from a corotating plasma cannot exist in the aligned rotator; (2) a finite zone in which beams of particles move up and down in the 'open' magnetic field lines cannot be connected to the infinite vacuum. The results integrate a large body of evidence associated with the shape of the pulsar magnetosphere, and are therefore considered to be a reliable basis on which to develop a new configuration of the pulsar magnetosphere.

  11. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunes, Nicolás; Siemens, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein's theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime . Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  12. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Yunes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein’s theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime. Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  13. Blind surveys for radio pulsars and transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorimer, D. R.

    2011-01-01

    The main reasons for searching for pulsars are to: (i) get an accurate census of the neutron star population and its origin and evolution; (ii) connect neutron stars to other stellar populations in the Galaxy and globular clusters; (iii) study Galactic astronomy (the interstellar medium and magnetic field); (iv) find and study new interesting individual objects; (v) study pulsar phenomenology; (vi) find pulsars to add to the sensitivity of pulsar timing arrays. This review focuses on blind (i.e. large area) searches for radio pulsars. I'll summarize the methods we use, some of the challenges they present, look at some of the recent and current efforts going on. I will also look at outreach of this area to groups outside the traditional area of pulsar research, highlight the discoveries of radio transients and look ahead to the future. Pulsars found at other wavelengths will be reviewed elsewhere in this volume.

  14. Understanding the spectral and timing behaviour of a newly discovered transient X-ray pulsar Swift J0243.6+6124

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K.; Naik, Sachindra; Chenevez, Jérôme

    2018-01-01

    We present the results obtained from timing and spectral studies of the newly discovered accreting X-ray binary pulsar Swift J0243.6+6124 using Nuclear Spectroscopy Telescope Array observation in 2017 October at a flux level of ~280 mCrab. Pulsations at 9.854 23(5) s were detected in the X...

  15. The Green Bank North Celestial Cap Pulsar Survey: New Pulsars and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Ryan S.; Swiggum, Joe; Stovall, Kevin; Chawla, Pragya; DeCesar, Megan E.; Fonseca, Emmanuel; Levin, Lina; Cui, Bingyi; Kondratiev, Vlad; Archibald, Anne; Boyles, Jason; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Jenet, Fredrick; Kaplan, David; Karako-Argaman, Chen; Kaspi, Victoria; Martinez, Jose; McLaughlin, Maura; Ransom, Scott M.; Roberts, Mallory; Siemens, Xavier; Spiewak, Renee; Stairs, Ingrid; van Leeuwn, Joeri; Green Bank North Celestial Cap Survey Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Green Bank North Celestial Cap pulsar survey is the most successful low frequency pulsar survey ever. GBNCC uses the Green Bank telescope to cover the full visible sky at 350 MHz. With the survey over 70% complete, we have discovered over 150 pulsars, including 20 MSPs and 11 RRATs. I will report on the current status of the survey and plans for its completion in the coming years. I will also report on several discoveries including: timing solutions for dozens of new pulsars; new high precision MSPs and their suitability for inclusion in pulsar timing arrays; a new relativistic double neutron star system; new pulsar mass measurements; proper motion measurements for several MSPs; a new mode changing pulsar; interesting new MSP binaries; nulling fraction analyses; and possible implications of the lack of any fast radio bursts in the survey so far.

  16. Millisecond and binary pulsars as nature's frequency standards - II. The effects of low-frequency timing noise on residuals and measured parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.

    1999-05-01

    Millisecond and binary pulsars are the most stable natural frequency standards. They can be applied to a number of principal problems in modern astronomy and time-keeping metrology, including the search for a stochastic gravitational wave background in the early Universe, testing general relativity and establishing a new ephemeris time-scale. The full exploration of pulsar properties requires that proper unbiased estimates of the spin and orbital parameters be obtained, a problem which deserves special investigation. These estimates depend essentially on the random noise component being revealed in the residuals of time of arrival (TOA) and having various physical origins. In the present paper, the influence of low-frequency (`red') timing noise with spectral indices from 1 to 6 on TOA residuals, variances, and covariances of the estimates of measured parameters of single and binary pulsars is studied. In order to determine the functional dependence of these quantities on time, an analytical technique for processing observational data in the time domain is developed. Data processing in the time domain is more informative, because it takes into account both the stationary and non-stationary components of noise. Data processing in the frequency domain is valid if and only if the noise is stationary. Our analysis includes a simplified timing model of a binary pulsar in a circular orbit and a procedure for estimating pulsar parameters and residuals under the influence of red noise. We reconfirm, in accordance with the results of previous authors, that uncorrelated white noise in the errors of measurements of TOA causes gradually decreasing residuals, variances and covariances of all parameters. On the other hand, we show that any low-frequency, correlated noise of terrestrial or/and astrophysical origin that is present causes the residuals, variances and covariances of certain parameters to increase with time. Hence, the low-frequency noise corrupts our observations

  17. Rotational properties of strange-pulsar models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benvenuto, O.G.; Horvath, J.E.; Vucetich, H.

    1991-01-01

    We present a study of the rotational properties of strange pulsars: strange-matter stars capable of supporting glitches. It is shown that their differentiated internal structure implies a lower maximum rotational frequency than that of homogeneous strange stars. Nevertheless, they are able to fit the known pulsar properties

  18. Time, history and international law

    CERN Document Server

    Craven, Matthew; Vogiatzi, Maria

    2006-01-01

    This book examines theoretical and practical issues concerning the relationship between international law, time and history. Problems relating to time and history are ever-present in the work of international lawyers, whether understood in terms of the role of historic practice in the doctrine of sources, the application of the principle of inter-temporal law in dispute settlement, or in gaining a coherent insight into the role that was played by international law in past events. But very little has been written about the various different ways in which international lawyers approach or unders

  19. Surveys Of The Galactic Plane For Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, S. D.

    2011-03-01

    Since their discovery in 1968, the known population of radio pulsars has grown to ~2000, and comprises several different groups which display markedly different behaviour from one another. Despite the large number of known sources, there are several scientific justifications for new wide-area searches for pulsars. These are outlined in this work, but include population studies, the evolutionary history of pulsars, and the possible detection of gravitational waves through high-precision timing.Previous pulsar surveys have been limited by (a) the hardware used to record the survey data; and, (b) the computational power that has been available to process this data. This has resulted in an observational bias which made the discovery of distant, highly dispersed pulsars, very difficult. Particularly affected by this are the most rapidly-rotating pulsars --- the millisecond pulsars --- which are known to rotate with spin periods as short as 1.4 ms. Since these are also some of the most interesting sources, with the greatest potential for high-precision timing, it is important to perform searches both deep into the Galactic plane and covering the whole sky, with sufficient time resolution to discover more millisecond pulsars. This thesis describes two such pulsar surveys, in which several discoveries have been made.The first is a survey of the Galactic plane at an observing frequency of 6.5 GHz, motivated by the need to discover pulsars at the Galactic centre. This survey resulted in the discovery of three pulsars, all of which are at distances > 9.5 kpc.The second is the ongoing High Time Resolution Universe pulsar survey using the 64-metre telescope at Parkes. This survey will make observations of the whole of the Southern sky using extremely high time resolution and narrow frequency channels. Preliminary results from the survey are presented here, including the discovery of 5 millisecond pulsars at relatively large distances, including one for which regular eclipses

  20. Stability of pulsar rotational and orbital periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei

    2010-11-01

    Millisecond and binary pulsars are the most stable astronomical standards of frequency. They can be applied to solving a number of problems in astronomy and time-keeping metrology including the search for a stochastic gravitational wave background in the early universe, testing general relativity, and establishing a new time-scale. The full exploration of pulsar properties requires that proper unbiased estimates of spin and orbital parameters of the pulsar be obtained. These estimates depend essentially on the random noise components present in pulsar timing residuals. The instrumental white noise has predictable statistical properties and makes no harm for interpretation of timing observations, while the astrophysical/geophyeical low-frequency noise corrupts them, thus, reducing the quality of tests of general relativity and decreasing the stability of the pulsar time scale.

  1. Clocks in the sky the story of pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    McNamara, Geoff

    2008-01-01

    Pulsars are rapidly spinning neutron stars, the collapsed cores of once massive stars that ended their lives as supernova explosions. Pulsar rotation rates can reach incredible speeds, up to hundreds of times per second. This title explores the history, subsequent discovery and contemporary research into pulsar astronomy.

  2. Time in internationally comparative studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerens, Jaap; Luyten, Johannes W.; Glas, Cornelis A.W.; Scheerens, J

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, illustrative internationally comparative data about time at school, time spent in out-of-school programs, and homework/ individual study time are presented. In the first section this is done in a more descriptive way, while in the second and third sections, the association between

  3. International atomic time and time transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Wlodzimierz

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) keep a central role in the international timekeeping. American Global Positioning System (GPS) is a navigation system that has proven itself to be a reliable source of positioning for both the military community and the civilian community. But, little known by many, is the fact that GPS has proven itself to be an important and valuabe utility to the timekeeping community (Lewandowski et al. 1999). GPS is a versatile and global tool which can be used to both distribute time to an arbitrary number of users and synchronise clocks over large distances with a high degree of precision and accuracy. Similar performance can be obtained with Russian Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS). It is expected in the near future satellites of a new European navigation system GALILEO might bring some important opportunities for international timekeeping. This paper after a brief introduction to international timekeeping focuses on the description of recent progress in time transfer techniques using GNSS satellites.

  4. Searching for pulsars using image pattern recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, W. W.; Berndsen, A.; Madsen, E. C.; Tan, M.; Stairs, I. H.; Brazier, A.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Scholz, P.; Stovall, K.; Cohen, S.; Dartez, L. P.; Lunsford, G.; Martinez, J. G.; Mata, A.; Ransom, S. M.; Banaszak, S.; Biwer, C. M.; Flanigan, J.; Rohr, M.

    2014-01-01

    performance of this system can be improved over time as more training data are accumulated. This AI system has been integrated into the PALFA survey pipeline and has discovered six new pulsars to date.

  5. Searching for pulsars using image pattern recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, W. W.; Berndsen, A.; Madsen, E. C.; Tan, M.; Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 6224 Agricultural Road, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Brazier, A. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Lazarus, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Lynch, R.; Scholz, P. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Stovall, K.; Cohen, S.; Dartez, L. P.; Lunsford, G.; Martinez, J. G.; Mata, A. [Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); Ransom, S. M. [NRAO, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Banaszak, S.; Biwer, C. M.; Flanigan, J.; Rohr, M., E-mail: zhuww@phas.ubc.ca, E-mail: berndsen@phas.ubc.ca [Center for Gravitation, Cosmology and Astrophysics. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); and others

    2014-02-01

    performance of this system can be improved over time as more training data are accumulated. This AI system has been integrated into the PALFA survey pipeline and has discovered six new pulsars to date.

  6. Star Cluster Buzzing With Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A dense globular star cluster near the center of our Milky Way Galaxy holds a buzzing beehive of rapidly-spinning millisecond pulsars, according to astronomers who discovered 21 new pulsars in the cluster using the National Science Foundation's 100-meter Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The cluster, called Terzan 5, now holds the record for pulsars, with 24, including three known before the GBT observations. Pulsar Diagram Pulsar Diagram: Click on image for more detail. "We hit the jackpot when we looked at this cluster," said Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, VA. "Not only does this cluster have a lot of pulsars -- and we still expect to find more in it -- but the pulsars in it are very interesting. They include at least 13 in binary systems, two of which are eclipsing, and the four fastest-rotating pulsars known in any globular cluster, with the fastest two rotating nearly 600 times per second, roughly as fast as a household blender," Ransom added. Ransom and his colleagues reported their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, CA, and in the online journal Science Express. The star cluster's numerous pulsars are expected to yield a bonanza of new information about not only the pulsars themselves, but also about the dense stellar environment in which they reside and probably even about nuclear physics, according to the scientists. For example, preliminary measurements indicate that two of the pulsars are more massive than some theoretical models would allow. "All these exotic pulsars will keep us busy for years to come," said Jason Hessels, a Ph.D student at McGill University in Montreal. Globular clusters are dense agglomerations of up to millions of stars, all of which formed at about the same time. Pulsars are spinning, superdense neutron stars that whirl "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is

  7. Binary and Millisecond Pulsars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorimer Duncan R.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We review the main properties, demographics and applications of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Our knowledge of these exciting objects has greatly increased in recent years, mainly due to successful surveys which have brought the known pulsar population to over 1800. There are now 83 binary and millisecond pulsars associated with the disk of our Galaxy, and a further 140 pulsars in 26 of the Galactic globular clusters. Recent highlights include the discovery of the young relativistic binary system PSR J1906+0746, a rejuvination in globular cluster pulsar research including growing numbers of pulsars with masses in excess of 1.5M_⊙, a precise measurement of relativistic spin precession in the double pulsar system and a Galactic millisecond pulsar in an eccentric (e = 0.44 orbit around an unevolved companion.

  8. Binary and Millisecond Pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Lorimer, D. R.

    2005-01-01

    We review the main properties, demographics and applications of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Our knowledge of these exciting objects has greatly increased in recent years, mainly due to successful surveys which have brought the known pulsar population to over 1800. There are now 83 binary and millisecond pulsars associated with the disk of our Galaxy, and a further 140 pulsars in 26 of the Galactic globular clusters. Recent highlights include the discovery of the young relativistic b...

  9. Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaspi, V M [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University St, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada)

    2008-03-07

    everything you ever wanted to know about pulsars but were afraid to ask. Chapter 1 begins a brief and interesting account of the discovery of pulsars, followed by an overview of the rotation-powered and accretion-powered populations. The following four chapters are fairly detailed and reasonably quantitative descriptions of neutron star interiors. This is no easy feat, given that a description of the physics of neutron stars demands a deep understanding of all major physical forces, and must include general relativity as well as detailed particle physics. The historical notes at the beginning of Chapter 2 are particularly fascinating, recounting the path to today's understanding of neutron stars in very interesting detail. Chapter 7 presents rotation-powered pulsar radio properties, and a nice description of pulsar timing, including relativistic and non-relativistic binaries and GR tests. The remaining chapters tackle a variety of topics including binary evolution, superfluidity, accretion-powered pulsar properties, magnetospheres and emission mechanisms, magnetic fields, spin evolution and strange stars. The coverage is somewhat uneven, with the strange star chapter, for example, an obvious afterthought. The utility of an encyclopedia lies in its breadth and in how up-to-date it is. Although admirable in its intentions, the Ghosh book does omit some major pulsar topics. This book leaves the impression that rotation-powered pulsars produce only radio emission; hardly (if at all) mentioned is the vast literature on their infrared, optical, and even more importantly, x-ray and gamma-ray emission, the latter being far more relevant to the pulsar 'machine' than the energetically puny radio output. Also absent are pulsar winds; this is particularly puzzling given both the lovely wind nebula that graces the book's cover, and the central role the wind plays as primary sink of the rotation power. One of the most actively pursued topics in pulsar astrophysics in

  10. X-Ray Pulsar Based Navigation and Time Determination, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DARPA recently initiated the XNAV program to undertake development of GPS independent, precision navigation and time determination based on observations of certain...

  11. Binary and Millisecond Pulsars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorimer Duncan R.

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We review the main properties, demographics and applications of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Our knowledge of these exciting objects has greatly increased in recent years, mainly due to successful surveys which have brought the known pulsar population to over 1700. There are now 80 binary and millisecond pulsars associated with the disk of our Galaxy, and a further 103 pulsars in 24 of the Galactic globular clusters. Recent highlights have been the discovery of the first ever double pulsar system and a recent flurry of discoveries in globular clusters, in particular Terzan 5.

  12. A Census of Southern Pulsars at 185 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mengyao; Bhat, N. D. R.; Tremblay, S. E.; Ord, S. M.; Sobey, C.; Swainston, N. A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Johnston, Simon; Meyers, B. W.; McSweeney, S. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array, and its recently developed Voltage Capture System, facilitates extending the low-frequency range of pulsar observations at high-time and -frequency resolution in the Southern Hemisphere, providing further information about pulsars and the ISM. We present the results of an initial time-resolved census of known pulsars using the Murchison Widefield Array. To significantly reduce the processing load, we incoherently sum the detected powers from the 128 Murchison Widefield Array tiles, which yields 10% of the attainable sensitivity of the coherent sum. This preserves the large field-of-view ( 450 deg2 at 185 MHz), allowing multiple pulsars to be observed simultaneously. We developed a WIde-field Pulsar Pipeline that processes the data from each observation and automatically folds every known pulsar located within the beam. We have detected 50 pulsars to date, 6 of which are millisecond pulsars. This is consistent with our expectation, given the telescope sensitivity and the sky coverage of the processed data ( 17 000 deg2). For 10 pulsars, we present the lowest frequency detections published. For a subset of the pulsars, we present multi-frequency pulse profiles by combining our data with published profiles from other telescopes. Since the Murchison Widefield Array is a low-frequency precursor to the Square Kilometre Array, we use our census results to forecast that a survey using the low-frequency component of the Square Kilometre Array Phase 1 can potentially detect around 9 400 pulsars.

  13. Early pulsar observations with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessels, J.; Stappers, B.; Hassall, T.; Weltevrede, P.; Alexov, A.; Coenen, T.; van Leeuwen, J.; Kondratiev, V.; Mol, J.D.; Kramer, M.; Noutsos, A.; Karastergiou, A.

    2010-01-01

    This contribution to the proceedings of "A New Golden Age for Radio Astronomy" is simply intended to give some of the highlights from pulsar observations with LOFAR at the time of its official opening: June 12th, 2010. These observations illustrate that, though LOFAR is still under construction and

  14. Conquering systematics in the timing of the pulsar triple system J0337+1715: Towards a unique and robust test of the strong equivalence principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusinskaia, N. V.; Archibald, A. M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Lorimer, D. R.; Ransom, S. M.; Stairs, I. H.; Lynch, R. S.

    2017-12-01

    PSR J0337+1715 is a millisecond radio pulsar in a hierarchical stellar triple system containing two white dwarfs. The pulsar orbits the inner white dwarf every 1.6 days. In turn, this inner binary system orbits the outer white dwarf every 327 days. The gravitational influence of the outer white dwarf strongly accelerates the inner binary, making this system an excellent laboratory in which to test the strong equivalence principle (SEP) of general relativity – especially because the neutron star has significant gravitational self-binding energy. This system has been intensively monitored using three radio telescopes: Arecibo, Green Bank and Westerbork. Using the more than 25000 pulse times of arrival (TOAs) collected to date, we have modeled the system using direct 3-body numerical integration. Here we present our efforts to quantify the effects of systematics in the TOAs and timing residuals, which can limit the precision to which we can test the SEP in this system. In this work we describe Fourier-based techniques that we apply to the residuals in order to isolate the effects of systematics that could masquerade as an SEP violation. We also demonstrate that tidal effects are insignificant in the modeling.

  15. Pulsars In The Headlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Puerto, C.

    1967 was the year of the so-called “war of the six days” or “third Arab Israeli war”, the year of the Che Guevara's death in Bolivia, the year of the military coup in Greece and, in medicine, the year of the first human heart transplant. Moreover, the signing of the international agreement on the use of space with peaceful means and the crash of the Russian shuttle Soyuz-1, with Cosmonaut Vladimir Kamarov on board also happened that year. Likewise, Spanish writer and professor of journalists, José Azorín, passed away. However, here we are interested in 1967 because it was the year of the detection of pulsars, which astronomers initially confused with signals from extraterrestrials or Little Green Men. Nowadays, they are still present in the headlines.

  16. Probing gravitation with pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Radio pulsars are fascinating and extremely useful objects. Despite our on-going difficulties in understanding the details of their emission physics, they can be used as precise cosmic clocks in a wide-range of experiments - in particular for probing gravitational physics. While the reader should consult the contributions to these proceedings to learn more about this exciting field of discovering, exploiting and understanding pulsars, we will concentrate here on on the usage of pulsars as gravity labs.

  17. Braking index of isolated pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamil, O.; Stone, J. R.; Urbanec, M.; Urbancová, G.

    2015-03-01

    Isolated pulsars are rotating neutron stars with accurately measured angular velocities Ω , and their time derivatives that show unambiguously that the pulsars are slowing down. Although the exact mechanism of the spin-down is a question of detailed debate, the commonly accepted view is that it arises through emission of magnetic dipole radiation (MDR) from a rotating magnetized body. Other processes, including the emission of gravitational radiation, and of relativistic particles (pulsar wind), are also being considered. The calculated energy loss by a rotating pulsar with a constant moment of inertia is assumed proportional to a model dependent power of Ω . This relation leads to the power law Ω ˙ =-K Ωn where n is called the braking index. The MDR model predicts n exactly equal to 3. Selected observations of isolated pulsars provide rather precise values of n , individually accurate to a few percent or better, in the range 1 structure. In addition, we examine the effects of the baryonic mass MB of the star, and possible core superfluidity, on the value of the braking index within the MDR model. Four microscopic equations of state are employed as input to two different computational codes that solve Einstein's equations numerically, either exactly or using the perturbative Hartle-Thorne method, to calculate the moment of inertia and other macroscopic properties of rotating neutron stars. The calculations are performed for fixed values of MB (as masses of isolated pulsars are not known) ranging from 1.0 - 2.2 M⊙ , and fixed magnetic dipole moment and inclination angle between the rotational and magnetic field axes. The results are used to solve for the value of the braking index as a function of frequency, and find the effect of the choice of the EoS, MB. The density profile of a star with a given MB is calculated to determine the transition between the crust and the core and used in estimation of the effect of core superfluidity on the braking index. Our

  18. Localizing New Pulsars with Intensity Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiggum, Joe; Gentile, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Although low-frequency, single dish pulsar surveys provide an efficient means of searching large regions of sky quickly, the localization of new discoveries is poor. For example, discoveries from 350 MHz surveys using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have position uncertainties up to the FWHM of the telescope's "beam" on the sky, over half a degree! Before finding a coherent timing solution (requires 8-12 months of dedicated timing observations) a "gridding" method is usually employed to improve localization of new pulsars, whereby a grid of higher frequency beam positions is used to tile the initial error region. This method often requires over an hour of observing time to achieve arcminute-precision localization (provided the pulsar is detectable at higher frequencies).Here, we describe another method that uses the same observing frequency as the discovery observation and scans over Right Ascension and Declination directions around the nominal position. A Gaussian beam model is fit to folded pulse profile intensities as a function of time/position to provide improved localization. Using five test cases, we show that intensity mapping localization at 350 MHz with the GBT yields pulsar positions to 1 arcminute precision, facilitating high-frequency follow-up and higher significance detections for future pulsar timing. This method is also well suited to be directly implemented in future low-frequency drift scan pulsar surveys (e.g. with the Five hundred meter Aperture Spherical Telescope; FAST).

  19. Astronomers Discover Fastest-Spinning Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope have discovered the fastest-spinning neutron star ever found, a 20-mile-diameter superdense pulsar whirling faster than the blades of a kitchen blender. Their work yields important new information about the nature of one of the most exotic forms of matter known in the Universe. Pulsar Graphic Pulsars Are Spinning Neutron Stars CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version) "We believe that the matter in neutron stars is denser than an atomic nucleus, but it is unclear by how much. Our observations of such a rapidly rotating star set a hard upper limit on its size, and hence on how dense the star can be.," said Jason Hessels, a graduate student at McGill University in Montreal. Hessels and his colleagues presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Washington, DC. Pulsars are spinning neutron stars that sling "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is left after a massive star explodes at the end of its "normal" life. With no nuclear fuel left to produce energy to offset the stellar remnant's weight, its material is compressed to extreme densities. The pressure squeezes together most of its protons and electrons to form neutrons; hence, the name "neutron star." "Neutron stars are incredible laboratories for learning about the physics of the fundamental particles of nature, and this pulsar has given us an important new limit," explained Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and one of Hessels' collaborators on this work. The scientists discovered the pulsar, named PSR J1748-2446ad, in a globular cluster of stars called Terzan 5, located some 28,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Sagittarius. The newly-discovered pulsar is spinning 716 times per second, or at 716 Hertz (Hz), readily beating the previous record of 642 Hz from a pulsar

  20. PEACE: pulsar evaluation algorithm for candidate extraction - a software package for post-analysis processing of pulsar survey candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. J.; Stovall, K.; Jenet, F. A.; Martinez, J.; Dartez, L. P.; Mata, A.; Lunsford, G.; Cohen, S.; Biwer, C. M.; Rohr, M.; Flanigan, J.; Walker, A.; Banaszak, S.; Allen, B.; Barr, E. D.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Desvignes, G.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kaspi, V. M.; Knispel, B.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Lyne, A.; McLaughlin, M.; Ransom, S.; Scholz, P.; Siemens, X.; Spitler, L.; Stairs, I.; Tan, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2013-07-01

    Modern radio pulsar surveys produce a large volume of prospective candidates, the majority of which are polluted by human-created radio frequency interference or other forms of noise. Typically, large numbers of candidates need to be visually inspected in order to determine if they are real pulsars. This process can be labour intensive. In this paper, we introduce an algorithm called Pulsar Evaluation Algorithm for Candidate Extraction (PEACE) which improves the efficiency of identifying pulsar signals. The algorithm ranks the candidates based on a score function. Unlike popular machine-learning-based algorithms, no prior training data sets are required. This algorithm has been applied to data from several large-scale radio pulsar surveys. Using the human-based ranking results generated by students in the Arecibo Remote Command Center programme, the statistical performance of PEACE was evaluated. It was found that PEACE ranked 68 per cent of the student-identified pulsars within the top 0.17 per cent of sorted candidates, 95 per cent within the top 0.34 per cent and 100 per cent within the top 3.7 per cent. This clearly demonstrates that PEACE significantly increases the pulsar identification rate by a factor of about 50 to 1000. To date, PEACE has been directly responsible for the discovery of 47 new pulsars, 5 of which are millisecond pulsars that may be useful for pulsar timing based gravitational-wave detection projects.

  1. GUPPI: Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Scott M.; Demorest, P.; Ford, J.; McCullough, R.; Ray, J.; DuPlain, R.; Brandt, P.

    2009-12-01

    The high precision radio pulsar timing required for gravitational wave detection experiments (like NANOGrav) and gravitational theory or neutron star equation-of-state tests demands that pulse phase be measured to precisions of 0.01% of the pulse period, or tens to hundreds of nano-seconds for millisecond pulsars (MSPs). This requirement means high precision instrumentation. At NRAO we are developing a state-of-the-art pulsar backend called GUPPI for these scientific problems. GUPPI provides wide bandwidth (up to 800 MHz), high dynamic range (8-bit sampling), substantially improved interference resistance (compared to all other GBT pulsar instruments), and full polarization capabilities. Currently it is being commissioned as a fully supported facility instrument for the GBT in a digital filterbank (i.e. incoherent dedispersion) mode. Within the next six months full coherent dedispersion capabilities are planned.

  2. Black widow pulsars: the price of promiscuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, A. R.; Davies, M. B.; Beer, M. E.

    2003-10-01

    The incidence of evaporating `black widow' pulsars (BWPs) among all millisecond pulsars is far higher in globular clusters than in the field. This implies a special formation mechanism for them in clusters. Cluster millisecond pulsars in wide binaries with white dwarf companions exchange them for turnoff-mass stars. These new companions eventually overflow their Roche lobes because of encounters and tides. The millisecond pulsars eject the overflowing gas from the binary, giving mass loss on the binary evolution time-scale. The systems are only observable as BWPs at epochs where this evolution is slow, making the mass loss transparent and the lifetime long. This explains why observed BWPs have low-mass companions. We suggest that at least some field BWPs were ejected from globular clusters or entered the field population when the cluster itself was disrupted.

  3. Post-Keplerian perturbations of the orbital time shift in binary pulsars: an analytical formulation with applications to the galactic center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iorio, Lorenzo [Ministero dell' Istruzione, Univ. Ricerca (M.I.U.R.)-Istruzione, Bari (Italy)

    2017-07-15

    We develop a general approach to analytically calculate the perturbations Δδτ p of the orbital component of the change δτ{sub p} of the times of arrival of the pulses emitted by a binary pulsar p induced by the post-Keplerian accelerations due to the mass quadrupole Q{sub 2}, and the post-Newtonian gravitoelectric (GE) and Lense-Thirring (LT) fields. We apply our results to the so-far still hypothetical scenario involving a pulsar orbiting the supermassive black hole in the galactic center at Sgr A*. We also evaluate the gravitomagnetic and quadrupolar Shapiro-like propagation delays δτ{sub prop}. By assuming the orbit of the existing main sequence star S2 and a time span as long as its orbital period P{sub b}, we obtain vertical stroke Δδτ{sub p}{sup GE} vertical stroke pulsar timing in Sgr A* is of the order of 100 μs, or, perhaps, even 1-10 μs. Our method is, in principle, neither limited just to some particular orbital configuration nor

  4. Magnetic field decay in black widow pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Camile; de Avellar, Marcio G. B.; Horvath, J. E.; Souza, Rodrigo A. de; Benvenuto, O. G.; De Vito, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    We study in this work the evolution of the magnetic field in `redback-black widow' pulsars. Evolutionary calculations of these `spider' systems suggest that first the accretion operates in the redback stage, and later the companion star ablates matter due to winds from the recycled pulsar. It is generally believed that mass accretion by the pulsar results in a rapid decay of the magnetic field when compared to the rate of an isolated neutron star. We study the evolution of the magnetic field in black widow pulsars by solving numerically the induction equation using the modified Crank-Nicolson method with intermittent episodes of mass accretion on to the neutron star. Our results show that the magnetic field does not fall below a minimum value (`bottom field') in spite of the long evolution time of the black widow systems, extending the previous conclusions for much younger low-mass X-ray binary systems. We find that in this scenario, the magnetic field decay is dominated by the accretion rate, and that the existence of a bottom field is likely related to the fact that the surface temperature of the pulsar does not decay as predicted by the current cooling models. We also observe that the impurity of the pulsar crust is not a dominant factor in the decay of magnetic field for the long evolution time of black widow systems.

  5. PULSE@Parkes: Pulsar Observing for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollow, Robert; Hobbs, G.; Champion, D.; Amy, S.; Carr, M.; Chapman, J.; Mulcahy, M.; Jenet, F.; Burke, S.; Alem, L.; Krumm-Heller, A.; van Straten, W.; McKinnon, D.; Danaia, L.

    2008-05-01

    The PULSE@Parkes (PULsar Student Exploration online at Parkes) project allows high school students to control the 64m Parkes radio telescope remotely via the Internet to observe pulsars. They then analyze their data and share their results with students in other schools and professional astronomers. The data they obtain is also used by professional astronomers for studies of pulsar glitches, timing noise, dispersion measure variations and the nulling phenomena. Student observations directly support ongoing science projects including the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array that hopes to make a direct detection of gravitational waves and timing observations carried out in support of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST. PULSE@Parkes fosters student interest and engagement in science by providing students an opportunity to use an iconic major national facility, experience a real observation run and interact with professional astronomers. The education research program embedded into the project seeks to determine the value, if any, of the observing experience and how students may best engage with the extensive online project materials. The project is a first stage in a long-term plan to develop effective and stimulating education activities that utilize the wealth of data that will be produced by the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) that will be completed early next decade. The project was inspired by the Arecibo Remote Command Center at University of Texas, Brownsville and is developing linkage between Australian and US students. Further international linkage with GLAST Outreach activities is also being explored. PULSE@Parkes is funded by CSIRO.

  6. On the pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Kadomsev, B B

    2010-01-01

    This book serves as a good introduction to the physics of pulsars by explaining the subject matter in simple terms which are understandable to both undergraduate physics students and also the general public. On the Pulsar links together ideas about physics, informatics and biology, and contains many original examples, problems and solutions. It starts with simple examples about the regular structures that are possible in strong magnetic fields and the author then suggests that special conditions on the pulsar can result in some forms of self-organization. It will also make a valuable teaching

  7. Binary and Millisecond Pulsars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan R. Lorimer

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge of binary and millisecond pulsars has greatly increased in recent years. This is largely due to the success of large-area surveys which have brought the known population of such systems in the Galactic disk to around 50. As well as being interesting as a population of astronomical sources, many pulsars turn out to be superb celestial clocks. In this review we summarise the main properties of binary and millisecond pulsars and highlight some of their applications to relativistic astrophysics.

  8. Early NICER Observations of Magnetars and Young Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nynka, Melania

    2018-01-01

    Neutron star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) is an X-ray telescope attached to the International Space Station (ISS). Launched in June 2017, it is designed to precisely measure the masses and radii of neutron stars (NS) and probe NS equations of state. But its precision timing capabilities and large effective area uniquely position NICER for the study of magnetars. The NICER Magnetar & Magnetosphere (M&M) science working group focuses on studying highly-magnetized neutron stars, a diverse program that includes magnetars, high-B pulsars, rotation powered pulsars, and isolated neutron stars. Our ongoing campaign has already observed targets such as 4U 0142+61, a magnetar in outburst with coincident NuSTAR and Swift observations, the radio rotation powered Vela pulsar PSR B0833-45, and a transient magnetar XTE J1810-197. I will discuss the goals of the M&M program, spectral and temporal results from the observed targets, and an overview of upcoming observations.

  9. Pulsar Emission Spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Gruzinov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Emission spectrum is calculated for a weak axisymmetric pulsar. Also calculated are the observed spectrum, efficiency, and the observed efficiency. The underlying flow of electrons and positrons turns out to be curiously intricate.

  10. Wide Band Artificial Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Zackary

    2017-01-01

    The Wide Band Artificial Pulsar (WBAP) is an instrument verification device designed and built by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virgina. The site currently operates the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument (GUPPI) and the Versatile Green Bank Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) digital backends for their radio telescopes. The commissioning and continued support for these sophisticated backends has demonstrated a need for a device capable of producing an accurate artificial pulsar signal. The WBAP is designed to provide a very close approximation to an actual pulsar signal. This presentation is intended to provide an overview of the current hardware and software implementations and to also share the current results from testing using the WBAP.

  11. Listening in on Baby - Monitoring the Youngest Known Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotthelf, Eric

    We have discovered a most remarkable young pulsar, PSR J1846-0258, in the core of a Crab-like pulsar wind nebula at the center of the bright shell-type SNR Kes 75. Based on its spin-down rate and X-ray spectrum, PSR J1846-0258 is likely the youngest known rotation-powered pulsar. Compared to the Crab pulsar, however, its period, spin-down rate, and X-ray conversion efficiency are each an order of magnitude greater, likely the result of its extreme magnetic field, above the quantum critical threshold. We propose to continue our monitoring campaign of PSR~J1846-0258 to measure the braking index, characterize its timing noise, and search for evidence of timing glitches. Furthermore, an X- ray ephemeris contemporal with GLAST is critical to detecting the pulsar at higher energies.

  12. Chandra Associates Pulsar and Historic Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    SAN DIEGO -- Scientists using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory have found new evidence that a pulsar in the constellation of Sagittarius was created when a massive star exploded, witnessed by Chinese astronomers in the year 386 AD. If confirmed, this will be only the second pulsar to be clearly associated with a historic event. These results were presented today by Victoria Kaspi and Mallory Roberts of McGill University at the American Astronomical Society meeting. Also participating in the research were Gautum Vasisht from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Eric Gotthelf from Columbia University, Michael Pivovaroff from Therma-Wave, Inc., and Nobuyuki Kawai from the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Japan. The scientists used Chandra to locate the pulsar exactly at the geometric center of the supernova remnant known as G11.2-0.3. This location provides very strong evidence that the pulsar, a neutron star that is rotating 14 times a second, was formed in the supernova of 386 AD, and therefore has an age of 1615 years. "Determining the true ages of astronomical objects is notoriously difficult, and for this reason, historical records of supernovas are of great importance,"said Kaspi."In roughly the past 2,000 years, fewer than 10 reports of probable supernovae have been archived mostly by Asian astronomers. Of those handful, the remnant of 1054 AD, the Crab Nebula, was until now the only pulsar whose birth could be associated with a historic event - and, hence, the only neutron star that has a firm age." Between mid-April and mid-May in the year 386 AD, a young "guest star", presumably a supernova, was recorded by Chinese observers in the direction of the sky now known as the constellation of Sagittarius. In the 1970s, radio astronomers discovered an expanding nebula of gas and high-energy particles, called G11.2-0.3, that is believed to be the remnant of that explosion. In 1997, a team of X-ray astronomers used Japan’s ASCA satellite to discover a pulsar

  13. Giant pulsar glitches in full general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourie, A.; Chamel, N.; Novak, J.; Oertel, M.

    2017-12-01

    We present recent numerical simulations of giant pulsar glitches, as observed in the emblematic Vela pulsar, based on a two-fluid model, including for the first time all general-relativistic effects and realistic equations of state. In particular, we focus on modelling the vortex-mediated transfer of angular momentum that takes place during the spin-up stage from the neutron superfluid to the charged particles through dissipative mutual friction forces. Taking general relativity into account does not only modify the structure of the star but also leads to a new coupling between the fluids arising from frame-dragging effects. As a consequence, general relativity can strongly affect the global dynamics of pulsar glitches : the errors on the value of the characteristic rise time incurred by using Newtonian gravity are thus found to be as large as ˜ 40 % for the models considered.

  14. Monitoring Baby - Listening in on the Youngest Known Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotthelf, Eric

    We have discovered a most remarkable young pulsar, PSR J1846-0258, in the core of a Crab-like pulsar wind nebula at the center of the bright shell-type supernova remnant Kes 75. Based on its spin-down rate and X- ray spectrum, PSR J1846-0258 is likely the youngest known rotation- powered pulsar. Compared to the Crab pulsar, however, its period, spin- down rate, and spin-down to X-ray luminosity conversion efficiency are each an order of magnitude greater, likely the result of its extreme magnetic field, above the quantum critical threshold. We propose to continue our monitoring campaign of PSR J1846-0258 to measure the braking index, characterize its timing noise, and search for evidence of glitches. This pulsar provides important insight into the evolution of the youngest NS-SNR systems.

  15. Pulsar precession: a nod is not as good as a wink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintzmann, H.

    1986-01-01

    The question of the reality of pulsar precession is reassessed and the relevant precession periods and amplitudes are reestimated. It is argued that the pulsar timing data provide evidence for the viewpoint that pulsars do indeed precess and that they turn off after some 10 4 precessional turns because they align their magnetic fields with their rotation axis due to viscous damping. Chances for an actual detection in the long known pulsars are small but PSR 1510-59 and some more recently dicovered young pulsars are promising candidates. (Author) [pt

  16. COBRA: a Bayesian approach to pulsar searching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentati, L.; Champion, D. J.; Kramer, M.; Barr, E.; Torne, P.

    2018-02-01

    We introduce COBRA, a GPU-accelerated Bayesian analysis package for performing pulsar searching, that uses candidates from traditional search techniques to set the prior used for the periodicity of the source, and performs a blind search in all remaining parameters. COBRA incorporates models for both isolated and accelerated systems, as well as both Keplerian and relativistic binaries, and exploits pulse phase information to combine search epochs coherently, over time, frequency or across multiple telescopes. We demonstrate the efficacy of our approach in a series of simulations that challenge typical search techniques, including highly aliased signals, and relativistic binary systems. In the most extreme case, we simulate an 8 h observation containing 24 orbits of a pulsar in a binary with a 30 M⊙ companion. Even in this scenario we show that we can build up from an initial low-significance candidate, to fully recovering the signal. We also apply the method to survey data of three pulsars from the globular cluster 47Tuc: PSRs J0024-7204D, J0023-7203J and J0024-7204R. This final pulsar is in a 1.6 h binary, the shortest of any pulsar in 47Tuc, and additionally shows significant scintillation. By allowing the amplitude of the source to vary as a function of time, however, we show that we are able to obtain optimal combinations of such noisy data. We also demonstrate the ability of COBRA to perform high-precision pulsar timing directly on the single pulse survey data, and obtain a 95 per cent upper limit on the eccentricity of PSR J0024-7204R of εb < 0.0007.

  17. Particle acceleration by pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arons, Jonathan.

    1980-06-01

    The evidence that pulsars accelerate relativistic particles is reviewed, with emphasis on the γ-ray observations. The current state of knowledge of acceleration in strong waves is summarized, with emphasis on the inability of consistent theories to accelerate very high energy particles without converting too much energy into high energy photons. The state of viable models for pair creation by pulsars is summarized, with the conclusion that pulsars very likely lose rotational energy in winds instead of in superluminous strong waves. The relation of the pair creation models to γ-ray observations and to soft X-ray observations of pulsars is outlined, with the conclusion that energetically viable models may exist, but none have yet yielded useful agreement with the extant data. Some paths for overcoming present problems are discussed. The relation of the favored models to cosmic rays is discussed. It is pointed out that the pairs made by the models may have observable consequences for observation of positrons in the local cosmic ray flux and for observations of the 511 keV line from the interstellar medium. Another new point is that asymmetry of plasma supply from at least one of the models may qualitatively explain the gross asymmetry of the X-ray emission from the Crab nebula. It is also argued that acceleration of cosmic ray nuclei by pulsars, while energetically possible, can occur only at the boundary of the bubbles blown by the pulsars, if the cosmic ray composition is to be anything like that of the known source spectrum

  18. Application of X-Ray Pulsar Navigation: A Characterization of the Earth Orbit Trade Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wayne Hong

    2016-01-01

    The potential for pulsars as a navigation source has been studied since their discovery in 1967. X-ray pulsar navigation (XNAV) is a celestial navigation system that uses the consistent timing nature of x-ray photons from millisecond pulsars (MSP) to perform space navigation. By comparing the detected arrival of x-ray photons to a reference database of expected pulsar light-curve timing models, one can infer a range and range rate measurement based on light time delay. Much of the challenge of XNAV comes from the faint signal, availability, and distant nature of pulsars. This is a study of potential pulsar XNAV measurements to measure extended Kalman filter (EKF) tracking performance with a wide trade space of bounded Earth orbits, using a simulation of existing x-ray detector space hardware. An example of an x-ray detector for XNAV is the NASA Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation (SEXTANT) mission, a technology demonstration of XNAV set to perform on the International Space Station (ISS) in late 2016early 2017. XNAV hardware implementation is driven by trajectory and environmental influences which add noise to the x-ray pulse signal. In a closed Earth orbit, the radiation environment can exponentially increase the signal noise from x-ray pulsar sources, decreasing the quality and frequency of measurements. The SEXTANT mission in particular improves on the signal to noise ratio by focusing an array of 56 x-ray silicon drift detectors at one pulsar target at a time. This reduces timing glitches and other timing noise contributions from ambient x-ray sources to within a 100 nanosecond resolution. This study also considers the SEXTANT scheduling challenges inherent in a single target observation. Finally, as the navigation sources are now relatively inertial targets, XNAV measurements are also subject to periods of occultation from various celestial bodies. This study focuses on the characterization of these drivers in closed Earth orbits and is not a

  19. Pulsar Coherent De-dispersion Experiment at Urumqi Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Yong; Ali, Esamdin; Zhang, Jin

    2006-12-01

    A Pulsar coherent de-dispersion experiment has been carried out using the 25-m Nanshan radio telescope at Urumqi Observatory. It uses a dual polarization receiver operating at 18 cm and a VLBI back-end: Mark5A, the minimum sampling time is 5 ns. The data processing system is based on a C program on Linux and a 4-node Beowulf cluster. A high quality data acquisition system and a cluster with more processors are needed to build an on-line pulsar coherent de-dispersion system in future. The main directions for the instrument are studies of pulsar timing, scintillation monitoring, etc.

  20. Pulsar population synthesis using palfa detections and pulsar search collaboratory discoveries including a wide DNS system and a nearby MSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiggum, Joseph Karl

    Using the ensemble of detections from pulsar surveys, we can learn about the sizes and characteristics of underlying populations. In this thesis, I analyze results from the Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (PALFA) precursor and Green Bank Telescope 350 MHz Drift Scan surveys; I examine survey sensitivity to see how detections can inform pulsar population models, I look at new ways of including young scientists -- high school students -- in the discovery process and I present timing solutions for students' discoveries (including a nearby millisecond pulsar and a pulsar in a wide-orbit double neutron star system). The PALFA survey is on-going and uses the ALFA 7-beam receiver at 1400 MHz to search both inner and outer Galactic sectors visible from Arecibo (32° ?£? 77° and 168° ?£? 214°) close to the Galactic plane (|b| ? 5°) for pulsars. The PALFA precursor survey observed a subset of this region, (|b| ? 1°) and detected 45 pulsars, including one known millisecond pulsar (MSP) and 11 previously unknown, long-period (normal) pulsars. I assess the sensitivity of the PALFA precursor survey and use the number of normal pulsar and MSP detections to infer the size of each underlying Galactic population. Based on 44 normal pulsar detections and one MSP, we constrain each population size to 107,000+36,000-25,000 and 15,000 +85,000-6,000 respectively with 95% confidence. Based on these constraints, we predict yields for the full PALFA survey and find a deficiency in normal pulsar detections, possibly due to radio frequency interference and/or scintillation, neither of which are currently accounted for in population simulations. The GBT 350 MHz Drift Scan survey collected data in the summer of 2007 while the GBT was stationary, undergoing track replacement. Results discussed here come from ~20% of the survey data, which were processed and donated to the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC). The PSC is a joint outreach program between WVU and NRAO, involving high school

  1. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, R.; Heatherly, S.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Boyles, J. R.; Wilson, M.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lynch, R.; Ransom, S.

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) (NSF #0737641) is a joint project between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and West Virginia University designed to interest high school students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics related career paths by helping them to conduct authentic scientific research. The 3 year PSC program,…

  2. Probing the properties of the pulsar wind via studying the dispersive effects in the pulses from the pulsar companion in a double neutron-star binary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shu-Xu; Cheng, K.-S.

    2017-12-01

    The velocity and density distribution of e± in the pulsar wind are crucial distinction among magnetosphere models, and contain key parameters determining the high-energy emission of pulsar binaries. In this work, a direct method is proposed, which might probe the properties of the wind from one pulsar in a double-pulsar binary. When the radio signals from the first-formed pulsar travel through the relativistic e± flow in the pulsar wind from the younger companion, the components of different radio frequencies will be dispersed. It will introduce an additional frequency-dependent time-of-arrival delay of pulses, which is function of the orbital phase. In this paper, we formulate the above-mentioned dispersive delay with the properties of the pulsar wind. As examples, we apply the formula to the double-pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B and the pulsar-neutron star binary PSR B1913+16. For PSR J0737-3039A/B, the time delay in 300 MHz is ≲ 10 μ s-1 near the superior conjunction, under the optimal pulsar wind parameters, which is approximately half of the current timing accuracy. For PSR B1913+16, with the assumption that the neutron-star companion has a typical spin-down luminosity of 1033 erg s-1, the time delay is as large as 10 - 20 μ s-1 in 300 MHz. The best timing precision of this pulsar is ∼ 5 μ s-1 in 1400 MHz. Therefore, it is possible that we can find this signal in archival data. Otherwise, we can set an upper limit on the spin-down luminosity. Similar analysis can be applied to other 11 known pulsar-neutron star binaries.

  3. Gravitational waves from pulsars with measured braking index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Jose C.N. de; Coelho, Jaziel G.; Costa, Cesar A. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Divisao de Astrofisica, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    We study the putative emission of gravitational waves (GWs) in particular for pulsars with measured braking index. We show that the appropriate combination of both GW emission and magnetic dipole brakes can naturally explain the measured braking index, when the surface magnetic field and the angle between the magnetic dipole and rotation axes are time dependent. Then we discuss the detectability of these very pulsars by aLIGO and the Einstein Telescope. We call attention to the realistic possibility that aLIGO can detect the GWs generated by at least some of these pulsars, such as Vela, for example. (orig.)

  4. International Work-Conference on Time Series

    CERN Document Server

    Pomares, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents selected peer-reviewed contributions from The International Work-Conference on Time Series, ITISE 2015, held in Granada, Spain, July 1-3, 2015. It discusses topics in time series analysis and forecasting, advanced methods and online learning in time series, high-dimensional and complex/big data time series as well as forecasting in real problems. The International Work-Conferences on Time Series (ITISE) provide a forum for scientists, engineers, educators and students to discuss the latest ideas and implementations in the foundations, theory, models and applications in the field of time series analysis and forecasting. It focuses on interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research encompassing the disciplines of computer science, mathematics, statistics and econometrics.

  5. Gigahertz-peaked spectra pulsars in Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, R.; RoŻko, K.; Kijak, J.; Lewandowski, W.

    2018-04-01

    We have carried out a detailed study of the spectral nature of six pulsars surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). The pulsar flux density was estimated using the interferometric imaging technique of the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at three frequencies 325, 610, and 1280 MHz. The spectra showed a turnover around gigahertz frequency in four out of six pulsars. It has been suggested that the gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) in pulsars arises due to thermal absorption of the pulsar emission in surrounding medium like PWNe, H II regions, supernova remnants, etc. The relatively high incidence of GPS behaviour in pulsars surrounded by PWNe imparts further credence to this view. The pulsar J1747-2958 associated with the well-known Mouse nebula was also observed in our sample and exhibited GPS behaviour. The pulsar was detected as a point source in the high-resolution images. However, the pulsed emission was not seen in the phased-array mode. It is possible that the pulsed emission was affected by extreme scattering causing considerable smearing of the emission at low radio frequencies. The GPS spectra were modelled using the thermal free-free absorption and the estimated absorber properties were largely consistent with PWNe. The spatial resolution of the images made it unlikely that the point source associated with J1747-2958 was the compact head of the PWNe, but the synchrotron self-absorption seen in such sources was a better fit to the estimated spectral shape.

  6. Effects of phase transition induced density fluctuations on pulsar dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Bagchi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We show that density fluctuations during phase transitions in pulsar cores may have non-trivial effects on pulsar timings, and may also possibly account for glitches and anti-glitches. These density fluctuations invariably lead to non-zero off-diagonal components of the moment of inertia, leading to transient wobbling of star. Thus, accurate measurements of pulsar timing and intensity modulations (from wobbling may be used to identify the specific pattern of density fluctuations, hence the particular phase transition, occurring inside the pulsar core. Changes in quadrupole moment from rapidly evolving density fluctuations during the transition, with very short time scales, may provide a new source for gravitational waves.

  7. Pulsed Gamma-Ray Emission From Short-Period Pulsars: Predicted Gamma-Ray Pulsar PSR1951+32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, K. S.; Ding, K. Y. Winnis

    1995-03-01

    We studied the gamma-ray emission mechanisms from pulsars with period, P, between 4.6 times 10(-2) B12(2/5) s and 0.17 B12(5/12) sin (1/6) theta alpha (-5/4) s in terms of outermagnetospheric gap model. We found that the spectra of all known gamma -ray pulsars can be fitted by two free parameters, namely, alpha r_L, the mean distance to the outergap, and sin theta , the mean pitch angle of the secondary e(+/-) pairs. Gamma-rays from those pulsars with P 432, 724) which is confirmed by the recent GRO result.

  8. International Work-Conference on Time Series

    CERN Document Server

    Pomares, Héctor; Valenzuela, Olga

    2017-01-01

    This volume of selected and peer-reviewed contributions on the latest developments in time series analysis and forecasting updates the reader on topics such as analysis of irregularly sampled time series, multi-scale analysis of univariate and multivariate time series, linear and non-linear time series models, advanced time series forecasting methods, applications in time series analysis and forecasting, advanced methods and online learning in time series and high-dimensional and complex/big data time series. The contributions were originally presented at the International Work-Conference on Time Series, ITISE 2016, held in Granada, Spain, June 27-29, 2016. The series of ITISE conferences provides a forum for scientists, engineers, educators and students to discuss the latest ideas and implementations in the foundations, theory, models and applications in the field of time series analysis and forecasting.  It focuses on interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary rese arch encompassing the disciplines of comput...

  9. X-ray pulsar rush in 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanishi, K.; Tsujimoto, K.; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Yokogawa, J.; Koyama, K.

    1999-01-01

    We present recent remarkable topics about discoveries of X-ray pulsars. 1. Pulsations from two Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters: These pulsars have enormously strong magnetic field (B ∼ 10 15 G), thus these are called as 'magnetar', new type of X-ray pulsars. 2. New Crab-like pulsars: These discoveries lead to suggesting universality of Crab-like pulsars. 3. An X-ray bursting millisecond pulsar: This is strong evidence for the recycle theory of generating radio millisecond pulsars. 4. X-ray pulsar rush in the SMC: This indicates the younger star formation history in the SMC. (author)

  10. An algorithm for determining the rotation count of pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Paulo C. C.; Ridolfi, Alessandro

    2018-02-01

    We present here a simple, systematic method for determining the correct global rotation count of a radio pulsar; an essential step for the derivation of an accurate phase-coherent ephemeris. We then build on this method by developing a new algorithm for determining the global rotational count for pulsars with sparse timing data sets. This makes it possible to obtain phase-coherent ephemerides for pulsars for which this has been impossible until now. As an example, we do this for PSR J0024-7205aa, an extremely faint MSP recently discovered in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. This algorithm has the potential to significantly reduce the number of observations and the amount of telescope time needed to follow up on new pulsar discoveries.

  11. Could the low-braking-index pulsar PSR J1734-3333 evolve into a magnetar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Z.-F.; Wang, N.; Shan, H.

    2017-12-01

    The low braking-index pulsar PSR J1734$-$3333 could be born with superhigh internal magnetic fields $B_{\\rm in}\\sim10^{15}-10^{16}$ G, and undergo a supercritical accretion soon after its formation in a supernova explosion. The buried multipole magnetic fields will merger into a dipole magnetic field. Since the magnetic flow transfers from the core to the crust of the pulsar, its surface dipole field grows quickly at a power-law form assumed until it saturates at the level of internal dipole field. The increase in surface dipole magnetic field results in the observed low braking index of $n=0.9(2)$. Keeping an average field growth index $\\varepsilon=1.34(6)$, this pulsar will become a magnetar with surface dipole magnetic field at the equator $B_{\\rm d}\\sim 2.6(1)\\times 10^{14}$\\,G and $\\sim 5.3(2)\\times 10^{14}$\\,G after next 50\\,kyrs and 100\\,kys, respectively.

  12. Pulsar astrometry by using VLBI (PSR0329 between Kashima 26mPhi and Usuda 64mPhi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, S.; Kiuchi, H.; Hanado, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Imae, M.; Fujisawa, K.; Hirabayashi, H.; Kobayashi, H.

    1993-01-01

    Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) carried out a VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometer) experiment of the Pulsar 0329 plus 54 on November in 1992 between Kashima 26mPhi and Usuda 64mPhi. We got a correlation for it by using K-3 VLBI correlator which was developed by CRL. Though we observed a slow pulsar this time, we are going to make millisecond pulsar experiments by making good use of this result and by using K-4 correlator which is under developing in CRL. Its result will give us precise positions and proper motions of pulsars which are useful for obtaining precise pulsar timing.

  13. Charge conjugation and internal space time symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavsic, M.; Recami, E.

    1982-01-01

    The relativistic framework in which fundamental particles are regarded as extended objects is adopted. Then it is shown than the geometrical operation which reflects the internal space time particle is equivalent to the operation C which inverts the sign of all its additive charges

  14. Possible Evolution of the Pulsar Braking Index from Larger than Three to About One

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, H. [School of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Guangzhou University, 510006 Guangzhou (China); Kou, F. F., E-mail: htong_2005@163.com [Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830011 (China)

    2017-03-10

    The coupled evolution of pulsar rotation and inclination angle in the wind braking model is calculated. The oblique pulsar tends to align. The pulsar alignment affects its spin-down behavior. As a pulsar evolves from the magneto-dipole radiation dominated case to the particle wind dominated case, the braking index first increases and then decreases. In the early time, the braking index may be larger than three. During the following long time, the braking index is always smaller than three. The minimum braking index is about one. This can explain the existence of a high braking index larger than three and a low braking index simultaneously. The pulsar braking index is expected to evolve from larger than three to about one. The general trend is for the pulsar braking index to evolve from the Crab-like case to the Vela-like case.

  15. Monitoring Baby - Listening in on the Youngest Known Pulsar (XTEAO11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotthelf, Eric

    We have discovered a most remarkable young pulsar, PSR~J1846-0258, in the core of a Crab-like pulsar wind nebula at the center of the bright shell-type supernova remnant Kes~75. Based on its spin-down rate and X- ray spectrum, PSR~J1846-0258 is likely the youngest known rotation- powered pulsar. Compared to the Crab pulsar, however, its period, spin- down rate, and spin-down to X-ray luminosity conversion efficiency are each an order of magnitude greater, likely the result of its extreme magnetic field, above the quantum critical threshold. We propose to continue our monitoring campaign to measure the pulsar's braking index, characterize its timing noise, and search for evidence of timing glitches. This pulsar provides important insight into the evolution of the youngest NS-SNR systems.

  16. Late-Time Evolution of Composite Supernova Remnants: Deep Chandra Observations and Hydrodynamical Modeling of a Crushed Pulsar Wind Nebula in SNR G327.1-1.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Kolb, Christopher; Blondin, John; Hughes, John P.; Bucciantini, Niccolo

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the evolution of composite supernova remnants (SNRs) and the eventual fate of relativistic particles injected by their pulsars, we present a multifaceted investigation of the interaction between a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and its host SNR G327.1-1.1. Our 350 ks Chandra X-ray observations of SNR G327.1-1.1 reveal a highly complex morphology; a cometary structure resembling a bow shock, prong-like features extending into large arcs in the SNR interior, and thermal emission from the SNR shell. Spectral analysis of the non-thermal emission offers clues about the origin of the PWN structures, while enhanced abundances in the PWN region provide evidence for mixing of supernova ejecta with PWN material. The overall morphology and spectral properties of the SNR suggest that the PWN has undergone an asymmetric interaction with the SNR reverse shock(RS) that can occur as a result of a density gradient in the ambient medium and or a moving pulsar that displaces the PWN from the center of the remnant. We present hydrodynamical simulations of G327.1-1.1 that show that its morphology and evolution can be described by a approx. 17,000 yr old composite SNR that expanded into a density gradient with an orientation perpendicular to the pulsar's motion. We also show that the RSPWN interaction scenario can reproduce the broadband spectrum of the PWN from radio to gamma-ray wavelengths. The analysis and modeling presented in this work have important implications for our general understanding of the structure and evolution of composite SNRs.

  17. An Eccentric Binary Millisecond Pulsar in the Galactic Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, David J.; Ransom, Scott M.; Lazarus, Patrick; Camilo, Fernando; Bassa, Cess; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Nice, David J.; Freire, Paulo C. C.; Stairs, Ingrid H.; vanLeeuwen, Joeri; hide

    2008-01-01

    Binary pulsar systems are superb probes of stellar and binary evolution and the physics of extreme environments. In a survey with the Arecibo telescope, we have found PSR J1903+0327, a radio pulsar with a rotational period of 2.15 milliseconds in a highly eccentric (e = 0.44) 95-day orbit around a solar mass (M.) companion. Infrared observations identify a possible main-sequence companion star. Conventional binary stellar evolution models predict neither large orbital eccentricities nor main-sequence companions around millisecond pulsars. Alternative formation scenarios involve recycling a neutron star in a globular cluster, then ejecting it into the Galactic disk, or membership in a hierarchical triple system. A relativistic analysis of timing observations of the pulsar finds its mass to be 1.74 +/- 0.04 Solar Mass, an unusually high value.

  18. An eccentric binary millisecond pulsar in the galactic plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, David J; Ransom, Scott M; Lazarus, Patrick; Camilo, Fernando; Bassa, Cees; Kaspi, Victoria M; Nice, David J; Freire, Paulo C C; Stairs, Ingrid H; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Stappers, Ben W; Cordes, James M; Hessels, Jason W T; Lorimer, Duncan R; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Backer, Don C; Bhat, N D Ramesh; Chatterjee, Shami; Cognard, Ismaël; Deneva, Julia S; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Gaensler, Bryan M; Han, Jinlin; Jenet, Fredrick A; Kasian, Laura; Kondratiev, Vlad I; Kramer, Michael; Lazio, Joseph; McLaughlin, Maura A; Venkataraman, Arun; Vlemmings, Wouter

    2008-06-06

    Binary pulsar systems are superb probes of stellar and binary evolution and the physics of extreme environments. In a survey with the Arecibo telescope, we have found PSR J1903+0327, a radio pulsar with a rotational period of 2.15 milliseconds in a highly eccentric (e = 0.44) 95-day orbit around a solar mass (M(middle dot in circle)) companion. Infrared observations identify a possible main-sequence companion star. Conventional binary stellar evolution models predict neither large orbital eccentricities nor main-sequence companions around millisecond pulsars. Alternative formation scenarios involve recycling a neutron star in a globular cluster, then ejecting it into the Galactic disk, or membership in a hierarchical triple system. A relativistic analysis of timing observations of the pulsar finds its mass to be 1.74 +/- 0.04 M solar symbol, an unusually high value.

  19. Gravitational waves from pulsars in the context of magnetic ellipticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Jose C.N. de; Coelho, Jaziel G.; Costa, Cesar A. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Divisao de Astrofisica, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    In one of our previous articles we have considered the role of a time dependent magnetic ellipticity on the pulsars' braking indices and on the putative gravitational waves these objects can emit. Since only nine of more than 2000 known pulsars have accurately measured braking indices, it is of interest to extend this study to all known pulsars, in particular as regards gravitational wave generation. To do so, as shown in our previous article, we need to know some pulsars' observable quantities such as: periods and their time derivatives, and estimated distances to the Earth. Moreover, we also need to know the pulsars' masses and radii, for which we are adopting current fiducial values. Our results show that the gravitational wave amplitude is at best h ∝ 10{sup -28}. This leads to a pessimistic prospect for the detection of gravitational waves generated by these pulsars, even for Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, and the planned Einstein Telescope, if the ellipticity has a magnetic origin. (orig.)

  20. Gravitational waves from pulsars in the context of magnetic ellipticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Jose C.N. de; Coelho, Jaziel G.; Costa, Cesar A.

    2017-01-01

    In one of our previous articles we have considered the role of a time dependent magnetic ellipticity on the pulsars' braking indices and on the putative gravitational waves these objects can emit. Since only nine of more than 2000 known pulsars have accurately measured braking indices, it is of interest to extend this study to all known pulsars, in particular as regards gravitational wave generation. To do so, as shown in our previous article, we need to know some pulsars' observable quantities such as: periods and their time derivatives, and estimated distances to the Earth. Moreover, we also need to know the pulsars' masses and radii, for which we are adopting current fiducial values. Our results show that the gravitational wave amplitude is at best h ∝ 10 -28 . This leads to a pessimistic prospect for the detection of gravitational waves generated by these pulsars, even for Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, and the planned Einstein Telescope, if the ellipticity has a magnetic origin. (orig.)

  1. The LOFAR Known Pulsar Data Pipeline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexov, A.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Mol, J.D.; Stappers, B.; van Leeuwen, J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Transient radio phenomena and pulsars are one of six LOFAR Key Science Projects (KSPs). As part of the Transients KSP, the Pulsar Working Group (PWG) has been developing the LOFAR Pulsar Data Pipelines to both study known pulsars as well as search for new ones. The pipelines are being

  2. Inferring Binary Pulsar Population Statistics Using the NANOGrav 11 YearData Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetzler, Steven; Stovall, Kevin; Demorest, Paul

    2018-01-01

    The North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) monitors a set of millisecond pulsars to search for the effects of gravitational waves on pulsar signals. The NANOGrav 11 Year Data Set offers a unique opportunity to explore the statistics of binary pulsar populations. Containing the timing solutions for 31 millisecond pulsars in binary orbits with white dwarf companions, this data set provides us with access to a large number of binary pulsars which have been observed with a unique level of consistency over multi-year time scales. We have used this data set to examine the binary pulsar orbital inclination angle distribution to see if the results are consistent with the standard assumption that the angles are uniformly distributed over the cosine of the inclination. This assumption could be violated if, for example, coupling between a pulsar's spin and its binary orbit causes preferential beaming in certain directions relative to the orbital plane. We will present multiple approaches and statistical tests that we have used to check this assumption. We will discuss our results for each when applied to the binary pulsars in the NANOGrav 11 Year Data Set. While only applied to orbital inclinations, the statistical analysis tools we develop are quite powerful and can be used to infer and test the population statistics of any of the parameters present in a pulsar's timing solution.

  3. Population Studies of Radio and Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K; Gonthier, Peter; Coltisor, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Rotation-powered pulsars are one of the most promising candidates for at least some of the 40-50 EGRET unidentified gamma-ray sources that lie near the Galactic plane. Since the end of the EGRO mission, the more sensitive Parkes Multibeam radio survey has detected mere than two dozen new radio pulsars in or near unidentified EGRET sources, many of which are young and energetic. These results raise an important question about the nature of radio quiescence in gamma-ray pulsars: is the non-detection of radio emission a matter of beaming or of sensitivity? The answer is very dependent on the geometry of the radio and gamma-ray beams. We present results of a population synthesis of pulsars in the Galaxy, including for the first time the full geometry of the radio and gamma-ray beams. We use a recent empirically derived model of the radio emission and luminosity, and a gamma-ray emission geometry and luminosity derived theoretically from pair cascades in the polar slot gap. The simulation includes characteristics of eight radio surveys of the Princeton catalog plus the Parkes MB survey. Our results indicate that EGRET was capable of detecting several dozen pulsars as point sources, with the ratio of radio-loud to radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars increasing significantly to about ten to one when the Parkes Survey is included. Polar cap models thus predict that many of the unidentified EGRET sources could be radio-loud gamma- ray pulsars, previously undetected as radio pulsars due to distance, large dispersion and lack of sensitivity. If true, this would make gamma-ray telescopes a potentially more sensitive tool for detecting distant young neutron stars in the Galactic plane.

  4. XMM-Newton Observations of Four Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.

    2005-01-01

    I present an analysis of the XMM-Newton observations of four millisecond pulsars, J0437-4715, J2124-3358, J1024-0719, and J0034-0534. The new data provide strong evidence of thermal emission in the X-ray flux detected from the first three objects. This thermal component is best interpreted as radiation from pulsar polar caps covered with a nonmagnetic hydrogen atmosphere. A nonthermal power-law component, dominating at energies E greater than or equal to 3 keV, can also be present in the detected X-ray emission. For PSR J0437-4715, the timing analysis reveals that the shape and pulsed fraction of the pulsar light curves are energy dependent. This, together with the results obtained from the phase-resolved spectroscopy, supports the two-component (thermal plus nonthermal) interpretation of the pulsar's X-ray radiation. Highly significant pulsations have been found in the X-ray flux of PSRs 52124-3358 and 51024-0719. For PSR 50034-0534, a possible X-ray counterpart of the radio pulsar has been suggested. The inferred properties of the detected thermal emission are compared with predictions of radio pulsar models.

  5. Be/X-Ray Pulsar Binary Science with LOFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2011-01-01

    Accretion disks are ubiquitous in astronomical sources. Accretion powered pulsars are a good test bed for accretion disk physics, because unlike for other objects, the spin of the neutron star is directly observable allowing us to see the effects of angular momentum transfer onto the pulsar. The combination of a sensitive wide-field monitor and the large area detector on LOFT will enable new detailed studies of accretion powered pulsars which I will review. RXTE observations have shown an unusually high number of Be/X-ray pulsar binaries in the SMC. Unlike binaries in the Milky Way, these systems are all at the same distance, allowing detailed population studies using the sensitive LOFT WFM, potentially providing connections to star formation episodes. For Galactic accreting pulsar systems, LOFT will allow measurement of spectral variations within individual pulses, mapping the accretion column in detail for the first time. LOFT will also provide better constraints on magnetic fields in accreting pulsars, allowing measurements of cyclotron features, observations of transitions into the centrifugal inhibition regime, and monitoring of spin-up rate vs flux correlations. Coordinated multi-wavelength observations are crucial to extracting the best science from LOFT from these and numerous other objects.

  6. Pair plasma in pulsar magnetospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asseo, Estelle

    2003-01-01

    The main features of radiation received from pulsars imply that they are neutron stars which contain an extremely intense magnetic field and emit coherently in the radio domain. Most recent studies attribute the origin of the coherence to plasma instabilities arising in pulsar magnetospheres; they mainly concern the linear, or the nonlinear, character of the involved unstable waves. We briefly introduce radio pulsars and specify physical conditions in pulsar emission regions: geometrical properties, magnetic field, pair creation processes and repartition of relativistic charged particles. We point to the main ingredients of the linear theory, extensively explored since the 1970s: (i) a dispersion relation specific to the pulsar case; (ii) the characteristics of the waves able to propagate in relativistic pulsar plasmas; (iii) the different ways in which a two-humped distribution of particles may arise in a pulsar magnetosphere and favour the development of a two-stream instability. We sum up recent improvements of the linear theory: (i) the determination of a 'coupling function' responsible for high values of the wave field components and electromagnetic energy available; (ii) the obtention of new dispersion relations for actually anisotropic pulsar plasmas with relativistic motions and temperatures; (iii) the interaction between a plasma and a beam, both with relativistic motions and temperatures; (iv) the interpretation of observed 'coral' and 'conal' features, associated with the presence of boundaries and curved magnetic field lines in the emission region; (v) the detailed topology of the magnetic field in the different parts of the emission region and its relation to models recently proposed to interpret drifting subpulses observed from PSR 0943+10, showing 20 sub-beams of emission. We relate the nonlinear evolution of the two-stream instability and development of strong turbulence in relativistic pulsar plasmas to the emergence of relativistic solitons, able

  7. Einstein@Home Finds an Elusive Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    Since the release of the second Fermi-LAT catalog in 2012, astronomers have been hunting for 3FGL J1906.6+0720, a gamma-ray source whose association couldn't be identified. Now, personal-computer time volunteered through the Einstein@Home project has resulted in the discovery of a pulsar that has been hiding from observers for years. A Blind Search: Identifying sources detected by Fermi-LAT can be tricky: the instrument's sky resolution is limited, so the position of the source can be hard to pinpoint. The gamma-ray source 3FGL J1906.6+0720 appeared in both the second and third Fermi-LAT source catalogs, but even after years of searching, no associated radio or X-ray source had been found. A team of researchers, led by Colin Clark of the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, suspected that the source might be a gamma-ray pulsar. To confirm this, however, they needed to detect pulsed emission — something inherently difficult given the low photon count and the uncertain position of the source. The team conducted a blind search for pulsations coming from the general direction of the gamma-ray source. Two things were needed for this search: clever data analysis and a lot of computing power. The data analysis algorithm was designed to be adaptive: it searched a 4-dimensional parameter space that included a safety margin, allowing the algorithm to wander if the source was at the edge of the parameter space. The computing power was contributed by tens of thousands of personal computers volunteered by participants in the Einstein@Home project, making much shorter work out of a search that would have required dozens of years on a single laptop. The sky region around the newly discovered pulsar. The dotted ellipse shows the 3FGL catalog 95% confidence region for the source. The data analysis algorithm was designed to search an area 50% larger (given by the dashed ellipse), but it was allowed to “walk away” within the gray shaded region if the source seemed to

  8. CU Virginis - The First Stellar Pulsar

    OpenAIRE

    Kellett, Barry J.; Graffagnino, Vito; Bingham, Robert; Muxlow, Tom W. B.; Gunn, Alastair G.

    2007-01-01

    CU Virginis is one of the brightest radio emitting members of the magnetic chemically peculiar (MCP) stars and also one of the fastest rotating. We have now discovered that CU Vir is unique among stellar radio sources in generating a persistent, highly collimated, beam of coherent, 100% polarised, radiation from one of its magnetic poles that sweeps across the Earth every time the star rotates. This makes the star strikingly similar to a pulsar. This similarity is further strengthened by the ...

  9. Pulsar Bursts Coming From Beachball-Sized Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    In a major breakthrough for understanding what one of them calls "the most exotic environment in the Universe," a team of astronomers has discovered that powerful radio bursts in pulsars are generated by structures as small as a beach ball. VLA Image of Crab Nebula VLA Image of Crab Nebula (Click on Image for Larger Version) Pulsar Diagram Diagram of a Pulsar (Click on Image for Larger Version) "These are by far the smallest objects ever detected outside our solar system," said Tim Hankins, leader of the research team, which studied the pulsar at the center of the Crab Nebula, more than 6,000 light-years from Earth. "The small size of these regions is inconsistent with all but one proposed theory for how the radio emission is generated," he added. The other members of the team are Jeff Kern, James Weatherall and Jean Eilek. Hankins was a visiting scientist at Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico at the time the pulsar observations were made. He and Eilek are professors at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (New Mexico Tech) in Socorro, NM. Kern is a graduate student at NM Tech and a predoctoral fellow at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro. Weatherall is an adjunct professor at NM Tech, currently working at the Federal Aviation Administration. The astronomers reported their discovery in the March 13 edition of the scientific journal Nature. Pulsars are superdense neutron stars, the remnants of massive stars that exploded as supernovae. Pulsars emit powerful beams of radio waves and light. As the neutron star spins, the beam sweeps through space like the beam of a lighthouse. When such a beam sweeps across the Earth, astronomers see a pulse from the pulsar. The Crab pulsar spins some 33 times every second. British radio astronomers discovered pulsars in 1967, one receiving the Nobel Prize for the discovery. In the years since, the method by which pulsars produce their powerful beams of electromagnetic radiation has remained a

  10. Coherent radiation from pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, J.L. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Interaction between a relativistic electrom stream and a plasma under conditions believed to exist in pulsar magnetospheres is shown to result in the simultaneous emission of coherent curvature radiation at radio wavelengths and incoherent curvature radiation at X-ray wavelengths from the same spatial volume. It is found that such a stream can propagate through a plasma parallel to a very strong magnetic field only if its length is less than a critical length L/sub asterisk/ic. Charge induced in the plasma by the stream co-moves with the stream and has the same limitation in longitudinal extent. The resultant charge bunching is sufficient to cause the relatively low energy plasma particles to radiate at radio wavelengths coherently while the relatively high energy stream particles radiate at X-ray wavelengths incoherently as the stream-plasma system moves along curved magnetic field lines. The effective number of coherently radiating particles per bunch is estimated to be approx.10 14 --10 15 for a tupical pulsar

  11. Modelling pulsar wind nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    In view of the current and forthcoming observational data on pulsar wind nebulae, this book offers an assessment of the theoretical state of the art of modelling them. The expert authors also review the observational status of the field and provide an outlook for future developments. During the last few years, significant progress on the study of pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) has been attained both from a theoretical and an observational perspective, perhaps focusing on the closest, more energetic, and best studied nebula: the Crab, which appears in the cover. Now, the number of TeV detected PWNe is similar to the number of characterized nebulae observed at other frequencies over decades of observations. And in just a few years, the Cherenkov Telescope Array will increase this number to several hundreds, actually providing an essentially complete account of TeV emitting PWNe in the Galaxy. At the other end of the multi-frequency spectrum, the SKA and its pathfinder instruments, will reveal thousands of new pulsa...

  12. Hitting the Pulsar Jackpot in Terzan 5 with the GBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, S. M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Stairs, I. H.; Freire, P. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Camilo, F.; Kaplan, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    We report the discovery of at least 17 new pulsars in the rich globular cluster Terzan 5 using the GBT at 2 GHz. This cluster, located near the galactic center, has long been suspected of harboring many millisecond pulsars (MSPs) due both to its large predicted stellar interaction rate and the steep-spectrum radio emission observed in its core. However, earlier pulsar searches using the Parkes radio-telescope had only uncovered 3 pulsars, due primarily to the deleterious effects of the ISM towards the cluster. Our single 6-hr observation of Terzan 5 taken in July 2004, resulted in 14 new millisecond and/or binary pulsars, while follow-up observations provided (at least) 3 others. These discoveries imply that the 20+ known pulsars in the cluster are but the tip of the iceberg, and in fact much searching remains to be done with our current data. These discoveries confirm that Terzan 5 is one of the largest producers of MSPs among the Galactic globular clusters. At least 9 of the new pulsars are members of binary systems. There are two or more eclipsing systems, the 3rd and 4th fastest known rotators, a rare long orbital period (Porb ˜60 days) binary, and two highly eccentric binaries. Timing of these latter systems over the next year will provide their total masses and may (after several years) allow us to separate out the pulsar and companion masses. Two or three of the binaries may have main sequence companions, implying they were formed during exchange encounters after the MSPs were recycled and making them amenable to detection in the near-IR. Timing observations of the ensemble of pulsars will allow us to probe the mass-to-light ratio of the cluster core (and provide evidence for or against a black hole residing there), the mass distribution of the cluster as projected on the sky, and other aspects of globular cluster dynamics. In addition, extended monitoring may show that one or more of the pulsars are members of long-period binary systems.

  13. X-ray pulsars in nearby irregular galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun

    2018-01-01

    The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Irregular Galaxy IC 10 are valuable laboratories to study the physical, temporal and statistical properties of the X-ray pulsar population with multi-satellite observations, in order to probe fundamental physics. The known distance of these galaxies can help us easily categorize the luminosity of the pulsars and their age difference can be helpful for for studying the origin and evolution of compact objects. Therefore, a complete archive of 116 XMM-Newton PN, 151 Chandra (Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer) ACIS, and 952 RXTE PCA observations for the pulsars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) were collected and analyzed, along with 42 XMM-Newton and 30 Chandra observations for the Large Magellanic Cloud, spanning 1997-2014. From a sample of 67 SMC pulsars we generate a suite of products for each pulsar detection: spin period, flux, event list, high time-resolution light-curve, pulse-profile, periodogram, and X-ray spectrum. Combining all three satellites, I generated complete histories of the spin periods, pulse amplitudes, pulsed fractions and X-ray luminosities. Many of the pulsars show variations in pulse period due to the combination of orbital motion and accretion torques. Long-term spin-up/down trends are seen in 28/25 pulsars respectively, pointing to sustained transfer of mass and angular momentum to the neutron star on decadal timescales. The distributions of pulse detection and flux as functions of spin period provide interesting findings: mapping boundaries of accretion-driven X-ray luminosity, and showing that fast pulsars (P<10 s) are rarely detected, which yet are more prone to giant outbursts. In parallel we compare the observed pulse profiles to our general relativity (GR) model of X-ray emission in order to constrain the physical parameters of the pulsars.In addition, we conduct a search for optical counterparts to X-ray sources in the local dwarf galaxy IC 10 to form a comparison

  14. New Pulsars Discovered in Arecibo Drift-Scan Searches

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Champion, D. J.; Xilouris, K.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Backer, D. C.; Cordes, J. M.; Lommen, A. N.; Fruchter, A. S.

    2003-01-01

    We report on new pulsars discovered in Arecibo drift-scan data. Processing of 2200 square degrees of data has resulted in the detection of 41 known and 12 new pulsars. New pulsars include two millisecond pulsars, one solitary and one binary recycled pulsar, and one pulsar with very unusual pulse profile morphology and complex drifting subpulse behavior.

  15. Neutron Stars and Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Neutron stars are the most compact astronomical objects in the universe which are accessible by direct observation. Studying neutron stars means studying physics in regimes unattainable in any terrestrial laboratory. Understanding their observed complex phenomena requires a wide range of scientific disciplines, including the nuclear and condensed matter physics of very dense matter in neutron star interiors, plasma physics and quantum electrodynamics of magnetospheres, and the relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics of electron-positron pulsar winds interacting with some ambient medium. Not to mention the test bed neutron stars provide for general relativity theories, and their importance as potential sources of gravitational waves. It is this variety of disciplines which, among others, makes neutron star research so fascinating, not only for those who have been working in the field for many years but also for students and young scientists. The aim of this book is to serve as a reference work which not only review...

  16. Using HAWC to discover invisible pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Tim; Auchettl, Katie; Bramante, Joseph; Cholis, Ilias; Fang, Ke; Hooper, Dan; Karwal, Tanvi; Li, Shirley Weishi

    2017-11-01

    Observations by HAWC and Milagro have detected bright and spatially extended TeV γ -ray sources surrounding the Geminga and Monogem pulsars. We argue that these observations, along with a substantial population of other extended TeV sources coincident with pulsar wind nebulae, constitute a new morphological class of spatially extended TeV halos. We show that HAWCs wide field of view unlocks an expansive parameter space of TeV halos not observable by atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. Under the assumption that Geminga and Monogem are typical middle-aged pulsars, we show that ten-year HAWC observations should eventually observe 37-13+17 middle-aged TeV halos that correspond to pulsars whose radio emission is not beamed towards Earth. Depending on the extrapolation of the TeV halo efficiency to young pulsars, HAWC could detect more than 100 TeV halos from misaligned pulsars. These pulsars have historically been difficult to detect with existing multiwavelength observations. TeV halos will constitute a significant fraction of all HAWC sources, allowing follow-up observations to efficiently find pulsar wind nebulae and thermal pulsar emission. The observation and subsequent multi-wavelength follow-up of TeV halos will have significant implications for our understanding of pulsar beam geometries, the evolution of pulsar wind nebulae, the diffusion of cosmic rays near energetic pulsars, and the contribution of pulsars to the cosmic-ray positron excess.

  17. Listening in on Baby - Monitoring the Youngest Known Pulsar (core Program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have discovered a most remarkable young pulsar, PSR J1846-0258, in the core of a Crab-like pulsar wind nebula at the center of the bright shell-type SNR Kes 75. Based on its spin-down rate and X-ray spectrum, PSR J1846-0258 is likely the youngest known rotation-powered pulsar. Compared to the Crab pulsar, however, its period, spin-down rate, and X-ray conversion efficiency are each an order of magnitude greater, likely the result of its extreme magnetic field, above the quantum critical threshold. We propose to continue our monitoring campaign of PSR~J1846-0258 to measure the braking index, characterize its timing noise, and search for evidence of timing glitches. Furthermore, an X- ray ephemeris contemporal with GLAST is critical to detecting the pulsar at higher energies.

  18. a Surprise from the Pulsar in the Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-11-01

    New observations of the spectrum of the rapidly spinning neutron star (the `pulsar') in the Crab Nebula have been carried out with the ESO 3.5-metre New Technology Telescope (NTT) by a group of Italian astronomers [1]. Because of greatly improved spectral resolution which allows to register even very fine details in the pulsar's spectrum, they are able to determine for the first time with high accuracy the overall dependance of the emission on wavelength, i.e. the `shape' of the spectrum. Quite unexpectedly, they also detect a hitherto unknown 100 A (10 nm) broad `absorption dip', which can be securely attributed to the pulsar. These results open an exciting new window for the study of the extreme physical processes close to a pulsar. The Nature of Pulsars It is estimated that there may be as many as 100 million neutron stars in our Galaxy. A neutron star is the superdense remnant of the extremely violent supernova explosion that occurs at the end of the life of a comparatively massive star. In fact, all stars that are more than about 6 times heavier than the Sun are believed to end their lives as supernovae. During the explosion, the central core of the dying star collapses in a few milliseconds and the matter at the centre is compressed to a density comparable to that of an atomic nucleus. Due to the enormous inward pressure, the atomic particles are squeezed together into a kind of neutron jam. The outcome is the formation of a neutron star with a diameter of 10-15 kilometres, weighing as much as the Sun. In accordance with the physical law that implies that the rotation momentum of the exploding star must be conserved, newborn neutron stars will rotate very rapidly around their axis, in some cases as fast as 100 times per second. In the same way, the new neutron star is expected to possess a strong magnetic field. Of these myriads of neutron stars, about 700 have been observed to emit radio pulses (hence the name `pulsar'). A few of these can also be detected

  19. The Lovell Telescope and its role in pulsar astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyne, Andrew; Morison, Ian

    2017-12-01

    This year marks the 60th anniversary of the commissioning of the 250-ft telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory, and the 50th anniversary of the discovery of pulsars at Cambridge. Both events resulted in enduring astronomical researches that have become intimately entwined, and here we celebrate them with a brief historical account of their relationship. We describe how the completion of the telescope in October 1957 coincided with the launch of Sputnik 1 at the start of the space race, a timely circumstance that was the financial saviour of Bernard Lovell's ambitious project. The telescope established a vital role in space tracking and, by the time that pulsars were discovered a decade later, was supported by an infrastructure that allowed their prompt, successful observation. Technical innovations to both the telescope and its receivers since then have continued to make it a superb tool for world-leading pulsar investigations and the study of the radio Universe.

  20. Characterizing the nature of subpulse drifting in pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Rahul; Mitra, Dipanjan

    2018-04-01

    We report a detailed study of subpulse drifting in four long-period pulsars. These pulsars were observed in the Meterwavelength Single-pulse Polarimetric Emission Survey and the presence of phase-modulated subpulse drifting was reported in each case. We carried out longer duration and more sensitive observations lasting 7000-12 000 periods in the frequency range 306-339 MHz. The drifting features were characterized in great detail, including the phase variations across the pulse window. For two pulsars, J0820-1350 and J1720-2933, the phases changed steadily across the pulse window. The pulsar J1034-3224 has five components. The leading component was very weak and was barely detectable in our single-pulse observations. The four trailing components showed subpulse drifting. The phase variations changed in alternate components with a reversal in the sign of the gradient. This phenomenon is known as bi-drifting. The pulsar J1555-3134 showed two distinct peak frequencies of comparable strengths in the fluctuation spectrum. The two peaks did not appear to be harmonically related and were most likely a result of different physical processes. Additionally, the long observations enabled us to explore the temporal variations of the drifting features. The subpulse drifting was largely constant with time but small fluctuations around a mean value were seen.

  1. Gamma-ray pulsars: Emission zones and viewing geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.; Yadigaroglu, I.-A.

    1995-01-01

    There are now a half-dozen young pulsars detected in high-energy photons by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO), showing a variety of emission efficiencies and pulse profiles. We present here a calculation of the pattern of high-energy emission on the sky in a model which posits gamma-ray production by charge-depleted gaps in the outer magnetosphere. This model accounts for the radio to gamma-ray pulse offsets of the known pulsars, as well as the shape of the high-energy pulse profiles. We also show that about one-third of emitting young radio pulsars will not be detected due to beaming effects, while approximately 2.5 times the number of radio-selected gamma-ray pulsars will be viewed only high energies. Finally we compute the polarization angle variation and find that the previously misunderstood optical polarization sweep of the Crab pulsar arises naturally in this picture. These results strongly support an outer magnetosphere location for the gamma-ray emission.

  2. Ensemble candidate classification for the LOTAAS pulsar survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, C. M.; Lyon, R. J.; Stappers, B. W.; Cooper, S.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Michilli, D.; Sanidas, S.

    2018-03-01

    One of the biggest challenges arising from modern large-scale pulsar surveys is the number of candidates generated. Here, we implemented several improvements to the machine learning (ML) classifier previously used by the LOFAR Tied-Array All-Sky Survey (LOTAAS) to look for new pulsars via filtering the candidates obtained during periodicity searches. To assist the ML algorithm, we have introduced new features which capture the frequency and time evolution of the signal and improved the signal-to-noise calculation accounting for broad profiles. We enhanced the ML classifier by including a third class characterizing RFI instances, allowing candidates arising from RFI to be isolated, reducing the false positive return rate. We also introduced a new training data set used by the ML algorithm that includes a large sample of pulsars misclassified by the previous classifier. Lastly, we developed an ensemble classifier comprised of five different Decision Trees. Taken together these updates improve the pulsar recall rate by 2.5 per cent, while also improving the ability to identify pulsars with wide pulse profiles, often misclassified by the previous classifier. The new ensemble classifier is also able to reduce the percentage of false positive candidates identified from each LOTAAS pointing from 2.5 per cent (˜500 candidates) to 1.1 per cent (˜220 candidates).

  3. Discovery of Three New Millisecond Pulsars in Terzan 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadelano, M.; Ransom, S. M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Ferraro, F. R.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Lanzoni, B.; Pallanca, C.; Stairs, I. H.

    2018-03-01

    We report on the discovery of three new millisecond pulsars (MSPs; namely J1748‑2446aj, J1748‑2446ak, and J1748‑2446al) in the inner regions of the dense stellar system Terzan 5. These pulsars have been discovered thanks to a method, alternative to the classical search routines, that exploited the large set of archival observations of Terzan 5 acquired with the Green Bank Telescope over five years (from 2010 to 2015). This technique allowed the analysis of stacked power spectra obtained by combining ∼206 hr of observation. J1748‑2446aj has a spin period of ∼2.96 ms, J1748‑2446ak of ∼1.89 ms (thus it is the fourth fastest pulsar in the cluster) and J1748‑2446al of ∼5.95 ms. All three MSPs are isolated, and currently we have timing solutions only for J1748‑2446aj and J1748‑2446ak. For these two systems, we evaluated the contribution to the measured spin-down rate of the acceleration due to the cluster potential field, thus estimating the intrinsic spin-down rates, which are in agreement with those typically measured for MSPs in globular clusters (GCs). Our results increase the number of pulsars known in Terzan 5 to 37, which now hosts 25% of the entire pulsar population identified, so far, in GCs.

  4. Angular Momentum Transfer and Fractional Moment of Inertia in Pulsar Glitches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eya, I. O.; Urama, J. O.; Chukwude, A. E., E-mail: innocent.eya@unn.edu.ng, E-mail: innocent.eya@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu State (Nigeria)

    2017-05-01

    We use the Jodrell Bank Observatory glitch database containing 472 glitches from 165 pulsars to investigate the angular momentum transfer during rotational glitches in pulsars. Our emphasis is on pulsars with at least five glitches, of which there are 26 that exhibit 261 glitches in total. This paper identifies four pulsars in which the angular momentum transfer, after many glitches, is almost linear with time. The Lilliefore test on the cumulative distribution of glitch spin-up sizes in these glitching pulsars shows that glitch sizes in 12 pulsars are normally distributed, suggesting that their glitches originate from the same momentum reservoir. In addition, the distribution of the fractional moment of inertia (i.e., the ratio of the moment of inertia of neutron star components that are involved in the glitch process) have a single mode, unlike the distribution of fractional glitch size (Δ ν / ν ), which is usually bimodal. The mean fractional moment of inertia in the glitching pulsars we sampled has a very weak correlation with the pulsar spin properties, thereby supporting a neutron star interior mechanism for the glitch phenomenon.

  5. PROSPECTS FOR PROBING THE SPACETIME OF Sgr A* WITH PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, K.; Wex, N.; Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Cordes, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Lazio, T. J. W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, M/S 138-308, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    The discovery of radio pulsars in compact orbits around Sgr A* would allow an unprecedented and detailed investigation of the spacetime of this supermassive black hole. This paper shows that pulsar timing, including that of a single pulsar, has the potential to provide novel tests of general relativity, in particular its cosmic censorship conjecture and no-hair theorem for rotating black holes. These experiments can be performed by timing observations with 100 {mu}s precision, achievable with the Square Kilometre Array for a normal pulsar at frequency above 15 GHz. Based on the standard pulsar timing technique, we develop a method that allows the determination of the mass, spin, and quadrupole moment of Sgr A*, and provides a consistent covariance analysis of the measurement errors. Furthermore, we test this method in detailed mock data simulations. It seems likely that only for orbital periods below {approx}0.3 yr is there the possibility of having negligible external perturbations. For such orbits, we expect a {approx}10{sup -3} test of the frame dragging and a {approx}10{sup -2} test of the no-hair theorem within five years, if Sgr A* is spinning rapidly. Our method is also capable of identifying perturbations caused by distributed mass around Sgr A*, thus providing high confidence in these gravity tests. Our analysis is not affected by uncertainties in our knowledge of the distance to the Galactic center, R{sub 0}. A combination of pulsar timing with the astrometric results of stellar orbits would greatly improve the measurement precision of R{sub 0}.

  6. Using HAWC to discover invisible pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, Tim; Auchettl, Katie; Bramante, Joseph; Cholis, Ilias; Fang, Ke; Hooper, Dan; Karwal, Tanvi; Li, Shirley Weishi

    2017-11-01

    Observations by HAWC and Milagro have detected bright and spatially extended TeV gamma-ray sources surrounding the Geminga and Monogem pulsars. We argue that these observations, along with a substantial population of other extended TeV sources coincident with pulsar wind nebulae, constitute a new morphological class of spatially extended TeV halos. We show that HAWCs wide field-of-view unlocks an expansive parameter space of TeV halos not observable by atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. Under the assumption that Geminga and Monogem are typical middle-aged pulsars, we show that ten-year HAWC observations should eventually observe 37$^{+17}_{-13}$ middle-aged TeV halos that correspond to pulsars whose radio emission is not beamed towards Earth. Depending on the extrapolation of the TeV halo efficiency to young pulsars, HAWC could detect more than 100 TeV halos from mis-aligned pulsars. These pulsars have historically been difficult to detect with existing multiwavelength observations. TeV halos will constitute a significant fraction of all HAWC sources, allowing follow-up observations to efficiently find pulsar wind nebulae and thermal pulsar emission. The observation and subsequent multi-wavelength follow-up of TeV halos will have significant implications for our understanding of pulsar beam geometries, the evolution of PWN, the diffusion of cosmic-rays near energetic pulsars, and the contribution of pulsars to the cosmic-ray positron excess.

  7. Spatially-resolved Spectroscopy of the IC443 Pulsar Wind Nebula and Environs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, D. A.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Zavlin, V. E.; Bucciantini, N.; Clarke, T. E.; Karovska, M.; Pavlov, G. G.; O'Dell, S. L.; vanderHorst, A J.; Yukita, M.

    2013-01-01

    Deep Chandra ACIS observations of the region around the putative pulsar, CXOU J061705.3+222117, in the supernova remnant IC443 reveal, for the first time, a ring-like morphology surrounding the pulsar and a jet-like structure oriented roughly north-south across the ring and through the pulsar location. The observations further confirm that (1) the spectrum and flux of the central object are consistent with a rotation-powered pulsar interpretation, (2) the non-thermal surrounding nebula is likely powered by the pulsar wind, and (3) the thermal-dominated spectrum at greater distances is consistent with emission from the supernova remnant. The cometary shape of the nebula, suggesting motion towards the southwest (or, equivalently, flow of ambient medium to the northeast), appears to be subsonic; there is no evidence for a strong bow shock, and the circular ring is not distorted by motion through the ambient medium.

  8. The surprising Crab pulsar and its nebula: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, R; Blandford, R

    2014-06-01

    The Crab nebula and its pulsar (referred to together as 'the Crab') have historically played a central role in astrophysics. True to this legacy, several unique discoveries have been made recently. The Crab was found to emit gamma-ray pulsations up to energies of 400 GeV, beyond what was previously expected from pulsars. Strong gamma-ray flares, of durations of a few days, were discovered from within the nebula, while the source was previously expected to be stable in flux on these time scales. Here we review these intriguing and suggestive developments. In this context we give an overview of the observational properties of the Crab and our current understanding of pulsars and their nebulae.

  9. New prescription for traumatic times | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Do international relief agencies need to look at new ways to help people recover from natural disasters and wars? Should their methods be more adaptable to local conditions and less reflective of Western biases?

  10. SEXTANT X-Ray Pulsar Navigation Demonstration: Initial On-Orbit Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jason W.; Winternitz, Luke B.; Hassouneh, Munther A.; Price, Samuel R.; Semper, Sean R.; Yu, Wayne H.; Ray, Paul S.; Wolf, Michael T.; Kerr, Matthew; Wood, Kent S.; hide

    2018-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are rapidly rotating neutron stars that appear to pulsate across the electromagnetic spectrum. Some MSPs have long-term timing stability that rivals that of atomic clocks. Pulse arrival phase can be predicted with great accuracy at any reference point in the Solar System through use of a pulsar timing model on a spacecraft. Comparing observed phase to predictions gives information that may be used in a navigation process. Why X-rays? Some stable MSPs have conveniently detectable X-ray emissions. X-rays are immune to interstellar dispersion effects thought to limit radio pulsar timing models. Highly directional compact detectors possible.

  11. Testing pair production in pulsar magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timokhin, Andrey

    2017-09-01

    We propose to test whether electron-positron pair creation in the outer parts of pulsar magnetosphere, strongly preferred by the most recent pulsar models, can provide enough pair plasma to account for X-ray emission of pulsar wind nebulae. We will develop a theoretical foundation for such test and apply this test to several pulsars and their nebulae observed by Chandra. The proposed method is largely independent of the details of magnetosphere models and can be used as a powerful test for a broad range of pulsar models.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic calculations on pulsar magnetospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkmann, W.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper, the relativistic magnetohydrodynamic is presented in covariant form and applied to some problems in the field of pulsar magnetospheres. In addition, numerical methods to solve the resulting equations of motion are investigated. The theory of relativistic magnetohydrodynamic presented here is valid in the framework of the theory of general relativity, describing the interaction of electromagnetic fields with an ideal fluid. In the two-dimensional case, a Lax-Wendroff method is studied which should be optimally stable with the operator splitting of Strang. In the framework of relativistic magnetohydrodynamic also the model of a stationary aequatorial stellar pulsar wind as well as the parallel rotator is investigated. (orig.) [de

  13. On the nature of pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishnan, V.

    1982-01-01

    Although neutron stars were predicted nearly half a century ago, their radiations have been received and studied for just over a decade. Called pulsars because of the pulsating nature of their signals, they exhibit a wide variety of periodic phenomena in their radio emission. This article begins with a historical introduction followed by a short review of their main characteristics. The major models proposed to explain these properties are then outlined. Finally, some very recent developments which promise to throw new light on the mechanism of pulsars and their relationship to supernova remnants are briefly described and discussed. (author)

  14. Pulsar magnetosphere-wind or wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, C.F.

    1979-01-01

    The structure of both the interior and exterior pulsar magnetosphere depends upon the strength of its plasma source near the surface of the star. We review wave models of exterior pulsar magnetospheres in the light of a vacuum pair-production source model proposed by Sturrock, and Ruderman and Sutherland. This model predicts the existence of a cutoff, determined by the neutron star's spin rate and magnetic field strenght, beyond which coherent radio emission is no longer possible. Since the observed distribution of pulsar spin periods and period derivatives, and the distribution of pulsars with missing radio pulses, is consistent with the pair production threshold, those neutron stars observed as radio pulsars can have relativistic magnetohydrodynamic wind exterior magnetospheres, and cannot have relativistic plasma wave exterior magnetospheres. On the other hand, most erstwhile pulsars in the galaxy are probably halo objects that emit weak fluxes of energetic photons that can have relativistic wave exterior magnetospheres. Extinct pulsars have not been yet observed

  15. An investigation of pulsar searching techniques with the fast folding algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, A. D.; Barr, E. D.; Champion, D. J.; Kramer, M.; Zhu, W. W.

    2017-06-01

    Here, we present an in-depth study of the behaviour of the fast folding algorithm (FFA), an alternative pulsar searching technique to the fast Fourier transform (FFT). Weaknesses in the FFT, including a susceptibility to red noise, leave it insensitive to pulsars with long rotational periods (P > 1 s). This sensitivity gap has the potential to bias our understanding of the period distribution of the pulsar population. The FFA, a time-domain based pulsar searching technique, has the potential to overcome some of these biases. Modern distributed-computing frameworks now allow for the application of this algorithm to all-sky blind pulsar surveys for the first time. However, many aspects of the behaviour of this search technique remain poorly understood, including its responsiveness to variations in pulse shape and the presence of red noise. Using a custom CPU-based implementation of the FFA, ffancy, we have conducted an in-depth study into the behaviour of the FFA in both an ideal, white noise regime as well as a trial on observational data from the High Time Resolution Universe South Low Latitude pulsar survey, including a comparison to the behaviour of the FFT. We are able to both confirm and expand upon earlier studies that demonstrate the ability of the FFA to outperform the FFT under ideal white noise conditions, and demonstrate a significant improvement in sensitivity to long-period pulsars in real observational data through the use of the FFA.

  16. Pulsar radiation as polarized shot noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordes, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Pulsar radiation can be resonably modeled as amplitude-modulated shot noise for which the amplitude modulations correspond to the subpulses and micropulses that comprise the structure of single pulses. The shot noise fluctuates on nanosecond time scales and therefore has a bandwidth typical of pulsars, namely, 1-10 GHz. If curvature radiation from bunches of coherently radiating particles is the relevant radiation mechanism, then the radiation from a single bunch corresponds to a shot pulse; such a physical interpretation is not crucial to the validity of the shot noise model, however. We calculate some statistics of the corresponding signal in a narrow-band receiver system, an informative one being the intensity modulation index of the narrow-band noise from which it can be determined whether or not the noise has Gaussian statistics. Departures from Gaussian statistics can occur if intensity variations are due primarily to changes in the number of particles radiating coherently at any instant. If the temporal density of shot pulses is sufficiently high, however, only Gaussian statistics will be observed, meaning that extensive incoherent addition occurs in the generation and the propagation of the radiation.The first and second moments of the Stokes parameters of narrow-band signals are derived for both time-independent and time-variable polarization. It is shown how the polarization properties of short time scale structure can be determined from the autocorrelation functions of the Stokes parameters

  17. The green bank northern celestial cap pulsar survey. I. Survey description, data analysis, and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stovall, K.; Dartez, L. P.; Ford, A. J.; Garcia, A.; Hinojosa, J.; Jenet, F. A.; Leake, S. [Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, One West University Boulevard, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); Lynch, R. S.; Archibald, A. M.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Banaszak, S.; Biwer, C. M.; Day, D.; Flanigan, J.; Kaplan, D. L. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Boyles, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Hessels, J. W. T.; Kondratiev, V. I., E-mail: stovall.kevin@gmail.com [ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); and others

    2014-08-10

    We describe an ongoing search for pulsars and dispersed pulses of radio emission, such as those from rotating radio transients (RRATs) and fast radio bursts, at 350 MHz using the Green Bank Telescope. With the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument, we record 100 MHz of bandwidth divided into 4096 channels every 81.92 μs. This survey will cover the entire sky visible to the Green Bank Telescope (δ > –40°, or 82% of the sky) and outside of the Galactic Plane will be sensitive enough to detect slow pulsars and low dispersion measure (<30 pc cm{sup –3}) millisecond pulsars (MSPs) with a 0.08 duty cycle down to 1.1 mJy. For pulsars with a spectral index of –1.6, we will be 2.5 times more sensitive than previous and ongoing surveys over much of our survey region. Here we describe the survey, the data analysis pipeline, initial discovery parameters for 62 pulsars, and timing solutions for 5 new pulsars. PSR J0214+5222 is an MSP in a long-period (512 days) orbit and has an optical counterpart identified in archival data. PSR J0636+5129 is an MSP in a very short-period (96 minutes) orbit with a very low mass companion (8 M{sub J}). PSR J0645+5158 is an isolated MSP with a timing residual RMS of 500 ns and has been added to pulsar timing array experiments. PSR J1434+7257 is an isolated, intermediate-period pulsar that has been partially recycled. PSR J1816+4510 is an eclipsing MSP in a short-period orbit (8.7 hr) and may have recently completed its spin-up phase.

  18. The Green Bank Northern Celestial Cap Pulsar Survey. I. Survey Description, Data Analysis, and Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovall, K.; Lynch, R. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Archibald, A. M.; Banaszak, S.; Biwer, C. M.; Boyles, J.; Dartez, L. P.; Day, D.; Ford, A. J.; Flanigan, J.; Garcia, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hinojosa, J.; Jenet, F. A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Leake, S.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lunsford, G.; Martinez, J. G.; Mata, A.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Rohr, M. D.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; van Leeuwen, J.; Walker, A. N.; Wells, B. L.

    2014-08-01

    We describe an ongoing search for pulsars and dispersed pulses of radio emission, such as those from rotating radio transients (RRATs) and fast radio bursts, at 350 MHz using the Green Bank Telescope. With the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument, we record 100 MHz of bandwidth divided into 4096 channels every 81.92 μs. This survey will cover the entire sky visible to the Green Bank Telescope (δ > -40°, or 82% of the sky) and outside of the Galactic Plane will be sensitive enough to detect slow pulsars and low dispersion measure (pulsars (MSPs) with a 0.08 duty cycle down to 1.1 mJy. For pulsars with a spectral index of -1.6, we will be 2.5 times more sensitive than previous and ongoing surveys over much of our survey region. Here we describe the survey, the data analysis pipeline, initial discovery parameters for 62 pulsars, and timing solutions for 5 new pulsars. PSR J0214+5222 is an MSP in a long-period (512 days) orbit and has an optical counterpart identified in archival data. PSR J0636+5129 is an MSP in a very short-period (96 minutes) orbit with a very low mass companion (8 M J). PSR J0645+5158 is an isolated MSP with a timing residual RMS of 500 ns and has been added to pulsar timing array experiments. PSR J1434+7257 is an isolated, intermediate-period pulsar that has been partially recycled. PSR J1816+4510 is an eclipsing MSP in a short-period orbit (8.7 hr) and may have recently completed its spin-up phase.

  19. Space 'beachballs' generate pulsar bursts

    CERN Multimedia

    Wasowicz, L

    2003-01-01

    Researchers have analyzed radio emissions from a pulsar at the center of the Crab Nebula and have found 'subpulses' that last around 2 nanoseconds. They speculate this means the regions in which these ultra-short pulses are generated can be no larger than about 2 feet across - the distance light travels in 2 nanoseconds (2 pages).

  20. SYSTEMATIC AND STOCHASTIC VARIATIONS IN PULSAR DISPERSION MEASURES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, M. T.; Cordes, J. M.; Chatterjee, S.; Jones, M. L.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Armstrong, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze deterministic and random temporal variations in the dispersion measure (DM) from the full three-dimensional velocities of pulsars with respect to the solar system, combined with electron-density variations over a wide range of length scales. Previous treatments have largely ignored pulsars’ changing distances while favoring interpretations involving changes in sky position from transverse motion. Linear trends in pulsar DMs observed over 5–10 year timescales may signify sizable DM gradients in the interstellar medium (ISM) sampled by the changing direction of the line of sight to the pulsar. We show that motions parallel to the line of sight can also account for linear trends, for the apparent excess of DM variance over that extrapolated from scintillation measurements, and for the apparent non-Kolmogorov scalings of DM structure functions inferred in some cases. Pulsar motions through atomic gas may produce bow-shock ionized gas that also contributes to DM variations. We discuss the possible causes of periodic or quasi-periodic changes in DM, including seasonal changes in the ionosphere, annual variations of the solar elongation angle, structure in the heliosphere and ISM boundary, and substructure in the ISM. We assess the solar cycle’s role on the amplitude of ionospheric and solar wind variations. Interstellar refraction can produce cyclic timing variations from the error in transforming arrival times to the solar system barycenter. We apply our methods to DM time series and DM gradient measurements in the literature and assess their consistency with a Kolmogorov medium. Finally, we discuss the implications of DM modeling in precision pulsar timing experiments

  1. Glitches: The Exact Quantum Signatures of Pulsars Metamorphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hujeirat, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    The observed recurrence of glitches in pulsars and neutron stars carries rich information about the evolution of their internal structures. In this article, I show that the glitch-events observed in pulsars are exact quantum signatures for their metamorphosis into dark super-baryons (SBs), whose interiors are made of purely incompressible superconducting gluon-quark superfluids. Here the quantum nuclear shell model is adopted to describe the permitted energy levels of the SB, which are assumed to be identical to the discrete spinning rates Ω_{SB} that SBs are allowed to rotate with. Accordingly, a glitch-event corresponds to a prompt spin-down of the superconducting SB from one energy level to the next, thereby expelling a certain number of vortices, which in turn spins up the ambient medium. The process is provoked mainly by the negative torque of the ambient dissipative nuclear fluid and by a universal scalar field φ at the background of a supranuclear dense matter. As dictated by the Onsager-Feynman equation, the prompt spin-down must be associated with increase of the dimensions of the embryonic SB to finally convert the entire pulsar into SB-Objects on the scale of Gyrs. Based on our calculations, a Vela-like pulsar should display billions of glitches during its lifetime, before it metamorphoses entirely into a maximally compact SB-object and disappears from our observational windows. The present model predicts the mass of SBs and ΔΩ/Ω in young pulsars to be relatively lower than their older counterparts

  2. Variable camshaft timing for internal combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterfield, R.P.; Smith, F.R.; Dembosky, S.K.

    1991-09-10

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine. It comprises a rotatable crankshaft; a camshaft, the camshaft being rotatable about its longitudinal central axis and being subject to a unidirectionally acting torque during the rotation thereof; first means mounted on the camshaft, the first means being oscillatable with respect to the camshaft about the longitudinal central axis of the camshaft at least through a limited arc; second means keyed to the camshaft for rotation therewith; rotary movement transmitting means interconnecting the crankshaft and one of the first means and the second means for transmitting rotary movement from the crankshaft to the camshaft; a first hydraulic cylinder having a body end pivotably attached to one of the first means and the second means and a piston end pivotably attached to the other of the first means and the second means; a second hydraulic cylinder having a body end pivotably attached to the one of the first means and the second means and a piston end pivotably attached to the other of the first means and the second means, the second hydraulic cylinder and the first hydraulic cylinder being disposed to act in opposite directions.

  3. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies With GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.J.; /NASA, Goddard

    2011-11-23

    Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

  4. Galactic distribution and evolution of pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.H.; Manchester, R.N.

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of pulsars with respect to period, z-distance, luminosity, and galactocentric radius has been investigated using data from three extensive pulsar surveys. It is shown that selection effects only slightly modify the observed period and z-distributions but strongly affect the observed luminosity function and galactic distribution. These latter two distributions are computed from the Jodrell Bank and Arecibo data, using an iterative procedure. The largest uncertainties in our results are the result of uncertainty in the adopted distance scale. Therefore, where relevant, separate calculations have been made for two values of the average interstellar electron density, , 0.02 cm -3 and 0.03 cm -3 .The derived luminosity function is closely represented by a power law with index (for logarithmic luminosity intervals) close to -1. For =0.03 cm -3 , the density of potentially observable pulsars is about 90 kpc -2 in the local region and increases with decreasing galactocentric radius. These distributions imply that the total number of pulsars in the Galaxy is about 10 5 . If only a fraction of all pulsars are observable because of beaming effects, then the total number in the Galaxy is correspondingly greater.Recent observations of pulsar proper motions show that pulsars are generally high-velocity objects. The observed z-distribution of pulsars implies that the mean age of observable pulsars does not exceed 2 x 10 6 years. With this mean age the pulsar birthrate required to maintain the observed galactic distribution is 10 -4 yr -1 kpc -2 in the local region and one pulsar birth every 6 years in the Galaxy as a whole. For =0.02 cm -3 , the corresponding rate is one birth every 40 years. These rates exceed most estimates of supernova occurrence rates and may require that all stars with mass greater than approx.2.5 Msun form pulsars at the end of their evolutionary life

  5. Global Current Circuit Structure in a Resistive Pulsar Magnetosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yugo. E.

    2017-12-01

    Pulsar magnetospheres have strong magnetic fields and large amounts of plasma. The structures of these magnetospheres are studied using force-free electrodynamics. To understand pulsar magnetospheres, discussions must include their outer region. However, force-free electrodynamics is limited in it does not handle dissipation. Therefore, a resistive pulsar magnetic field model is needed. To break the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) condition E\\cdot B=0, Ohm’s law is used. This work introduces resistivity depending upon the distance from the star and obtain a self-consistent steady state by time integration. Poloidal current circuits form in the magnetosphere while the toroidal magnetic field region expands beyond the light cylinder and the Poynting flux radiation appears. High electric resistivity causes a large space scale poloidal current circuit and the magnetosphere radiates a larger Poynting flux than the linear increase outside of the light cylinder radius. The formed poloidal-current circuit has width, which grows with the electric conductivity. This result contributes to a more concrete dissipative pulsar magnetosphere model.

  6. A Gaussian Mixture Model for Nulling Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, D. L.; Swiggum, J. K.; Fichtenbauer, T. D. J.; Vallisneri, M.

    2018-03-01

    The phenomenon of pulsar nulling—where pulsars occasionally turn off for one or more pulses—provides insight into pulsar-emission mechanisms and the processes by which pulsars turn off when they cross the “death line.” However, while ever more pulsars are found that exhibit nulling behavior, the statistical techniques used to measure nulling are biased, with limited utility and precision. In this paper, we introduce an improved algorithm, based on Gaussian mixture models, for measuring pulsar nulling behavior. We demonstrate this algorithm on a number of pulsars observed as part of a larger sample of nulling pulsars, and show that it performs considerably better than existing techniques, yielding better precision and no bias. We further validate our algorithm on simulated data. Our algorithm is widely applicable to a large number of pulsars even if they do not show obvious nulls. Moreover, it can be used to derive nulling probabilities of nulling for individual pulses, which can be used for in-depth studies.

  7. Limits on gravitational-wave emission from selected pulsars using LIGO data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B; Abbott, R; Adhikari, R; Ageev, A; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Daw, E; DeBra, D; Delker, T; Dergachev, V; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Credico, A; Díaz, M; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Edlund, J A; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Findley, T; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; González, G; Gossler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guenther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harms, J; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W R; Jones, D I; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kötter, K; Kovalik, J; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Lück, H; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Márka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Murray, P; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Seifert, F; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P H; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Steussy, D; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; van Putten, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zaleski, K D; Zanolin, M; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zhu, R; Zotov, N; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J; Kramer, M; Lyne, A G

    2005-05-13

    We place direct upper limits on the amplitude of gravitational waves from 28 isolated radio pulsars by a coherent multidetector analysis of the data collected during the second science run of the LIGO interferometric detectors. These are the first direct upper limits for 26 of the 28 pulsars. We use coordinated radio observations for the first time to build radio-guided phase templates for the expected gravitational-wave signals. The unprecedented sensitivity of the detectors allows us to set strain upper limits as low as a few times 10(-24). These strain limits translate into limits on the equatorial ellipticities of the pulsars, which are smaller than 10(-5) for the four closest pulsars.

  8. Detections of millisecond pulsars with the FERMI Large Area Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillemot, L.

    2009-09-01

    The Fermi observatory was launched on June 11, 2008. It hosts the Large Area Telescope (LAT), sensitive to gamma-ray photons from 20 MeV to over 300 GeV. When the LAT began its activity, nine young and energetic pulsars were known in gamma ray range. At least several tens of pulsar detections by the LAT were predicted before launch. The LAT also allowed the study of millisecond pulsars (MSPs), never firmly detected in gamma ray range before Fermi. This thesis first presents the pulsar timing campaign for the LAT, in collaboration with large radio telescopes and X-ray telescopes, allowing for high sensitivity pulsed searches. Furthermore, it lead to quasi-homogeneous coverage of the galactic MSPs, so that the search for pulsations in LAT data for this population of stars was not affected by an a-priori bias. We present a search for pulsations from these objects in LAT data. For the first time, eight galactic MSPs have been detected as sources of pulsed gamma-ray emission over 100 MeV. In addition, a couple of good candidates for future detection are seen. A similar search for globular cluster MSPs was not successful so far. Comparison of the phase-aligned gamma-ray and radio light curves, as well as the spectral shapes, leads to the conclusion that their gamma-ray emission is similar to that of normal pulsars, and is probably produced in the outer-magnetosphere. This discovery suggests that many unresolved gamma-ray sources are unknown MSPs. (author)

  9. Beating the spin-down limit on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, Bruce; Allen, Gabrielle; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Armor, P.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.

    2008-01-01

    We present direct upper limits on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar using data from the first nine months of the fifth science run of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). These limits are based on two searches. In the first we assume that the gravitational wave emission follows the observed radio timing, giving an upper limit on gravitational wave emission that beats indirect limits inferred from the spin-down and braking index of the pulsar and the e...

  10. Gravitational waves from binary supermassive black holes missing in pulsar observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, R M; Ravi, V; Lentati, L T; Lasky, P D; Hobbs, G; Kerr, M; Manchester, R N; Coles, W A; Levin, Y; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Dai, S; Keith, M J; Osłowski, S; Reardon, D J; van Straten, W; Toomey, L; Wang, J-B; Wen, L; Wyithe, J S B; Zhu, X-J

    2015-09-25

    Gravitational waves are expected to be radiated by supermassive black hole binaries formed during galaxy mergers. A stochastic superposition of gravitational waves from all such binary systems would modulate the arrival times of pulses from radio pulsars. Using observations of millisecond pulsars obtained with the Parkes radio telescope, we constrained the characteristic amplitude of this background, A(c,yr), to be gravitational waves. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. The Bursting Pulsar GRO J1744-28: the Slowest Transitional Pulsar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, J. M. C.; Altamirano, D.; Sanna, A.

    2018-04-01

    GRO J1744-28 (the Bursting Pulsar) is a neutron star LMXB which shows highly structured X-ray variability near the end of its X-ray outbursts. In this letter we show that this variability is analogous to that seen in Transitional Millisecond Pulsars such as PSR J1023+0038: `missing link' systems consisting of a pulsar nearing the end of its recycling phase. As such, we show that the Bursting Pulsar may also be associated with this class of objects. We discuss the implications of this scenario; in particular, we discuss the fact that the Bursting Pulsar has a significantly higher spin period and magnetic field than any other known Transitional Pulsar. If the Bursting Pulsar is indeed transitional, then this source opens a new window of oppurtunity to test our understanding of these systems in an entirely unexplored physical regime.

  12. Polarimetry of 600 pulsars from observations at 1.4 GHz with the Parkes radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Simon; Kerr, Matthew

    2018-03-01

    Over the past 13 yr, the Parkes radio telescope has observed a large number of pulsars using digital filter bank backends with high time and frequency resolution and the capability for Stokes recording. Here, we use archival data to present polarimetry data at an observing frequency of 1.4 GHz for 600 pulsars with spin-periods ranging from 0.036 to 8.5 s. We comment briefly on some of the statistical implications from the data and highlight the differences between pulsars with high and low spin-down energy. The data set, images and table of properties for all 600 pulsars are made available in a public data archive maintained by the CSIRO.

  13. Resolving discrete pulsar spin-down states with current and future instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, B.; Stappers, B. W.; Weltevrede, P.

    2018-04-01

    An understanding of pulsar timing noise offers the potential to improve the timing precision of a large number of pulsars as well as facilitating our understanding of pulsar magnetospheres. For some sources, timing noise is attributable to a pulsar switching between two different spin-down rates (\\dot{ν }). Such transitions may be common but difficult to resolve using current techniques. In this work, we use simulations of \\dot{ν }-variable pulsars to investigate the likelihood of resolving individual \\dot{ν } transitions. We inject step changes in the value of \\dot{ν } with a wide range of amplitudes and switching time-scales. We then attempt to redetect these transitions using standard pulsar timing techniques. The pulse arrival-time precision and the observing cadence are varied. Limits on \\dot{ν } detectability based on the effects such transitions have on the timing residuals are derived. With the typical cadences and timing precision of current timing programmes, we find that we are insensitive to a large region of Δ \\dot{ν } parameter space that encompasses small, short time-scale switches. We find, where the rotation and emission states are correlated, that using changes to the pulse shape to estimate \\dot{ν } transition epochs can improve detectability in certain scenarios. The effects of cadence on Δ \\dot{ν } detectability are discussed, and we make comparisons with a known population of intermittent and mode-switching pulsars. We conclude that for short time-scale, small switches, cadence should not be compromised when new generations of ultra-sensitive radio telescopes are online.

  14. Pulsar observations with the MAGIC telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Jezabel R.; Dazzi, F.; Idec, W.; Moretti, E.; Schweizer, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Bonnefoy, S.; Carreto-Fidalgo, D.; Lopez, M. [Universitad Compultense, Madrid (Spain); Galindo, D.; Zanin, R. [Universitat de Barcelona, ICC/IEEC-UB, Barcelona (Spain); Ona Wilhelmi, E. de [Institute for Space Sciences (CSIC/IEEC), Barcelona (Spain); Reichardt, I. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Padova (Italy); Saito, T. [Kyoto University, Hakubi Center (Japan); Collaboration: MAGIC-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    MAGIC is a stereoscopic system of two IACTs, located at the ORM (Spain). Since 2008, MAGIC has played a big role in Pulsar physics due to the discovery of the first VHE gamma-ray emission from the Crab pulsar. Such a discovery was possible thanks to a revolutionary trigger technique used in the initial MAGIC mono system, the Sum-Trigger, that provided a 25 GeV energy threshold. The study of the Crab keeps providing numerous important results for the understanding of pulsar physics. The most recent ones are the bridge emission at VHE and the detection of the Crab pulsations at TeV energies. MAGIC has been also searching for new pulsars, providing recently interesting results about the Geminga pulsar and nebula. This talk reviews the essential MAGIC results about VHE pulsars and their implications for pulsar physics.Also we discuss the development of a new stereo trigger system, the Sum-Trigger-II, and the importance of the observation windows that this system opens for the study of VHE pulsars.

  15. Nature of Coherent Radio Emission from Pulsars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dipanjan Mitra

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... We explore the implications of the period dependence of opening angle (ρν ∝ P. −0.5). Rankin ..... ond order effects like magnetic field sweep-back, polar currents or Shapiro delay becomes important. ..... of pulsars to find b (see Becker 2009; Table 1.4 from. Szary 2013 for a list of pulsars) with specific ...

  16. Plerions and pulsar-powered nebulae

    OpenAIRE

    Gaensler, Bryan

    2000-01-01

    In this brief review, I discuss recent developments in the study of pulsar-powered nebulae ("plerions"). The large volume of data which has been acquired in recent years reveals a diverse range of observational properties, demonstrating how differing environmental and pulsar properties manifest themselves in the resulting nebulae.

  17. PSR J1755-2550: A young radio pulsar with a massive, compact companion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C.; Kruckow, M. U.; Tauris, T. M.; Lyne, A. G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Ridolfi, A.; Caiazzo, I.; Heyl, J.; Kramer, M.; Cameron, A. D.; Champion, D. J.; Stappers, B.

    2018-02-01

    Radio pulsars found in binary systems with short orbital periods are usually fast spinning as a consequence of recycling via mass transfer from their companion stars; this process is also thought to decrease the magnetic field of the neutron star being recycled. Here, we report on timing observations of the recently discovered binary PSR J1755-2550 and find that this pulsar is an exception: with a characteristic age of 2.1 Myr, it is relatively young; furthermore, with a spin period of 315 ms and a surface magnetic field strength at its poles of 0.88 × 1012 G the pulsar shows no sign of having been recycled. Based on its timing and orbital characteristics, the pulsar either has a massive white dwarf (WD) or a neutron star (NS) companion. To distinguish between these two cases, we searched radio observations for a potential recycled pulsar companion and analysed archival optical data for a potential WD companion. Neither work returned conclusive detections. We apply population synthesis modelling and find that both solutions are roughly equally probable. Our population synthesis also predicts a minimum mass of 0.90 M⊙ for the companion star to PSR J1755-2550 and we simulate the systemic runaway velocities for the resulting WDNS systems which may merge and possibly produce Ca-rich supernovae. Whether PSR J1755-2550 hosts a WD or a NS companion star, it is certainly a member of a rare subpopulation of binary radio pulsars.

  18. Internal-time observable of classical relativistic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Ya'acov, Uri

    2006-01-01

    The relativistic framework with its symmetries offers a natural definition for the internal time of classical (non-quantum) physical systems as a Lorentz-invariant observable. The internal-time observable, measuring the system's aging or internal evolution, is identified with the proper time of the system derived from its centre-of-mass (CM) coordinate. For its definition as an observable it is required that the system be symmetric not only under Lorentz-Poincare transformations but also under uniform scaling, with the associated existence of a dilatation function D, and yet that D be a varying-not conserved-quantity. Two alternative definitions are discussed, and it is found that in order to maintain simultaneity of the CM time with the events that define it, it is necessary to split the dilatation function into a CM part and an internal part

  19. A lower limit for the birth rate of pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, R.; Vivekanand, M.

    1981-01-01

    Using experimental data on observed pulsars, a lower limit for the birth rate of pulsars in our galaxy was estimated, taking into account the beam factor which allows for the possibility that only a fraction of all pulsars is beamed towards the earth. The calculation reduces the discrepancy between pulsar and supernova birth rates. (U.K.)

  20. Soft X-ray emission from the radio pulsar PSR 0656 + 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, F. A.; Middleditch, J.; Hjellming, R. M.; Mason, K. O.

    1989-01-01

    A radio source with a flux density of a few mJy was found in the error region of the soft X-ray source E0656 + 14, and identified as the radio pulsar PSR 0656 + 14. The radio source has a steep, nonthermal spectrum and a high degree of linear (62 percent) and circular (19 percent) polarization. The X-ray spectrum of the pulsar is among the softest sources observed with the Einstein Observatory. The X-ray data taken with the Einstein imaging proportional counter (IPC) permit a range of blackbody temperatures of 3-6 x 10 to the 5th K, and an equivalent column density of hydrogen smaller than 4 x 10 to the 20th/sq cm. If the assumption is made that the X-ray flux is thermal radiation from surface of the neutron star, then the pulsar must be at a distance smaller than 550 pc, consistent with the low dispersion measure of PSR 0656 + 14. The X-ray timing data suggest that the X-ray emission is modulated at the pulsar's 0.385-s spin period with an amplitude of 18 percent + or - 6 percent, and that there is a 0.0002 probability that this is spurious. It was noted that PSR 0656 + 14 is close to the geometric center of a 20-deg diameter soft X-ray emitting ring called the Gemini-Monoceros enhancement. The close distance of the pulsar, together with its relatively young age of 1.1 x 10 to the 5th yr, makes it possible that the ring is a supernova remnant from the explosion of the pulsar's progenitor. A radio source extending over a region 1.2 to 3.3 arcmin south of the pulsar is a candidate for association with the pulsar.

  1. Millisecond Pulsar Companions in SDSS and Pan-Starrs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMann, Natasha; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; McLaughlin, Maura; Kaplan, David; NANOGrav

    2018-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are being timed precisely in hopes of detecting gravitational waves (GWs). In order to detect GWs, pulsars must be studied in great detail. The perturbations in timing caused by binaries must be determined so as not to confuse them with a GW perturbation. This study used a list of published MSPs to determine if any known MSP’s white dwarf companions are located and visible in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-Starrs) Footprints. No new possible companions were discovered but five objects were found in the SDSS and 18, including the same five from SDSS, were found in Pan-Starrs that could be the companion to an MSP. All objects are less than 1.5 arcseconds away from the MSP’s position. In order to verify the object as the companion, the color magnitudes must be compared to those previously published.

  2. Monitoring and Discovering X-ray Pulsars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbet, R.H.D.; Laycock, S.; Coe, M.J.; Marshall, F.E.; Markwardt, C.B.

    2004-01-01

    Regular monitoring of the SMC with RXTE has revealed a huge number of X-ray pulsars. Together with discoveries from other satellites at least 45 SMC pulsars are now known. One of these sources, a pulsar with a period of approximately 7.8 seconds, was first detected in early 2002 and since discovery it has been found to be in outburst nine times. The outburst pattern clearly shows a period of 45.1 ± 0.4 d which is thought to be the orbital period of this system. Candidate outburst periods have also been obtained for nine other pulsars and continued monitoring will enable us to confirm these. This large number of pulsars, all located at approximately the same distance, enables a wealth of comparative studies. In addition, the large number of pulsars found (which vastly exceeds the number expected simply by scaling the relative mass of the SMC and the Galaxy) reveals the recent star formation history of the SMC which has been influenced by encounters with both the LMC and the Galaxy

  3. A New High-Frequency Search for Galactic Center Millisecond Pulsars using DSS-43

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemley, Cameron; Prince, Thomas Allen; Majid, Walid A.; Murchikova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The primary 70-meter Deep Space Network antenna (DSS-43) in Canberra, Australia was equipped with a new high-frequency (18-28 GHz) receiver system in May 2015 for use in a search for Galactic Center (GC) millisecond pulsars. The primary motivation for this search is that a pulsar in the Galactic Center region (especially one that is gravitationally bound to the massive black hole at the GC) would provide unprecedented tests of gravity in the strong-field regime and would offer an entirely new tool for probing the characteristics of the Galactic Center region. Preparation for the GC pulsar search has involved the development of a single-pulse search pipeline that integrates tools from both Fortran and Python as well as the implementation of this pipeline on high performance CPUs. The original version of the search pipeline was developed using Vela Pulsar data from DSS-43, and a more refined version that relies upon chi-squared fitting techniques was ultimately developed using Crab Pulsar data. Future work will involve continued testing of the single-pulse search pipeline using data from the rotating radio transient (RRAT) J1819-1458, the characterization of RRAT pulses using high time resolution data from the new receiver system on DSS-43, and ultimately the analysis of high-frequency data using the existing pipeline to search for millisecond pulsars in the Galactic Center.

  4. Pulsar magnetospheres in binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershkovich, A. I.; Dolan, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The criterion for stability of a tangential discontinuity interface in a magnetized, perfectly conducting inviscid plasma is investigated by deriving the dispersion equation including the effects of both gravitational and centrifugal acceleration. The results are applied to neutron star magnetospheres in X-ray binaries. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability appears to be important in determining whether MHD waves of large amplitude generated by instability may intermix the plasma effectively, resulting in accretion onto the whole star as suggested by Arons and Lea and leading to no X-ray pulsar behavior.

  5. Interstellar scintillation of the double pulsar J0737–3039

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickett, B. J.; Coles, W. A.; Nava, C. F. [ECE Dept., University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0407 (United States); McLaughlin, M. A. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Camilo, F. [National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center, Arecibo, PR 00612-8346 (United States); Ferdman, R. D.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G. [Jodrell Bank Center for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Freire, P. C. C. [Dept. of Physics, McGill University, Montréal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Stairs, I. H., E-mail: bjrickett@ucsd.edu [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    We report a series of observations of the interstellar scintillation (ISS) of the double pulsar J0737–3039 over the course of 18 months. As in earlier work, the basic phenomenon is the variation in the ISS caused by the changing transverse velocities of each pulsar, the ionized interstellar medium (IISM), and the Earth. The transverse velocity of the binary system can be determined both by very long baseline interferometry and timing observations. The orbital velocity and inclination is almost completely determined from timing observations, but the direction of the orbital angular momentum is not known. Since the Earth's velocity is known, and can be compared with the orbital velocity by its effect on the timescale of the ISS, we can determine the orientation Ω of the pulsar orbit with respect to equatorial coordinates (Ω = 65 ± 2°). We also resolve the ambiguity (i = 88.°7 or 91.°3) in the inclination of the orbit deduced from the measured Shapiro delay by our estimate i = 88.°1 ± 0.°5. This relies on the analysis of the ISS over both frequency and time, and provides a model for the location, anisotropy, turbulence level, and transverse phase gradient of the IISM. We find that the IISM can be well-modeled during each observation, typically of a few orbital periods, but its turbulence level and mean velocity vary significantly over the 18 months.

  6. Radio pulsar glitches as a state-dependent Poisson process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulgenzi, W.; Melatos, A.; Hughes, B. D.

    2017-10-01

    Gross-Pitaevskii simulations of vortex avalanches in a neutron star superfluid are limited computationally to ≲102 vortices and ≲102 avalanches, making it hard to study the long-term statistics of radio pulsar glitches in realistically sized systems. Here, an idealized, mean-field model of the observed Gross-Pitaevskii dynamics is presented, in which vortex unpinning is approximated as a state-dependent, compound Poisson process in a single random variable, the spatially averaged crust-superfluid lag. Both the lag-dependent Poisson rate and the conditional distribution of avalanche-driven lag decrements are inputs into the model, which is solved numerically (via Monte Carlo simulations) and analytically (via a master equation). The output statistics are controlled by two dimensionless free parameters: α, the glitch rate at a reference lag, multiplied by the critical lag for unpinning, divided by the spin-down rate; and β, the minimum fraction of the lag that can be restored by a glitch. The system evolves naturally to a self-regulated stationary state, whose properties are determined by α/αc(β), where αc(β) ≈ β-1/2 is a transition value. In the regime α ≳ αc(β), one recovers qualitatively the power-law size and exponential waiting-time distributions observed in many radio pulsars and Gross-Pitaevskii simulations. For α ≪ αc(β), the size and waiting-time distributions are both power-law-like, and a correlation emerges between size and waiting time until the next glitch, contrary to what is observed in most pulsars. Comparisons with astrophysical data are restricted by the small sample sizes available at present, with ≤35 events observed per pulsar.

  7. Pulsar Search Using Supervised Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, John M.

    2017-05-01

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars which emit a strong beam of energy through mechanisms that are not entirely clear to physicists. These very dense stars are used by astrophysicists to study many basic physical phenomena, such as the behavior of plasmas in extremely dense environments, behavior of pulsar-black hole pairs, and tests of general relativity. Many of these tasks require a large ensemble of pulsars to provide enough statistical information to answer the scientific questions posed by physicists. In order to provide more pulsars to study, there are several large-scale pulsar surveys underway, which are generating a huge backlog of unprocessed data. Searching for pulsars is a very labor-intensive process, currently requiring skilled people to examine and interpret plots of data output by analysis programs. An automated system for screening the plots will speed up the search for pulsars by a very large factor. Research to date on using machine learning and pattern recognition has not yielded a completely satisfactory system, as systems with the desired near 100% recall have false positive rates that are higher than desired, causing more manual labor in the classification of pulsars. This work proposed to research, identify, propose and develop methods to overcome the barriers to building an improved classification system with a false positive rate of less than 1% and a recall of near 100% that will be useful for the current and next generation of large pulsar surveys. The results show that it is possible to generate classifiers that perform as needed from the available training data. While a false positive rate of 1% was not reached, recall of over 99% was achieved with a false positive rate of less than 2%. Methods of mitigating the imbalanced training and test data were explored and found to be highly effective in enhancing classification accuracy.

  8. Spectral properties of 441 radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, F.; van Straten, W.; Keane, E. F.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Johnston, S.; Kerr, M.

    2018-02-01

    We present a study of the spectral properties of 441 pulsars observed with the Parkes radio telescope near the centre frequencies of 728, 1382 and 3100 MHz. The observations at 728 and 3100 MHz were conducted simultaneously using the dual-band 10-50 cm receiver. These high-sensitivity, multifrequency observations provide a systematic and uniform sample of pulsar flux densities. We combine our measurements with spectral data from the literature in order to derive the spectral properties of these pulsars. Using techniques from robust regression and information theory, we classify the observed spectra in an objective, robust and unbiased way into five morphological classes: simple or broken power law, power law with either low- or high-frequency cut-off and log-parabolic spectrum. While about 79 per cent of the pulsars that could be classified have simple power-law spectra, we find significant deviations in 73 pulsars, 35 of which have curved spectra, 25 with a spectral break and 10 with a low-frequency turn-over. We identify 11 gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) pulsars, with 3 newly identified in this work and 8 confirmations of known GPS pulsars; 3 others show tentative evidence of GPS, but require further low-frequency measurements to support this classification. The weighted mean spectral index of all pulsars with simple power-law spectra is -1.60 ± 0.03. The observed spectral indices are well described by a shifted log-normal distribution. The strongest correlations of spectral index are with spin-down luminosity, magnetic field at the light-cylinder and spin-down rate. We also investigate the physical origin of the observed spectral features and determine emission altitudes for three pulsars.

  9. THE BRAKING INDEX OF A RADIO-QUIET GAMMA-RAY PULSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, C. J.; Pletsch, H. J.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Beer, C.; Bock, O.; Cuéllar, A.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Nieder, L. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Wu, J.; Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Camilo, F. [SKA South Africa, Pinelands, 7405 (South Africa); Johnson, T. J. [College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Kerr, M., E-mail: colin.clark@aei.mpg.de [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2016-11-20

    We report the discovery and timing measurements of PSR J1208−6238, a young and highly magnetized gamma-ray pulsar, with a spin period of 440 ms. The pulsar was discovered in gamma-ray photon data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during a blind-search survey of unidentified LAT sources, running on the distributed volunteer computing system Einstein@Home . No radio pulsations were detected in dedicated follow-up searches with the Parkes radio telescope, with a flux density upper limit at 1369 MHz of 30 μ Jy. By timing this pulsar’s gamma-ray pulsations, we measure its braking index over five years of LAT observations to be n = 2.598 ± 0.001 ± 0.1, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second estimates the bias due to timing noise. Assuming its braking index has been similar since birth, the pulsar has an estimated age of around 2700 years, making it the youngest pulsar to be found in a blind search of gamma-ray data and the youngest known radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar. Despite its young age, the pulsar is not associated with any known supernova remnant or pulsar wind nebula. The pulsar’s inferred dipolar surface magnetic field strength is 3.8 × 10{sup 13} G, almost 90% of the quantum-critical level. We investigate some potential physical causes of the braking index deviating from the simple dipole model but find that LAT data covering a longer time interval will be necessary to distinguish between these.

  10. THE BRAKING INDEX OF A RADIO-QUIET GAMMA-RAY PULSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, C. J.; Pletsch, H. J.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Beer, C.; Bock, O.; Cuéllar, A.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Nieder, L.; Wu, J.; Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M.; Camilo, F.; Johnson, T. J.; Kerr, M.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery and timing measurements of PSR J1208−6238, a young and highly magnetized gamma-ray pulsar, with a spin period of 440 ms. The pulsar was discovered in gamma-ray photon data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during a blind-search survey of unidentified LAT sources, running on the distributed volunteer computing system Einstein@Home . No radio pulsations were detected in dedicated follow-up searches with the Parkes radio telescope, with a flux density upper limit at 1369 MHz of 30 μ Jy. By timing this pulsar’s gamma-ray pulsations, we measure its braking index over five years of LAT observations to be n = 2.598 ± 0.001 ± 0.1, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second estimates the bias due to timing noise. Assuming its braking index has been similar since birth, the pulsar has an estimated age of around 2700 years, making it the youngest pulsar to be found in a blind search of gamma-ray data and the youngest known radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar. Despite its young age, the pulsar is not associated with any known supernova remnant or pulsar wind nebula. The pulsar’s inferred dipolar surface magnetic field strength is 3.8 × 10 13 G, almost 90% of the quantum-critical level. We investigate some potential physical causes of the braking index deviating from the simple dipole model but find that LAT data covering a longer time interval will be necessary to distinguish between these.

  11. Gamma-rays and neutrinos from the pulsar wind nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednarek, W.; Bartosik, M.

    2005-01-01

    We construct the time-dependent radiation model for the pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe), assuming that leptons are accelerated in resonant scattering with heavy nuclei, which are injected into the nebula by the pulsar. The equilibrium spectra of these particles inside the nebula are calculated taking into account their radiation and adiabatic energy losses. The spectra of γ-rays produced by these particles are compared with the observations of the PWNe emitting TeV γ-rays and predictions are made for the expected γ-ray fluxes from other PWNe. Expected neutrino fluxes and neutrino event rates in a 1 km 2 neutrino detector from these nebulae are also calculated. It is concluded that only the Crab Nebula can produce a detectable neutrino event rate in the 1 km 2 neutrino detector. Other PWNe can emit TeV γ-rays on the level of a few percent of that observed from the Crab Nebula

  12. International society of sports nutrition position stand: nutrient timing

    OpenAIRE

    Kerksick, Chad M.; Arent, Shawn; Schoenfeld, Brad J.; Stout, Jeffrey R.; Campbell, Bill; Wilborn, Colin D.; Taylor, Lem; Kalman, Doug; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E.; Kreider, Richard B.; Willoughby, Darryn; Arciero, Paul J.; VanDusseldorp, Trisha A.; Ormsbee, Michael J.; Wildman, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Position statement The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) provides an objective and critical review regarding the timing of macronutrients in reference to healthy, exercising adults and in particular highly trained individuals on exercise performance and body composition. The following points summarize the position of the ISSN: Nutrient timing incorporates the use of methodical planning and eating of whole foods, fortified foods and dietary supplements. The timing of energy inta...

  13. Proposed University of California Berkeley fast pulsar search machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, S.R.; Backer, D.C.; Werthimer, D.; Heiles, C.

    1984-01-01

    With the discovery of 1937+21 by Backer et al. (1982) there is much renewed interest in an all sky survey for fast pulsars. University of California Berkeley has designed and is in the process of building an innovative and powerful, stand-alone, real-time, digital signal-processor to conduct an all sky survey for pulsars with rotation rates as high as 2000 Hz and dispersion measures less than 120 cm -3 pc at 800 MHz. The machine is anticipated to be completed in the Fall of 1985. The search technique consists of obtaining a 2-dimensional Fourier transform of the microwave signal. The transform is effected in two stages: a 64-channel, 3-level digital autocorrelator provides the radio frequency to delay transform and a fast 128K-point array processor effects the time to intensity fluctuation frequency transform. The use of a digital correlator allows flexibility in the choice of the observing radio frequency. Besides, the bandwidth is not fixed as in a multi-channel filter bank. In the machine, bandwidths can range from less than a MHz to 40 MHz. In the transform plane, the signature of a pulsar consists of harmonically related peaks which lie on a straight line which passes through the origin. The increased computational demand of a fast pulsar survey will be met by a combination of multi-CPU processing and pipeline design which involves a fast array processor and five commercial 68,000-based micro-processors. 6 references, 3 figures

  14. PSR J1723–2837: AN ECLIPSING BINARY RADIO MILLISECOND PULSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Fronefield [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Lyne, Andrew G. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Stairs, Ingrid H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kaplan, David L. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); McLaughlin, Maura A.; Lorimer, Duncan R. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Freire, Paulo C. C.; Kramer, Michael [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Burgay, Marta; D' Amico, Nichi; Possenti, Andrea [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Poggio dei Pini, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy); Camilo, Fernando [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Faulkner, Andrew [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thompson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Manchester, Richard N. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Steeghs, Danny, E-mail: fcrawfor@fandm.edu [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-10

    We present a study of PSR J1723–2837, an eclipsing, 1.86 ms millisecond binary radio pulsar discovered in the Parkes Multibeam survey. Radio timing indicates that the pulsar has a circular orbit with a 15 hr orbital period, a low-mass companion, and a measurable orbital period derivative. The eclipse fraction of ∼15% during the pulsar's orbit is twice the Roche lobe size inferred for the companion. The timing behavior is significantly affected by unmodeled systematics of astrophysical origin, and higher-order orbital period derivatives are needed in the timing solution to account for these variations. We have identified the pulsar's (non-degenerate) companion using archival ultraviolet, optical, and infrared survey data and new optical photometry. Doppler shifts from optical spectroscopy confirm the star's association with the pulsar and indicate a pulsar-to-companion mass ratio of 3.3 ± 0.5, corresponding to a companion mass range of 0.4 to 0.7 M{sub ☉} and an orbital inclination angle range of between 30° and 41°, assuming a pulsar mass range of 1.4-2.0 M{sub ☉}. Spectroscopy indicates a spectral type of G for the companion and an inferred Roche-lobe-filling distance that is consistent with the distance estimated from radio dispersion. The features of PSR J1723–2837 indicate that it is likely a 'redback' system. Unlike the five other Galactic redbacks discovered to date, PSR J1723–2837 has not been detected as a γ-ray source with Fermi. This may be due to an intrinsic spin-down luminosity that is much smaller than the measured value if the unmeasured contribution from proper motion is large.

  15. A millisecond pulsar in a stellar triple system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, S M; Stairs, I H; Archibald, A M; Hessels, J W T; Kaplan, D L; van Kerkwijk, M H; Boyles, J; Deller, A T; Chatterjee, S; Schechtman-Rook, A; Berndsen, A; Lynch, R S; Lorimer, D R; Karako-Argaman, C; Kaspi, V M; Kondratiev, V I; McLaughlin, M A; van Leeuwen, J; Rosen, R; Roberts, M S E; Stovall, K

    2014-01-23

    Gravitationally bound three-body systems have been studied for hundreds of years and are common in our Galaxy. They show complex orbital interactions, which can constrain the compositions, masses and interior structures of the bodies and test theories of gravity, if sufficiently precise measurements are available. A triple system containing a radio pulsar could provide such measurements, but the only previously known such system, PSR B1620-26 (refs 7, 8; with a millisecond pulsar, a white dwarf, and a planetary-mass object in an orbit of several decades), shows only weak interactions. Here we report precision timing and multiwavelength observations of PSR J0337+1715, a millisecond pulsar in a hierarchical triple system with two other stars. Strong gravitational interactions are apparent and provide the masses of the pulsar M[Symbol: see text](1.4378(13), where M[Symbol: see text]is the solar mass and the parentheses contain the uncertainty in the final decimal places) and the two white dwarf companions (0.19751(15)M[Symbol: see text] and 0.4101(3))M[Symbol: see text], as well as the inclinations of the orbits (both about 39.2°). The unexpectedly coplanar and nearly circular orbits indicate a complex and exotic evolutionary past that differs from those of known stellar systems. The gravitational field of the outer white dwarf strongly accelerates the inner binary containing the neutron star, and the system will thus provide an ideal laboratory in which to test the strong equivalence principle of general relativity.

  16. H I line measurements of eight southern pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koribalski, B.; Johnston, Simon; Weisberg, J. M.; Wilson, W.

    1995-03-01

    To derive their kinematic distances and to study the interstellar medium, we have measured 21 cm absorption and emission spectra in the direction of eight southern pulsars with the Parkes telescope. For the first time we have successfully obtained H I absorption measurements for PSRs J0908-4913, J1453-6413, J1456-6843, and J1709-4429. We have also significantly improved the sensitivity and resolution on PSRs J0742-2822, J1001-5507, and J1056-6258, whose spectra have previously been measured. Furthermore, we obtained a high-quality absorption spectrum on an eight pulsar, PSR J1559-4438, whose previously determined spectrum was not usable for kinematic distance determinations due to frequency structure imposed by interstellar scintillation. We present our absorption and emission spectra for these eight pulsars, derive kinematic distances and electron densities along their lines of sight where possible, and compare our results with previous work. For PSRs J1001-5507 and J1056-6258 we see H I emission and absorption at velocities which cannot be explained by a simple rotation curve model. We present evidence to suggest that PSR J1056-6258 may be located behind the H II region BBW 328. We discuss the gamma-ray efficiency of PSR J1709-4429 and its association with a supernova remnant in light of our kinematic distance estimate. Additionally, we briefly examine the optical depths and the inferred spin temperatures of the interstellar gas clouds in the direction of some of the observed pulsars.

  17. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H. [comps.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  18. Detecting pulsars in the Galactic Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajwade, K. M.; Lorimer, D. R.; Anderson, L. D.

    2017-10-01

    Although high-sensitivity surveys have revealed a number of highly dispersed pulsars in the inner Galaxy, none have so far been found in the Galactic Centre (GC) region, which we define to be within a projected distance of 1 pc from Sgr A*. This null result is surprising given that several independent lines of evidence predict a sizable population of neutron stars in the region. Here, we present a detailed analysis of both the canonical and millisecond pulsar populations in the GC and consider free-free absorption and multipath scattering to be the two main sources of flux density mitigation. We demonstrate that the sensitivity limits of previous surveys are not sufficient to detect GC pulsar population, and investigate the optimum observing frequency for future surveys. Depending on the degree of scattering and free-free absorption in the GC, current surveys constrain the size of the potentially observable population (I.e. those beaming towards us) to be up to 52 canonical pulsars and 10 000 millisecond pulsars. We find that the optimum frequency for future surveys is in the range of 9-13 GHz. We also predict that future deeper surveys with the Square Kilometre array will probe a significant portion of the existing radio pulsar population in the GC.

  19. New limits on the population of normal and millisecond pulsars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, J. P.; Lorimer, D. R.

    2010-07-01

    We model the potentially observable populations of normal and millisecond radio pulsars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively) where the known population currently stands at 19 normal radio pulsars. Taking into account the detection thresholds of previous surveys, and assuming optimal period and luminosity distributions based on studies of Galactic pulsars, we estimate that there are (1.79 +/- 0.20) × 104 and (1.09 +/- 0.16) × 104 normal pulsars in the LMC and SMC, respectively. When we attempt to correct for beaming effects, and the fraction of high-velocity pulsars which escape the clouds, we estimate birth rates in both the LMC and SMC to be comparable and in the range of 0.5-1 pulsars per century. Although higher than estimates for the rate of core-collapse supernovae in the clouds, these pulsar birth rates are consistent with historical supernova observations in the past 300 yr. A substantial population of active radio pulsars (of the order of a few hundred thousand) has escaped the LMC and SMC and populates the local intergalactic medium. For the millisecond pulsar (MSP) population, the lack of any detections from current surveys leads to respective upper limits (at the 95 per cent confidence level) of 15000 for the LMC and 23000 for the SMC. Several MSPs could be detected by a currently ongoing survey of the SMC with improved time and frequency resolution using the Parkes multibeam system. Giant-pulse emitting neutron stars could also be seen by this survey.

  20. Spectra of short-period pulsars according to the hypothesis of the two types of pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malov, I.F.

    1985-01-01

    The lack of low-frequency turnovers in the spectra of PSR 0531+21 and 1937+21 may be expl ned if the generation of radio emission in these pulsars occurs near the light cylinder. Differences of high frequency cut-offs and spectral inoices for long-period pulsars and short-period ones are discussed

  1. Exploring Radio Pulsars With New Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torne, Pablo

    2017-04-01

    Pulsars are rapidly-rotating, highly-magnetized compact neutron stars. Their strong gravitational and magnetic fields, together with the stability of their rotations and the precision with which we can measure them using radio telescopes, make pulsars unique laboratories for a wide variety of physical experiments. This thesis presents an investigation of the application of new receiver technologies and observing techniques at different radio wavelengths to the search for and study of pulsars. Discovering new pulsars always expands our capabilities to do new science. In general, the most exciting pulsars are those in binary systems because of their potential in high-precision tests of General Relativity and other gravity theories, and for constraining the Equation-of-State of ultra-dense matter. I present a search for pulsars in the Galactic Centre, where the probabilities of finding pulsar binaries, including the long-sought pulsar-black hole system, are high. The data were taken with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope and used high radio frequencies between 4.85 and 18.95 GHz to partially overcome the strong scattering in the direction to the centre of the Galaxy. With approximately 50 per cent of the results reviewed, no new pulsars have been discovered. We carried out a study of the sensitivity limits of the survey, finding that our sensitivity to Galactic Centre pulsars is highly reduced by the contributions to the total system noise of the Galactic Centre background and the atmosphere. We conclude that the paucity of detections in this and perhaps also previous similar surveys is likely due to insufficient sensitivity, and not a lack of pulsars in the region. In March 2013, a radio magnetar, one of the rarest types of pulsars, became suddenly visible from the Galactic Centre. I led two multifrequency observing campaigns on this source, SGR J1745-2900, in order to study its radio emission properties. Four different observatories were involved (including

  2. The Velocity Distribution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Chernoff, D. F.; Cordes, J. M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We infer the velocity distribution of radio pulsars based on large-scale 0.4 GHz pulsar surveys. We do so by modelling evolution of the locations, velocities, spins, and radio luminosities of pulsars; calculating pulsed flux according to a beaming model and random orientation angles of spin and beam; applying selection effects of pulsar surveys; and comparing model distributions of measurable pulsar properties with survey data using a likelihood function. The surveys analyzed have well-defined characteristics and cover approx. 95% of the sky. We maximize the likelihood in a 6-dimensional space of observables P, dot-P, DM, absolute value of b, mu, F (period, period derivative, dispersion measure, Galactic latitude, proper motion, and flux density). The models we test are described by 12 parameters that characterize a population's birth rate, luminosity, shutoff of radio emission, birth locations, and birth velocities. We infer that the radio beam luminosity (i) is comparable to the energy flux of relativistic particles in models for spin-driven magnetospheres, signifying that radio emission losses reach nearly 100% for the oldest pulsars; and (ii) scales approximately as E(exp 1/2) which, in magnetosphere models, is proportional to the voltage drop available for acceleration of particles. We find that a two-component velocity distribution with characteristic velocities of 90 km/ s and 500 km/ s is greatly preferred to any one-component distribution; this preference is largely immune to variations in other population parameters, such as the luminosity or distance scale, or the assumed spin-down law. We explore some consequences of the preferred birth velocity distribution: (1) roughly 50% of pulsars in the solar neighborhood will escape the Galaxy, while approx. 15% have velocities greater than 1000 km/ s (2) observational bias against high velocity pulsars is relatively unimportant for surveys that reach high Galactic absolute value of z distances, but is severe for

  3. ngVLA Key Science Goal 4: Using Pulsars in the Galactic Center as Fundamental Tests of Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Geoffrey C.; Chatterjee, Shami; Cordes, James; Demorest, Paul; Dexter, Jason; Kramer, Michael; Lazio, Joseph; Ransom, Scott; Wharton, Robert; ngVLA Science Working Group 4

    2018-01-01

    Pulsars in the Galactic Center (GC) are important probes of general relativity (GR), star formation, stellar dynamics, stellar evolution, and the interstellar medium. A pulsar in orbit around the massive black hole in the GC, Sgr A*, has the power to provide a high-precision measurement of the black hole mass and spin in a unique regime of GR. It is sufficient to find and time a normal, slowly rotating pulsar in a reasonable orbit, in order to measure the mass of Sgr A* with a precision of 1 solar mass, to test the cosmic censorship conjecture to a precision of 0.1%, and to test the no-hair theorem to a precision of 1%. The pulsar population in the GC on scales from the inner parsec to the edge of the Central Molecular Zone (250 parsecs in diameter) can provide fresh insight into the complex processes at work in this region: the characteristic age distribution of the discovered pulsars will give insight into the star formation history; millisecond pulsars can be used as acceleratormeters to probe the local gravitational potential; the observed dispersion and scattering measures (and their variability) will allow us to probe the distribution, clumpiness and other properties of the central interstellar medium, including characterization of the central magnetic field using Faraday rotation. Proper motions of young pulsars can be used to point back to regions of recent star formation and/or supernova remnants.Despite years of searching, only a handful of pulsars in the central 0.5 degrees are known. This is likely the result of strong interstellar scattering along the line of sight, which broadens individual pulses to greater width than the pulse period. Scattering effects decline as wavelength to the fourth power, implying that we require observation at higher frequencies than are typical for typical pulsar searches. The characteristic steep spectrum of pulsars, however, implies the need for greater instrumental sensitivity at higher frequencies in order to detect and

  4. Relations over Time among Children's Shyness, Emotionality, and Internalizing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggum, Natalie D.; Eisenberg, Nancy; Reiser, Mark; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Valiente, Carlos; Sallquist, Julie; Michalik, Nicole M.; Liew, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Data regarding children's shyness and emotionality were collected at three time points, two years apart (T1: N = 214, M = 6.12 years; T2: N = 185, M = 7.67 years; T3: N = 185, M = 9.70 years), and internalizing data were collected at T1 and T3. Relations among parent-rated shyness, emotionality [parent- and teacher-rated anger, sadness, and…

  5. A NEW, LOW BRAKING INDEX FOR THE LMC PULSAR B0540–69

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, F. E.; Harding, A. K. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Guillemot, L. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l’Environnement et de l’Espace (LPC2E), CNRS-Université d’Orléans, F-45071 Orléans (France); Martin, P. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie, UPS/CNRS, UMR5277, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Smith, D. A., E-mail: frank.marshall@nasa.gov [Centre d’Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, IN2P3/CNRS, Université de Bordeaux 1, BP120, F-33175, Gradignan Cedex (France)

    2016-08-20

    We report the results of a 16 month monitoring campaign using the Swift satellite of PSR B0540–69, a young pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Phase connection was maintained throughout the campaign so that a reliable ephemeris could be determined, and the length of the campaign is adequate to accurately determine the spin frequency ν and its first and second derivatives. The braking index n is 0.031 ± 0.013 (90% confidence), a value much lower than previously reported for B0540–69 and almost all other young pulsars. We use data from the extensive monitoring campaign with Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer to show that timing noise is unlikely to significantly affect the measurement. This is the first measurement of the braking index in the pulsar's recently discovered high spin-down state. We discuss possible mechanisms for producing the low braking index.

  6. The Effect of Transient Accretion on the Spin-up of Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2017-01-01

    A millisecond pulsar is a neutron star that has been substantially spun up by accretion from a binary companion. A previously unrecognized factor governing the spin evolution of such pulsars is the crucial effect of nonsteady or transient accretion. We numerically compute the evolution of accreting neutron stars through a series of outburst and quiescent phases, considering the drastic variation of the accretion rate and the standard disk-magnetosphere interaction. We find that, for the same long-term average accretion rate, X-ray transients can spin up pulsars to rates several times higher than can persistent accretors, even when the spin-down due to electromagnetic radiation during quiescence is included. We also compute an analytical expression for the equilibrium spin frequency in transients, by taking spin equilibrium to mean that no net angular momentum is transferred to the neutron star in each outburst cycle. We find that the equilibrium spin rate for transients, which depends on the peak accretion rate during outbursts, can be much higher than that for persistent sources. This explains our numerical finding. This finding implies that any meaningful study of neutron star spin and magnetic field distributions requires the inclusion of the transient accretion effect, since most accreting neutron star sources are transients. Our finding also implies the existence of a submillisecond pulsar population, which is not observed. This may point to the need for a competing spin-down mechanism for the fastest-rotating accreting pulsars, such as gravitational radiation.

  7. Arecibo PALFA Survey and Einstein@Home: Binary Pulsar Discovery by Volunteer Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knispel, B.; Lazarus, P.; Allen, B.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bock, O.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Desvignes, G.; Fehrmann, H.; Freire, P. C. C.; Hammer, D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kramer, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; Machenschalk, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Messenger, C.; Nice, D. J.; Papa, M. A.; Pletsch, H. J.; Prix, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.

    2011-05-01

    We report the discovery of the 20.7 ms binary pulsar J1952+2630, made using the distributed computing project Einstein@Home in Pulsar ALFA survey observations with the Arecibo telescope. Follow-up observations with the Arecibo telescope confirm the binary nature of the system. We obtain a circular orbital solution with an orbital period of 9.4 hr, a projected orbital radius of 2.8 lt-s, and a mass function of f = 0.15 M sun by analysis of spin period measurements. No evidence of orbital eccentricity is apparent; we set a 2σ upper limit e <~ 1.7 × 10-3. The orbital parameters suggest a massive white dwarf companion with a minimum mass of 0.95 M sun, assuming a pulsar mass of 1.4 M sun. Most likely, this pulsar belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Future timing observations will aim to determine the parameters of this system further, measure relativistic effects, and elucidate the nature of the companion star.

  8. Eight new millisecond pulsars in NGC 6440 and NGC 6441

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freire, P.C.C.; Ransom, S.M.; Bégin, S.; Stairs, I.H.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Frey, L.H.; Camilo, F.

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by the recent discovery of 30 new millisecond pulsars in Terzan 5, made using the Green Bank Telescope's S-band receiver and the Pulsar Spigot spectrometer, we have set out to use the same observing system in a systematic search for pulsars in other globular clusters. Here we report on the

  9. Pulsar Wind Bubble Blowout from a Supernova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondin, John M. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Chevalier, Roger A., E-mail: blondin@ncsu.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

    2017-08-20

    For pulsars born in supernovae, the expansion of the shocked pulsar wind nebula is initially in the freely expanding ejecta of the supernova. While the nebula is in the inner flat part of the ejecta density profile, the swept-up, accelerating shell is subject to the Rayleigh–Taylor instability. We carried out two- and three-dimensional simulations showing that the instability gives rise to filamentary structure during this initial phase but does not greatly change the dynamics of the expanding shell. The flow is effectively self-similar. If the shell is powered into the outer steep part of the density profile, the shell is subject to a robust Rayleigh–Taylor instability in which the shell is fragmented and the shocked pulsar wind breaks out through the shell. The flow is not self-similar in this phase. For a wind nebula to reach this phase requires that the deposited pulsar energy be greater than the supernova energy, or that the initial pulsar period be in the ms range for a typical 10{sup 51} erg supernova. These conditions are satisfied by some magnetar models for Type I superluminous supernovae. We also consider the Crab Nebula, which may be associated with a low energy supernova for which this scenario applies.

  10. MILLISECOND PULSAR SCINTILLATION STUDIES WITH LOFAR: INITIAL RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archibald, Anne M.; Kondratiev, Vladislav I.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Stinebring, Daniel R., E-mail: archibald@astron.nl, E-mail: kondratiev@astron.nl, E-mail: hessels@astron.nl, E-mail: dan.stinebring@oberlin.edu [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990-AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands)

    2014-08-01

    High-precision timing of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) over years to decades is a promising technique for direct detection of gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies. Time-variable, multi-path scattering in the interstellar medium is a significant source of noise for this detector, particularly as timing precision approaches 10 ns or better for MSPs in the pulsar timing array. For many MSPs, the scattering delay above 1 GHz is at the limit of detectability; therefore, we study it at lower frequencies. Using the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) radio telescope, we have analyzed short (5-20 minutes) observations of 3 MSPs in order to estimate the scattering delay at 110-190 MHz, where the number of scintles is large and, hence, the statistical uncertainty in the scattering delay is small. We used cyclic spectroscopy, still relatively novel in radio astronomy, on baseband-sampled data to achieve unprecedented frequency resolution while retaining adequate pulse-phase resolution. We detected scintillation structure in the spectra of the MSPs PSR B1257+12, PSR J1810+1744, and PSR J2317+1439 with diffractive bandwidths of 6 ± 3, 2.0 ± 0.3, and ∼7 kHz, respectively, where the estimate for PSR J2317+1439 is reliable to about a factor of two. For the brightest of the three pulsars, PSR J1810+1744, we found that the diffractive bandwidth has a power-law behavior Δν{sub d}∝ν{sup α}, where ν is the observing frequency and α = 4.5 ± 0.5, consistent with a Kolmogorov inhomogeneity spectrum. We conclude that this technique holds promise for monitoring the scattering delay of MSPs with LOFAR and other high-sensitivity, low-frequency arrays like the low-frequency component of the Square Kilometre Array.

  11. The population of TeV pulsar wind nebulae in the H.E.S.S. Galactic Plane Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Andersson, T.; Angüner, E. O.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carr, J.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O.'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; Valerius, K.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Żywucka, N.

    2018-04-01

    The nine-year H.E.S.S. Galactic Plane Survey (HGPS) has yielded the most uniform observation scan of the inner Milky Way in the TeV gamma-ray band to date. The sky maps and source catalogue of the HGPS allow for a systematic study of the population of TeV pulsar wind nebulae found throughout the last decade. To investigate the nature and evolution of pulsar wind nebulae, for the first time we also present several upper limits for regions around pulsars without a detected TeV wind nebula. Our data exhibit a correlation of TeV surface brightness with pulsar spin-down power Ė. This seems to be caused both by an increase of extension with decreasing Ė, and hence with time, compatible with a power law RPWN(Ė) Ė-0.65±0.20, and by a mild decrease of TeV gamma-ray luminosity with decreasing Ė, compatible with L1-10 TeV Ė0.59±0.21. We also find that the offsets of pulsars with respect to the wind nebula centre with ages around 10 kyr are frequently larger than can be plausibly explained by pulsar proper motion and could be due to an asymmetric environment. In the present data, it seems that a large pulsar offset is correlated with a high apparent TeV efficiency L1-10 TeV/Ė. In addition to 14 HGPS sources considered firmly identified pulsar wind nebulae and 5 additional pulsar wind nebulae taken from literature, we find 10 HGPS sources that are likely TeV pulsar wind nebula candidates. Using a model that subsumes the present common understanding of the very high-energy radiative evolution of pulsar wind nebulae, we find that the trends and variations of the TeV observables and limits can be reproduced to a good level, drawing a consistent picture of present-day TeV data and theory.

  12. A New, Low Braking Index for the LMC Pulsar B0540-69

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, F. E.; Guillemot, L.; Harding, A. K.; Martin, P.; Smith, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a 16-month monitoring campaign using the Swift satellite of PSR 0540, a young pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Phase connection was maintained throughout the campaign so that a reliable ephemeris could be determined, and the length of the campaign is adequate to accurately determine the spin frequency and its first and second derivatives. The braking index n is 0.031 +/- 0.013 (90% confidence), a value much lower than previously reported for 0 540 and almost all other young pulsars. We use data from the extensive monitoring campaign with RXTE to showt hat timing noise is unlikely to significantly affect the measurement. This is the first measurement of the braking index in the pulsars recently discovered high spin-down state. We discuss possible mechanisms for producing the low braking index.

  13. TIMING SIGNATURES OF THE INTERNAL-SHOCK MODEL FOR BLAZARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettcher, M.; Dermer, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the spectral and timing signatures of the internal-shock model for blazars. For this purpose, we develop a semi-analytical model for the time-dependent radiative output from internal shocks arising from colliding relativistic shells in a blazar jet. The emission through synchrotron and synchrotron-self Compton radiation as well as Comptonization of an isotropic external radiation field are taken into account. We evaluate the discrete correlation function (DCF) of the model light curves in order to evaluate features of photon-energy-dependent time lags and the quality of the correlation, represented by the peak value of the DCF. The almost completely analytic nature of our approach allows us to study in detail the influence of various model parameters on the resulting spectral and timing features. This paper focuses on a range of parameters in which the γ-ray production is dominated by Comptonization of external radiation, most likely appropriate for γ-ray bright flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) or low-frequency peaked BL Lac objects (LBLs). In most cases relevant for FSRQs and LBLs, the variability of the optical emission is highly correlated with the X-ray and high-energy (HE: > 100 MeV) γ-ray emission. Our baseline model predicts a lead of the optical variability with respect to the higher-energy bands by 1-2 hr and of the HE γ-rays before the X-rays by about 1 hr. We show that variations of certain parameters may lead to changing signs of inter-band time lags, potentially explaining the lack of persistent trends of time lags in most blazars.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 315 glitches in the rotation of 102 pulsars (Espinoza+, 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, C. M.; Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.; Kramer, M.

    2012-02-01

    The Jodrell Bank timing data base comprises observations of more than 700 pulsars, carried out at Jodrell Bank Observatory (JBO) since 1978. Observation procedures are described by Hobbs et al. (2004, Cat. J/MNRAS/353/1311). In summary, these have mostly been performed with the 76-m Lovell telescope, with some complementary observations made using the 30-m MkII and 42-ft telescopes. Every pulsar is observed at typical intervals of 2-10 d in a 64-MHz band centred on 1404-MHz, using an analogue filter bank. Occasionally, observations were also carried out in a band centred at 610-MHz. (3 data files).

  15. A Full Mesh ATCA-based General Purpose Data Processing Board (Pulsar II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajuha, S.; et al.

    2017-06-29

    The Pulsar II is a custom ATCA full mesh enabled FPGA-based processor board which has been designed with the goal of creating a scalable architecture abundant in flexible, non-blocking, high bandwidth interconnections. The design has been motivated by silicon-based tracking trigger needs for LHC experiments. In this technical memo we describe the Pulsar II hardware and its performance, such as the performance test results with full mesh backplanes from different vendors, how the backplane is used for the development of low-latency time-multiplexed data transfer schemes and how the inter-shelf and intra-shelf synchronization works.

  16. Real time curriculum map for internal medicine residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Roger Y; Roberts, J Mark

    2007-11-07

    To manage the voluminous formal curriculum content in a limited amount of structured teaching time, we describe the development and evaluation of a curriculum map for academic half days (AHD) in a core internal medicine residency program. We created a 3-year cyclical curriculum map (an educational tool combining the content, methodology and timetabling of structured teaching), comprising a matrix of topics under various specialties/themes and corresponding AHD hours. All topics were cross-matched against the ACP-ASIM in-training examination, and all hours were colour coded based on the categories of core competencies. Residents regularly updated the map on a real time basis. There were 208 topics covered in 283 AHD hours. All topics represented core competencies with minimal duplication (78% covered once in 3 years). Only 42 hours (15%) involved non-didactic teaching, which increased after implementation of the map (18-19 hours/year versus baseline 5 hours/year). Most AHD hours (78%) focused on medical expert competencies. Resident satisfaction (90% response) was high throughout (range 3.64 +/- 0.21, 3.84 +/- 0.14 out of 4), which improved after 1 year but returned to baseline after 2 years. We developed and implemented an internal medicine curriculum map based on real time resident input, with minimal topic duplication and high resident satisfaction. The map provided an opportunity to balance didactic versus non-didactic teaching, and teaching on medical versus non medical expert topics.

  17. Avalanche Dynamics of Radio Pulsar Glitches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melatos, A.; Peralta, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2008-01-01

    We test statistically the hypothesis that radio pulsar glitches result from an avalanche process, in which angular momentum is transferred erratically from the flywheel-like superfluid in the star to the slowly decelerating, solid crust via spatially connected chains of local, impulsive, threshold-activated events, so that the system fluctuates around a self-organized critical state. Analysis of the glitch population (currently 285 events from 101 pulsars) demonstrates that the size distribution in individual pulsars is consistent with being scale invariant, as expected for an avalanche process. The measured power-law exponents fall in the range -0.13 age. The rate distribution itself is fitted reasonably well by an exponential for λ >= 0.25 yr-1, with langle λ rangle = 1.3+ 0.7-0.6 yr-1. For λ 0.25 yr-1 must exceed ~70%.

  18. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE 350 MHz DRIFT-SCAN SURVEY. I. SURVEY OBSERVATIONS AND THE DISCOVERY OF 13 PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyles, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Cardoso, R. F. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Lynch, R. S.; Kaspi, V. M.; Archibald, A.; Karako-Argaman, C. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University St., Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Stairs, I. H.; Berndsen, A.; Cherry, A.; McPhee, C. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Hessels, J. W. T.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Van Leeuwen, J. [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Epstein, C. R. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Pennucci, T. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Roberts, M. S. E. [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 94602-3017 (United States); Stovall, K., E-mail: jason.boyles@wku.edu [Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Over the summer of 2007, we obtained 1191 hr of 'drift-scan' pulsar search observations with the Green Bank Telescope at a radio frequency of 350 MHz. Here we describe the survey setup, search procedure, and the discovery and follow-up timing of 13 pulsars. Among the new discoveries, one (PSR J1623-0841) was discovered only through its single pulses, two (PSRs J1327-0755 and J1737-0814) are millisecond pulsars, and another (PSR J2222-0137) is a mildly recycled pulsar. PSR J1327-0755 is a 2.7 ms pulsar at a dispersion measure (DM) of 27.9 pc cm{sup -3} in an 8.7 day orbit with a minimum companion mass of 0.22 M {sub Sun }. PSR J1737-0814 is a 4.2 ms pulsar at a DM of 55.3 pc cm{sup -3} in a 79.3 day orbit with a minimum companion mass of 0.06 M {sub Sun }. PSR J2222-0137 is a 32.8 ms pulsar at a very low DM of 3.27 pc cm{sup -3} in a 2.4 day orbit with a minimum companion mass of 1.11 M {sub Sun }. It is most likely a white-dwarf-neutron-star system or an unusual low-eccentricity double neutron star system. Ten other pulsars discovered in this survey are reported in the companion paper Lynch et al.

  19. Fastest Pulsar Speeding Out of Galaxy, Astronomers Discover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    guesses about their distances. With this one, we have a precise, direct measurement of the distance, so we can measure the speed directly," Brisken said. The VLBA measurements show the pulsar moving at nearly 1100 kilometers (more than 670 miles) per second -- about 150 times faster than an orbiting Space Shuttle. At this speed, it could travel from London to New York in five seconds. In order to measure the pulsar's distance, the astronomers had to detect a "wobble" in its position caused by the Earth's motion around the Sun. That "wobble" was roughly the length of a baseball bat as seen from the Moon. Then, with the distance determined, the scientists could calculate the pulsar's speed by measuring its motion across the sky. "The motion we measured with the VLBA was about equal to watching a home run ball in Boston's Fenway Park from a seat on the Moon," Chatterjee explained. "However, the pulsar took nearly 22 months to show that much apparent motion. The VLBA is the best possible telescope for tracking such tiny apparent motions." The star's presumed birthplace among giant stars in the constellation Cygnus lies within the plane of the Milky Way, a spiral galaxy. The new VLBA observations indicate that the neutron star now is headed away from the Milky Way's plane with enough speed to take it completely out of the Galaxy. Since the supernova explosion nearly 2 and a half million years ago, the pulsar has moved across about a third of the night sky as seen from Earth. "We've thought for some time that supernova explosions can give a kick to the resulting neutron star, but the latest computer models of this process have not produced speeds anywhere near what we see in this object," Chatterjee said. "This means that the models need to be checked, and possibly corrected, to account for our observations," he said. "There also are some other processes that may be able to add to the speed produced by the supernova kick, but we'll have to investigate more thoroughly to draw

  20. The VELA-X-Pulsar Wind Nebula Revisited with Four Years of Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondin, M. -H.; Romani, R. W.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Guillemot, L.; Harding, Alice K.; Reposeur, T.

    2013-01-01

    The Vela supernova remnant (SNR) is the closest SNR to Earth containing an active pulsar, the Vela pulsar (PSR B0833-45). This pulsar is an archetype of the middle-aged pulsar class and powers a bright pulsar wind nebula (PWN), Vela-X, spanning a region of 2deg × 3deg south of the pulsar and observed in the radio, X-ray, and very high energy ?-ray domains. The detection of the Vela-X PWN by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) was reported in the first year of the mission. Subsequently, we have reinvestigated this complex region and performed a detailed morphological and spectral analysis of this source using 4 yr of Fermi-LAT observations. This study lowers the threshold for morphological analysis of the nebula from 0.8 GeV to 0.3 GeV, allowing for the inspection of distinct energy bands by the LAT for the first time. We describe the recent results obtained on this PWN and discuss the origin of the newly detected spatial features.

  1. Multi-Zone Modeling of the Pulsar Win Nebula HESS J1825-137

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Etten, Adam; Romani, Roger W.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-11-08

    The pulsar wind nebula associated with PSR J1826-1334, HESS J1825-137, is a bright very high energy source with an angular extent of {approx} 1{sup o} and spatially-resolved spectroscopic TeV measurements. The gamma-ray spectral index is observed to soften with increasing distance from the pulsar, likely the result of cooling losses as electrons traverse the nebula. We describe analysis of X-ray data of the extended nebula, as well as 3-D time-dependent spectral energy distribution modeling, with emphasis on the spatial variations within HESS J1825-137. The multi-wavelength data places significant constraints on electron injection, transport, and cooling within the nebula. The large size and high nebular energy budget imply a relatively rapid initial pulsar spin period of 13 {+-} 7 ms and an age of 40 {+-} 9 kyr. The relative fluxes of each VHE zone can be explained by advective particle transport with a radially decreasing velocity profile with v(r) {proportional_to} r{sup -0.5}. The evolution of the cooling break requires an evolving magnetic field which also decreases radially from the pulsar, B(r, t) {proportional_to} r{sup -0.7} E(t){sup 1/2}. Detection of 10 TeV flux {approx} 80 pc from the pulsar requires rapid diffusion of high energy particles with {tau}{sub esc} {approx} 90 (R/10 pc){sup 2}(E{sub e}/100TeV){sup -1} year, contrary to the common assumption of toroidal magnetic fields with strong magnetic confinement. The model predicts a rather uniform Fermi LAT surface brightness out to {approx} 1{sup o} from the pulsar, in good agreement with the recently discovered LAT source centered 0.5{sup o} southwest of PSR J1826-1334 with extension 0.6 {+-} 0.1{sup o}.

  2. DIVERSITY OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS FROM COMPACT BINARY MERGERS HOSTING PULSARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, Cole; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Montes, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Short-duration gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs) are widely believed to result from the mergers of compact binaries. This model predicts an afterglow that bears the characteristic signatures of a constant, low-density medium, including a smooth prompt-afterglow transition, and a simple temporal evolution. However, these expectations are in conflict with observations for a non-negligible fraction of sGRB afterglows. In particular, the onset of the afterglow phase for some of these events appears to be delayed and, in addition, a few of them exhibit late-time rapid fading in their light curves. We show that these peculiar observations can be explained independently of ongoing central engine activity if some sGRB progenitors are compact binaries hosting at least one pulsar. The Poynting flux emanating from the pulsar companion can excavate a bow-shock cavity surrounding the binary. If this cavity is larger than the shock deceleration length scale in the undisturbed interstellar medium, then the onset of the afterglow will be delayed. Should the deceleration occur entirely within the swept-up thin shell, a rapid fade in the light curve will ensue. We identify two types of pulsar that can achieve the conditions necessary for altering the afterglow: low-field, long-lived pulsars, and high-field pulsars. We find that a sizable fraction (≈20%-50%) of low-field pulsars are likely to reside in neutron star binaries based on observations, while their high-field counterparts are not. Hydrodynamical calculations motivated by this model are shown to be in good agreement with observations of sGRB afterglow light curves

  3. Constraining Gamma-Ray Pulsar Gap Models with a Simulated Pulsar Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierbattista, Marco; Grenier, I. A.; Harding, A. K.; Gonthier, P. L.

    2012-01-01

    With the large sample of young gamma-ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), population synthesis has become a powerful tool for comparing their collective properties with model predictions. We synthesised a pulsar population based on a radio emission model and four gamma-ray gap models (Polar Cap, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, and One Pole Caustic). Applying gamma-ray and radio visibility criteria, we normalise the simulation to the number of detected radio pulsars by a select group of ten radio surveys. The luminosity and the wide beams from the outer gaps can easily account for the number of Fermi detections in 2 years of observations. The wide slot-gap beam requires an increase by a factor of 10 of the predicted luminosity to produce a reasonable number of gamma-ray pulsars. Such large increases in the luminosity may be accommodated by implementing offset polar caps. The narrow polar-cap beams contribute at most only a handful of LAT pulsars. Using standard distributions in birth location and pulsar spin-down power (E), we skew the initial magnetic field and period distributions in a an attempt to account for the high E Fermi pulsars. While we compromise the agreement between simulated and detected distributions of radio pulsars, the simulations fail to reproduce the LAT findings: all models under-predict the number of LAT pulsars with high E , and they cannot explain the high probability of detecting both the radio and gamma-ray beams at high E. The beaming factor remains close to 1.0 over 4 decades in E evolution for the slot gap whereas it significantly decreases with increasing age for the outer gaps. The evolution of the enhanced slot-gap luminosity with E is compatible with the large dispersion of gamma-ray luminosity seen in the LAT data. The stronger evolution predicted for the outer gap, which is linked to the polar cap heating by the return current, is apparently not supported by the LAT data. The LAT sample of gamma-ray pulsars

  4. Real time curriculum map for internal medicine residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts J Mark

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To manage the voluminous formal curriculum content in a limited amount of structured teaching time, we describe the development and evaluation of a curriculum map for academic half days (AHD in a core internal medicine residency program. Methods We created a 3-year cyclical curriculum map (an educational tool combining the content, methodology and timetabling of structured teaching, comprising a matrix of topics under various specialties/themes and corresponding AHD hours. All topics were cross-matched against the ACP-ASIM in-training examination, and all hours were colour coded based on the categories of core competencies. Residents regularly updated the map on a real time basis. Results There were 208 topics covered in 283 AHD hours. All topics represented core competencies with minimal duplication (78% covered once in 3 years. Only 42 hours (15% involved non-didactic teaching, which increased after implementation of the map (18–19 hours/year versus baseline 5 hours/year. Most AHD hours (78% focused on medical expert competencies. Resident satisfaction (90% response was high throughout (range 3.64 ± 0.21, 3.84 ± 0.14 out of 4, which improved after 1 year but returned to baseline after 2 years. Conclusion We developed and implemented an internal medicine curriculum map based on real time resident input, with minimal topic duplication and high resident satisfaction. The map provided an opportunity to balance didactic versus non-didactic teaching, and teaching on medical versus non medical expert topics.

  5. Scattering analysis of LOFAR pulsar observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geyer, M.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V.I.; Zagkouris, K.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W.; Grießmeier, J.M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Michilli, D.; Pilia, M.; Sobey, C.

    2017-01-01

    We measure the effects of interstellar scattering on average pulse profiles from 13 radio pulsars with simple pulse shapes. We use data from the LOFAR High Band Antennas, at frequencies between 110 and 190 MHz. We apply a forward fitting technique, and simultaneously determine the intrinsic pulse

  6. Centrifugal acceleration of plasma in pulsar magnetosphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present a relativistic model for the centrifugal acceleration of plasma bunches and the coherent radio emission in pulsar magnetosphere. We find that rotation broadens the width of leading component compared to the width of trailing component. We explain this difference in the component widths using the nested cone ...

  7. Gamma-Ray Pulsars Models and Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K

    2001-01-01

    Pulsed emission from gamma-ray pulsars originates inside the magnetosphere, from radiation by charged particles accelerated near the magnetic poles or in the outer gaps. In polar cap models, the high energy spectrum is cut off by magnetic pair production above an energy that is dependent on the local magnetic field strength. While most young pulsars with surface fields in the range B = 10^{12} - 10^{13} G are expected to have high energy cutoffs around several GeV, the gamma-ray spectra of old pulsars having lower surface fields may extend to 50 GeV. Although the gamma-ray emission of older pulsars is weaker, detecting pulsed emission at high energies from nearby sources would be an important confirmation of polar cap models. Outer gap models predict more gradual high-energy turnovers at around 10 GeV, but also predict an inverse Compton component extending to TeV energies. Detection of pulsed TeV emission, which would not survive attenuation at the polar caps, is thus an important test of outer gap models. N...

  8. Magnetorotational and Tayler Instabilities in the Pulsar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vadim Urpin

    2017-09-07

    Sep 7, 2017 ... Equation (4) for electrons has a well-known form (Bra- ginskii 1965). This equation is used to derive the generalized Ohm's law in laboratory plasma. For typical values of pulsar magnetic fields, the elec- tromagnetic energy density is much greater than the kinetic energy density. Under this condition, the role.

  9. Nature of Coherent Radio Emission from Pulsars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dipanjan Mitra

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... idea went through several refinement and presently it is understood that an additional source of plasma is ... observations tend to favour the idea that the coher- ent radio emission in pulsars are excited by ...... κ has some uncertainty, two extreme values of κ = 102 and 104 has been chosen while plottingν◦.

  10. 363. WE-Heraeus seminar on neutron stars and pulsars - 40 years after the discovery. Posters and contributed talks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, W.; Huang, H.H.

    2007-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: X-ray observation of pulsars, gamma-ray observation of pulsars, radio observations of pulsars, theory of neutron stars and pulsars, AXPs, SGRs, and strange stars, gravitayional waves, analysis tools with software. (HSI)

  11. 363. WE-Heraeus seminar on neutron stars and pulsars - 40 years after the discovery. Posters and contributed talks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, W.; Huang, H.H. (eds.)

    2007-07-01

    The following topics were dealt with: X-ray observation of pulsars, gamma-ray observation of pulsars, radio observations of pulsars, theory of neutron stars and pulsars, AXPs, SGRs, and strange stars, gravitayional waves, analysis tools with software. (HSI)

  12. High-Energy Emission From Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.; Usov, Vladimir V.; Muslimov, Alex G.

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray and gamma-ray spectrum of rotation-powered millisecond pulsars is investigated in a model for acceleration and pair cascades on open field lines above the polar caps. Although these pulsars have low surface magnetic fields, their short periods allow them to have large magnetospheric potential drops, but the majority do not produce sufficient pairs to completely screen the accelerating electric field. In these sources, the primary and secondary electrons continue to accelerate to high altitude and their Lorentz factors are limited by curvature and synchrotron radiation reaction. The accelerating particles maintain high Lorentz factors and undergo cyclotron resonant absorption of radio emission, that produces and maintains a large pitch angle, resulting in a strong synchrotron component. The resulting spectra consist of several distinct components: curvature radiation from primary electrons dominating from 1 - 100 GeV, synchrotron radiation from primary and secondary electrons dominating up to about 100 MeV, and much weaker inverse-Compton radiation from primary electrons a t 0.1 - 1 TeV. We find that the relative size of these components depends on pulsar period, period derivative, and neutron star mass and radius with the level of the synchrotron component also depending sensitively on the radio emission properties. This model is successful in describing the observed X-ray and gamma-ray spectrum of PSR J0218+4232 as synchrotron radiation, peaking around 100 MeV and extending up to a turnover around several GeV. The predicted curvature radiation components from a number of millisecond pulsars, as well as the collective emission from the millisecond pulsars in globular clusters, should be detectable with AGILE and GLAST. We also discuss a hidden population of X-ray-quiet and radio-quiet millisecond pulsars which have evolved below the pair death line, some of which may be detectable by telescopes sensitive above 1 GeV. Subject headings: pulsars: general

  13. Simulated gamma-ray pulse profile of the Crab pulsar with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtovoi, A.; Zampieri, L.

    2016-07-01

    We present simulations of the very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray light curve of the Crab pulsar as observed by the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The CTA pulse profile of the Crab pulsar is simulated with the specific goal of determining the accuracy of the position of the interpulse. We fit the pulse shape obtained by the Major Atmospheric Gamma-Ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescope with a three-Gaussian template and rescale it to account for the different CTA instrumental and observational configurations. Simulations are performed for different configurations of CTA and for the ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) mini-array. The northern CTA configuration will provide an improvement of a factor of ˜3 in accuracy with an observing time comparable to that of MAGIC (73 h). Unless the VHE spectrum above 1 TeV behaves differently from what we presently know, unreasonably long observing times are required for a significant detection of the pulsations of the Crab pulsar with the high-energy-range sub-arrays. We also found that an independent VHE timing analysis is feasible with Large Size Telescopes. CTA will provide a significant improvement in determining the VHE pulse shape parameters necessary to constrain theoretical models of the gamma-ray emission of the Crab pulsar. One of such parameters is the shift in phase between peaks in the pulse profile at VHE and in other energy bands that, if detected, may point to different locations of the emission regions.

  14. Giant Pulse Studies of Ordinary and Recycled Pulsars with NICER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Natalia; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Gendreau, Keith C.; Enoto, Teruaki; Harding, Alice; Lommen, Andrea; Ray, Paul S.; Deneva, Julia; Kerr, Matthew; Ransom, Scott M.; NICER Team

    2018-01-01

    Radio Giant Pulses are one of the earliest discovered form of anomalous single pulse emission from pulsars. Known for their non-periodical occurrence, restriction to certain phase ranges, power-law intensity distributions, pulse widths ranging from microseconds to nanoseconds and very high brightness temperatures, they stand out as an individual form of pulsar radio emission.Discovered originally in the case of the Crab pulsar, several other pulsars have been observed to emit radio giant pulses, the most promising being the recycled pulsar PSR B1937+21 and also the Vela pulsar.Although radio giant pulses are apparently the result of a coherent emission mechanism, recent studies of the Crab pulsar led to the discovery of an additional incoherent component at optical wavelengths. No such component has been identified for recycled pulsars, or Vela yet.To provide constraints on possible emission regions in their magnetospheres and to search for differences between giant pulses from ordinary and recycled pulsars, we present the progress of the correlation study of PSR B1937+21 and the Vela pulsar carried out with NICER and several radio observatories.

  15. The Crab Pulsar and Relativistic Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    2017-12-01

    The possibility that the Crab pulsar produces a separated ion-dominated and pair-plasma-dominated, magnetically striped relativistic wind is assessed by rough estimates of the polar cap acceleration of the ion and electron primary beams, the pair production of secondary electrons and positrons, and a simple model of the near-magnetosphere-wind zone. For simplicity, only the orthogonal rotator is considered. Below (above) the rotational equator, ions (electrons) are accelerated in a thin sheath, of order (much less than) the width of the polar cap, to Lorentz factor {γ }i≈ (5{--}10)× {10}7({γ }e≈ {10}7). The accelerating parallel electric field is shorted out by ion-photon (curvature synchrotron) pair production. With strong, but fairly reasonable, assumptions, a set of general magnetic geometry relativistic wind equations is derived and shown to reduce to conservation relations that are similar to those of the wind from a magnetic monopole. The strength of the field-aligned currents carried by the primary beams is determined by the wind’s Alfvén critical point condition to be about eight times the Goldreich-Julian value. A simple model for the transition from the dipole region wind to the asymptotic monopole wind zone is developed. The asymptotic ratio of Poynting flux to ion (pair plasma) kinetic energy flux—the wind {σ }w∞ -parameter—is found to be of order {σ }w∞ ≈ 1/2({10}4). The far wind zone is likely to be complex, with the ion-dominated and pair-plasma-dominated magnetic stripes merging, and the oppositely directed azimuthal magnetic fields annihilating.

  16. Going to Extremes: Pulsar Gives Insight on Ultra Dense Matter and Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    A long look at a young pulsar with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory revealed unexpectedly rapid cooling, which suggests that it contains much denser matter than previously expected. The pulsar's cool temperature and the vast magnetic web of high-energy particles that surrounds it have implications for the theory of nuclear matter and the origin of magnetic fields in cosmic objects. Animation: Layers of Chandra's 3-Color Image Animation: Layers of Chandra's 3-Color Image An international team of scientists used the Chandra data to measure the temperature of the pulsar at the center of 3C58, the remains of a star observed to explode in the year 1181. Chandra's image of 3C58 also shows spectacular jets, rings and magnetized loops of high-energy particles generated by the pulsar. "We now have strong evidence that, in slightly more than 800 years, the surface of the 3C58 pulsar has cooled to a temperature of slightly less than a million degrees Celsius," said Patrick Slane of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., and lead author on a paper describing these results in the November 20, 2004 issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "A million degrees may sound pretty hot, but for a young neutron star that's like the frozen tundra in Green Bay, Wisconsin." Optical & Chandra X-ray Composite of 3C58 Optical & Chandra X-ray Composite of 3C58 Pulsars are formed when the central core of a massive star collapses to create a dense object about 15 miles across that is composed almost entirely of neutrons. Collisions between neutrons and other subatomic particles in the interior of the star produce neutrinos that carry away energy as they escape from the star. This cooling process depends critically on the density and type of particles in the interior, so measurements of the surface temperature of pulsars provide a way to probe extreme conditions where densities are so high that our current understanding of how particles interact with one another is limited

  17. Secondary periodicities of microbursts of TeV gamma rays from the Crab pulsar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishwanath, P.R.; Bhat, P.N.; Gupta, S.K.; Ramanamurthy, P.V.

    1985-01-01

    Observations were made during the past several years on the Crab pulsar using the Ooty atmospheric Cerenkov array with the aim of detecting possible emission of ultra high energy gamma rays by the pulsar. During the course of these observations, it was found that the Crab pulsar emits TeV gamma rays in bursts of short duration. The microbursts of TeV gamma rays from the Crab pulsar, which were seen in the data of at least three years, also reveal interesting secondary periodicities. It was noticed at first that some bursts could be connected with the others that occurred during the same night or during the next two nights with integral number of cycles of periods 43 + or - 1 minute. Ten possible periods in the vicinity of 43 minutes were determined for all the combinations of bursts for each year. The best values of periods thus obtained were different from year to year. But when, instead of the real time, the number of Crab cycles elapsed between the bursts was used as the unit of time, two values of burst periods - 77460 and 77770 Crab cycles - were found to be significant in the data of at least two years. A Monte Carlo simulation using 1500 trial periods chosen randomly within + or - 5 minutes of the original burst period did not reveal any value of the period as significant

  18. High-Energy Pulsar Models: Developments and New Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    The past few years have seen a major advance in observational knowledge of high-energy (HE) pulsars. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and AGILE have increased the number of known gamma-ray pulsars by an order of magnitude, its members being divided roughly equally among millisecond pulsars (MSPs), young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. Many new and diverse emission characteristics are being measured, while radio and X-ray follow-up observations increase the pulsar detection rate and enrich our multiwavelength picture of these extreme sources. The wealth of new data has provided impetus for further development and improvement of existing theoretical pulsar models. Geometric light curve (LC) modelling has uncovered three broad classes into which HE pulsars fall: those where the radio profile leads, is aligned with, or lags the gamma-ray profile. For example, the original MSP and original black widow system are members of the second class, requiring co-located emission regions and thereby breaking with traditional notions of radio emission origin. These models imply narrow accelerator gaps in the outer magnetosphere, indicating copious pair production even in MSP magnetospheres that were previously thought to be pair-starved. The increased quality and variety of the LCs necessitate construction of ever more sophisticated models. We will review progress in global magnetosphere solutions which specify a finite conductivity on field lines above the stellar surface, filling the gap between the standard vacuum and force-free (FF; plasma-filled) models. The possibility of deriving phase-resolved spectra for the brightest pulsars, coupled with the fact that the HE pulsar population is sizable enough to allow sampling of various pulsar geometries, will enable much more stringent testing of future radiation models. Reproduction of the observed phase-resolved behavior of this disparate group will be one of the next frontiers in pulsar science, impacting on

  19. High-energy pulsar models: Developments and new questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.

    2014-03-01

    The past few years have seen a major advance in observational knowledge of high-energy (HE) pulsars. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and {AGILE} have increased the number of known γ-ray pulsars by an order of magnitude, its members being divided roughly equally among millisecond pulsars (MSPs), young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. Many new and diverse emission characteristics are being measured, while radio and X-ray follow-up observations increase the pulsar detection rate and enrich our multiwavelength picture of these extreme sources. The wealth of new data has provided impetus for further development and improvement of existing theoretical pulsar models. Geometric light curve (LC) modelling has uncovered three broad classes into which HE pulsars fall: those where the radio profile leads, is aligned with, or lags the γ-ray profile. For example, the original MSP and original black widow system are members of the second class, requiring co-located emission regions and thereby breaking with traditional notions of radio emission origin. These models imply narrow accelerator gaps in the outer magnetosphere, indicating copious pair production even in MSP magnetospheres that were previously thought to be pair-starved. The increased quality and variety of the LCs necessitate construction of ever more sophisticated models. We will review progress in global magnetosphere solutions which specify a finite conductivity on field lines above the stellar surface, filling the gap between the standard vacuum and force-free (FF; plasma-filled) models. The possibility of deriving phase-resolved spectra for the brightest pulsars, coupled with the fact that the HE pulsar population is sizable enough to allow sampling of various pulsar geometries, will enable much more stringent testing of future radiation models. Reproduction of the observed phase-resolved behavior of this disparate group will be one of the next frontiers in pulsar science, impacting on our

  20. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE VELA PULSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Bartelt, J.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Atwood, W. B.; Bagagli, R.; Baldini, L.; Bellardi, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Band, D. L.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bisello, D.; Baughman, B. M.

    2009-01-01

    The Vela pulsar is the brightest persistent source in the GeV sky and thus is the traditional first target for new γ-ray observatories. We report here on initial Fermi Large Area Telescope observations during verification phase pointed exposure and early sky survey scanning. We have used the Vela signal to verify Fermi timing and angular resolution. The high-quality pulse profile, with some 32,400 pulsed photons at E ≥ 0.03 GeV, shows new features, including pulse structure as fine as 0.3 ms and a distinct third peak, which shifts in phase with energy. We examine the high-energy behavior of the pulsed emission; initial spectra suggest a phase-averaged power-law index of Γ = 1.51 +0.05 -0.04 with an exponential cutoff at E c = 2.9 ± 0.1 GeV. Spectral fits with generalized cutoffs of the form e -(E/E c ) b require b ≤ 1, which is inconsistent with magnetic pair attenuation, and thus favor outer-magnetosphere emission models. Finally, we report on upper limits to any unpulsed component, as might be associated with a surrounding pulsar wind nebula.

  1. Binary pulsars as probes of a Galactic dark matter disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Andrea; Zavala, Jesús; Blas, Diego

    2018-03-01

    As a binary pulsar moves through a wind of dark matter particles, the resulting dynamical friction modifies the binary's orbit. We study this effect for the double disk dark matter (DDDM) scenario, where a fraction of the dark matter is dissipative and settles into a thin disk. For binaries within the dark disk, this effect is enhanced due to the higher dark matter density and lower velocity dispersion of the dark disk, and due to its co-rotation with the baryonic disk. We estimate the effect and compare it with observations for two different limits in the Knudsen number (Kn). First, in the case where DDDM is effectively collisionless within the characteristic scale of the binary (Kn ≫ 1) and ignoring the possible interaction between the pair of dark matter wakes. Second, in the fully collisional case (Kn ≪ 1), where a fluid description can be adopted and the interaction of the pair of wakes is taken into account. We find that the change in the orbital period is of the same order of magnitude in both limits. A comparison with observations reveals good prospects to probe currently allowed DDDM models with timing data from binary pulsars in the near future. We finally comment on the possibility of extending the analysis to the intermediate (rarefied gas) case with Kn ∼ 1.

  2. General-relativistic Simulations of Four States of Accretion onto Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfrey, Kyle; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    Accreting neutron stars can power a wide range of astrophysical phenomena including short- and long-duration gamma-ray bursts, ultra-luminous X-ray sources, and X-ray binaries. Numerical simulations are a valuable tool for studying the accretion-disk–magnetosphere interaction that is central to these problems, most clearly for the recently discovered transitional millisecond pulsars. However, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) methods, widely used for simulating accretion, have difficulty in highly magnetized stellar magnetospheres, while force-free methods, suitable for such regions, cannot include the accreting gas. We present an MHD method that can stably evolve essentially force-free, highly magnetized regions, and describe the first time-dependent relativistic simulations of magnetized accretion onto millisecond pulsars. Our axisymmetric general-relativistic MHD simulations for the first time demonstrate how the interaction of a turbulent accretion flow with a pulsar’s electromagnetic wind can lead to the transition of an isolated pulsar to the accreting state. This transition naturally leads to the formation of relativistic jets, whose power can greatly exceed the power of the isolated pulsar’s wind. If the accretion rate is below a critical value, the pulsar instead expels the accretion stream. More generally, our simulations produce for the first time the four possible accretion regimes, in order of decreasing mass accretion rate: (a) crushed magnetosphere and direct accretion; (b) magnetically channeled accretion onto the stellar poles; (c) the propeller state, where material enters through the light cylinder but is prevented from accreting by the centrifugal barrier; (d) almost perfect exclusion of the accretion flow from the light cylinder by the pulsar wind.

  3. Pulsar spin-down: the glitch-dominated rotation of PSR J0537-6910

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonopoulou, D.; Espinoza, C. M.; Kuiper, L.; Andersson, N.

    2018-01-01

    The young, fast-spinning X-ray pulsar J0537-6910 displays an extreme glitch activity, with large spin-ups interrupting its decelerating rotation every ∼100 d. We present nearly 13 yr of timing data from this pulsar, obtained with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We discovered 22 new glitches and performed a consistent analysis of all 45 glitches detected in the complete data span. Our results corroborate the previously reported strong correlation between glitch spin-up size and the time to the next glitch, a relation that has not been observed so far in any other pulsar. The spin evolution is dominated by the glitches, which occur at a rate of ∼3.5 per year, and the post-glitch recoveries, which prevail the entire interglitch intervals. This distinctive behaviour provides invaluable insights into the physics of glitches. The observations can be explained with a multicomponent model that accounts for the dynamics of the neutron superfluid present in the crust and core of neutron stars. We place limits on the moment of inertia of the component responsible for the spin-up and, ignoring differential rotation, the velocity difference it can sustain with the crust. Contrary to its rapid decrease between glitches, the spin-down rate increased over the 13 yr, and we find the long-term braking index nl = -1.22(4), the only negative braking index seen in a young pulsar. We briefly discuss the plausible interpretations of this result, which is in stark contrast to the predictions of standard models of pulsar spin-down.

  4. Pulsars and cosmic rays in the dense supernova shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezinsky, V.S.; Prilutsky, O.F.

    1977-01-01

    Cosmic rays (c.r.) injected by a young pulsar in the dense supernova shell are considered. The maintenance of the Galactic c.r. pool by pulsar production is shown to have a difficulty: adiabatic energy losses of c.r. in the expanding shell demand a high initial c.r. luminosity of pulsar, which results in too high flux of γ-radiation produced through π 0 -decays (in excess over diffuse γ-ray background). (author)

  5. The Asymmetric Bow Shock/Pulsar Wind Nebula of PSR J2124–3358

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.; Slane, Patrick; Green, Andrew W.

    2017-12-01

    We describe new measurements of the remarkable Hα/UV/X-ray bow shock and pulsar wind nebula (PWN) of the isolated millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J2124‑3358. Chandra X-ray Observatory imaging shows a one-sided jet structure with a softer equatorial outflow. KOALA integral field unit spectroscopy shows that non-radiative emission dominates the bow shock and that the Hα nebula is asymmetric about the pulsar velocity with an elongation into the plane of the sky. We extend analytic models of the contact discontinuity to accommodate such shapes and compare these to the data. Using Hubble Space Telescope UV detections of the pulsar and bow shock, radio timing distance, proper motion measurements, and the CXO-detected projected spin axis, we model the 3D PWN momentum flux distribution. The integrated momentum flux depends on the ionization of the ambient ISM, but for an expected ambient warm neutral medium, we infer I=2.4× {10}45 {{g}} {{cm}}2. This implies {M}{NS}=1.6{--}2.1 {M}ȯ , depending on the equation of state, which in turn suggests that the MSP gained significant mass during recycling and then lost its companion. However, this conclusion is at present tentative, since lower ionization allows ∼ 30 % lower masses, and uncertainty in the parallax allows up to 50% error.

  6. Pulsar Science with the Green Bank 43m Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Mickaliger, M. B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Langston, G. I.; Bilous, A. V.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Ransom, S. M.; Crawford, F.

    2011-01-01

    The 43m telescope at the NRAO site in Green Bank, WV has recently been outfitted with a clone of the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument (GUPPI \\cite{Ransom:2009}) backend, making it very useful for a number of pulsar related studies in frequency ranges 800-1600 MHz and 220-440 MHz. Some of the recent science being done with it include: monitoring of the Crab pulsar, a blind search for transient sources, pulsar searches of targets of opportunity, and an all-sky mapping project. F...

  7. The International Time Service of the National Geographic Institute (IGNA Laboratory) Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, D.; Cimbaro, S.

    2014-06-01

    The "International Time Service" (Servicio Internacional de la Hora, SIH) at the Instituto Geográfico National Argentino (IGNA, formerly Instituto Geográfico Militar Argentino, IGMA), has contributed to the maintenance of the international time scale since its creation in 1931. In 2010 the IGNA started a process of upgrading its time laboratory with the objective of improving its contribution to the computation of the international reference time scales at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM).

  8. Massive stars and X-ray pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrichs, H.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis is a collection of 7 separate articles entitled: long term changes in ultraviolet lines in γ CAS, UV observations of γ CAS: intermittent mass-loss enhancement, episodic mass loss in γ CAS and in other early-type stars, spin-up and spin-down of accreting neutron stars, an excentric close binary model for the X Persei system, has a 97 minute periodicity in 4U 1700-37/HD 153919 really been discovered, and, mass loss and stellar wind in massive X-ray binaries. (Articles 1, 2, 5, 6 and 7 have been previously published). The first three articles are concerned with the irregular mass loss in massive stars. The fourth critically reviews thoughts since 1972 on the origin of the changes in periodicity shown by X-ray pulsars. The last articles indicate the relation between massive stars and X-ray pulsars. (C.F.)

  9. Gravitational wave emission from oscillating millisecond pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Mark G.; Schwenzer, Kai

    2015-02-01

    Neutron stars undergoing r-mode oscillation emit gravitational radiation that might be detected on the Earth. For known millisecond pulsars the observed spin-down rate imposes an upper limit on the possible gravitational wave signal of these sources. Taking into account the physics of r-mode evolution, we show that only sources spinning at frequencies above a few hundred Hertz can be unstable to r-modes, and we derive a more stringent universal r-mode spin-down limit on their gravitational wave signal. We find that this refined bound limits the gravitational wave strain from millisecond pulsars to values below the detection sensitivity of next generation detectors. Young sources are therefore a more promising option for the detection of gravitational waves emitted by r-modes and to probe the interior composition of compact stars in the near future.

  10. Movement of the pulsars and neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkovich, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    The astronomical observations show that the pulsars are not in the center of the remainder of the supernovae that gave its origin, but rather are displaced of the same one and moving to a speed of about 500 km/s, which is much bigger that of the progenitor star. This fact constitutes a strong evidence that the pulsars is accelerated in the moment of its birth and by this it is denominated to this phenomenon 'pulsars kick'. They exist numerous and varied mechanisms to explain this effect, but none makes it in way completely satisfactory. In this thesis we will study in detail a mechanism proposed originally by Kusenko and Segre and that is based on an asymmetric emission of the neutrinos flow induced by the oscillations of the same ones when its spread in a magnetized media. For this end we will develop, in first instance, the Eddington model. This is based on the transport of the neutrino flux and it describes in a reasonable way the atmosphere of a neutron protostar, place where take place the oscillations. Next we will study the problem of the emission of a neutrino gas from a resonance volume. These results will be applied to the study of the kick in the cases of oscillations among active neutrinos and actives with sterile to determine the magnetic field and the oscillation parameters (difference of the square of the masses of those neutrinos and mixture angle in vacuum) required. Finally we will analyze those neutrino oscillations induced by a possible violation of the Equivalence principle and it implication in the pulsars dynamics. (Author)

  11. Are the Dyson rings around pulsars detectable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanov, Z.

    2018-04-01

    In the previous paper ring (Osmanov 2016) (henceforth Paper-I) we have extended the idea of Freeman Dyson and have shown that a supercivilization has to use ring-like megastructures around pulsars instead of a spherical shell. In this work we reexamine the same problem in the observational context and we show that facilities of modern infrared (IR) telescopes (Very Large Telescope Interferometer and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)) might efficiently monitor the nearby zone of the solar system and search for the IR Dyson-rings up to distances of the order of 0.2 kpc, corresponding to the current highest achievable angular resolution, 0.001 mas. In this case the total number of pulsars in the observationally reachable area is about 64 +/- 21. We show that pulsars from the distance of the order of ~ 1 kpc are still visible for WISE as point-like sources but in order to confirm that the object is the neutron star, one has to use the ultraviolet telescopes, which at this moment cannot provide enough sensitivity.

  12. International society of sports nutrition position stand: nutrient timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerksick, Chad M; Arent, Shawn; Schoenfeld, Brad J; Stout, Jeffrey R; Campbell, Bill; Wilborn, Colin D; Taylor, Lem; Kalman, Doug; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Kreider, Richard B; Willoughby, Darryn; Arciero, Paul J; VanDusseldorp, Trisha A; Ormsbee, Michael J; Wildman, Robert; Greenwood, Mike; Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Aragon, Alan A; Antonio, Jose

    2017-01-01

    The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) provides an objective and critical review regarding the timing of macronutrients in reference to healthy, exercising adults and in particular highly trained individuals on exercise performance and body composition. The following points summarize the position of the ISSN:Nutrient timing incorporates the use of methodical planning and eating of whole foods, fortified foods and dietary supplements. The timing of energy intake and the ratio of certain ingested macronutrients may enhance recovery and tissue repair, augment muscle protein synthesis (MPS), and improve mood states following high-volume or intense exercise.Endogenous glycogen stores are maximized by following a high-carbohydrate diet (8-12 g of carbohydrate/kg/day [g/kg/day]); moreover, these stores are depleted most by high volume exercise.If rapid restoration of glycogen is required ( 70) glycemic indexthe addition of caffeine (3-8 mg/kg)combining carbohydrates (0.8 g/kg/h) with protein (0.2-0.4 g/kg/h) Extended (> 60 min) bouts of high intensity (> 70% VO 2 max) exercise challenge fuel supply and fluid regulation, thus carbohydrate should be consumed at a rate of ~30-60 g of carbohydrate/h in a 6-8% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (6-12 fluid ounces) every 10-15 min throughout the entire exercise bout, particularly in those exercise bouts that span beyond 70 min. When carbohydrate delivery is inadequate, adding protein may help increase performance, ameliorate muscle damage, promote euglycemia and facilitate glycogen re-synthesis.Carbohydrate ingestion throughout resistance exercise (e.g., 3-6 sets of 8-12 repetition maximum [RM] using multiple exercises targeting all major muscle groups) has been shown to promote euglycemia and higher glycogen stores. Consuming carbohydrate solely or in combination with protein during resistance exercise increases muscle glycogen stores, ameliorates muscle damage, and facilitates greater acute and

  13. Probing Millisecond Pulsar Emission Geometry Using Light Curves From the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Christo; Harding, Alice; Guillemot, L.

    2009-01-01

    An interesting new high-energy pulsar sub-population is emerging following early discoveries of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We present results from 3D emission modeling, including the Special Relativistic effects of aberration and time-of-flight delays and also rotational sweepback of 13-field lines, in the geometric context of polar cap (PC), slot gap (SG), outer gap (OG), and two-pole caustic (TPC) pulsar models. In contrast to the general belief that these very old, rapidly-rotating neutron stars (NSs) should have largely pair-starved magnetospheres due to the absence of significant pair production, we find that most of the light curves are best fit by SG and OG models, which indicates the presence of narrow accelerating gaps limited by robust pair production -- even in these pulsars with very low spin-down luminosities. The gamma-ray pulse shapes and relative phase lags with respect to the radio pulses point to high-altitude emission being dominant for all geometries. We also find exclusive differentiation of the current gamma-ray MSP population into two MSP sub-classes: light curve shapes and lags across wavebands impose either pair-starved PC (PSPC) or SG / OG-type geometries. In the first case, the radio pulse has a small lag with respect to the single gamma-ray pulse, while the (first) gamma-ray peak usually trails the radio by a large phase offset in the latter case. Finally, we find that the flux correction factor as a function of magnetic inclination and observer angles is typically of order unity for all models. Our calculation of light curves and flux correction factor f(_, _, P) for the case of MSPs is therefore complementary to the "ATLAS paper" of Watters et al. for younger pulsars.

  14. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS PSR J1057-5226, J1709-4429, AND J1952+3252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Buehler, R.; Antolini, E.; Bonamente, E.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.

    2010-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data have confirmed the pulsed emission from all six high-confidence gamma-ray pulsars previously known from the EGRET observations. We report results obtained from the analysis of 13 months of LAT data for three of these pulsars (PSR J1057-5226, PSR J1709-4429, and PSR J1952+3252) each of which had some unique feature among the EGRET pulsars. The excellent sensitivity of LAT allows more detailed analysis of the evolution of the pulse profile with energy and also of the variation of the spectral shape with phase. We measure the cutoff energy of the pulsed emission from these pulsars for the first time and provide a more complete picture of the emission mechanism. The results confirm some, but not all, of the features seen in the EGRET data.

  15. Meter-wavelength observations of pulsars using very long baseline interferometry. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ., College Park; [with particular attention to the Crab nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, N. R.

    1974-01-01

    The results of an investigation of the angular structure imposed on pulsar radiation due to scattering in the interstellar medium are presented. The technique of very-long-baseline interferometry was used to obtain the necessary high angular resolution. The interferometers formed by the Arecibo, NRAO, and Sugar Grove telescopes were used at radio frequencies of 196, 111, and 74 MHz during seven separate observing sessions between November 1971 and February 1973. A crude visibility function for the Crab nebular pulsar was obtained along with the correlated pulse profile. The technique of differential fringe phase was used to show that the pulsar and the compact source in the Crab nebula are coincident to within 0.001 arcsec which corresponds to aproximately 2 a.u. at the distance to the nebula. The ratio of pulsing to total flux, and the fringe visibility of the time-averaged pulsing flux are also discussed, and apparent angular sizes of the pulsars were measured.

  16. The evolution of international cooperation up to the present time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, Bertrand

    1978-01-01

    This paper delivered at the Symposium organised on the XXth anniservary of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency recalls the historical background of nuclear cooperation which went through three stages : European collaboration, U.S. isolationist policy and finally, openness. Cooperation took place at three levels: bilateral and multilateral technical cooperation; creation of joint multinational undertakings; trade relations. The paper then examines three particular areas which illustrate the evolution of international nuclear cooperation, i.e., organisation of the uranium market, uranium enrichment and the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. (NEA) [fr

  17. Hard X-ray timing and spectral characteristics of the energetic pulsar PSR J0205+6449 in supernova remnant 3C 58: An RXTE PCA/HEXTE and XMM-Newton view on the 0.5-250 keV band

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, L.; Hermsen, W.; Urama, J.O.; den Hartog, P.R.; Lyne, A.G.; Stappers, B.W.

    2010-01-01

    Context. PSR J0205+6449 is a young rotation-powered pulsar in SNR 3C 58. It is one of only three young (<10 000 year old) pulsars that have so far been detected in the radio and the classical X-ray bands, as well as at hard X-rays above 20 keV and at high-energy (>100 MeV) gamma-rays. The other two

  18. Formation of Double Neutron Stars, Millisecond Pulsars and Double ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Edward P. J. Heuvel

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... Abstract. The 1982 model for the formation of Hulse–Taylor binary radio pulsar PSR B1913+16 is described, which since has become the 'standard model' for the formation of the double neutron stars, confirmed by the. 2003 discovery of the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039AB. A brief overview is ...

  19. Second Generation Dutch Pulsar Machine - PuMa-II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karuppusamy, Ramesh; Stappers, Ben; Slump, Cornelis H.; van der Klis, Michiel

    2004-01-01

    The Second Generation Pulsar Machine (PuMa- II) is under development for the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. This is a summary of th e system design and architecture. We show that state of the art pulsar research is possible with commercially available hardware components. This approach

  20. Detecting dark matter with imploding pulsars in the galactic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramante, Joseph; Linden, Tim

    2014-11-07

    The paucity of old millisecond pulsars observed at the galactic center of the Milky Way could be the result of dark matter accumulating in and destroying neutron stars. In regions of high dark matter density, dark matter clumped in a pulsar can exceed the Schwarzschild limit and collapse into a natal black hole which destroys the pulsar. We examine what dark matter models are consistent with this hypothesis and find regions of parameter space where dark matter accumulation can significantly degrade the neutron star population within the galactic center while remaining consistent with observations of old millisecond pulsars in globular clusters and near the solar position. We identify what dark matter couplings and masses might cause a young pulsar at the galactic center to unexpectedly extinguish. Finally, we find that pulsar collapse age scales inversely with the dark matter density and linearly with the dark matter velocity dispersion. This implies that maximum pulsar age is spatially dependent on position within the dark matter halo of the Milky Way. In turn, this pulsar age spatial dependence will be dark matter model dependent.

  1. On the internal resonant modes in marching-on-in-time solution of the time domain electric field integral equation

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Yifei

    2013-08-01

    Internal resonant modes are always observed in the marching-on-in-time (MOT) solution of the time domain electric field integral equation (EFIE), although \\'relaxed initial conditions,\\' which are enforced at the beginning of time marching, should in theory prevent these spurious modes from appearing. It has been conjectured that, numerical errors built up during time marching establish the necessary initial conditions and induce the internal resonant modes. However, this conjecture has never been proved by systematic numerical experiments. Our numerical results in this communication demonstrate that, the internal resonant modes\\' amplitudes are indeed dictated by the numerical errors. Additionally, it is shown that in a few cases, the internal resonant modes can be made \\'invisible\\' by significantly suppressing the numerical errors. These tests prove the conjecture that the internal resonant modes are induced by numerical errors when the time domain EFIE is solved by the MOT method. © 2013 IEEE.

  2. International business and economic geography : knowledge, time and transactions costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCann, Philip

    This paper sketches out how the ways in which a combination of economic geography and international business approaches can shed light on the spatial behaviour of multinational companies. The emphasis of the argument here is on the nature of the knowledge content embedded in the transactions of the

  3. Managing Migration: Time for a New International Regime?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D. Handmaker (Jeff)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractFor anyone concerned with understanding the complex factors behind contemporary migration and its impact on international refugee law, and especially for those attempting to develop policies to manage migration, this book makes a valuable contribution. This collection of articles from a

  4. Strong-field tests of gravity using pulsars and black holes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, M.; Backer, D.C.; Cordes, J.M.; Lazio, T.J.W.; Stappers, B.W.; Johnston, S.

    2004-01-01

    The sensitivity of the SKA enables a number of tests of theories of gravity. A Galactic Census of pulsars will discover most of the active pulsars in the Galaxy beamed toward us. In this census will almost certainly be pulsar black hole binaries as well as pulsars orbiting the super-massive black

  5. On the energetics and number of gamma-ray pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermer, Charles D.; Sturner, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    We examine a nearly aligned pulsar model with polar cap acceleration in order to explain the energetics and number of the known gamma-ray pulsars. In this model, the efficiency of converting spin-down luminosity to gamma-ray luminosity increases with decreasing spin-down luminosity, a trend recently emphasized by Ulmer. The predicted gamma-ray flux is proportional to dot P(exp 3/4)/P(exp 5/4) d(exp 2), where P is the period, dot P is the period derivative, and d is the distance to the pulsar. For initial spin periods between approximately equals 10 and 30 ms and neutron star polar magnetic fields between approximately equals 1 and 4 TG, this model accounts for the number and age distribution of the five pulsars which have been observed to emit gamma rays at energies greater than 100 MeV. Implications for pulsar studies are considered.

  6. Do the enigmatic ``Infrared-Faint Radio Sources'' include pulsars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, George; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Keith, Michael; Mao, Minnie; Champion, David

    2009-04-01

    The Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) team have surveyed seven square degrees of sky at 1.4GHz. During processing some unexpected infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS sources) were discovered. The nature of these sources is not understood, but it is possible that some of these sources may be pulsars within our own galaxy. We propose to observe the IFRS sources with steep spectral indices using standard search techniques to determine whether or not they are pulsars. A pulsar detection would 1) remove a subset of the IFRS sources from the ATLAS sample so they would not need to be observed with large optical/IR telescopes to find their hosts and 2) be intrinsically interesting as the pulsar would be a millisecond pulsar and/or have an extreme spatial velocity.

  7. Testing the strong equivalence principle with the triple pulsar PSR J 0337 +1715

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Lijing

    2016-04-01

    Three conceptually different masses appear in equations of motion for objects under gravity, namely, the inertial mass, mI , the passive gravitational mass, mP, and the active gravitational mass, mA. It is assumed that, for any objects, mI=mP=mA in the Newtonian gravity, and mI=mP in the Einsteinian gravity, oblivious to objects' sophisticated internal structure. Empirical examination of the equivalence probes deep into gravity theories. We study the possibility of carrying out new tests based on pulsar timing of the stellar triple system, PSR J 0337 +1715 . Various machine-precision three-body simulations are performed, from which, the equivalence-violating parameters are extracted with Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling that takes full correlations into account. We show that the difference in masses could be probed to 3 ×1 0-8 , improving the current constraints from lunar laser ranging on the post-Newtonian parameters that govern violations of mP=mI and mA=mP by thousands and millions, respectively. The test of mP=mA would represent the first test of Newton's third law with compact objects.

  8. Investigating the "transitional'' binary pulsar XSS J12270-4859

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possenti, Andrea; Burgay, Marta; Belloni, Tomaso; Pellizzoni, Alberto Paolo; de Martino, Domitilla; Papitto, Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    XSS J1227-4859 is the second "Transitional" pulsar binary system discovered in the galactic field. We plan to set up a campaign of observations at 50cm, 20cm, 10cm and 3cm, with the aims of: (i) discriminating the various proposed mechanisms responsible for the orbital variations seen in the system; (ii) studying the time evolution and the nature of the radio eclipses; (iii) investigating the nature of the gamma-ray emission from the binary; (iv) determining the critical X-ray luminosity above which the pulsed radio emission disappears; (v) constraining the geometry of the emission from the system in the radio, X-ray and gamma-ray bands.

  9. Internal and ancestral controls of cell-generation times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubitschek, H. E.

    1969-01-01

    Lateral and longitudinal correlations between related cells reveal associations between the generation times of cells for an intermediate period /three generations in bacteral cultures/. Generation times of progeny are influenced by nongenetic factors transmitted from their ancestors.

  10. Radio emission region exposed: courtesy of the double pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomiashvili, David; Lyutikov, Maxim

    2014-06-01

    The double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B offers exceptional possibilities for detailed probes of the structure of the pulsar magnetosphere, pulsar winds and relativistic reconnection. We numerically model the distortions of the magnetosphere of pulsar B by the magnetized wind from pulsar A, including effects of magnetic reconnection and of the geodetic precession. Geodetic precession leads to secular evolution of the geometric parameters and effectively allows a 3D view of the magnetosphere. Using the two complimentary models of pulsar B's magnetosphere, adapted from the Earth's magnetosphere models by Tsyganenko (ideal pressure confinement) and Dungey (highly resistive limit), we determine the precise location and shape of the coherent radio emission generation region within pulsar B's magnetosphere. We successfully reproduce orbital variations and secular evolution of the profile of B, as well as subpulse drift (due to reconnection between the magnetospheric and wind magnetic fields), and determine the location and the shape of the emission region. The emission region is located at about 3750 stellar radii and has a horseshoe-like shape, which is centred on the polar magnetic field lines. The best-fitting angular parameters of the emission region indicate that radio emission is generated on the field lines which, according to the theoretical models, originate close to the poles and carry the maximum current. We resolved all but one degeneracy in pulsar B's geometry. When considered together, the results of the two models converge and can explain why the modulation of B's radio emission at A's period is observed only within a certain orbital phase region. Our results imply that the wind of pulsar A has a striped structure only 1000 light-cylinder radii away. We discuss the implications of these results for pulsar magnetospheric models, mechanisms of coherent radio emission generation and reconnection rates in relativistic plasma.

  11. Management of internal communication in times of uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez de la Gala, F.

    2014-01-01

    Garona is having a strong media coverage since 2009. The continuity process is under great controversy that has generated increased uncertainty for workers and their families, affecting motivation. Although internal communication has sought to manage its effects on the structure of the company, the rate of spread of alien information has made this complex mission. The regulatory body has been interested in its potential impact on safety culture, making a significant difference compared to other industrial sectors. (Author)

  12. Characterizing multiple solutions to the time-energy canonical commutation relation via internal symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballar, Roland Cristopher F.; Ocampo, Leonard R.; Galapon, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    Internal symmetries can be used to classify multiple solutions to the time-energy canonical commutation relation (TE-CCR). The dynamical behavior of solutions to the TE-CCR possessing particular internal symmetries involving time reversal differ significantly from solutions to the TE-CCR without those particular symmetries, implying a connection between the internal symmetries of a quantum system, its internal unitary dynamics, and the TE-CCR.

  13. Statistical properties of giant pulses from the Crab pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, M. V.; Stappers, B.

    2007-08-01

    Aims:We have studied the statistics of giant pulses from the Crab pulsar for the first time with particular reference to their widths. Methods: We have analyzed data collected during 3.5 h of observations conducted with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope operated in a tied-array mode at a frequency of 1200 MHz. The PuMa pulsar backend provided voltage recording of X and Y linear polarization states in two conjugate 10 MHz bands. We restricted the time resolution to 4 μs to match the scattering on the interstellar inhomogeneities. Results: In total about 18000 giant pulses (GP) were detected in full intensity with a threshold level of 6σ. We analyzed cumulative probability distribution (CPD) of giant pulse energies for groups of GPs with different effective widths in the range 4 to 65 μs. The CPDs were found to manifest notable differences for the different GP width groups. The slope of a power-law fit to the high-energy portion of the CPD evolves from -1.7 to -3.2 when going from the shortest to the longest GPs. There are breaks in the CPD power-law fits indicating flattening at low energies with indices varying from -1.0 to -1.9 for the short and long GPs, respectively. The GPs with a stronger peak flux density were found to be of shorter duration. We compare our results with previously published data and discuss the importance of these peculiarities in the statistical properties of GPs for the theoretical understanding of the emission mechanism responsible for GP generation.

  14. No tension between assembly models of super massive black hole binaries and pulsar observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Hannah; Chen, Siyuan; Del Pozzo, Walter; Sesana, Alberto; Vecchio, Alberto

    2018-02-08

    Pulsar timing arrays are presently the only means to search for the gravitational wave stochastic background from super massive black hole binary populations, considered to be within the grasp of current or near-future observations. The stringent upper limit from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array has been interpreted as excluding (>90% confidence) the current paradigm of binary assembly through galaxy mergers and hardening via stellar interaction, suggesting evolution is accelerated or stalled. Using Bayesian hierarchical modelling we consider implications of this upper limit for a range of astrophysical scenarios, without invoking stalling, nor more exotic physical processes. All scenarios are fully consistent with the upper limit, but (weak) bounds on population parameters can be inferred. Recent upward revisions of the black hole-galaxy bulge mass relation are disfavoured at 1.6σ against lighter models. Once sensitivity improves by an order of magnitude, a non-detection will disfavour the most optimistic scenarios at 3.9σ.

  15. Scattering analysis of LOFAR pulsar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, M.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Zagkouris, K.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Michilli, D.; Pilia, M.; Sobey, C.

    2017-09-01

    We measure the effects of interstellar scattering on average pulse profiles from 13 radio pulsars with simple pulse shapes. We use data from the LOFAR High Band Antennas, at frequencies between 110 and 190 MHz. We apply a forward fitting technique, and simultaneously determine the intrinsic pulse shape, assuming single Gaussian component profiles. We find that the constant τ, associated with scattering by a single thin screen, has a power-law dependence on frequency τ ∝ ν-α, with indices ranging from α = 1.50 to 4.0, despite simplest theoretical models predicting α = 4.0 or 4.4. Modelling the screen as an isotropic or extremely anisotropic scatterer, we find anisotropic scattering fits lead to larger power-law indices, often in better agreement with theoretically expected values. We compare the scattering models based on the inferred, frequency-dependent parameters of the intrinsic pulse, and the resulting correction to the dispersion measure (DM). We highlight the cases in which fits of extreme anisotropic scattering are appealing, while stressing that the data do not strictly favour either model for any of the 13 pulsars. The pulsars show anomalous scattering properties that are consistent with finite scattering screens and/or anisotropy, but these data alone do not provide the means for an unambiguous characterization of the screens. We revisit the empirical τ versus DM relation and consider how our results support a frequency dependence of α. Very long baseline interferometry, and observations of the scattering and scintillation properties of these sources at higher frequencies, will provide further evidence.

  16. The origin of radio pulsar polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyks, J.

    2017-12-01

    Polarization of radio pulsar profiles involves a number of poorly understood, intriguing phenomena, such as the existence of comparable amounts of orthogonal polarization modes (OPMs), strong distortions of polarization angle (PA) curves into shapes inconsistent with the rotating vector model (RVM), and the strong circular polarization V which can be maximum (instead of zero) at the OPM jumps. It is shown that the comparable OPMs and large V result from a coherent addition of phase-delayed waves in natural propagation modes, which are produced by a linearly polarized emitted signal. The coherent mode summation implies opposite polarization properties to those known from the incoherent case, in particular, the OPM jumps occur at peaks of V, whereas V changes sign at a maximum linear polarization fraction L/I. These features are indispensable to interpret various observed polarization effects. It is shown that statistical properties of emission and propagation can be efficiently parametrized in a simple model of coherent mode addition, which is successfully applied to complex polarization phenomena, such as the stepwise PA curve of PSR B1913+16 and the strong PA distortions within core components of pulsars B1933+16 and B1237+25. The inclusion of coherent mode addition opens the possibility for a number of new polarization effects, such as inversion of relative modal strength, twin minima in L/I coincident with peaks in V, 45° PA jumps in weakly polarized emission, and loop-shaped core PA distortions. The empirical treatment of the coherency of mode addition makes it possible to advance the understanding of pulsar polarization beyond the RVM model.

  17. Cosmic-ray Positrons from Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, C.; Kopp, A.; Harding, A. K.; Gonthier, P. L.; Büsching, I.

    2015-07-01

    Observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope of γ-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP) light curves imply copious pair production in their magnetospheres, and not exclusively in those of younger pulsars. Such pair cascades may be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons, contributing to the observed enhancement in positron flux above ∼10 GeV. Fermi has also uncovered many new MSPs, impacting Galactic stellar population models. We investigate the contribution of Galactic MSPs to the flux of terrestrial cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. Our population synthesis code predicts the source properties of present-day MSPs. We simulate their pair spectra invoking an offset-dipole magnetic field. We also consider positrons and electrons that have been further accelerated to energies of several TeV by strong intrabinary shocks in black widow (BW) and redback (RB) systems. Since MSPs are not surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae or supernova shells, we assume that the pairs freely escape and undergo losses only in the intergalactic medium. We compute the transported pair spectra at Earth, following their diffusion and energy loss through the Galaxy. The predicted particle flux increases for non-zero offsets of the magnetic polar caps. Pair cascades from the magnetospheres of MSPs are only modest contributors around a few tens of GeV to the lepton fluxes measured by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, PAMELA, and Fermi, after which this component cuts off. The contribution by BWs and RBs may, however, reach levels of a few tens of percent at tens of TeV, depending on model parameters.

  18. COSMIC-RAY POSITRONS FROM MILLISECOND PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venter, C.; Kopp, A.; Büsching, I. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Harding, A. K. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gonthier, P. L. [Hope College, Department of Physics, Holland, MI (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope of γ-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP) light curves imply copious pair production in their magnetospheres, and not exclusively in those of younger pulsars. Such pair cascades may be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons, contributing to the observed enhancement in positron flux above ∼10 GeV. Fermi has also uncovered many new MSPs, impacting Galactic stellar population models. We investigate the contribution of Galactic MSPs to the flux of terrestrial cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. Our population synthesis code predicts the source properties of present-day MSPs. We simulate their pair spectra invoking an offset-dipole magnetic field. We also consider positrons and electrons that have been further accelerated to energies of several TeV by strong intrabinary shocks in black widow (BW) and redback (RB) systems. Since MSPs are not surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae or supernova shells, we assume that the pairs freely escape and undergo losses only in the intergalactic medium. We compute the transported pair spectra at Earth, following their diffusion and energy loss through the Galaxy. The predicted particle flux increases for non-zero offsets of the magnetic polar caps. Pair cascades from the magnetospheres of MSPs are only modest contributors around a few tens of GeV to the lepton fluxes measured by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, PAMELA, and Fermi, after which this component cuts off. The contribution by BWs and RBs may, however, reach levels of a few tens of percent at tens of TeV, depending on model parameters.

  19. Particle Acceleration in Dissipative Pulsar Magnetospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanas, Z.; Kalapotharakos, C.; Harding, A.; Contopoulos, I.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsar magnetospheres represent unipolar inductor-type electrical circuits at which an EM potential across the polar cap (due to the rotation of their magnetic field) drives currents that run in and out of the polar cap and close at infinity. An estimate ofthe magnitude of this current can be obtained by dividing the potential induced across the polar cap V approx = B(sub O) R(sub O)(Omega R(sub O)/c)(exp 2) by the impedance of free space Z approx eq 4 pi/c; the resulting polar cap current density is close to $n {GJ} c$ where $n_{GJ}$ is the Goldreich-Julian (GJ) charge density. This argument suggests that even at current densities close to the GJ one, pulsar magnetospheres have a significant component of electric field $E_{parallel}$, parallel to the magnetic field, a condition necessary for particle acceleration and the production of radiation. We present the magnetic and electric field structures as well as the currents, charge densities, spin down rates and potential drops along the magnetic field lines of pulsar magnetospheres which do not obey the ideal MHD condition $E cdot B = 0$. By relating the current density along the poloidal field lines to the parallel electric field via a kind of Ohm's law $J = sigma E_{parallel}$ we study the structure of these magnetospheres as a function of the conductivity $sigma$. We find that for $sigma gg OmegaS the solution tends to the (ideal) Force-Free one and to the Vacuum one for $sigma 11 OmegaS. Finally, we present dissipative magnetospheric solutions with spatially variable $sigma$ that supports various microphysical properties and are compatible with the observations.

  20. Magnetospheric structure of rotation powered pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arons, J. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA) California Univ., Livermore, CA (USA). Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics)

    1991-01-07

    I survey recent theoretical work on the structure of the magnetospheres of rotation powered pulsars, within the observational constraints set by their observed spindown, their ability to power synchrotron nebulae and their ability to produce beamed collective radio emission, while putting only a small fraction of their energy into incoherent X- and gamma radiation. I find no single theory has yet given a consistent description of the magnetosphere, but I conclude that models based on a dense outflow of pairs from the polar caps, permeated by a lower density flow of heavy ions, are the most promising avenue for future research. 106 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Effects of general relativity on glitch amplitudes and pulsar mass upper bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, M.; Montoli, A.; Pizzochero, P. M.

    2018-04-01

    Pinning of vortex lines in the inner crust of a spinning neutron star may be the mechanism that enhances the differential rotation of the internal neutron superfluid, making it possible to freeze some amount of angular momentum which eventually can be released, thus causing a pulsar glitch. We investigate the general relativistic corrections to pulsar glitch amplitudes in the slow-rotation approximation, consistently with the stratified structure of the star. We thus provide a relativistic generalization of a previous Newtonian model that was recently used to estimate upper bounds on the masses of glitching pulsars. We find that the effect of general relativity on the glitch amplitudes obtained by emptying the whole angular momentum reservoir is less than 30 per cent. Moreover, we show that the Newtonian upper bounds on the masses of large glitchers obtained from observations of their maximum recorded event differ by less than a few percent from those calculated within the relativistic framework. This work can also serve as a basis to construct more sophisticated models of angular momentum reservoir in a relativistic context: in particular, we present two alternative scenarios for macroscopically rigid and slack pinned vortex lines, and we generalize the Feynman-Onsager relation to the case when both entrainment coupling between the fluids and a strong axisymmetric gravitational field are present.

  2. Shining Light on Quantum Gravity with Pulsar-Black hole Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, John; Kavic, Michael; Lippert, Matthew; Simonetti, John H.

    2017-03-01

    Pulsars are some of the most accurate clocks found in nature, while black holes offer a unique arena for the study of quantum gravity. As such, pulsar-black hole (PSR-BH) binaries provide ideal astrophysical systems for detecting the effects of quantum gravity. With the success of aLIGO and the advent of instruments like SKA and eLISA, the prospects for the discovery of such PSR-BH binaries are very promising. We argue that PSR-BH binaries can serve as ready-made testing grounds for proposed resolutions to the black hole information paradox. We propose using timing signals from a pulsar beam passing through the region near a black hole event horizon as a probe of quantum gravitational effects. In particular, we demonstrate that fluctuations of the geometry outside a black hole lead to an increase in the measured root mean square deviation of the arrival times of pulsar pulses traveling near the horizon. This allows for a clear observational test of the nonviolent nonlocality proposal for black hole information escape. For a series of pulses traversing the near-horizon region, this model predicts an rms in pulse arrival times of ˜ 30 μ {{s}} for a 3{M}⊙ black hole, ˜ 0.3 {ms} for a 30{M}⊙ black hole, and ˜ 40 {{s}} for Sgr A*. The current precision of pulse time-of-arrival measurements is sufficient to discern these rms fluctuations. This work is intended to motivate observational searches for PSR-BH systems as a means of testing models of quantum gravity.

  3. Swift follow-up of the newly discovered burster millisecond pulsar IGR J17511-3057

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozzo, E.; Ferrigno, C.; Kuulkers, E.

    2009-01-01

    Following the discovery of the new hard X-ray transient IGR J17511-3057 by INTEGRAL (Atel #2196) and its classification as a millisecond pulsar by RXTE (Atel #2197), a Swift ToO was performed. Swift/XRT observed IGR J17511-3057 on 2009-09-13 at 19:53:31 for a total exposure time of 4 ks. The firs...

  4. Multiband nonthermal radiative properties of pulsar wind nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bo-Tao; Zhang, Li; Fang, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Aims: The nonthermal radiative properties of 18 pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are studied in the 1D leptonic model. Methods: The dynamical and radiative evolution of a PWN in a nonradiative supernova remnant are self-consistently investigated in this model. The leptons (electrons/positrons) are injected with a broken power-law form, and nonthermal emission from a PWN is mainly produced by time-dependent relativistic leptons through synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton process. Results: Observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of all 18 PWNe are reproduced well, where the indexes of low-energy electron components lie in the range of 1.0-1.8 and those of high-energy electron components in the range of 2.1-3.1. Our results show that FX/Fγ > 10 for young PWNe; 1 particle-dominated. Statistical analysis for the sample of 14 PWNe further indicate that (1) not all pulsar parameters have correlations with electron injection parameters, but electron maximum energy and PWN magnetic field correlate with the magnetic field at the light cylinder, the potential difference at the polar cap, and the spin-down power; (2) the spin-down power positively correlates with radio, X-ray, bolometric, and synchrotron luminosities, but does not correlate with gamma-ray luminosity; (3) the spin-down power positively correlates with radio, X-ray, and γ-band surface brightness; and (4) the PWN radius and the PWN age negatively correlate with X-ray luminosity, the ratio of X-ray to gamma-ray luminosities, and the synchrotron luminosity.

  5. Galactic Shapiro delay to the Crab pulsar and limit on weak equivalence principle violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Shantanu; Kahya, Emre

    2018-02-01

    We calculate the total galactic Shapiro delay to the Crab pulsar by including the contributions from the dark matter as well as baryonic matter along the line of sight. The total delay due to dark matter potential is about 3.4 days. For baryonic matter, we included the contributions from both the bulge and the disk, which are approximately 0.12 and 0.32 days respectively. The total delay from all the matter distribution is therefore 3.84 days. We also calculate the limit on violations of Weak equivalence principle by using observations of "nano-shot" giant pulses from the Crab pulsar with time-delay <0.4 ns, as well as using time differences between radio and optical photons observed from this pulsar. Using the former, we obtain a limit on violation of Weak equivalence principle in terms of the PPN parameter Δ γ < 2.41× 10^{-15}. From the time-difference between simultaneous optical and radio observations, we get Δ γ < 1.54× 10^{-9}. We also point out differences in our calculation of Shapiro delay and that from two recent papers (Yang and Zhang, Phys Rev D 94(10):101501, 2016; Zhang and Gong, Astrophys J 837:134, 2017), which used the same observations to obtain a corresponding limit on Δ γ.

  6. TWO MILLISECOND PULSARS DISCOVERED BY THE PALFA SURVEY AND A SHAPIRO DELAY MEASUREMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deneva, J. S.; Camilo, F. [Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612 (United States); Freire, P. C. C.; Champion, D. J.; Desvignes, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Cordes, J. M.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Lyne, A. G. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Cognard, I. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l' Environnement et de l' Espace, LPC2E, CNRS et Universite d' Orleans, and Station de radioastronomie de Nancay, Observatoire de Paris (France); Nice, D. J. [Department of Physics, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042 (United States); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Allen, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Bhat, N. D. R. [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Bogdanov, S. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Crawford, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Hessels, J. W. T. [ASTRON, Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Jenet, F. A. [Center for Gravitational Wave Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue Universite, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); and others

    2012-09-20

    We present two millisecond pulsar discoveries from the PALFA survey of the Galactic plane with the Arecibo telescope. PSR J1955+2527 is an isolated pulsar with a period of 4.87 ms, and PSR J1949+3106 has a period of 13.14 ms and is in a 1.9 day binary system with a massive companion. Their timing solutions, based on 4 years of timing measurements with the Arecibo, Green Bank, Nancay, and Jodrell Bank telescopes, allow precise determination of spin and astrometric parameters, including precise determinations of their proper motions. For PSR J1949+3106, we can clearly detect the Shapiro delay. From this we measure the pulsar mass to be 1.47{sup +0.43}{sub -0.31} M{sub Sun }, the companion mass to be 0.85{sup +0.14}{sub -0.11} M{sub Sun }, and the orbital inclination to be i = 79.9{sup -1.9}{sub +1.6} deg, where uncertainties correspond to {+-}1{sigma} confidence levels. With continued timing, we expect to also be able to detect the advance of periastron for the J1949+3106 system. This effect, combined with the Shapiro delay, will eventually provide very precise mass measurements for this system and a test of general relativity.

  7. The SUrvey for Pulsars and Extragalactic Radio Bursts – II. New FRB discoveries and their follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhandari, S.; Keane, E.F.; Barr, E.D.; Jameson, A.; Petroff, E.; Johnston, S.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N.D.R.; Burgay, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Caleb, M.; Eatough, R.P.; Flynn, C.; Green, J.A.; Jankowski, F.; Kramer, M.; Krishnan, V Venkatraman; Morello, V.; Possenti, A.; Stappers, B.; Tiburzi, C.; van Straten, W.; Andreoni, I.; Butterley, T.; Chandra, P.; Cooke, J.; Corongiu, A.; Coward, D.M.; Dhillon, V.S.; Dodson, R.; Hardy, L.K.; Howell, E.J.; Jaroenjittichai, P.; Klotz, A.; Littlefair, S.P.; Marsh, T.R.; Mickaliger, M.; Muxlow, T.; Perrodin, D.; Pritchard, D.; Sawangwit, U.; Terai, T.; Tominaga, N.; Torne, P.; Totani, T.; Trois, A.; Turpin, D.; Niino, Y.; Wilson, R.W.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Marti, J.; Basa, S.; Belhorma, B.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bourret, S.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Brânzas, H.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coelho, J.A.B.; Coleiro, A.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Díaz, A.F.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Di Palma, I.; Domi, A.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; El Bojaddaini, I.; El Khayati, N.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ettahiri, A.; Fassi, F.; Felis, I.; Fusco, L.A.; Gay, P.; Giordano, V.; Glotin, H.; Grégoire, T.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A.J.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; Illuminati, G.; James, C.W.; de Jong, M.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachaud, C.; Lahmann, R.; Lefevre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martinez-Mora, J.A.; Mele, R.; Melis, K.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Navas, S.; Nezri, E.; Organokov, M.; Pavalas, G.E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Quinn, L.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Saldaña, M.; Salvadori, I.; Samtleben, D.F.E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schussler, F.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Trovato, A.; Turpin, D.; Tönnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Versari, F.; Vivolo, D.; Vizzocca, A.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2017-01-01

    We report the discovery of four Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) in the ongoing SUrvey for Pulsars and Extragalactic Radio Bursts at the Parkes Radio Telescope: FRBs 150610, 151206, 151230 and 160102. Our real-time discoveries have enabled us to conduct extensive, rapid multimessenger follow-up at 12 major

  8. Pulsar Emission Geometry and Accelerating Field Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCesar, Megan E.; Harding, Alice K.; Miller, M. Coleman; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Parent, Damien

    2012-01-01

    The high-quality Fermi LAT observations of gamma-ray pulsars have opened a new window to understanding the generation mechanisms of high-energy emission from these systems, The high statistics allow for careful modeling of the light curve features as well as for phase resolved spectral modeling. We modeled the LAT light curves of the Vela and CTA I pulsars with simulated high-energy light curves generated from geometrical representations of the outer gap and slot gap emission models. within the vacuum retarded dipole and force-free fields. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo maximum likelihood method was used to explore the phase space of the magnetic inclination angle, viewing angle. maximum emission radius, and gap width. We also used the measured spectral cutoff energies to estimate the accelerating parallel electric field dependence on radius. under the assumptions that the high-energy emission is dominated by curvature radiation and the geometry (radius of emission and minimum radius of curvature of the magnetic field lines) is determined by the best fitting light curves for each model. We find that light curves from the vacuum field more closely match the observed light curves and multiwavelength constraints, and that the calculated parallel electric field can place additional constraints on the emission geometry

  9. Turbulent Magnetic Relaxation in Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrake, Jonathan; Arons, Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    We present a model for magnetic energy dissipation in a pulsar wind nebula. A better understanding of this process is required to assess the likelihood that certain astrophysical transients may be powered by the spin-down of a “millisecond magnetar.” Examples include superluminous supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and anticipated electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave detections of binary neutron star coalescence. Our model leverages recent progress in the theory of turbulent magnetic relaxation to specify a dissipative closure of the stationary magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wind equations, yielding predictions of the magnetic energy dissipation rate throughout the nebula. Synchrotron losses are self-consistently treated. To demonstrate the model’s efficacy, we show that it can reproduce many features of the Crab Nebula, including its expansion speed, radiative efficiency, peak photon energy, and mean magnetic field strength. Unlike ideal MHD models of the Crab (which lead to the so-called σ-problem), our model accounts for the transition from ultra to weakly magnetized plasma flow and for the associated heating of relativistic electrons. We discuss how the predicted heating rates may be utilized to improve upon models of particle transport and acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae. We also discuss implications for the Crab Nebula’s γ-ray flares, and point out potential modifications to models of astrophysical transients invoking the spin-down of a millisecond magnetar.

  10. X-ray pulsars: accretion flow deceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.S.

    1987-01-01

    X-ray pulsars are thought to be neutron stars that derive the energy for their x-ray emission by accreting material onto their magnetic polar caps. The accreting material and the x-ray pulsar atmospheres were idealized as fully ionized plasmas consisting only of electrons and protons. A high magnetic field (∼ 5 x 10 12 Gauss) permeates the atmospheric plasma, and causes the motion of atmospheric electrons perpendicular to the field to be quantized into discrete Landau levels. All atmospheric electrons initially lie in the Landau ground state, but in the author's calculations of Coulomb collisions between atmospheric electrons and accreting protons, he allows for processes that leave the electrons in the first excited Landau level. He also considers interactions between accreting protons and the collective modes of the atmospheric plasma. Division of the electromagnetic interaction of a fast proton with a magnetized plasma into single particle and collective effects is described in detail in Chapter 2. Deceleration of the accretion flow due to Coulomb collisions with atmospheric electrons and collective plasma effects was studied in a number of computer simulations. These simulations, along with a discussion of the physical state of the atmospheric plasma and its interactions with a past proton, are presented in Chapter 3. Details of the atmospheric model and a description of the results of the simulations are given in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains some brief concluding remarks, and some thoughts on future research

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HTRU survey: long-period pulsars polarimetry (Tiburzi+, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiburzi, C.; Johnston, S.; Bailes, M.; Bates, S. D.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burgay, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Champion, D.; Coster, P.; D'Amico, N.; Keith, M. J.; Kramer, M.; Levin, L.; Milia, S.; Ng, C.; Possenti, A.; Stappers, B. W.; Thornton, D.; van Straten, W.

    2017-11-01

    We present the polarization analysis of a sample of 49 long-period pulsars, whose spin periods range from a few hundred milliseconds to about two and a half seconds. They were all discovered during the mid-latitude part of the HTRU survey (Keith et al. 2010MNRAS.409..619K; Bates et al. 2012MNRAS.427.1052B) apart from PSR J1846-4249 (that has been discovered in the high latitude survey and it will be presented in one of the next papers of the HTRU series). After discovery and confirmation, the pulsars were followed-up with the third Parkes Digital Filterbank, observing them for at least one year to allow the determination of a complete timing solution. (2 data files).

  12. Pulsar coherent de-dispersion system of Urumqi Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyong, Liu; Esamdin, Ali; Jin, Zhang

    Pulsar coherent de-dispersion experiment has been carried by using the 25-m Nanshan radio telescope of Urumqi Observatory It uses a dual polarization receiver operating at 18cm and a VLBI back-end Mark5A The data processing system is based on a C program on Linux and a 4-node Beowulf cluster A high quality data acquisition system and a cluster with more processors are needed to build an on-line pulsar coherent de-dispersion system in future Key words Astronomical instrument Pulsar Coherent de-dispersion Parallel computing Cluster Mark5A

  13. Contrasting Behaviour from Two Be/X-ray Binary Pulsars: Insights into Differing Neutron Star Accretion Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, L. J.; Drave, S. P.; Hill, A. B.; Coe, M. J.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Bird, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the identification of two periodic X-ray signals coming from the direction of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). On detection with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), the 175.4 s and 85.4 s pulsations were considered to originate from new Be/X-ray binary (BeXRB) pulsars with unknown locations. Using rapid follow-up INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton observations, we show the first pulsar (designated SXP175) to be coincident with a candidate high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) in the northern bar region of the SMC undergoing a small Type II outburst. The orbital period (87d) and spectral class (B0-B0.5IIIe) of this system are determined and presented here for the first time. The second pulsar is shown not to be new at all, but is consistent with being SXP91.1 - a pulsar discovered at the very beginning of the 13 year long RXTE key monitoring programme of the SMC. Whilst it is theoretically possible for accreting neutron stars to change spin period so dramatically over such a short time, the X-ray and optical data available for this source suggest this spin-up is continuous during long phases of X-ray quiescence, where accretion driven spin-up of the neutron star should be minimal.

  14. Spatially-Dependent Modelling of Pulsar Wind Nebula G0.9+0.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensburg, C.; Krüger, P. P.; Venter, C.

    2018-03-01

    We present results from a leptonic emission code that models the spectral energy distribution of a pulsar wind nebula by solving a Fokker-Planck-type transport equation and calculating inverse Compton and synchrotron emissivities. We have created this time-dependent, multi-zone model to investigate changes in the particle spectrum as they traverse the pulsar wind nebula, by considering a time and spatially-dependent B-field, spatially-dependent bulk particle speed implying convection and adiabatic losses, diffusion, as well as radiative losses. Our code predicts the radiation spectrum at different positions in the nebula, yielding the surface brightness versus radius and the nebular size as function of energy. We compare our new model against more basic models using the observed spectrum of pulsar wind nebula G0.9+0.1, incorporating data from H.E.S.S. as well as radio and X-ray experiments. We show that simultaneously fitting the spectral energy distribution and the energy-dependent source size leads to more stringent constraints on several model parameters.

  15. An internally consistent gamma ray burst time history phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    A phenomenology for gamma ray burst time histories is outlined. Order of their generally chaotic appearance is attempted, based on the speculation that any one burst event can be represented above 150 keV as a superposition of similarly shaped increases of varying intensity. The increases can generally overlap, however, confusing the picture, but a given event must at least exhibit its own limiting characteristic rise and decay times if the measurements are made with instruments having adequate temporal resolution. Most catalogued observations may be of doubtful or marginal utility to test this hypothesis, but some time histories from Helios-2, Pioneer Venus Orbiter and other instruments having one-to several-millisecond capabilities appear to provide consistency. Also, recent studies of temporally resolved Solar Maximum Mission burst energy spectra are entirely compatible with this picture. The phenomenology suggested here, if correct, may assist as an analytic tool for modelling of burst processes and possibly in the definition of burst source populations.

  16. Time warp operating system version 2.7 internals manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Time Warp Operating System (TWOS) is an implementation of the Time Warp synchronization method proposed by David Jefferson. In addition, it serves as an actual platform for running discrete event simulations. The code comprising TWOS can be divided into several different sections. TWOS typically relies on an existing operating system to furnish some very basic services. This existing operating system is referred to as the Base OS. The existing operating system varies depending on the hardware TWOS is running on. It is Unix on the Sun workstations, Chrysalis or Mach on the Butterfly, and Mercury on the Mark 3 Hypercube. The base OS could be an entirely new operating system, written to meet the special needs of TWOS, but, to this point, existing systems have been used instead. The base OS's used for TWOS on various platforms are not discussed in detail in this manual, as they are well covered in their own manuals. Appendix G discusses the interface between one such OS, Mach, and TWOS.

  17. International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: Nutrient timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziegenfuss Tim

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Position Statement: The position of the Society regarding nutrient timing and the intake of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats in reference to healthy, exercising individuals is summarized by the following eight points: 1. Maximal endogenous glycogen stores are best promoted by following a high-glycemic, high-carbohydrate (CHO diet (600 – 1000 grams CHO or ~8 – 10 g CHO/kg/d, and ingestion of free amino acids and protein (PRO alone or in combination with CHO before resistance exercise can maximally stimulate protein synthesis. 2. During exercise, CHO should be consumed at a rate of 30 – 60 grams of CHO/hour in a 6 – 8% CHO solution (8 – 16 fluid ounces every 10 – 15 minutes. Adding PRO to create a CHO:PRO ratio of 3 – 4:1 may increase endurance performance and maximally promotes glycogen re-synthesis during acute and subsequent bouts of endurance exercise. 3. Ingesting CHO alone or in combination with PRO during resistance exercise increases muscle glycogen, offsets muscle damage, and facilitates greater training adaptations after either acute or prolonged periods of supplementation with resistance training. 4. Post-exercise (within 30 minutes consumption of CHO at high dosages (8 – 10 g CHO/kg/day have been shown to stimulate muscle glycogen re-synthesis, while adding PRO (0.2 g – 0.5 g PRO/kg/day to CHO at a ratio of 3 – 4:1 (CHO: PRO may further enhance glycogen re-synthesis. 5. Post-exercise ingestion (immediately to 3 h post of amino acids, primarily essential amino acids, has been shown to stimulate robust increases in muscle protein synthesis, while the addition of CHO may stimulate even greater levels of protein synthesis. Additionally, pre-exercise consumption of a CHO + PRO supplement may result in peak levels of protein synthesis. 6. During consistent, prolonged resistance training, post-exercise consumption of varying doses of CHO + PRO supplements in varying dosages have been shown to stimulate

  18. Liquidity spillover in international stock markets through distinct time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, Marcelo Brutti; Vieira, Kelmara Mendes

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies liquidity spillovers through different time scales based on a wavelet multiscaling method. We decompose daily data from U.S., British, Brazilian and Hong Kong stock markets indices in order to calculate the scale correlation between their illiquidities. The sample is divided in order to consider non-crisis, sub-prime crisis and Eurozone crisis. We find that there are changes in correlations of distinct scales and different periods. Association in finest scales is smaller than in coarse scales. There is a rise on associations in periods of crisis. In frequencies, there is predominance for significant distinctions involving the coarsest scale, while for crises periods there is predominance for distinctions on the finest scale.

  19. LAT Second Catalog of Gamma-ray Pulsars

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The LAT Second Pulsar Catalog is available as a .tgz (tarred and zipped) archive file. The archive includes a main catalog FITS file with the data from the paper...

  20. Public List of LAT-Detected Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The following is a compilation of all publicly-announced gamma-ray pulsars detected using the Fermi LAT. Each of the detections has been vetted by the LAT team,...

  1. Fast pulsars, strange stars: An opportunity in radio astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1990-01-01

    The world's data on radio pulsars is not expected to represent the underlying pulsar population because of a search bias against detection of short periods, especially below 1 ms. Yet pulsars in increasing numbers with periods right down to this limit have been discovered suggesting that there may be even shorter ones. If pulsars with periods below 1/2 ms were found, the conclusion that the confined hadronic phase of nucleons and nuclei is only metastable would be almost inescapable. The plausible ground state in that event is the deconfined phase of (3-flavor) strange-quark-matter. From the QCD energy scale this is as likely a ground state as the confined phase. We show that strange matter as the ground state is not ruled out by any known fact, and most especially not by the fact that the universe is in the confined phase. 136 refs

  2. Pulsar Science with the Green Bank 43 m Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaliger, M. B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Langston, G.; Bilous, A. V.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Ransom, S. M.; Crawford, F.

    2011-08-01

    The 43 m telescope at the NRAO site in Green Bank, WV has recently been outfitted with a clone of the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument (GUPPI [1]) backend, making it very useful for a number of pulsar related studies in frequency ranges 800-1600 MHz and 220-440 MHz. Some of the recent science being done with it include: monitoring of the Crab pulsar, a blind search for transient sources, pulsar searches of targets of opportunity, and an all-sky mapping project. For the Crab monitoring project, regular observations are searched for giant pulses (GPs), which are then correlated with γ-ray photons from the Fermi spacecraft. Data from the all-sky mapping project are first run through a pipeline that does a blind transient search, looking for single pulses over a DM range of 0-500 pc cm-3. These projects are made possible by MIT Lincoln Labs.

  3. Pulsar H(alpha) Bowshocks probe Neutron Star Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2014-08-01

    We propose a KOALA/AAOmega study of southern pulsar bow shocks. These rare, Balmer-dominated, non-radiative shocks provide an ideal laboratory to study the interaction of the relativistic pulsar wind with the ISM. We will cover H(alpha) at high spectral resolution to measure the kinematics of the upstream ISM and the post-shock flow, while the blue channel measures the Balmer decrement and probes for a faint cooling component. These data, with MHD models, allow us to extract the 3D flow geometry and the orientation and asymmetry of the pulsar wind. These data can also measure the pulsar spindown power, thus estimating the neutron star moment of inertia and effecting a fundamental test of dense matter physics.

  4. One-Dimensional Model of the Pulsar Accelerator

    OpenAIRE

    TSUKAMOTO, Kaoru; SHIBATA, Shinpei

    1991-01-01

    We construct an one-dimensional model of the accelerating region of the pulsar magnetosphere. The pair-creation-limited voltage of accelerator is obtained as fanctions of the location of the accelerator.

  5. Pulsars in the Classroom: Suggested Exercises for Lab or Homework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Kurtiss J.

    1978-01-01

    Exercises for introductory to intermediate level college students are proposed. Observations of pulsars can be used to illustrate the phenomena of dispersion and Faraday rotation of radio waves, and to illustrate the differential rotation of the galaxy. (BB)

  6. High-resolution spectral analysis of transient pulsars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Palombara, N.; Sidoli, L.; Esposito, P.; Pintore, F.; Tiengo, A.; Mereghetti, S.

    2017-10-01

    At low energies the spectra of several X-ray binary pulsars show a significant excess over the main power-law component. Although various physical processes (both thermal and non-thermal) have been invoked to produce this excess, its origin is still unclear. The best sources to study this type of feature are the transient pulsars in the Small Magellanic Cloud, which can reach high luminosities (L_{X} > 10^{38} erg s^{-1}) and, thanks to the low absorption in the SMC direction, can provide high statistics spectra at low energies. In the last three years we observed with XMM-Newton the large outburst of three of these transient pulsars (RX J0059.2-7138, SMC X-2, and IGR J01572-7259). Thanks to the high throughput and spectral resolution of XMM, these observations allowed us to investigate at an unprecedented level of detail their spectral and timing properties at soft X-ray energies. We found that these sources show a pulsed emission also at low energies, and that they are characterized by a significant thermal component of low temperature (kT ˜ 0.2 keV); moreover, we discovered several emission and absorption features, which are very likely produced by photoionization of plasma located above the inner regions of the accretion disc.

  7. Neutron stars, fast pulsars, supernovae and the equation of state of dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glendening, N.K.

    1989-06-01

    We discuss the prospects for obtaining constraints on the equation of state from astrophysical sources. Neutron star masses although few are known at present, provide a very direct constraint in as much as the connection to the equation of state involves only the assumption that Einstein's general theory of relativity is correct at the macroscopic scale. If the millisecond pulses briefly observed in the remnant of SN1987A can be attributed to uniform rotation of a pulsar, then a very severe constraint is placed on the equation of state. The theory again is very secure. The precise nature of the constraint is not yet understood, but it appears that the equation of state must be neither too soft nor stiff, and it may be that there is information not only on the stiffness of the equation of state but on its shape. Supernovae simulations involve such a plethora of physical processes including those involved in the evolution of the precollapse configuration, not all of them known or understood, that they provide no constraint at the present time. Not even the broad category of mechanism for the explosion is agreed upon (prompt shock, delayed shock, or nuclear explosion). In connection with very fast pulsars, we include some speculations on pure quark matter stars, and on possible scenarios for understanding the disappearance of the fast pulsar in SN1987A. 47 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Gigahertz-peaked Spectra Pulsars and Thermal Absorption Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijak, J.; Basu, R.; Lewandowski, W.; Rożko, K. [Janusz Gil Institute of Astronomy, University of Zielona Góra, ul. Z. Szafrana 2, PL-65-516 Zielona Góra (Poland); Dembska, M., E-mail: jkijak@astro.ia.uz.zgora.pl [DLR Institute of Space Systems, Robert-Hooke-Str. 7 D-28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2017-05-10

    We present the results of our radio interferometric observations of pulsars at 325 and 610 MHz using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. We used the imaging method to estimate the flux densities of several pulsars at these radio frequencies. The analysis of the shapes of the pulsar spectra allowed us to identify five new gigahertz-peaked spectra (GPS) pulsars. Using the hypothesis that the spectral turnovers are caused by thermal free–free absorption in the interstellar medium, we modeled the spectra of all known objects of this kind. Using the model, we were able to put some observational constraints on the physical parameters of the absorbing matter, which allows us to distinguish between the possible sources of absorption. We also discuss the possible effects of the existence of GPS pulsars on future search surveys, showing that the optimal frequency range for finding such objects would be from a few GHz (for regular GPS sources) to possibly 10 GHz for pulsars and radio magnetars exhibiting very strong absorption.

  9. Featured Image: A Slow-Spinning X-Ray Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    This image (click for a closer look!) reveals the sky location of a new discovery: the slowest spinning X-ray pulsar a spinning, highly magnetized neutron star ever found in an extragalactic globular cluster. The pulsar, XB091D (circled in the bottom left inset), lies in the globular cluster B091D in the Andromeda galaxy. In a recent study led by Ivan Zolotukhin (University of Toulouse, Moscow State University, and Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences), a team of scientists details the importance of this discovery. This pulsar is gradually spinning faster and faster a process thats known as recycling, thought to occur as a pulsar accretes material from a donor star in a binary system. Zolotukhin and collaborators think that this particular pairing formed relatively recently, when the pulsar captured a passing star into a binary system. Were now seeing it in a unique stage of evolution where the pulsar is just starting to get recycled. For more information, check out the paper below!CitationIvan Yu. Zolotukhin et al 2017 ApJ 839 125. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa689d

  10. Internalizing versus Externalizing Control: Different Ways to Perform a Time-Based Prospective Memory Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tracy; Loft, Shayne; Humphreys, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    "Time-based prospective memory" (PM) refers to performing intended actions at a future time. Participants with time-based PM tasks can be slower to perform ongoing tasks (costs) than participants without PM tasks because internal control is required to maintain the PM intention or to make prospective-timing estimates. However, external…

  11. Extreme scattering events towards two young pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, M.; Coles, W. A.; Ward, C. A.; Johnston, S.; Tuntsov, A. V.; Shannon, R. M.

    2018-03-01

    We have measured the scintillation properties of 151 young, energetic pulsars with the Parkes radio telescope and have identified two extreme scattering events (ESEs). Towards PSR J1057-5226, we discovered a 3 yr span of strengthened scattering during which the variability in flux density and the scintillation bandwidth decreased markedly. The transverse size of the scattering region is ˜23 au, and strong flux density enhancement before and after the ESE may arise from refractive focusing. Long observations reveal scintillation arcs characteristic of interference between rays scattered at large angles, and the clearest arcs appear during the ESE. The arcs suggest scattering by a screen 100-200 pc from the Earth, perhaps ionized filamentary structure associated with the boundary of the local bubble(s). Towards PSR J1740-3015, we observed a `double dip' in the measured flux density similar to ESEs observed towards compact extragalactic radio sources. The observed shape is consistent with that produced by a many-au scale diverging plasma lens with electron density ˜500 cm-3. The continuing ESE is at least 1500 d long, making it the longest detected event to date. These detections, with materially different observational signatures, indicate that well-calibrated pulsar monitoring is a keen tool for ESE detection and interstellar medium (ISM) diagnostics. They illustrate the strong role au-scale non-Kolmogorov density fluctuations and the local ISM structure play in such events and are key to understanding both their intrinsic physics and their impact on other phenomena, particularly fast radio bursts.

  12. Multi-wavelength emissions from the millisecond pulsar binary PSR J1023+0038 during an accretion active state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takata, J.; Leung, Gene C. K.; Wu, E. M. H.; Cheng, K. S. [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Li, K. L.; Kong, A. K. H.; Tam, P. H. T. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Hui, C. Y. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Xing, Yi; Wang, Zhongxiang [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Cao, Yi; Tang, Sumin, E-mail: takata@hku.hk, E-mail: akong@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    Recent observations strongly suggest that the millisecond pulsar binary PSR J1023+0038 has developed an accretion disk since 2013 June. We present a multi-wavelength analysis of PSR J1023+0038, which reveals that (1) its gamma-rays suddenly brightened within a few days in 2013 June/July and has remained at a high gamma-ray state for several months; (2) both UV and X-ray fluxes have increased by roughly an order of magnitude; and (3) the spectral energy distribution has changed significantly after the gamma-ray sudden flux change. Time variabilities associated with UV and X-rays are on the order of 100-500 s and 50-100 s, respectively. Our model suggests that a newly formed accretion disk, due to the sudden increase of the stellar wind, could explain the changes of all these observed features. The increase of UV is emitted from the disk, and a new component in gamma-rays is produced by inverse Compton scattering between the new UV component and pulsar wind. The increase of X-rays results from the enhancement of injection pulsar wind energy into the intra-binary shock due to the increase of the stellar wind. We also predict that the radio pulses may be blocked by the evaporated winds from the disk, and the pulsar is still powered by rotation.

  13. Phase Evolution of the Crab Pulsar between Radio and X-Ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, L. L.; Ge, M. Y.; Zheng, S. J.; Lu, F. J.; Tuo, Y. L.; Zhang, S. N.; Lu, Y. [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yuan, J. P.; Tong, H. [Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830011 (China); Han, J. L. [National Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Jia 20 Datun Road, Beijing 100012 (China); Du, Y. J., E-mail: yanlinli@ihep.ac.cn [Qian Xuesen Laboratory of Space Technology, No. 104, Youyi Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2017-08-20

    We study the X-ray phases of the Crab pulsar utilizing the 11-year observations from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer , 6-year radio observations from Nanshan Telescope, and the ephemeris from Jodrell Bank Observatory. It is found that the X-ray phases in different energy bands and the radio phases from the Nanshan Telescope show similar behaviors, including long-time evolution and short-time variations. Such strong correlations between the X-ray and radio phases imply that the radio and X-ray timing noises are both generated from the pulsar spin that cannot be well described by the the monthly ephemeris from the Jodrell Bank observatory. When using the Nanshan phases as references to study the X-ray timing noise, it has a significantly smaller variation amplitude and shows no long-time evolution, with a change rate of (−1.1 ± 1.1) × 10{sup −7} periods per day. These results show that the distance of the X-ray and radio emission regions on the Crab pulsar has no detectable secular change, and it is unlikely that the timing noises resulted from any unique physical processes in the radio or X-ray emitting regions. The similar behaviors of the X-ray and radio timing noises also imply that the variation of the interstellar medium is not the origin of the Crab pulsar’s timing noises, which is consistent with the results obtained from the multi-frequency radio observations of PSR B1540−06.

  14. Toward an Empirical Theory of Pulsar Emission. XII. Exploring the Physical Conditions in Millisecond Pulsar Emission Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rankin, Joanna M.; Mitra, Dipanjan [Physics Department, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States); Archibald, Anne; Hessels, Jason; Leeuwen, Joeri van [Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ransom, Scott [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 29201 (United States); Stairs, Ingrid [Physics Department, University of British Columbia, V6T 1Z4, BC (Canada); Straten, Willem van [Institute for Radio Astronomy and Space Research, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Weisberg, Joel M., E-mail: Joanna.Rankin@uvm.edu [Physics and Astronomy Department, Carleton College, Northfield, MN 55057 (United States)

    2017-08-10

    The five-component profile of the 2.7 ms pulsar J0337+1715 appears to exhibit the best example to date of a core/double-cone emission-beam structure in a millisecond pulsar (MSP). Moreover, three other MSPs, the binary pulsars B1913+16, B1953+29, and J1022+1001, seem to exhibit core/single-cone profiles. These configurations are remarkable and important because it has not been clear whether MSPs and slow pulsars exhibit similar emission-beam configurations, given that they have considerably smaller magnetospheric sizes and magnetic field strengths. MSPs thus provide an extreme context for studying pulsar radio emission. Particle currents along the magnetic polar flux tube connect processes just above the polar cap through the radio-emission region to the light-cylinder and the external environment. In slow pulsars, radio-emission heights are typically about 500 km around where the magnetic field is nearly dipolar, and estimates of the physical conditions there point to radiation below the plasma frequency and emission from charged solitons by the curvature process. We are able to estimate emission heights for the four MSPs and carry out a similar estimation of physical conditions in their much lower emission regions. We find strong evidence that MSPs also radiate by curvature emission from charged solitons.

  15. Allocation of Internal Medicine Resident Time in a Swiss Hospital: A Time and Motion Study of Day and Evening Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Nathalie; Méan, Marie; Castioni, Julien; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Waeber, Gérard; Garnier, Antoine

    2017-04-18

    Little current evidence documents how internal medicine residents spend their time at work, particularly with regard to the proportions of time spent in direct patient care versus using computers. To describe how residents allocate their time during day and evening hospital shifts. Time and motion study. Internal medicine residency at a university hospital in Switzerland, May to July 2015. 36 internal medicine residents with an average of 29 months of postgraduate training. Trained observers recorded the residents' activities using a tablet-based application. Twenty-two activities were categorized as directly related to patients, indirectly related to patients, communication, academic, nonmedical tasks, and transition. In addition, the presence of a patient or colleague and use of a computer or telephone during each activity was recorded. Residents were observed for a total of 696.7 hours. Day shifts lasted 11.6 hours (1.6 hours more than scheduled). During these shifts, activities indirectly related to patients accounted for 52.4% of the time, and activities directly related to patients accounted for 28.0%. Residents spent an average of 1.7 hours with patients, 5.2 hours using computers, and 13 minutes doing both. Time spent using a computer was scattered throughout the day, with the heaviest use after 6:00 p.m. The study involved a small sample from 1 institution. At this Swiss teaching hospital, internal medicine residents spent more time at work than scheduled. Activities indirectly related to patients predominated, and about half the workday was spent using a computer. Information Technology Department and Department of Internal Medicine of Lausanne University Hospital.

  16. International Comprehensive Ocean Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) in Near-Real Time (NRT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) Near-Real-Time (NRT) product is an extension of the official ICOADS dataset with preliminary...

  17. Documenting and determining distributions, trends, and relations in truck times at international border crossing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-20

    Documenting the times trucks incur when crossing an international border facility is valuable both to the private freight industry and to gateway facility operators and planners. : Members of the project team previously developed and implemented an a...

  18. CHANDRA PHASE-RESOLVED X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE CRAB PULSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Yakovlev, Dmitry G.; Harding, Alice; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.; Becker, Werner

    2011-01-01

    We present a new study of the X-ray spectral properties of the Crab Pulsar. The superb angular resolution of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory enables distinguishing the pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase allows the least-biased measure of interstellar X-ray extinction due primarily to photoelectric absorption and secondarily to scattering by dust grains in the direction of the Crab Nebula. We modify previous findings that the line of sight to the Crab is underabundant in oxygen and provide measurements with improved accuracy and less bias. Using the abundances and cross sections from Wilms et al. we find [O/H] = (5.28 ± 0.28) × 10 –4 (4.9 × 10 –4 is solar abundance). We also measure for the first time the impact of scattering of flux out of the image by interstellar grains. We find τ scat = 0.147 ± 0.043. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase also measures the X-ray spectral index even at pulse minimum—albeit with increasing statistical uncertainty. The spectral variations are, by and large, consistent with a sinusoidal variation. The only significant variation from the sinusoid occurs over the same phase range as some rather abrupt behavior in the optical polarization magnitude and position angle. We also compare these spectral variations to those observed in gamma-rays and conclude that our measurements are both a challenge and a guide to future modeling and will thus eventually help us understand pair cascade processes in pulsar magnetospheres. The data are also used to set new, and less biased, upper limits to the surface temperature of the neutron star for different models of the neutron star atmosphere. We discuss how such data are best connected to theoretical models of neutron star cooling and neutron star interiors. The data restrict the neutrino emission rate in the pulsar core and the amount of light elements in the heat-blanketing envelope. The observations allow the

  19. Optimization of Signal Timing of Intersections by Internal Metering of Queue Time Ratio of Vehicles in Network Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Ghanbarikarekani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of signal timing in urban network is usually done by minimizing the delay times or queue lengths. Sincethe effect of each intersection on the whole network is not considered in the mentioned methods, traffic congestion may occur in network links. Therefore, this paper has aimed to provide a timing optimization algorithm for traffic signals using internal timing policy based on balancing queue time ratio of vehicles in network links. In the proposed algorithm, the difference between the real queue time ratio and the optimum one for each link of intersection was minimized. To evaluate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm on traffic performance, the proposed algorithm was applied in a hypothetical network. By comparing the simulating software outputs, before and after implementing the algorithm, it was concluded that the queue time ratio algorithm has improved the traffic parameters by increasing the flow as well as reducing the delay time and density of the network.

  20. Denying humanitarian access as an international crime in times of non-international armed conflict: the challenges to prosecute and some proposals for the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, R.

    2015-01-01

    Impeding humanitarian access and the starving of civilians is prohibited under international humanitarian law in times of both international and non-international armed conflicts. Such conduct is criminalised under the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC Statute) when committed

  1. GMRT DISCOVERY OF PSR J1544+4937: AN ECLIPSING BLACK-WIDOW PULSAR IDENTIFIED WITH A FERMI-LAT SOURCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, B.; Roy, J.; Gupta, Y. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune 411 007 (India); Ray, P. S.; Wolff, M. T.; Wood, K. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Bhattacharya, D. [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune 411 007 (India); Romani, R. W.; Den Hartog, P. R.; Kerr, M.; Michelson, P. F. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Cognard, I. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l' Environnement, LPCE UMR 6115 CNRS, F-45071 Orleans Cedex 02 (France); Johnston, S.; Keith, M. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Saz Parkinson, P. M. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Wood, D. L. [Praxis Inc., Alexandria, VA 22303 (United States)

    2013-08-10

    Using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, we performed deep observations to search for radio pulsations in the directions of unidentified Fermi-Large Area Telescope {gamma}-ray sources. We report the discovery of an eclipsing black-widow millisecond pulsar, PSR J1544+4937, identified with the uncataloged {gamma}-ray source FERMI J1544.2+4941. This 2.16 ms pulsar is in a 2.9 hr compact circular orbit with a very low mass companion (M{sub c} > 0.017M{sub Sun }). At 322 MHz this pulsar is found to be eclipsing for 13% of its orbit, whereas at 607 MHz the pulsar is detected throughout the low-frequency eclipse phase. Variations in the eclipse ingress phase are observed, indicating a clumpy and variable eclipsing medium. Moreover, additional short-duration absorption events are observed around the eclipse boundaries. Using the radio timing ephemeris we were able to detect {gamma}-ray pulsations from this pulsar, confirming it as the source powering the {gamma}-ray emission.

  2. Ghost supernova remnants : evidence for pulsar reactivation in dusty molecular clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintzmann, H.; Novello, M.

    1983-01-01

    An evidence in favour of a new model for pulsar evolution is discussed, according to which pulsars may only function as regularly pulsed emitters if an accretion disc provides a sufficiently continuous return-current to the radio pulsar (neutron star). (L.C.) [pt

  3. A novel look at the pulsar force-free magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, S. A.; Flanchik, A. B.

    2018-03-01

    The stationary axisymmetric force-free magnetosphere of a pulsar is considered. We present an exact dipolar solution of the pulsar equation, construct the magnetospheric model on its basis and examine its observational support. The new model has toroidal rather than common cylindrical geometry, in line with that of the plasma outflow observed directly as the pulsar wind nebula at much larger spatial scale. In its new configuration, the axisymmetric magnetosphere consumes the neutron star rotational energy much more efficiently, implying re-estimation of the stellar magnetic field, B_{new}0=3.3×10^{-4}B/P, where P is the pulsar period. Then the 7-order scatter of the magnetic field derived from the rotational characteristics of the pulsars observed appears consistent with the \\cotχ-law, where χ is a random quantity uniformly distributed in the interval [0,π/2]. Our result is suggestive of a unique actual magnetic field strength of the neutron stars along with a random angle between the magnetic and rotational axes and gives insight into the neutron star unification on the geometrical basis.

  4. Order parameters for the high-energy spectra of pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Diego F.

    2018-03-01

    Neutron stars are a common compact endpoint of the life of stars. Magnetized and rotating neutron stars emit beams of radiation, which can only be seen when the observer and the beam stand aligned. Periodic recurrence of such alignment gives rise to pulsations and to the name `pulsar' for the star itself. We present a physical model for the non-thermal emission of pulsars. With just four physical parameters, we fit the spectra of the γ- and X-ray pulsars across seven orders of magnitude in energy. We find that all detections can be encompassed in a continuous variation of the model parameters. The model explains the appearance of sub-exponential cutoffs at high energies as a natural consequence of synchro-curvature-dominated losses, unveiling that curvature-only emission plays a less significant role—if any—in the spectrum of most pulsars. The model also explains the flattening of the X-ray spectra at soft energies as a result of propagating particles being subject to synchrotron losses all along their trajectories. Using this model, we analyse how observations in γ-rays can predict the detectability of the pulsar in X-rays, and vice versa.

  5. DISCOVERY OF FIVE NEW PULSARS IN ARCHIVAL DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickaliger, M. B.; Collins, A.; Hough, L.; Tehrani, N.; Tenney, C.; Liska, A.; Swiggum, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Boyles, J.

    2012-01-01

    Reprocessing of the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey has resulted in the discovery of five previously unknown pulsars and several as-yet-unconfirmed candidates. PSR J0922–52 has a period of 9.68 ms and a dispersion measure (DM) of 122.4 pc cm –3 . PSR J1147–66 has a period of 3.72 ms and a DM of 133.8 pc cm –3 . PSR J1227–6208 has a period of 34.53 ms, a DM of 362.6 pc cm –3 , is in a 6.7 day binary orbit, and was independently detected in an ongoing high-resolution Parkes survey by Thornton et al. and also in independent processing by Einstein-Home volunteers. PSR J1546–59 has a period of 7.80 ms and a DM of 168.3 pc cm –3 . PSR J1725–3853 is an isolated 4.79 ms pulsar with a DM of 158.2 pc cm –3 . These pulsars were likely missed in earlier processing efforts due to the fact that they have both high DMs and short periods, and also due to the large number of candidates that needed to be looked through. These discoveries suggest that further pulsars are awaiting discovery in the multibeam survey data.

  6. Multiwavelength Studies of the Mouse Pulsar Wind Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Noel; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Pavlov, George G.; Ng, C.-Y.; Beniamini, Paz; O'Sullivan, Samantha

    2018-01-01

    PSR J1747-2958 is a young and energetic pulsar at an estimated distance of ~5 kpc. It is moving supersonically through the ISM and powers the famous Mouse pulsar wind nebula (PWN; G359.23-0.82): a tail spanning 45" in X-rays and 12' in radio. We discuss the results of our analysis of deep Chandra observations (as well as archival radio and IR data) of the Mouse PWN. We present a spatially-resolved spectral map of the PWN, which displays a photon index which varies strongly with distance from the pulsar over the 45" extent of the X-ray tail as the result of synchrotron cooling. We discuss the shape of the multiwavelength spectrum, the PWN physical properties (e.g., we infer a high magnetic field B~200 μG), and the connection between PWN morphology and radio/gamma-ray light curves which we use to constrain the viewing angle and identify structures in the PWN. We compare the Mouse pulsar with the population of other pulsars with measured (or inferred) velocities.

  7. General-relativistic pulsar magnetospheric emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pétri, J.

    2018-03-01

    Most current pulsar emission models assume photon production and emission within the magnetosphere. Low frequency radiation is preferentially produced in the vicinity of the polar caps whereas the high-energy tail is shifted to regions closer but still inside the light-cylinder. We conducted a systematic study of the merit of several popular radiation sites like the polar cap, the outer gap and the slot gap. We computed sky maps emanating from each emission site according to a prescribed distribution function for the emitting particles made of an electron/positron mixture. Calculations are performed using a three dimensional integration of the plasma emissivity in the vacuum electromagnetic field of a rotating and centred general-relativistic dipole. We compare Newtonian electromagnetic fields to their general-relativistic counterpart. In the latter case, light bending is also taken into account. As a typical example, light-curves and sky maps are plotted for several power-law indices of the particle distribution function. The detailed pulse profiles strongly depend on the underlying assumption about the fluid motion subject to strong electromagnetic fields. This electromagnetic topology enforces the photon propagation direction directly, or indirectly, from aberration effects. We also discuss the implication of a net stellar electric charge on to sky maps. Taking into account the electric field strongly affects the light-curves originating close to the light-cylinder where the electric field strength becomes comparable to the magnetic field strength.

  8. International two-way satellite time transfers using INTELSAT space segment and small Earth stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenstra, Lester B.

    1990-05-01

    The satellite operated by the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization (INTELSAT) provides new and unique capabilities for the coordinates of international time scales on a world wide basis using the two-way technique. A network of coordinated clocks using small earth stations collocated with the scales is possible. Antennas as small as 1.8 m at K-band and 3 m at C-band transmitting powers of less than 1 W will provide signals with time jitters of less than 1 ns existing spread spectrum modems. One way time broadcasting is also possible, under the INTELSAT INTELNET system, possibly using existing international data distribution (press and financial) systems that are already operating spread spectrum systems. The technical details of the satellite and requirements on satellite earth stations are given. The resources required for a regular operational international time transfer service are analyzed with respect to the existing international digital service offerings of the INTELSAT Business Service (IBS) and INTELNET. Coverage areas, typical link budgets, and a summary of previous domestic and international work using this technique are provided. Administrative procedures for gaining access to the space segment are outlined. Contact information for local INTELSAT signatories is listed.

  9. GAMMA-RAY SIGNAL FROM THE PULSAR WIND IN THE BINARY PULSAR SYSTEM PSR B1259-63/LS 2883

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khangulyan, Dmitry [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Aharonian, Felix A. [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Bogovalov, Sergey V. [National Research Nuclear University-MEPHI, Kashirskoe Shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Ribo, Marc, E-mail: khangul@astro.isas.jaxa.jp, E-mail: felix.aharonian@dias.ie, E-mail: svbogovalov@mephi.ru, E-mail: mribo@am.ub.es [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciences del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-12-01

    Binary pulsar systems emit potentially detectable components of gamma-ray emission due to Comptonization of the optical radiation of the companion star by relativistic electrons of the pulsar wind, both before and after termination of the wind. The recent optical observations of binary pulsar system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 revealed radiation properties of the companion star which differ significantly from previous measurements. In this paper, we study the implications of these observations for the interaction rate of the unshocked pulsar wind with the stellar photons and the related consequences for fluxes of high energy and very high energy (VHE) gamma rays. We show that the signal should be strong enough to be detected with Fermi close to the periastron passage, unless the pulsar wind is strongly anisotropic or the Lorentz factor of the wind is smaller than 10{sup 3} or larger than 10{sup 5}. The higher luminosity of the optical star also has two important implications: (1) attenuation of gamma rays due to photon-photon pair production and (2) Compton drag of the unshocked wind. While the first effect has an impact on the light curve of VHE gamma rays, the second effect may significantly decrease the energy available for particle acceleration after termination of the wind.

  10. Autonomous Navigation Above the GNSS Constellations and Beyond: GPS Navigation for the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission and SEXTANT Pulsar Navigation Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winternitz, Luke

    2017-01-01

    This talk will describe two first-of-their-kind technology demonstrations attached to ongoing NASA science missions, both of which aim to extend the range of autonomous spacecraft navigation far from the Earth. First, we will describe the onboard GPS navigation system for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission which is currently operating in elliptic orbits reaching nearly halfway to the Moon. The MMS navigation system is a key outgrowth of a larger effort at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center to advance high-altitude Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) navigation on multiple fronts, including developing Global Positioning System receivers and onboard navigation software, running simulation studies, and leading efforts to characterize and protect signals at high-altitude in the so-called GNSS Space-Service Volume (SSV). In the second part of the talk, we will describe the Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT) mission that aims to make the first in-space demonstration of X-ray pulsar navigation (XNAV). SEXTANT is attached to the NASA astrophysics mission Neutron-star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) whose International Space Station mounted X-ray telescope is investigating the fundamental physics of extremes in gravity, material density, and electromagnetic fields found in neutron stars, and whose instrument provides a nearly ideal navigation sensor for XNAV.

  11. Nonlinear QED effects in X-ray emission of pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakeri, Soroush [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haghighat, Mansour [Department of Physics, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71946-84795 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Xue, She-Sheng, E-mail: Soroush.Shakeri@ph.iut.ac.ir, E-mail: m.haghighat@shirazu.ac.ir, E-mail: xue@icra.it [ICRANet, Piazzale della Repubblica 10, 65122, Pescara (Italy)

    2017-10-01

    In the presence of strong magnetic fields near pulsars, the QED vacuum becomes a birefringent medium due to nonlinear QED interactions. Here, we explore the impact of the effective photon-photon interaction on the polarization evolution of photons propagating through the magnetized QED vacuum of a pulsar. We solve the quantum Boltzmann equation within the framework of the Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian to find the evolution of the Stokes parameters. We find that linearly polarized X-ray photons propagating outward in the magnetosphere of a rotating neutron star can acquire high values for the circular polarization parameter. Meanwhile, it is shown that the polarization characteristics of photons besides photon energy depend strongly on parameters of the pulsars such as magnetic field strength, inclination angle and rotational period. Our results are clear predictions of QED vacuum polarization effects in the near vicinity of magnetic stars which can be tested with the upcoming X-ray polarimetric observations.

  12. Black Hole/Pulsar Binaries in the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2018-04-01

    We have performed population synthesis calculation on the formation of binaries containing a black hole (BH) and a neutron star (NS) in the Galactic disk. Some of important input parameters, especially for the treatment of common envelope evolution, are updated in the calculation. We have discussed the uncertainties from the star formation rate of the Galaxy and the velocity distribution of NS kicks on the birthrate (˜ 0.6-13 Myr^{-1}) of BH/NS binaries. From incident BH/NS binaries, by modelling the orbital evolution duo to gravitational wave radiation and the NS evolution as radio pulsars, we obtain the distributions of the observable parameters such as the orbital period, eccentricity and pulse period of the BH/pulsar binaries. We estimate that there may be ˜3 - 80 BH/pulsar binaries in the Galactic disk and around 10% of them could be detected by the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope.

  13. TeV Gamma Rays From Galactic Center Pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan [Fermilab; Cholis, Ilias [Johns Hopkins U.; Linden, Tim [Ohio State U., CCAPP

    2017-05-25

    Measurements of the nearby pulsars Geminga and B0656+14 by the HAWC and Milagro telescopes have revealed the presence of bright TeV-emitting halos surrounding these objects. If young and middle-aged pulsars near the Galactic Center transfer a similar fraction of their energy into TeV photons, then these sources could dominate the emission that is observed by HESS and other ground-based telescopes from the innermost ~10^2 parsecs of the Milky Way. In particular, both the spectral shape and the angular extent of this emission is consistent with TeV halos produced by a population of pulsars. The overall flux of this emission requires a birth rate of ~100-1000 neutron stars per Myr near the Galactic Center, in good agreement with recent estimates.

  14. A massive pulsar in a compact relativistic binary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, John; Freire, Paulo C C; Wex, Norbert; Tauris, Thomas M; Lynch, Ryan S; van Kerkwijk, Marten H; Kramer, Michael; Bassa, Cees; Dhillon, Vik S; Driebe, Thomas; Hessels, Jason W T; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Langer, Norbert; Marsh, Thomas R; McLaughlin, Maura A; Pennucci, Timothy T; Ransom, Scott M; Stairs, Ingrid H; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Verbiest, Joris P W; Whelan, David G

    2013-04-26

    Many physically motivated extensions to general relativity (GR) predict substantial deviations in the properties of spacetime surrounding massive neutron stars. We report the measurement of a 2.01 ± 0.04 solar mass (M⊙) pulsar in a 2.46-hour orbit with a 0.172 ± 0.003 M⊙ white dwarf. The high pulsar mass and the compact orbit make this system a sensitive laboratory of a previously untested strong-field gravity regime. Thus far, the observed orbital decay agrees with GR, supporting its validity even for the extreme conditions present in the system. The resulting constraints on deviations support the use of GR-based templates for ground-based gravitational wave detectors. Additionally, the system strengthens recent constraints on the properties of dense matter and provides insight to binary stellar astrophysics and pulsar recycling.

  15. Nuclear limits on gravitational waves from elliptically deformed pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krastev, Plamen G.; Li Baoan; Worley, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational radiation is a fundamental prediction of General Relativity. Elliptically deformed pulsars are among the possible sources emitting gravitational waves (GWs) with a strain-amplitude dependent upon the star's quadrupole moment, rotational frequency, and distance from the detector. We show that the gravitational wave strain amplitude h 0 depends strongly on the equation of state of neutron-rich stellar matter. Applying an equation of state with symmetry energy constrained by recent nuclear laboratory data, we set an upper limit on the strain-amplitude of GWs produced by elliptically deformed pulsars. Depending on details of the EOS, for several millisecond pulsars at distances 0.18 kpc to 0.35 kpc from Earth, the maximalh 0 is found to be in the range of ∼[0.4-1.5]x10 -24 . This prediction serves as the first direct nuclear constraint on the gravitational radiation. Its implications are discussed

  16. TIME VARIATION AND ASYMMETRY IN THE WORLD PRICE OF COVARIANCE RISK: THE IMPLICATIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL DIVERSIFICATION

    OpenAIRE

    Olan T. Henry; Nilss Olekalns; Kalvinder Shields

    2004-01-01

    The International Capital Asset Pricing Model measures country risk in terms of the conditional covariance of national returns with the world return. Using impulse responses from a multivariate nonlinear model we provide evidence of time variation and asymmetry in the measure of country risk. and the implied benefit to international diversification. The evidence implies that the price of risk and the benefits from diversification may differ in a statistically and economically meaningful fashi...

  17. Pubertal timing and Mexican-origin girls' internalizing and externalizing symptoms: the influence of harsh parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deardorff, Julianna; Cham, Heining; Gonzales, Nancy A; White, Rebecca M B; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Wong, Jessie J; Roosa, Mark W

    2013-09-01

    Early-maturing girls are at risk for internalizing and externalizing problems. Research concerning pubertal timing and mental health among Mexican Americans or the influence of parenting behaviors on these relations has been scarce. This study addressed these gaps. This was a prospective examination of 362 Mexican-origin girls and their mothers in 3 waves of data. Measures included girls' self-report of pubertal development and girls' and mothers' report of maternal harsh parenting and daughters' mental health. Using structural equation modeling, we examined whether pubertal timing in 5th grade predicted girls' internalizing and externalizing outcomes in 10th grade. We also examined the mediating and moderating effects of harsh parenting on the relations between pubertal timing and internalizing and externalizing behaviors, as well as the influence of mothers' and daughters' nativity on these relations. Results differed depending on reporter and maternal nativity. Using daughters' report, we found that Mexican American mothers' harsh parenting acted as a moderator. At high levels of harsh parenting, early pubertal timing predicted higher externalizing scores, while at low levels of harsh parenting, early timing predicted lower externalizing scores. For Mexican immigrant mothers, harsh parenting mediated the effects of pubertal timing on girls' internalizing and externalizing problems. There were no significant pubertal effects for mothers' report. Findings suggest that maternal harsh parenting plays a key role in the relations between early pubertal timing and behavioral and emotional outcomes among Mexican-origin girls. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Pubertal Timing and Mexican-Origin Girls’ Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms: The Influence of Harsh Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deardorff, J.; Cham, H.; Gonzales, NA.; White, R.M.B.; Tein, J.-Y.; Wong, J.; Roosa, M.W.

    2012-01-01

    Early-maturing girls are at risk for internalizing and externalizing problems. Scarce research has examined pubertal timing and mental health among Mexican Americans, or examined the influence of parenting behaviors on these relations. This study addressed these gaps. This was a prospective examination of 362 Mexican-origin girls and their mothers using three waves of data. Measures included girls’ self-report of pubertal development and girls’ and mothers’ report of maternal harsh parenting and daughters’ mental health. Using structural equation modeling, we examined whether pubertal timing in 5th grade predicted girls’ internalizing and externalizing outcomes in 10th grade. We also examined the mediating and moderating effects of harsh parenting on the relations between pubertal timing and internalizing and externalizing behaviors, as well as the influence of mothers’ and daughters’ nativity on these relations. Results differed depending on reporter and maternal nativity. Using daughters’ report, Mexican American mothers’ harsh parenting acted as a moderator. At high levels of harsh parenting, early pubertal timing predicted higher externalizing scores, while at low levels of harsh parenting, early timing predicted lower externalizing scores. For Mexican immigrant mothers, harsh parenting mediated the effects of pubertal timing on girls’ internalizing and externalizing problems. There were no significant pubertal effects for mothers’ report. Findings suggest that maternal harsh parenting plays a key role in the relations between early pubertal timing and behavioral and emotional outcomes among Mexican-origin girls. PMID:23231686

  19. Physical conditions in the reconnection layer in pulsar magnetospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A. [Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, Physics Department, University of Colorado, UCB 390, Boulder, CO 80309-0390 (United States); Spitkovsky, Anatoly, E-mail: uzdensky@colorado.edu, E-mail: anatoly@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The magnetosphere of a rotating pulsar naturally develops a current sheet (CS) beyond the light cylinder (LC). Magnetic reconnection in this CS inevitably dissipates a nontrivial fraction of the pulsar spin-down power within a few LC radii. We develop a basic physical picture of reconnection in this environment and discuss its implications for the observed pulsed gamma-ray emission. We argue that reconnection proceeds in the plasmoid-dominated regime, via a hierarchical chain of multiple secondary islands/flux ropes. The inter-plasmoid reconnection layers are subject to strong synchrotron cooling, leading to significant plasma compression. Using the conditions of pressure balance across these current layers, the balance between the heating by magnetic energy dissipation and synchrotron cooling, and Ampere's law, we obtain simple estimates for key parameters of the layers—temperature, density, and layer thickness. In the comoving frame of the relativistic pulsar wind just outside of the equatorial CS, these basic parameters are uniquely determined by the strength of the reconnecting upstream magnetic field. For the case of the Crab pulsar, we find them to be of order 10 GeV, 10{sup 13} cm{sup –3}, and 10 cm, respectively. After accounting for the bulk Doppler boosting due to the pulsar wind, the synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission from the reconnecting CS can explain the observed pulsed high-energy (GeV) and very high energy (∼100 GeV) radiation, respectively. Also, we suggest that the rapid relative motions of the secondary plasmoids in the hierarchical chain may contribute to the production of the pulsar radio emission.

  20. Efficiency of Synchrotron Radiation from Rotation-powered Pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisaka, Shota [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-5258 (Japan); Tanaka, Shuta J., E-mail: kisaka@phys.aoyama.ac.jp, E-mail: sjtanaka@center.konan-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Konan University, Kobe, Hyogo, 658-8501 (Japan)

    2017-03-01

    Synchrotron radiation is widely considered to be the origin of the pulsed non-thermal emissions from rotation-powered pulsars in optical and X-ray bands. In this paper, we study the synchrotron radiation emitted by the created electron and positron pairs in the pulsar magnetosphere to constrain the energy conversion efficiency from the Poynting flux to the particle energy flux. We model two pair creation processes, two-photon collision, which efficiently works in young γ -ray pulsars (≲10{sup 6} year), and magnetic pair creation, which is the dominant process to supply pairs in old pulsars (≳10{sup 6} year). Using the analytical model, we derive the maximum synchrotron luminosity as a function of the energy conversion efficiency. From the comparison with observations, we find that the energy conversion efficiency to the accelerated particles should be an order of unity in the magnetosphere, even though we make a number of the optimistic assumptions to enlarge the synchrotron luminosity. In order to explain the luminosity of the non-thermal X-ray/optical emission from pulsars with low spin-down luminosity L {sub sd} ≲ 10{sup 34} erg s{sup −1}, non-dipole magnetic field components should be dominant at the emission region. For the γ -ray pulsars with L {sub sd} ≲ 10{sup 35} erg s{sup −1}, observed γ -ray to X-ray and optical flux ratios are much higher than the flux ratio between curvature and the synchrotron radiations. We discuss some possibilities such as the coexistence of multiple accelerators in the magnetosphere as suggested from the recent numerical simulation results. The obtained maximum luminosity would be useful to select observational targets in X-ray and optical bands.

  1. Swinging between rotation and accretion power in a binary millisecond pulsar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papitto A.

    2014-01-01

    While accreting mass, the X-ray emission of IGR J18245–2452 varies dramatically on time-scales ranging from a second to a few hours. We interpret a state characterised by a lower flux and pulsed fraction, and by sudden increases of the hardness of the X-ray emission, in terms of the onset of a magnetospheric centrifugal inhibition of the accretion flow. Prospects of finding new members of the newly established class of transitional pulsars are also briefly discussed.

  2. Do we see accreting magnetars in X-ray pulsars?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postnov K.A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Strong magnetic field of accreting neutron stars (1014 G is hard to probe by Xray spectroscopy but can be indirectly inferred from spin-up/spin-down measurement in X-ray pulsars. The existing observations of slowly rotating X-ray pulsars are discussed. It is shown that magnetic fields of neutron stars derived from these observations (or lower limits in some cases fall within the standard 1012-1013 G range. Claims about the evidence for accreting magnetars are critically discussed in the light of recent progress in understanding of accretion onto slowly rotating neutron stars in the subsonic regime.

  3. Pulsar Coherent De-dispersion System on the Urumqi Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Yong; Ali, Esamdin; Zhang, Jin

    2007-03-01

    Pulsar coherent de-dispersion experiment was carried out by using the 25m Nanshan radio telescope in the Urumqi Observatory. It uses a dual polarization receiver operating at 18cm and a VLBI back-end, Mark5A. The data processing system is based on a C program on the Linux and a 4-node Beowulf cluster. A high quality data acquisition system and a cluster with more processors are needed to build an online pulsar coherent de-dispersion system in the future.

  4. Strong binary pulsar constraints on Lorentz violation in gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Kent; Blas, Diego; Yunes, Nicolás; Barausse, Enrico

    2014-04-25

    Binary pulsars are excellent laboratories to test the building blocks of Einstein's theory of general relativity. One of these is Lorentz symmetry, which states that physical phenomena appear the same for all inertially moving observers. We study the effect of violations of Lorentz symmetry in the orbital evolution of binary pulsars and find that it induces a much more rapid decay of the binary's orbital period due to the emission of dipolar radiation. The absence of such behavior in recent observations allows us to place the most stringent constraints on Lorentz violation in gravity, thus verifying one of the cornerstones of Einstein's theory much more accurately than any previous gravitational observation.

  5. Are the infrared-faint radio sources pulsars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, A. D.; Keith, M.; Hobbs, G.; Norris, R. P.; Mao, M. Y.; Middelberg, E.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects which are strong at radio wavelengths but undetected in sensitive Spitzer observations at infrared wavelengths. Their nature is uncertain and most have not yet been associated with any known astrophysical object. One possibility is that they are radio pulsars. To test this hypothesis we undertook observations of 16 of these sources with the Parkes Radio Telescope. Our results limit the radio emission to a pulsed flux density of less than 0.21 mJy (assuming a 50 per cent duty cycle). This is well below the flux density of the IFRS. We therefore conclude that these IFRS are not radio pulsars.

  6. Strong Binary Pulsar Constraints on Lorentz Violation in Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolas; Barausse, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Binary pulsars are excellent laboratories to test the building blocks of Einstein's theory of General Relativity. One of these is Lorentz symmetry which states that physical phenomena appear the same for all inertially moving observers. We study the effect of violations of Lorentz symmetry in the orbital evolution of binary pulsars and find that it induces a much more rapid decay of the binary's orbital period due to the emission of dipolar radiation. The absence of such behavior in recent observations allows us to place the most stringent constraints on Lorentz violation in gravity, thus verifying one of the cornerstones of Einstein's theory much more accurately than any previous gravitational observation.

  7. $\\gamma$-Ray Pulsars: Emission Zones and Viewing Geometries

    OpenAIRE

    Romani, Roger W.; Yadigaroglu, I. -A.

    1994-01-01

    There are now a half dozen young pulsars detected in high energy photons by the Compton GRO, showing a variety of emission efficiencies and pulse profiles. We present here a calculation of the pattern of high energy emission on the sky in a model which posits $\\gamma$-ray production by charge depleted gaps in the outer magnetosphere. This model accounts for the radio to $\\gamma$-ray pulse offsets of the known pulsars, as well as the shape of the high energy pulse profiles. We also show that $...

  8. Pulsar average wave forms and hollow-cone beam models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    Pulsar wave forms have been analyzed from observations conducted over a wide radio-frequency range to assess the wave-form morphologies and to measure wave-form widths. The results of the analysis compare favorably with the predictions of a model with a hollow-cone beam of fixed dimensions and with random orientation of both the observer and the cone axis with respect to the pulsar spin axis. A class of three-component wave forms is included in the model by adding a central pencil beam to the hollow-cone hypothesis. The consequences of a number of discrepancies between observations and quantitative predictions of the model are discussed.

  9. The second FERMI large area telescope catalog of gamma-ray pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgay, M.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chaty, S.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, A. W.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cognard, I.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D' Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desvignes, G.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Espinoza, C. M.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Freire, P. C. C.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hessels, J.; Hewitt, J.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Janssen, G. H.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Johnston, S.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kramer, M.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R. N.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mignani, R. P.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Pletsch, H. J.; Porter, T. A.; Possenti, A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renault, N.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Roy, J.; Ruan, J.; Sartori, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Shannon, R.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stappers, B. W.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Theureau, G.; Thompson, D. J.; Thorsett, S. E.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Venter, C.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Wang, N.; Weltevrede, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wolff, M. T.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.

    2013-09-19

    This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ≥0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sample constrains emission models. Fermi's selection biases complement those of radio surveys, enhancing comparisons with predicted population distributions.

  10. The second fermi large area telescope catalog of gamma-ray pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgay, M.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chaty, S.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, A. W.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cognard, I.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D' Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desvignes, G.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Espinoza, C. M.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Freire, P. C. C.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hessels, J.; Hewitt, J.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Janssen, G. H.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Johnston, S.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kramer, M.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R. N.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mignani, R. P.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Pletsch, H. J.; Porter, T. A.; Possenti, A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renault, N.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Roy, J.; Ruan, J.; Sartori, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Shannon, R.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stappers, B. W.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Theureau, G.; Thompson, D. J.; Thorsett, S. E.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Venter, C.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Wang, N.; Weltevrede, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wolff, M. T.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.

    2013-09-19

    This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ≥0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sample constrains emission models. Fermi's selection biases complement those of radio surveys, enhancing comparisons with predicted population distributions.

  11. THE SECOND FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE CATALOG OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A. A. [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Allafort, A.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Baldini, L. [Università di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Baring, M. G. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Belfiore, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhattacharyya, B. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune 411 007 (India); Bissaldi, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, and Università di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Brigida, M., E-mail: hartog@stanford.edu [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' M. Merlin' ' dell' Università e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); and others

    2013-10-01

    This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ≥0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sample constrains emission models. Fermi's selection biases complement those of radio surveys, enhancing comparisons with predicted population distributions.

  12. Time evolution of the energy confinement time, internal inductance and effective edge safety factor on IR-T1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salar Elahi, A; Ghoranneviss, M

    2010-01-01

    An attempt is made to investigate the time evolution of the energy confinement time, internal inductance and effective edge safety factor on IR-T1 tokamak. For this purpose, four magnetic pickup coils were designed, constructed and installed on the outer surface of the IR-T1 and then the Shafranov parameter (asymmetry factor) was obtained from them. On the other hand, also a diamagnetic loop was designed and installed on IR-T1 and poloidal beta was determined from it. Therefore, the internal inductance and effective edge safety factor were measured. Also, the time evolution of the energy confinement time was measured using the diamagnetic loop. Experimental results on IR-T1 show that the maximum energy confinement time (which corresponds to minimum collisions, minimum microinstabilities and minimum transport) is at low values of the effective edge safety factor (2.5 eff (a) i <0.72). The results obtained are in agreement with those obtained with the theoretical approach [1-5].

  13. Prevalence and Correlates of Screen-Time in Youth: An International Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Atkin, Andrew James; Sharp, Stephen John; Corder, Kirsten Liane; van, Esther Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Screen-time (including TV viewing/computer use) may be adversely associated with metabolic and mental health in children. Purpose To describe the prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of screen-time in an international sample of children aged 4-17 years. Methods Data are from the International Children’s Accelerometry Database (collected between 1997-2009; analysed in 2013). Participants were 11,434 children (48.9% male; mean (SD) age at first assessment 11.7 (3.2) ye...

  14. Narrow-Band Search of Continuous Gravitational-Wave Signals from Crab and Vela Pulsars in Virgo VSR4 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adams, T.; hide

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of a coherent narrow-band search for continuous gravitational-wave signals from the Crab and Vela pulsars conducted on Virgo VSR4 data. In order to take into account a possible small mismatch between the gravitational wave frequency and two times the star rotation frequency, inferred from measurement of the electromagnetic pulse rate, a range of 0.02 Hz around two times the star rotational frequency has been searched for both the pulsars. No evidence for a signal has been found and 95% confidence level upper limits have been computed both assuming polarization parameters are completely unknown and that they are known with some uncertainty, as derived from X-ray observations of the pulsar wind torii. For Vela the upper limits are comparable to the spin-down limit, computed assuming that all the observed spin-down is due to the emission of gravitational waves. For Crab the upper limits are about a factor of two below the spin-down limit, and represent a significant improvement with respect to past analysis. This is the first time the spin-down limit is significantly overcome in a narrow-band search.

  15. Parametric and Internal Resonances of an Axially Moving Beam with Time-Dependent Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamadev Sahoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear vibration of a travelling beam subjected to principal parametric resonance in presence of internal resonance is investigated. The beam velocity is assumed to be comprised of a constant mean value along with a harmonically varying component. The stretching of neutral axis introduces geometric cubic nonlinearity in the equation of motion of the beam. The natural frequency of second mode is approximately three times that of first mode; a three-to-one internal resonance is possible. The method of multiple scales (MMS is directly applied to the governing nonlinear equations and the associated boundary conditions. The nonlinear steady state response along with the stability and bifurcation of the beam is investigated. The system exhibits pitchfork, Hopf, and saddle node bifurcations under different control parameters. The dynamic solutions in the periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic forms are captured with the help of time history, phase portraits, and Poincare maps showing the influence of internal resonance.

  16. Evidence of Pulsars Metamorphism and Their Connection to Stellar Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hujeirat, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    It is agreed that the progenitors of neutron stars (-NSs) and black holes (-BHs) should be massive stars with M > 9 M_{Sun}. Yet none of these objects have ever been found with [2 M_{Sun}computer-code is based on finite volume method using both the first-order Euler and fourth-order Rugge-Kutta integration methods. The inclusion of φ at zero-temperature is motivated by recent observations of the short-living pentaquarks at the LHC. Based on these studies, I argue that pulsars must be born with embryonic super-baryons (SBs) that form through merger of individual neutrons at their centers. The cores of SBs are made of purely incompressible superconducting gluon-quark superfluids (henceforth SuSu-fluids). Such quantum fluids have a uniform supranuclear density and governed by the critical EOSs P = E for baryonic matter and for φ-induced dark energy P_{φ}= -E_{φ}. The incompressibility here ensures that particles communicate at the shortest possible time scale, superfluidity and superconductivity enforce SBs to spin-down promptly as dictated by the Onsager-Feynman equation and to expel vortices and magnetic flux tubes, whereas their lowest energy state grants SBs lifetimes that are comparable to those of protons. These extra-ordinary long lifetimes suggest that conglomeration of SuSu-objects would evolve over several big bang events to possibly form dark matter halos that embed the galaxies in the observable universe. Pulsars and young neutron stars should metamorphose into SuSu-objects: a procedure which is predicted to last for one Gyr or even shorter, depending on their initial compactness. Once the process is completed, then they become extraordinary compact and turn invisible. It turns out that recent observations of particle collisions at the LHC and RHIC, observations of glitching pulsars and primordial galaxies remarkably support the present scenario.

  17. Chandra Phase-resolved Spectroscopy of the High Magnetic Field Pulsar B1509−58

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Chin-Ping; Ng, C.-Y. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Takata, J. [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Shannon, R. M. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102 (Australia); Johnston, S., E-mail: cphu@hku.hk, E-mail: ncy@bohr.physics.hku.hk [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2017-04-01

    We report on a timing and spectral analysis of the young, high magnetic field rotation-powered pulsar (RPP) B1509−58 using Chandra continuous-clocking mode observation. The pulsar’s X-ray light curve can be fit by the two Gaussian components and the pulsed fraction shows moderate energy dependence over the Chandra band. The pulsed X-ray spectrum is well described by a power law with a photon index 1.16(4), which is harder than the values measured with RXTE /PCA and NuSTAR . This result supports the log-parabolic model for the broadband X-ray spectrum. With the unprecedented angular resolution of Chandra , we clearly identified off-pulse X-ray emission from the pulsar, and its spectrum is best fit by a power law plus blackbody model. The latter component has a temperature of ∼0.14 keV with a bolometric luminosity comparable to the luminosities of other young and high magnetic field RPPs, and it lies between the temperature of magnetars and typical RPPs. In addition, we found that the nonthermal X-ray emission of PSR B1509−58 is significantly softer in the off-pulse phase than in the pulsed phase, with the photon index varying between 1.0 and 1.8 and anticorrelated with the flux. This is similar to the behavior of three other young pulsars. We interpreted it as different contributions of pair-creation processes at different altitudes from the neutron star surface according to the outer-gap model.

  18. XMM-Newton Observation of the nearby Pulsar B1133+16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szary, Andrzej; Gil, Janusz; Zhang, Bing; Haberl, Frank; Melikidze, George I.; Geppert, Ulrich; Mitra, Dipanjan; Xu, Ren-Xin

    2017-02-01

    We constrain the X-ray properties of the nearby (360 {pc}), old (5 {Myr}) pulsar B1133+16 with ˜ 100 {ks} effective exposure time by XMM-Newton. The observed pulsar flux in the 0.2-3 keV energy range is ˜ {10}-14 {erg} {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1, which results in the recording of ˜600 source counts with the EPIC pn and MOS detectors. The X-ray radiation is dominated by nonthermal radiation and is well described by both a single power-law model (PL) and a sum of blackbody and power-law emission (BB+PL). The BB+PL model results in a spectral photon index {{Γ }}={2.4}-0.3+0.4 and a nonthermal flux in the 0.2-3 keV energy range of (7+/- 2)× {10}-15 {erg} {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1. The thermal emission is consistent with the blackbody emission from a small hot spot with a radius of {R}{pc}≈ {14}-5+7 {{m}} and a temperature of {T}{{s}}={2.9}-0.4+0.6 {MK}. Assuming that the hot spot corresponds to the polar cap of the pulsar, we can use the magnetic flux conservation law to estimate the magnetic field at the surface {B}{{s}}≈ 3.9× {10}14 {{G}}. The observations are in good agreement with the predictions of the partially screened gap model, which assumes the existence of small-scale surface magnetic field structures in the polar cap region.

  19. Multiwavelength observations of the transitional millisecond pulsar binary XSS J12270-4859

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Martino, D.; Papitto, A.; Belloni, T.; Burgay, M.; De Ona Wilhelmi, E.; Li, J.; Pellizzoni, A.; Possenti, A.; Rea, N.; Torres, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of X-ray, ultraviolet and optical/near-IR photometric data of the transitional millisecond pulsar binary XSS J12270-4859, obtained at different epochs after the transition to a rotation-powered radio pulsar state. The observations, while confirming the large-amplitude orbital modulation found in previous studies after the state change, also reveal an energy dependence of the amplitudes as well as variations on time-scale of months. The amplitude variations are anticorrelated in the X-ray and the UV/optical bands. The average X-ray spectrum is described by a power law with Γ index of 1.07(8) without requiring an additional thermal component. The power-law index Γ varies from ˜1.2 to ˜1.0 between superior and inferior conjunction of the neutron star. We interpret the observed X-ray behaviour in terms of synchrotron radiation emitted in an extended intrabinary shock, located between the pulsar and the donor star, which is eclipsed due to the companion orbital motion. The G5-type donor dominates the UV/optical and near-IR emission and is similarly found to be heated up to ˜6500 K as in the disc state. The analysis of optical light curves gives a binary inclination 46° ≲ i ≲ 65° and a mass ratio 0.11 ≲ q ≲ 0.26. The donor mass is found to be 0.15 ≲ M2 ≲ 0.36 M⊙ for a neutron star mass of 1.4 M⊙. The variations in the amplitude of the orbital modulation are interpreted in terms of small changes in the mass-flow rate from the donor star. The spectral energy distribution from radio to gamma-rays is composed by multiple contributions that are different from those observed during the accretion-powered state.

  20. CORRELATION OF CHANDRA PHOTONS WITH THE RADIO GIANT PULSES FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilous, A. V. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Kondratiev, V. I. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Ransom, S. M., E-mail: avb3k@virginia.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2012-04-10

    No apparent correlation was found between giant pulses (GPs) and X-ray photons from the Crab pulsar during 5.4 hr of simultaneous observations with the Green Bank Telescope at 1.5 GHz and Chandra X-Ray Observatory primarily in the energy range of 1.5-4.5 keV. During the Crab pulsar periods with GPs, the X-ray flux in radio emission phase windows does not change more than by {+-}10% for main pulse (MP) GPs and {+-}30% for interpulse (IP) GPs. During GPs themselves, the X-ray flux does not change by more than two times for MP GPs and five times for IP GPs. All limits quoted are compatible with 2{sigma} fluctuations of the X-ray flux around the sets of false GPs with random arrival times. The results speak in favor of changes in plasma coherence as the origin of GPs. However, the results do not rule out variations in the rate of particle creation if the particles that emit coherent radio emission are mostly at the lowest Landau level.

  1. CORRELATION OF CHANDRA PHOTONS WITH THE RADIO GIANT PULSES FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilous, A. V.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Ransom, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    No apparent correlation was found between giant pulses (GPs) and X-ray photons from the Crab pulsar during 5.4 hr of simultaneous observations with the Green Bank Telescope at 1.5 GHz and Chandra X-Ray Observatory primarily in the energy range of 1.5-4.5 keV. During the Crab pulsar periods with GPs, the X-ray flux in radio emission phase windows does not change more than by ±10% for main pulse (MP) GPs and ±30% for interpulse (IP) GPs. During GPs themselves, the X-ray flux does not change by more than two times for MP GPs and five times for IP GPs. All limits quoted are compatible with 2σ fluctuations of the X-ray flux around the sets of false GPs with random arrival times. The results speak in favor of changes in plasma coherence as the origin of GPs. However, the results do not rule out variations in the rate of particle creation if the particles that emit coherent radio emission are mostly at the lowest Landau level.

  2. Real-Time Scheduling Approaches for Vehicle-Based Internal Transport Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Le-Anh (Tuan); M.B.M. de Koster (René)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, we study the problem of scheduling and dispatching vehicles in vehicle-based internal transport systems within warehouses and production facilities. We develop and use two rolling horizon policies to solve real-time vehicle scheduling problems. To solve static instances of

  3. 12 CFR 269.10 - Time for internal labor organization business, consultations and negotiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., consultations and negotiations. 269.10 Section 269.10 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD... § 269.10 Time for internal labor organization business, consultations and negotiations. Solicitation of... the employees concerned. Officially requested or approved consultation between management executives...

  4. Pubertal Timing and Youth Internalizing Psychopathology: The Role of Relational Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantz, Hayley; Parent, Justin; Forehand, Rex; Breslend, Nicole Lafko; Winer, Jeffrey P

    2017-02-01

    The current study examined relational aggression as a potential mechanism that explains the association between off-time pubertal development and internalizing problems in youth. Youth gender was also examined as a moderator for the association between these variables. It was hypothesized that early pubertal maturation would be associated with higher levels of relationally aggressive behavior which, in turn, would be associated with elevated levels of internalizing problems. Parents of 372 children between the ages of 8 and 17 were recruited through Amazon's Mechanical Turk. Parents responded to demographic information about themselves, as well as information about their child's pubertal timing, relationally aggressive behavior, and anxiety and depressive symptoms. Findings indicated that early pubertal timing was associated with higher levels of anxiety directly, and higher levels of both anxiety and depressive symptoms indirectly through higher levels of relational aggression. In all but one of the pathways examined, gender was not found to moderate the associations between the study variables of interest. This study is the first to examine relational aggression as a mechanism by which early pubertal timing leads to internalizing problems. The findings suggest that relational aggression could be a target for intervention among early developing youth who are at risk for internalizing problems.

  5. Reference population for international comparisons and time trend surveillance of preterm delivery proportions in three countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morken, N.H.; Vogel, I.; Kallen, K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: International comparison and time trend surveillance of preterm delivery rates is complex. New techniques that could facilitate interpretation of such rates are needed. METHODS: We studied all live births and stillbirths (>or= 28 weeks gestation) registered in the medical birth...

  6. Pubertal Timing and Mexican-Origin Girls' Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms: The Influence of Harsh Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deardorff, Julianna; Cham, Heining; Gonzales, Nancy A.; White, Rebecca M. B.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Wong, Jessie J.; Roosa, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Early-maturing girls are at risk for internalizing and externalizing problems. Research concerning pubertal timing and mental health among Mexican Americans or the influence of parenting behaviors on these relations has been scarce. This study addressed these gaps. This was a prospective examination of 362 Mexican-origin girls and their mothers in…

  7. Dinámica de pulsares jóvenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, M. P.; Horvath, J. E.

    La observación detallada de los pulsos en varios pulsares jóvenes (τ comportamiento. Se derivan curvas analíticas para la evolución de Ω (t) y se estudia la posibilidad de describir un conjunto de observables (incluyendo el braking index n) con estos modelos.

  8. Formation of Double Neutron Stars, Millisecond Pulsars and Double ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Edward P. J. Heuvel

    MS received 18 April 2017; accepted 7 June 2017; published online 12 September 2017. Abstract. The 1982 model for the formation of Hulse–Taylor binary radio pulsar PSR ..... shop (ESA-SP 552), edited by V. Schönfelder, G. Lichti &. C. Winkler, ESASP552, 185V. van den Heuvel, E. P. J., De Loore, C. 1973, Astron.

  9. The Nature of Coherent Radio Emission from Pulsars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    72

    waves excited by the coherent curvature radiation are polarized either along the k and local magnetic field plane (O-mode) or perpendicular to the k and magnetic field plane (X-mode). The single pulse observations suggest that pulsar radio emission is excited by coher- ent curvature radiation which is a definitive solution to.

  10. A radio pulsar/X-ray binary link

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archibald, A.M.; Stairs, I.H.; Ransom, S.M.; Kaspi, V.M.; Kondratiev, V.I.; Lorimer, D.R.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Boyles, J.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Lynch, R.; van Leeuwen, J.; Roberts, M.S.E.; Jenet, F.; Champion, D.J.; Rosen, R.; Barlow, B.N.; Dunlap, B.H.; Remillard, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    Radio pulsars with millisecond spin periods are thought to have been spun up by the transfer of matter and angular momentum from a low-mass companion star during an x-ray-emitting phase. The spin periods of the neutron stars in several such low-mass x-ray binary (LMXB) systems have been shown to be

  11. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory: Three Years of Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Maura; Heatherly, S.; Rosen, R.

    2011-01-01

    The Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) is a joint partnership between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and West Virginia University (WVU) to improve the quality of science education in West Virginia high schools. The ultimate goal of the PSC is to engage students in science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM), and related fields by using information technology to conduct current scientific research, specifically searching for new pulsars. We expect to discover roughly 30 new pulsars in the PSC data. The PSC has had several scientific and educational successes. To date, the PSC students have made two astronomical discoveries: a 4.8-s pulsar and bright radio burst of astrophysical origin, most likely from a sporadic neutron star. We have 21 new high schools this year, bringing the number of PSC schools to 43. Ten of these schools are part of PSC West, a trial scale-up of our original PSC program. Of the 33 schools in the original PSC program, 13 come from rural school districts; one third of these are from schools where over 50% participate in the Free/Reduced School Lunch program. We are reaching first generation college-goers. For students, the program succeeds in building confidence in students, rapport with the scientists involved in the project, and team-work ability. We see additional gains in girls, who see themselves as scientists after participating in the PSC program. This is an important predictor of success in STEM fields.

  12. Spectroscopic Studies of X-Ray Binary Pulsars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    ... those X-ray sources. A merit of investigating soft excess feature using XBP spectra is that it allows us to search pulse modulation of the soft component. Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are also known to have a two component spectra, a steep power law and blackbody emission model (e.g., Mereghetti & Stella 1995).

  13. X-Rays from the Nearby Solitary Millisecond Pulsar PSR J0030+0451 - the Final ROSAT Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, W; Bäcker, A N; Lommen, D; Becker, Werner; Tr"umper, Joachim; Backer, Andrea N.Lommen & Donald C.

    2000-01-01

    We report on X-ray observations of the solitary 4.8 ms pulsar PSR J0030+0451. The pulsar was one of the last targets observed in DEC-98 by the ROSAT PSPC. X-ray pulses are detected on a $4.5\\sigma$ level and make the source the $11^{th}$ millisecond pulsar detected in the X-ray domain. The pulsed fraction is found to be $69\\pm18%$. The X-ray pulse profile is characterized by two narrow peaks which match the gross pulse profile observed at 1.4 GHz. Assuming a Crab-like spectrum the X-ray flux is in the range $f_x= 2-3\\times 10^{-13}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2} $ ($0.1-2.4$ keV), implying an X-ray efficiency of $L_x/\\dot{E}\\sim 0.5-5 \\times 10^{-3} (d/0.23 {kpc})^2$.

  14. Pulsar bi-drifting: implications for polar cap geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Geoff; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    For many years it has been considered puzzling how pulsar radio emission, supposedly created by a circulating carousel of sub-beams, can produce the drift bands demonstrated by PSR J0815+0939, and more recently PSR B1839-04, which simultaneously drifts in opposing directions. Here, we suggest that the carousels of these pulsars, and hence their beams, are not circular but elliptical with axes tilted with respect to the fiducial plane. We show that certain relatively unusual lines of sight can cause bi-drifting to be observed, and a simulation of the two known exemplars is presented. Although bi-drifting is rare, non-circular beams may be common among pulsars and reveal themselves by having profile centroids displaced from the fiducial plane identified by polarization position angle swings. They may also result in profiles with asymmetric- and frequency-dependent component evolution. It is further suggested that the carousels may change their tilt by specific amounts and later reverse them. This may occur suddenly, accompanying a mode change (e.g. PSR B0943+10), or more gradually and short lived as in `flare' pulsars (e.g. PSR B1859+07). A range of pulsar behaviour (e.g. the shifting drift patterns of PSRs B0818-41 and B0826-34) may also be the result of non-circular carousels with varying orientation. The underlying nature of these carousels - whether they are exclusively generated by polar cap physics or driven by magnetospheric effects - is briefly discussed.

  15. Detectability of rotation-powered pulsars in future hard X-ray surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei

    2009-01-01

    Recent INTEGRAL/IBIS hard X-ray surveys have detected about 10 young pulsars. We show hard X-ray properties of these 10 young pulsars, which have a luminosity of 10 33 -10 37 erg s -1 and a photon index of 1.6-2.1 in the energy range of 20-100 keV. The correlation between X-ray luminosity and spin-down power of L X ∝ L sd 1.31 suggests that the hard X-ray emission in rotation-powered pulsars is dominated by the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) component. Assuming spectral properties are similar in 20-100 keV and 2-10 keV for both the pulsar and PWN components, the hard X-ray luminosity and flux of 39 known young X-ray pulsars and 8 millisecond pulsars are obtained, and a correlation of L X ∝ L sd 1.5 is derived. About 20 known young X-ray pulsars and 1 millisecond pulsars could be detected with future INTEGRAL and HXMT surveys. We also carry out Monte Carlo simulations of hard X-ray pulsars in the Galaxy and the Gould Belt, assuming values for the pulsar birth rate, initial position, proper motion velocity, period, and magnetic field distribution and evolution based on observational statistics and the L X - L sd relations: L X ∝ L sd 1.31 and L X ∝ L sd 1.5 . More than 40 young pulsars (mostly in the Galactic plane) could be detected after ten years of INTEGRAL surveys and the launch of HXMT. So, the young pulsars would be a significant part of the hard X-ray source population in the sky, and will contribute to unidentified hard X-ray sources in present and future hard X-ray surveys by INTEGRAL and HXMT.

  16. Entry Location and Entry Timing (ELET Decision Model for International Construction Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che Maznah Mat Isa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a model for entry location (EL and entry timing (ET decisions to guide construction firms in accessing targeted international markets.  Neglecting to properly choose the right combination of the entry location and entry timing (ELET decisions can lead to poor performance of the firms’ international ventures.  The sampling frame was from the Malaysian construction firms that have undertaken and completed projects abroad.  Survey questionnaires sent to 115 firms registered with Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB Malaysia, operating in more than 50 countries, achieved a 39.1 per cent response rate. Based on a comprehensive statistical analysis of survey data it was found that the mutually inclusive significant factors that influenced the firms’ ELET decisions were: the firm’s ability to assess market signals and opportunities, international experience, financial capacity, competencies and capabilities (project management, specialist expertise and technology, resources (level of knowledge based on research and development, experience in similar works, financial support from the home country banks, technical complexities of projects and availability of funds for projects.  Hence, the present research builds on and extends the literature on the ELET decisions in a more integrated way. Keywords: Entry location, entry timing, resource-based view, international markets, Malaysian construction firms.

  17. PULSAR: a balloon-borne experiment to detect variable low energy gamma-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui-Van, N.A.; Martin, I.M.; Blanco, F.G.; Braga, J.

    1983-01-01

    The main goal of the balloon-borne 'PULSAR' experiment is to observe γ-ray photons of variable sources and pulsars in the energy range 0.1-5.0 MeV. The geometrical arrangement of the telescope has been designed according to detector sensitivity estimations for the pulsed radiation, which have been made by empirical and analytical methods. From the obtained results we expect to achieve a detection sensitivity of 3.7 x 10 -7 photons cm -2 s -1 KeV -1 (0.1 - 0.5 MeV) and 4.5 x 10 -6 photons cm -2 s -1 KeV -1 (1.0 - 5.0 MeV), for 5 hours integration time at 5 g cm -2 atmospheric depth, with 3σ statistical significance. It was developed an on-board electronics, compatible with the available telemetry capacity, that is able to process the data with a time resolution of approximatelly 4 miliseconds. (Author) [pt

  18. Pulsar-black hole binaries as a window on quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, John; Kavic, Michael; Lippert, Matthew; Simonetti, John H.

    Pulsars (PSRs) are some of the most accurate clocks found in nature, while black holes (BHs) offer a unique arena for the study of quantum gravity. As such, PSR-BH binaries provide ideal astrophysical systems for detecting effects of quantum gravity. With the success of aLIGO and the advent of instruments like the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) and Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA), the prospects for discovery of such PSR-BH binaries are very promising. We argue that PSR-BH binaries can serve as ready-made testing grounds for proposed resolutions to the BH information paradox. We propose using timing signals from a PSR beam passing through the region near a BH event horizon as a probe of quantum gravitational effects. In particular, we demonstrate that fluctuations of the geometry outside a BH lead to an increase in the measured root-mean-square deviation of arrival times of PSR pulsar traveling near the horizon.

  19. Role of near-real-time accounting in international safeguards for reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Shipley, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    The effectiveness of conventional nuclear materials accounting systems, both national and international, is constrained by the fundamental process features of high-throughput nuclear facilities and the economic limits of effective nuclear materials management consistent with production goals. Conventional accounting, complemented by near-real-time accounting, may meet projected IAEA performance goals for detecting diversion in medium- and high-throughput reprocessing facilities projected for the late 1900's. The design of materials accounting systems for international safeguards in reprocessing plants is discussed, paying particular attention to the question of international verification. Specific problems in measurement techniques, data evaluation, and systems structure are identified, and the current status of research and development efforts is reviewed

  20. Mexican American adolescents' family obligation values and behaviors: links to internalizing symptoms across time and context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telzer, Eva H; Tsai, Kim M; Gonzales, Nancy; Fuligni, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Family obligation is an important aspect of family relationships among families from Mexican backgrounds and can have significant implications for adolescents' well-being. Prior research and theory regarding youths' obligations offer conflicting hypotheses about whether it is detrimental or beneficial for adolescents' well-being. In the current longitudinal study, we used a daily diary method among 428 Mexican American adolescents and their parents to closely examine the impact of adolescents' family obligation values and family assistance behaviors on internalizing symptoms over time. The authors closely examined the role of the family context in these associations. Results suggest that family obligation values relate to declines in adolescents' internalizing symptoms, whereas family assistance behaviors are both a protective and risk factor, depending on the family context. Only when youths provide family assistance in response to acute changes in parental physical and psychological distress do family assistance behaviors relate to increases in adolescents' internalizing symptoms.

  1. Expansion and Brightness Changes in the Pulsar-wind Nebula in the Composite Supernova Remnant Kes 75

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gwynne, Peter H.

    2018-04-01

    We report new Chandra X-ray observations of the shell supernova remnant Kes 75 (G29.7‑0.3) containing a pulsar and pulsar-wind nebula (PWN). Expansion of the PWN is apparent across four epochs—2000, 2006, 2009, and 2016. We find an expansion rate between 2000 and 2016 of the northwest edge of the PWN of 0.249% ± 0.023% yr‑1, for an expansion age R/(dR/dt) of 400 ± 40 yr and an expansion velocity of about 1000 km s‑1. We suggest that the PWN is expanding into an asymmetric nickel bubble in a conventional Type IIP supernova. Some acceleration of the PWN expansion is likely, giving a true age of 480 ± 50 yr. The pulsar’s birth luminosity was larger than the current value by a factor of 3–8, while the initial period was within a factor of 2 of its current value. We confirm directly that Kes 75 contains the youngest known PWN, and hence the youngest known pulsar. The pulsar PSR J1846‑0258 has a spindown-inferred magnetic field of 5 × 1013 G; in 2006, it emitted five magnetar-like short X-ray bursts, but its spindown luminosity has not changed significantly. However, the flux of the PWN has decreased by about 10% between 2009 and 2016, almost entirely in the northern half. A bright knot has declined by 30% since 2006. During this time, the photon indices of the power-law models did not change. This flux change is too rapid to be due to normal PWN evolution in one-zone models.

  2. Gamma-Ray Pulsars: Beaming Evolution, Statistics, and Unidentified EGRET Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadigaroglu, I.-A.; Romani, Roger W.

    1995-08-01

    We compute the variation of the beaming fraction with the efficiency of high-energy γ-ray production in the outer gap pulsar model of Romani and Yadigaroglu. This allows us to correct the fluxes observed for pulsars in the EGRET band and to derive a simple estimate of the variation of efficiency with age. Integration of this model over the population of young neutron stars gives the expected number of γ-ray pulsars along with their distributions in age and distance. This model also shows that many of the unidentified EGRET plane sources should be pulsars and predicts the γ-ray fluxes of known radio pulsars. The contribution of unresolved pulsars to the background flux in the EGRET band is found to be ˜5%.

  3. Inferring the Composition of Super-Jupiter Mass Companions of Pulsars with Radio Line Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Alak; Loeb, Abraham, E-mail: akr@tifr.res.in, E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute of Theory and Computation, Center for Astrophysics, Harvard University 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-02-10

    We propose using radio line spectroscopy to detect molecular absorption lines (such as OH at 1.6–1.7 GHz) before and after the total eclipse of black widow and other short orbital period binary pulsars with low-mass companions. The companion in such a binary may be ablated away by energetic particles and high-energy radiation produced by the pulsar wind. The observations will probe the eclipsing wind being ablated by the pulsar and constrain the nature of the companion and its surroundings. Maser emission from the interstellar medium stimulated by a pulsar beam might also be detected from the intrabinary medium. The short temporal resolution allowed by the millisecond pulsars can probe this medium with the high angular resolution of the pulsar beam.

  4. Health Anxiety Levels in Patients Admitted to Internal Medicine Outpatient Clinic for Several Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gul

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Health anxiety (HA in patients consist of incorrect reference to normal bodily sensations as a signs of a serious disease. The aim of this study is to investigate the HA in patients admitted to internal medicine outpatient clinic for several times within one year. Material and Method: 60 patients who admitted more than one time to internal medicine outpatient clinic within one year and the control group consisted of 60 people were enrolled in this study. Short-form of health anxiety inventory (SAE-KF was given to these groups, The results were compared statistically. Results: SAE-KF scores were significantly higher in the patient group (11.17 ± 6.07 than the control group (10.71±4.44 (Z=-5.96, P

  5. Figaro: an experiment for pulsar and variable source studies in the MeV range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, E.; Agnetta, G.; Di Raffaele, R.; Gerardi, G.

    1983-01-01

    The paper presents a large area, balloon borne, NaI(Tl) detector for low-energy gamma rays with temporal signature: Figaro. The main detector is a mosaic of 12 NaI(Tl) tiles 22.5 x 15 x 5 cm, for a total geometric area of 4050 sq cm. In the energy band 140 keV-6 MeV, the expected background counting rate at float altitude is in the range of two to three thousand counts per second. For pulsar analysis the expected 3sigma sensitivity for 5 hours exposition time is 2.5 10 to the -4th ph/sq cm.s.MeV (150-500 keV) 1.5 10 to the -4th ph/sq cm.s.MeV (1-6 MeV). This performance, together with the large effective area and the relatively short duration of a balloon flight, make Figaro particularly suitable for the identification of sources by means of temporal analysis. For objectives in the Northern sky, including the Crab pulsar, a transmediterranean flight is planned for the summer of 1982 a Southern mission is scheduled in Brazil for the fall of 1983 (Vela, PSR 1822-09)

  6. Pubertal Timing and Mexican-Origin Girls’ Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms: The Influence of Harsh Parenting

    OpenAIRE

    Deardorff, J.; Cham, H.; Gonzales, NA.; White, R.M.B.; Tein, J.-Y.; Wong, J.; Roosa, M.W.

    2012-01-01

    Early-maturing girls are at risk for internalizing and externalizing problems. Scarce research has examined pubertal timing and mental health among Mexican Americans, or examined the influence of parenting behaviors on these relations. This study addressed these gaps. This was a prospective examination of 362 Mexican-origin girls and their mothers using three waves of data. Measures included girls’ self-report of pubertal development and girls’ and mothers’ report of maternal harsh parenting ...

  7. The time-frequency method of signal analysis in internal combustion engine diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramchuk, V. S.; Kazmin, V. P.; Faerman, V. A.; Le, V. T.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the study of applicability of time-frequency correlation functions to solving the problems of internal combustion engine fault diagnostics. The proposed methods are theoretically justified and experimentally tested. In particular, the method’s applicability is illustrated by the example of specially generated signals that simulate the vibration of an engine both during the normal operation and in the case of a malfunction in the system supplying fuel to the cylinders. This method was confirmed during an experiment with an automobile internal combustion engine. The study offers the main findings of the simulation and the experiment and highlights certain characteristic features of time-frequency autocorrelation functions that allow one to identify malfunctions in an engine’s cylinder. The possibility in principle of using time-frequency correlation functions in function testing of the internal combustion engine is demonstrated. The paper’s conclusion proposes further research directions including the application of the method to diagnosing automobile gearboxes.

  8. Lower face lifting and contouring with a novel internal real-time thermosensing monopolar radiofrequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Jin; Kwon, Hyoung Il; Yeo, Un Cheol; Ko, Joo Yeon

    2016-09-01

    As demand for a youthful appearance has increased, various techniques for face lifting and contouring have been used to reduce excess fat deposition and improve skin laxity. Recently, radiofrequency (RF)-assisted lipolysis and liposuction (RFAL) has been introduced for body and face contouring. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical improvement and safety of a new RFAL device for face lifting and contouring. A prospective study was conducted in 20 Korean patients who underwent an internal real-time thermosensing monopolar RFAL procedure. Prior to treatment and 12 and 24 weeks after treatment, digital photographs were taken, and the degree of improvement as measured by investigators and patients was recorded. Skin elasticity was measured using a Cutometer (CT575, Courage and Khazaka®, Cologne, Germany). Safety profiles were also evaluated at each visit. Results showed favorable improvement in skin laxity and fat deposition. Both investigators' evaluations and patients' evaluation showed significant improvement between 12 and 24 weeks. Although the changes in skin elasticity measured by the Cutometer were not statistically significant, all three treated regions showed a trend toward improvement. No major side effects such as infection or burn were observed. The internal, real-time thermosensing monopolar RFAL device showed clinical efficacy and safety. After further studies with more patients and longer follow-up periods, internal real-time thermosensing monopolar RF devices might become one of the popular treatment options for face lifting and contouring.

  9. Internal Concentration and Time Are Important Modifiers of Toxicity: The Case of Chlorpyrifos on Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Hyun-Jeoung; Kwon, Jung-Hwan

    2016-09-06

    The internal concentration of chemicals in exposed organisms changes over time due to absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion processes since chemicals are taken up from the environment. Internal concentration and time are very important modifiers of toxicity when biomarkers are used to evaluate the potential hazards and risks of environmental pollutants. In this study, the responses of molecular biomarkers, and the fate of chemicals in the body, were comprehensively investigated to determine cause-and-effect relationships over time. Chlorpyrifos (CP) was selected as a model chemical, and Caenorhabditis elegans was exposed to CP for 4 h using the passive dosing method. Worms were then monitored in fresh medium during a 48-h recovery regime. The mRNA expression of genes related to CYP metabolism (cyp35a2 and cyp35a3) increased during the constant exposure phase. The body residue of CP decreased once it reached a peak level during the early stage of exposure, indicating that the initial uptake of CP rapidly induced biotransformation with the synthesis of new CYP metabolic proteins. The residual chlorpyrifos-oxon concentration, an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor, continuously increased even after the recovery regime started. These delayed toxicokinetics seem to be important for the extension of AChE inhibition for up to 9 h after the start of the recovery regime. Comprehensive investigation into the molecular initiation events and changes in the internal concentrations of chemical species provide insight into response causality within the framework of an adverse outcome pathway.

  10. Closed to reason: time for accountability for the International Narcotic Control Board

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Small Dan

    2007-05-01

    International Harm Reduction Development Program (IHRD joined by former United Nations Special Envoy for HIV/AIDS in Africa, the respected Canadian statesman Stephen Lewis. The full report, "Closed to Reason: The International Narcotics Control Board and HIV/AIDS" is attached along [see Additional file 1] with a Russian translation of the key findings of the authors [see Additional files 2] as well as Russian and Chinese translations of this abstract [see Additional 3 and 4]. As the report makes very clear, the time to inject some accountability and reason into the INCB is now. Additional file 1 Closed to Reason: The International Narcotics Control Board and HIV/AIDS. Report by J. Csete and D. Wolfe of the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network; International Harm Reduction Development Program (IHRD; Open Society Institute (OSI; 2007:1–32. Click here for file Additional file 2 Closed to Reason: The International Narcotics Control Board and HIV/AIDS Key Findings. Russian translation of key findings of the above report. Click here for file Additional file 3 "Closed to Reason": Time for Accountability for the International Narcotic Control Board. Russian translation of abstract of the above editorial. Click here for file Additional file 4 "Closed to Reason": Time for accountability for the International Narcotic Control Board. Chinese translation of abstract of the above editorial. Click here for file Howmany times must a man look up Before he can see the sky Yes and how many ears Must one man have Before he can hear people cry? Yes, and how many deaths Will it take till he knows That too many people have died? Bob Dylan

  11. ORDINARY X-RAYS FROM THREE EXTRAORDINARY MILLISECOND PULSARS: XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS OF PSRs J0337+1715, J0636+5129, AND J0645+5158

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiewak, Renée; Kaplan, David L. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Archibald, Anne; Hessels, Jason [ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Gentile, Peter; Lorimer, Duncan; McLaughlin, Maura [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, 210E Hodges Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Lynch, Ryan; Ransom, Scott [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Stairs, Ingrid [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Stovall, Kevin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    We present the first X-ray observations of three recently discovered millisecond pulsars (MSPs) with interesting characteristics: PSR J0337+1715, PSR J0636+5129, and PSR J0645+5158. PSR J0337+1715 is a fast-spinning, bright, and so-far unique MSP in a hierarchical triple system with two white dwarf companions. PSR J0636+5129 is an MSP in a very tight 96-minute orbit with a low-mass, 8 M {sub J} companion. PSR J0645+5158 is a nearby, isolated MSP with a very small duty cycle (1%–2%), which has led to its inclusion in high-precision pulsar timing programs. Using data from XMM-Newton , we have analyzed X-ray spectroscopy for these three objects, as well as optical/ultraviolet photometry for PSR J0337+1715. The X-ray data for each are largely consistent with expectations for most MSPs with regards to the ratios of thermal and non-thermal emission. We discuss the implications of these data on the pulsar population, and prospects for future observations of these pulsars.

  12. ORDINARY X-RAYS FROM THREE EXTRAORDINARY MILLISECOND PULSARS: XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS OF PSRs J0337+1715, J0636+5129, AND J0645+5158

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiewak, Renée; Kaplan, David L.; Archibald, Anne; Hessels, Jason; Gentile, Peter; Lorimer, Duncan; McLaughlin, Maura; Lynch, Ryan; Ransom, Scott; Stairs, Ingrid; Stovall, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We present the first X-ray observations of three recently discovered millisecond pulsars (MSPs) with interesting characteristics: PSR J0337+1715, PSR J0636+5129, and PSR J0645+5158. PSR J0337+1715 is a fast-spinning, bright, and so-far unique MSP in a hierarchical triple system with two white dwarf companions. PSR J0636+5129 is an MSP in a very tight 96-minute orbit with a low-mass, 8 M J companion. PSR J0645+5158 is a nearby, isolated MSP with a very small duty cycle (1%–2%), which has led to its inclusion in high-precision pulsar timing programs. Using data from XMM-Newton , we have analyzed X-ray spectroscopy for these three objects, as well as optical/ultraviolet photometry for PSR J0337+1715. The X-ray data for each are largely consistent with expectations for most MSPs with regards to the ratios of thermal and non-thermal emission. We discuss the implications of these data on the pulsar population, and prospects for future observations of these pulsars.

  13. Prevalence and correlates of screen time in youth: an international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Andrew J; Sharp, Stephen J; Corder, Kirsten; van Sluijs, Esther M F

    2014-12-01

    Screen time (including TV viewing/computer use) may be adversely associated with metabolic and mental health in children. To describe the prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of screen time in an international sample of children aged 4-17 years. Data from the International Children's Accelerometry Database were collected between 1997-2009 and analyzed in 2013. Participants were 11,434 children (48.9% boys; mean [SD] age at first assessment, 11.7 [3.2] years). Exposures were sex, age, weight status, maternal education, and ethnicity. The outcome was self- or proxy-reported screen time 2 hours/day. Analyses were conducted initially at study level and then combined using random-effects meta-analysis. Within each contributing study, at least two thirds of participants exceeded 2 hours/day of screen time. In meta-analytic models, overweight or obese children were more likely to exceed 2 hours/day of screen time than those who were non-overweight (OR=1.58, 95% CI=1.33,1.88). Girls (vs boys: 0.65; 0.54, 0.78) and participants with more highly educated mothers (vs educational attainment. The population-attributable risk associated with this exposure is potentially high; further efforts to understand the determinants of within- and between-country variation in these behaviors and inform the development of effective behavior change intervention programs is warranted. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Study of the spectral characteristics of unidentified galactic EGRET sources. Are they pulsar-like?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merck, M.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Esposito, J. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Fierro, J. M.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lin, Y. C.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Michelson, P. F.; von Montigny, C.; Muecke, A.; Mukherjee, R.; Nolan, P. L.; Pohl, M.; Schneid, E.; Sreekumar, P.; Thompson, D. J.; Willis, T. D.

    1996-12-01

    A spectral study of unidentified galactic EGRET sources was performed. The derived spectra are compared to the spectra of pulsars to test the hypothesis, that a significant fraction of these sources are Geminga like radio-quiet pulsars (Yadigaroglu & Romani 1995ApJ...449..211Y). Most of the sources show significantly different spectra than expected under this hypothesis. Of those with spectra consistent with typical pulsar spectra, four are positionally consistent with young spin-powered radio pulsars leaving only very few Geminga type candidates in the sample.

  15. Quasars, pulsars and black holes (a bibliography with abstracts). Report for 1964--Feb 77

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grooms, D.W.

    1977-04-01

    Astronomical surveys of quasars, pulsars, and black holes are cited. Computer simulations, mathematical models and other methods used for the verification of hypotheses about astrophysical processes are included

  16. A possible mechanism for the pulsar radio emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinata, S.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of radio emission is considered within a model which produces the beam-plasma system near the pulsar. A longitudinal instability develops near the light cylinder for a particular choice of parameters adopted in the paper. The excited wave strongly oscillates the beam particles perpendicular to its average velocity on one hand, and forms bunches of them on the other hand. Consequently, coherent radiation is expected. The frequency of the emission falls within the radio band, but the intensity turns out to be too low to explain observations. An appreciable enhancement of the beam number density over the Goldreich-Julian value (nsub(b) approximately equal to BΩ/2πec) is needed if the mechanism discussed in the present paper is responsible for the pulsar radio emission. (Auth.)

  17. A radio pulsar/x-ray binary link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Anne M; Stairs, Ingrid H; Ransom, Scott M; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Lorimer, Duncan R; McLaughlin, Maura A; Boyles, Jason; Hessels, Jason W T; Lynch, Ryan; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Roberts, Mallory S E; Jenet, Frederick; Champion, David J; Rosen, Rachel; Barlow, Brad N; Dunlap, Bart H; Remillard, Ronald A

    2009-06-12

    Radio pulsars with millisecond spin periods are thought to have been spun up by the transfer of matter and angular momentum from a low-mass companion star during an x-ray-emitting phase. The spin periods of the neutron stars in several such low-mass x-ray binary (LMXB) systems have been shown to be in the millisecond regime, but no radio pulsations have been detected. Here we report on detection and follow-up observations of a nearby radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) in a circular binary orbit with an optically identified companion star. Optical observations indicate that an accretion disk was present in this system within the past decade. Our optical data show no evidence that one exists today, suggesting that the radio MSP has turned on after a recent LMXB phase.

  18. High-Energy Emission at Shocks in Millisecond Pulsar Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kust Harding, Alice; Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Venter, Christo; Boettcher, Markus

    2016-04-01

    A large number of new Black Widow (BW) and Redback (RB) energetic millisecond pulsars have been discovered through radio searches of unidentified Fermi sources, increasing the known number of these systems from 4 to 28. We model the high-energy emission components from particles accelerated to several TeV in intrabinary shocks in BW and RB systems, and their predicted modulation at the binary orbital period. Synchrotron emission is expected at X-ray energies and such modulated emission has already been detected by Chandra and XMM. Inverse Compton emission from accelerated particles scattering the UV emission from the radiated companion star is expected in the Fermi and TeV bands. Detections or constraints on this emission will probe the unknown physics of pulsar winds.

  19. Time-variable gravity potential components for optical clock comparisons and the definition of international time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, C.; Denker, H.; Timmen, L.

    2016-12-01

    The latest generation of optical atomic clocks is approaching the level of one part in 1018 in terms of frequency stability and uncertainty. For clock comparisons and the definition of international time scales, a relativistic redshift effect of the clock frequencies has to be taken into account at a corresponding uncertainty level of about 0.1 m2 s-2 and 0.01 m in terms of gravity potential and height, respectively. Besides the predominant static part of the gravity potential, temporal variations must be considered in order to avoid systematic frequency shifts. Time-variable gravity potential components induced by tides and non-tidal mass redistributions are investigated with regard to the level of one part in 1018. The magnitudes and dominant time periods of the individual gravity potential contributions are investigated globally and for specific laboratory sites together with the related uncertainty estimates. The basics of the computation methods are presented along with the applied models, data sets and software. Solid Earth tides contribute by far the most dominant signal with a global maximum amplitude of 4.2 m2 s-2 for the potential and a range (maximum-to-minimum) of up to 1.3 and 10.0 m2 s-2 in terms of potential differences between specific laboratories over continental and intercontinental scales, respectively. Amplitudes of the ocean tidal loading potential can amount up to 1.25 m2 s-2, while the range of the potential between specific laboratories is 0.3 and 1.1 m2 s-2 over continental and intercontinental scales, respectively. These are the only two contributors being relevant at a 10-17 level. However, several other time-variable potential effects can particularly affect clock comparisons at the 10-18 level. Besides solid Earth pole tides, these are non-tidal mass redistributions in the atmosphere, the oceans and the continental water storage.

  20. Universal law for waiting internal time in seismicity and its implication to earthquake network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Sumiyoshi; Suzuki, Norikazu

    2012-02-01

    In their paper (Europhys. Lett., 71 (2005) 1036), Carbone, Sorriso-Valvo, Harabaglia and Guerra showed that the "unified scaling law" for conventional waiting times of earthquakes claimed by Bak et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 88 (2002) 178501) is actually not universal. Here, instead of the conventional time, the concept of the internal time termed the event time is considered for seismicity. It is shown that, in contrast to the conventional waiting time, the waiting event time obeys a power law. This implies the existence of temporal long-range correlations in terms of the event time with no sharp decay of the crossover type. The discovered power-law waiting event-time distribution turns out to be universal in the sense that it takes the same form for seismicities in California, Japan and Iran. In particular, the parameters contained in the distribution take the common values in all these geographical regions. An implication of this result to the procedure of constructing earthquake networks is discussed.

  1. PULSAR.MAKING VISIBLE THE SOUND OF STARS

    OpenAIRE

    Lega, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Pulsar, making visible the sound of stars is a comunication based on a sound Installation raised as a site-specific project to show the hidden abilities of sound to generate images and patterns on the matter, using the acoustic science of cymatics. The objective of this communication will show people how through abstract and intangible sounds from celestial orbs of cosmos (radio waves generated by electromagnetic pulses from the rotation of neutrón stars), we can create ar...

  2. Sudden and suspicious deaths outside the deceased's own country--time for an international protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M A

    1982-01-01

    Increased leisure time, international business commitments, and ease of travel have led to an increased incidence of sudden deaths outside the deceased's own country. Methods of investigation of sudden death, and the extent of such enquiries, vary greatly from country to country. The relatives of the decreased frequently make serious allegations relating to the circumstances of the death when they return to their homeland, and when the body is repatriated, a local pathologist may be directed to make an examination. This is frequently limited by inadequate police information, inadequate preservation of the organs and the absence of any autopsy report. Examples of these difficulties are presented, and suggestions offered for a basic protocol for the examination and report upon the death of a foreign national. Following the presentation of this paper at the International Association of Forensic Sciences Meeting in Bergen, considerable discussion took place and there have been further developments in the United Kingdom. These are briefly reported.

  3. The Crab nebula's ''wisps'' as shocked pulsar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallant, Y.A.; Arons, J.; Langdon, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    The Crab synchrotron nebula has been successfully modelled as the post-shock region of a relativistic, magnetized wind carrying most of the spindown luminosity from the central pulsar. While the Crab is the best-studied example, most of the highest spindown luminosity pulsars are also surrounded by extended synchrotron nebulae, and several additional supernova remnants with ''plerionic'' morphologies similar to the Crab are known where the central object is not seen. All these objects have nonthermal, power-law spectra attributable to accelerated high-energy particles thought to originate in a Crab-like relativistic pulsar wind. However, proposed models have so far treated the wind shock as an infinitesimally thin discontinuity, with an arbitrarily ascribed particle acceleration efficiency. To make further progress, investigations resolving the shock structure seemed in order. Motivated by these considerations, we have performed ''particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of perpendicularly magnetized shocks in electron-positron and electron-positron-ion plasmas. The shocks in pure electron-positron plasmas were found to produce only thermal distributions downstream, and are thus poor candidates as particle acceleration sites. When the upstream plasma flow also contained a smaller population of positive ions, however, efficient acceleration of positrons, and to a lesser extent of electrons, was observed in the simulations

  4. Current Results and Future Directions of the Pulsar Search Collaboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heatherly, Sue Ann; Rosen, R.; McLaughlin, M.; Lorimer, D.

    2011-01-01

    The Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) is a joint partnership between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and West Virginia University (WVU). The ultimate goal of the PSC is to interest students in science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM) fields by engaging them in conducting authentic scientific research-specifically the search for new pulsars. Of the 33 schools in the original PSC program, 13 come from rural school districts; one third of these are from schools where over 50% participate in the Free/Reduced School Lunch program. We are reaching first generation college-goers. For students, the program succeeds in building confidence in students, rapport with the scientists involved in the project, and greater comfort with team-work. We see additional gains in girls, as they see themselves more as scientists after participating in the PSC program, which is an important predictor of success in STEM fields. The PSC has had several scientific successes as well. To date, PSC students have made two astronomical discoveries: a 4.8-s pulsar and bright radio burst of astrophysical origin, most likely from a sporadic neutron star. We will report on the status of the project including new evaluation data. We will also describe PSC-West, an experiment to involve schools in Illinois and Wisconsin using primarily online tools for professional development of teachers and coaching of students. Knowledge gained through our efforts with PSC-West will assist the PSC team in scaling up the project.

  5. Orbitally-Modulated X-rays From Millisecond Pulsar Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kust Harding, Alice; Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Venter, Christo; Boettcher, Markus; Baring, Matthew G.

    2017-06-01

    A large number of new Black Widow (BW) and Redback (RB) rotation-powered millisecond pulsars have been discovered through radio searches of unidentified Fermi sources, increasing the known number of these systems from 4 to 28. We model the high-energy synchrotron emission component from particles accelerated to several TeV in intrabinary shocks in two known BW and RB systems, and its predicted modulation at the binary orbital period. Constructing a geometric model of the shock, we use radio eclipse data in conjunction with optical constraints on the binary inclination angle to constrain the shock stagnation point distance from either the pulsar or companion star. We next model the X-ray synchrotron orbital light curves and compare them to those observed from the PSR B1957+20, where the shock surrounds the companion, and PSR J1023+0038, where the shock surrounds the pulsar, to constrain the bulk Lorentz factor of the wind flow as well as further constrain the inclination angle.

  6. Energetic Ring Shows Way To Discovery Of Pulsar "Bulls-Eye"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Astronomers from the University of Massachusetts and Columbia University have found the "bulls-eye" pulsar in a bright ring of high-energy particles in a distant supernova remnant. This discovery, made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Arecibo Radio Telescope, will help scientists better understand how neutron stars channel enormous amounts of energy into particles moving near the speed of light. Chandra's image of the supernova remnant SNR G54.1+0.3 reveals a bright, point-like central source, which is surrounded by a ring and two jet-like structures in an extended nebula of high-energy particles. The radio data show that this bright central source is a neutron star, or pulsar, that is rotating 7 times per second. "The features Chandra found appear to be due to the energetic flow of radiation and particles from a rapidly spinning neutron star formed during a supernova event," said Fangjun Lu of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst who led the X-ray research. Lu and colleagues informed Fernando Camilo of Columbia University in New York of this detection. Camilo and his collaborators then used the powerful Arecibo telescope to look for the tell-tale radio pulsations from a neutron star at the center of the ring. After a search in August 2001 was aborted by radio-frequency interference, they observed the source again in April 2002 and found a weak, pulsating radio source. Further observations indicate the pulsar (and hence the supernova remnant) has an age of approximately 3000 years. Analysis of 1997 ASCA satellite data confirmed that the source is pulsing in X-rays as well. "This discovery is an excellent example of how the superb resolution of Chandra and the improved capabilities of Arecibo worked together to quickly resolve an outstanding scientific question," said Camilo. "We look forward to continued substantial progress in understanding the properties of young neutron stars." Intense electric fields around the neutron star accelerate

  7. Conditional independence graph for nonlinear time series and its application to international financial markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Zhao, Hongxia

    2013-05-01

    Conditional independence graphs are proposed for describing the dependence structure of multivariate nonlinear time series, which extend the graphical modeling approach based on partial correlation. The vertexes represent the components of a multivariate time series and edges denote direct dependence between corresponding series. The conditional independence relations between component series are tested efficiently and consistently using conditional mutual information statistics and a bootstrap procedure. Furthermore, a method combining information theory with surrogate data is applied to test the linearity of the conditional dependence. The efficiency of the methods is approved through simulation time series with different linear and nonlinear dependence relations. Finally, we show how the method can be applied to international financial markets to investigate the nonlinear independence structure.

  8. A Full Mesh ATCA-based General Purpose Data Processing Board: Pulsar II

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, J; Okumura, Y

    2014-01-01

    High luminosity conditions at the LHC pose many unique challenges for potential silicon based track trigger systems. Among those challenges is data formatting, where hits from thousands of silicon modules must first be shared and organized into overlapping trigger towers. Other challenges exist for Level-1 track triggers, where many parallel data paths may be used for 5 high speed time multiplexed data transfers. Communication between processing nodes requires high bandwidth, low latency, and flexible real time data sharing, for which a full mesh backplane is a natural fit. A custom full mesh enabled ATCA board called the Pulsar II has been designed with the goal of creating a scalable architecture abundant in flexible, non-blocking, high bandwidth board- to-board communication channels while keeping the design as simple as possible.

  9. Trajectory-tracking control of underwater inspection robot for nuclear reactor internals using Time Delay Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joon-Young [Green Growth Laboratory, Korea Electric Power Research Institute, 65 Munjiro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: asura@kepco.co.kr; Cho, Byung-Hak; Lee, Jae-Kyung [Green Growth Laboratory, Korea Electric Power Research Institute, 65 Munjiro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-11-15

    This paper addresses the trajectory control problem of an underwater inspection robot for nuclear reactor internals. From the viewpoint of control engineering, the trajectory control of the underwater robot is a difficult task due to its nonlinear dynamics, which includes various hydraulic forces such as buoyancy and hydrodynamic damping, the difference between the centres of gravity and buoyancy, and disturbances from a tether cable. To solve such problems, we applied Time Delay Control to the underwater robot. This control law has a very simple structure not requiring nonlinear plant dynamics, and was proven to be highly robust against nonlinearities, uncertainties and disturbances. We confirmed its effectiveness through experiments.

  10. Trajectory-tracking control of underwater inspection robot for nuclear reactor internals using Time Delay Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Joon-Young; Cho, Byung-Hak; Lee, Jae-Kyung

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the trajectory control problem of an underwater inspection robot for nuclear reactor internals. From the viewpoint of control engineering, the trajectory control of the underwater robot is a difficult task due to its nonlinear dynamics, which includes various hydraulic forces such as buoyancy and hydrodynamic damping, the difference between the centres of gravity and buoyancy, and disturbances from a tether cable. To solve such problems, we applied Time Delay Control to the underwater robot. This control law has a very simple structure not requiring nonlinear plant dynamics, and was proven to be highly robust against nonlinearities, uncertainties and disturbances. We confirmed its effectiveness through experiments.

  11. Timing avian long-distance migration: from internal clock mechanisms to global flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åkesson, Susanne; Ilieva, Mihaela; Karagicheva, Julia; Rakhimberdiev, Eldar; Tomotani, Barbara; Helm, Barbara

    2017-11-19

    Migratory birds regularly perform impressive long-distance flights, which are timed relative to the anticipated environmental resources at destination areas that can be several thousand kilometres away. Timely migration requires diverse strategies and adaptations that involve an intricate interplay between internal clock mechanisms and environmental conditions across the annual cycle. Here we review what challenges birds face during long migrations to keep track of time as they exploit geographically distant resources that may vary in availability and predictability, and summarize the clock mechanisms that enable them to succeed. We examine the following challenges: departing in time for spring and autumn migration, in anticipation of future environmental conditions; using clocks on the move, for example for orientation, navigation and stopover; strategies of adhering to, or adjusting, the time programme while fitting their activities into an annual cycle; and keeping pace with a world of rapidly changing environments. We then elaborate these themes by case studies representing long-distance migrating birds with different annual movement patterns and associated adaptations of their circannual programmes. We discuss the current knowledge on how endogenous migration programmes interact with external information across the annual cycle, how components of annual cycle programmes encode topography and range expansions, and how fitness may be affected when mismatches between timing and environmental conditions occur. Lastly, we outline open questions and propose future research directions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wild clocks: integrating chronobiology and ecology to understand timekeeping in free-living animals'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  12. Understanding recovery: changes in the relationships of the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) components over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A M; Perruccio, A V; Ibrahim, S; Hogg-Johnson, S; Wong, R; Badley, E M

    2012-12-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework describes human functioning through body structure and function, activity and participation in the context of a person's social and physical environment. This work tested the temporal relationships of these components. Our hypotheses were: 1) there would be associations among physical impairment, activity limitations and participation restrictions within time; 2) prior status of a component would be associated with future status; 3) prior status of one component would influence status of a second component (e.g. prior activity limitations would be associated with current participation restrictions); and, 4) the magnitude of the within time relationships of the components would vary over time. Participants from Canada with primary hip or knee joint replacement (n = 931), an intervention with predictable improvement in pain and disability, completed standardized outcome measures pre-surgery and five times in the first year post-surgery. These included physical impairment (pain), activity limitations and participation restrictions. ICF component relationships were evaluated cross-sectionally and longitudinally using path analysis adjusting for age, sex, BMI, hip vs. knee, low back pain and mood. All component scores improved significantly over time. The path coefficients supported the hypotheses in that both within and across time, physical impairment was associated with activity limitation and activity limitation was associated with participation restriction; prior status and change in a component were associated with current status in another component; and, the magnitude of the path coefficients varied over time with stronger associations among components to three months post surgery than later in recovery with the exception of the association between impairment and participation restrictions which was of similar magnitude at all times. This work enhances understanding of the

  13. Reporting studies on time to diagnosis: proposal of a guideline by an international panel (REST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launay, Elise; Cohen, Jérémie F; Bossuyt, Patrick M; Buekens, Pierre; Deeks, Jonathan; Dye, Timothy; Feltbower, Richard; Ferrari, Andrea; Kramer, Michael; Leeflang, Mariska; Moher, David; Moons, Karel G; von Elm, Erik; Ravaud, Philippe; Chalumeau, Martin

    2016-09-27

    Studies on time to diagnosis are an increasing field of clinical research that may help to plan corrective actions and identify inequities in access to healthcare. Specific features of time to diagnosis studies, such as how participants were selected and how time to diagnosis was defined and measured, are poorly reported. The present study aims to derive a reporting guideline for studies on time to diagnosis. Each item of a list previously used to evaluate the completeness of reporting of studies on time to diagnosis was independently evaluated by a core panel of international experts (n = 11) for relevance and readability before an open electronic discussion allowed consensus to be reached on a refined list. The list was then submitted with an explanatory document to first, last and/or corresponding authors (n = 98) of published systematic reviews on time to diagnosis (n = 45) for relevance and readability, and finally approved by the core expert panel. The refined reporting guideline consists of a 19-item checklist: six items are about the process of participant selection (with a suggested flowchart), six about the definition and measurement of time to diagnosis, and three about optional analyses of associations between time to diagnosis and participant characteristics and health outcomes. Of 24 responding authors of systematic reviews, more than 21 (≥88 %) rated the items as relevant, and more than 17 (≥70 %) as readable; 19 of 22 (86 %) authors stated that they would potentially use the reporting guideline in the future. We propose a reporting guideline (REST) that could help authors, reviewers, and editors of time to diagnosis study reports to improve the completeness and the accuracy of their reporting.

  14. GNSS in real-time: Demonstration experiment at Berlin Airport International

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickert, Jens; Dick, Galina; Ge, Maorong; Heise, Stefan; Li, XingXing; Ming, Shangguan; Nischan, Thomas; Ramatschi, Markus; Schuh, Harald; Alberding, Jürgen; Weigmann, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Real-time (RT) applications are in focus of recent GNSS research. International activities related to the RT data collection and distribution, as well as provision of specific RT data products (e.g., satellite orbits and clocks, station coordinates) are coordinated within the Real-Time Project of the International GNSS Service (IGS). Currently IGS provides real-time data from more than 100 globally distributed GNSS ground stations. This number, in parallel with the extension of various additional international real-time networks, is continuously increasing. In parallel to the rapid development of GNSS RT activities also innovative geophysical applications were pioneered by GNSS research groups and institutions, including GFZ. One prominent example is the use of GNSS components in early warning systems. GNSS measurements can be used there for the rapid detection and characterization of deformation fields, related to earthquakes, which induce Tsunamis. Such deformation data cannot be provided by seismometer measurements, but are important for the prediction of the tsunami wave propagation caused by earthquakes. The GNSS real-time group at GFZ is involved in several research projects related to geophysical RT GNSS applications, and also operates one of the RT analysis centers of the IGS. We introduce results of a real-time GNSS demonstration project, which was performed in 2012 at the new Berlin International Airport BER at Schönefeld, south-east of Berlin city center. The main goal of the project was the demonstration of the functionality of a complex RT-PPP server-client solution for dynamic applications which was developed within a joint research project of GFZ and the company Alberding GmbH. Compared to the standard PPP (clock & orbit) this solution uses additional information (ionosphere, uncalibrated phase delays UPD) to increase the positioning accuracy and to reduce the convergence time. The major challenges of the experiment were the stable operation of the

  15. Discovery of Hard Nonthermal Pulsed X-Ray Emission from the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1841-045

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, L.; Hermsen, W.; Méndez, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    We report the discovery of nonthermal pulsed X-ray/soft gamma-ray emission up to ~150 keV from the anomalous 11.8 s X-ray pulsar AXP 1E 1841-045 located near the center of supernova remnant Kes 73 using Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Proportional Counter Array and High Energy X-Ray Timing

  16. Real-time spectral interferometry probes the internal dynamics of femtosecond soliton molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herink, G; Kurtz, F; Jalali, B; Solli, D R; Ropers, C

    2017-04-07

    Solitons, particle-like excitations ubiquitous in many fields of physics, have been shown to exhibit bound states akin to molecules. The formation of such temporal soliton bound states and their internal dynamics have escaped direct experimental observation. By means of an emerging time-stretch technique, we resolve the evolution of femtosecond soliton molecules in the cavity of a few-cycle mode-locked laser. We track two- and three-soliton bound states over hundreds of thousands of consecutive cavity roundtrips, identifying fixed points and periodic and aperiodic molecular orbits. A class of trajectories acquires a path-dependent geometrical phase, implying that its dynamics may be topologically protected. These findings highlight the importance of real-time detection in resolving interactions in complex nonlinear systems, including the dynamics of soliton bound states, breathers, and rogue waves. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. The Green Bank Northern Celestial Cap Pulsar Survey. I. Survey Description, Data Analysis, and Initial Results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stovall, K.; Lynch, R.S.; Ransom, S.M.; Archibald, A.M.; Banaszak, S.; Biwer, C.M.; Boyles, J.; Dartez, L.P.; Day, D.; Ford, A.J.; Flanigan, J.; Garcia, A.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Hinojosa, J.; Jenet, F.A.; Kaplan, D.L.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V.M.; Kondratiev, V.I.; Leake, S.; Lorimer, D.R.; Lunsford, G.; Martinez, J.G.; Mata, A.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Roberts, M.S.E.; Rohr, M.D.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I.H.; van Leeuwen, J.; Walker, A.N.; Wells, B.L.

    2014-01-01

    We describe an ongoing search for pulsars and dispersed pulses of radio emission, such as those from rotating radio transients (RRATs) and fast radio bursts, at 350 MHz using the Green Bank Telescope. With the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument, we record 100 MHz of bandwidth divided

  18. First Search for Gravitational Waves from Known Pulsars with Advanced LIGO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Belgin, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, H. -P.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, Laura; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; Day, R.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devenson, J.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M. Di; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Alvarez, M. Dovale; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Etienne, Z.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Galiana, A. Fernandez; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fong, H.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, Whansun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kraemer, H.C.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGrath Hoareau, C.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meador, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A. M.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newport, J. M.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Castro-Perez, J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Rhoades, E.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, D.M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, Perminder S; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, E.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tippens, T.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torrie, C. I.; Toeyrae, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Williams, D.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D.S.; Wu, G.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S.J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; Buchner, S.; Cognard, I.; Corongiu, A.; Freire, P. C.C.; Guillemot, L.; Hobbs, G. B.; Kerr, M.; Lyne, A. G.; Possenti, A.; Ridolfi, A.; Shannon, R. M.; Stappers, B. W.; Weltevrede, P.

    2017-01-01

    We present the result of searches for gravitational waves from 200 pulsars using data from the first observing run of the Advanced LIGO detectors. We find no significant evidence for a gravitational-wave signal from any of these pulsars, but we are able to set the most constraining upper limits yet

  19. EINSTEIN@HOME DISCOVERY OF FOUR YOUNG GAMMA-RAY PULSARS IN FERMI LAT DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pletsch, H. J.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Papa, M. A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut), D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Guillemot, L.; Champion, D. J.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Ng, C. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Anderson, D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hammer, D.; Siemens, X. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Keith, M. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility (Australia); Ray, P. S., E-mail: holger.pletsch@aei.mpg.de, E-mail: lucas.guillemot@cnrs-orleans.fr [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    We report the discovery of four gamma-ray pulsars, detected in computing-intensive blind searches of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsars were found using a novel search approach, combining volunteer distributed computing via Einstein@Home and methods originally developed in gravitational-wave astronomy. The pulsars PSRs J0554+3107, J1422–6138, J1522–5735, and J1932+1916 are young and energetic, with characteristic ages between 35 and 56 kyr and spin-down powers in the range 6 × 10{sup 34}—10{sup 36} erg s{sup –1}. They are located in the Galactic plane and have rotation rates of less than 10 Hz, among which the 2.1 Hz spin frequency of PSR J0554+3107 is the slowest of any known gamma-ray pulsar. For two of the new pulsars, we find supernova remnants coincident on the sky and discuss the plausibility of such associations. Deep radio follow-up observations found no pulsations, suggesting that all four pulsars are radio-quiet as viewed from Earth. These discoveries, the first gamma-ray pulsars found by volunteer computing, motivate continued blind pulsar searches of the many other unidentified LAT gamma-ray sources.

  20. The pulsar contribution to the diffuse galactic gamma-ray emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.; Kanbach, G.; Hunter, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    There is active interest in the extent to which unresolved gamma-ray pulsars contribute to the Galactic diffuse emission, and in whether unresolved gamma-ray pulsars could be responsible for the excess of diffuse Galactic emission above 1 GeV that has been observed by EGRET. The diffuse gamma-ray...

  1. Multiwavelength observations of the transitional millisecond pulsar binary XSS J12270-4859

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Martino, D.; Papitto, A.; Belloni, T.; Burgay, M.; De Ona Wilhelmi, E.; Li, J.; Pellizzoni, A.; Possenti, A.; Rea, N.; Torres, D.F.

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of X-ray, ultraviolet and optical/near-IR photometric data of the transitional millisecond pulsar binary XSS J12270−4859, obtained at different epochs after the transition to a rotation-powered radio pulsar state. The observations, while confirming the large-amplitude orbital

  2. Searches for gravitational waves from known pulsars with Science Run 5 LIGO data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B.P.; et al., [Unknown; Hessels, J.W.T.

    2010-01-01

    We present a search for gravitational waves from 116 known millisecond and young pulsars using data from the fifth science run of the LIGO detectors. For this search, ephemerides overlapping the run period were obtained for all pulsars using radio and X-ray observations. We demonstrate an updated

  3. Arecibo Pulsar Survey Using ALFA. III. Precursor Survey and Population Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swiggum, J.K.; Lorimer, D.R.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Bates, S.D.; Champion, D.J.; Ransom, S.M.; Lazarus, P.; Brazier, A.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Nice, D.J.; Ellis, J.; Senty, T.R.; Allen, B.; Bhat, N.D.R.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J.M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.S.; Freire, P.C.C.; Jenet, F.A.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V.M.; Knispel, B.; Lee, K.J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lynch, R.; Lyne, A.G.; Scholz, P.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I.H.; Stappers, B.W.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.; Zhu, W.W.

    2014-01-01

    The Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (PALFA) Survey uses the ALFA 7-beam receiver to search both inner and outer Galactic sectors visible from Arecibo (32° lsim ℓ lsim 77° and 168° lsim ℓ lsim 214°) close to the Galactic plane (|b| lsim 5°) for pulsars. The PALFA survey is sensitive to sources

  4. International study of objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time with body mass index and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyck, D Van; Cerin, E; De Bourdeaudhuij, I

    2015-01-01

    Background:Physical activity (PA) has been consistently implicated in the etiology of obesity, whereas recent evidence on the importance of sedentary time remains inconsistent. Understanding of dose-response associations of PA and sedentary time with overweight and obesity in adults can be improv...... for country-specific health guidelines.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 22 July 2014; doi:10.1038/ijo.2014.115....... effects of study site and gender.Methods:Data from the International Physical activity and the Environment Network (IPEN) Adult study were used. IPEN Adult is an observational multi-country cross-sectional study, and 12 sites in 10 countries are included. Participants wore an accelerometer for seven...... relationship of accelerometer-based moderate-to-vigorous PA and total counts per minute with BMI and the probability of being overweight/obese was identified. The associations were negative, but weakened at higher levels of moderate-to-vigorous PA (>50 min per day) and higher counts per minute. No associations...

  5. Internal medicine and the training of international medical graduates: a time for open discussion and new approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levey, G S

    1992-09-01

    The number of foreign national medical graduates entering internal medicine residency training programs in the United States has doubled since 1986. A rigorous, standardized preresidency evaluation of the basic clinical skills and language abilities of international medical graduates should be implemented. Those found to have significant deficits should undertake a preparatory curriculum designed to meet special educational needs before entry into the formal training program. A relevant curriculum might include formal lectures, reading assignments, physical diagnosis sessions, language classes, patient encounter sessions, and a tutorial on U.S medical culture that includes medical ethics and the basics of the our health care system. All or only some of these may be required for any given individual. The Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) could provide many of the methods needed for an evaluation program and work collaboratively with program directors. This new approach to training of international medical graduates will require an evaluation system to to measure its effectiveness. Important questions about the funding of graduate medical education for international medical graduates must also be addressed.

  6. The Geminga pulsar wind nebula in the mid-infrared and submillimetre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, J. S.; Holland, W. S.

    2017-10-01

    The nearby middle-aged Geminga pulsar has crossed the Galactic plane within the last ∼0.1 Myr. We present archival data from Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and from SCUBA and SCUBA-2 on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to assess whether any mid-infrared and submillimetre emission arises from interaction of the pulsar wind nebula with the interstellar medium. A candidate shell and bow shock are reported. Given the low pulsar velocity and local density, dust grains appear able to penetrate into the nebula. A compact source seen towards the pulsar is fitted with a dust spectrum. If confirmed as a real association at higher resolution, this could be a circum-pulsar disc of at least a few Earth-masses, in which future planets could form.

  7. Legal Time of the Republic of Colombia and its international traceability using the Cesium Atomic Clock - Time and Frequency National Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Forero, Liz Catherine; Bahamón Cortés, Nelson

    2017-06-01

    Around the world, there are different providers of timestamp (mobile, radio or television operators, satellites of the GPS network, astronomical measurements, etc.), however, the source of the legal time for a country is either the national metrology institute or another designated laboratory. This activity requires a time standard based on an atomic time scale. The International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM) calculates a weighted average of the time kept in more than 60 nations and produces a single international time scale, called Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). This article presents the current time scale that generates Legal Time for the Republic of Colombia produced by the Instituto Nacional de Metrología (INM) using the time and frequency national standard, a cesium atomic oscillator. It also illustrates how important it is for the academic, scientific and industrial communities, as well as the general public, to be synchronized with this time scale, which is traceable to the International System (SI) of units, through international comparisons that are made in real time.

  8. Evading the pulsar constraints on the cosmic string tension in supergravity inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Kohei; Miyamoto, Yuhei; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2012-04-01

    The cosmic string is a useful probe of the early Universe and may give us a clue to physics at high energy scales where any artificial particle accelerators cannot reach. Although one of the most promising tools is the cosmic microwave background, the constraint from gravitational waves is becoming so stringent that one may not hope to detect its signatures in the cosmic microwave background. In this paper, we construct a scenario that contains cosmic strings observable in the cosmic microwave background while evading the constraint imposed by the recent pulsar timing data. We argue that cosmic strings with relatively large tension are allowed by delaying the onset of the scaling regime. We also show that this scenario is naturally realized in the context of chaotic inflation in supergravity, where the phase transition is governed by the Hubble induced mass.

  9. Einstein@Home discovers a radio-quiet gamma-ray millisecond pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Colin J.; Pletsch, Holger J.; Wu, Jason; Guillemot, Lucas; Kerr, Matthew; Johnson, Tyrel J.; Camilo, Fernando; Salvetti, David; Allen, Bruce; Anderson, David; Aulbert, Carsten; Beer, Christian; Bock, Oliver; Cuéllar, Andres; Eggenstein, Heinz-Bernd; Fehrmann, Henning; Kramer, Michael; Kwang, Shawn A.; Machenschalk, Bernd; Nieder, Lars; Ackermann, Markus; Ajello, Marco; Baldini, Luca; Ballet, Jean; Barbiellini, Guido; Bastieri, Denis; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Blandford, Roger D.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bonino, Raffaella; Bottacini, Eugenio; Brandt, Terri J.; Bregeon, Johan; Bruel, Philippe; Buehler, Rolf; Burnett, Toby H.; Buson, Sara; Cameron, Rob A.; Caputo, Regina; Caraveo, Patrizia A.; Cavazzuti, Elisabetta; Cecchi, Claudia; Charles, Eric; Chekhtman, Alexandre; Ciprini, Stefano; Cominsky, Lynn R.; Costantin, Denise; Cutini, Sara; D’Ammando, Filippo; De Luca, Andrea; Desiante, Rachele; Di Venere, Leonardo; Di Mauro, Mattia; Di Lalla, Niccolò; Digel, Seth W.; Favuzzi, Cecilia; Ferrara, Elizabeth C.; Franckowiak, Anna; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Funk, Stefan; Fusco, Piergiorgio; Gargano, Fabio; Gasparrini, Dario; Giglietto, Nico; Giordano, Francesco; Giroletti, Marcello; Gomez-Vargas, Germán A.; Green, David; Grenier, Isabelle A.; Guiriec, Sylvain; Harding, Alice K.; Hewitt, John W.; Horan, Deirdre; Jóhannesson, Guðlaugur; Kensei, Shiki; Kuss, Michael; La Mura, Giovanni; Larsson, Stefan; Latronico, Luca; Li, Jian; Longo, Francesco; Loparco, Francesco; Lovellette, Michael N.; Lubrano, Pasquale; Magill, Jeffrey D.; Maldera, Simone; Manfreda, Alberto; Mazziotta, Mario N.; McEnery, Julie E.; Michelson, Peter F.; Mirabal, Nestor; Mitthumsiri, Warit; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Monzani, Maria Elena; Morselli, Aldo; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Nuss, Eric; Ohsugi, Takashi; Omodei, Nicola; Orienti, Monica; Orlando, Elena; Palatiello, Michele; Paliya, Vaidehi S.; de Palma, Francesco; Paneque, David; Perkins, Jeremy S.; Persic, Massimo; Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Porter, Troy A.; Principe, Giacomo; Rainò, Silvia; Rando, Riccardo; Ray, Paul S.; Razzano, Massimiliano; Reimer, Anita; Reimer, Olaf; Romani, Roger W.; Saz Parkinson, Pablo M.; Sgrò, Carmelo; Siskind, Eric J.; Smith, David A.; Spada, Francesca; Spandre, Gloria; Spinelli, Paolo; Thayer, Jana B.; Thompson, David J.; Torres, Diego F.; Troja, Eleonora; Vianello, Giacomo; Wood, Kent; Wood, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are old neutron stars that spin hundreds of times per second and appear to pulsate as their emission beams cross our line of sight. To date, radio pulsations have been detected from all rotation-powered MSPs. In an attempt to discover radio-quiet gamma-ray MSPs, we used the aggregated power from the computers of tens of thousands of volunteers participating in the Einstein@Home distributed computing project to search for pulsations from unidentified gamma-ray sources in Fermi Large Area Telescope data. This survey discovered two isolated MSPs, one of which is the only known rotation-powered MSP to remain undetected in radio observations. These gamma-ray MSPs were discovered in completely blind searches without prior constraints from other observations, raising hopes for detecting MSPs from a predicted Galactic bulge population. PMID:29503868

  10. Einstein@Home discovers a radio-quiet gamma-ray millisecond pulsar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Colin J; Pletsch, Holger J; Wu, Jason; Guillemot, Lucas; Kerr, Matthew; Johnson, Tyrel J; Camilo, Fernando; Salvetti, David; Allen, Bruce; Anderson, David; Aulbert, Carsten; Beer, Christian; Bock, Oliver; Cuéllar, Andres; Eggenstein, Heinz-Bernd; Fehrmann, Henning; Kramer, Michael; Kwang, Shawn A; Machenschalk, Bernd; Nieder, Lars; Ackermann, Markus; Ajello, Marco; Baldini, Luca; Ballet, Jean; Barbiellini, Guido; Bastieri, Denis; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Blandford, Roger D; Bloom, Elliott D; Bonino, Raffaella; Bottacini, Eugenio; Brandt, Terri J; Bregeon, Johan; Bruel, Philippe; Buehler, Rolf; Burnett, Toby H; Buson, Sara; Cameron, Rob A; Caputo, Regina; Caraveo, Patrizia A; Cavazzuti, Elisabetta; Cecchi, Claudia; Charles, Eric; Chekhtman, Alexandre; Ciprini, Stefano; Cominsky, Lynn R; Costantin, Denise; Cutini, Sara; D'Ammando, Filippo; De Luca, Andrea; Desiante, Rachele; Di Venere, Leonardo; Di Mauro, Mattia; Di Lalla, Niccolò; Digel, Seth W; Favuzzi, Cecilia; Ferrara, Elizabeth C; Franckowiak, Anna; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Funk, Stefan; Fusco, Piergiorgio; Gargano, Fabio; Gasparrini, Dario; Giglietto, Nico; Giordano, Francesco; Giroletti, Marcello; Gomez-Vargas, Germán A; Green, David; Grenier, Isabelle A; Guiriec, Sylvain; Harding, Alice K; Hewitt, John W; Horan, Deirdre; Jóhannesson, Guðlaugur; Kensei, Shiki; Kuss, Michael; La Mura, Giovanni; Larsson, Stefan; Latronico, Luca; Li, Jian; Longo, Francesco; Loparco, Francesco; Lovellette, Michael N; Lubrano, Pasquale; Magill, Jeffrey D; Maldera, Simone; Manfreda, Alberto; Mazziotta, Mario N; McEnery, Julie E; Michelson, Peter F; Mirabal, Nestor; Mitthumsiri, Warit; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Monzani, Maria Elena; Morselli, Aldo; Moskalenko, Igor V; Nuss, Eric; Ohsugi, Takashi; Omodei, Nicola; Orienti, Monica; Orlando, Elena; Palatiello, Michele; Paliya, Vaidehi S; de Palma, Francesco; Paneque, David; Perkins, Jeremy S; Persic, Massimo; Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Porter, Troy A; Principe, Giacomo; Rainò, Silvia; Rando, Riccardo; Ray, Paul S; Razzano, Massimiliano; Reimer, Anita; Reimer, Olaf; Romani, Roger W; Saz Parkinson, Pablo M; Sgrò, Carmelo; Siskind, Eric J; Smith, David A; Spada, Francesca; Spandre, Gloria; Spinelli, Paolo; Thayer, Jana B; Thompson, David J; Torres, Diego F; Troja, Eleonora; Vianello, Giacomo; Wood, Kent; Wood, Matthew

    2018-02-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are old neutron stars that spin hundreds of times per second and appear to pulsate as their emission beams cross our line of sight. To date, radio pulsations have been detected from all rotation-powered MSPs. In an attempt to discover radio-quiet gamma-ray MSPs, we used the aggregated power from the computers of tens of thousands of volunteers participating in the Einstein@Home distributed computing project to search for pulsations from unidentified gamma-ray sources in Fermi Large Area Telescope data. This survey discovered two isolated MSPs, one of which is the only known rotation-powered MSP to remain undetected in radio observations. These gamma-ray MSPs were discovered in completely blind searches without prior constraints from other observations, raising hopes for detecting MSPs from a predicted Galactic bulge population.

  11. Progress towards steady-state operation and real time control of internal transport barriers in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litaudon, X.; Becoulet, A.; Crisanti, F.

    2003-01-01

    In JET advanced tokamak research mainly focuses on plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITBs), generated by modifications of the current profile. The formerly developed optimised shear regime with low magnetic shear in the plasma center has been extended to deeply reversed magnetic shear configurations. High fusion performance with wide ITBs has been obtained transiently in deeply reversed magnetic shear configuration: H IPB98(y,2) ∼1.9, β N =2.4 at I p =2.5MA. At somewhat reduced performance electron and ion ITBs have been sustained in full current drive operation with 1MA of bootstrap current: H IPB98(y,2) ∼1, β N =1.7 at I p =2.0MA. The ITBs have been maintained up to 11s. This duration, much larger than the energy confinement time (37 times larger), is already approaching a current resistive time. New real-time measurements and feedback control algorithms have been developed and implemented in JET for successfully controlling the ITB dynamics and the current density profile in the highly non-inductive regime. (author)

  12. THE RADIATIVE X-RAY AND GAMMA-RAY EFFICIENCIES OF ROTATION-POWERED PULSARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vink, Jacco; Bamba, Aya; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2011-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the X-ray luminosity of rotation-powered pulsars and their surrounding nebulae using the sample of Kargaltsev and Pavlov, and we complement this with an analysis of the γ-ray emission of Fermi-detected pulsars. We report a strong trend in the efficiency with which spin-down power is converted to X-ray and γ-ray emission with characteristic age: young pulsars and their surrounding nebulae are efficient X-ray emitters, whereas in contrast old pulsars are efficient γ-ray emitters. We divided the X-ray sample in a young (τ c 4 yr) and old sample and used linear regression to search for correlations between the logarithm of the X-ray and γ-ray luminosities and the logarithms of the periods and period derivatives. The X-ray emission from young pulsars and their nebulae are both consistent with L X ∝ P-dot 3 /P 6 . For old pulsars and their nebulae the X-ray luminosity is consistent with a more or less constant efficiency η≡L X / E-dot rot ∼8x10 -5 . For the γ-ray luminosity we confirm that L γ ∝ √E-dot rot . We discuss these findings in the context of pair production inside pulsar magnetospheres and the striped wind model. We suggest that the striped wind model may explain the similarity between the X-ray properties of the pulsar wind nebulae and the pulsars themselves, which according to the striped wind model may both find their origin outside the light cylinder, in the pulsar wind zone.

  13. Where Are the r-modes? Chandra Observations of Millisecond Pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoodifar, Simin; Strohmayer, Tod [Astrophysics Science Division and Joint Space-Science Institute, NASA' s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2017-05-10

    We present the results of Chandra observations of two non-accreting millisecond pulsars, PSRs J1640+2224 (J1640) and J1709+2313 (J1709), with low inferred magnetic fields and spin-down rates in order to constrain their surface temperatures, obtain limits on the amplitude of unstable r -modes in them, and make comparisons with similar limits obtained for a sample of accreting low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) neutron stars. We detect both pulsars in the X-ray band for the first time. They are faint, with inferred soft X-ray fluxes (0.3–3 keV) of ≈6 × 10{sup −15} and 3 × 10{sup −15} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} for J1640 and J1709, respectively. Spectral analysis assuming hydrogen atmosphere emission gives global effective temperature upper limits (90% confidence) of 3.3–4.3 × 10{sup 5} K for J1640 and 3.6–4.7 × 10{sup 5} K for J1709, where the low end of the range corresponds to canonical neutron stars ( M = 1.4 M {sub ⊙}), and the upper end corresponds to higher-mass stars ( M = 2.21 M {sub ⊙}). Under the assumption that r -mode heating provides the thermal support, we obtain dimensionless r -mode amplitude upper limits of 3.2–4.8 × 10{sup −8} and 1.8–2.8 × 10{sup −7} for J1640 and J1709, respectively, where again the low end of the range corresponds to lower-mass, canonical neutron stars ( M = 1.4 M {sub ⊙}). These limits are about an order of magnitude lower than those we derived previously for a sample of LMXBs, except for the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1808.4–3658, which has a comparable amplitude limit to J1640 and J1709.

  14. Method for reducing peak phase current and decreasing staring time for an internal combustion engine having an induction machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amey, David L.; Degner, Michael W.

    2002-01-01

    A method for reducing the starting time and reducing the peak phase currents for an internal combustion engine that is started using an induction machine starter/alternator. The starting time is reduced by pre-fluxing the induction machine and the peak phase currents are reduced by reducing the flux current command after a predetermined period of time has elapsed and concurrent to the application of the torque current command. The method of the present invention also provides a strategy for anticipating the start command for an internal combustion engine and determines a start strategy based on the start command and the operating state of the internal combustion engine.

  15. Hitomi X-ray observation of the pulsar wind nebula G21.5-0.9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steven W.; Angelini, Lorella; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Axelsson, Magnus; Bamba, Aya; Bautz, Marshall W.; Blandford, Roger; Brenneman, Laura W.; Brown, Gregory V.; Bulbul, Esra; Cackett, Edward M.; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng P.; Coppi, Paolo S.; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; de Vries, Cor P.; den Herder, Jan-Willem; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan E.; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi C.; Gandhi, Poshak; Giustini, Margherita; Goldwurm, Andrea; Gu, Liyi; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haba, Yoshito; Hagino, Kouichi; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harrus, Ilana M.; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko S.; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John P.; Ichinohe, Yuto; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Hajime; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Iwai, Masachika; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Tim; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Koyama, Katsuji; Koyama, Shu; Kretschmar, Peter; Krimm, Hans A.; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox S.; Lumb, David; Madejski, Greg; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Maier, Daniel; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian R.; Mehdipour, Missagh; Miller, Eric D.; Miller, Jon M.; Mineshige, Shin; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stéphane; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Porter, Frederick S.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Toru; Sato, Goro; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sawada, Makoto; Schartel, Norbert; Serlemtsos, Peter J.; Seta, Hiromi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Simionescu, Aurora; Smith, Randall K.; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Łukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Uno, Shin'ichiro; Urry, C. Megan; Ursino, Eugenio; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; Wilkins, Dan R.; Williams, Brian J.; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen; Sato, Toshiki; Nakaniwa, Nozomu; Murakami, Hiroaki; Guest, Benson

    2018-04-01

    We present results from the Hitomi X-ray observation of a young composite-type supernova remnant (SNR) G21.5-0.9, whose emission is dominated by the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) contribution. The X-ray spectra in the 0.8-80 keV range obtained with the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS), Soft X-ray Imager, and Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) show a significant break in the continuum as previously found with the NuSTAR observation. After taking into account all known emissions from the SNR other than the PWN itself, we find that the Hitomi spectra can be fitted with a broken power law with photon indices of Γ1 = 1.74 ± 0.02 and Γ2 = 2.14 ± 0.01 below and above the break at 7.1 ± 0.3 keV, which is significantly lower than the NuSTAR result (˜9.0 keV). The spectral break cannot be reproduced by time-dependent particle injection one-zone spectral energy distribution models, which strongly indicates that a more complex emission model is needed, as suggested by recent theoretical models. We also search for narrow emission or absorption lines with the SXS, and perform a timing analysis of PSR J1833-1034 with the HXI and the Soft Gamma-ray Detector. No significant pulsation is found from the pulsar. However, unexpectedly, narrow absorption line features are detected in the SXS data at 4.2345 keV and 9.296 keV with a significance of 3.65 σ. While the origin of these features is not understood, their mere detection opens up a new field of research and was only possible with the high resolution, sensitivity, and ability to measure extended sources provided by an X-ray microcalorimeter.

  16. Sigma observation of the pulsar OAO 1657 - 415: Precise localization at hard X-ray energy and discovery of spin-down

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mereghetti, S.; Mandrou, P.; Natalucci, L.; Ballet, J.; Lambert, A.

    1991-01-01

    The region of sky containing the 38 s X-ray pulsar OAO 1657 - 415 has been observed on March 1990 with Sigma, an imaging gamma-ray telescope exploiting the coded mask technique. This observation has yielded an accurate (about arcminute-scale) localization for OAO 1657 - 415 at hard X-ray energy, confirming its association with a previously suggested soft X-ray candidate. A timing analysis of the 40-120 keV data has revealed for the first time a spin-down episode in OAO 1657 - 415, implying that an important change in the accretion torque experienced by this X-ray pulsar must have recently occurred. 18 refs

  17. Discovery of a 1.69 ms radio pulsar associated with the X-ray binary XSS J12270-4859

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Paul S.; Roy, Jayanta; Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Stappers, Benjamin; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Deneva, Julia S.; Camilo, Fernando M.

    2015-01-01

    XSS J12270-4859 is an X-ray binary associated with the Fermi LAT gamma-ray source 1FGL J1227.9-4852 (Hill et al. 2011). In 2012 December, the source underwent a transition where the X-ray and optical luminosity dropped suddenly and spectral signatures of an accretion disk disappeared (Bassa et al. 2014). We report the discovery of a 1.69 millisecond pulsar using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 607 MHz associated with this source, confirming that system is now an active radio millisecond pulsar. We report on radio timing observations of the source with the GMRT and Parkes Telescope that allow precise determination of the orbital parameters of the system. In addition, using simultaneous radio imaging and timing observations with the GMRT, we are able to study the eclipse behavior.

  18. Models for the formation of binary and millisecond radio pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van den Heuvel, E.P.J.

    1984-01-01

    The peculiar combination of a relatively short pulse period and a relatively weak surface dipole magnetic field strength of binary radio pulsars finds a consistent explanation in terms of: (i) decay of the surface dipole component of neutron star magnetic fields on a timescale of (2-5).10 6 yrs, in combination with: (ii) spin up of the rotation of the neutron star during a subsequent mass-transfer phase. The two observed classes of binary radio pulsars (very close and very wide systems, respectively) are expected to have been formed by the later evolution of binaries consisting of a neutron star and a normal companion star, in which the companion was (considerably) more massive than the neutron star, or less massive than the neutron star, respectively. In the first case the companion of the neutron star in the final system will be a fairly massive white dwarf, in a circular orbit, or a neutron star in an eccentric orbit. In the second case the final companion to the neutron star will be a low-mass (approx. 0.3 Msub solar) helium white dwarf in a wide and nearly circular orbit. In systems of the second type the neutron star was most probably formed by the accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf. This explains why PSR 1953+29 has a millisecond rotation period and why PSR 0820+02 has not. Binary coalescence models for the formation of the 1.5 millisecond pulsar appear to be viable. The companion to the neutron star may have been a low-mass red dwarf, a neutron star, or a massive (> 0.7 Msub solar) white dwarf. In the red-dwarf case the progenitor system probably was a CV binary in which the white dwarf collapsed by accretion. 66 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  19. Population Synthesis of Radio & Gamma-Ray Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Sara; Gonthier, P. L.; Harding, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the number of known gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in the Galactic disk has risen substantially thanks to confirmed detections by Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). We have developed a new population synthesis of gamma-ray and radio MSPs in the galaxy which uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques to explore the large and small worlds of the model parameter space and allows for comparisons of the simulated and detected MSP distributions. The simulation employs empirical radio and gamma-ray luminosity models that are dependent upon the pulsar period and period derivative with freely varying exponents. Parameters associated with the birth distributions are also free to vary. The computer code adjusts the magnitudes of the model luminosities to reproduce the number of MSPs detected by a group of ten radio surveys, thus normalizing the simulation and predicting the MSP birth rates in the Galaxy. Computing many Markov chains leads to preferred sets of model parameters that are further explored through two statistical methods. Marginalized plots define confidence regions in the model parameter space using maximum likelihood methods. A secondary set of confidence regions is determined in parallel using Kuiper statistics calculated from comparisons of cumulative distributions. These two techniques provide feedback to affirm the results and to check for consistency. Radio flux and dispersion measure constraints have been imposed on the simulated gamma-ray distributions in order to reproduce realistic detection conditions. The simulated and detected distributions agree well for both sets of radio and gamma-ray pulsar characteristics, as evidenced by our various comparisons.

  20. Investigation of a rotary valving system with variable valve timing for internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Paul C.; Hansen, Craig N.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of the program was to provide a functional demonstration of the Hansen Rotary Valving System with Variable Valve Timing (HRVS/VVT), capable of throttleless inlet charge control, as an alternative to conventional poppet-valves for use in spark ignited internal combustion engines. The goal of this new technology is to secure benefits in fuel economy, broadened torque band, vibration reduction, and overhaul accessibility. Additionally, use of the variable valve timing capability to vary the effective compression ratio is expected to improve multifuel tolerance and efficiency. Efforts directed at the design of HRVS components proved to be far more extensive than had been anticipated, ultimately requiring that proof-trial design/development work be performed. Although both time and funds were exhausted before optical or ion-probe types of in-cylinder investigation could be undertaken, a great deal of laboratory data was acquired during the course of the design/development work. This laboratory data is the basis for the information presented in this final report.

  1. 11th International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC) Workshop on Time-Delay Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Emilia; Sename, Olivier; Dugard, Luc

    2016-01-01

    This book mostly results from a selection of papers presented during the 11th IFAC (International Federation of Automatic Control) Workshop on Time-Delay Systems, which took place in Grenoble, France, February 4 - 6, 2013.  During this event, 37 papers were presented. Taking into account the reviewers' evaluation and the papers' presentation the best papers have been selected and collected into the present volume. The authors of 13 selected papers were invited to participate to this book and provided a more detailed and improved version of the conference paper. To enrich the book, three more chapters have been included from specialists on time-delay systems who presented their work during the 52nd IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, which held in December 10 - 13, 2013, at Florence, Italy. The content of the book is divided into four main parts as follows: Modeling, Stability analysis, Stabilization and control, and Input-delay systems. Focusing on various topics of time-delay systems, this book will be...

  2. Orbital evolution of colliding star and pulsar winds in 2D and 3D: effects of dimensionality, EoS, resolution, and grid size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch-Ramon, V.; Barkov, M. V.; Perucho, M.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The structure formed by the shocked winds of a massive star and a non-accreting pulsar in a binary system suffers periodic and random variations of orbital and non-linear dynamical origins. The characterization of the evolution of the wind interaction region is necessary for understanding the rich phenomenology of these sources. Aims: For the first time, we simulate in 3 dimensions the interaction of isotropic stellar and relativistic pulsar winds along one full orbit, on scales well beyond the binary size. We also investigate the impact of grid resolution and size, and of different state equations: a γ̂-constant ideal gas, and an ideal gas with γ̂ dependent on temperature. Methods: We used the code PLUTO to carry out relativistic hydrodynamical simulations in 2 and 3 dimensions of the interaction between a slow dense wind and a mildly relativistic wind with Lorentz factor 2, along one full orbit in a region up to ~100 times the binary size. The different 2-dimensional simulations were carried out with equal and larger grid resolution and size, and one was done with a more realistic equation of state than in 3 dimensions. Results: The simulations in 3 dimensions confirm previous results in 2 dimensions, showing: a strong shock induced by Coriolis forces that terminates the pulsar wind also in the opposite direction to the star; strong bending of the shocked-wind structure against the pulsar motion; and the generation of turbulence. The shocked flows are also subject to a faster development of instabilities in 3 dimensions, which enhances shocks, two-wind mixing, and large-scale disruption of the shocked structure. In 2 dimensions, higher resolution simulations confirm lower resolution results, simulations with larger grid sizes strengthen the case for the loss of the general coherence of the shocked structure, and simulations with two different equations of state yield very similar results. In addition to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, discussed in

  3. The X-ray emission properties of millisecond pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, W.; Trümper, J.

    1998-01-01

    Until now X-radiation from nine millisecond pulsars has been detected. In the present paper we summarize the observations and show the results of a re-analysis of archival ROSAT data. In addition we present the results of recent observations of PSR J0437-4715 with the ROSAT PSPC and HRI detectors. We show that the pulsed fraction is independent of energy in the range 0.1-2.4 keV. The pulse width as measured at X-ray energies is comparable with that observed in the radio domain. An upper limit...

  4. DSPSR: Digital Signal Processing Software for Pulsar Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Straten, W.; Bailes, M.

    2011-01-01

    dspsr is a high-performance, open-source, object-oriented, digital signal processing software library and application suite for use in radio pulsar astronomy. Written primarily in C++, the library implements an extensive range of modular algorithms that can optionally exploit both multiple-core processors and general-purpose graphics processing units. After over a decade of research and development, dspsr is now stable and in widespread use in the community. This paper presents a detailed description of its functionality, justification of major design decisions, analysis of phase-coherent dispersion removal algorithms, and demonstration of performance on some contemporary microprocessor architectures.

  5. Deep Space Navigation and Timing Architecture and Simulation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcosm will develop a deep space navigation and timing architecture and associated simulation, incorporating state-of-the art radiometric, x-ray pulsar, and laser...

  6. An Eccentric Binary Millisecond Pulsar with a Helium White Dwarf Companion in the Galactic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, John; Kaplan, David L.; Stovall, Kevin; Freire, Paulo C. C.; Deneva, Julia S.; Koester, Detlev; Jenet, Fredrick; Martinez, Jose G.

    2016-10-01

    Low-mass white dwarfs (LMWDs) are believed to be exclusive products of binary evolution, as the universe is not old enough to produce them from single stars. Because of the strong tidal forces operating during the binary interaction phase, the remnant systems observed today are expected to have negligible eccentricities. Here, we report on the first unambiguous identification of an LMWD in an eccentric (e = 0.13) orbit around the millisecond pulsar PSR J2234+0511, which directly contradicts this picture. We use our spectra and radio-timing solution (derived elsewhere) to infer the WD temperature ({T}{{eff}}=8600+/- 190 K), and peculiar systemic velocity relative to the local standard of rest (≃ 31 km s-1). We also place model-independent constraints on the WD radius ({R}{{WD}}={0.024}-0.002+0.004 {R}⊙ ) and surface gravity ({log} g={7.11}-0.16+0.08 dex). The WD and kinematic properties are consistent with the expectations for low-mass X-ray binary evolution and disfavor a dynamic three-body formation channel. In the case of the high eccentricity being the result of a spontaneous phase transition, we infer a mass of ˜1.60 M ⊙ for the pulsar progenitor, which is too low for the quark-nova mechanism proposed by Jiang et al., and too high for the scenario of Freire & Tauris, in which a WD collapses into a neutron star via a rotationally delayed accretion-induced collapse. We find that eccentricity pumping via interaction with a circumbinary disk is consistent with our inferred parameters. Finally, we report tentative evidence for pulsations that, if confirmed, would transform the star into an unprecedented laboratory for WD physics.

  7. Chemical reaction, thermal relaxation time and internal material parameter effects on MHD viscoelastic fluid with internal structure using the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sabeel M.; Hammad, M.; Sunny, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    In this article, the influence of thermal relaxation time and chemical reaction is studied on the MHD upper-convected viscoelastic fluid with internal structure using the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux equation for the first time in the literature. The flow-governing equations are formulated and are converted into their respective ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with the application of similarity functions. The resulting system of coupled nonlinear ODEs is solved along with the prescribed conditions at boundary using a finite-difference code in MATLAB. Influence of chemical reaction, thermal relaxation time and internal material parameter on the macroscopic and micropolar velocities as well as on the temperature and concentration profiles is examined along with other physical parameters ( e.g., magnetic parameter, Eckert number, Prandtl number and fluid relaxation time). The accuracy of the obtained numerical solution is shown by comparing the physical parameters of interest with particular cases of existing results in the literature.

  8. Gravitational Waves from Known Pulsars: Results from the Initial Detector Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of searches for gravitational waves from a large selection of pulsars using data from the most recent science runs (S6, VSR2 and VSR4) of the initial generation of interferometric gravitational wave detectors LIGO (Laser Interferometric Gravitational-wave Observatory) and Virgo. We do not see evidence for gravitational wave emission from any of the targeted sources but produce upper limits on the emission amplitude. We highlight the results from seven young pulsars with large spin-down luminosities. We reach within a factor of five of the canonical spin-down limit for all seven of these, whilst for the Crab and Vela pulsars we further surpass their spin-down limits. We present new or updated limits for 172 other pulsars (including both young and millisecond pulsars). Now that the detectors are undergoing major upgrades, and, for completeness, we bring together all of the most up-to-date results from all pulsars searched for during the operations of the first-generation LIGO, Virgo and GEO600 detectors. This gives a total of 195 pulsars including the most recent results described in this paper.

  9. Discovery of an Unidentified Fermi Object as a Black Widow-Like Millisecond Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, A. K. H.; Huang, R. H. H.; Cheng, K. S.; Takata, J.; Yatsu, Y.; Cheung, C. C.; Donato, D.; Lin, L. C. C.; Kataoka, J.; Takahashi, Y.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has revolutionized our knowledge of the gamma-ray pulsar population, leading to the discovery of almost 100 gamma-ray pulsars and dozens of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Although the outer-gap model predicts different sites of emission for the radio and gamma-ray pulsars, until now all of the known gamma-ray MSPs have been visible in the radio. Here we report the discovery of a radio-quiet" gamma-ray emitting MSP candidate by using Fermi, Chandra, Swift, and optical observations. The X-ray and gamma-ray properties of the source are consistent with known gamma-ray pulsars. We also found a 4.63-hr orbital period in optical and X-ray data. We suggest that the source is a black widow-like MSP with a approx. 0.1 Stellar Mass late-type companion star. Based on the profile of the optical and X-ray light-curves, the companion star is believed to be heated by the pulsar while the X-ray emissions originate from pulsar magnetosphere and/or from intra-binary shock. No radio detection of the source has been reported yet and although no gamma-ray/radio pulsation has been found, we estimated that the spin period of the MSP is approx. 3-5 ms based on the inferred gamma-ray luminosity.

  10. Analysis of space-time structure of Internal Transport Barrier in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neudatchin, S.V.; Takizuka, Tomonori; Shirai, Hiroshi; Fujita, Takaaki; Takeji, Satoshi; Isei, Nobuaki; Kamada, Yutaka.

    1997-08-01

    Characteristics of the structure of Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) for reversed shear (RS) plasmas as well as for normal shear plasmas in JT-60U are studied. The fast-time-scale outward expansion of the ITB position is seen at the phase q min passes across 3 in RS discharges. The steep features of the T e and T i profiles in RS plasmas are measured during the programmed-motion phase. The discontinuous change of the electron heat diffusivity χ e within 3 cm distance near the ITB 'shoulder' is found and the χ e value in the ITB region is 1/10 of that inside the ITB 'shoulder'. It is observed that locations of the ITB for T e and T i are slightly different from each other. The BLM (Barrier Localized Mode) -induced L-H transition and the H-L back transition in a high β p plasma with normal shear are studied. The BLM suddenly relaxes the T e profile but does not deteriorate the improved transport property. The H-L back transition causes the simultaneous degradation of transport near the ITB region. The χ e jump is estimated as about 1 m 2 /s. After the back transition, the transport is discontinuously improved in time and the ITB properties are recovered. Global natures of these transient processes are noticeable. A new experimental technique called 'multi-step programmed motion' is proposed to measure the steep structure of the ITB. (author)

  11. Microscopy, culture, and quantitative real-time PCR examination confirm internalization of mycobacteria in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaevska, M; Lvoncik, S; Slana, I; Kulich, P; Kralik, P

    2014-07-01

    The environment is a reservoir of nontuberculous mycobacteria and is considered a source of infection for animals and humans. Mycobacteria can persist in different types of environments for a relatively long time. We have studied their possible internalization into plant tissue through intact, as well as damaged, root systems of different types of plants grown in vitro and under field conditions. The substrate into which plants were seeded was previously contaminated with different strains of Mycobacterium avium (10(8) to 10(10) cells/g of soil) and feces from animals with paratuberculosis. We detected M. avium subsp. avium, hominissuis, and paratuberculosis in the stems and leaves of the plants by both culture and real-time quantitative PCR. The presence of mycobacteria in the plant tissues was confirmed by microscopy. The concentration of mycobacteria found inside plant tissue was several orders of magnitude lower (up to 10(4) cells/g of tissue) than the initial concentration of mycobacteria present in the culture medium or substrate. These findings led us to the hypothesis that plants may play a role in the spread and transmission of mycobacteria to other organisms in the environment. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Ultrahigh energy cosmic ray nuclei from extragalactic pulsars and the effect of their Galactic counterparts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Ke; Olinto, Angela V.; Kotera, Kumiko

    2013-01-01

    The acceleration of ultrahigh energy nuclei in fast spinning newborn pulsars can explain the observed spectrum of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and the trend towards heavier nuclei for energies above 10 19 eV as reported by the Auger Observatory. Pulsar acceleration implies a hard injection spectrum ( ∼ E −1 ) due to pulsar spin down and a maximum energy E max ∼ Z 10 19 eV due to the limit on the spin rate of neutron stars. We have previously shown that the escape through the young supernova remnant softens the spectrum, decreases slightly the maximum energy, and generates secondary nuclei. Here we show that the distribution of pulsar birth periods and the effect of propagation in the interstellar and intergalactic media modifies the combined spectrum of all pulsars. By assuming a normal distribution of pulsar birth periods centered at 300 ms, we show that the contribution of extragalactic pulsar births to the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray spectrum naturally gives rise to a contribution to very high energy cosmic rays (VHECRs, between 10 16 and 10 18 eV) by Galactic pulsar births. The required injected composition to fit the observed spectrum depends on the absolute energy scale, which is uncertain, differing between Auger Observatory and Telescope Array. The contribution of Galactic pulsar births can also bridge the gap between p