WorldWideScience

Sample records for international collaborative research

  1. International tuberculosis research collaborations within Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molton, James S; Singh, Shweta; Chen, Ling Jun; Paton, Nicholas I

    2017-09-07

    Asia bears more than half the global tuberculosis (TB) burden. Economic development in the region has increased available funding for biomedical research and opportunity for collaboration. We explored the extent of international tuberculosis research collaborations between institutions within Asia. We conducted a Pubmed search for all articles with tuberculosis in the title published during a 12 month period with at least one author affiliation listed in Asia, then identified international collaborations from institution websites and internet searches. We identified 99 international collaborations involving an institution within Asia, of which only 8 (8.1%) were collaborations between Asian institutions. The remainder were with institutions outside of Asia. The paucity of intra-Asian international research collaboration represents a lost opportunity to optimise regional research funding, capacity building and the development of an Asia-relevant TB research agenda.

  2. Legal Considerations for International Collaborative Research Contract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D. S.; Oh, K. B.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    Though collaborative research is pure academic activity the research plan and resource allocation for the research are shaped under foam of contract. Thus, legal binding effect and compulsive instrument is adopted at the research contract. This paper aimed at guiding equal collaborative research contract in legal aspect. To reach the goal (1) enforceability and elements of international collaborative contract, (2) damage calculation and related issues with those topics shall be discussed in each section

  3. Processes of international collaboration in management research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsen, Karsten; Butler, Christina; Mäkelä, Kristiina

    2013-01-01

    Scientists and academics increasingly work on collaborative projects and write papers in international research teams. This trend is driven by greater publishing demands in terms of the quality and breadth of data and analysis methods, which tend to be difficult to achieve without collaborating...... across institutional and national boundaries. Yet, our understanding of the collaborative processes in an academic setting and the potential tensions associated with them remains limited. We use a reflexive, autoethnographic approach to explicitly investigate our own experiences of international...... collaborative research. We offer systematic insights into the social and intellectual processes of academic collaborative writing, identifying six lessons and two key tensions that influence the success of international research teams. Our findings may benefit the formation of future coauthor teams...

  4. Immersion research education: students as catalysts in international collaboration research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K H; Friedemann, M L; Bűscher, A; Sansoni, J; Hodnicki, D

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes an international nursing and health research immersion program. Minority students from the USA work with an international faculty mentor in teams conducting collaborative research. The Minority Health International Research Training (MHIRT) program students become catalysts in the conduct of cross-cultural research. To narrow the healthcare gap for disadvantaged families in the USA and partner countries. Faculty from the USA, Germany, Italy, Colombia, England, Austria and Thailand formed an international research and education team to explore and compare family health issues, disparities in chronic illness care, social inequities and healthcare solutions. USA students in the MHIRT program complete two introductory courses followed by a 3-month research practicum in a partner country guided by faculty mentors abroad. The overall program development, student study abroad preparation, research project activities, cultural learning, and student and faculty team outcomes are explored. Cross-fertilization of research, cultural awareness and ideas about improving family health occur through education, international exchange and research immersion. Faculty research and international team collaboration provide opportunities for learning about research, health disparities, cultural influences and healthcare systems. The students are catalysts in the research effort, the dissemination of research findings and other educational endeavours. Five steps of the collaborative activities lead to programmatic success. MHIRT scholars bring creativity, enthusiasm, and gain a genuine desire to conduct health research about families with chronic illness. Their cultural learning stimulates career plans that include international research and attention to vulnerable populations. © 2012 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2012 International Council of Nurses.

  5. Boosting China's research collaboration | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    “China has dispatched Chinese medical teams since 1963,” says 2015 IDRC Research Award recipient Rong Li, “but there has been little public health assistance.” ... “China's cooperation to date has also largely ignored the role of research collaboration,” he says. Li focused ... I accumulated skills on qualitative research.

  6. International research collaboration in maritime health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Olaf Chresten

    2011-01-01

    . The area is regulated by international standards based on international research-based knowledge on health and safety. Moreover, many of the world's seafarers come from developing countries with specific disease problems like HIV and no possibility of independent maritime health research. The international......The new ILO-2006-convention and the EU Commission's strategic objectives for the EU maritime transport policy 2008-2018, mentions the necessity of a modern health and safety system for maritime transportation. However, there is no specific strategy for the development of maritime health and safety...... maritime health research is sparse, and an increase in such research is necessary to help benefit needed shipping as a highly globalized industry. This paper presents an example of such research, accompanied by a discussion of methods and opportunities to increase international maritime health research....

  7. How international is internationally collaborated research? A bibliometric study of Russian surname holder collaboration networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaulova, M.; Goek, A.; Shapira, P.

    2016-07-01

    International research performance indicators attain increased attention in science policy. They are seen to reflect relative competitiveness of a country in producing leading research (in terms of cited papers) and its commercialisation (in terms of assigned patents). However, more studies point to ongoing global bias in production, composition and assessment of research performance metrics (Rafols et al., 2012; van Leeuwen et al., 2001). As research performance indicators are used increasingly in national science policy and in influential international rankings, it is important to understand their inherent bias. For instance, explosive growth of international collaboration in science is widely reported (Glänzel, 2001), and is generally perceived as having beneficial ‘knowledge exchange’ effect for involved parties. It is recognised as a capacity-building factor of domestic research indicating the increase in research quality (Bornmann et al., 2015). However, existing research has reported reproduction of uneven global relations between countries in terms of science and technology. For example, patterns of international cooperation in nanotechnology are still centred on the developed countries, which are key nodes in international networks (Shapira and Wang, 2010). (Author)

  8. International Collaborative Research Partnerships: Blending Science with Management and Diplomacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Chuen-Yen; Wang, Crystal; Orsega, Susan; Tramont, Edmund C; Koita, Ousmane; Polis, Michael A; Siddiqui, Sophia

    2014-12-01

    As globalization progressively connects and impacts the health of people across the world, collaborative research partnerships provide mutual advantages by sharing knowledge and resources to address locally and globally relevant scientific and public health questions. Partnerships undertaken for scientific research are similar to business collaborations in that they require attention to partner systems, whether local, international, political, academic, or non-academic. Scientists, like diplomats or entrepreneurs, are representatives of their field, culture, and country and become obligatory agents in health diplomacy. This role significantly influences current and future collaborations with not only the immediate partner but with other in country partners as well. Research partnerships need continuous evaluation of the collaboration's productivity, perspectives of all partners, and desired outcomes for success to avoid engaging in "research tourism", particularly in developing regions. International engagement is a cornerstone in addressing the impact of infectious diseases globally. Global partnerships are strategically aligned with national, partner and global health priorities and may be based on specific requests for assistance from the partnering country governments. Here we share experiences from select research collaborations to highlight principles that we have found key in building long-term relationships with collaborators and in meeting the aim to address scientific questions relevant to the host country and strategic global health initiatives.

  9. Enhancing international collaboration among early-career researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Jennifer K; Albada, Akke; Farahani, Mansoureh; Lithner, Maria; Neumann, Melanie; Sandhu, Harbinder; Shepherd, Heather L

    2010-01-01

    Objective The European Association of Communication in Healthcare (EACH) Early Career Researchers Network (ECRN) aims are to (1) promote international collaboration among young investigators and (2) provide a support network for future innovative communication research projects. In October 2009, Miami, USA at a workshop facilitated by the ECRN at the International Conference on Communication in Healthcare (ICCH) hosted by the American Academy of Communication in Healthcare we explored common facilitators and challenges faced by early career researchers in health communication research. Methods Attendees introduced themselves, their research area(s) of interest, and listed one facilitator and one barrier for their career development. EACH ECRN members then led a discussion of facilitators and challenges encountered in communication research projects and career development. We discussed potential collaboration opportunities, future goals, and activities. Results Having supportive collegial relationships, institutional support, job security, and funding are critical facilitators for early career investigators. Key challenges include difficulty with time management and prioritizing, limited resources, and contacts. Conclusion International collaboration among early career researchers is a feasible and effective means to address important challenges, by increasing opportunities for professional support and networking, problem-solving, discussion of data, and ultimately publishing. Practice Implications Future AACH-EACH Early Career Researcher Networks should continue to build collaborations by developing shared research projects, papers, and other scholarly products. PMID:20663630

  10. Strengthening International Collaboration: Geosciences Research and Education in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.

    2009-05-01

    Geophysical research increasingly requires global multidisciplinary approaches and global integration. Global warming, increasing CO2 levels and increased needs of mineral and energy resources emphasize impact of human activities. The planetary view of our Earth as a deeply complex interconnected system also emphasizes the need of international scientific cooperation. International collaboration presents an immense potential and is urgently needed for further development of geosciences research and education. In analyzing international collaboration a relevant aspect is the role of scientific societies. Societies organize meetings, publish journals and books and promote cooperation through academic exchange activities and can further assist communities in developing countries providing and facilitating access to scientific literature, attendance to international meetings, short and long-term stays and student and young researcher mobility. Developing countries present additional challenges resulting from limited economic resources and social and political problems. Most countries urgently require improved educational and research programs. Needed are in-depth analyses of infrastructure and human resources and identification of major problems and needs. Questions may include what are the major limitations and needs in research and postgraduate education in developing countries? what and how should international collaboration do? and what are the roles of individuals, academic institutions, funding agencies, scientific societies? Here we attempt to examine some of these questions with reference to case examples and AGU role. We focus on current situation, size and characteristics of research community, education programs, facilities, economic support, and then move to perspectives for potential development in an international context.

  11. International Combined Orthopaedic Research Societies: A model for international collaboration to promote orthopaedic and musculoskeletal research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Miclau

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In October 2013, the International Combined Orthopaedic Research Societies (ICORS; http://i-cors.org was founded with inaugural member organisations from the previous Combined Orthopaedic Research Society, which had sponsored combined meetings for more than 2 decades. The ICORS is dedicated to the stimulation of orthopaedic and musculoskeletal research in fields such as biomedical engineering, biology, chemistry, and veterinary and human clinical research. The ICORS seeks to facilitate communication with member organisations to enhance international research collaborations and to promote the development of new international orthopaedic and musculoskeletal research organisations. Through new categories of membership, the ICORS represents the broadest coalition of orthopaedic research organisations globally.

  12. Health literacy: setting an international collaborative research agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowlands Gillian

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health literacy is an increasingly important topic in both the policy and research agendas of many countries. During the recent 36th Annual Meeting of the North American Primary Care Research Group, the authors led an audio-taped 3-hour forum, "Studying Health Literacy: Developing an International Collaboration," where the current state of health literacy (HL in the United States (US and United Kingdom (UK was presented and attendees were encouraged to debate a future research agenda. Discussion of Forum Themes The debate centred around three distinct themes, including: (1 refining HL definitions and conceptual models, (2 HL measurement and assessment tools, and (3 developing a collaborative international research agenda. The attendees agreed that future research should be theoretically grounded and conceptual models employed in studies should be explicit to allow for international comparisons to be drawn. Summary and Authors Reflections The importance of HL research and its possible contribution to health disparities is becoming increasingly recognised internationally. International collaborations and comparative studies could illuminate some of the possible determinants of disparities, and also possibly provide a vehicle to examine other research questions of interest.

  13. Gendered Patterns in International Research Collaborations in Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhly, K. M.; Visser, L. M.; Zippel, K. S.

    2017-01-01

    Although women's representation in higher education nears parity with men at the undergraduate level, this representation diminishes as one ascends the academic ranks. Because gender gaps in the "elite" activity of international research collaborations might contribute to the underrepresentation of women in the upper ranks, we ask if…

  14. Gendered patterns in international research collaborations in academia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uhly, K.M.; Visser, L.M.; Zippel, K.S.

    2017-01-01

    Although women's representation in higher education nears parity with men at the undergraduate level, this representation diminishes as one ascends the academic ranks. Because gender gaps in the ‘elite’ activity of international research collaborations might contribute to the underrepresentation of

  15. Minority International Research Training Program: Global Collaboration in Nursing Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElmurry, Beverly J.; Misner, Susan J.; Buseh, Aaron G.

    2003-01-01

    The Minority International Research Training Program pairs minority nursing students with faculty mentors at international sites for short-term research. A total of 26 undergraduate, 22 graduate, and 6 postdoctoral students have participated. Challenges include recruitment, orientation, and preparation of students; identification and preparation…

  16. A schedule for fusion research development and international collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakihana, H.

    1983-01-01

    In order to reach their goal of commercial fusion power reactors, development must proceed in a series of basic stages. Each step is expected to incur an increased level of cost. The cost-sharing benefits of international collaboration will become increasingly important and attractive with each successive step preceding commercialization. Outstanding examples of implementation of international collaboration in fusion include the JET project and the INTOR workshop which lend encouragement for the prospects for international collaboration in fusion in the future. (author)

  17. Establishing and maintaining international collaborative research teams: an autobiographical insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T J Carr

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the growing impetus for international collaborative research teams (ICRT, there are relatively few resources available to guide and support researchers through the processes of establishing and maintaining ICRTs. In particular, no articles were found that provided researchers’ firsthand accounts of being a member of such a team. Having access to such personal accounts can help both experienced and novice researchers learn more directly about what to expect, as well as the benefits, challenges, pitfalls, and success strategies for establishing and maintaining ICRTs. The authors used phenomenological autobiographical reflective journaling to capture their experiences as members of ICRTs. In this article we provide an overview of key themes that emerged from the analysis of our reflections as members of ICRTs. These themes include: benefits, challenges, and strategies for success. Our aim is to share our first-hand experiences of what it is like to establish and participate in ICRT. It is not our intention to provide readers with prescriptive guidelines on how to set up and maintain ICRTs. Every ICRT is unique and some of these ideas may or may not apply in every case. Instead, we are describing what worked for us, hoping that others may benefit from our experience. Consequently, we suggest that the focus of ICRT should be on the benefits thereof which promote and encourage interaction between disciplines, transfer of knowledge and techniques and personal and professional development. Keywords: international, collaborative, research, teams, interdisciplinary

  18. Evolutionary convergence of the patterns of international research collaborations across scientific fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, L.; Coccia, M.

    2015-01-01

    Frame and Carpenter (1979) analysed the pattern of international research collaboration among scientific fields in 1970s. Starting from this pioneering work, this paper investigates international collaborations over 1997-2012 and compares the critical results with earlier studies to detect the

  19. Research and Collaboration Overview of Institut Pasteur International Network: A Bibliometric Approach toward Research Funding Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Mostafavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Institut Pasteur International Network (IPIN, which includes 32 research institutes around the world, is a network of research and expertise to fight against infectious diseases. A scientometric approach was applied to describe research and collaboration activities of IPIN. Methods Publications were identified using a manual search of IPIN member addresses in Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE between 2006 and 2011. Total publications were then subcategorized by geographic regions. Several scientometric indicators and the H-index were employed to estimate the scientific production of each IPIN member. Subject and geographical overlay maps were also applied to visualize the network activities of the IPIN members. Results A total number of 12667 publications originated from IPIN members. Each author produced an average number of 2.18 papers and each publication received an average of 13.40 citations. European Pasteur Institutes had the largest amount of publications, authored papers, and H-index values. Biochemistry and molecular biology, microbiology, immunology and infectious diseases were the most important research topics, respectively. Geographic mapping of IPIN publications showed wide international collaboration among IPIN members around the world. Conclusion IPIN has strong ties with national and international authorities and organizations to investigate the current and future health issues. It is recommended to use scientometric and collaboration indicators as measures of research performance in IPIN future policies and investment decisions.

  20. Research and collaboration overview of Institut Pasteur International Network: a bibliometric approach toward research funding decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Ehsan; Bazrafshan, Azam

    2014-01-01

    Institut Pasteur International Network (IPIN), which includes 32 research institutes around the world, is a network of research and expertise to fight against infectious diseases. A scientometric approach was applied to describe research and collaboration activities of IPIN. Publications were identified using a manual search of IPIN member addresses in Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) between 2006 and 2011. Total publications were then subcategorized by geographic regions. Several scientometric indicators and the H-index were employed to estimate the scientific production of each IPIN member. Subject and geographical overlay maps were also applied to visualize the network activities of the IPIN members. A total number of 12667 publications originated from IPIN members. Each author produced an average number of 2.18 papers and each publication received an average of 13.40 citations. European Pasteur Institutes had the largest amount of publications, authored papers, and H-index values. Biochemistry and molecular biology, microbiology, immunology and infectious diseases were the most important research topics, respectively. Geographic mapping of IPIN publications showed wide international collaboration among IPIN members around the world. IPIN has strong ties with national and international authorities and organizations to investigate the current and future health issues. It is recommended to use scientometric and collaboration indicators as measures of research performance in IPIN future policies and investment decisions.

  1. International collaboration, the route to fuel cycle research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinsley, T.; Mathers, D.; Rayment, F.

    2013-01-01

    In hindsight, involvement with European Framework projects such as GoFastR (Gas-cooled Fast Reactors) and ACSEPT (Actinide Recycling by Separation and Transmutation) was a crucial and, at the time, an innovative step in maintaining the UK skills base during a period of major changes in the UK nuclear industry. It has undoubtedly delivered the objectives intended in terms of maintenance of the key skills, developing and training new staff, regenerating facilities and building strong links with the European nuclear research community. Over the last 2-3 years NNL's participation in European projects has moved forward such that NNL (National Nuclear Laboratory) is an integral partner of several major projects, fully engaged with delivering the core objectives of the projects and intent on forging deep collaborations with key organisations across Europe. With the renewed interest in nuclear energy and future fuel cycle options in the UK, NNL is now well positioned to contribute at an even deeper level in European level programmes

  2. International collaboration, the route to fuel cycle research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinsley, T.; Mathers, D.; Rayment, F. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    In hindsight, involvement with European Framework projects such as GoFastR (Gas-cooled Fast Reactors) and ACSEPT (Actinide Recycling by Separation and Transmutation) was a crucial and, at the time, an innovative step in maintaining the UK skills base during a period of major changes in the UK nuclear industry. It has undoubtedly delivered the objectives intended in terms of maintenance of the key skills, developing and training new staff, regenerating facilities and building strong links with the European nuclear research community. Over the last 2-3 years NNL's participation in European projects has moved forward such that NNL (National Nuclear Laboratory) is an integral partner of several major projects, fully engaged with delivering the core objectives of the projects and intent on forging deep collaborations with key organisations across Europe. With the renewed interest in nuclear energy and future fuel cycle options in the UK, NNL is now well positioned to contribute at an even deeper level in European level programmes.

  3. Social Network Analysis of 50 Years of International Collaboration in the Research of Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shesen; Zhang, Ganzhou; Guo, Yufei

    2016-01-01

    The definition of the field of educational technology has evolved over 50 years. New inventions and economic globalization increasingly facilitate people's communication for exchange of ideas and collaboration. This work attempts to describe international research collaboration in educational technology for the past 50 years. This article intends…

  4. International collaboration between nuclear research centres and the role of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, B.

    2001-01-01

    A research reactor is a core facility in many nuclear research centres (NRCs) of Member States and it is logical that it should be the focus of any international collaboration between such centres. There are several large and sophisticated research reactors in operation in both developed and developing Member States, such as Belgium, China, Egypt, France, Hungary, Indonesia, India, Japan, ROK, Netherlands, South Africa and the USA. There are also several new, large reactors under construction or being planned such as those in Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, and Thailand. It is felt that the utilization of these reactors can be enhanced by international co-operation to achieve common goals in research and applications. (author)

  5. International collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    In the wake of the demise of the US Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) project last year which empoverished both US and world science, some rapid scene shifting is going on. The SSC may be dead, but the underlying physics quest lives on. In the US, the 'future vision' subpanel of the High Energy Physics Advisory Board (HEPAP) is at work formulating its recommendations. On the international front, the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) at a special meeting in Vancouver in January drafted a statement

  6. Educational Technology Research Journals: "International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning," 2006-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Shiloh M. J.; Martin, M. Troy; Bodily, Robert; Faulconer, Christian; West, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    The authors analyzed all research articles from the first issue of the "International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning" in 2006 until the second issue of 2014. They determined the research methodologies, most frequently used author-supplied keywords as well as two- and three-word phrases, and most frequently published…

  7. Advancing Diversity and Inclusion within the IceCube Collaboration: Lessons from an International Particle Astrophysics Research Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knackert, J.

    2017-12-01

    The IceCube Collaboration is comprised of 300 scientists, engineers, students, and support staff at 48 institutions in 12 countries. IceCube recognizes the value of increased diversity within STEM fields and is committed to improving this situation both within the collaboration and more broadly. The process of establishing and maintaining a focus on diversity and inclusion within an international research collaboration has yielded many lessons and best practices relevant for broader STEM diversity efforts. Examples of events, training activities, and workshops to promote diversity both internally and within the broader STEM community will be provided. We will outline strategies to promote an environment of inclusivity and increase diversity in hiring within IceCube. We will describe collaborations with local networks and advocacy groups that have helped to guide our efforts and maximize their impact. We will also discuss methods for getting community members interested, informed, and invested, while helping them better understand the benefits associated with increased STEM diversity. This work has been informed by the American Association for the Advancement of Science's inaugural cohort of the Community Engagement Fellows Program. The author has made this submission on behalf of the IceCube Collaboration Diversity Task Force.

  8. International stem cell collaboration: how disparate policies between the United States and the United Kingdom impact research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jingyuan; Flynn, Jesse M; Solnick, Rachel E; Ecklund, Elaine Howard; Matthews, Kirstin R W

    2011-03-08

    As the scientific community globalizes, it is increasingly important to understand the effects of international collaboration on the quality and quantity of research produced. While it is generally assumed that international collaboration enhances the quality of research, this phenomenon is not well examined. Stem cell research is unique in that it is both politically charged and a research area that often generates international collaborations, making it an ideal case through which to examine international collaborations. Furthermore, with promising medical applications, the research area is dynamic and responsive to a globalizing science environment. Thus, studying international collaborations in stem cell research elucidates the role of existing international networks in promoting quality research, as well as the effects that disparate national policies might have on research. This study examined the impact of collaboration on publication significance in the United States and the United Kingdom, world leaders in stem cell research with disparate policies. We reviewed publications by US and UK authors from 2008, along with their citation rates and the political factors that may have contributed to the number of international collaborations. The data demonstrated that international collaborations significantly increased an article's impact for UK and US investigators. While this applied to UK authors whether they were corresponding or secondary, this effect was most significant for US authors who were corresponding authors. While the UK exhibited a higher proportion of international publications than the US, this difference was consistent with overall trends in international scientific collaboration. The findings suggested that national stem cell policy differences and regulatory mechanisms driving international stem cell research in the US and UK did not affect the frequency of international collaborations, or even the countries with which the US and UK most

  9. NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: Building Collaboration Through International Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, K. E.; Schmidt, G. K.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is a virtual institute focused on re-search at the intersection of science and exploration, training the next generation of lunar scientists, and community development. As part of the SSERVI mission, we act as a hub for opportunities that engage the larger scientific and exploration communities in order to form new interdisciplinary, research-focused collaborations. This talk will describe the international partner re-search efforts and how we are engaging the international science and exploration communities through workshops, conferences, online seminars and classes, student exchange programs and internships.

  10. The importance of international collaboration for rare diseases research: a European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julkowska, D; Austin, C P; Cutillo, C M; Gancberg, D; Hager, C; Halftermeyer, J; Jonker, A H; Lau, L P L; Norstedt, I; Rath, A; Schuster, R; Simelyte, E; van Weely, S

    2017-09-01

    Over the last two decades, important contributions were made at national, European and international levels to foster collaboration into rare diseases research. The European Union (EU) has put much effort into funding rare diseases research, encouraging national funding organizations to collaborate together in the E-Rare program, setting up European Reference Networks for rare diseases and complex conditions, and initiating the International Rare Diseases Research Consortium (IRDiRC) together with the National Institutes of Health in the USA. Co-ordination of the activities of funding agencies, academic researchers, companies, regulatory bodies, and patient advocacy organizations and partnerships with, for example, the European Research Infrastructures maximizes the collective impact of global investments in rare diseases research. This contributes to accelerating progress, for example, in faster diagnosis through enhanced discovery of causative genes, better understanding of natural history of rare diseases through creation of common registries and databases and boosting of innovative therapeutic approaches. Several examples of funded pre-clinical and clinical gene therapy projects show that integration of multinational and multidisciplinary expertize generates new knowledge and can result in multicentre gene therapy trials. International collaboration in rare diseases research is key to improve the life of people living with a rare disease.

  11. Investigating the interplay between fundamentals of national research systems: performance, investments and international collaborations

    OpenAIRE

    Cimini, Giulio; Zaccaria, Andrea; Gabrielli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We discuss, at the macro-level of nations, the contribution of research funding and rate of international collaboration to research performance, with important implications for the science of science policy. In particular, we cross-correlate suitable measures of these quantities with a scientometric-based assessment of scientific success, studying both the average performance of nations and their temporal dynamics in the space defined by these variables during the last decade. We find signifi...

  12. Good collaborative practice: reforming capacity building governance of international health research partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Claire Leonie; Shaw, David; Sprumont, Dominique; Sankoh, Osman; Tanner, Marcel; Elger, Bernice

    2018-01-08

    In line with the policy objectives of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, this commentary seeks to examine the extent to which provisions of international health research guidance promote capacity building and equitable partnerships in global health research. Our evaluation finds that governance of collaborative research partnerships, and in particular capacity building, in resource-constrained settings is limited but has improved with the implementation guidance of the International Ethical Guidelines for Health-related Research Involving Humans by The Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS) (2016). However, more clarity is needed in national legislation, industry and ethics guidelines, and regulatory provisions to address the structural inequities and power imbalances inherent in international health research partnerships. Most notably, ethical partnership governance is not supported by the principal industry ethics guidelines - the International Conference on Harmonization Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceutical for Human Use (ICH) Good Clinical Practice (ICH-GCP). Given the strategic value of ICH-GCP guidelines in defining the role and responsibility of global health research partners, we conclude that such governance should stipulate the minimal requirements for creating an equitable environment of inclusion, mutual learning, transparency and accountability. Procedurally, this can be supported by i) shared research agenda setting with local leadership, ii) capacity assessments, and iii) construction of a memorandum of understanding (MoU). Moreover, the requirement of capacity building needs to be coordinated amongst partners to support good collaborative practice and deliver on the public health goals of the research enterprise; improving local conditions of health and reducing global health inequality. In this respect, and in order to develop consistency between sources of research governance, ICH

  13. Collaborative international research: ethical and regulatory issues pertaining to human biological materials at a South African institutional research ethics committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathar, Aslam; Dhai, Amaboo; van der Linde, Stephan

    2014-12-01

    Human Biological Materials (HBMs) are an invaluable resource in biomedical research. To determine if researchers and a Research Ethics Committee (REC) at a South African institution addressed ethical issues pertaining to HBMs in collaborative research with developed countries. Ethically approved retrospective cross-sectional descriptive audit. Of the 1305 protocols audited, 151 (11.57%) fulfilled the study's inclusion criteria. Compared to other developed countries, a majority of sponsors (90) were from the USA (p = 0.0001). The principle investigators (PIs) in all 151 protocols informed the REC of their intent to store HBMs. Only 132 protocols informed research participants (P ethical and regulatory issues pertaining to HBMs. There was a lack of congruence between the ethical guidelines of developed countries and their actions which are central to the access to HBMs in collaborative research. HBMs may be leaving South Africa without EPs and MTAs during the process of international collaborative research. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Collaborative research: Accomplishments & potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsouyanni, Klea

    2008-01-01

    Although a substantial part of scientific research is collaborative and increasing globalization will probably lead to its increase, very few studies actually investigate the advantages, disadvantages, experiences and lessons learned from collaboration. In environmental epidemiology interdisciplinary collaboration is essential and the contrasting geographical patterns in exposure and disease make multi-location projects essential. This paper is based on a presentation given at the Annual Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology, Paris 2006, and is attempting to initiate a discussion on a framework for studying collaborative research. A review of the relevant literature showed that indeed collaborative research is rising, in some countries with impressive rates. However, there are substantial differences between countries in their outlook, need and respect for collaboration. In many situations collaborative publications receive more citations than those based on national authorship. The European Union is the most important host of collaborative research, mainly driven by the European Commission through the Framework Programmes. A critical assessment of the tools and trends of collaborative networks under FP6, showed that there was a need for a critical revision, which led to changes in FP7. In conclusion, it is useful to study the characteristics of collaborative research and set targets for the future. The added value for science and for the researchers involved may be assessed. The motivation for collaboration could be increased in the more developed countries. Particular ways to increase the efficiency and interaction in interdisciplinary and intercultural collaboration may be developed. We can work towards "the principles of collaborative research" in Environmental Epidemiology. PMID:18208596

  15. The Era of International Space Station Utilization Begins: Research Strategy, International Collaboration, and Realized Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumm, Tracy; Robinson, Julie A.; Ruttley, Tara; Johnson-Green, Perry; Karabadzhak, George; Nakamura, Tai; Sorokin, Igor V.; Zell, Martin; Jean, Sabbagh

    2010-01-01

    With the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) nearing completion and the support of a full-time crew of six, a new era of utilization for research is beginning. For more than 15 years, the ISS international partnership has weathered financial, technical and political challenges proving that nations can work together to complete assembly of the largest space vehicle in history. And while the ISS partners can be proud of having completed one of the most ambitious engineering projects ever conceived, the challenge of successfully using the platform remains. During the ISS assembly phase, the potential benefits of space-based research and development were demonstrated; including the advancement of scientific knowledge based on experiments conducted in space, development and testing of new technologies, and derivation of Earth applications from new understanding. The configurability and human-tended capabilities of the ISS provide a unique platform. The international utilization strategy is based on research ranging from physical sciences, biology, medicine, psychology, to Earth observation, human exploration preparation and technology demonstration. The ability to complete follow-on investigations in a period of months allows researchers to make rapid advances based on new knowledge gained from ISS activities. During the utilization phase, the ISS partners are working together to track the objectives, accomplishments, and the applications of the new knowledge gained. This presentation will summarize the consolidated international results of these tracking activities and approaches. Areas of current research on ISS with strong international cooperation will be highlighted including cardiovascular studies, cell and plant biology studies, radiation, physics of matter, and advanced alloys. Scientific knowledge and new technologies derived from research on the ISS will be realized through improving quality of life on Earth and future spaceflight endeavours

  16. International research collaboration as social relation: an Ethiopian-Canadian example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Amy; Guruge, Sepali; Aga, Fekadu; Hailemariam, Damen; Hyman, Ilene; Tamiru, Melesse

    2011-06-01

    International collaboration in nursing and other health disciplines is vital for addressing global health issues. While the results and processes of such collaborations have been reported, few publications have addressed their philosophical or theoretical underpinnings, particularly with respect to collaboration between those in low- and high-income countries. Piaget's notion of social relations of cooperation and constraint and Habermas's notion of "lifeworld" provide a theoretical lens through which to examine international collaboration as a construction of knowledge. This article is an exploration of these ideas as seen in the collective experience of Canadians and Ethiopians organizing an interdisciplinary forum on intimate partner violence in Ethiopia. The project is presented as a case study for reflecting on international collaboration as a manifestation of social relations. Such re-visioning of international collaboration may be useful for improving collaborative processes and their outcomes.

  17. Collaborative translational research leading to multicenter clinical trials in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: the Cooperative International Neuromuscular Research Group (CINRG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escolar, Diana M; Henricson, Erik K; Pasquali, Livia; Gorni, Ksenija; Hoffman, Eric P

    2002-10-01

    Progress in the development of rationally based therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy has been accelerated by encouraging multidisciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration between basic science and clinical investigators in the Cooperative International Research Group. We combined existing research efforts in pathophysiology by a gene expression profiling laboratory with the efforts of animal facilities capable of conducting high-throughput drug screening and toxicity testing to identify safe and effective drug compounds that target different parts of the pathophysiologic cascade in a genome-wide drug discovery approach. Simultaneously, we developed a clinical trial coordinating center and an international network of collaborating physicians and clinics where those drugs could be tested in large-scale clinical trials. We hope that by bringing together investigators at these facilities and providing the infrastructure to support their research, we can rapidly move new bench discoveries through animal model screening and into therapeutic testing in humans in a safe, timely and cost-effective setting.

  18. International collaboration and comparative research on ocean top predators under CLIOTOP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobday, Alistair J.; Arrizabalaga, Haritz; Evans, Karen; Scales, Kylie L.; Senina, Inna; Weng, Kevin C.

    2017-06-01

    Oceanic top predators have ecological, social and economic value of global significance. These wide-ranging marine species, which include sharks, tunas and billfishes, marine mammals, turtles and seabirds, are the focus of international research attention under the Climate Impacts on Oceanic Top Predators (CLIOTOP) science programme, one of the Integrated Marine Biosphere Research (IMBeR) projects. Over more than a decade, research conducted under CLIOTOP has involved scientists from more than 30 countries, with international collaboration increasing markedly over time, and comparative analyses resulting in new knowledge and understanding of oceanic top predators. This special issue presents 27 papers arising from the 3rd CLIOTOP symposium, held in San Sebastián, Spain in September 2015, spanning topics such as conservation biology, trophic ecology, fisheries science, climate change, and adaptive management. The maturation and synthesis of CLIOTOP's collaborative research is now resulting in real-world management applications and improving understanding of potential ecological and socio-economic impacts of climate change in oceanic systems. The ultimate CLIOTOP goal of preparing both climate-sensitive predator populations and the human societies dependent on them for the impending impacts of climate change is now within reach.

  19. Ethics of international clinical research collaboration - the experience of AlloStem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, C

    2006-02-01

    This paper examines the ethics of international clinical collaboration in stem cell research by focusing on the AlloStem project. AlloStem is an international research programme, financed by the European Union under the Sixth Framework Programme, with the aim of advancing the use of stem cells in treating leukaemia and other haematological diseases. Several areas of ethical importance are explored. Research justification and the need to consider both deontological and teleological aspects are examined. Ethical sensitivity in research and the requirement to respond to areas of ethical concern identified by the European Commission, such as the involvement of human beings, the use of human tissue, and the use of animals are also explored. Ethical issues around project structure and management, such as ethical standardization in international research, and achieving set targets are discussed. The ethical importance of dissemination of findings and teaching in clinical research is also considered. Finally, the distribution of benefits is addressed and the importance of distributive justice is emphasized.

  20. Nuclear safety research collaborations between the US and Russian Federation international nuclear safety centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.J; Braun, J.C; Klickman, A.E.; Bugaenko, S.E; Kabanov, L.P; Kraev, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    The Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) have formed International Nuclear Safety Centers to collaborate on nuclear safety research. USDOE established the U. S. Center at Argonne National Laboratory in October 1995. MINATOM established the Russian Center at the Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering in Moscow in July 1996. In April 1998 the Russian center became an independent, autonomous organization under MINATOM. The goals of the centers are to: cooperate in the development of technologies associated with nuclear safety in nuclear power engineering. be international centers for the collection of information important for safety and technical improvements in nuclear power engineering. maintain a base for fundamental knowledge needed to design nuclear reactors.The strategic approach that is being used to accomplish these goals is for the two centers to work together to use the resources and the talents of the scientists associated with the US Center and the Russian Center to do collaborative research to improve the safety of Russian-designed nuclear reactors

  1. Setting a research agenda for progressive multiple sclerosis: the International Collaborative on Progressive MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert J; Thompson, Alan; Baker, David; Baneke, Peer; Brown, Doug; Browne, Paul; Chandraratna, Dhia; Ciccarelli, Olga; Coetzee, Timothy; Comi, Giancarlo; Feinstein, Anthony; Kapoor, Raj; Lee, Karen; Salvetti, Marco; Sharrock, Kersten; Toosy, Ahmed; Zaratin, Paola; Zuidwijk, Kim

    2012-11-01

    Despite significant progress in the development of therapies for relapsing MS, progressive MS remains comparatively disappointing. Our objective, in this paper, is to review the current challenges in developing therapies for progressive MS and identify key priority areas for research. A collaborative was convened by volunteer and staff leaders from several MS societies with the mission to expedite the development of effective disease-modifying and symptom management therapies for progressive forms of multiple sclerosis. Through a series of scientific and strategic planning meetings, the collaborative identified and developed new perspectives on five key priority areas for research: experimental models, identification and validation of targets and repurposing opportunities, proof-of-concept clinical trial strategies, clinical outcome measures, and symptom management and rehabilitation. Our conclusions, tackling the impediments in developing therapies for progressive MS will require an integrated, multi-disciplinary approach to enable effective translation of research into therapies for progressive MS. Engagement of the MS research community through an international effort is needed to address and fund these research priorities with the ultimate goal of expediting the development of disease-modifying and symptom-relief treatments for progressive MS.

  2. Setting a research agenda for progressive multiple sclerosis: The International Collaborative on Progressive MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alan; Baker, David; Baneke, Peer; Brown, Doug; Browne, Paul; Chandraratna, Dhia; Ciccarelli, Olga; Coetzee, Timothy; Comi, Giancarlo; Feinstein, Anthony; Kapoor, Raj; Lee, Karen; Salvetti, Marco; Sharrock, Kersten; Toosy, Ahmed; Zaratin, Paola; Zuidwijk, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant progress in the development of therapies for relapsing MS, progressive MS remains comparatively disappointing. Our objective, in this paper, is to review the current challenges in developing therapies for progressive MS and identify key priority areas for research. A collaborative was convened by volunteer and staff leaders from several MS societies with the mission to expedite the development of effective disease-modifying and symptom management therapies for progressive forms of multiple sclerosis. Through a series of scientific and strategic planning meetings, the collaborative identified and developed new perspectives on five key priority areas for research: experimental models, identification and validation of targets and repurposing opportunities, proof-of-concept clinical trial strategies, clinical outcome measures, and symptom management and rehabilitation. Our conclusions, tackling the impediments in developing therapies for progressive MS will require an integrated, multi-disciplinary approach to enable effective translation of research into therapies for progressive MS. Engagement of the MS research community through an international effort is needed to address and fund these research priorities with the ultimate goal of expediting the development of disease-modifying and symptom-relief treatments for progressive MS. PMID:22917690

  3. Simultaneous and Comparable Numerical Indicators of International, National and Local Collaboration Practices in English-Medium Astrophysics Research Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, David I.; Alcaraz, M. Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We report an investigation on collaboration practices in research papers published in the most prestigious English-medium astrophysics journals. Method: We propose an evaluation method based on three numerical indicators to study and compare, in absolute terms, three different types of collaboration (international, national and…

  4. Nuclear safety research collaborations between the U.S. and Russian Federation International Nuclear Safety Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D. J.; Braun, J. C.; Klickman, A. E.; Bougaenko, S. E.; Kabonov, L. P.; Kraev, A. G.

    2000-01-01

    The Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the US Department of Energy (USDOE) have formed International Nuclear Safety Centers to collaborate on nuclear safety research. USDOE established the US Center (ISINSC) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in October 1995. MINATOM established the Russian Center (RINSC) at the Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (RDIPE) in Moscow in July 1996. In April 1998 the Russian center became a semi-independent, autonomous organization under MINATOM. The goals of the center are to: Cooperate in the development of technologies associated with nuclear safety in nuclear power engineering; Be international centers for the collection of information important for safety and technical improvements in nuclear power engineering; and Maintain a base for fundamental knowledge needed to design nuclear reactors. The strategic approach is being used to accomplish these goals is for the two centers to work together to use the resources and the talents of the scientists associated with the US Center and the Russian Center to do collaborative research to improve the safety of Russian-designed nuclear reactors. The two centers started conducting joint research and development projects in January 1997. Since that time the following ten joint projects have been initiated: INSC databases--web server and computing center; Coupled codes--Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic; Severe accident management for Soviet-designed reactors; Transient management and advanced control; Survey of relevant nuclear safety research facilities in the Russian Federation; Computer code validation for transient analysis of VVER and RBMK reactors; Advanced structural analysis; Development of a nuclear safety research and development plan for MINATOM; Properties and applications of heavy liquid metal coolants; and Material properties measurement and assessment. Currently, there is activity in eight of these projects. Details on each of these

  5. WDS/DSA Certification - International collaboration for a trustworthy research data infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrane, Mustapha; Hugo, Wim; Harrison, Sandy

    2016-04-01

    Today's research is international, transdisciplinary, and data-enabled, which requires scrupulous data stewardship, full and open access to data, and efficient collaboration and coordination. New expectations on researchers based on policies from governments and funders to share data fully, openly, and in a timely manner present significant challenges but are also opportunities to improve the quality and efficiency of research and its accountability to society. Researchers should be able to archive and disseminate data as required by many institutions or funders, and civil society to scrutinize datasets underlying public policies. Thus, the trustworthiness of data services must be verifiable. In addition, the need to integrate large and complex datasets across disciplines and domains with variable levels of maturity calls for greater coordination to achieve sufficient interoperability and sustainability. The World Data System (WDS) of the International Council for Science (ICSU) promotes long-term stewardship of, and universal and equitable access to, quality-assured scientific data and services across a range of disciplines in the natural and social sciences. WDS aims at coordinating and supporting trusted scientific data services for the provision, use, and preservation of relevant datasets to facilitate scientific research, in particular under the ICSU umbrella, while strengthening their links with the research community. WDS certifies its Members, holders and providers of data or data products, using internationally recognized standards. Certification of scientific data services is essential to ensure trustworthiness of the global research data infrastructure. It contributes to building a searchable, distributed, interoperable and sustainable research data infrastructure. Several certification standards have been developed over the last decade, such as the Network of Expertise in long-term Storage and Accessibility of Digital Resources in Germany (NESTOR) seal

  6. ICFA on international collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    International collaboration in high energy physics is what ICFA - the International Committee for Future Accelerators - is all about. Progress is highlighted every three years when ICFA convenes its 'Future Perspectives in High Energy Physics' seminar to focus attention on major issues and to identify evolving trends. The latest such seminar, held at the DESY Laboratory in Hamburg from 3-7 May, looked at international cooperation in the construction of major facilities. Status reports across the whole range of existing experimental programmes and ongoing plans gave valuable pointers to future needs. For electron-positron linear colliders (EPLC), research and development work towards the next generation of machines is underway in Laboratories throughout the world. At previous such seminars, at Tsukuba, Japan (1984), Brookhaven, USA (1987) and Protvino (1990), ICFA, which has no direct power, could sometimes only stand on the sidelines and comment on the emergence of major new national plans. The lessons learnt, ICFA is keen to make sure that the EPLC debut on the world stage will be better choreographed. In addition to plans for new major experimental facilities, the Hamburg seminar also provided a valuable snapshot of the current scene and the directions in which ongoing research is poised to take. This covered existing facilities and projects, 'factories' to mass-produce specific particles, fixed target studies and non-accelerator experiments as well as the key EPLC development theme. B-physics, the study of particles containing the fifth, or 'beauty' (b) quark, emerged as an important thread running across several machine scenarios

  7. INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION: Panelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    At the meeting of the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA), in Geneva in July, Chairman A.N. Skrinsky of Novosibirsk reviewed ICFA progress, particularly the activities of the specialist Panels which pursue specific Committee objectives in guiding worldwide collaboration in high energy physics

  8. INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION: Panelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1991-10-15

    At the meeting of the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA), in Geneva in July, Chairman A.N. Skrinsky of Novosibirsk reviewed ICFA progress, particularly the activities of the specialist Panels which pursue specific Committee objectives in guiding worldwide collaboration in high energy physics.

  9. A Comparison of Internal Dispositions and Career Trajectories after Collaborative versus Apprenticed Research Experiences for Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, Kyle J; Demetrikopoulos, Melissa K; Britner, Shari L; Carruth, Laura L; Williams, Brian A; Pecore, John L; DeHaan, Robert L; Goode, Christopher T

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate research experiences confer benefits on students bound for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers, but the low number of research professionals available to serve as mentors often limits access to research. Within the context of our summer research program (BRAIN), we tested the hypothesis that a team-based collaborative learning model (CLM) produces student outcomes at least as positive as a traditional apprenticeship model (AM). Through stratified, random assignment to conditions, CLM students were designated to work together in a teaching laboratory to conduct research according to a defined curriculum led by several instructors, whereas AM students were paired with mentors in active research groups. We used pre-, mid-, and postprogram surveys to measure internal dispositions reported to predict progress toward STEM careers, such as scientific research self-efficacy, science identity, science anxiety, and commitment to a science career. We are also tracking long-term retention in science-related career paths. For both short- and longer-term outcomes, the two program formats produced similar benefits, supporting our hypothesis that the CLM provides positive outcomes while conserving resources, such as faculty mentors. We discuss this method in comparison with course-based undergraduate research and recommend its expansion to institutional settings in which mentor resources are scarce. © 2017 K. J. Frantz et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  10. Review of the Strategic Plan for International Collaboration on Fusion Science and Technology Research. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The United States Government has employed international collaborations in magnetic fusion energy research since the program was declassified in 1958. These collaborations have been successful not only in producing high quality scientific results that have contributed to the advancement of fusion science and technology, they have also allowed us to highly leverage our funding. Thus, in the 1980s, when the funding situation made it necessary to reduce the technical breadth of the U.S. domestic program, these highly leveraged collaborations became key strategic elements of the U.S. program, allowing us to maintain some degree of technical breadth. With the recent, nearly complete declassification of inertial confinement fusion, the use of some international collaboration is expected to be introduced in the related inertial fusion energy research activities as well. The United States has been a leader in establishing and fostering collaborations that have involved scientific and technological exchanges, joint planning, and joint work at fusion facilities in the U.S. and worldwide. These collaborative efforts have proven mutually beneficial to the United States and our partners. International collaborations are a tool that allows us to meet fusion program goals in the most effective way possible. Working with highly qualified people from other countries and other cultures provides the collaborators with an opportunity to see problems from new and different perspectives, allows solutions to arise from the diversity of the participants, and promotes both collaboration and friendly competition. In short, it provides an exciting and stimulating environment resulting in a synergistic effect that is good for science and good for the people of the world.

  11. Teaching Social Research Methods on an International, Collaborative Environment & Sustainability Degree Programme: Exploring plagiarism, group work, and formative feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Laycock, R

    2017-01-01

    International collaboration is central to the Sustainable Development agenda given environmental challenges that span national boundaries. Education for Sustainability therefore needs to account for international/intercultural understandings, such as though international collaborative degree programmes in Higher Education. This paper evaluates a module taught on an international collaborative Bachelor’s degree programme in Environment & Sustainability taught between Nanjing Xiaozhuang Univers...

  12. Experiences of Collaborative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahneman, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The author's personal history of the research that led to his recognition in economics is described, focusing on the process of collaboration and on the experience of controversy. The author's collaboration with Amos Tversky dealt with 3 major topics: judgment under uncertainty, decision making, and framing effects. A subsequent collaboration,…

  13. NanoJapan: international research experience for undergraduates program: fostering U.S.-Japan research collaborations in terahertz science and technology of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sarah R.; Matherly, Cheryl A.; Kono, Junichiro

    2014-09-01

    The international nature of science and engineering research demands that students have the skillsets necessary to collaborate internationally. However, limited options exist for science and engineering undergraduates who want to pursue research abroad. The NanoJapan International Research Experience for Undergraduates Program is an innovative response to this need. Developed to foster research and international engagement among young undergraduate students, it is funded by a National Science Foundation Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) grant. Each summer, NanoJapan sends 12 U.S. students to Japan to conduct research internships with world leaders in terahertz (THz) spectroscopy, nanophotonics, and ultrafast optics. The students participate in cutting-edge research projects managed within the framework of the U.S-Japan NSF-PIRE collaboration. One of our focus topics is THz science and technology of nanosystems (or `TeraNano'), which investigates the physics and applications of THz dynamics of carriers and phonons in nanostructures and nanomaterials. In this article, we will introduce the program model, with specific emphasis on designing high-quality international student research experiences. We will specifically address the program curriculum that introduces students to THz research, Japanese language, and intercultural communications, in preparation for work in their labs. Ultimately, the program aims to increase the number of U.S. students who choose to pursue graduate study in this field, while cultivating a generation of globally aware engineers and scientists who are prepared for international research collaboration.

  14. Ties That Bind International Research Teams: A Network Multilevel Model of Interdisciplinary Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollasch, Aurelia Wiktoria

    2012-01-01

    Today large research projects require substantial involvement of researchers from different organizations, disciplines, or cultures working in groups or teams to accomplish a common goal of producing, sharing, and disseminating scientific knowledge. This study focuses on the international research team that was launched in response to pressing…

  15. International collaborations through the internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olson, Gary M.; David, Paul A.; Eksteen, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The past decade has seen remarkable advances in the availability of tools to support scientific collaboration at a distance. This is especially good news for international collaborations, where in the past constraints on collocation and travel have made such collaborations a major challenge. The ...

  16. International Collaboration in Crop Improvement Research: Current Status and Future Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Traxler, Greg; Pingali, Prabhu L.

    1999-01-01

    Investments over the past 35 years have created a system of national and international research centers that has revolutionized the supply of improved cereal varieties to developing country farmers. The newly created scientific ability to exploit genetic resources has been the engine of productivity growth in much of world agriculture. But the success that has been attained in building research institutions has not touched all countries or farmers, nor can it be considered permanent. The fina...

  17. International collaboration in medical radiation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, Gary; Allen, Carla; Platt, Jane

    2016-06-01

    International collaboration is recognised for enhancing the ability to approach complex problems from a variety of perspectives, increasing development of a wider range of research skills and techniques and improving publication and acceptance rates. The aim of this paper is to describe the current status of international collaboration in medical radiation science and compare this to other allied health occupations. This study utilised a content analysis approach where co-authorship of a journal article was used as a proxy for research collaboration and the papers were assigned to countries based on the corporate address given in the by-line of the publication. A convenience sample method was employed and articles published in the professional medical radiation science journals in the countries represented within our research team - Australia, the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States of America (USA) were sampled. Physiotherapy, speech pathology, occupational therapy and nursing were chosen for comparison. Rates of international collaboration in medical radiation science journals from Australia, the UK and the USA have steadily increased over the 3-year period sampled. Medical radiation science demonstrated lower average rates of international collaboration than the other allied health occupations sampled. The average rate of international collaboration in nursing was far below that of the allied health occupations sampled. Overall, the UK had the highest average rate of international collaboration, followed by Australia and the USA, the lowest. Overall, medical radiation science is lagging in international collaboration in comparison to other allied health fields.

  18. Committee for international collaborative research of medical and welfare apparatus; Iryo fukushi kiki kokusai kyodo kenkyu jigyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The paper summarized activities for an investigational study on the international collaborative research project on the medical and welfare apparatus implemented in fiscal 1995. As investigation activities, the second meeting of information exchanges with E.U. and three north European countries was held following the meeting in fiscal 1994, and at the same time, information exchanges were made with organizations/institutions of industry/government/university in Germany, France and Canada. The study made it clear that Europe is also taking a direction of low-degree action diagnosis/care as Japan is. Further, concrete exchanges of information advanced and an awareness of the common issues was made clear such as the necessity of developing apparatus which meets the apparatus market and users` needs. As international collaborative activities, new methods of information exchanges were adopted such as the satellite meeting of the International MR Society, meetings with researchers who visited Japan. The satellite meeting of the International MR Society was favorably accepted by participants, and it was pointed out that it is important to continue the meeting in view of the materialization of themes, etc. 4 refs., 32 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Collaborations in fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, D.; Davis, S.; Roney, P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews current experimental collaborative efforts in the fusion community and extrapolates to operational scenarios for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Current requirements, available technologies and tools, and problems, issues and concerns are discussed. This paper specifically focuses on the issues that apply to experimental operational collaborations. Special requirements for other types of collaborations, such as theoretical or design and construction efforts, will not be addressed. Our current collaborative efforts have been highly successful, even though the tools in use will be viewed as primitive by tomorrow's standards. An overview of the tools and technologies in today's collaborations can be found in the first section of this paper. The next generation of fusion devices will not be primarily institutionally based, but will be national (TPX) and international (ITER) in funding, management, operation and in ownership of scientific results. The TPX will present the initial challenge of real-time remotely distributed experimental data analysis for a steady state device. The ITER will present new challenges with the possibility of several remote control rooms all participating in the real-time operation of the experimental device. A view to the future of remote collaborations is provided in the second section of this paper

  20. Humans on the International Space Station-How Research, Operations, and International Collaboration are Leading to New Understanding of Human Physiology and Performance in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronbinson, Julie A.; Harm, Deborah L.

    2009-01-01

    As the International Space Station (ISS) nears completion, and full international utilization is achieved, we are at a scientific crossroads. ISS is the premier location for research aimed at understanding the effects of microgravity on the human body. For applications to future human exploration, it is key for validation, quantification, and mitigation of a wide variety of spaceflight risks to health and human performance. Understanding and mitigating these risks is the focus of NASA s Human Research Program. However, NASA s approach to defining human research objectives is only one of many approaches within the ISS international partnership (including Roscosmos, the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency). Each of these agencies selects and implements their own ISS research, with independent but related objectives for human and life sciences research. Because the science itself is also international and collaborative, investigations that are led by one ISS partner also often include cooperative scientists from around the world. The operation of the ISS generates significant additional data that is not directly linked to specific investigations. Such data comes from medical monitoring of crew members, life support and radiation monitoring, and from the systems that have been implemented to protect the health of the crew (such as exercise hardware). We provide examples of these international synergies in human research on ISS and highlight key early accomplishments that derive from these broad interfaces. Taken as a whole, the combination of diverse research objectives, operational data, international sharing of research resources on ISS, and scientific collaboration provide a robust research approach and capability that no one partner could achieve alone.

  1. International scientific collaboration in nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelli, A.

    1998-01-01

    International collaboration is a vital component of every serious nonproliferation effort. Several examples of the experiences that the Argonne Arms Control and Nonproliferation Program has had in this area are given and, in the process, important components of the program come to light. Some of the main principles that the program has learned to follow while pursuing international collaboration projects are shared, as are the pitfalls that the program has learned to avoid. (author)

  2. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal ... disciplines (including medicine, pharmacy, nursing, biotechnology, cell and ... collaboration among scientists, the industry and the healthcare professionals.

  3. The EuroMyositis registry: an international collaborative tool to facilitate myositis research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilleker, James B; Vencovsky, Jiri; Wang, Guochun; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Schmidt, Jens; Oakley, Paula; Benveniste, Olivier; Danieli, Maria Giovanna; Danko, Katalin; Thuy, Nguyen Thi Phuong; Vazquez-Del Mercado, Monica; Andersson, Helena; De Paepe, Boel; deBleecker, Jan L; Maurer, Britta; McCann, Liza J; Pipitone, Nicolo; McHugh, Neil; Betteridge, Zoe E; New, Paul; Cooper, Robert G; Ollier, William E; Lamb, Janine A; Krogh, Niels Steen; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Chinoy, Hector

    2018-01-01

    The EuroMyositis Registry facilitates collaboration across the idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) research community. This inaugural report examines pooled Registry data. Cross-sectional analysis of IIM cases from 11 countries was performed. Associations between clinical subtypes, extramuscular involvement, environmental exposures and medications were investigated. Of 3067 IIM cases, 69% were female. The most common IIM subtype was dermatomyositis (DM) (31%). Smoking was more frequent in connective tissue disease overlap cases (45%, OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.90, p=0.012). Smoking was associated with interstitial lung disease (ILD) (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.65, p=0.013), dysphagia (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.77, p=0.001), malignancy ever (OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.36 to 2.33, p<0.001) and cardiac involvement (OR 2.40, 95% CI 1.60 to 3.60, p<0.001).Dysphagia occurred in 39% and cardiac involvement in 9%; either occurrence was associated with higher Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) scores (adjusted OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.43 to 2.23, p<0.001). HAQ scores were also higher in inclusion body myositis cases (adjusted OR 3.85, 95% CI 2.52 to 5.90, p<0.001). Malignancy (ever) occurred in 13%, most commonly in DM (20%, OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.65 to 2.57, p<0.001).ILD occurred in 30%, most frequently in antisynthetase syndrome (71%, OR 10.7, 95% CI 8.6 to 13.4, p<0.001). Rash characteristics differed between adult-onset and juvenile-onset DM cases ('V' sign: 56% DM vs 16% juvenile-DM, OR 0.16, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.36, p<0.001). Glucocorticoids were used in 98% of cases, methotrexate in 71% and azathioprine in 51%. This large multicentre cohort demonstrates the importance of extramuscular involvement in patients with IIM, its association with smoking and its influence on disease severity. Our findings emphasise that IIM is a multisystem inflammatory disease and will help inform prognosis and clinical management of patients. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated

  4. Ethical challenges for international collaborative research partnerships in the context of the Zika outbreak in the Dominican Republic: a qualitative case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canario Guzmán, Julio Arturo; Espinal, Roberto; Báez, Jeannette; Melgen, Ricardo Elias; Rosario, Patricia Antonia Pérez; Mendoza, Eddys Rafael

    2017-09-25

    The establishment of international collaborative research partnerships in times of infectious disease outbreaks of international importance has been considered an ethical imperative. Frail health research systems in low- and middle-income countries can be an obstacle to achieve the goal of knowledge generation and the search for health equity before, during and after infectious disease outbreaks. A qualitative case study was conducted to identify the challenges and opportunities facing the Dominican Republic with regards to developing international collaborative research partnerships in the context of the Zika outbreak and its ethical implications. Researchers conducted 34 interviews (n = 30 individual; n = 4 group) with 39 participants (n = 23 males; n = 16 females) representing the government, universities, international donor agencies, non-governmental organisations, community-based organisations and medical societies, in two metropolitan cities. Five international collaborative research projects related to the Zika virus were identified. Major ethical challenges were linked to the governance of health research, training of human resources, the institutionalisation of scientific activity, access to research funds and cultural aspects. Capacity-building was not necessarily a component of some partnership agreements. With few exceptions, local researchers were merely participating in data collection and less on defining the problem. Opportunities for collaborative work included the possibility of participation in international research consortiums through calls for proposals. The Dominican government and research stakeholders can contribute to the international response to the Zika virus through active participation in international collaborative research partnerships; however, public recognition of the need to embrace health research as part of public policy efforts is warranted. A working group led by the government and formed by national and

  5. The ecology of the Chernobyl catastrophe. Scientific outlines of an international programme of collaborative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savchenko, V.K.

    1995-01-01

    The Chernobyl disaster was the largest civil nuclear catastrophe of all time. When reactor number 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded on 26 April 1986, it permanently changed the lives of more than 4 million people living in Belarus, Ukraine and Russia, shaking the fabric of an area almost the size of England, and triggering a whole swathe of environmental, economic, social, medical and political repercussions. At first the Soviet Union tackled the aftermath alone but, by 1990, with the process of change associated with perestroika, the three affected states of Belarus, Ukraine and the Federation of Russia appealed to the international community for solidarity and help. In co-operation with other agencies of the United Nations system, the UNESCO Chernobyl Programme was launched , with the formal signing of an agreement in January 1991 between the three republics and UNESCO. Since then, some twenty projects have been carried out in UNESCO's various fields of competence - education, science, culture and communication. The volume reviews eight years of study on the impact of Chernobyl on natural ecosystems, agro-ecosystems, human ecology, biological diversity, and genetic and socio-economic systems. It comprises eight chapters. The first three chapters discuss the effects of the high levels of radionuclides released from the Chernobyl reactor on the environment, on natural ecosystems and on agro-ecosystems. The fourth chapter, on human ecology, covers both the human effects at the time of the disaster and those still continuing today. Chapters five and six describe the impact of radionuclide release on biological diversity and genetic systems respectively. The socioeconomic effects of the catastrophe are discussed in chapter seven. Each of these seven chapters ends with scientific hypotheses and research recommendations, with a final chapter providing a detailed description of the setting up and aims of the multinational and multidimensional Chernobyl

  6. Role of Scientific Societies in International Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.

    2007-12-01

    Geophysical research increasingly requires global multidisciplinary approaches. Understanding how deeply interrelated are Earth components and processes, population growth, increased needs of mineral and energy resources, global impact of human activities, and view of our planet as an interconnected system emphasizes the need of international cooperation. International research collaboration has an immense potential and is needed for further development of Earth science research and education. The Union Session is planned to provide a forum for analysis and discussion of the status of research and education of geosciences in developing countries, international collaboration programs and new initiatives for promoting and strengthening scientific cooperation. A theme of particular relevance in the analyses and discussions is the role of scientific societies in international collaboration. Societies organize meetings, publish journals and books and promote cooperation through academic exchange activities. They may further assist communities in developing countries in providing and facilitating access to scientific literature, attendance to international meetings, short and long-term stays and student and young researcher mobility. What else can be done? This is a complex subject and scientific societies may not be seen independently from the many factors involved in research and education. Developing countries present additional challenges resulting from limited economic resources and social and political problems, while urgently requiring improved educational and research programs. Needed are in-depth analyses of infrastructure and human resources, and identification of major problems and needs. What are the major limitations and needs in research and postgraduate education in developing countries? What and how should international collaboration do? What are the roles of individuals, academic institutions, funding agencies, scientific societies? Here we attempt to

  7. Influence of institute governance on international research collaboration: towards a typological theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulnicane-Ozolina, Inga

    2013-01-01

    While for centuries scientific activities have spanned national borders, research has been organised largely nationally and locally with diverse missions, reward systems, hierarchies and funding structures. Diversity of research governance facilitating development of a wide variety of competences

  8. The guideline implementability research and application network (GIRAnet: an international collaborative to support knowledge exchange: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagliardi Anna R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modifying the format and content of guidelines may facilitate their use and lead to improved quality of care. We reviewed the medical literature to identify features desired by different users and associated with guideline use to develop a framework of implementability and found that most guidelines do not contain these elements. Further research is needed to develop and evaluate implementability tools. Methods We are launching the Guideline Implementability Research and Application Network (GIRAnet to enable the development and testing of implementability tools in three domains: Resource Implications, Implementation, and Evaluation. Partners include the Guidelines International Network (G-I-N and its member guideline developers, implementers, and researchers. In phase one, international guidelines will be examined to identify and describe exemplar tools. Indication-specific and generic tools will populate a searchable repository. In phase two, qualitative analysis of cognitive interviews will be used to understand how developers can best integrate implementability tools in guidelines and how health professionals use them for interpreting and applying guidelines. In phase three, a small-scale pilot test will assess the impact of implementability tools based on quantitative analysis of chart-based behavioural outcomes and qualitative analysis of interviews with participants. The findings will be used to plan a more comprehensive future evaluation of implementability tools. Discussion Infrastructure funding to establish GIRAnet will be leveraged with the in-kind contributions of collaborating national and international guideline developers to advance our knowledge of implementation practice and science. Needs assessment and evaluation of GIRAnet will provide a greater understanding of how to develop and sustain such knowledge-exchange networks. Ultimately, by facilitating use of guidelines, this research may lead to improved

  9. The Rise of Global Science and the Emerging Political Economy of International Research Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    This article charts the rise of global science and a global science infrastructure as part of the emerging international knowledge system exemplifying a geography of knowledge and the importance of new info-communications networks. The article theorises the rise of global science, which still strongly reflects a Western bias and is highly…

  10. Facilitate, Collaborate, Educate: the Role of the IRIS Consortium in Supporting National and International Research in Seismology (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, D. W.; Beck, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    Over the twenty-five years since its founding in 1984, the IRIS Consortium has contributed in fundamental ways to change the practice and culture of research in seismology in the US and worldwide. From an original founding group of twenty-two U.S. academic institutions, IRIS membership has now grown to 114 U.S. Member Institutions, 20 Educational Affiliates and 103 Foreign Affiliates. With strong support from the National Science Foundation, additional resources provided by other federal agencies, close collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and many international partners, the technical resources of the core IRIS programs - the Global Seismographic Network (GSN), the Program for Array Seismic Studies of the Continental Lithosphere (PASSCAL), the Data Management System (DMS) and Education and Outreach - have grown to become a major national and international source of experimental data for research on earthquakes and Earth structure, and a resource to support education and outreach to the public. While the primary operational focus of the Consortium is to develop and maintain facilities for the collection of seismological data for basic research, IRIS has become much more than an instrument facility. It has become a stimulus for collaboration between academic seismological programs and a focus for their interactions with national and international partners. It has helped establish the academic community as a significant contributor to the collection of data and an active participant in global research and monitoring. As a consortium of virtually all of the Earth science research institutions in the US, IRIS has helped coordinate the academic community in the development of new initiatives, such as EarthScope, to strengthen the support for science and argue for the relevance of seismology and its use in hazard mitigation. The early IRIS pioneers had the foresight to carefully define program goals and technical standards for the IRIS facilities that have stood

  11. 15th March 2011 - Singapore National Research Foundation Permanent Secretary(National Research and Development)T. M. Kian signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and visiting CMS control centre with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    15th March 2011 - Singapore National Research Foundation Permanent Secretary(National Research and Development)T. M. Kian signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and visiting CMS control centre with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

  12. Learning Together Through International Collaborative Writing Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mick Healey

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The International Collaborative Writing Groups (ICWG initiative creates a space for ongoing collaboration amongst scholars of teaching and learning who co-author a manuscript on a topic of shared interest. The second ICWG, linked to the 2015 International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Conference in Melbourne, Australia, involved 59 scholars from 11 countries. In this piece, we describe the aims, process, and outcomes for the ICWG, comparing it with the first ICWG in 2012. While international collaboration around a topic of shared interest is generally viewed positively, the realities of collaborating online with limited face-to-face interactions to complete a manuscript can be challenging. We argue, despite such challenges, that ongoing collaboration amongst scholars is vital to the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL movement. Drawing on our experience of leading the overall ICWG initiative and our research into participants’ experiences, we suggest there are individual dispositions toward collaboration that enrich and enable successful participation in ICWG experiences. We end by highlighting the final products arising from almost two year of collaborative thinking and writing from six groups.

  13. The Haiti research-based model of international public health collaboration: the GHESKIO Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, Jean W; Severe, Patrice D; Fitzgerald, Daniel W; Deschamps, Marie M; Joseph, Patrice; Riviere, Cynthia; Rouzier, Vanessa; Johnson, Warren D

    2014-01-01

    For 3 decades, GHESKIO (the Groupe Haitien d'Etude du Sarcome de Kaposi et des Infections Opportunistes), the Haitian Ministry of Health, and Weill Cornell have pursued a tripartite mission of service, training, and translational research. The initial focus was on AIDS and tuberculosis. The mission has expanded to include the local community and now provides maternal-child health, family planning, cancer prevention and treatment, immunizations (including human papillomavirus, cholera), and primary education through vocational and microcredit programs. Outcome measures include a reduction in HIV prevalence from 6.2% to the current 2.2%, extensive tuberculosis and cholera prevention and treatment programs, and national training programs for biomedical and community health workers.

  14. Silence in Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verouden, Nick W.; Sanden, van der Maarten C.A.; Aarts, Noelle

    2016-01-01

    Solving publicly important issues asks for the development of socio-technical approaches, which demands collaboration between researchers with different perspectives, values, and interests. In these complex interdisciplinary collaborations, the course of communication is of utmost importance,

  15. International energy technology collaboration: benefits and achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The IEA Energy Technology Collaboration Programme facilitates international collaboration on energy technology research, development and deployment. More than 30 countries are involved in Europe, America, Asia, Australasia and Africa. The aim is to accelerate the development and deployment of new energy technologies to meet energy security, environmental and economic development goals. Costs and resources are shared among participating governments, utilities, corporations and universities. By co-operating, they avoid unproductive duplication and maximize the benefits from research budgets. The IEA Programme results every year in hundreds of publications which disseminate information about the latest energy technology developments and their commercial utilisation. The IEA Energy Technology Collaboration Programme operates through a series of agreements among governments. This report details the activities and achievements of all 41 agreements, covering energy technology information centres and Research and Development projects in fossil fuels, renewable energy efficient end-use, and nuclear fusion technologies. (authors). 58 refs., 9 tabs

  16. 17 September 2013 - Estonian Minister of Education and Research J. Aaviksoo signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R- Heuer; visiting the TOTEM facility with TOTEM Collaboration Spokesperson S. Giani; in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with International Relations Adviser T. Kurtyka and visiting the CMS cavern with CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela. International Relations Adviser R. Voss present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    17 September 2013 - Estonian Minister of Education and Research J. Aaviksoo signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R- Heuer; visiting the TOTEM facility with TOTEM Collaboration Spokesperson S. Giani; in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with International Relations Adviser T. Kurtyka and visiting the CMS cavern with CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela. International Relations Adviser R. Voss present.

  17. Information handling in collaborative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Collins

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available UK public policy makers have a growing interest in collaborative research, where academics work with public, private or third sector partners on a joint project which supports the partner’s aims. This paper reports on the findings of five case studies, looking at how information is sourced, managed, used and shared within collaborative research projects. It finds that researchers within collaborative projects have similar information management issues as are known to exist within academia more broadly, but that the specific conditions which govern research collaborations mean that interventions to improve or support information management must be carefully tailored.

  18. Establishment of the foundation for international collaborating research with US NASA FTCSC to develop space, military and special purpose food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Chul Hun; Byun, Myung Woo; Lee, Ju Wun; Kim, Dong Ho; Kim, Kyung Pho; Kim, Jang Ho; Kwon, Jung Ho

    2005-08-01

    In the space era of 21st century, the advancement of aerospace field is essential for ensuring the national security and raising the national status. Internationally spacefood and space life support system is considered as an limitedly developed technology area. Establishment of the foundation for collaborating study with NASA FTCSC to develop space, military, and special food. Acquirement of the basis of the technology development for safe, long-term preservation of military and special purpose food to ensure national security as well as health and welfare

  19. International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkholzer, Jens

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the current status of international collaboration regarding geologic disposal research in the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign. Since 2012, in an effort coordinated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, UFD has advanced active collaboration with several international geologic disposal programs in Europe and Asia. Such collaboration allows the UFD Campaign to benefit from a deep knowledge base with regards to alternative repository environments developed over decades, and to utilize international investments in research facilities (such as underground research laboratories), saving millions of R&D dollars that have been and are being provided by other countries. To date, UFD's International Disposal R&D Program has established formal collaboration agreements with five international initiatives and several international partners, and national lab scientists associated with UFD have conducted specific collaborative R&D activities that align well with its R&D priorities.

  20. International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report describes the current status of international collaboration regarding geologic disposal research in the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign. Since 2012, in an effort coordinated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, UFD has advanced active collaboration with several international geologic disposal programs in Europe and Asia. Such collaboration allows the UFD Campaign to benefit from a deep knowledge base with regards to alternative repository environments developed over decades, and to utilize international investments in research facilities (such as underground research laboratories), saving millions of R&D dollars that have been and are being provided by other countries. To date, UFD’s International Disposal R&D Program has established formal collaboration agreements with five international initiatives and several international partners, and national lab scientists associated with UFD have conducted specific collaborative R&D activities that align well with its R&D priorities.

  1. ACC International Academic Collaborative receives special award

    OpenAIRE

    Felker, Susan B.

    2006-01-01

    The Atlantic Coast Conference's new International Academic Collaborative (ACC/IAC) has been singled out by the New York-based Institute of International Education (IIE) for a special award for innovation in international education.

  2. Trends in the inter-regional and international research collaboration of the PRC’s regions: 2000-2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luwel, M.; Van Wijk, E.; Van der Wurff, L.J.; Wang, L.

    2016-07-01

    The regional structure of the PRC’s scientific output is analyzed using publications processed for the Web of Science. Over the period 2000-2015 and measured by the Salton Index of the co-publications the scientific collaboration among the PRC’s regions increased only slightly, in stark contrast with the USA’ states and during the most recent years the EU member countries. Only for research with other nations, representing about 30% of the total publication output, inter-regional collaboration is on the rise. For the leading PRC’s regions the USA is the dominant partner co-authoring about 50% of their publications. Germany and especially Japan seems to lose attractiveness to the advantage of the UK, Australia and neighboring Asian countries. (Author)

  3. Research award: Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... The Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia (CARIAA) builds resilience in these hot spots by supporting collaborative research on climate change adaptation to inform adaptation policy and practice. Specifically, CARIAA supports four consortia that research geographic and social ...

  4. Ocean Drilling: Forty Years of International Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Deborah K.; Exon, Neville; Barriga, Fernando J. A. S.; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    2010-10-01

    International cooperation is an essential component of modern scientific research and societal advancement [see Ismail-Zadeh and Beer, 2009], and scientific ocean drilling represents one of Earth science's longest-running and most successful international collaborations. The strength of this collaboration and its continued success result from the realization that scientific ocean drilling provides a unique and powerful tool to study the critical processes of both short-term change and the long-term evolution of Earth systems. A record of Earth's changing tectonics, climate, ocean circulation, and biota is preserved in marine sedimentary deposits and the underlying basement rocks. And because the ocean floor is the natural site for accumulation and preservation of geological materials, it may preserve a continuous record of these processes.

  5. Mapping the Collaborative Research Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, Julie Reed; Scholz, Carrie; Garcia, Alicia N.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant federal investments in the production of high-quality education research, the direct use of that research in policy and practice is not evident. Some education researchers are increasingly employing collaborative research models that use structures and processes to integrate practitioners into the research process in an effort…

  6. Reflections on collaboration in consumer research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Elin Brandi; The VOICE Group, with

    2008-01-01

    tacit in the marketing literature, namely the impact of the relationships between researchers. The paper draws on accounts of other research collaborations as well as authors' experiences, and discusses how interpersonal and cross-cultural dynamics influence the work of interpretive research teams.......Abstract: Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges and opportunities of collaboration in interpretive consumer research. Design/methodology/approach - The paper reviews literature on research teamwork, particularly on qualitative and international projects. It also provides...... an account of research collaboration on an interpretive research project across four countries, involving eight researchers. Findings - Despite the cult of individualism in academic life, most articles in leading marketing journals are now written by multi-author teams. The process and implications...

  7. Education and Strategic Research Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory National Security Education Center Image Search Site submit LaboratoryNational Security Education Center Menu Program Offices Energy Security Council New Mexico Consortium Geophysics, Planetary Physics, Signatures Events Collaborations for education and strategic research, student

  8. Benefits of International Collaboration on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasbrook, Pete; Robinson, Julie A.; Brown Tate, Judy; Thumm, Tracy; Cohen, Luchino; Marcil, Isabelle; De Parolis, Lina; Hatton, Jason; Umezawa, Kazuo; Shirakawa, Masaki; hide

    2017-01-01

    The International Space Station is a valuable platform for research in space, but the benefits are limited if research is only conducted by individual countries. Through the efforts of the ISS Program Science Forum, international science working groups, and interagency cooperation, international collaboration on the ISS has expanded as ISS utilization has matured. Members of science teams benefit from working with counterparts in other countries. Scientists and institutions bring years of experience and specialized expertise to collaborative investigations, leading to new perspectives and approaches to scientific challenges. Combining new ideas and historical results brings synergy and improved peer-reviewed scientific methods and results. World-class research facilities can be expensive and logistically complicated, jeopardizing their full utilization. Experiments that would be prohibitively expensive for a single country can be achieved through contributions of resources from two or more countries, such as crew time, up- and downmass, and experiment hardware. Cooperation also avoids duplication of experiments and hardware among agencies. Biomedical experiments can be completed earlier if astronauts or cosmonauts from multiple agencies participate. Countries responding to natural disasters benefit from ISS imagery assets, even if the country has no space agency of its own. Students around the world participate in ISS educational opportunities, and work with students in other countries, through open curriculum packages and through international competitions. Even experiments conducted by a single country can benefit scientists around the world, through specimen sharing programs and publicly accessible "open data" repositories. For ISS data, these repositories include GeneLab and the Physical Science Informatics System. Scientists can conduct new research using ISS data without having to launch and execute their own experiments. Multilateral collections of research

  9. Mapping the research on scientific collaboration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Jianhua; CHEN Chaomei; YAN Jianxin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to identify the trends and hot topics in the study of scientific collaboration via scientometric analysis.Information visualization and knowledge domain visualization techniques were adopted to determine how the study of scientific collaboration has evolved.A total of 1,455 articles on scientific cooperation published between 1993 and 2007 were retrieved from the SCI,SSCI and A&HCI databases with a topic search of scientific collaboration or scientific cooperation for the analysis.By using CiteSpace,the knowledge bases,research foci,and research fronts in the field of scientific collaboration were studied.The results indicated that research fronts and research foci are highly consistent in terms of the concept,origin,measurement,and theory of scientific collaboration.It also revealed that research fronts included scientific collaboration networks,international scientific collaboration,social network analysis and techniques,and applications of bibliometrical indicators,webmetrics,and health care related areas.

  10. The use of technology in international collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livonen, Mirja; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2000-01-01

    International collaboration is emerging as an essential function for organizations, playing an important role in organizational strategy, performance and knowledge management. Two case studies of international collaboration are discussed in this paper. Participants' perceptions and use...... of technology to collaborate are examined from the perspective of sense of presence, participation, task type, productivity and ease of use. The data suggest that technology compatibility with cultural and work style preferences and technology infrastructure is more important than media richness, in contrast...

  11. (International Collaboration on Advanced Neutron Sources)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayter, J.B.

    1990-11-08

    The International Collaboration on Advanced Neutron Sources was started about a decade ago with the purpose of sharing information throughout the global neutron community. The collaboration has been extremely successful in optimizing the use of resources, and the discussions are open and detailed, with reasons for failure shared as well as reasons for success. Although the meetings have become increasingly oriented toward pulsed neutron sources, many of the neutron instrumentation techniques, such as the development of better monochromators, fast response detectors and various data analysis methods, are highly relevant to the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). I presented one paper on the ANS, and another on the neutron optical polarizer design work which won a 1989 R D-100 Award. I also gained some valuable design ideas, in particular for the ANS hot source, in discussions with individual researchers from Canada, Western Europe, and Japan.

  12. Researching collaboratively: implications for qualitative research and researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Julianne

    2008-11-01

    Often discussions about collaborative research, and collaboration generally, begin at the point of how to collaborate, who to collaborate with, and what to collaborate about. Rarely do they include equally important questions of why we are having discussions about collaboration, where such an impetus and emphasis is coming from, and how it connects to the contemporary political research context. In a recent editorial in Qualitative Health Research, Janice Morse highlighted the need for reflection about collaboration. This article responds to that call, providing reflections on collaboration, the imperative to collaborate, and what this all might mean for both qualitative research and qualitative researchers. I hope to stimulate new points of departure for thinking and action shaping collaborative research endeavors without-and just as crucially, within-qualitative research.

  13. Collaborative research with children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousholt, Dorte

    2016-01-01

    The chapter addresses the methodological challenge of how to develop knowledge about the often unattended processes of persons conducting their everyday life in a complex and contradictory world. Examples from research processes that follow children’s lives and transitions across their different...

  14. Handbook of Collaborative Management Research

    CERN Document Server

    Shani, A B Rami B; Pasmore, William A A; Stymne, Dr Bengt; Adler, Niclas

    2007-01-01

    This handbook provides the latest thinking, methodologies and cases in the rapidly growing area of collaborative management research. What makes collaborative management research different is its emphasis on creating a close partnership between scholars and practitioners in the search for knowledge concerning organizations and complex systems. In the ideal situation, scholars and their managerial partners would work together to define the research focus, develop the methods to be used for data collection, participate equally in the analysis of data, and work together in the application and dis

  15. ICTP: A Successful Model of International Scientific Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The importance of international scientific collaboration in the changing world where the centre of gravity of fundamental research may be moving towards the east and the south is addressed. The unique role of ICTP in supporting global science is highlighted.

  16. Global scientific collaboration in COPD research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su YB

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Yanbing Su,1 Chao Long,2 Qi Yu,1 Juan Zhang,1 Daisy Wu,3 Zhiguang Duan1 1School of Management, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Medicine, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, 3Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the multiple collaboration types, quantitatively evaluate the publication trends and review the performance of institutions or countries (regions across the world in COPD research.Materials and methods: Scientometric methods and social network analysis were used to survey the development of publication trends and understand current collaboration in the field of COPD research based on the Web of Science publications during the past 18 years.Results: The number of publications developed through different collaboration types has increased. Growth trends indicate that the percentage of papers authored through multinational and domestic multi-institutional collaboration (DMIC have also increased. However, the percentage of intra-institutional collaboration and single-authored (SA studies has reduced. The papers that produced the highest academic impact result from international collaboration. The second highest academic impact papers are produced by DMIC. Out of the three, the papers that are produced by SA studies have the least amount of impact upon the scientific community. A handful of internationally renowned institutions not only take the leading role in the development of the research within their country (region but also play a crucial role in international research collaboration in COPD. Both the amount of papers produced and the amount of cooperation that occurs in each study are disproportionally distributed between high-income countries (regions and low-income countries (regions. Growing attention has been generated toward research on COPD from more and more different

  17. International Collaboration on CO2 Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter H. Israelsson; E. Eric Adams

    2007-06-30

    On December 4, 1997, the US Department of Energy (USDOE), the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan (NEDO), and the Norwegian Research Council (NRC) entered into a Project Agreement for International Collaboration on CO{sub 2} Ocean Sequestration. Government organizations from Japan, Canada, and Australia, and a Swiss/Swedish engineering firm later joined the agreement, which outlined a research strategy for ocean carbon sequestration via direct injection. The members agreed to an initial field experiment, with the hope that if the initial experiment was successful, there would be subsequent field evaluations of increasingly larger scale to evaluate environmental impacts of sequestration and the potential for commercialization. The evolution of the collaborative effort, the supporting research, and results for the International Collaboration on CO{sub 2} Ocean Sequestration were documented in almost 100 papers and reports, including 18 peer-reviewed journal articles, 46 papers, 28 reports, and 4 graduate theses. These efforts were summarized in our project report issued January 2005 and covering the period August 23, 1998-October 23, 2004. An accompanying CD contained electronic copies of all the papers and reports. This report focuses on results of a two-year sub-task to update an environmental assessment of acute marine impacts resulting from direct ocean sequestration. The approach is based on the work of Auerbach et al. [6] and Caulfield et al. [20] to assess mortality to zooplankton, but uses updated information concerning bioassays, an updated modeling approach and three modified injection scenarios: a point release of negatively buoyant solid CO{sub 2} hydrate particles from a moving ship; a long, bottom-mounted diffuser discharging buoyant liquid CO{sub 2} droplets; and a stationary point release of hydrate particles forming a sinking plume. Results suggest that in particular the first two discharge modes could be

  18. Present status of research activities at the national institute for fusion science and its role in international collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, J.

    1997-01-01

    In the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Japan, a helical magnetic confinement system named Large Helical Device (LHD) is under construction with objective of comprehensive studies of high temperature plasmas in a helical system and investigation of a helical reactor as an alternative approach. Superconducting coils of l = 2, m = 10, major radius R = 3.9 m, produce a steady state helical magnetic field for confinement, together with poloidal coils on LHD. The magnetic field strength on the axis is 3.0 T in the phase I and 4.0 T in the phase II experiment. The plasma major radius in LHD is 3.75 m, and averaged plasma radius is 0.6 m. The plasma will be produced and heated with ECH, and further heated with NBI and ICRF. It is also planned to produced a steady state plasma in LHD. It is expected to have the first plasma in 1998. Small devices such as CHS and others are under operation in the NIFS for supporting the LHD project. The Data and Planning Center of NIFS is collecting, compiling and evaluating atomic and molecular data which are necessary for nuclear fusion research. The talk will include the present status of the construction of LHD, research activities on the development of heating and diagnostic devices for LHD, and experimental results obtained on CHS, JIPP T-IIU and other devices. The role of NIFS on promoting IAEA activities to bridge large scale institutions and small and medium scale laboratories for world-wide collaborations in the field of plasma physics and fusion research will also be introduced, together with an idea of organizing a regional center in Asia. (author)

  19. 28 October 2013- Former US Vice President A. Gore signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry, Head of International Relations R. Voss, Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    28 October 2013- Former US Vice President A. Gore signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry, Head of International Relations R. Voss, Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela.

  20. 18 September 2012 - PD Dr. med. Andreas Trojan Researcher, University of Zürich and Mr Marc Forster Independant Swiss Movie Director Switzerland visiting the CMS underground area with Head of international Relations F. Pauss and CMS Collaboration Z. Szillasi.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    18 September 2012 - PD Dr. med. Andreas Trojan Researcher, University of Zürich and Mr Marc Forster Independant Swiss Movie Director Switzerland visiting the CMS underground area with Head of international Relations F. Pauss and CMS Collaboration Z. Szillasi.

  1. Information Life-Cycle Management at the Erasmus Medical Center : Collaboratively Managing Digital Data for Care, Research, Education and the International Development of the GLOBE 3D Genome Viewer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); P. Walgemoed; H.J.F.M.M. Eussen (Bert)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractInformation Lifecycle Management at the Erasmus University Medical Centre. Collaboratively managing digital data for care, research and education using the international development of the GLOBE 3D Genome Viewer and Erasmus Computing Grid as catalyzing initiatives. The

  2. Recommending Research Profiles for Multidisciplinary Academic Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Sidath Deepal

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates how data on multidisciplinary collaborative experiences can be used to solve a novel problem: recommending research profiles of potential collaborators to academic researchers seeking to engage in multidisciplinary research collaboration. As the current domain theories of multidisciplinary collaboration are insufficient…

  3. Integrating Diverse Data Systems for International Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Peter

    2014-05-01

    International collaborations, especially ones that arise with little or no financial resources, still face challenges in opening up data collections via a wide variety of differing and often non-interoperable means. In turn, this hampers the collaborative process, slows or even prevents scientific exchange. Early efforts that proposed a centralized, and project specific data archive encountered many difficulties, ranging from little or no adoption, to the inability to provide required documentation and metadata to make the datasets findable or usable. In time, virtualized approaches appeared to gain traction, for e.g. virtual observatories. In this contribution, we report on several international collaboration case studies with distributed data systems; their needs, successes, challenges and failures and synthesize a set of suggested practices to inform future international collaboration efforts.

  4. A Research Program on Implementing Integrated Care for Older Adults with Complex Health Needs (iCOACH: An International Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter P. Wodchis

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Health and social care systems across western developed nations are being challenged to meet the needs of an increasing number of people aging with multiple complex health and social needs. Community based primary health care (CBPHC has been associated with more equitable access to services, better population level outcomes and lower system level costs. Itmay be well suited to the increasingly complex needs of populations; however the implementation of CBPHC models of care faces many challenges. This paper describes a program of research by an international, multi-university, multidisciplinary research team who are seeking to understand how to scale up and spread models of Integrated CBPHC (ICBPHC. The key question being addressed is “What are the steps to implementing innovative integrated community-based primary health care models that address the health and social needs of older adults with complex care needs?” and will be answered in three phases. In the first phase we identify and describe exemplar models of ICBPHC and their context in relation to relevant policies and performance across the three jurisdictions (New Zealand, Ontario and Québec, Canada. The second phase involves a series of theory-informed, mixed methods case studies from which we shall develop a conceptual framework that captures not only the attributes of successful innovative ICBPHC models, but also how these models are being implemented. In the third phase, we aim to translate our research into practice by identifying emerging models of ICBPHC in advance, and working alongside policymakers to inform the development and implementation of these models in each jurisdiction. The final output of the program will be a comprehensive guide to the design, implementation and scaling-up of innovative models of ICBPHC.

  5. Collaborating and sharing data in epilepsy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Joost B; Worrell, Gregory A; Ives, Zachary; Dümpelmann, Matthias; Matthias, Dümpelmann; Litt, Brian; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    Technological advances are dramatically advancing translational research in Epilepsy. Neurophysiology, imaging, and metadata are now recorded digitally in most centers, enabling quantitative analysis. Basic and translational research opportunities to use these data are exploding, but academic and funding cultures prevent this potential from being realized. Research on epileptogenic networks, antiepileptic devices, and biomarkers could progress rapidly if collaborative efforts to digest this "big neuro data" could be organized. Higher temporal and spatial resolution data are driving the need for novel multidimensional visualization and analysis tools. Crowd-sourced science, the same that drives innovation in computer science, could easily be mobilized for these tasks, were it not for competition for funding, attribution, and lack of standard data formats and platforms. As these efforts mature, there is a great opportunity to advance Epilepsy research through data sharing and increase collaboration between the international research community.

  6. ELENA’s International Collaboration is born

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    On 13 June, ten institutes signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for the construction of the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA). Allowing the further deceleration of antiprotons from the Antimatter Decelerator, ELENA will significantly increase the number of particles trapped downstream in the experimental set-ups. This will give an important boost to antimatter research in the years to come.   Electrostatic triplet lenses - a device that will transport antiprotons from ELENA to the experiments. The electrostatic device was successfully tested with the ASACUSA experiment two weeks ago. ELENA - an upgrade of the existing Antiproton Decelerator (AD) - was approved by the CERN Council last year under the condition that external user institutions would contribute to its construction. On 13 June, the foundation stone of the new international collaboration was laid with the signature of the MoU. ELENA is a small magnetic decelerator ring 30 m in circumference that will fit inside the ...

  7. Establishment of research and development priorities regarding the geologic disposal of nuclear waste in the United States and strategies for international collaboration - 59168

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutt, Mark; Peters, Mark; Voegele, Michael; Birkholzer, Jens; Swift, Peter; McMahon, Kevin; Williams, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies (OFCT) has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct research and development (R and D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high level radioactive waste (HLW). The U.S. has, in accordance with the U.S. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (as amended), focused efforts for the past twenty plus years on disposing of UNF and HLW in a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The recent decision by the U.S. DOE to no longer pursue the development of that repository has necessitated investigating alternative concepts for the disposal of UNF and HLW that exists today and that could be generated under future fuel cycles. The disposal of UNF and HLW in a range of geologic media has been investigated internationally. Considerable progress has been made by in the U.S and other nations, but gaps in knowledge still exist. The U.S. national laboratories have participated in these programs and have conducted R and D related to these issues to a limited extent. However, a comprehensive R and D program investigating a variety of storage, geologic media, and disposal concepts has not been a part of the U.S. waste management program since the mid 1980's because of its focus on the Yucca Mountain site. Such a comprehensive R and D program is being developed and executed in the UFDC using a systematic approach to identify potential R and D opportunities. This paper describes the process used by the UFDC to identify and prioritize R and D opportunities. The U.S. DOE has cooperated and collaborated with other countries in many different 'arenas' including the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and through bilateral agreements with other countries. These international activities benefited the DOE through the

  8. Lewis' Educational and Research Collaborative Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyward, Ann; Gott, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    The Lewis Educational and Research Collaborative Internship Program (LERCIP) is a collaborative undertaking by the Office of Educational Programs at NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field (formerly NASA Lewis Research Center) and the Ohio Aerospace Institute. This program provides 10-week internships in addition to summer and winter extensions if funding is available and/or is requested by mentor (no less than 1 week no more than 4 weeks) for undergraduate/graduate students and secondary school teachers. Students who meet the travel reimbursement criteria receive up to $500 for travel expenses. Approximately 178 interns are selected to participate in this program each year and begin arriving the fourth week in May. The internships provide students with introductory professional experiences to complement their academic programs. The interns are given assignments on research and development projects under the personal guidance of NASA professional staff members. Each intern is assigned a NASA mentor who facilitates a research assignment. In addition to the research assignment, the summer program includes a strong educational component that enhances the professional stature of the participants. The educational activities include a research symposium and a variety of workshops, and lectures. An important aspect of the program is that it includes students with diverse social, cultural and economic backgrounds. The purpose of this report is to document the program accomplishments for 2004.

  9. Women in global science advancing academic careers through international collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Zippel, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Scientific and engineering research is increasingly global, and international collaboration can be essential to academic success. Yet even as administrators and policymakers extol the benefits of global science, few recognize the diversity of international research collaborations and their participants, or take gendered inequalities into account. Women in Global Science is the first book to consider systematically the challenges and opportunities that the globalization of scientific work brings to U.S. academics, especially for women faculty. Kathrin Zippel looks to the STEM fields as a case study, where gendered cultures and structures in academia have contributed to an underrepresentation of women. While some have approached underrepresentation as a national concern with a national solution, Zippel highlights how gender relations are reconfigured in global academia. For U.S. women in particular, international collaboration offers opportunities to step outside of exclusionary networks at home. International ...

  10. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    It seeks particularly (but not exclusively) to encourage multidisciplinary research and collaboration ... Submission of Manuscript: The International Journal of Health Research uses a journal management software to allow authors ... access to medicine, infrastructural decay, quality of health professional, poor adherence to ...

  11. Methodological issues and research recommendations for prognosis after mild traumatic brain injury: results of the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristman, Vicki L; Borg, Jörgen; Godbolt, Alison K; Salmi, L Rachid; Cancelliere, Carol; Carroll, Linda J; Holm, Lena W; Nygren-de Boussard, Catharina; Hartvigsen, Jan; Abara, Uko; Donovan, James; Cassidy, J David

    2014-03-01

    The International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI) Prognosis performed a comprehensive search and critical review of the literature from 2001 to 2012 to update the 2002 best-evidence synthesis conducted by the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Neurotrauma, Prevention, Management and Rehabilitation Task Force on the prognosis of MTBI. Of 299 relevant studies, 101 were accepted as scientifically admissible. The methodological quality of the research literature on MTBI prognosis has not improved since the 2002 Task Force report. There are still many methodological concerns and knowledge gaps in the literature. Here we report and make recommendations on how to avoid methodological flaws found in prognostic studies of MTBI. Additionally, we discuss issues of MTBI definition and identify topic areas in need of further research to advance the understanding of prognosis after MTBI. Priority research areas include but are not limited to the use of confirmatory designs, studies of measurement validity, focus on the elderly, attention to litigation/compensation issues, the development of validated clinical prediction rules, the use of MTBI populations other than hospital admissions, continued research on the effects of repeated concussions, longer follow-up times with more measurement periods in longitudinal studies, an assessment of the differences between adults and children, and an account for reverse causality and differential recall bias. Well-conducted studies in these areas will aid our understanding of MTBI prognosis and assist clinicians in educating and treating their patients with MTBI. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Bibliometric Analysis of International Collaboration in Wind and Solar Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Sakata

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern technology is increasingly complex and demands an ever-widening range of knowledge and skills. No single country will possess all the knowledge and skills required for addressing global issues such as climate change. Technology collaboration between leading countries is important to promptly and efficiently address the problem. Previous studies have shown that a high level of collaboration is correlated with high paper productivity. This paper first aims to use objective data and create maps that enable us to see both the distribution of worldwide research competency and the relationship of international collaboration in clean energy research. In the international research network of wind power and solar cell, 4,189 institutions located in 121 countries and 6,600 institutions located in 125 countries are included respectively. This paper discusses various factors that would have an impact on research capability and support strong international relationships. With respect to research capability, governmental policies, stability of governmental commitment, natural conditions and historical and institutional differences have a significant impact on it. For research collaborations, factors such as geographical proximity, international science and technology policy, and developmental stage of technology have been brought to attention. This study demonstrates that bibliometrics is a methodology that is capable of providing a knowledge base that is useful in the development of the international science and technology policy and technological management strategy.

  13. "Working the Ruins" of Collaborative Feminist Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Callie Spencer

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, I enact an "inquiry among the ruins" of a collaborative feminist duoethnography. Through the process of exploring instances of failure, I aim to (re)think "collaborative" research, feminist goals for collaborative research, and a space for such research in the academy. As I work the ruins of a duoethnography, I…

  14. International collaboration on CESR-TA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, John; Suetsugu, Yusuke

    2009-01-01

    An international collaboration on the CESR-TA (Cornell Electron Storage Ring-Test Accelerator) program, which is a program to investigate electron cloud instability (ECI) issues in the positron damping ring of the ILC (International Linear-Collider), is currently underway a Cornell University, KEK is supporting the program through the development of an X-ray beam profile monitor system to measure the extremely small beam size, and through the development of clearing electrodes to mitigate the ECI. (author)

  15. International Collaboration Patterns and Effecting Factors of Emerging Technologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Bai

    Full Text Available With the globalization of the world economy, international innovation collaboration has taken place all over the world. This study selects three emerging technologies (3D printing, big data and carbon nanotubes and graphene technology among 20 countries as the research objects, using three patent-based indicators and network relationship analysis to reflect international collaboration patterns. Then we integrate empirical analyses to show effecting factors of international collaboration degrees by using panel data. The results indicate that while 3D printing technology is associated with a "balanced collaboration" mode, big data technology is more accurately described by a radial pattern, centered on the United States, and carbon nanotubes and graphene technology exhibits "small-world" characteristics in this respect. It also shows that the factors GDP per capita (GPC, R&D expenditure (RDE and the export of global trade value (ETV negatively affect the level of international collaboration. It could be useful for China and other developing countries to make international scientific and technological collaboration strategies and policies in the future.

  16. Sustaining an International Partnership: An Evolving Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Melinda R.; Myck-Wayne, Janice; Stang, Kristin K.; Basinska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Universities across the United States have an increasing interest in international education. Increasing global awareness through educational collaborations will promote greater cross-cultural understanding and build effective relationships with diverse communities. This paper documents one university's effort to build an effective international…

  17. International fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear energy of the light elements deuterium and lithium can be released if the 100 MK degree temperature required for deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fusion reactions can be achieved together with sufficient thermal insulation for a net energy yield. Progress of world-wide research shows good prospect for these physical conditions being achieved by the use of magnetic field confinement and of rapidly developing heating methods. Tokamak systems, alternative magnetic systems and inertial confinement progress are described. International co-operation features a number of bilateral agreements between countries: the Euratom collaboration which includes the Joint European Torus, a joint undertaking of eleven Western European nations of Euratom, established to build and operate a major confinement experiment; the development of co-operative projects within the OECD/IEA framework; the INTOR workshop, a world-wide study under IAEA auspices of the next major step in fusion research which might be built co-operatively; and assessments of the potential of nuclear fusion by the IAEA and the International Fusion Research Council. The INTOR (International Tokamak Reactor) studies have outlined a major plant of the tokamak type to study the engineering and technology of fusion reactor systems, which might be constructed on a world-wide basis to tackle and share the investment risks of the developments which lie ahead. This paper summarizes the recent progress of research on controlled nuclear fusion, featuring those areas where international co-operation has played an important part, and describes the various arrangements by which this international co-operation is facilitated. (author)

  18. Establishment of research and development priorities regarding the geologic disposal of nuclear waste in the United States and strategies for international collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, Kevin; Swift, Peter; Nutt, Mark; Peters, Mark; Williams, Jeff; Voegele, Michael; Birkholzer, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies (OFCT) has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct research and development (R and D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of low level waste (LLW), used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high level radioactive waste (HLW). The U.S. has, for the past twenty-plus years, focused efforts on disposing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and HLW in a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain Nevada. The recent decision by the U.S. DOE to no longer pursue the development of that repository has necessitated investigating alternative concepts for the disposal of SNF and HLW that exists today and that could be generated under future fuel cycles. The disposal of SNF and HLW in a range of geologic media has been investigated internationally. Considerable progress has been made by in the U.S and other nations, but gaps in knowledge still exist. The U.S. national laboratories have participated in these programs and have conducted R and D related to these issues to a limited extent. However, a comprehensive R and D program investigating a variety of storage, geologic media and disposal concepts has not been a part of the U.S. waste management program since the mid 1980s. Such a comprehensive R and D program has been developed in the UFDC using a systematic approach to identify potential R and D opportunities. This paper will describe the process used by the UFDC and summarize the R and D being pursued. The U.S. DOE has cooperated and collaborated with other countries in many different 'arenas' including the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and through bilateral agreements with other countries. These international activities benefited the DOE through the acquisition and exchange of information, database development, and peer reviews by experts from

  19. Methodological Challenges for Collaborative Learning Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strijbos, Jan-Willem; Fischer, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Research on collaborative learning, both face-to-face and computer-supported, has thrived in the past 10 years. The studies range from outcome-oriented (individual and group learning) to process-oriented (impact of interaction on learning processes, motivation and organisation of collaboration) to mixed studies. Collaborative learning research is…

  20. International Collaboration Patterns and Effecting Factors of Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xu; Liu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    With the globalization of the world economy, international innovation collaboration has taken place all over the world. This study selects three emerging technologies (3D printing, big data and carbon nanotubes and graphene technology) among 20 countries as the research objects, using three patent-based indicators and network relationship analysis to reflect international collaboration patterns. Then we integrate empirical analyses to show effecting factors of international collaboration degrees by using panel data. The results indicate that while 3D printing technology is associated with a “balanced collaboration” mode, big data technology is more accurately described by a radial pattern, centered on the United States, and carbon nanotubes and graphene technology exhibits “small-world” characteristics in this respect. It also shows that the factors GDP per capita (GPC), R&D expenditure (RDE) and the export of global trade value (ETV) negatively affect the level of international collaboration. It could be useful for China and other developing countries to make international scientific and technological collaboration strategies and policies in the future. PMID:27911926

  1. International Collaboration Activities on Engineered Barrier Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) within the DOE Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) program has been engaging in international collaborations between repository R&D programs for high-level waste (HLW) disposal to leverage on gathered knowledge and laboratory/field data of near- and far-field processes from experiments at underground research laboratories (URL). Heater test experiments at URLs provide a unique opportunity to mimetically study the thermal effects of heat-generating nuclear waste in subsurface repository environments. Various configurations of these experiments have been carried out at various URLs according to the disposal design concepts of the hosting country repository program. The FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier Experiment in Crystalline Host Rock) project is a large-scale heater test experiment originated by the Spanish radioactive waste management agency (Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos S.A. – ENRESA) at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) URL in Switzerland. The project was subsequently managed by CIEMAT. FEBEX-DP is a concerted effort of various international partners working on the evaluation of sensor data and characterization of samples obtained during the course of this field test and subsequent dismantling. The main purpose of these field-scale experiments is to evaluate feasibility for creation of an engineered barrier system (EBS) with a horizontal configuration according to the Spanish concept of deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste in crystalline rock. Another key aspect of this project is to improve the knowledge of coupled processes such as thermal-hydro-mechanical (THM) and thermal-hydro-chemical (THC) operating in the near-field environment. The focus of these is on model development and validation of predictions through model implementation in computational tools to simulate coupled THM and THC processes.

  2. International funding opportunities for ideas of collaboration projects in OOHP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilin, Corina

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is presenting the exploratory workshop organized by the OOHP Master team in December 2011, which opened paths for theoretical knowledge and for collaboration with researchers having international prestige. Also, the paper presents funding opportunities available in national grants, and the strategy chosen by the team to prepare a two-step access to funds.

  3. International Medical Collaboration: Lessons from Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelló González, Mauro; Pons Vásquez, Reinaldo; Rodriguez Bencomo, David; Choonara, Imti

    2016-01-01

    Over 50,000 Cuban health professionals are currently working overseas in 67 different countries. They work in conjunction with local health professionals. The majority work in primary care in deprived areas. The aim is to reduce morbidity and mortality but also improve health in the long term by training local health professionals, and building both institutions and a structure to deliver health care alongside educating the local population. Cuba is a small, middle-income country. It has, however, made a significant international contribution in relation to medical collaboration. Cuba’s international collaboration is based on the principles of social justice and equity for all. It has set an example for other countries to emulate. PMID:27763571

  4. International Medical Collaboration: Lessons from Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Castelló González

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Over 50,000 Cuban health professionals are currently working overseas in 67 different countries. They work in conjunction with local health professionals. The majority work in primary care in deprived areas. The aim is to reduce morbidity and mortality but also improve health in the long term by training local health professionals, and building both institutions and a structure to deliver health care alongside educating the local population. Cuba is a small, middle-income country. It has, however, made a significant international contribution in relation to medical collaboration. Cuba’s international collaboration is based on the principles of social justice and equity for all. It has set an example for other countries to emulate.

  5. Enabling Research without Geographical Boundaries via Collaborative Research Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesing, S.

    2016-12-01

    Collaborative research infrastructures on global scale for earth and space sciences face a plethora of challenges from technical implementations to organizational aspects. Science gateways - also known as virtual research environments (VREs) or virtual laboratories - address part of such challenges by providing end-to-end solutions to aid researchers to focus on their specific research questions without the need to become acquainted with the technical details of the complex underlying infrastructures. In general, they provide a single point of entry to tools and data irrespective of organizational boundaries and thus make scientific discoveries easier and faster. The importance of science gateways has been recognized on national as well as on international level by funding bodies and by organizations. For example, the US NSF has just funded a Science Gateways Community Institute, which offers support, consultancy and open accessible software repositories for users and developers; Horizon 2020 provides funding for virtual research environments in Europe, which has led to projects such as VRE4EIC (A Europe-wide Interoperable Virtual Research Environment to Empower Multidisciplinary Research Communities and Accelerate Innovation and Collaboration); national or continental research infrastructures such as XSEDE in the USA, Nectar in Australia or EGI in Europe support the development and uptake of science gateways; the global initiatives International Coalition on Science Gateways, the RDA Virtual Research Environment Interest Group as well as the IEEE Technical Area on Science Gateways have been founded to provide global leadership on future directions for science gateways in general and facilitate awareness for science gateways. This presentation will give an overview on these projects and initiatives aiming at supporting domain researchers and developers with measures for the efficient creation of science gateways, for increasing their usability and sustainability

  6. The International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Guy; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Nakamura, Yasukazu

    2011-01-01

    Under the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC; http://www.insdc.org), globally comprehensive public domain nucleotide sequence is captured, preserved and presented. The partners of this long-standing collaboration work closely together to provide data formats and conventions that enable consistent data submission to their databases and support regular data exchange around the globe. Clearly defined policy and governance in relation to free access to data and relationships with journal publishers have positioned INSDC databases as a key provider of the scientific record and a core foundation for the global bioinformatics data infrastructure. While growth in sequence data volumes comes no longer as a surprise to INSDC partners, the uptake of next-generation sequencing technology by mainstream science that we have witnessed in recent years brings a step-change to growth, necessarily making a clear mark on INSDC strategy. In this article, we introduce the INSDC, outline data growth patterns and comment on the challenges of increased growth.

  7. Recognising contributions to work in research collaboratives: Guidelines for standardising reporting of authorship in collaborative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-01

    Trainee research collaboratives (TRCs) have been revolutionary changes to the delivery of high-quality, multicentre research. The aim of this study was to define common roles in the conduct of collaborative research, and map these to academic competencies as set out by General Medical Council (GMC) in the United Kingdom. This will support trainers and assessors when judging academic achievements of those involved in TRC projects, and supports trainees by providing guidance on how to fulfil their role in these studies. A modified Delphi process was followed. Electronic discussion with key stakeholders was undertaken to identify and describe common roles. These were refined and mapped to GMC educational domains and International Committee of Medical Journal Editors authorship (ICJME) guidelines. The resulting roles and descriptions were presented to a face-to-face consensus meeting for voting. The agreed roles were then presented back to the electronic discussion group for approval. Electronic discussion generated six common roles. All of these were agreed in face-to-face meetings, where two further roles identified and described. All eight roles required skills that map to part of the academic requirements for surgical training in the UK. This paper presents a standardised framework for reporting authorship in collaborative group authored research publications. Linkage of collaborator roles to the ICMJE guidelines and GMC academic competency guidelines will facilitate incorporation into relevant training curricular and journal publication policies. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF). The Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFS-RF) is a collaborative program of the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) and IDRC valued at CA $61 654 707 (CIDA: CA $50 000 000; IDRC: CA $11 654 707). The program ...

  9. International research networks in pharmaceuticals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantner, Uwe; Rake, Bastian

    2014-01-01

    of scientific publications related to pharmaceutical research and applying social network analysis, we find that both the number of countries and their connectivity increase in almost all disease group specific networks. The cores of the networks consist of high income OECD countries and remain rather stable......Knowledge production and scientific research have become increasingly more collaborative and international, particularly in pharmaceuticals. We analyze this tendency in general and tie formation in international research networks on the country level in particular. Based on a unique dataset...... over time. Using network regression techniques to analyze the network dynamics our results indicate that accumulative advantages based on connectedness and multi-connectivity are positively related to changes in the countries' collaboration intensity whereas various indicators on similarity between...

  10. Good and Bad Research Collaborations: Researchers' Views on Science and Ethics in Global Health Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Parker

    Full Text Available There has been a dramatic rise in the scale and scope of collaborative global health research. A number of structural and scientific factors explain this growth and there has been much discussion of these in the literature. Little, if any, attention has been paid, however, to the factors identified by scientists and other research actors as important to successful research collaboration. This is surprising given that their decisions are likely to play a key role in the sustainability and effectiveness of global health research initiatives. In this paper, we report on qualitative research with leading scientists involved in major international research collaborations about their views on good and bad collaborations and the factors that inform their decision-making about joining and participating actively in research networks. We identify and discuss eight factors that researchers see as essential in judging the merits of active participation in global health research collaborations: opportunities for active involvement in cutting-edge, interesting science; effective leadership; competence of potential partners in and commitment to good scientific practice; capacity building; respect for the needs, interests and agendas of partners; opportunities for discussion and disagreement; trust and confidence; and, justice and fairness in collaboration. Our findings suggest that the sustainability and effectiveness of global health research collaborations has an important ethical or moral dimension for the research actors involved.

  11. Good and Bad Research Collaborations: Researchers' Views on Science and Ethics in Global Health Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Michael; Kingori, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    There has been a dramatic rise in the scale and scope of collaborative global health research. A number of structural and scientific factors explain this growth and there has been much discussion of these in the literature. Little, if any, attention has been paid, however, to the factors identified by scientists and other research actors as important to successful research collaboration. This is surprising given that their decisions are likely to play a key role in the sustainability and effectiveness of global health research initiatives. In this paper, we report on qualitative research with leading scientists involved in major international research collaborations about their views on good and bad collaborations and the factors that inform their decision-making about joining and participating actively in research networks. We identify and discuss eight factors that researchers see as essential in judging the merits of active participation in global health research collaborations: opportunities for active involvement in cutting-edge, interesting science; effective leadership; competence of potential partners in and commitment to good scientific practice; capacity building; respect for the needs, interests and agendas of partners; opportunities for discussion and disagreement; trust and confidence; and, justice and fairness in collaboration. Our findings suggest that the sustainability and effectiveness of global health research collaborations has an important ethical or moral dimension for the research actors involved.

  12. Forming a Collaborative Action Research Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platteel, Tamara; Hulshof, Hans; Ponte, Petra; van Driel, Jan; Verloop, Nico

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the complex nature of collaborative relationships, the difficulties of conducting research with others, and the complications of partnerships in educational research. To create and sustain a communicative space in which participants can collaborate to innovate education and curriculum, time and opportunity to develop trust…

  13. International Collaboration Enhances Cancer Screening Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGH is working with the International Agency for Research on CancerExit Disclaimer (IARC) and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) on the ESTAMPA Study, a multi-centric study of cervical cancer screening and triage with HPV testing.

  14. Architectural design and the collaborative research environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Roger N

    2006-10-20

    Given that science is a collaborative endeavor, architects are striving to design new research buildings that not only provide a more pleasant work space but also facilitate interactions among researchers.

  15. Creating a platform for collaborative genomic research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Smithson

    2017-04-01

    The developed genomics informatics platform provides a step-change in this type of genetic research, accelerating reproducible collaborative research across multiple disparate organisations and data sources, of varying type and complexity.

  16. International collaboration for nuclear competence building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapalehto, T.; Storey, P.

    2004-01-01

    The life cycle of the nuclear industry is no different to that of any other industry, indeed to most forms of human activity: birth, growth, maturity, decline, rebirth and renewal or death. As a result of the twin facets of long time scales and essential technical competence the industry now faces two problems: how to retain existing skills and competences for the 50 plus years that a plant is operating and how to develop and retain new skills and competences in the areas of decommissioning and radioactive waste management. Different countries are at different stages of the nuclear technology life cycle, a competence that may have declined or be lost in one country may be strong in another. And therein lies one solution to the problems the sector faces - international collaboration. The initiatives such as the NEA Halden project and the Generation IV International Forum lay a ground for quiet optimism that collaboration, information exchange and exchange of personnel continue to be an integral part of the development of nuclear power. Also there is evidence that myriad initiatives are underway in the area of nuclear education and training. Though, national surveys show that still more engineers and scientists having nuclear knowledge are required than are graduating. (author)

  17. Action research in collaborative improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, H.G.A.; Coghlan, David; Brennan, Louis; McNichols, Tim

    2006-01-01

    There is an increasing need to apply and transfer continuous improvement (CI) to inter-organisational processes. As such collaborative improvement (CoI) is emerging as a new concept within managerial literature and practice. This paper begins with a discussion on the logic and value of applying

  18. Spanish Nuclear Safety Research under International Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, L. E.; Reventos, F.; Ahnert, C.; Jimenez, G.; Queral, C.; Verdu, G.; Miro, R.; Gallardo, S.

    2013-10-01

    The Nuclear Safety research requires a wide international collaboration of several involved groups. In this sense this paper pretends to show several examples of the Nuclear Safety research under international frameworks that is being performed in different Universities and Research Institutions like CIEMAT, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM) and Universitat Politenica de Valencia (UPV). (Author)

  19. View all initiatives | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The International Partnerships for Sustainable Societies are collaborations that produce high-quality research to inform academic, public, and policy debates to contribute to create just, inclusive, and sustainable social and economic development.

  20. International collaborative research on infectious diseases by Japanese universities and institutes in Asia and Africa, with a special emphasis on J-GRID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Sumio; Imamura, Daisuke; Mizuno, Tamaki; Miyoshi, Shin-Ichi; Ramamurthy, Thandavrayan

    2015-01-01

    In developed countries including Japan, malignant tumor (cancer), heart disease and cerebral apoplexy are major causes of death, but infectious diseases are still responsible for a high number of deaths in developing countries, especially among children aged less than 5 years. World Health Statistics published by WHO reports a high percentage of mortality from infectious diseases in children, and many of these diseases may be subject to transmission across borders and could possibly invade Japan.  Given this situation, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan initiated Phase I of the Program of Founding Research Centers for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Disease, which ran from FY 2005 to 2009, and involved 8 Japanese universities and 2 research centers. The program was established for the following purposes: 1) creation of a domestic research structure to promote the accumulation of fundamental knowledge about infectious diseases, 2) establishment of 13 overseas research collaboration centers in 8 countries at high risk of emerging and reemerging infections and at which Japanese researchers are stationed and conduct research in partnership with overseas instructors, 3) development of a network among domestic and overseas research centers, and 4) development of human resources.  The program was controlled under MEXT and managed by the RIKEN Center of Research Network for Infectious Diseases (Riken CRNID). Phase II of the program was set up as the Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Diseases (J-GRID), and has been running in FY 2010-2014.  Phase III will start in April 2015, and will be organized by the newly established Japanese governmental organization "Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED)", the so-called Japanese style NIH.  The Collaborative Research Center of Okayama University for Infectious Diseases in India (CRCOUI) was started up in 2007 at the National

  1. International research centre launched

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    Full text: The first scientific research and educational institution to be set up on a completely international basis was officially inaugurated in Trieste on 5 October 1964 by the Director General of IAEA, Dr. Sigvard Eklund, when he opened the first seminar of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics. As evidence of the international nature of the institution he noted that the scientists who would work and teach there during the first year represented sixteen different countries. By the end of 1964, the Centre building was nearing completion and three of the five floors were occupied. A successful symposium had been held on the subject of plasma physics, and a score of professors and fellows were at work, from Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Greece, India, Japan, Jordan, the Netherlands, Norway, Pakistan, Poland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. A dozen scientific papers had been issued as preprints. The main purpose of the Centre is to foster the advancement of theoretical physics through training and research; at first the chief subject will be high-energy and elementary particle physics. Plasma physics, low energy physics and solid-state physics will also be dealt with. Special attention is paid to the needs of the developing countries. Of the 25 fellows selected for the academic year 1964-65, more than half are from South America, Africa and Asia. In conjunction with the Research Centre, there is an Advanced School for theoretical Physics to provide graduate training for fellows who need such preparation before they embark upon research. The Centre works under the guidance of a Scientific Council comprising the president, Prof. M. Sandoval-Vallarta (Nuclear Energy Commission of Mexico); Prof. A. Abragam (Saclay, France); Prof. R. Oppenheimer (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, USA); Dr. V. Soloviev (Dubna, USSR); Prof V.F. Weiskopf (Director General, CERN) ; Prof Abdus Salam (Imperial College, London) ; Prof. P. Budini (University of Trieste

  2. NCI collaborates with Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) announced a collaboration with the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF) to incorporate MMRF's wealth of genomic and clinical data on the disease into the NCI Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a publicly available datab

  3. Conversion in the framework of international collaboration. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmetov, T.; Vagin, S.; Urezchenko, V.

    1996-01-01

    22-26 October 1996 the Republic of Kazakhstan Ministry of Science - Academy of Science, International Science and Technology Center with collaboration of National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan conducted an international workshop C onversion in the framework of international collaboration . In the workshop scientists and specialists from different countries participated. 84 reports were presented in this workshop

  4. Conversion in the framework of international collaboration. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmetov, T; Vagin, S; Urezchenko, V [eds.

    1997-12-31

    22-26 October 1996 the Republic of Kazakhstan Ministry of Science - Academy of Science, International Science and Technology Center with collaboration of National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan conducted an international workshop {sup C}onversion in the framework of international collaboration{sup .} In the workshop scientists and specialists from different countries participated. 84 reports were presented in this workshop

  5. University-Industry Collaboration in IS Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Petra; Bjørn-Andersen, Niels

    2012-01-01

    of successful modes of collaboration. In this paper, we present the findings of the first qualitative in‐depth phase, in which we inter‐ viewed nine experienced researchers in order to understand the phenomenon of university‐ industry collaboration in the context of different research backgrounds. The findings...... from the preliminary interviews show that researchers have very differing individual preferences regarding the ideal setup of such collaborative research projects. They also show that design research and case study are the most common research methods in such projects. While peer‐ reviewed conference...... papers and journal articles are the most popular forms of academic output, reports and sessions with managers are the prevalent output for industry partners. This work is a precursor to a larger survey, which will allow us to study correlations between characteristics of researcher/project type...

  6. International Collaboration in the Development of NPP Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, S.; Liu, L.; Yu, H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we first review the progress and current status of international collaboration and technical exchange in the development of nuclear power plant (NPP) software by The State Nuclear Power Software Development Center (SNPSDC) in China. Then we discuss the importance of the international collaboration and exchange in the trend of globalisation of NPP technology. We also identify the role and contribution of professional women in this process. SNPSDC, the first professional software development centre for NPP in China, has been developing COSINE — a self-reliance NPP design and analysis software product with China brand—since 2010. Through participating in OECD/NEA’s joint projects, such as ROSA-2 Project, PKL–3 Project, HYMERES Project and ATLAS Project, SNPSDC shared data with other countries involved with respect to particular areas, such as high quality reactor thermal hydraulics test data. SNPSDC’s engineers have also been actively participating in international technical and research exchange for presenting their innovative work to the community while learning from peers. Our record shows that over 30 papers have been presented in international conferences with respect to nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics, safety analysis, reactor physics and software engineering within the past 4 years. The above international collaboration and technical exchange helped SNPSDC’s engineers to keep up with the state-of-art technology in this field. The large amount of valuable experimental data transferred to SNPSDC ensured the functionality, usability and reliability of software while greatly reduced the cost and shortened the cycle of development. Female engineers and other employees of SNPSDC either drove or got actively involved in a lot of aspects of the above collaboration and exchange, such as technical communication, business negotiation and overseas affairs management. These professional women played an irreplaceable role in this project by

  7. Creatiing a Collaborative Research Network for Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, W.

    2012-12-01

    This abstract proposes a discussion of how professional science communication and scientific cooperation can become more efficient through the use of modern social network technology, using the example of Mendeley. Mendeley is a research workflow and collaboration tool which crowdsources real-time research trend information and semantic annotations of research papers in a central data store, thereby creating a "social research network" that is emergent from the research data added to the platform. We describe how Mendeley's model can overcome barriers for collaboration by turning research papers into social objects, making academic data publicly available via an open API, and promoting more efficient collaboration. Central to the success of Mendeley has been the creation of a tool that works for the researcher without the requirement of being part of an explicit social network. Mendeley automatically extracts metadata from research papers, and allows a researcher to annotate, tag and organize their research collection. The tool integrates with the paper writing workflow and provides advanced collaboration options, thus significantly improving researchers' productivity. By anonymously aggregating usage data, Mendeley enables the emergence of social metrics and real-time usage stats on top of the articles' abstract metadata. In this way a social network of collaborators, and people genuinely interested in content, emerges. By building this research network around the article as the social object, a social layer of direct relevance to academia emerges. As science, particularly Earth sciences with their large shared resources, become more and more global, the management and coordination of research is more and more dependent on technology to support these distributed collaborations.

  8. Collaborative Research and Behavioral Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schapiro, Steve; Brosnan, Sarah F.; Hopkins, William D

    2017-01-01

    The behavioral management of captive nonhuman primates (NHPs) can be significantly enhanced through synergistic relationships with noninvasive research projects. Many behavioral and cognitive research procedures are challenging and enriching (physically, cognitively, and/or socially......) for the animals (Hopper et al. 2016; Hopkins and Latzman 2017) without involving any invasive (surgical, biopsy, etc.) procedures. Noninvasive behavioral research programs present the primates with opportunities to choose to voluntarily participate (or not), providing them with greater control over...

  9. Fostering Collaborations towards Integrative Research Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Valentine

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The complex problems associated with global change processes calls for close collaboration between science disciplines to create new, integrated knowledge. In the wake of global change processes, forests and other natural environments have been rapidly changing, highlighting the need for collaboration and integrative research development. Few tools are available to explore the potential for collaborations in research ventures that are just starting up. This study presents a useful approach for exploring and fostering collaborations between academics working in research teams and organizations comprising multiple science disciplines (i.e., multi-disciplinary. The research aim was to reveal potential barriers, common ground, and research strengths between academics working in a new centre focused on forest and climate change research. This aim was based on the premise that raising awareness and working with this acquired knowledge fosters collaborations and integrative research development. An email survey was deployed amongst the academics to obtain: (i their understanding of common themes (e.g., climate change, scale of investigation, woodland/forest health/decline; (ii descriptions of the spatial and temporal scales of their research; and (iii their approach and perceived contributions to climate change research. These data were analysed using a semi-quantitative content analysis approach. We found that the main potential barriers were likely to be related to differences in understanding of the common research themes, whilst similarities and disciplinary strengths provided critical elements to foster collaborations. These findings were presented and discussed amongst the centre academics to raise awareness and create a dialogue around these issues. This process resulted in the development of four additional research projects involving multiple disciplines. The approach used in this study provides a useful methodology of broader benefit to

  10. Improving the Quality of Host Country Ethical Oversight of International Research: The Use of a Collaborative 'Pre-Review' Mechanism for a Study of Fexinidazole for Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Carl H; Ardiot, Chantal; Blesson, Séverine; Bonnin, Yves; Bompart, Francois; Colonna, Pierre; Dhai, Ames; Ecuru, Julius; Edielu, Andrew; Hervé, Christian; Hirsch, François; Kouyaté, Bocar; Mamzer-Bruneel, Marie-France; Maoundé, Dionko; Martinent, Eric; Ntsiba, Honoré; Pelé, Gérard; Quéva, Gilles; Reinmund, Marie-Christine; Sarr, Samba Cor; Sepou, Abdoulaye; Tarral, Antoine; Tetimian, Djetodjide; Valverde, Olaf; Van Nieuwenhove, Simon; Strub-Wourgaft, Nathalie

    2015-12-01

    Developing countries face numerous barriers to conducting effective and efficient ethics reviews of international collaborative research. In addition to potentially overlooking important scientific and ethical considerations, inadequate or insufficiently trained ethics committees may insist on unwarranted changes to protocols that can impair a study's scientific or ethical validity. Moreover, poorly functioning review systems can impose substantial delays on the commencement of research, which needlessly undermine the development of new interventions for urgent medical needs. In response to these concerns, the Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative (DNDi), an independent nonprofit organization founded by a coalition of public sector and international organizations, developed a mechanism to facilitate more effective and efficient host country ethics review for a study of the use of fexinidazole for the treatment of late stage African Trypanosomiasis (HAT). The project involved the implementation of a novel 'pre-review' process of ethical oversight, conducted by an ad hoc committee of ethics committee representatives from African and European countries, in collaboration with internationally recognized scientific experts. This article examines the process and outcomes of this collaborative process. © 2014 The Authors. Developing World Bioethics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. 12th International Symposium on Open Collaboration Companion

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Welcome to the proceedings of OpenSym 2016, the 12th international symposium on open collaboration! Open collaboration is collaboration that is egalitarian (everyone can join, no principled or artificial barriers to participation exist), meritocratic (decisions and status are merit-based rather than imposed) and self-organizing (processes adapt to people rather than people adapt to predefined processes).

  12. Research collaboration in groups and networks: differences across academic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyvik, Svein; Reymert, Ingvild

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give a macro-picture of collaboration in research groups and networks across all academic fields in Norwegian research universities, and to examine the relative importance of membership in groups and networks for individual publication output. To our knowledge, this is a new approach, which may provide valuable information on collaborative patterns in a particular national system, but of clear relevance to other national university systems. At the system level, conducting research in groups and networks are equally important, but there are large differences between academic fields. The research group is clearly most important in the field of medicine and health, while undertaking research in an international network is most important in the natural sciences. Membership in a research group and active participation in international networks are likely to enhance publication productivity and the quality of research.

  13. National and International Library Collaboration: Necessity, Advantages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Mark

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of cooperation between research library associations can be demonstrated quite clearly. Where cooperation becomes essential is where there is a common cause to champion or an initiative to pursue for the common good. Thanks in part to the power of information communications technology, research is becoming increasingly international in scope. The members of interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research teams are frequently drawn from across the world. Correspondingly, scholarly publishing (especially in medicine and the sciences is dominated by a few multinational publishers. In this context, issues that play a vital role in global scholarly communication - such as copyright, journal pricing, the managing of datasets, digital preservation and open access - are issues for the research library community everywhere in the world. Certainly there are many challenges at the local or regional level. However there are definite roles that research library associations can play most effectively at the national or international level. It is clear that by sharing expertise, building partnerships and alliances, it is possible to address common issues much more effectively than when working alone. What is special is that potentially the most powerful form of cooperation is advocacy at the national and international levels. It is essential for research library associations to work together at the political level to move their agenda forward. Examples are lobbying about copyright legislation (nationally, or within the EC or at WIPO; or promoting the cause of Open Access. The unique value of LIBER is to provide a forum and a platform for European research library associations to explore and benefit from cooperation and their shared strength.

  14. Collaborative Research in the Digital Humanities

    CERN Document Server

    Deegan, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration within digital humanities is both a pertinent and a pressing topic as the traditional mode of the humanist, working alone in his or her study, is supplemented by explicitly co-operative, interdependent and collaborative research. This is particularly true where computational methods are employed in large-scale digital humanities projects. This book, which celebrates the contributions of Harold Short to this field, presents fourteen essays by leading authors in the digital humanities. It addresses several issues of collaboration, from the multiple perspectives of institutions, pro

  15. International and interlaboratory collaboration on Neutron Science Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    For effectiveness of facility development for Neutron Science Projects at JAERI, international and interlaboratory collaborations have been extensively planned and promoted, especially in the areas of accelerator and target technology. Here status of two collaborations relevant to a spallation neutron target development is highlighted from those collaborations. The two collaborations are experiments on BNL-AGS spallation target simulation and PSI materials irradiation. Both are planned to start in spring of 1997. (author)

  16. Collaborative Research Partnerships for Knowledge Mobilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    This study examines elements of collaborative research partnerships (CRPs) between university researchers and organisations who engage in knowledge mobilisation activities in education. The study uses key informant interviews and document analysis from one type of partnership, and a survey of university-community partnerships across Canada to…

  17. Research reactor collaboration in the Asia-Pacific region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Byung Jin

    2006-01-01

    The number of research reactors over the world has been decreasing since its peak in the middle of the 1970s, and it is predicted to decrease more rapidly than before in the future. International collaboration on research reactors is an effective way for their continued safe service to human welfare in various technical areas. The number of new research reactors under construction or planned for in the Asia-Pacific region is the greatest in the world. Among the regional collaboration activities on research reactors, safety has been the most important subject followed by neutron activation analysis, radioisotope production and neutron beam applications. It is understood that more regional collaboration on basic technologies important for the safety, management and utilization of the research reactors is demanding. The new project proposal of the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia on 'Research Reactor Technology for Effective Utilization' is understood to meet the demands. Meanwhile, there is a consensus on the need for research reactor resource sharing in the region. As a result of the review on the international collaboration activities in the region, the author suggests a linkage between the above new project and IAEA/RCA project considering a possible sharing of research reactor resources in the region. (author)

  18. Key Success Factors and Guidance for International Collaborative Design Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robby Soetanto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the built environment (BE sector, the co-creation process of design demands understanding of requirements (as viewed by parties involved, mobilisation of tacit knowledge, negotiation, and complex exchange of information. The need to collaborate over distance has further exacerbated the complexity of the process, and, in itself, represents a significant challenge for BE professionals who are increasingly expected to undertake this process within globally distributed virtual teams. The research aims to identify key success factors and develop guidance for international collaborative design projects, via the implementation of collaborative design courses in UK and Canadian universities over three academic years. Questionnaire surveys, focus groups, observation of online meetings, personal reflections provided data for the analysis. The findings reveal the significance of the perceived risk of collaboration and a difference in preferred communication mode between architects and civil/structural engineers. These findings suggest the impact of training in the subject discipline, and that the opportunity for co-located working has helped the development of trust. The guidance is aimed at BE educators who wish to implement this activity in their courses.

  19. FY 1997 report of survey on the intellectual property in international collaboration research project; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho (kokusai kyodo kenkyu ni okeru chiteki zaisanken ni tsuite no chosa hokokusho)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    In promoting international collaboration research project, coordination of the patent system of each country which participants to the project belong to has broad implications in concluding the contract for the project. For example, in Japan, 100% of the patent belongs to the government for contrast or collaboration project with the government. While, in the USA, the patent developed by the private company belongs to the private company even for the contrast project. In Japan, the shared patent can not be transferred to the third party or implemented without agreement with the partner. While, in the USA, the shared patent can be transferred to the third party or implemented without agreement with the partner. Due to such a difference, some projects can not be established by ill coordination of intellectual property even when the meaning of the projects is well understood. In this survey, was investigated the outline of patent systems of major countries to study about what should well balanced treatment of intellectual property in international collaboration research project be in the future. 4 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Trend and impact of international collaboration in clinical medicine papers published in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Wah Yun; Ng, Kwan Hoong; Kabir, M A; Koh, Ai Peng; Sinnasamy, Janaki

    2014-01-01

    Research collaboration is the way forward in order to improve quality and impact of its research findings. International research collaboration has resulted in international co-authorship in scientific communications and publications. This study highlights the collaborating research and authorship trend in clinical medicine in Malaysia from 2001 to 2010. Malaysian-based author affiliation in the Web of Science (Science Citation Index Expanded) and clinical medicine journals ( n  = 999) and articles ( n  = 3951) as of 30th Oct 2011 were downloaded. Types of document analyzed were articles and reviews, and impact factors (IF) in the 2010 Journal Citation Report Science Edition were taken to access the quality of the articles. The number of publications in clinical medicine increased from 4.5 % ( n  = 178) in 2001 to 23.9 % ( n  = 944) in 2010. The top three contributors in the subject categories are Pharmacology and Pharmacy (13.9 %), General and Internal Medicine (13.6 %) and Tropical Medicine (7.3 %). By journal tier system: Tier 1 (18.7 %, n  = 738), Tier 2 (22.5 %, n  = 888), Tier 3 (29.6 %, n  = 1170), Tier 4 (27.2 %, n  = 1074), and journals without IF (2.1 %, n  = 81). University of Malaya was the most productive. Local collaborators accounted for 60.3 % and international collaborations 39.7 %. Articles with international collaborations appeared in journals with higher journal IFs than those without international collaboration. They were also cited more significantly than articles without international collaborations. Citations, impact factor and journal tiers were significantly associated with international collaboration in Malaysia's clinical medicine publications. Malaysia has achieved a significant number of ISI publications in clinical medicine participation in international collaboration.

  1. Mobility and International Collaboration: Case of the Mexican Scientific Diaspora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Marmolejo-Leyva

    Full Text Available We use a data set of Mexican researchers working abroad that are included in the Mexican National System of Researchers (SNI. Our diaspora sample includes 479 researchers, most of them holding postdoctoral positions in mainly seven countries: USA, Great Britain, Germany, France, Spain, Canada and Brazil. Their research output and impact is explored in order to determine their patterns of production, mobility and scientific collaboration as compared with previous studies of the SNI researchers in the periods 1991-2001 and 2003-2009. Our findings confirm that mobility has a strong impact on their international scientific collaboration. We found no substantial influence among the researchers that got their PhD degrees abroad from those trained in Mexican universities. There are significant differences among the areas of knowledge studied: biological sciences, physics and engineering have better production and impact rates than mathematics, geosciences, medicine, agrosciences, chemistry, social sciences and humanities. We found a slight gender difference in research production but Mexican female scientists are underrepresented in our diaspora sample. These findings would have policy implications for the recently established program that will open new academic positions for young Mexican scientists.

  2. Mobility and International Collaboration: Case of the Mexican Scientific Diaspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmolejo-Leyva, Rafael; Perez-Angon, Miguel Angel; Russell, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    We use a data set of Mexican researchers working abroad that are included in the Mexican National System of Researchers (SNI). Our diaspora sample includes 479 researchers, most of them holding postdoctoral positions in mainly seven countries: USA, Great Britain, Germany, France, Spain, Canada and Brazil. Their research output and impact is explored in order to determine their patterns of production, mobility and scientific collaboration as compared with previous studies of the SNI researchers in the periods 1991-2001 and 2003-2009. Our findings confirm that mobility has a strong impact on their international scientific collaboration. We found no substantial influence among the researchers that got their PhD degrees abroad from those trained in Mexican universities. There are significant differences among the areas of knowledge studied: biological sciences, physics and engineering have better production and impact rates than mathematics, geosciences, medicine, agrosciences, chemistry, social sciences and humanities. We found a slight gender difference in research production but Mexican female scientists are underrepresented in our diaspora sample. These findings would have policy implications for the recently established program that will open new academic positions for young Mexican scientists.

  3. International fusion research council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belozerov, A.N.

    1977-01-01

    A brief history of the International Fusion Research Council (IFRC) is given and the minutes of the 1976 meeting in Garching are summarized. At the Garching meeting, the IFRC evaluated the quality of papers presented at recent IAEA conferences on plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear research, and made recommendations on the organization and timing of future meetings on nuclear fusion

  4. The European Multicentre Bronchiectasis Audit and Research Collaboration (EMBARC): experiences from a successful ERS Clinical Research Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, James D; Crichton, Megan; Goeminne, Pieter C; Loebinger, Michael R; Haworth, Charles; Almagro, Marta; Vendrell, Montse; De Soyza, Anthony; Dhar, Raja; Morgan, Lucy; Blasi, Francesco; Aliberti, Stefano; Boyd, Jeanette; Polverino, Eva

    2017-09-01

    In contrast to airway diseases like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma, and rare diseases such as cystic fibrosis, there has been little research and few clinical trials in bronchiectasis. Guidelines are primarily based on expert opinion and treatment is challenging because of the heterogeneous nature of the disease. In an effort to address decades of underinvestment in bronchiectasis research, education and clinical care, the European Multicentre Bronchiectasis Audit and Research Collaboration (EMBARC) was established in 2012 as a collaborative pan-European network to bring together bronchiectasis researchers. The European Respiratory Society officially funded EMBARC in 2013 as a Clinical Research Collaboration, providing support and infrastructure to allow the project to grow. EMBARC has now established an international bronchiectasis registry that is active in more than 30 countries both within and outside Europe. Beyond the registry, the network participates in designing and facilitating clinical trials, has set international research priorities, promotes education and has participated in producing the first international bronchiectasis guidelines. This manuscript article the development, structure and achievements of EMBARC from 2012 to 2017. To understand the role of Clinical Research Collaborations as the major way in which the European Respiratory Society can stimulate clinical research in different disease areasTo understand some of the key features of successful disease registriesTo review key epidemiological, clinical and translational studies of bronchiectasis contributed by the European Multicentre Bronchiectasis Audit and Research Collaboration (EMBARC) project in the past 5 yearsTo understand the key research priorities identified by EMBARC for the next 5 years.

  5. 11 July 2011 - Carleton University Ottawa, Canada Vice President (Research and International) K. Matheson in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, accompanied by Adviser J. Ellis and signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    11 July 2011 - Carleton University Ottawa, Canada Vice President (Research and International) K. Matheson in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, accompanied by Adviser J. Ellis and signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

  6. Tuesday 28 January 2014 - K. E. Huthmacher Ministerialdirektor Provision for the Future - Basic and Sustainability Research Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) visiting the stands with R. Heuer CERN Director-General on the occasion of the Inauguration of the Industrial Exhibition Germany@CERN and visiting the ATLAS Cavern with D. Charlton ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson and R. Voss Head of International Relations.

    CERN Multimedia

    Pantelia, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Tuesday 28 January - K. E. Huthmacher Ministerialdirektor Provision for the Future - Basic and Sustainability Research Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) visiting the stands with R. Heuer CERN Director-General on the occasion of the Inauguration of the Industrial Exhibition Germany@CERN and visiting the ATLAS Cavern with D. Charlton ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson and R. Voss Head of International Relations.

  7. Reflections on practitioner-researcher collaborative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, Rex; Morran, Keith

    2010-04-01

    We offer comments regarding two articles in this issue, one titled "Bridging the Practitioner-Scientist Gap in Group Psychotherapy Research" and a complementary article providing the results of a survey, entitled "A Survey of Canadian Group Psychotherapist Association Members' Perceptions of Psychotherapy Research." We also make several recommendations for collaborative research between practitioners and scientists, such as the inclusion of clinicians on the research team, practice research networks, and improved approaches to communicating clinically relevant research findings. Also discussed are reflections and recommendations from the authors' experience as scientist-practitioners.

  8. International collaboration on inherently safe nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkenbus, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    Science and technology transcend economic and political ideologies, providing a means of communications and approach common to both the United States and the Soviet Union. This paper suggests that the field of nuclear fission is a logical and productive area for superpower and broader collaboration, but that the kind of collaboration characteristic of past and present activity is less than it optimally could be. The case for cost sharing is compelling with budget constraints and mounting concerns over global warming. The case for collaboration is based on economic, psychological, and political grounds. A collaborative effort in nuclear fission is presented as a near term effort by building and testing of a prototype reactor in the 1990s

  9. The world network of scientific collaborations between cities: domestic or international dynamics?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maisonobe, M.; Eckert, D.; Grossetti, M.; Jégou, L.; Milard, B.

    2016-07-01

    Earlier publication (Grossetti et al., 2014) has established that we are attending a decreasing concentration of scientific activities within “world-cities”. Given that more and more cities and countries are contributing to the world production of knowledge, this article analyzes the evolution of the world network of collaborations both at the domestic and international levels during the 2000s. Using data from the Science Citation Index Expanded, scientific authors’ addresses are geo-localized and grouped by urban areas. Our data suggests that interurban collaborations within countries have increased together with international linkages. In most countries, domestic collaborations have increased faster than international collaborations. Even among the top collaborating cities, sometimes referred to as “world cities”, the share of domestic collaborations is gaining momentum. Our results suggest that, contrary to common beliefs about the globalization process, national systems of research have been strengthening during the 2000s. (Author)

  10. Astronomical Virtual Observatories Through International Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Ohishi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Astronomical Virtual Observatories (VOs are emerging research environment for astronomy, and 16 countries and a region have funded to develop their VOs based on international standard protocols for interoperability. The 16 funded VO projects have established the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (http://www.ivoa.net/ to develop the standard interoperable interfaces such as registry (meta data, data access, query languages, output format (VOTable, data model, application interface, and so on. The IVOA members have constructed each VO environment through the IVOA interfaces. National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ started its VO project (Japanese Virtual Observatory - JVO in 2002, and developed its VO system. We have succeeded to interoperate the latest JVO system with other VOs in the USA and Europe since December 2004. Observed data by the Subaru telescope, satellite data taken by the JAXA/ISAS, etc. are connected to the JVO system. Successful interoperation of the JVO system with other VOs means that astronomers in the world will be able to utilize top-level data obtained by these telescopes from anywhere in the world at anytime. System design of the JVO system, experiences during our development including problems of current standard protocols defined in the IVOA, and proposals to resolve these problems in the near future are described.

  11. University Research Collaborations on Nuclear Technology: A Legal Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagakoshi, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: International nuclear research collaborations are becoming increasingly important as the need for environmentally sound and safe energy technology grows. Despite having its risk, the benefits of using nuclear energy cannot be overlooked considering the energy crisis the world is facing. In order to maximize the safety of existing technology and promoting safe ways of taking advantage of nuclear energy, collaborative efforts of all who are involved in nuclear technology is necessary, regardless of national borders or affiliation. Non-conventional use of nuclear energy shall also be sought after in order to reduce greenhouse gas emission and to overcome the energy crisis the world is facing. It is therefore important that international collaborations among research institutes are promoted. Collaboration amongst universities poses a series of legal questions on how to form the framework, how to protect individual and communal inventions and how to share the fruits of the invention. This paper proposes a possible framework of collaboration and elaborates on possible legal issues and solutions. (author

  12. Next generation environment for collaborative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collados, D.; Denis, G.; Galvez, P.; Newman, H.

    2001-01-01

    Collaborative environments supporting point to point and multipoint video-conferencing, document and application sharing across both local and wide area networks, video on demand (broadcast and playback) and interactive text facilities will be a crucial element for the development of the next generation of HEP experiments by geographically dispersed collaborations. The 'Virtual Room Video conferencing System' (VRVS) has been developed since 1995, in order to provide a low cost, bandwidth-efficient, extensible means for video conferencing and remote collaboration over networks within the High Energy and Nuclear Physics communities. The VRVS provides worldwide videoconferencing service and collaborative environment to the research and education communities. VRVS uses the Internet2 and ESnet high-performance networks infrastructure to deploy its Web-based system, which now includes more than 5790 registered hosts running VRVS software in more than 50 different countries. VRVS hosts an average of 100-multipoint videoconference and collaborative sessions worldwide every month. There are around 35 reflectors that manage the traffic flow, at HENP labs and universities in the US and Europe. So far, there are 7 Virtual Rooms for World Wide Conferences (involving more than one continent), and 4 Virtual Rooms each for intra-continental conferences in the US, Europe and Asia. VRVS continues to expand and implement new digital video technologies, including H.323 ITU standard integration, MPEG-2 videoconferencing integration, shared environments, and Quality of Service

  13. Collaborative Engineering for Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jose M.; Keys, L. Ken; Chen, Injazz J.

    2004-01-01

    Research and development (R&D) organizations are being required to be relevant, to be more application-oriented, and to be partners in the strategic management of the business while meeting the same challenges as the rest of the organization, namely: (1) reduced time to market; (2) reduced cost; (3) improved quality; (4) increased reliability; and (5) increased focus on customer needs. Recent advances in computer technology and the Internet have created a new paradigm of collaborative engineering or collaborative product development (CPD), from which new types of relationships among researchers and their partners have emerged. Research into the applicability and benefits of CPD in a low/no production, R&D, and/or government environment is limited. In addition, the supply chain management (SCM) aspects of these relationships have not been studied. This paper presents research conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) investigating the applicability of CPD and SCM in an R&D organization. The study concentrates on the management and implementation of space research activities at GRC. Results indicate that although the organization is engaged in collaborative relationships that incorporate aspects of SCM, a number of areas, such as development of trust and information sharing merit special attention.

  14. An analysis of national collaboration with Spanish researchers abroad in the health sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceituno-Aceituno, Pedro; Romero-Martínez, Sonia Janeth; Victor-Ponce, Patricia; García-Núñez, José

    2015-11-07

    The establishment of scientific collaborations with researchers abroad can be considered a good practice to make appropriate use of their knowledge and to increase the possibilities of them returning to their country. This paper analyses the collaboration between Spanish researchers abroad devoted to health sciences and national science institutions. We used the Fontes' approach to perform a study on this collaboration with Spanish researchers abroad. We measured the level of national and international cooperation, the opportunity provided by the host country to collaborate, the promotion of collaboration by national science institutions, and the types of collaboration. A total of 88 biomedical researchers out of the 268 Spanish scientists who filled up the survey participated in the study. Different data analyses were performed to study the variables selected to measure the scientific collaboration and profile of Spanish researchers abroad. There is a high level of cooperation between Spanish health science researchers abroad and international institutions, which contrasts with the small-scale collaboration with national institutions. Host countries facilitate this collaboration with national and international scientific institutions to a larger extent than the level of collaboration promotion carried out by Spanish institutions. The national collaboration with Spanish researchers abroad in the health sciences is limited. Thus, the practice of making appropriate use of the potential of their expertise should be promoted and the opportunities for Spanish health science researchers to return home should be improved.

  15. Collaboration networks and research productivity at IPEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Carlos Anisio; Barroso, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira, E-mail: monteiro@ipen.br, E-mail: barroso@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we investigate the IPEN's scientific collaboration network. Based on publications registered in IPEN's technical and scientific database was extracted a set of authors that developed technical and scientific work on the 2001 to 2010 period, using coauthorship to define the relationship between authors. From the data collected, we used degree centrality indicator in conjunction with two approaches to assess the relationship between collaboration and productivity: normal count, where for each publication that the author appears is added one for the author’s productivity indicator, and fractional count which is added a fractional value according to the total number of publication's authors. We concluded that collaboration for the development of a technical and scientific work has a positive correlation with the researchers productivity, that is, the greater the collaboration greater the productivity. We presented, also, a statistical summary to reveal the total number of publications and the number of IPEN's authors by publication, the average number of IPEN's authors per publication and the average number of publications by IPEN's author, the number of IPEN's authors that not published with no other author of the IPEN and, finally, the number of active and inactive (ex. retirees) researchers of the IPEN, as well as, the number of authors who do not have employment contract with the IPEN. (author)

  16. Collaboration networks and research productivity at IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Carlos Anisio; Barroso, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the IPEN's scientific collaboration network. Based on publications registered in IPEN's technical and scientific database was extracted a set of authors that developed technical and scientific work on the 2001 to 2010 period, using coauthorship to define the relationship between authors. From the data collected, we used degree centrality indicator in conjunction with two approaches to assess the relationship between collaboration and productivity: normal count, where for each publication that the author appears is added one for the author’s productivity indicator, and fractional count which is added a fractional value according to the total number of publication's authors. We concluded that collaboration for the development of a technical and scientific work has a positive correlation with the researchers productivity, that is, the greater the collaboration greater the productivity. We presented, also, a statistical summary to reveal the total number of publications and the number of IPEN's authors by publication, the average number of IPEN's authors per publication and the average number of publications by IPEN's author, the number of IPEN's authors that not published with no other author of the IPEN and, finally, the number of active and inactive (ex. retirees) researchers of the IPEN, as well as, the number of authors who do not have employment contract with the IPEN. (author)

  17. ICFA: Protvino meeting looks at trends in international collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1991-01-15

    International collaboration is the lifeblood of Big Science, and in high energy physics the triennial 'Future Perspectives' meeting organized by the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) provides a valuable opportunity to reappraise trends in this collaboration. The latest meeting was held in October at Protvino, near Moscow, where the Institute for High Energy Physics is the scene of construction work for the 21-kilometre UNK proton rings and the projected home of a big new linear collider for electrons and positrons.

  18. Group functioning of a collaborative family research team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S K; Halm, M A; Titler, M G; Craft, M; Kleiber, C; Montgomery, L A; Nicholson, A; Buckwalter, K; Cram, E

    1993-07-01

    Collaborative research teams are an attractive means of conducting nursing research in the clinical setting because of the many opportunities that collaboration can supply. These opportunities include a chance to: (1) network with other nurses who have similar interests, (2) share knowledge and expertise for designing clinical studies that directly affect daily practice, (3) develop instruments, (4) write grant proposals, (5) collect and analyze data, and (6) prepare manuscripts for publication. The effectiveness of research teams, however, is strongly influenced by group functioning. This article describes the functioning of a collaborative family interventions research team of nursing faculty members and CNSs at a large Midwestern university setting. The formation of the group and membership characteristics are described, along with strategies used to identify the research focus and individual and group goals. Aspects related to the influence of the group on members and the internal operations of the group are also addressed. Future strategies to be explored will focus on the size of the group and joint authorship issues. The authors also set forth a number of recommendations for development of collaborative research groups.

  19. International energy technology collaboration: wind power integration into electricity systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Justus, D.

    2006-01-01

    A rapid growth of wind power since the 1990s has led to notable market shares in some electricity markets. This growth is concentrated in a few countries with effective Research, Development and Demonstration (RD and D) programmes and with policies that support its diffusion into the market place. The speed and depth of its penetration in these electricity markets have amplified the need to address grid integration concerns, so as not to impede the further penetration of wind power. Research on technologies, tools and practices for integrating large amounts of wind power into electricity supply systems is attempting to respond to this need. In recent years, existing international collaborative research efforts have expanded their focus to include grid integration of wind power and new consortia have been formed to pool knowledge and resources. Effective results benefit a few countries that already have a significant amount of wind in their electricity supply fuel mix, as well as to the potential large markets worldwide. This paper focuses on the challenge of bringing significant amounts of intermittent generating sources into grids dominated by large central generating units. It provides a brief overview of the growth of wind power, mainly since 1990, the technical and operational issues related to integration and selected collaborative programmes underway to address grid integration concerns. (author)

  20. Collaborating internationally on physician leadership development: why now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ming-Ka; de Camps Meschino, Diane; Dath, Deepak; Busari, Jamiu; Bohnen, Jordan David; Samson, Lindy Michelle; Matlow, Anne; Sánchez-Mendiola, Melchor

    2016-07-04

    Purpose This paper aims to highlight the importance of leadership development for all physicians within a competency-based medical education (CBME) framework. It describes the importance of timely international collaboration as a key strategy in promoting physician leadership development. Design/methodology/approach The paper explores published and Grey literature around physician leadership development and proposes that international collaboration will meet the expanding call for development of leadership competencies in postgraduate medical learners. Two grounding frameworks were used: complexity science supports adding physician leadership training to the current momentum of CBME adoption, and relational cultural theory supports the engagement of diverse stakeholders in multiple jurisdictions around the world to ensure inclusivity in leadership education development. Findings An international collaborative identified key insights regarding the need to frame physician leadership education within a competency-based model. Practical implications International collaboration can be a vehicle for developing a globally relevant, generalizable physician leadership curriculum. This model can be expanded to encourage innovation, scholarship and program evaluation. Originality/value A competency-based leadership development curriculum is being designed by an international collaborative. The curriculum is based on established leadership and education frameworks. The international collaboration model provides opportunities for ongoing sharing, networking and diversification.

  1. High-magnetic-field research collaborations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goettee, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this project was to develop collaborations with the academic community to exploit scientific research potential of the pulsed magnetic fields that might be possible with electrically pulsed devices, as well as magneto-cumulative generators. The author started with a campaign of experiments using high-explosive-driven flux compression generators. The campaign's objective was to explore completely novel ideas in condensed-matter physics and chemistry. The initiative was very successful in pulling together top researchers from around the world

  2. Brazilian Participations in the International Astronomical Search Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, G. A.; Dalla-Costa, L. J.; Kalmus, A. T.; Kroth, E. C.; Matos, M. F.; Silva, A. L.; Silva, G. G.

    2014-10-01

    International Astronomical Search Collaboration (IASC) is an international educational project between universities, schools, observatories and research institutions. Its main objective is to enroll high school and college students in the monitoring and discovery of asteroids and Near Earth Objects (NEOs), especially Potentially Hazardous Asteroids. The methodology consists in the analysis of astronomical images obtained in several observatories in North America and Hawaii. The images are distributed throughout the school network and the results must be delivered in a 72-hour timeframe. Since 2010 Brazilian universities and schools have joined IASC, resulting in over a dozen new asteroids found (3 of them NEOs), and hundreds of measurements for already known asteroids. A major event in this collaboration was the All-Brazil Asteroid Search Campaign, which was conducted in September 2012. 2013 marks the fourth year of Brazilian participations in IASC, with one important milestone: the third straight appearance of a Brazilian institution in the Pan-STARRS campaign, which uses the PS1 telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii. We will present a summary of the overall results, as well as the latest news from 2013 campaigns. We will discuss the impact promoted by the past events, such as how the interest in astronomy changed before and after the campaigns, and it has helped the students to choose their future careers.

  3. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 32: A new era in international technical communication: American-Russian collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammia, Madelyn; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Keene, Michael L.; Burger, Robert H.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Until the recent dissolution of the Soviet Union, the Communist Party exerted a strict control of access to and dissemination of scientific and technical information (STI). This article presents models of the Soviet-style information society and the Western-style information society and discusses the effects of centralized governmental control of information on Russian technical communication practices. The effects of political control on technical communication are then used to interpret the results of a survey of Russian and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists concerning the time devoted to technical communication, their collaborative writing practices and their attitudes toward collaboration, the kinds of technical documents they produce and use, their views regarding the appropriate content for an undergraduate technical communication course, and their use of computer technology. Finally, the implications of these findings for future collaboration between Russian and U.S. engineers and scientists are examined.

  4. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. XXXII - A new era in international technical communication: American-Russian collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammia, Madelyn; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Keene, Michael L.; Burger, Robert H.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Until the recent dissolution of the Soviet Union, the Communist Party exerted a strict control of access to and dissemination of scientific and technical information. This article presents models of the Soviet-style information society and the Western-style information society and discusses the effects of centralized governmental control of information on Russian technical communication practices. The effects of political control on technical communication are then used to interpret the results of a survey of Russian and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists concerning the time devoted to technical communication, their collaborative writing practices and their attitudes toward collaboration, the kinds of technical documents they produce and use, their views regarding the appropriate content for an undergraduate technical communication course, and their use of computer technology. Finally, the implications of these findings for future collaboration between Russian and U.S. engineers and scientists are examined.

  5. Collaborative Research Program on Seafood Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-14

    Crystallographic Structures of Saxitoxins Cl and C2 Appendix C: Collaborative Research Program an Seafcod Toxins Progress Report on Ciguatera and Related...radioimmunoassay for PSP were also evalumted. The Hokama stick test for ciguatera toxin was also evaluated. 4. initiate Studies on the Accumulation...tco•d which caie a form of b-mnn poisoning referred to as ciguatera . The respcnsible toxins originate from ll1ular rine algae of the division

  6. Collaboration in Australian condensed matter physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cushion, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: This year marks the 'coming of age' of the annual Condensed Matter Physics Meetings which has constituted possibly the most successful physics series which has been run in Australia and New Zealand. The conferences have become colloquially known as the 'Wagga conferences' to the community, leading to such strange but interpretable phrases as 'Wagga is in New Zealand this year'. It seems an appropriate time to take stock of some of the changes which have taken place in Australian condensed matter physics research over the past 21 years. Statistics will be presented on some of the trends over this time, using the Wagga abstract books as the data source. Particular emphasis will be placed on the increase in collaborative research which has occurred, fuelled by a combination of government policies, reduction in resources and increasing complexity of some of the research projects. Collaborative papers now frequently include authors from more than one university as well as from CSIRO, ANSTO/AINSE, other government and semi-government laboratories and private industry. None of these occurred in the 'early days' but most would agree that the health of the discipline has been improved by the change. It is also appropriate to point out the role of the Wagga conferences in fostering these collaborations by bringing together the groups so that they could meet, interact and discover which people had the missing expertise to make a particular project viable

  7. Collaborative entrepreneurship: On the Influence of Internal and External Collaboration on Corporate Entrepreneurial Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; Timenes Laugen, Bjørge; Middel, Rick

    2008-01-01

    The present paper empirically tests the effect which internal/external collaboration has on innovation height and identifies characteristics of collaboration patterns leading to entrepreneurial innovation in particular. Doing so adds to the understanding of how corporate entrepreneurship best...... unfolds as interfirm activity, which here is termed collaborative entrepreneurship, and provides details on the particular patterns of Open Innovation. The empirical analysis is based on a data set with responses from 512 Danish engineers. The analysis finds that external collaboration has significantly...... different effects on innovation height depending on the type of partners involved, and furthermore suggests that the development of entrepreneurial innovation is not only dependent on high external involvement, but also on involvement and collaboration among internal functional departments and people....

  8. International Charter `Space and Major Disasters' Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. K.

    2017-12-01

    The International Charter aims at providing a unified system of space data acquisition and delivery to national disaster authorities of countries affected by natural or man-made disasters. Each of the sixteen Member Agencies has committed resources to support the objectives of the Charter and thus helping to mitigate the effects of disasters on human life and property, getting critical information into the hands of the disaster responders so that they can make informed decisions in the wake of a disaster. The Charter Member Agencies work together to provide remotely sensed imagery to any requesting country that is experiencing a natural or man-made disaster. The Space Agencies contribute priority satellite taskings, archive retrievals, and map production, as well as imagery of the affected areas. The imagery is provided at no cost to the affected country and is made available for the immediate response phase of the disaster. The Charter also has agreements with Sentinel Asia to submit activation requests on behalf of its 30+ member countries and the United Nations Office of Outer Space Affairs (UN OOSA) and United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR)/ United Nations Operational Satellite Applications Programme (UNOSAT) to submit activations on behalf of United Nations relief agencies such as UNICEF and UNOCHA. To further expand accessibility to the Charter Member Agency resources, the Charter has implemented the Universal Access initiative, which allows any country's disaster management authority to submit an application, attend a brief training session, and after successful completion, become an Authorized User able to submit activation requests without assistance from Member Agencies. The data provided by the Charter is used for many purposes including damage assessments, reference maps, evacuation route planning, search and rescue operations, decision maker briefings, scientific evaluations, and other response activities.

  9. Collaborative Research: The Alphabetic Braille and Contracted Braille Study as an Example of Collaborative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormsley, Diane P.; Emerson, Robert Wall; Erin, Jane

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the Alphabetic Braille Contracted Braille Study in relation to the dimensions of collaborative research: extent, intensity, substance, heterogeneity, velocity, formality, and productivity. It also discusses the dimensions of financing research and researchers' attitudes. The overall consensus is that the study would not have…

  10. Lewis' Educational and Research Collaborative Intership Program Grant Closeout Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Lewis' Educational and Research Collaborative Internship Program (LERCIP) is a collaborative undertaking by the Office of Educational Programs at NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field (formerly NASA Lewis Research Center) and the Ohio Aerospace Institute. This program provides 10-week internships and 10 or 12-week fellowships for undergraduate/graduate students and secondary school teachers. Approximately 130 interns are selected to participate in this program each year and begin arriving the second week in May. The internships provide students with introductory professional experiences to complement their academic programs. The interns are given assignments on research and development projects under the personal guidance of NASA professional staff members. Each intern is assigned a NASA mentor who facilitates a research assignment. In addition to the research assignment, the summer program includes a strong educational component that enhances the professional stature of the participants. The educational activities include a research symposium and a variety of workshops, lectures and short courses. An important aspect of the program is that it includes students with diverse social, cultural and economic backgrounds.

  11. International Collaboration on Air Pollution and Pregnancy Outcomes (ICAPPO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Tracey J.; Parker, Jennifer D.; Adams, Kate; Bell, Michelle L.; Gehring, Ulrike; Glinianaia, Svetlana; Ha, Eun-Hee; Jalaludin, Bin; Slama, Rémy

    2010-01-01

    Reviews find a likely adverse effect of air pollution on perinatal outcomes, but variation of findings hinders the ability to incorporate the research into policy. The International Collaboration on Air Pollution and Pregnancy Outcomes (ICAPPO) was formed to better understand relationships between air pollution and adverse birth outcomes through standardized parallel analyses in datasets from different countries. A planning group with 10 members from 6 countries was formed to coordinate the project. Collaboration participants have datasets with air pollution values and birth outcomes. Eighteen research groups with data for approximately 20 locations in Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America are participating, with most participating in an initial pilot study. Datasets generally cover the 1990s. Number of births is generally in the hundreds of thousands, but ranges from around 1,000 to about one million. Almost all participants have some measure of particulate matter, and most have ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide. Strong enthusiasm for participating and a geographically-diverse range of participants should lead to understanding uncertainties about the role of air pollution in perinatal outcomes and provide decision-makers with better tools to account for pregnancy outcomes in air pollution policies. PMID:20644693

  12. Arab Reform Initiative | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The conference will be devoted to an exchange between institutions conducting research on Islamist movements with support from IDRC and ARI. ... International Water Resources Association, in close collaboration with IDRC, is holding a webinar titled “Climate change and adaptive water management: Innovative solutions ...

  13. International collaboration on used fuel disposition crystalline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gardner, Payton [Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States); Kim, Geon-Young [Korean Atomic Energy Research Inst. Daejeon (Korea); Ji, Sung-Hoon [Korean Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daejeon (Korea)

    2016-08-01

    Active participation in international R&D is crucial for achieving the UFD long-term goals of conducting “experiments to fill data needs and confirm advanced modeling approaches” (by 2015) and of having a “robust modeling and experimental basis for evaluation of multiple disposal system options” (by 2020). DOE’s Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and its Office of Used Fuel Disposition Research and Development (UFD) have developed a strategic plan to advance cooperation with international partners. The international collaboration on the evaluation of crystalline disposal media at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in FY16 focused on the following four activities: (1) thermal-hydrologic-mechanical-chemical modeling single fracture evolution; (2) simulations of flow and transport in Bedrichov Tunnel, Czech Republic, (3) completion of streaming potential testing at Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), and (4) technical data exchange with KAERI on thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) properties and specifications of bentonite buffer materials. The first two activities are part of the Development of Coupled Models and their Validation against Experiments (DECOVALEX-2015) project.

  14. International Education Hubs: Collaboration for Competitiveness and Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jane

    2014-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the development of education hubs, a recent phenomenon in international higher education. Three models of hubs are examined in relation to the forces, risks, and opportunities of globalization and how local and international collaborations are essential for both global competitiveness and sustainability.

  15. The North American Career Development Partnership: Experiment in International Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carslon, Burton L.; Goguen, Robert A.; Jarvis, Phillip S.; Lester, Juliette N.

    2000-01-01

    Describes how career development programs became the focus of an international partnership between the United States and Canada. Traces the history of each country's efforts, beginning in the 1970s, which led to this significant international collaboration. Concludes with a discussion of the lessons learned from these experiences. (Author/JDM)

  16. National Storage Laboratory: a collaborative research project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Robert A.; Hulen, Harry; Watson, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    The grand challenges of science and industry that are driving computing and communications have created corresponding challenges in information storage and retrieval. An industry-led collaborative project has been organized to investigate technology for storage systems that will be the future repositories of national information assets. Industry participants are IBM Federal Systems Company, Ampex Recording Systems Corporation, General Atomics DISCOS Division, IBM ADSTAR, Maximum Strategy Corporation, Network Systems Corporation, and Zitel Corporation. Industry members of the collaborative project are funding their own participation. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory through its National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) will participate in the project as the operational site and provider of applications. The expected result is the creation of a National Storage Laboratory to serve as a prototype and demonstration facility. It is expected that this prototype will represent a significant advance in the technology for distributed storage systems capable of handling gigabyte-class files at gigabit-per-second data rates. Specifically, the collaboration expects to make significant advances in hardware, software, and systems technology in four areas of need, (1) network-attached high performance storage; (2) multiple, dynamic, distributed storage hierarchies; (3) layered access to storage system services; and (4) storage system management.

  17. Deep Learning: Enriching Teacher Training through Mobile Technology and International Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Amanda; Gibbs, Janet

    2018-01-01

    This article presents results from an international collaboration between college students and pre-service teachers in Norway and the UK. This research is part of a large, international project exploring and developing the interrelationship between mobile technology and teachers' perceptions of teaching and learning. Data was collected for this…

  18. US-China Collaboration on Landslide Research and Student Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G.

    2016-12-01

    Funded by a NSF International Research Experience for Students (IRES) project (OIA: 1460034) at the University of Houston (http://ires.nsm.uh.edu), the author brought eight U.S. students to China in the summer of 2016. The host university at the China side is the China University of Geoscience at Wuhan. The international collaborative project is designed to expose U.S. students to the international landslide research community at an early stage of their careers. The NSF IRES program will support minimum 18 U.S. students (two graduates and four undergraduates per year) to conduct advanced landslide research in the Three Gorges area in China during the summers (eight weeks) of 2016, 2017, and 2018. The 2016 summer program includes a one-week-long pre-training at the University of Houston, a two-week-long intensive Chinese language and cultural course at the main campus of the China University of Geosciences (Wuhan), a four-week-long landslide field investigation in the Three Gorges Reservoir area, and a one-week-long wrap-up at the University of Houston. This presentation will introduce the experiences and lessons that we learned from the first-year activities of the international collaborative project.

  19. Collaborative Research in Contexts of Inequality: The Role of Social Reflexivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, Brenda; Bozalek, Vivienne; Farmer, Jean; Garraway, James; Herman, Nicoline; Jawitz, Jeff; McMillan, Wendy; Mistri, Gita; Ndebele, Clever; Nkonki, Vuyisile; Quinn, Lynn; van Schalkwyk, Susan; Vorster, Jo-Anne; Winberg, Chris

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the role and value of social reflexivity in collaborative research in contexts of extreme inequality. Social reflexivity mediates the enablements and constraints generated by the internal and external contextual conditions impinging on the research collaboration. It fosters the ability of participants in a collaborative…

  20. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    It seeks particularly (but not exclusively) to encourage multidisciplinary research and collaboration ... teaching of the subject and their self-rated unseriousness about the subject. ..... ac.nz/~iase/publications/5/stan0219.pdf. 4. Wakeford RE.

  1. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    It seeks particularly (but not exclusively) to encourage multidisciplinary research and collaboration among ... in the medical wards of a teaching hospital and to generate discussions .... Manual data entry which is the current practice in most ...

  2. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    collaboration among scientists, the industry and the healthcare professionals. ... forum for the communication and evaluation of data, methods and findings in health ... research articles, 3,000 for technical notes, case reports, commentaries and ...

  3. INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION: US panel members named

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    After the demise of the US Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) project, the US Secretary of Energy has been requested to produce a plan to 'maximize the value of the investment in the project and minimizing the loss to the US, including recommendations as to the feasibility of utilizing SSC assets in whole or in part in pursuit of an international high energy physics endeavour.'

  4. International collaboration in the development of materials for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amelinckx, S.

    1988-01-01

    International collaboration in the field of fusion physics research has become a tradition since many years. There are good reasons for this. Fusion physics experiments require progressively larger and more expensive machines. The construction of a major fusion device is beyond the possibility of single nations, except for the largest ones. Moreover it is desirable to test several fundamentally different design options. It would therefore be unreasonable to duplicate major fusion physics experiments. The necessity to pool and coordinate efforts in this area has therefore been recognized since many years and not only within the European community, but even on a global scale. The situation is somewhat different in the area of fusion materials research. In a number of areas of materials research 'big machines' are not required and meaningful research is within the reach of even small countries, moreover it can be done in decentralized fashion. It should nevertheless be noted that the number of properties to be studied and the number of materials options to be evaluated is so extensive that even here excessive duplication would be harmful. (orig.)

  5. ICFA: Protvino meeting looks at trends in international collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    International collaboration is the lifeblood of Big Science, and in high energy physics the triennial 'Future Perspectives' meeting organized by the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) provides a valuable opportunity to reappraise trends in this collaboration. The latest meeting was held in October at Protvino, near Moscow, where the Institute for High Energy Physics is the scene of construction work for the 21-kilometre UNK proton rings and the projected home of a big new linear collider for electrons and positrons

  6. Collaborative action research: implementation of cooperative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Stoner, Marilyn; Molle, Mary E

    2010-06-01

    Nurse educators must continually improve their teaching skills through innovation. However, research about the process used by faculty members to transform their teaching methods is limited. This collaborative study uses classroom action research to describe, analyze, and address problems encountered in implementing cooperative learning in two undergraduate nursing courses. After four rounds of action and reflection, the following themes emerged: students did not understand the need for structured cooperative learning; classroom structure and seating arrangement influenced the effectiveness of activities; highly structured activities engaged the students; and short, targeted activities that involved novel content were most effective. These findings indicate that designing specific activities to prepare students for class is critical to cooperative learning. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Federated Identity Management for Research Collaborations

    CERN Document Server

    Broeder, Daan; Kelsey, David; Kershaw, Philip; Lüders, Stefan; Lyall, Andrew; Nyrönen, Tommi; Wartel, Romain; Weyer, Heinz J

    2012-01-01

    Federated identity management (FIM) is an arrangement that can be made among multiple organisations that lets subscribers use the same identification data to obtain access to the secured resources of all organisations in the group. Identity federation offers economic advantages, as well as convenience, to organisations and their users. For example, multiple institutions can share a single application, with resultant cost savings and consolidation of resources. In order for FIM to be effective, the partners must have a sense of mutual trust. A number of laboratories including national and regional research organizations are facing the challenge of a deluge of scientific data that needs to be accessed by expanding user bases in dynamic collaborations that cross organisational and national boundaries. Driven by these needs, representatives from a variety of research communities, including photon/neutron facilities, social science & humanities, high-energy physics, atmospheric science, bioinformatics and fusi...

  8. Building a biomedical cyberinfrastructure for collaborative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Peter A; Mobley, Lee Rivers; Hamilton, Carol M

    2011-05-01

    For the potential power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and translational medicine to be realized, the biomedical research community must adopt standard measures, vocabularies, and systems to establish an extensible biomedical cyberinfrastructure. Incorporating standard measures will greatly facilitate combining and comparing studies via meta-analysis. Incorporating consensus-based and well-established measures into various studies should reduce the variability across studies due to attributes of measurement, making findings across studies more comparable. This article describes two well-established consensus-based approaches to identifying standard measures and systems: PhenX (consensus measures for phenotypes and eXposures), and the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). NIH support for these efforts has produced the PhenX Toolkit, an assembled catalog of standard measures for use in GWAS and other large-scale genomic research efforts, and the RTI Spatial Impact Factor Database (SIFD), a comprehensive repository of geo-referenced variables and extensive meta-data that conforms to OGC standards. The need for coordinated development of cyberinfrastructure to support measures and systems that enhance collaboration and data interoperability is clear; this paper includes a discussion of standard protocols for ensuring data compatibility and interoperability. Adopting a cyberinfrastructure that includes standard measures and vocabularies, and open-source systems architecture, such as the two well-established systems discussed here, will enhance the potential of future biomedical and translational research. Establishing and maintaining the cyberinfrastructure will require a fundamental change in the way researchers think about study design, collaboration, and data storage and analysis. Copyright © 2011 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of international collaboration in PNC's R ampersand D programme for HLW disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Sumio; Umeki, Hiroyuki; Yamakawa, Minoru

    1996-01-01

    PNC has been active in promoting international cooperation in connection with the Japanese HLW disposal programme, based on both a bilateral and multilateral approach. Both types of cooperation are extremely useful; in particular, bilateral cooperation has the advantage of providing opportunities for in-depth discussions in mutual areas of interest. By way of contrast, multilateral cooperation also provides an international arena for broader discussion and corroboration of output from individual R ampersand D programmes. International collaboration also provides young researchers with an opportunity to learn from experience. Depending on the issues to be tackled, appropriate forms of collaboration have been integrated into PNC's strategy for maximizing output. The lessons learned from collaboration are very valuable and can be used directly in their programme to enhance its credibility. The format of collaboration has also been extensively developed: it has been found that resources can be utilized more effectively by sharing them appropriately

  10. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The International Journal of Health Research is an online international ... The journal welcomes original research papers, reviews and case reports on ..... mediator generated by endothelial cells, ... Springer Science and Business Media,.

  11. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal ... research papers, reviews and case reports on current topics of special ... formulated as Gastroretentive Drug Delivery System ...... In vivo gastric studies were run.

  12. Towards a measurement of internalization of collaboration scripts in the medical context - results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesewetter, Jan; Gluza, Martin; Holzer, Matthias; Saravo, Barbara; Hammitzsch, Laura; Fischer, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Collaboration as a key qualification in medical education and everyday routine in clinical care can substantially contribute to improving patient safety. Internal collaboration scripts are conceptualized as organized - yet adaptive - knowledge that can be used in specific situations in professional everyday life. This study examines the level of internalization of collaboration scripts in medicine. Internalization is understood as fast retrieval of script information. The goals of the current study were the assessment of collaborative information, which is part of collaboration scripts, and the development of a methodology for measuring the level of internalization of collaboration scripts in medicine. For the contrastive comparison of internal collaboration scripts, 20 collaborative novices (medical students in their final year) and 20 collaborative experts (physicians with specialist degrees in internal medicine or anesthesiology) were included in the study. Eight typical medical collaborative situations as shown on a photo or video were presented to the participants for five seconds each. Afterwards, the participants were asked to describe what they saw on the photo or video. Based on the answers, the amount of information belonging to a collaboration script (script-information) was determined and the time each participant needed for answering was measured. In order to measure the level of internalization, script-information per recall time was calculated. As expected, collaborative experts stated significantly more script-information than collaborative novices. As well, collaborative experts showed a significantly higher level of internalization. Based on the findings of this research, we conclude that our instrument can discriminate between collaboration novices and experts. It therefore can be used to analyze measures to foster subject-specific competency in medical education.

  13. Seafloor 2030 - Building a Global Ocean Map through International Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrini, V. L.; Wigley, R. A.; Falconer, R. K. H.; Jakobsson, M.; Allen, G.; Mayer, L. A.; Schmitt, T.; Rovere, M.; Weatherall, P.; Marks, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    With more than 85% of the ocean floor unmapped, a huge proportion of our planet remains unexplored. Creating a comprehensive map of seafloor bathymetry remains a true global challenge that can only be accomplished through collaboration and partnership between governments, industry, academia, research organizations and non-government organizations. The objective of Seafloor 2030 is to comprehensively map the global ocean floor to resolutions that enable exploration and improved understanding of ocean processes, while informing maritime policy and supporting the management of natural marine resources for a sustainable Blue Economy. Seafloor 2030 is the outcome of the Forum for Future of Ocean Floor Mapping held in Monaco in June 2016, which was held under the auspices of GEBCO and the Nippon Foundation of Japan. GEBCO is the only international organization mandated to map the global ocean floor and is guided by the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO. The task of completely mapping the ocean floor will require new global coordination to ensure that both existing data are identified and that new mapping efforts are coordinated to help efficiently "map the gaps." Fundamental to achieving Seafloor 2030 will be greater access to data, tools and technology, particularly for developing and coastal nations. This includes bathymetric post-processing and analysis software, database technology, computing infrastructure and gridding techniques as well as the latest developments in seafloor mapping methods and emerging crowd-sourced bathymetry initiatives. The key to achieving this global bathymetric map is capacity building and education - including greater coordination between scientific research and industry and the effective engagement of international organizations such as the United Nations.

  14. Experiences with remote collaborations in fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurden, G.A.; Davis, S.; Barnes, D.

    1998-03-01

    The magnetic fusion research community has considerable experience in placing remote collaboration tools in the hands of real user. The ability to remotely view operations and to control selected instrumentation and analysis tasks has been demonstrated. University of Wisconsin scientists making turbulence measurements on TFTR: (1) were provided with a remote control room from which they could operate their diagnostic, while keeping in close contact with their colleagues in Princeton. LLNL has assembled a remote control room in Livermore in support of a large, long term collaboration on the DIII-D tokamak in San Diego. (2) From the same control room, a joint team of MIT and LLNL scientists has conducted full functional operation of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak located 3,000 miles away in Cambridge Massachusetts. (3) These early efforts have been highly successful, but are only the first steps needed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a complete facilities on line environment. These efforts have provided a proof of principle for the collaboratory concept and they have also pointed out shortcomings in current generation tools and approaches. Current experiences and future directions will be discussed

  15. Standard methods for sampling freshwater fishes: Opportunities for international collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Scott A.; Mercado-Silva, Norman; Hubert, Wayne A.; Beard, Douglas; Dave, Göran; Kubečka, Jan; Graeb, Brian D. S.; Lester, Nigel P.; Porath, Mark T.; Winfield, Ian J.

    2017-01-01

    With publication of Standard Methods for Sampling North American Freshwater Fishes in 2009, the American Fisheries Society (AFS) recommended standard procedures for North America. To explore interest in standardizing at intercontinental scales, a symposium attended by international specialists in freshwater fish sampling was convened at the 145th Annual AFS Meeting in Portland, Oregon, in August 2015. Participants represented all continents except Australia and Antarctica and were employed by state and federal agencies, universities, nongovernmental organizations, and consulting businesses. Currently, standardization is practiced mostly in North America and Europe. Participants described how standardization has been important for management of long-term data sets, promoting fundamental scientific understanding, and assessing efficacy of large spatial scale management strategies. Academics indicated that standardization has been useful in fisheries education because time previously used to teach how sampling methods are developed is now more devoted to diagnosis and treatment of problem fish communities. Researchers reported that standardization allowed increased sample size for method validation and calibration. Group consensus was to retain continental standards where they currently exist but to further explore international and intercontinental standardization, specifically identifying where synergies and bridges exist, and identify means to collaborate with scientists where standardization is limited but interest and need occur.

  16. Phebus FP: organisation of the project and international collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tattegrain, A.; Hardt, P. von der

    1992-01-01

    PHEBUS Fission Product (FP) Research Programme developed from the initial French design study into a European project, and further into an international programme by agreements with overseas partners during the past two years. The programme is supervised by a Steering Committee which reviews the technical-scientific options and the results. The executive body under the Committee, the Project Group, includes a Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and Commission of the European Communities (CEC) manager as well as three (CEA) project leaders for design and manufacture, experiment operation, and interpretation of test results. The Steering Committee can request expertise from the two working groups the Analytical Group (SAWG) (elaborating test objectives, carrying out reactor calculations and test precalculations) and the Technical Group (TG) (assessing the designs proposed and the results obtained by the Project Group). A third group looks into financial aspects of the CEA-CEC contract only. The two working groups, SAWG and TG, play an important role in the exchange of information and of expertise between all partners. The paper reviews the internal Project organisation and the collaboration network, inside the European Community and through CEA overseas. (author)

  17. International Research Chairs Initiative | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The International Research Chairs Initiative (IRCI) is a seven-year, CA$8 million research program that pairs top research talent from universities in Canada with their counterparts in developing countries to address key ... The results of this joint effort: world-class discoveries and healthier, wealthier, fairer societies.

  18. International Collaboration Tools for Industrial Development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dan, Nagy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available - EU Horizon 2020 RISE program Goal: A great challenge for the future lies in the transfer of Industry 4.0 expertise and technologies in small and medium sized enterprises (SME). Although the high potential of Industry 4.0 in SMEs, the main limit... lies in a lack of concrete models for its implementation and application in small and medium enterprises. Thus, this research project titled “SME 4.0 - Smart Manufacturing and Logistics for SMEs in an X-to-order and Mass Customization Environment...

  19. INL - NNL an International Technology Collaboration Case Study - Advanced Fogging Technologies for Decommissioning - 13463

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banford, Anthony; Edwards, Jeremy; Demmer, Rick; Rankin, Richard; Hastings, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    International collaboration and partnerships have become a reality as markets continue to globalize. This is the case in nuclear sector where over recent years partnerships commonly form to bid for capital projects internationally in the increasingly contractorized world and international consortia regularly bid and lead Management and Operations (M and O) / Parent Body Organization (PBO) site management contracts. International collaboration can also benefit research and technology development. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) are internationally recognized organizations delivering leading science and technology development programmes both nationally and internationally. The Laboratories are actively collaborating in several areas with benefits to both the laboratories and their customers. Recent collaborations have focused on fuel cycle separations, systems engineering supporting waste management and decommissioning, the use of misting for decontamination and in-situ waste characterisation. This paper focuses on a case study illustrating how integration of two technologies developed on different sides of the Atlantic are being integrated through international collaboration to address real decommissioning challenges using fogging technology. (authors)

  20. INL - NNL an International Technology Collaboration Case Study - Advanced Fogging Technologies for Decommissioning - 13463

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banford, Anthony; Edwards, Jeremy [National Nuclear Laboratory, 5th Floor Chadwick House, Birchwood Park, Warrington WA3 6AE(United Kingdom); Demmer, Rick; Rankin, Richard [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83401(United States); Hastings, Jeremy [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    International collaboration and partnerships have become a reality as markets continue to globalize. This is the case in nuclear sector where over recent years partnerships commonly form to bid for capital projects internationally in the increasingly contractorized world and international consortia regularly bid and lead Management and Operations (M and O) / Parent Body Organization (PBO) site management contracts. International collaboration can also benefit research and technology development. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) are internationally recognized organizations delivering leading science and technology development programmes both nationally and internationally. The Laboratories are actively collaborating in several areas with benefits to both the laboratories and their customers. Recent collaborations have focused on fuel cycle separations, systems engineering supporting waste management and decommissioning, the use of misting for decontamination and in-situ waste characterisation. This paper focuses on a case study illustrating how integration of two technologies developed on different sides of the Atlantic are being integrated through international collaboration to address real decommissioning challenges using fogging technology. (authors)

  1. IEF 2008: An international collaborative effort | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-05-10

    May 10, 2011 ... ... North American ecohealth researchers “pay more attention to the ecological dimensions ... of the researchers were from North America, in 2008 both researchers and practitioners from all ... Reducing the risk of rabies in Bali.

  2. Authorship in "College & Research Libraries" Revisited: Gender, Institutional Affiliation, Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, James L.

    1996-01-01

    Updates earlier studies on the characteristics of authorship of articles published in "College & Research Libraries", focusing on gender, institutional affiliation, and extent of collaboration. Results show representation by academic librarians and authors affiliated with library schools increased, collaboration predominated, and…

  3. International R&D collaboration networks and free trade agreements

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Hua Sheng

    2006-01-01

    This thesis contributes to the analysis of optimal industrial and strategic trade policy in the presence of oligopoly and other forms of imperfect competition, so as to make contact with important empirical regularities and policy concerns, such as international R&D collaboration, unionization and free trade. First, in the context of international competition in which R&D plays an important role, we study the consequences of allowing governments to subsidize R&D and coalition devi...

  4. Global research collaboration and international education: Laser metal deposition of varying percent of Ti-6Al-4V + molybdenum on Ti64 substrate for biomedical/aerospace applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumpaty, S

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the characterization studies conducted by Milwaukee School of Engineering senior undergraduate students in South Africa under the Research Experiences for Undergraduates grant EEC-1460183 sponsored by the National Science...

  5. Neurolymphomatosis: An International Primary CNS Lymphoma Collaborative Group report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Grisariu (Sigal); B. Avni (Batia); T.T. Batchelor (Tracy); M.J. van den Bent (Martin); F. Bokstein (Felix); D. Schiff (David); O. Kuittinen (Outi); M.C. Chamberlain (Marc C.); P. Roth (Patrick); A. Nemets (Anatoly); E. Shalom (Edna); D. Ben-Yehuda (Dina); T. Siegal (Tali)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractNeurolymphomatosis (NL) is a rare clinical entity. The International Primary CNS Lymphoma Collaborative Group retrospectively analyzed 50 patients assembled from 12 centers in 5 countries over a 16-year period. NL was related to non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 90% and to acute leukemia in 10%.

  6. BRICS and International Collaborations in Higher Education in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, N. V.

    2015-01-01

    International cooperation and collaborations played an important role in the economic and educational development of several countries. In the 1950s and 1960s external aid was an important modality to establish cooperation between countries, especially between developing and developed countries. Cross-border activities in higher education used to…

  7. Collaborative applied research programs at AITF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Ross [Alberta Innovates Technology Futures (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Alberta Innovates Technology Futures (AITF) is a 600 employee company created in 2010 and owned by the Alberta government; offices are located in Edmonton, Devon, Vegreville and Calgary. The purpose of this document is to present the services provided by AITF. The company provides technical support and advisory services as well as commercialization support, they provide the link between the concept stage and the commercialization stage. AITF proposes collaborative programs which can be consortia made up of a series of projects on general industry issues or joint industry projects which focus on a specific issue. During this presentation, a joint industry project, the fuels and lubricants exchange program, was presented along with several consortia such as the carbonate research program, the materials and reliability in oil sands program, and the AACI program. This presentation highlighted the work carried out by AITF to meet the needs of their clients.

  8. Celebrating international collaboration: reflections on the first Virtual International Practice Development Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira Stephens

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on the first Virtual International Practice Development Conference, held in May 2015 to celebrate International Nurses Day. The article describes key aspects of its planning, offers a flavour of the event itself and sets out an evaluation, including learning points and recommendations to assist with planning similar events in the future. Central to our learning are: The need for practice developers to grasp skills in technology associated with virtual space The need to embrace virtual space itself as another means by which creative and communicative spaces can be established for active learning and practice development activities The potential advantages that international virtual engagement has over face-to-face national or international engagement The delivery of this virtual event made a significant international contribution to global practice development activity within the International Practice Development Collaborative and to enabling practice developers to connect and celebrate on a more global basis. Implications for practice: Virtual space technology skills can assist with sharing and translating practice development research, innovations and critical commentary Virtual space can provide an adjunct to creative and communicative learning spaces Global networking opportunities can be developed and enhanced through the use of virtual space technology Practice developers need to role model the use of virtual technologies

  9. FY 1997 report on the research for construction of NEDO`s vision. Regional environment and international collaboration; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho (NEDO vision sakutei ni muketa chosa kenkyu). Chiiki kankyo to kokusai kyoryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    It is necessary for NEDO to transfer the energy technology to developing countries and conduct collaborations with them efficiently. First of all, environments of the community were analyzed from a viewpoint of natural environment, social and cultural environment, and industrial and economic environment. Then, this report outlines the organizations of domestic and international aid agencies which have potentials to conduct alliance and collaboration with NEDO, and also illustrates their activities including financing and technology exchange, regional activities, and progress of activities. Alliances and collaborations with NGOs of each international organization were analyzed on the aspect of the fields and know-how of alliance with NGOs, selection standards of NGOs and necessary systems and organizations to make effective alliance and collaboration with NGOs, and some case studies were taken. Organization, purposes and activities of NGOs in Asian countries are introduced, and their current situations are illustrated. Finally, some proposals were offered to make alliances and collaborations with aid agencies and NGOs. They are concerned about the fields and know-how of alliance with NGOs, selection standards of NGOs and necessary systems and organizations to make effective alliance and collaboration with NGOs. 44 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Building an International Collaboration for GeoInformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, W. S.; Lehnert, K.; Klump, J.

    2005-12-01

    Geoinformatics (cyberinfrastructure for the geosciences) is being developed as a linked system of sites that provide to the Earth science community a library of research data research-grade tools to manipulate, mine, analyze and model interdisciplinary data, and mechanisms to provide the necessary computational resources for these activities. Our science is global in scope and hence, geoinformatics (GI) must be an international effort. How do we build this international GI? What are the main challenges presented by the political, cultural, organizational, and technical diversity of the global science community that we need to address to achieve a truly global cyberinfrastructure for the Geosciences? GI needs to be developed in an internet-like fashion establishing connections among independent globally distributed sites (`nodes') that will share, link, and integrate their data holdings and services. Independence of the GI pieces with respect to goals, scope, and approaches is critical to sustain commitment from people to build a GI node for which they feel ownership and get credit. This should not be fought by funding agencies - and certainly not by state and federal agencies. Communication, coordination, and collaboration are the core efforts to build the connections, but incentives and resources are required to advance and support them. Part of the coordination effort is development and maintenance of standards. Who should set these standards and govern their modification? Do we need an official international body to do so, and should this be a "governing body" or an "advisory body"? What role should international commissions and bodies such as CODATA/ICSU or IUGS-CGI, international societies and unions, the national geological surveys and other federal agencies play? Guidance from the science community is key to construct a system that geo-researchers will want to use, and that meets their needs. Only when the community endorses GI as a fundamental platform to

  11. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    engineering fields). It seeks particularly (but not exclusively) to encourage multidisciplinary research and collaboration among scientists, the industry and the healthcare ... The journal welcomes original research papers, reviews and case reports on current topics of special .... software package version 6.1 (CDC, Atlanta,.

  12. Building Collaborative Research Opportunities into Study Abroad Programs: A Case Study from Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís, Patricia; Price, Marie; Adames de Newbill, María

    2015-01-01

    As universities increase their international study opportunities, enormous potential exists to create geography field courses that provide undergraduates and graduate students with primary research experience and intercultural collaboration. This paper draws from our experience leading a two-week collaborative field course in Panama. We outline…

  13. Researchers active in two recent international tribology conferences

    OpenAIRE

    Nystrom, Lynn A.

    2005-01-01

    Virginia Tech faculty and former graduate students, in collaboration with researchers in Poland and Sweden, co-authored five papers presented at the international World Tribology Congress III held in Washington, D.C.

  14. European military mental health research: benefits of collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmerich, Hubertus; Willmund, G D; Wesemann, U; Jones, N; Fear, N T

    2017-06-01

    Despite joint participation in international military operations, few collaborative military mental health research projects have been undertaken by European countries. From a common perspective of military mental health researchers from Germany and the UK, the lack of shared research might be related not only to the use of different languages but also the different ways in which the two militaries provide mental health and medical support to operations and differences in military institutions. One area that is suitable for military health research collaboration within UK and German forces is mental health and well-being among military personnel. This could include the study of resilience factors, the prevention of mental disorder, mental health awareness, stigma reduction and the treatment of mental disorder. Military mental health research topics, interests and the studies that have been conducted to date in the UK and Germany have considerable overlap and commonality of purpose. To undertake the investigation of the long-term consequences of operational deployment, the specific burdens placed on military families and to further the understanding of the role of factors such as biomarkers for use in military mental health research, it seems advisable to forge international research alliances across European nations, which would allow for researchers to draw transcultural and generalisable conclusions from their work. Such an enterprise is probably worthwhile given the shared research interests of Germany and the UK and the common perspectives on military mental health in particular. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Modern International Research Groups: Networks and Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katehi, Linda

    2009-05-01

    In a globalized economy, education and research are becoming increasing international in content and context. Academic and research institutions worldwide try to internationalize their programs by setting formal or informal collaborations. An education that is enhanced by international experiences leads to mobility of the science and technology workforce. Existing academic cultures and research structures are at odds with efforts to internationalize education. For the past 20-30 years, the US has recognized the need to improve the abroad experience of our scientists and technologists: however progress has been slow. Despite a number of both federally and privately supported programs, efforts to scale up the numbers of participants have not been satisfactory. The exchange is imbalanced as more foreign scientists and researchers move to the US than the other way around. There are a number of issues that contribute to this imbalance but we could consider the US academic career system, as defined by its policies and practices, as a barrier to internationalizing the early career faculty experience. Strict curricula, pre-tenure policies and financial commitments discourage students, post doctoral fellows and pre-tenure faculty from taking international leaves to participate in research abroad experiences. Specifically, achieving an international experience requires funding that is not provided by the universities. Furthermore, intellectual property requirements and constraints in pre-tenure probationary periods may discourage students and faculty from collaborations with peers across the Atlantic or Pacific or across the American continent. Environments that support early career networking are not available. This presentation will discuss the increasing need for international collaborations and will explore the need for additional programs, more integration, better conditions and improved infrastructures that can encourage and support mobility of scientists. In addition

  16. Power Institutions and International Collaboration on the Kola Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir Hønneland

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses how international cooperative projects have contributed to increased interaction between civilian authorities and the military or other power agencies in Murmansk Oblast. The cases of fisheries enforcement, nuclear safety and the fight against communicable diseases, especially tuberculosis in prisons, are reviewed. The main lesson is that international collaboration ventures can sometimes provide arenas for initiating new coordination patterns that would otherwise not have evolved. Occasionally, the international project is simply the pretext necessary for changing a situation that both civilian and power agencies view as irrational. Whether these changes are fundamental and structural, however, remains to be seen.

  17. Mongolize or Westernize - international collaboration in educational change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baltzersen, Johnny

    The paper presented at the 10th International Congress of Mongolists, Ulaanbaatar, August 2011 discuss conflicting approaches to international collaboration in development aid with Mongolia as a case. The paper introduces the dilemmas facing education reform in Mongolia after the collapse of soci...... of socialism in 1990 and Mongolia's struggle to find a balance between (re)defining a Mongolian-based philosophical and practical foundation guiding education development and the flood of Western-based ideas following the international donor funded aid programs....

  18. Bridging EO Research, Operations and Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarth, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Building flexible and responsive processing and delivery systems is key to getting EO information used by researchers, policy agents and the public. There are typically three distinct processes we tackle to get product uptake: undertake research, operationalise the validated research, and deliver information and garner feedback in an appropriate way. In many cases however, the gaps between these process elements are large and lead to poor outcomes. Good research may be "lost" and not adopted, there may be resistance to uptake by government or NGOs of significantly better operational products based on EO data, and lack of accessibility means that there is no use of interactive science outputs to improve cross disciplinary science or to start a dialog with citizens. So one of the the most important tasks, if we wish to have broad uptake of EO information and accelerate further research, is to link these processes together in a formal but flexible way. One of the ways to operationalize research output is by building a platform that can take research code and scale it across much larger areas. In remote sensing, this is typically a system that has access to current and historical corrected imagery with a processing pipeline built over the top. To reduce the demand on high level scientific programmers and allowing cross disciplinary researchers to hack and play and refine, this pipeline needs to be easy to use, collaborative and link to existing tools to encourage code experimentation and reuse. It is also critical to have efficient, tight integration with information delivery and extension components so that the science relevant to your user is available quickly and efficiently. The rapid expansion of open data licensing has helped this process, but building top-down web portals and tools without flexibility and regard for end user needs has limited the use of EO information in many areas. This research reports on the operalization of a scale independent time series

  19. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal ... The journal is devoted to the promotion of health sciences and related disciplines (including medicine, pharmacy, nursing, biotechnology, cell and molecular ...

  20. Caring International Research Collaborative: A Five-Country Partnership to Measure Perception of Nursing Staffs’ Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Caring for Self

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Itzhaki

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Partnering in research across disciplines and across countries can be challenging due to differing contexts of practice and culture. This study sought to demonstrate how central constructs that have application across disciplines and countries can be studied while concurrently considering context. Groups of nurses from Botswana, Ireland, Israel, New Zealand, and Spain partnered to identify how to measure the constructs of caring for self, burnout, and compassion fatigue, replicating a study by Johnson (2012, who found that caring for self had a moderately strong negative relationship with both compassion fatigue and burnout. While these constructs were of interest to all five groups, the conversation of contextual influences varied. All five groups used the same instruments to measure the central constructs. Levels of burnout and compassion fatigue varied by country but were moderated by caring for self. Partnering across countries made it possible to understand that caring for self moderates the negative impact of burnout and compassion fatigue in all five countries. This study gives insight into methods for partnering across disciplines and contexts.

  1. Fiscal 1996 report on the committee for international collaborative research of medical and welfare apparatus; 1996 nendo chosa hokokusho (iryo fukushi kiki kokusai kyodo kenkyu jigyo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    From a viewpoint that cancer, cerebral hemorrhage, heart disease, etc. caused by the progress in aging are problems not only to Japan but to all developed countries, a possibility of Japan`s joint study with other countries was examined to promote efficiently and effectively research/development of the apparatus required. Moreover, from a viewpoint of being the same Asian countries, a possibility of the joint study was examined also with developing countries which are largely different in disease structure and environment of the use of apparatus from developed countries. In the examination on medical/welfare apparatus technology of China, before the site examination, a book of data was arranged on the actual state of population and disease structure and the R and D situation of medical/welfare apparatus in Japan, and at the same time, celebrated persons in China were introduced by the scientific society side as widely as possible. By this preliminary study, the original objective of the examination could be achieved. In the examination with the U.S. and Europe, Japan held meetings with engineers of the U.K., France and the U.S. Japan`s `load control type walking supporting apparatus,` of which the development was finished, was very highly evaluated by each organ of the countries

  2. Industry-university collaboration for research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalaby, B.A.; Snell, V.G.; Rouben, B.

    2015-01-01

    University Network for Excellence in Nuclear Engineering also known as UNENE is a joint partnership between the nuclear industry and thirteen universities. UNENE has been legally registered as of 2002 as a not for profit organization. The establishment of this network was prompted by industry to address anticipated retirement of a large number of professionals from industry starting in early 2000 onwards and thus the loss of nuclear knowledge and experience within industry. UNENE was created to provide a sustainable supply of highly qualified personnel to industry, support nuclear research within various universities and provide a course based Master's Degree in nuclear engineering to enhance the knowledge of young professionals within the industry in the science and technology of the CANDU nuclear power system. The paper describes the current UNENE, its research objectives, key outcomes of research programs to date and its contribution to industry needs in maintaining an economic and safe power plant performance of its nuclear fleet. The paper addresses achievements within the education program and the new 4-course diploma program recently introduced to enhance core expertise of young industry professionals. Also publications and national and international collaborations in various aspects of research have significantly contributed to Canada's position in nuclear science and research worldwide. Such collaborations are also addressed. (author)

  3. Industry-university collaboration for research and education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalaby, B.A.; Snell, V.G.; Rouben, B. [Univ. Network of Excellence in Nuclear Energy (UNENE), Ontario (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    University Network for Excellence in Nuclear Engineering also known as UNENE is a joint partnership between the nuclear industry and thirteen universities. UNENE has been legally registered as of 2002 as a not for profit organization. The establishment of this network was prompted by industry to address anticipated retirement of a large number of professionals from industry starting in early 2000 onwards and thus the loss of nuclear knowledge and experience within industry. UNENE was created to provide a sustainable supply of highly qualified personnel to industry, support nuclear research within various universities and provide a course based Master's Degree in nuclear engineering to enhance the knowledge of young professionals within the industry in the science and technology of the CANDU nuclear power system. The paper describes the current UNENE, its research objectives, key outcomes of research programs to date and its contribution to industry needs in maintaining an economic and safe power plant performance of its nuclear fleet. The paper addresses achievements within the education program and the new 4-course diploma program recently introduced to enhance core expertise of young industry professionals. Also publications and national and international collaborations in various aspects of research have significantly contributed to Canada's position in nuclear science and research worldwide. Such collaborations are also addressed. (author)

  4. Industry-university collaboration for research and education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalaby, B.A.; Snell, V.G.; Rouben, B., E-mail: basma.shalaby@rogers.com [University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Energy, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    University Network for Excellence in Nuclear Engineering also known as UNENE is a joint partnership between the nuclear industry and thirteen universities. UNENE has been legally registered as of 2002 as a not for profit organization. The establishment of this network was prompted by industry to address anticipated retirement of a large number of professionals from industry starting in early 2000 onwards and thus the loss of nuclear knowledge and experience within industry. UNENE was created to provide a sustainable supply of highly qualified personnel to industry, support nuclear research within various universities and provide a course based Master's Degree in nuclear engineering to enhance the knowledge of young professionals within the industry in the science and technology of the CANDU nuclear power system. The paper describes the current UNENE, its research objectives, key outcomes of research programs to date and its contribution to industry needs in maintaining an economic and safe power plant performance of its nuclear fleet. The paper addresses achievements within the education program and the new 4-course diploma program recently introduced to enhance core expertise of young industry professionals. Also publications and national and international collaborations in various aspects of research have significantly contributed to Canada's position in nuclear science and research worldwide. Such collaborations are also addressed. (author)

  5. International Collaboration in Satellite Observations for Disaster Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Kenneth A.; Abrams, Michael

    2012-01-01

    When lives are threatened or lost due to catastrophic disasters, and when massive financial impacts are experienced, international emergency response teams rapidly mobilize to provide urgently required support. Satellite observations of affected areas often provide essential insight into the magnitude and details of the impacts. The large cost and high complexity of developing and operating satellite flight and ground systems encourages international collaboration in acquiring imagery for such significant global events in order to speed delivery of critical information to help those affected, and optimize spectral, spatial, and temporal coverage of the areas of interest. The International Charter-Space and Major Disasters was established to enable such collaboration in sensor tasking during times of crisis and is often activated in response to calls for assistance from authorized users. Insight is provided from a U.S. perspective into sensor support for Charter activations and other disaster events through a description of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), which has been used to support emergency situations for over a decade through its expedited tasking and near real-time data delivery capabilities. Examples of successes achieved and challenges encountered in international collaboration to develop related systems and fulfill tasking requests suggest operational considerations for new missions as well as areas for future enhancements.

  6. A Study on planning of the international collaboration foundation for the Advanced Nuclear Technology Development Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2005-03-15

    Korea has participated in the international collaboration programs for the development of future nuclear energy systems driven by the countries holding advanced nuclear technology and Korea and U.S. have cooperated in the INERI. This study aimed mainly at developing the plan for participation in the collaborative development of the Gen IV, searching the participation strategy for INERI and the INPRO, and the international cooperation in these programs. Contents and scope of the study for successful achievement are as follows; Investigation and analysis of international and domestic trends related to advanced nuclear technologies, Development of the plan for collaborative development of the Gen IV and conducting the international cooperation activities, Support for the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. and conducting the international cooperation, International cooperation activities for the INPRO. This study can be useful for planning the research plan and setting up of the strategy of integrating the results of the international collaboration and the domestic R and D results by combining the Gen IV and the domestic R and D in the field of future nuclear technology. Futhermore, this study can contribute to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities not only with the advanced countries for acquisition of the advanced technologies but also with the developing countries for the export of the domestic nuclear energy systems.

  7. A Study on planning of the international collaboration foundation for the Advanced Nuclear Technology Development Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2005-03-01

    Korea has participated in the international collaboration programs for the development of future nuclear energy systems driven by the countries holding advanced nuclear technology and Korea and U.S. have cooperated in the INERI. This study aimed mainly at developing the plan for participation in the collaborative development of the Gen IV, searching the participation strategy for INERI and the INPRO, and the international cooperation in these programs. Contents and scope of the study for successful achievement are as follows; Investigation and analysis of international and domestic trends related to advanced nuclear technologies, Development of the plan for collaborative development of the Gen IV and conducting the international cooperation activities, Support for the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. and conducting the international cooperation, International cooperation activities for the INPRO. This study can be useful for planning the research plan and setting up of the strategy of integrating the results of the international collaboration and the domestic R and D results by combining the Gen IV and the domestic R and D in the field of future nuclear technology. Futhermore, this study can contribute to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities not only with the advanced countries for acquisition of the advanced technologies but also with the developing countries for the export of the domestic nuclear energy systems

  8. A Study on planning of promotion for international collaborative development of Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hee, Chang Moon; Yang, M. S.; Ha, J. J.

    2006-06-01

    Korea has participated in the international collaboration programs for the development of future nuclear energy systems driven by the countries holding advanced nuclear technology and Korea and U. S. have cooperated in the INERI. This study is mainly at developing the plan for participation in the collaborative development of the Gen IV, searching the participation strategy for INERI and the INPRO, and the international cooperation in these programs. Contents and scope of the study for successful achievement are as follows; - Investigation and analysis of international and domestic trends related to advanced nuclear technologies - Development of the plan for collaborative development of the Gen IV and conducting the international cooperation activities - Support for the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U. S. and conducting the international cooperation - International cooperation activities for the INPRO This study can be useful for planning the research plan and setting up of the strategy of integrating the results of the international collaboration and the domestic R and D results by combining the Gen IV and the domestic R and D in the field of future nuclear technology. Furthermore, this study can contribute to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities not only with the advanced countries for acquisition of the advanced technologies but also with the developing countries for the export of the domestic nuclear energy systems

  9. Reasoning about the value of cultural awareness in international collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Bernáld

    Full Text Available As international collaborations become a part of everyday life, cultural awareness becomes crucial for our ability to work with people from other countries. People see, evaluate, and interpret things differently depending on their cultural background and cultural awareness. This includes aspects such as appreciation of different communication patterns, the awareness of different value systems and, not least, to become aware of our own cultural values, beliefs and perceptions. This paper addresses the value of cultural awareness in general through describing how it was introduced in two computer science courses with a joint collaboration between students from the US and Sweden. The cultural seminars provided to the students are presented, as well as a discussion of the students\\' reflections and the teachers\\' experiences. The cultural awareness seminars provided students with a new understanding of cultural differences which greatly improved the international collaboration. Cultural awareness may be especially important for small countries like New Zealand and Sweden, since it could provide an essential edge in collaborations with representatives from more \\'powerful\\' countries.

  10. Global research collaboration: Networks and partners in South East Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Woolley, Richard; Robinson-Garcia, Nicolas; Costas, Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    This is an empirical paper that addresses the role of bilateral and multilateral international co-authorships in the six leading science systems among the ASEAN group of countries (ASEAN6). The paper highlights the different ways that bilateral and multilateral co-authorships structure global networks and the collaborations of the ASEAN6. The paper looks at the influence of the collaboration styles of major collaborating countries of the ASEAN6, particularly the USA and Japan. It also highlig...

  11. Crossing boundaries to improve mental health in the Americas: international collaborative authorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killion, Chery M

    2007-01-01

    A nurse anthropologist with a background in international collaborations attended Project LEAD for two years, which enabled her to continue to serve as an advocate for the mentally ill in Belize. The anthropologist collaborated with a psychiatrist from Belize to develop a cross-cultural, cross-discipline publication, "Mental Health in Belize: A National Priority, " which highlights the work of psychiatric nurse practitioners in the country. The researcher learned to collaborate with her peer in Belize through face to face discussions and e-mail and overcame technological difficulties and cultural barriers to produce an international publication. Project LEAD gave the author a sense of self-discovery and self-knowledge, reinforced core values, and developed a frame of reference for leadership. The author also benefited from discussions by local, national, and international leaders on leadership in terms of its key components, contexts, challenges, triumphs, and styles.

  12. Assessment of precision and concordance of quantitative mitochondrial DNA assays: a collaborative international quality assurance study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammond, Emma L.; Sayer, David; Nolan, David; Walker, Ulrich A.; Ronde, Anthony de; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Cote, Helene C. F.; Gahan, Michelle E.; Cherry, Catherine L.; Wesselingh, Steven L.; Reiss, Peter; Mallal, Simon

    2003-01-01

    Background: A number of international research groups have developed DNA quantitation assays in order to investigate the role of mitochondrial DNA depletion in anti-retroviral therapy-induced toxicities. Objectives: A collaborative study was undertaken to evaluate intra-assay precision and between

  13. Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia (CARIAA) builds the resilience of vulnerable populations and their livelihoods in these hot spots by supporting collaborative research on climate change adaptation to inform policy and practice. CARIAA takes a unique approach by organizing research ...

  14. Teacher research as self-study and collaborative activity

    OpenAIRE

    Gade, Sharada

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights two insightful methods for advancing teacher research: practitioner self-study in relation to a range of texts, with which to examine one’s educational landscape; and classroom interventions conceived as a Vygotskian activity, via teacher-researcher collaboration. Both approaches allow teachers and collaborating researchers to share individual expertise across institutional boundaries and engage in creative local action.

  15. Status Report on Laboratory Testing and International Collaborations in Salt.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Matteo, Edward N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reedlunn, Benjamin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sobolik, Steven R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mills, Melissa Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kirkes, Leslie Dawn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Xiong, Yongliang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Icenhower, Jonathan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report is a summary of the international collaboration and laboratory work funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Spent Fuel and Waste Science & Technology (SFWST) as part of the Sandia National Laboratories Salt R&D work package. This report satisfies milestone levelfour milestone M4SF-17SN010303014. Several stand-alone sections make up this summary report, each completed by the participants. The first two sections discuss international collaborations on geomechanical benchmarking exercises (WEIMOS) and bedded salt investigations (KOSINA), while the last three sections discuss laboratory work conducted on brucite solubility in brine, dissolution of borosilicate glass into brine, and partitioning of fission products into salt phases.

  16. Norway's role in international collaboration towards rehabilitation of Andreeva Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdall, M; Sneve, M; Standring, W J F; Amundsen, I

    2009-12-01

    Andreeva Bay is one of the largest and most hazardous nuclear legacy sites in northwest Russia. The site is the location of large amounts of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and radioactive wastes and the risks associated with the site have precipitated an extensive international collaborative effort towards securing and rehabilitating the site. Given the location and proximity of the site, Norway has and continues to contribute in a number of ways towards this effort. Norway's activities in relation to rehabilitative efforts at Andreeva Bay are focused on both infrastructural and remediative initiatives as well as regulatory collaboration with Russia towards ensuring effective and safe operations during handling and removal of SNF and radioactive materials. This article describes Norway's role within international efforts in the context of the rehabilitation of Andreeva Bay and outlines previous activities and Norway's future direction with respect to the site.

  17. Supply chain process collaboration and Internet utilization: an international perspective of business to business relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Paulo Valadares de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compiles the findings of an international study which primary objective was to investigate the relationships between Internet utilization in business-to-business relationships, collaborative efforts and their impact over supplier and customer-oriented processes performance. It highlights the Internet as an important enhancer of collaboration in supply chains and addresses the effects of such efforts on companies’ overall performance. As a conclusive-descriptive and quantitative study, data from a survey of 788 companies from the USA, China, Canada, United Kingdom, and Brazil were analyzed with the use of descriptive statistics, reliability evaluation of the research model’s internal scales, path analysis and structural equation modeling to evaluate supply chain processes collaboration, both up- and down-stream. Internet utilization in supplier and customer-oriented processes was found positively related to collaborative practices in business-to-business relationships. Collaborative practices in supplier and customer-oriented processes, in turn, showed potential effects on performance. Also, supplier-oriented processes performance was found positively associated with customer-oriented process performance. Both internet use and collaborative practices are even more important in a high-context country like Brazil. The paper helps clarify the impact of internet use on business-to-business collaborative relationships. In this sense, practitioners can take this impact to redraw the organizational landscape and business processes amongst supply chain participants.

  18. Collaborative research among academia, business, and government

    Science.gov (United States)

    SETAC is a tripartite organization comprised chiefly of three sectors: academia, government, and industry. Collaborative connections within and among these sectors provide the basis for scientific structural integrity. Such interactions generally foster scientific integrity, tra...

  19. Collaboration in Education: International Field Class on Permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streletskiy, D. A.; Shiklomanov, N. I.; Grebenets, V. I.

    2011-12-01

    Field work is a dominant research component in the earth sciences. Understanding and proper use of field methods can enhance the quality of research, while lack of understanding in acquiring data can lead to misleading interpretation of results. Early involvement in field work helps students to bridge the gap between theoretical knowledge and practical applications and to be better prepared for future jobs. However, many University curriculums lack adequate, required field methods courses. Presented are results of collaboration between the George Washington and Moscow State Universities in organization of field courses on Arctic physical and social environments. The latest field course took place in summer 2011 in the Central Siberian region and is a part of the International Permafrost Association education and outreach effort initiated during International Polar Year. The 25 day course involved fifteen Russian and US students who traveled from Moscow to Krasnoyarsk, and then along Yenisey river to Norilsk. This route was chosen as having diversity of natural conditions and variety of economic, engineering, and demographic problems associated with development. The main goal of the class was to investigate permafrost conditions of Central Siberia; dynamics of upper permafrost due to changing climate and under anthropogenic influence; and to understand factors responsible for the diversity of permafrost conditions in the region. The students and instructors were required to make presentations on a variety of topics focusing on the region or research methods, such as climate, vegetation, hydrology, history of development, economics, remote sensing, etc. The emphasis in the field was made on understanding permafrost in relation to other components of the natural system. For example, landscape conditions (including microclimatic, biogeographic and pedologic conditions) were described at every site located in natural settings. Sites located in settlements were evaluated

  20. The Diesel Combustion Collaboratory: Combustion Researchers Collaborating over the Internet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. M. Pancerella; L. A. Rahn; C. Yang

    2000-02-01

    The Diesel Combustion Collaborator (DCC) is a pilot project to develop and deploy collaborative technologies to combustion researchers distributed throughout the DOE national laboratories, academia, and industry. The result is a problem-solving environment for combustion research. Researchers collaborate over the Internet using DCC tools, which include: a distributed execution management system for running combustion models on widely distributed computers, including supercomputers; web-accessible data archiving capabilities for sharing graphical experimental or modeling data; electronic notebooks and shared workspaces for facilitating collaboration; visualization of combustion data; and video-conferencing and data-conferencing among researchers at remote sites. Security is a key aspect of the collaborative tools. In many cases, the authors have integrated these tools to allow data, including large combustion data sets, to flow seamlessly, for example, from modeling tools to data archives. In this paper the authors describe the work of a larger collaborative effort to design, implement and deploy the DCC.

  1. Visualization analysis of author collaborations in schizophrenia research

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ying; Duan, Zhiguang

    2015-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is a serious mental illness that levies a heavy medical toll and cost burden throughout the world. Scientific collaborations are necessary for progress in psychiatric research. However, there have been few publications on scientific collaborations in schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent of author collaborations in schizophrenia research. Methods This study used 58,107 records on schizophrenia from 2003 to 2012 which were downloaded from S...

  2. 28th February 2011 - Turkish Minister of Foreign Affairs A. Davutoğlu signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; meeting the CERN Turkish Community at Point 1; visiting the ATLAS control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    28th February 2011 - Turkish Minister of Foreign Affairs A. Davutoğlu signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; meeting the CERN Turkish Community at Point 1; visiting the ATLAS control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  3. 14th March 2011 - Australian Senator the Hon. K. Carr Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research in the ATLAS Visitor Centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti,visiting the SM18 area with G. De Rijk,the Computing centre with Department Head F. Hemmer, signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer with Head of International relations F. Pauss

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    14th March 2011 - Australian Senator the Hon. K. Carr Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research in the ATLAS Visitor Centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti,visiting the SM18 area with G. De Rijk,the Computing centre with Department Head F. Hemmer, signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer with Head of International relations F. Pauss

  4. Animal Research International: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Animal Research International: Advanced Search ... containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ... Journal of Biomedical Research, African Journal of Biotechnology, African Journal of Chemical Education ...

  5. Benefits of Collaborative Finance Research in Business Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration in business research provides outcomes and results that are more efficient than those due to individual efforts. The integration of diverse environments and disciplines often generates creative ideas. Collaboration increases the quality of research and effectiveness of discoveries, and promotes the dissemination of knowledge. Cases…

  6. Collaborating internationally on physician leadership education: first steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlow, Anne; Chan, Ming-Ka; Bohnen, Jordan David; Blumenthal, Daniel Mark; Sánchez-Mendiola, Melchor; de Camps Meschino, Diane; Samson, Lindy Michelle; Busari, Jamiu

    2016-07-04

    Purpose Physicians are often ill-equipped for the leadership activities their work demands. In part, this is due to a gap in traditional medical education. An emergent international network is developing a globally relevant leadership curriculum for postgraduate medical education. The purpose of this article is to share key learnings from this process to date. Design/methodology/approach The Toronto International Summit on Leadership Education for Physicians (TISLEP) was hosted by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, and the University of Toronto's Faculty of Medicine and Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation. Of 64 attendees from eight countries, 34 joined working groups to develop leadership competencies. The CanMEDS Competency Framework, stage of learner development and venue of learning formed the scaffold for the work. Emotional intelligence was selected as the topic to test the feasibility of fruitful international collaboration; results were presented at TISLEP 2015. Findings Dedicated international stakeholders engaged actively and constructively through defined working groups to develop a globally relevant, competency-based curriculum for physician leadership education. Eleven principles are recommended for consideration in physician leadership curriculum development. Defining common language and taxonomy is essential for a harmonized product. The importance of establishing an international network to support implementation, evaluation, sustainability and dissemination of the work was underscored. Originality/value International stakeholders are collaborating successfully on a graduated, competency-based leadership curriculum for postgraduate medical learners. The final product will be available for adaptation to local needs. An international physician leadership education network is being developed to support and expand the work underway.

  7. Collaborative web hosting challenges and research directions

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Reaz

    2014-01-01

    This brief presents a peer-to-peer (P2P) web-hosting infrastructure (named pWeb) that can transform networked, home-entertainment devices into lightweight collaborating Web servers for persistently storing and serving multimedia and web content. The issues addressed include ensuring content availability, Plexus routing and indexing, naming schemes, web ID, collaborative web search, network architecture and content indexing. In pWeb, user-generated voluminous multimedia content is proactively uploaded to a nearby network location (preferably within the same LAN or at least, within the same ISP)

  8. De-romanticising dialogue in collaborative health care research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Professor MSO Louise; Olesen, Birgitte Ravn; Scheffmann-Petersen, Michael

    2018-01-01

    in the tensional interplay of multiple voices whereby certain voices dominate. Finally, the article offers a typology of ideal types of collaborative research relations that can be used in the initial research phase as a platform for reflexive discussion between researchers and potential collaborative partners......In the current socio-political conjuncture, collaborative, dialogic forms of knowledge production abound and are idealised as democratic and inclusive. The aim of the article is to contribute to the body of critical, reflexive analyses of collaborative research by analysing how complex dynamics...... of exclusion as well as inclusion create tensions in researchers’ attempts to establish collaborative relations in the initial phase of an action research project. The analysis applies a framework combining Bakhtinian dialogic communication theory and Foucauldian theory to explore inclusion and exclusion...

  9. International collaboration on capture, storage and utilization of greenhouse gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, P.

    1998-01-01

    Climate change will have world-wide implications. So it is highly appropriate that there should be international collaboration to investigate technologies for reducing emissions of greenhouse gases, the root cause of the problem. Sixteen countries, as well as three industrial sponsors, support the IEA Greenhouse Gas R and D Program and, in many cases, industry is also involved indirectly, through the national memberships. This provides a broad range of interest and expertise to guide the management of the Program, as well as ensuring that the results reach a wide audience. The IEA Greenhouse Gas R and D Program has three main activities: (1) evaluation of technologies for mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from use of fossil fuels; (2) dissemination of the results of these studies; (3) identification of targets for research, development and demonstration and promotion of these findings. In its first five years of operation, the Program has studied the major greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide and methane, and various means of reducing their emissions. The main emphasis has been placed on capture, storage and utilization of CO 2 from power generation. This option is now much better understood and can be compared with more established measures, such as fuel switching, energy efficiency improvements and use of renewable energy. As well as studying abatement of CO 2 emissions, the Program has conducted a series of studies of technologies for reducing CH 4 emissions from man-made sources. The Program's activities are carried out by the Operating Agent, who develops and manages a series of technical studies to meet members' requirements

  10. 19th International Conference on Interactive Collaborative Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Guralnick, David; Uhomoibhi, James

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Interactive Collaborative Learning, held 21-23 September 2016 at Clayton Hotel in Belfast, UK. We are currently witnessing a significant transformation in the development of education. The impact of globalisation on all areas of human life, the exponential acceleration of developments in both technology and the global markets, and the growing need for flexibility and agility are essential and challenging elements of this process that have to be addressed in general, but especially in the context of engineering education. To face these topical and very real challenges, higher education is called upon to find innovative responses. Since being founded in 1998, this conference has consistently been devoted to finding new approaches to learning, with a focus on collaborative learning. Today the ICL conferences have established themselves as a vital forum for the exchange of information on key trends and findings, and of practical lessons le...

  11. Internal and External Collaboration in New Product Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timenes Laugen, Bjørge; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; Middel, Rick

    2009-01-01

    Industry and academia alike are increasingly becoming aware of the fact that innovation does not take place in isolated cells or functions within the firm. During the last the years the term open innovation has emphasised the importance of internal and external collaboration in order to increase...... strategic priorities influence the degree of external and internal involvement in the NPD process, moderated by contextual factors. Results based on analyses of 584 companies from the International Manufacturing Strategy Survey (IMSS) 2005 indicate that suppliers are heavily involved in the NPD process...... in firms in B2C markets aiming at increasing the innovation volume. For B2B companies the reverse picture emerges. However, when the aim is to increase the radicality of new products, suppliers and customers are heavily involved for firms in B2B markets. Further, market uncertainty, and to some extent...

  12. Collaborative innovation: Internal and external involvement in new product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timenes Laugen, Bjørge; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2011-01-01

    Industry and academia alike are increasingly becoming aware of the fact that innovation does not take place in isolated cells or functions within the firm. During the last the years the term open innovation has emphasized the importance of internal and external collaboration in order to increase...... strategic priorities influence the degree of external and internal involvement in the NPD process, moderated by contextual factors. Results based on analyses of 584 companies from the International Manufacturing Strategy Survey (IMSS) 2005 indicate that suppliers are heavily involved in the NPD process...... in firms in B2C markets aiming at increasing the innovation volume. For B2B companies the reverse picture emerges. However, when the aim is to increase the radicality of new products, suppliers and customers are heavily involved for firms in B2B markets. Further, market uncertainty, and to some extent...

  13. Collaborative Learning. Research to Practice Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    A Fully Integrated Educational System practices collaborative learning among all peers. The study summarized in this report (Zhang, X., Anderson, R. C., Morris, J., Miller, B., Nguyen-Janiel, K. T., Lin, T., Zhang, J., Jadallah, M., Scott, T., Sun, J., Latawjec, B., Ma, S., Grabow, K., & Hsu, J. Y. (2016). "Improving children's competence…

  14. USDA-EPA Collaborative Ammonia Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2014, a work group was formed between USDA and EPA to facilitate information exchange on ammonia emissions from agriculture, air quality impacts and emission mitigation options and to identify opportunities for collaboration. This document provides background on the work grou...

  15. Identifying Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration in Instructional Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yonjoo

    2017-01-01

    Interdisciplinarity is defined as communication and collaboration across academic disciplines. The instructional technology (IT) field has claimed to have an interdisciplinary nature influenced by neighboring fields such as psychology, communication, and management. However, it has been difficult to find outstanding evidence of the field's…

  16. Experiences from Nordic research collaboration in linguistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helge Sandøy

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The project “Modern loanwords in the languages of the Nordic countries (MIN – Moderne importord i språka i Norden” was the first large-scale collaborative project between linguists in the Nordic countries. This article presents both the aim of the project and some experiences from the work with respect to project design, financing and networking.

  17. Health Maintenance System (HMS) Hardware Research, Design, and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Stefanie M.

    2010-01-01

    The Space Life Sciences division (SLSD) concentrates on optimizing a crew member's health. Developments are translated into innovative engineering solutions, research growth, and community awareness. This internship incorporates all those areas by targeting various projects. The main project focuses on integrating clinical and biomedical engineering principles to design, develop, and test new medical kits scheduled for launch in the Spring of 2011. Additionally, items will be tagged with Radio Frequency Interference Devices (RFID) to keep track of the inventory. The tags will then be tested to optimize Radio Frequency feed and feed placement. Research growth will occur with ground based experiments designed to measure calcium encrusted deposits in the International Space Station (ISS). The tests will assess the urine calcium levels with Portable Clinical Blood Analyzer (PCBA) technology. If effective then a model for urine calcium will be developed and expanded to microgravity environments. To support collaboration amongst the subdivisions of SLSD the architecture of the Crew Healthcare Systems (CHeCS) SharePoint site has been redesigned for maximum efficiency. Community collaboration has also been established with the University of Southern California, Dept. of Aeronautical Engineering and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Hardware disbursements will transpire within these communities to support planetary surface exploration and to serve as an educational tool demonstrating how ground based medicine influenced the technological development of space hardware.

  18. International energy technology collaboration and climate change mitigation. Case study 1. Concentrating Solar Power Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philibert, C. [Energy and Environment Division, International Energy Agency IEA, Paris (France)

    2004-07-01

    Mitigating climate change and achieving stabilisation of greenhouse gas atmospheric concentrations will require deep reductions in global emissions of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions. Developing and disseminating new, low-carbon energy technology will thus be needed. Two previous AIXG papers have focused on possible drivers for such a profound technological change: Technology Innovation, Development and Diffusion, released in June 2003, and International Energy Technology Collaboration and Climate Change Mitigation, released in June 2004. The first of these papers assesses a broad range of technical options for reducing energy-related CO2 emissions. It examines how technologies evolve and the role of research and development efforts, alternative policies, and short-term investment decisions in making long-term options available. It considers various policy tools that may induce technological change, some very specific, and others with broader expected effects. Its overall conclusion is that policies specifically designed to promote technical change, or 'technology push', could play a critical role in making available and affordable new energy technologies. However, such policies would not be sufficient to achieve the Convention's objective in the absence of broader policies. First, because there is a large potential for cuts that could be achieved in the short run with existing technologies; and second, the development of new technologies requires a market pull as much as a technology push. The second paper considers the potential advantages and disadvantages of international energy technology collaboration and transfer for promoting technological change. Advantages of collaboration may consist of lowering R and D costs and stimulating other countries to invest in R and D; disadvantage may include free-riding and the inefficiency of reaching agreement between many actors. This paper sets the context for further discussion on the role of

  19. Dynamics of International Business Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunz, Werner; Manning, Stephan; Pedersen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the evolution of the field of international business (IB) research based on a relational cluster analysis of co-citations in the Journal of International Business Studies (JIBS) from 1982 to 2011. Particularly, we examine the changing role of theory in relation to empirical IB...... research. Based on a factor and network analysis, we identify distinct clusters of IB research and their relations over time. We show that the initial focus of IB research on issues of international expansion has shifted towards issues of governance and implementation. In this process, debates on foreign...... entry mode and culture have served as important integrating themes. At the same time, theory debates in IB have expanded from a narrow focus on explaining international expansion, to a rather heterogeneous conglomerate of approaches which have assisted increasingly differentiated empirical research. Our...

  20. International Occupational Therapy Research Priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Lynette; Coppola, Susan; Alvarez, Liliana; Cibule, Lolita; Maltsev, Sergey; Loh, Siew Yim; Mlambo, Tecla; Ikiugu, Moses N; Pihlar, Zdenka; Sriphetcharawut, Sarinya; Baptiste, Sue; Ledgerd, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Occupational therapy is a global profession represented by the World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT). International research priorities are needed for strategic guidance on global occupational therapy practice. The objective of this study was to develop international research priorities to reflect global occupational therapy practice. A Delphi study using three rounds of electronic surveys, distributed to WFOT member organizations and WFOT accredited universities, was conducted. Data were analyzed after each round, and priorities were presented for rating and ranking in order of importance. Forty-six (53%) out of 87 WFOT member countries participated in the Delphi process. Eight research priorities were confirmed by the final electronic survey round. Differences were observed in rankings given by member organizations and university respondents. Despite attrition at Round 3, the final research priorities will help to focus research efforts in occupational therapy globally. Follow-up research is needed to determine how the research priorities are being adopted internationally.

  1. Introduction: international research ethics education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millum, Joseph; Sina, Barbara

    2014-04-01

    NIH's Fogarty International Center has provided grants for the development of training programs in international research ethics for low- and middle-income (LMIC) professionals since 2000. Drawing on 12 years of research ethics training experience, a group of Fogarty grantees, trainees, and other ethics experts sought to map the current capacity and need for research ethics in LMICs, analyze the lessons learned about teaching bioethics, and chart a way forward for research ethics training in a rapidly changing health research landscape. This collection of papers is the result.

  2. Evaluation of an international and interprofessional collaboration forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Teresa; Hua, Susan; Turale, Sue

    2016-11-01

    International and interprofessional collaborations are increasingly becoming a core requirement for health professionals in our globalized world. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Asia Pacific Alliance of Health Leaders (APAHL) Forum to enhance the development of international perspectives and leadership among students and faculty in the discipline of health. This pilot study used a student-designed questionnaire to evaluate the views of students and faculty members about the effectiveness of APAHL in meeting its goals. Quantitative data from the scaled items on the questionnaire were analyzed by aggregating the data. Qualitative data were analyzed using a qualitative descriptive approach. Study participants comprised of 22 health science (nursing and laboratory science) students and 15 faculty members. Both faculty and students agreed that APAHL was effective in leadership development of students, as well as in advancing internationalization, interprofessional collaboration, and cultural awareness among students. A clear theme among the students was acknowledgement of the importance of communication, in particular being proficient in English. Difficulties in communication were an issue for both students and faculty members. This pilot study has shown the benefits of a student-focused international forum in developing cross-cultural awareness, and will provide the groundwork for evaluating the effectiveness of cross-cultural and interprofessional leadership forums aimed particularly at students of health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Collaborative Oceanographic Research Opportunities with Schmidt Ocean Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zykov, V.

    2014-12-01

    Schmidt Ocean Institute (http://www.schmidtocean.org/) was founded by Dr. Eric Schmidt and Wendy Schmidt in 2009 to support frontier oceanographic research and exploration to expand the understanding of the world's oceans through technological advancement, intelligent, data-rich observation and analysis, and open sharing of information. Schmidt Ocean Institute operates a state-of-the-art globally capable research vessel Falkor (http://www.schmidtocean.org/story/show/47). After two years of scientific operations in the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean, Eastern and Central Pacific, R/V Falkor is now preparing to support research in the Western Pacific and Eastern Indian Oceans in 2015 and 2016. As part of the long term research program development for Schmidt Ocean Institute, we aim to identify initiatives and projects that demonstrate strong alignment with our strategic interests. We focus on scientific opportunities that highlight effective use of innovative technologies to better understand the oceans, such as, for example, research enabled with remotely operated and autonomous vehicles, acoustics, in-situ sensing, telepresence, etc. Our technology-first approach to ocean science gave rise to infrastructure development initiatives, such as the development of a new full ocean depth Hybrid Remotely Operated Vehicle, new 6000m scientific Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, live HD video streaming from the ship to YouTube, shipboard high performance supercomputing, etc. We also support projects focusing on oceanographic technology research and development onboard R/V Falkor. We provide our collaborators with access to all of R/V Falkor's facilities and instrumentation in exchange for a commitment to make the resulting scientific data openly available to the international oceanographic community. This presentation aims to expand awareness about the interests and capabilities of Schmidt Ocean Institute and R/V Falkor among our scientific audiences and further

  4. Visualization analysis of author collaborations in schizophrenia research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Duan, Zhiguang

    2015-02-19

    Schizophrenia is a serious mental illness that levies a heavy medical toll and cost burden throughout the world. Scientific collaborations are necessary for progress in psychiatric research. However, there have been few publications on scientific collaborations in schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent of author collaborations in schizophrenia research. This study used 58,107 records on schizophrenia from 2003 to 2012 which were downloaded from Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI Expanded) via Web of Science. CiteSpace III, an information visualization and analysis software, was used to make a visual analysis. Collaborative author networks within the field of schizophrenia were determined using published documents. We found that external author collaboration networks were more scattered while potential author collaboration networks were more compact. Results from hierarchical clustering analysis showed that the main collaborative field was genetic research in schizophrenia. Based on the results, authors belonging to different institutions and in different countries should be encouraged to collaborate in schizophrenia research. This will help researchers focus their studies on key issues, and allow each other to offer reasonable suggestions for making polices and providing scientific evidence to effectively diagnose, prevent, and cure schizophrenia.

  5. International Research and Studies Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The International Research and Studies Program supports surveys, studies, and instructional materials development to improve and strengthen instruction in modern foreign languages, area studies, and other international fields. The purpose of the program is to improve and strengthen instruction in modern foreign languages, area studies and other…

  6. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal allowing ... forum for the communication and evaluation of data, methods and findings in health sciences and related ... Conclusion: Permeation rate of drugs across the ..... New Delhi, McGraw Hill Medical Publishing ... Human skin permeation of.

  7. International collaborative fire modeling project (ICFMP). Summary of benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roewekamp, Marina; Klein-Hessling, Walter; Dreisbach, Jason; McGrattan, Kevin; Miles, Stewart; Plys, Martin; Riese, Olaf

    2008-09-01

    This document was developed in the frame of the 'International Collaborative Project to Evaluate Fire Models for Nuclear Power Plant Applications' (ICFMP). The objective of this collaborative project is to share the knowledge and resources of various organizations to evaluate and improve the state of the art of fire models for use in nuclear power plant fire safety, fire hazard analysis and fire risk assessment. The project is divided into two phases. The objective of the first phase is to evaluate the capabilities of current fire models for fire safety analysis in nuclear power plants. The second phase will extend the validation database of those models and implement beneficial improvements to the models that are identified in the first phase of ICFMP. In the first phase, more than 20 expert institutions from six countries were represented in the collaborative project. This Summary Report gives an overview on the results of the first phase of the international collaborative project. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the capability of fire models to analyze a variety of fire scenarios typical for nuclear power plants (NPP). The evaluation of the capability of fire models to analyze these scenarios was conducted through a series of in total five international Benchmark Exercises. Different types of models were used by the participating expert institutions from five countries. The technical information that will be useful for fire model users, developers and further experts is summarized in this document. More detailed information is provided in the corresponding technical reference documents for the ICFMP Benchmark Exercises No. 1 to 5. The objective of these exercises was not to compare the capabilities and strengths of specific models, address issues specific to a model, nor to recommend specific models over others. This document is not intended to provide guidance to users of fire models. Guidance on the use of fire models is currently being

  8. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Reference Ranges for Fasting Profiles and Oral Glucose Tolerance Test ... Submission of Manuscript: The International Journal of Health Research uses a journal management software to allow .... medical textbooks [4, 5] and internet. In the.

  9. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2008-11-03

    Nov 3, 2008 ... The International Journal of Health Research is an online ... forum for the communication and evaluation of data, methods and findings ... Introduction ... worms are pathogenic for human beings. .... McGraw Hill Co., New York,.

  10. DOE, IAEA collaborate to put decades of nuclear research online

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Decades of nuclear research supported by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies are being made searchable on the World Wide Web, as part of a collaborative effort between the DOE and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The project aims to give researchers, academics, and the general public access to vast volumes of valuable nuclear-related research over the internet. As part of its knowledge preservation mandate, the IAEA' s International Nuclear Information System(INIS) works to preserve nuclear knowledge by digitizing historic nuclear energy research documents dating from 1970 through the early 1990s. Collections from over 29 countries are now digitally available and several additional digital preservation projects are ongoing or are being established, particularly in the Latin America and Caribbean regions. ''Thanks to the collaborative work of the IAEA and its Member States, scientists and students in the nuclear field now have instant access to important research and technical information over the internet,'' said IAEA Deputy Director General for Nuclear Energy Yury Sokolov. ''Our INIS programme continues to work to preserve and provide access to publications and documents on the peaceful applications of nuclear technology.'' The DOE project is one of the larger programmes in the INIS project, and includes more than 180,000 documents from the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI). OSTI is the U.S. representative to INIS and has had its own digitization focus in recent years. The novel partnership highlights the longstanding mutual benefits of DOE participation in INIS. In essence, it opens up previous research on the safe and peaceful uses of nuclear energy by making it freely and quickly available to scientists and engineers. By making scientific data electronically available, the INIS database helps scientists and students to attain volumes of data that are otherwise inaccessible

  11. ENT audit and research in the era of trainee collaboratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew E; Hardman, John; Ellis, Matthew; Williams, Richard J

    2018-05-26

    Large surgical audits and research projects are complex and costly to deliver, but increasingly surgical trainees are delivering these projects within formal collaboratives and research networks. Surgical trainee collaboratives are now recognised as a valuable part of the research infrastructure, with many perceived benefits for both the trainees and the wider surgical speciality. In this article, we describe the activity of ENT trainee research collaboratives within the UK, and summarise how INTEGRATE, the UK National ENT Trainee Research Network, successfully delivered a national audit of epistaxis management. The prospective audit collected high-quality data from 1826 individuals, representing 94% of all cases that met the inclusion criteria at the 113 participating sites over the 30-day audit period. It is hoped that the audit has provided a template for subsequent high-quality and cost-effective national studies, and we discuss the future possibilities for ENT trainee research collaboratives.

  12. Crop improvement in the CGIAR as a global success story of open access and international collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Byerlee

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available International agricultural research has historically been an example par excellence of open source approach to biological research. Beginning in the 1950s and especially in the 1960s, a looming global food crisis led to the development of a group of international agricultural research centers with a specific mandate to foster international exchange and crop improvement relevant to many countries. This formalization of a global biological commons in genetic resources was implemented through an elaborate system of international nurseries with a breeding hub, free sharing of germplasm, collaboration in information collection, the development of human resources, and an international collaborative network. This paper traces the history of the international wheat program with particular attention to how this truly open source system operated in practice and the impacts that it had on world poverty and hunger. The paper also highlights the challenges of maintaining and evolving such a system over the long term, both in terms of financing, as well the changing ‘rules of the game’ resulting from international agreements on intellectual property rights and biodiversity. Yet the open source approach is just as relevant today, as witnessed by current crises in food prices and looming crop diseases problem of global significance.

  13. Networking 2.0: Expanding your collaboration circles through the Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee (IARPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, J. A.; Bowden, S.; Stephenson, S. N.; Starkweather, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee (IARPC) envisions a prosperous, sustainable, and healthy Arctic understood through innovative and collaborative research coordinated among Federal agencies and domestic and international partners. IARPC's approach is to harnesses the talent of the scientific and stakeholder community through Federally-run but broadly open collaboration teams, and an innovative website that expands the frontiers of collaborative research. The Obama Administration released the five-year Arctic Research Plan: FY2013-2017 in February 2013. The Plan focuses on advancing knowledge and sustainability of the Arctic by improving collaboration in seven priority research areas: sea ice and marine ecosystems, terrestrial ice and ecosystems, atmospheric studies, observing systems, regional climate models, human health studies, and adaptation tools for communities. From these seven research areas, 12 collaboration teams were formed to respond to the 145 milestones laid out in the Plan. The collaboration teams are charged with enhancing inter-institutional and interdisciplinary implementation of scientific research on local, regional, and circumpolar environmental and societal issues in the Arctic. The collaboration teams are co-chaired by Federal program managers, and, in some cases, external partners and are open to research and stakeholder communities. They meet on a regular basis by web- or teleconference to inform one another about ongoing and planned programs and new research results, as well as to inventory existing programs, identify gaps in knowledge and research, and address and implement the Plan's milestones. In-between meetings, team members communicate via our innovative, user-driven, collaboration website. Members share information about their research activities by posting updates, uploading documents, and including events on our calendar, and entering into dialogue about their research activities. Conversations taking place on the

  14. The European Multicentre Bronchiectasis Audit and Research Collaboration (EMBARC: experiences from a successful ERS Clinical Research Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Chalmers

    2017-09-01

    To understand the role of Clinical Research Collaborations as the major way in which the European Respiratory Society can stimulate clinical research in different disease areas To understand some of the key features of successful disease registries To review key epidemiological, clinical and translational studies of bronchiectasis contributed by the European Multicentre Bronchiectasis Audit and Research Collaboration (EMBARC project in the past 5 years To understand the key research priorities identified by EMBARC for the next 5 years

  15. Digital Divide and International Research and Development in Information Technology and Teacher Education, Part 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laferriere, Therese; Resta, Paul; Davis, Niki; McLaughlin, Robert; Orey, Michael; Shakwa, Geoffrey; Malone, Todd; Wilder, Hilary; Gibson, Ian; Beisser, Sally; FitzGibbon, Ann; Brennan Freeman, Eileen; Castro-Filho, Jose Aires; Voogt, Joke; Knezek, Gerald; Hargrave, Connie; Carlsen, Roger; McFerrin, Karen; Price, Jerry; Weber, Roberta; Willis, Dee Anna

    2007-01-01

    The maturing research and development foci of SITE's International Committee have an ethical dimension. Comparative research and international collaboration are a healthy way, facilitated by communication technologies, to increase diversity within teacher education as well as to increase the quality

  16. Digital Divide and International Research and Development in Information Technology and Teacher Education, Part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laferriere, Therese; Resta, Paul; Davis, Niki; McLaughlin, Robert; Orey, Michael; Shakwa, Geoffrey; Malone, Todd; Wilder, Hilary; Gibson, Ian; Beisser, Sally; FitzGibbon, Ann; Brennan Freeman, Eileen; Castro-Filho, Jose Aires; Voogt, Joke; Knezek, Gerald; Hargrave, Connie; Carlsen, Roger; McFerrin, Karen; Price, Jerry; Weber, Roberta; Willis, Dee Anna

    2007-01-01

    The maturing research and development foci of SITE's International Committee have an ethical dimension. Comparative research and international collaboration are a healthy way, facilitated by communication technologies, to increase diversity within teacher education as well as to increase the quality

  17. Validation of the Impact of Health Information Technology (I-HIT) Scale: an international collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Patricia C; Hurley, Ann C; Brown, Suzanne; Carr, Robyn; Cashen, Margaret; Collins, Rita; Cook, Robyn; Currie, Leanne; Docherty, Charles; Ensio, Anneli; Foster, Joanne; Hardiker, Nicholas R; Honey, Michelle L L; Killalea, Rosaleen; Murphy, Judy; Saranto, Kaija; Sensmeier, Joyce; Weaver, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) Nursing Informatics Community developed a survey to measure the impact of health information technology (HIT), the I-HIT Scale, on the role of nurses and interdisciplinary communication in hospital settings. In 2007, nursing informatics colleagues from Australia, England, Finland, Ireland, New Zealand, Scotland and the United States formed a research collaborative to validate the I-HIT across countries. All teams have completed construct and face validation in their countries. Five out of six teams have initiated reliability testing by practicing nurses. This paper reports the international collaborative's validation of the I-HIT Scale completed to date.

  18. Proven collaboration model for impact generating research with universities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bezuidenhout, DF

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available -optics, image processing and computer vision. This paper presents the research collaboration model with universities that has ensured the PRISM programme's success. It is shown that this collaboration model has resulted in a pipeline of highly-skilled people...

  19. De-romanticising dialogue in collaborative health care research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Louise Jane; Olesen, Birgitte Ravn; Scheffmann-Petersen, Michael

    2018-01-01

    In the current socio-political conjuncture, collaborative, dialogic forms of knowledge production abound and are idealised as democratic and inclusive. The aim of the article is to contribute to the body of critical, reflexive analyses of collaborative research by analysing how complex dynamics...

  20. Research Collaborations Between Universities and Department of Defense Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-31

    Council – Resident Research Associateship (USAF/NRC-RRA) Program,” last accessed March 10, 2013, http://www.wpafb.af.mil/ library /factsheets...as CRAs and CTAs, could enable collaboration through university consortia designed to support DOD laboratory research. Such alliances would have the...university consortia , may be able to leverage partnerships that meet their collaborative research needs. 5. Increased Patent Filing Fees when Partnering

  1. Advances in Wilms Tumor Treatment and Biology: Progress Through International Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dome, Jeffrey S; Graf, Norbert; Geller, James I; Fernandez, Conrad V; Mullen, Elizabeth A; Spreafico, Filippo; Van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy

    2015-09-20

    Clinical trials in Wilms tumor (WT) have resulted in overall survival rates of greater than 90%. This achievement is especially remarkable because improvements in disease-specific survival have occurred concurrently with a reduction of therapy for large patient subgroups. However, the outcomes for certain patient subgroups, including those with unfavorable histologic and molecular features, bilateral disease, and recurrent disease, remain well below the benchmark survival rate of 90%. Therapy for WT has been advanced in part by an increasingly complex risk-stratification system based on patient age; tumor stage, histology, and volume; response to chemotherapy; and loss of heterozygosity at chromosomes 1p and 16q. A consequence of this system has been the apportionment of patients into such small subgroups that only collaboration between large international WT study groups will support clinical trials that are sufficiently powered to answer challenging questions that move the field forward. This article gives an overview of the Children's Oncology Group and International Society of Pediatric Oncology approaches to WT and focuses on four subgroups (stage IV, initially inoperable, bilateral, and relapsed WT) for which international collaboration is pressing. In addition, biologic insights resulting from collaborative laboratory research are discussed. A coordinated expansion of international collaboration in both clinical trials and laboratory science will provide real opportunity to improve the treatment and outcomes for children with renal tumors on a global level. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Productive international collaboration in the large coil task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Komarek, P.; Shimamoto, S.; Vecsey, G.

    1987-01-01

    The Large Coil Task (LCT), initiated in 1977, has been very productive of useful technical information about superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil design and manufacture. Moreover, it has demonstrated close international collaboration in fusion technology development, including integration of large components built in four different countries. Each of six 40-t test coils was designed and produced by a major industrial team, with government laboratory guidance, to a common set of specifications. The six were assembled into a toroidal array for testing in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge. Testing was done by a team of representatives of EURATOM, Japan, Switzerland, and the United States, with each participant having full access to all data. Coils were thoroughly instrumented, enabling penetrating analysis of behavior

  3. Expanding NASA and Roscosmos Scientific Collaboration on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasbrook, Pete

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is a world-class laboratory orbiting in space. NASA and Roscosmos have developed a strong relationship through the ISS Program Partnership, working together and with the other ISS Partners for more than twenty years. Since 2013, based on a framework agreement between the Program Managers, NASA and Roscosmos are building a joint program of collaborative research on ISS. This international collaboration is developed and implemented in phases. Initially, members of the ISS Program Science Forum from NASA and TsNIIMash (representing Roscosmos) identified the first set of NASA experiments that could be implemented in the "near term". The experiments represented the research categories of Technology Demonstration, Microbiology, and Education. Through these experiments, the teams from the "program" and "operations" communities learned to work together to identify collaboration opportunities, establish agreements, and jointly plan and execute the experiments. The first joint scientific activity on ISS occurred in January 2014, and implementation of these joint experiments continues through present ISS operations. NASA and TsNIIMash have proceeded to develop "medium term" collaborations, where scientists join together to improve already-proposed experiments. A major success is the joint One-Year Mission on ISS, with astronaut Scott Kelly and cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko, who returned from ISS in March, 2016. The teams from the NASA Human Research Program and the RAS Institute for Biomedical Problems built on their considerable experience to design joint experiments, learn to work with each other's protocols and processes, and share medical and research data. New collaborations are being developed between American and Russian scientists in complex fluids, robotics, rodent research and space biology, and additional human research. Collaborations are also being developed in Earth Remote Sensing, where scientists will share data from imaging

  4. Conceptions and Expectations of Research Collaboration in the European Social Sciences: Research Policies, Institutional Contexts and the Autonomy of the Scientific Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeau, Yann; Papatsiba, Vassiliki

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the interactions between policy drivers and academic practice in international research collaboration. It draws on the case of the Open Research Area (ORA), a funding scheme in the social sciences across four national research agencies, seeking to boost collaboration by supporting "integrated" projects. The paper…

  5. Cross-border data exchange - a case study on international collaboration gone wrong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanko-Hombach, Valentina

    2016-04-01

    The subject of ethics in science has become a hot topic recently (Gleick, 2011). As publication pressure on researchers increases and use of the internet allows faster turn-around, the quality of the peer review process has suffered. This presentation describes one case of scientific ethics violation in which the editors of a high-ranking scientific journal improperly permitted publication of a paper that was based upon unethical acquisition of data and failed to acknowledge scientific collaboration and exchange of intellectual property. We will present "Case description" and "Ethical issues" with a hope that our experience draws attention to important ethical issues in international collaborative research, and prevents such misconduct in the future. Since international research involves cooperation and coordination among many people in different disciplines and institutions across national borders, ethical standards should promote values that are essential to integrity and collaborative work, including trust, accountability, mutual respect, and fairness. One lesson to be learned is not to engage in collaboration without a written agreement stating clearly who is responsible for what and how the results of collaborative research are to be shared. This is especially important in cases of international collaborations, particularly those involving smaller or developing nations who often do not have the high-tech facilities of developed nations. There is also need to establish clear regulations regarding co-authorship on papers in which intellectual property and significant financial investment was made to allow the research to proceed. As such, a system of ethics to guide the practice of science from data collection to publication and beyond is timely and much needed to protect the integrity of scientific collaboration. It will keep science moving forward by validating research findings and confirming or raising questions about results. References Benos, D. J., Fabres

  6. Factors that impact interdisciplinary natural science research collaboration in academia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maglaughlin, Kelly L.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2005-01-01

    to provide a more comprehensive understanding of interdisciplinary scientific research collaboration within the natural sciences in academia. Data analysis confirmed factors previously identified in various literatures and yielded new factors. A total of twenty factors were identified, and classified......Interdisciplinary collaboration occurs when people with different educational and research backgrounds bring complementary skills to bear on a problem or task. The strength of interdisciplinary scientific research collaboration is its capacity to bring together diverse scientific knowledge...... to address complex problems and questions. However, interdisciplinary scientific research can be difficult to initiate and sustain. We do not yet fully understand factors that impact interdisciplinary scientific research collaboration. This study synthesizes empirical data from two empirical studies...

  7. International collaboration in the history of science of Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soňa ŠTRBÁŇOVÁ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last ten years, approximately, we could witness an evolution in informal international collaboration focusing on shared and interconnected history of science in the Habsburg Monarchy and in Central Europe in general. This effort, which includes mainly historians of science from Austria, Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland, has already produced a number of important results and contributed to the thematization of some timeless topics of history of sciences such as, for instance, nationalization and internationalization of science. In the context of this cooperation, the seminar of Jan Surman, a historian of science of Polish descent, held at the Institute of Contemporary History of the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague in May 2015, concentrated on the formation of national scientific terminologies. It also underlined the necessity and usefulness of international collaboration in achieving a deeper understanding of the “national” histories of science, which cannot be separated from the “international” history.

  8. India's participation in the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, Shishir

    2012-01-01

    Keeping its vision of developing fusion energy as a viable source, India joined the ITER collaboration in December 2005. ITER is a seven party collaboration with China, EU, India, Japan, S. Korea, Russia and the USA. ITER has a challenging mission of achieving Q=10 figure of merit at 500 MW fusion power output. The construction of ITER is structured as a set of 'in-kind' procurement packages to be executed by the partners. This involves all activities like design, prototyping, testing, shipping and assembly with commissioning at the ITER site at Cadarache, France. Currently, ITER presents the only opportunity to carry out novel experiments with burning plasmas and the new realms of fusion physics. It is important to participate in such experiments with a view for their exploitation in future. This talk summarizes the ITER device, its key challenges, role played by India and how these enmesh with the future of domestic program in fusion research. (author)

  9. The ANTOSTRAT legacy: Science collaboration and international transparency in potential marine mineral resource exploitation of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Alan; Barker, Peter; Barrett, Peter; Behrendt, John; Brancolini, Giuliano; Childs, Jonathan R.; Escutia, Carlota; Jokat, Wilfried; Kristoffersen, Yngve; Leitchenkov, German; Stagg, Howard; Tanahashi, Manabu; Wardell, Nigel; Webb, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The Antarctic Offshore Stratigraphy project (ANTOSTRAT; 1989–2002) was an extremely successful collaboration in international marine geological science that also lifted the perceived “veil of secrecy” from studies of potential exploitation of Antarctic marine mineral resources. The project laid the groundwork for circum-Antarctic seismic, drilling, and rock coring programs designed to decipher Antarctica’s tectonic, stratigraphic, and climate histories. In 2002, ANTOSTRAT evolved into the equally successful and currently active Antarctic Climate Evolution research program. The need for, and evolution of, ANTOSTRAT was based on two simple tenets within SCAR and the Antarctic Treaty: international science collaboration and open access to data. The ANTOSTRAT project may be a helpful analog for other regions of strong international science and geopolitical interests, such as the Arctic. This is the ANTOSTRAT story.

  10. Animal Research International: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. Animal Research International is an online Journal inaugurated in University of Nigeria to meet the growing need for an indigenous and authoritative organ for the dissemination of the results of scientific research into the fauna of Africa and the world at large. Concise contributions on investigations on ...

  11. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J.; Chang, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Bae, Y. Y.; Kim, W. W.; Jeong, I.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, J. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    Generation IV International Forum(GIF), where 13 countries including Korea collaborate to develop future nuclear energy systems, put into force 'Generation IV International Forum Project Arrangement' in 2007 for the international research and development of Gen IV Systems, following the entry into force of Framework Agreement in 2005. The International Nuclear Research Initiative(I-NERI) between Korea and United States and the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems and Fuel Cycles(INPRO) of IAEA are continued in this year, produced lots of visible outcomes. These international activities have a common goal of the collaborative development of advanced nuclear system technologies but differ in the main focusing areas and aspects, so Korea needs to establish the integrated strategy based on the distinguished and complementary approach for the participation of each international programs, as examples the GIF for the advanced system technology development, INPRO for the set-up of institution and infra-structure, and I-NERI for the access of the core technologies and acquisition of the transparency of nuclear R and D.

  12. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J.; Chang, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Bae, Y. Y.; Kim, W. W.; Jeong, I.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, J. H.

    2008-06-01

    Generation IV International Forum(GIF), where 13 countries including Korea collaborate to develop future nuclear energy systems, put into force 'Generation IV International Forum Project Arrangement' in 2007 for the international research and development of Gen IV Systems, following the entry into force of Framework Agreement in 2005. The International Nuclear Research Initiative(I-NERI) between Korea and United States and the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems and Fuel Cycles(INPRO) of IAEA are continued in this year, produced lots of visible outcomes. These international activities have a common goal of the collaborative development of advanced nuclear system technologies but differ in the main focusing areas and aspects, so Korea needs to establish the integrated strategy based on the distinguished and complementary approach for the participation of each international programs, as examples the GIF for the advanced system technology development, INPRO for the set-up of institution and infra-structure, and I-NERI for the access of the core technologies and acquisition of the transparency of nuclear R and D

  13. From global bioethics to ethical governance of biomedical research collaborations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlberg, Ayo; Rehmann-Sutter, Christoph; Sleeboom-Faulkner, Margaret; Lu, Guangxiu; Döring, Ole; Cong, Yali; Laska-Formejster, Alicja; He, Jing; Chen, Haidan; Gottweis, Herbert; Rose, Nikolas

    2013-12-01

    One of the features of advanced life sciences research in recent years has been its internationalisation, with countries such as China and South Korea considered 'emerging biotech' locations. As a result, cross-continental collaborations are becoming common generating moves towards ethical and legal standardisation under the rubric of 'global bioethics'. Such a 'global', 'Western' or 'universal' bioethics has in turn been critiqued as an imposition upon resource-poor, non-Western or local medical settings. In this article, we propose that a different tack is necessary if we are to come to grips with the ethical challenges that inter-continental biomedical research collaborations generate. In particular we ask how national systems of ethical governance of life science research might cope with increasingly global research collaborations with a focus on Sino-European collaboration. We propose four 'spheres' - deliberation, regulation, oversight and interaction - as a helpful way to conceptualise national systems of ethical governance. Using a workshop-based mapping methodology (workshops held in Beijing, Shanghai, Changsha, Xian, Shenzen and London) we identified three specific ethical challenges arising from cross-continental research collaborations: (1) ambiguity as to which regulations are applicable; (2) lack of ethical review capacity not only among ethical review board members but also collaborating scientists; (3) already complex, researcher-research subject interaction is further complicated when many nationalities are involved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Organizational approaches to collaboration in vocational rehabilitation − An international literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Andersson

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Collaboration between welfare organizations is an important strategy for integrating different health and welfare services. This article reports a review of the international literature on vocational rehabilitation, focusing on different organizational models of collaboration as well as different barriers and facilitating factors. Methods: The review was based on an extensive search in scientific journals from 1995 to 2010, which generated more than 13 000 articles. The number of articles was reduced in different steps through a group procedure based on the abstracts. Finally, 205 articles were read in full text and 62 were included for content analysis. Results: Seven basic models of collaboration were identified in the literature. They had different degrees of complexity, intensity and formalization. They could also be combined in different ways.  Several barriers and facilitators of collaboration were also identified. Most of these were related to factors as communication, trust and commitment.Conclusion: There is no optimal model of collaboration to be applied everywhere, but one model could be more appropriate than others in a certain context. More research is needed to compare different models and to see whether they are applicable also in other fields of collaboration inside or outside the welfare system.

  15. Organizational approaches to collaboration in vocational rehabilitation − An international literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Andersson

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Collaboration between welfare organizations is an important strategy for integrating different health and welfare services. This article reports a review of the international literature on vocational rehabilitation, focusing on different organizational models of collaboration as well as different barriers and facilitating factors.  Methods: The review was based on an extensive search in scientific journals from 1995 to 2010, which generated more than 13 000 articles. The number of articles was reduced in different steps through a group procedure based on the abstracts. Finally, 205 articles were read in full text and 62 were included for content analysis. Results: Seven basic models of collaboration were identified in the literature. They had different degrees of complexity, intensity and formalization. They could also be combined in different ways.  Several barriers and facilitators of collaboration were also identified. Most of these were related to factors as communication, trust and commitment. Conclusion: There is no optimal model of collaboration to be applied everywhere, but one model could be more appropriate than others in a certain context. More research is needed to compare different models and to see whether they are applicable also in other fields of collaboration inside or outside the welfare system.

  16. Complexity in graduate medical education: a collaborative education agenda for internal medicine and geriatric medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anna; Fernandez, Helen; Cayea, Danelle; Chheda, Shobhina; Paniagua, Miguel; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Day, Hollis

    2014-06-01

    Internal medicine residents today face significant challenges in caring for an increasingly complex patient population within ever-changing education and health care environments. As a result, medical educators, health care system leaders, payers, and patients are demanding change and accountability in graduate medical education (GME). A 2012 Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) retreat identified medical education as an area for collaboration between internal medicine and geriatric medicine. The authors first determined a short-term research agenda for resident education by mapping selected internal medicine reporting milestones to geriatrics competencies, and listing available sample learner assessment tools. Next, the authors proposed a strategy for long-term collaboration in three priority areas in clinical medicine that are challenging for residents today: (1) team-based care, (2) transitions and readmissions, and (3) multi-morbidity. The short-term agenda focuses on learner assessment, while the long-term agenda allows for program evaluation and improvement. This model of collaboration in medical education combines the resources and expertise of internal medicine and geriatric medicine educators with the goal of increasing innovation and improving outcomes in GME targeting the needs of our residents and their patients.

  17. Initiatives in national and international collaborations at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viyogi, Yogendra Pathak; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2008-01-01

    Over the last two decades VECC scientists, under the leadership of their director Bikash Sinha, have pursued experimental physics studies under international collaboration programmes, which would not have been possible with the existing facilities at home. The collaboration extended from RIKEN (Japan) in the east to CERN (Switzerland) in the west. It spanned the energy scales from a few tens of MeV per nucleon to several hundred GeV per nucleon and the physics topics on one extreme being the structure of exotic nuclei and their decay modes and on other extreme being the phase transition of hadronic matter and the formation of quark gluon plasma. The dynamic leadership of Dr. Sinha not only helped to shed the initial inhibitions towards such activities, going beyond the national frontiers, but also gave a new dimension to the experimental physics research in the country. It helped to organize an Indian team of scientists from various national institutes and universities. It paved way for full scale funding of the projects and set the trend that enabled many other Indian groups to join several international collaborations in various fields. Here we reflect on the evolution of these national and international collaboration programmes and the physics, technological and sociological benefits resulting from these activities. (author)

  18. Inter-Professional Collaboration in Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, Yvonne; van Koeven, Erna; Schaafsma, Frank

    2018-01-01

    This article describes an example of inter-professional action research conducted by teachers and university-based researchers/teacher educators in a vocational college in the Netherlands. The research was aimed at the professional learning of the teachers on their pedagogical approach to a new curriculum initiative. Despite a difficult context in…

  19. Design and Implementation of Collaborative Research Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venti, Mike W.; Berger, David E.

    2009-01-01

    This poster reviews the collarborative research approaches that NASA has been designing and implementing for the Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Project. The inputs for the technical plan are reviewed, the Research Test and Integration Plan (RTIP) WIKI, is used to create and propose a multi-themed and multi-partner research testing opportunities. The outputs are testing opportunities.

  20. Multi-Institutional Collaborative Astronomy Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, T. F.; Slater, S. J.

    2011-09-01

    ASP, AAS, APS, and AAPT advocate that scientists should be engaged and acknowledged for successfully engaging in astronomy and physics education research and the scholarship of teaching because these efforts serve to improve pedagogical techniques and the evaluation of teaching. However, scientists have had the opportunity to pursue formal training in how to meaningfully engage in astronomy education research as an important scholarly endeavor. This special interest session for college and university physics and astronomy faculty, post-docs, and graduate students provided a forum to discuss the motivations, strategies, methodology, and publication routes for improving astronomy education through conducting rigorous science education research. Topics for discussion targeted the value of various education research questions, strengths and weaknesses of several different research design methodologies, strategies to successfully obtain Institutional Review Board approval to conduct education research on human subjects, and become more aware of how education research articles are created for publication in journals such as the Astronomy Education Review.

  1. Is There a Relationship between the Usage of Active and Collaborative Learning Techniques and International Students' Study Anxiety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshlessan, Rezvan

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the relationships between the international students' perception of professors' instructional practices (the usage of active and collaborative learning techniques in class) and the international students' study anxiety. The dominant goal of this research was to investigate whether the professors' usage of active…

  2. Open Online Research: Developing Software and Method for Collaborative Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bröer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by the potentials of web-based collaboration, in 2014, a group of social scientists, students and information specialists started tinkering with software and methodology for open online collaborative research. The results of their research led to a gathering of academics at the #ethnography Conference Amsterdam 2014, where new material was collected, shared and collaboratively interpreted. Following the conference, they continued to develop software and methodology. In this contribution, we report on the aims, methodology, inspiring examples, caveats and results from testing several prototypes of open online research software. We conclude that open online collaborative interpretation is both feasible and desirable. Dialogue and reflexivity, we hold, are able to transcend separated perspectives and stimulate agreement on a set of distinct interpretations; they simultaneously respect the multiplicity of understandings of social phenomena whilst bringing order into this diversity. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs160327

  3. Technological learning through international collaboration: Lessons from the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Danielle; Weigel, Annalisa

    2013-02-01

    Countries on every continent are making new or renewed commitments to domestic satellite programs. These programs have the potential to address national needs by enhancing access to information, improving infrastructure and providing inspiration to the public. How do countries without local expertise in space technology begin a new satellite program? What is the role of international collaboration in supporting the efforts of a new space fairing country? This paper explores such questions by highlighting outputs from intensive field work in Africa and Asia. Specifically, the study explores case studies of early space activity in these countries to search for lessons about the management of a young space program. The observations from field work are compared to ideas from scholarly literature on technological learning. The findings are organized using principles from systems architecture. The paper presents a model that captures many of the influences and strategic decision areas for a collaborative satellite development project. The paper also highlights the growth of capability among African countries in the area of satellite technology.

  4. Collaborative Research: Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Plasma Physics of Antihydrogen Generation and Trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robicheaux, Francis

    2013-03-29

    Ever since Dirac predicted the existence of antimatter in 1928, it has excited our collective imagination. Seventy-four years later, two collaborations at CERN, ATHENA and ATRAP, created the first slow antihydrogen. This was a stunning achievement, but the most important antimatter experiments require trapped, not just slow, antihydrogen. The velocity, magnetic moment, and internal energy and state of the antihydrogen depend strongly on how it is formed. To trap antihydrogen, physicists face two broad challenges: (1) Understanding the behavior of the positron and antiprotons plasmas from which the antihydrogen is synthesized; and (2) Understanding the atomic processes by which positrons and antiprotons recombine. Recombination lies on the boundary between atomic and plasma physics, and cannot be studied properly without employing tools from both fields. The proposed collaborative research campaign will address both of these challenges. The collaboration members have unique experience in the relevant fields of experimental and theoretical non-neutral plasma physics, numerical modeling, nonlinear dynamics and atomic physics. This expertise is not found elsewhere amongst antihydrogen researchers. The collaboration members have strong ties already, and seek to formalize them with this proposal. Three of the four PIs are members of the ALPHA collaboration, an international collaboration formed by most of the principal members of the ATHENA collaboration.

  5. Usability Evaluation of a Research Repository and Collaboration Web Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Maron, Deborah J.; Charles, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports results from an empirical usability evaluation of Human-Animal Bond Research Initiative Central as part of the effort to develop an open access research repository and collaboration platform for human-animal bond researchers. By repurposing and altering key features of the original HUBzero system, Human-Animal Bond Research…

  6. Energy engineering: Student-researcher collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leban, Krisztina Monika; Ritchie, Ewen; Beckowska, Patrycja Maria

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on cooperation methods between researchers and students at different levels. Levels included in this work are BSc, MSc and PhD student levels. At Aalborg University, Department of Energy Technology education and research are closely linked. The relationship between student...

  7. Collaborative Partnerships between Research and Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Charlotte; Willumsen, Elisabeth

    design is applied, including qualitative approaches such as fieldwork and interviews. In addition, a survey questionnaire is developed containing a psychometric evaluation representing the quantitative approach. The main goals of the project are: 1) to identify innovation in daily practices in elderly...... between research institutions and elderly care facilities to study social innovation as a phenomenon in institution-based elderly care. We received initial funding from the Research Council of Norway to work closely together on the main proposal, which was subsequently funded. Five research institutions......The ambition to open up the processes and results of publicly-funded research has led to the emergence of a broad Open Science movement. The goal is radical: to make research accessible to everyone so as to enhance impact and innovation in society. Not only governments and funding agencies...

  8. Energy research, national and international

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhijn, A.A.T. van

    1976-01-01

    The Dutch Energy Research Programme inaugurated by the National Steering Group for Energy Research (LSEO) is discussed. Three types of criteria to be borne in mind in the selection of new directions in development are considered: the setting of targets for energy policy: the general central social and economic aims of the country; and the scientific, financial and organisational possibilities. International aspects are reviewed with reference to the IEA, CERN, Euratom, ELDO and ESRO. (D.J.B.)

  9. Collaboration in teacher education through research in multicultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changing demands in education and society and the specific roles of teachers in classroom praxis urge lecturers (teacher trainers) from different tertiary institutions to collaborate in an internationally-funded project Understanding human rights through different belief systems: intercultural and interreligious dialogue. The

  10. The CHIP surveys | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-07-08

    Jul 8, 2011 ... Many of the young scholars relied on data generated by the China Household Income Project (CHIP), a collaboration between Chinese and international economists that has tracked inequality in China for the past 20 years.

  11. Public, environmental, and occupational health research activity in Arab countries: bibliometric, citation, and collaboration analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweileh, Waleed M; Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Sawalha, Ansam F

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze quantity, assess quality, and investigate international collaboration in research from Arab countries in the field of public, environmental and occupational health. Original scientific articles and reviews published from the 22 Arab countries in the category "public, environmental & occupational health" during the study period (1900 - 2012) were screened using the ISI Web of Science database. The total number of original and review research articles published in the category of "public, environmental & occupational health" from Arab countries was 4673. Main area of research was tropical medicine (1862; 39.85%). Egypt with 1200 documents (25.86%) ranked first in quantity and ranked first in quality of publications (h-index = 51). The study identified 2036 (43.57%) documents with international collaboration. Arab countries actively collaborated with authors in Western Europe (22.91%) and North America (21.04%). Most of the documents (79.9%) were published in public health related journals while 21% of the documents were published in journals pertaining to prevention medicine, environmental, occupational health and epidemiology. Research in public, environmental and occupational health in Arab countries is in the rise. Public health research was dominant while environmental and occupation health research was relatively low. International collaboration was a good tool for increasing research quantity and quality.

  12. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2009-06-06

    Jun 6, 2009 ... disciplines (including medicine, pharmacy, nursing, biotechnology, cell and molecular biology, and related engineering fields). ... International Journal of Health Research, June 2009; 2(2): 195-199 (e2213p91-95) ... were measured in the diabetic and non-diabetic rats. .... People with Type 2 diabetes are at.

  13. Situated ethics in collaborative research with children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    an epistemological as well as an ontological necessity. The paper discusses how a renegotiation of ethics is particularly difficult whilst engaging in a project investigating everyday media experiences of young children (aged 3-6) at a German day care centre. Albeit the children were explicitly considered co......-researchers to the research questions, the most visible negotiations of enacted ethics took place among the participating adults: researcher, parents, and pedagogues – thereby potentially shunning the children’s perspectives on the research process. Nevertheless does the paper argue that an iterative renegotiation of ethics...... took place also with the children, and that the principle challenge lies in rendering these renegotiations visible in academic publications. It proposes conceptual developments that draw on both New Materialism and the Psychology from the Standpoint of the Subject in order to tackle this challenge....

  14. International Collaboration on Spent Fuel Disposition in Crystalline Media: FY17 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kainina, Elena [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jove-Colon, Carlos [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Active participation in international R&D is crucial for achieving the Spent Fuel Waste Science & Technology (SFWST) long-term goals of conducting “experiments to fill data needs and confirm advanced modeling approaches” and of having a “robust modeling and experimental basis for evaluation of multiple disposal system options” (by 2020). DOE’s Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) has developed a strategic plan to advance cooperation with international partners. The international collaboration on the evaluation of crystalline disposal media at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in FY17 focused on the collaboration through the Development of Coupled Models and their Validation against Experiments (DECOVALEX-2019) project. The DECOVALEX project is an international research and model comparison collaboration, initiated in 1992, for advancing the understanding and modeling of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in geological systems. SNL has been participating in three tasks of the DECOVALEX project: Task A. Modeling gas injection experiments (ENGINEER), Task C. Modeling groundwater recovery experiment in tunnel (GREET), and Task F. Fluid inclusion and movement in the tight rock (FINITO).

  15. Globalization of Stem Cell Science: An Examination of Current and Past Collaborative Research Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jingyuan; Matthews, Kirstin R. W.

    2013-01-01

    Science and engineering research has becoming an increasingly international phenomenon. Traditional bibliometric studies have not captured the evolution of collaborative partnerships between countries, particularly in emerging technologies such as stem cell science, in which an immense amount of investment has been made in the past decade. Analyzing over 2,800 articles from the top journals that include stem cell research in their publications, this study demonstrates the globalization of stem cell science. From 2000 to 2010, international collaborations increased from 20.9% to 36% of all stem cell publications analyzed. The United States remains the most prolific and the most dominant country in the field in terms of publications in high impact journals. But Asian countries, particularly China are steadily gaining ground. Exhibiting the largest relative growth, the percent of Chinese-authored stem cell papers grew more than ten-fold, while the percent of Chinese-authored international papers increased over seven times from 2000 to 2010. And while the percent of total stem cell publications exhibited modest growth for European countries, the percent of international publications increased more substantially, particularly in the United Kingdom. Overall, the data indicated that traditional networks of collaboration extant in 2000 still predominate in stem cell science. Although more nations are becoming involved in international collaborations and undertaking stem cell research, many of these efforts, with the exception of those in certain Asian countries, have yet to translate into publications in high impact journals. PMID:24069210

  16. Citation Impact of Collaboration in Radiology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Parikh, Ujas; Duszak, Richard

    2018-02-01

    Team science involving multidisciplinary and multi-institutional collaboration is increasingly recognized as a means of strengthening the quality of scientific research. The aim of this study was to assess associations between various forms of collaboration and the citation impact of published radiology research. In 2010, 876 original research articles published in Academic Radiology, the American Journal of Roentgenology, JACR, and Radiology were identified with at least one radiology-affiliated author. All articles were manually reviewed to extract features related to all authors' disciplines and institutions. Citations to these articles through September 2016 were extracted from Thomson Reuters Web of Science. Subsequent journal article citation counts were significantly higher (P < .05) for original research articles with at least seven versus six or fewer authors (26.2 ± 30.8 versus 20.3 ± 23.1, respectively), with authors from multiple countries versus from a single country (32.3 ± 39.2 versus 22.0 ± 25.0, respectively), with rather than without a nonuniversity collaborator (28.7 ± 38.6 versus 22.4 ± 24.9, respectively), and with rather than without a nonclinical collaborator (26.5 ± 33.1 versus 21.9 ± 24.4, respectively). On multivariate regression analysis, the strongest independent predictors of the number of citations were authors from multiple countries (β = 9.14, P = .002), a nonuniversity collaborator (β = 4.80, P = .082), and at least seven authors (β = 4.11, P = .038). With respect to subsequent journal article citations, various forms of collaboration are associated with greater scholarly impact of published radiology research. To enhance the relevance of their research, radiology investigators are encouraged to pursue collaboration across traditional disciplinary, institutional, and geographic boundaries. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. European labs brace for German cuts: international collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Clery, D

    1996-01-01

    Germany, the largest contributor to international European research labs, announced plans to reduce its contributions an average of 8% in the nation's latest budget. CERN and other labs are worried that the cuts will endanger ongoing projects and that other countries may follow Germany's lead.

  18. Facilitating learning through an international virtual collaborative practice: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wihlborg, Monne; Friberg, Elizabeth E; Rose, Karen M; Eastham, Linda

    2018-02-01

    Internationalisation of higher education involving information and communication technology such as e-learning opens opportunities for innovative learning approaches across nations and cultures. Describe a case in practice of collaborative and transformative learning in relation to 'internationalisation on home grounds' with the broader learning objective of 'becoming aware and knowledgeable'. A mutually developed project established a virtual international collaborative exchange for faculty and students using a course management software (MOODLE) and open access technology (Adobe CONNECT). Two research universities in Sweden and the United States. Approximately 90 nursing students from each university per semester over several semesters. A collaborative process to develop a joint learning community to construct a virtual module and learning activity involving academics and nursing students in two countries using principles of meaning construction and negotiated learning. Developed possibilities for dealing with the challenges and finding strategies for a future higher education system that opens dialogues worldwide. Virtual international exchanges open innovative communication and learning contexts across nations and cultures. Internationalisation is so much more than students and teachers' mobility. 'Internationalisation on home grounds' (internationalisation for all) should receive more attention to support faculty and student collaboration, learning, and professional development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Grid computing : enabling a vision for collaborative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Laszewski, G.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the authors provide a motivation for Grid computing based on a vision to enable a collaborative research environment. The authors vision goes beyond the connection of hardware resources. They argue that with an infrastructure such as the Grid, new modalities for collaborative research are enabled. They provide an overview showing why Grid research is difficult, and they present a number of management-related issues that must be addressed to make Grids a reality. They list projects that provide solutions to subsets of these issues

  20. IT Governance Research and Collaborative Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Mueller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available SPSPR (S-Strategy, P-Business Processes, S-ICT Services, P-ICT Processes, R-ICT Resources is a layered framework that is used to represent the relationship between business management and ICT management in the context of cloud computing. This research article applies the advanced object-oriented techniques and develops a fundamental object-oriented SPSPR-Model including four basic design patterns layer, dynamic factory, role and session.

  1. Understanding Public-Private Collaboration Configurations for International Information Infrastructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klievink, A.J.

    Collaboration between the public and the private sector is seen as an instrument to make governance smarter, more effective, and more efficient. However, whereas there is literature on public-private collaboration, very little of it addresses how these collaborations can be shaped to make use of the

  2. Understanding Public-Private Collaboration Configurations for International Information Infrastructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klievink, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Collaboration between the public and the private sector is seen as an instrument to make governance smarter, more effective, and more efficient. However, whereas there is literature on public-private collaboration, very little of it addresses how these collaborations can be shaped to make use of the

  3. Best Collaborative Publication Announced during Spring Research Festival Week | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The winner of the 2012 competition for the best collaborative publication was announced on May 7, as part of the lead-up to the Spring Research Festival sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR) and the National Cancer Institute at Frederick on May 8 and 9.

  4. Russian delegation visits NIH and NCI to discuss research collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Center for Global Health hosted a delegation from the Russian Foundation for Basic Research to discuss ongoing and future collaborations in cancer research. The delegation was accompanied by representatives from the US Embassy in Moscow and the Embassy of the Russian Federation in Washington DC.

  5. Hybridization of Practices in Teacher-Researcher Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Karim; Palm, Ola; Palmqvist, Jenny; Piqueras, Jesús; Wickman, Per-Olof

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we present experiences from a joint collaborative research project which may be described as an encounter between a school science teaching practice and a university science didactics research practice. We provide narratives which demonstrate how the encounter between these two communities of practice interacted to produce…

  6. Sino-Canadian collaborations in stem cell research: a scientometric analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Ali-Khan

    Full Text Available International collaboration (IC is essential for the advance of stem cell research, a field characterized by marked asymmetries in knowledge and capacity between nations. China is emerging as a global leader in the stem cell field. However, knowledge on the extent and characteristics of IC in stem cell science, particularly China's collaboration with developed economies, is lacking.We provide a scientometric analysis of the China-Canada collaboration in stem cell research, placing this in the context of other leading producers in the field. We analyze stem cell research published from 2006 to 2010 from the Scopus database, using co-authored papers as a proxy for collaboration. We examine IC levels, collaboration preferences, scientific impact, the collaborating institutions in China and Canada, areas of mutual interest, and funding sources. Our analysis shows rapid global expansion of the field with 48% increase in papers from 2006 to 2010. China now ranks second globally after the United States. China has the lowest IC rate of countries examined, while Canada has one of the highest. China-Canada collaboration is rising steadily, more than doubling during 2006-2010. China-Canada collaboration enhances impact compared to papers authored solely by China-based researchers This difference remained significant even when comparing only papers published in English.While China is increasingly courted in IC by developed countries as a partner in stem cell research, it is clear that it has reached its status in the field largely through domestic publications. Nevertheless, IC enhances the impact of stem cell research in China, and in the field in general. This study establishes an objective baseline for comparison with future studies, setting the stage for in-depth exploration of the dynamics and genesis of IC in stem cell research.

  7. Sino-Canadian collaborations in stem cell research: a scientometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Khan, Sarah E; Ray, Monali; McMahon, Dominique S; Thorsteinsdóttir, Halla

    2013-01-01

    International collaboration (IC) is essential for the advance of stem cell research, a field characterized by marked asymmetries in knowledge and capacity between nations. China is emerging as a global leader in the stem cell field. However, knowledge on the extent and characteristics of IC in stem cell science, particularly China's collaboration with developed economies, is lacking. We provide a scientometric analysis of the China-Canada collaboration in stem cell research, placing this in the context of other leading producers in the field. We analyze stem cell research published from 2006 to 2010 from the Scopus database, using co-authored papers as a proxy for collaboration. We examine IC levels, collaboration preferences, scientific impact, the collaborating institutions in China and Canada, areas of mutual interest, and funding sources. Our analysis shows rapid global expansion of the field with 48% increase in papers from 2006 to 2010. China now ranks second globally after the United States. China has the lowest IC rate of countries examined, while Canada has one of the highest. China-Canada collaboration is rising steadily, more than doubling during 2006-2010. China-Canada collaboration enhances impact compared to papers authored solely by China-based researchers This difference remained significant even when comparing only papers published in English. While China is increasingly courted in IC by developed countries as a partner in stem cell research, it is clear that it has reached its status in the field largely through domestic publications. Nevertheless, IC enhances the impact of stem cell research in China, and in the field in general. This study establishes an objective baseline for comparison with future studies, setting the stage for in-depth exploration of the dynamics and genesis of IC in stem cell research.

  8. Overview of the PPPL International Experimental Stellarator Collaboration Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, David [Princeton University

    2012-03-28

    PPPL has initiated and strengthened collaborative experimental programs aimed at developing the required toolsets and scientific knowledge for advancing stellarators as a viable fusion energy source. In particular, activities at LHD and W7-X, the two large superconducting helical confinement systems in the world, have been expanded. The focus at LHD has been on diagnostic development and data analysis, since the device is a mature research facility with more than 20MW of heating power available. High beta stability experiments, ion and electron temperature measurements using a recently installed imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer, and 3D equilibrium reconstructions will be described. The focus on W7-X has been to develop hardware capabilities for divertor heat flux control, including plasma-facing components, error field correction coils, and power supplies. Progress on these and other activities will be presented.

  9. Science diplomacy: Investigating the perspective of scholars on politics-science collaboration in international affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fähnrich, Birte

    2017-08-01

    Science diplomacy is a widely practiced area of international affairs, but academic research is rather sparse. The role of academia within this field of politics-science interaction has hardly been considered. This article analyzes this scholarly perspective: Based on a literature review, a case study of a German science diplomacy program is used to explore objectives, benefits, and constraints of science diplomacy for participating scholars. While political approaches suggest an ideal world where both sides profit from the collaboration, the findings of the case study point to another conclusion which shows that the interaction of scholars and officials in science diplomacy is far more complex. Thus, the contribution is regarded as both a useful starting point for further research and for a critical reflection of academics and politicians in science diplomacy practice to gauge what can be expected from the collaboration and what cannot.

  10. Informed consent and collaborative research: perspectives from the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, Adnan A; Wali, Salman A

    2006-03-01

    Informed consent has been recognized as an important component of research protocols and procedures of disclosure and consent in collaborative research have been criticized, as they may not be in keeping with cultural norms of developing countries. This study, which is part of a larger project funded by the United States National Bioethics Advisory Commission, explores the opinions of developing country researchers regarding informed consent in collaborative research. A survey of developing country researchers, involved in human subject research, was conducted by distributing a questionnaire with 169 questions, which included questions relating to informed consent. In addition, six focus group discussions, eight in-depth interviews and 78 responses to open-ended questions in the questionnaire provided qualitative data. 203 surveys were considered complete and were included in the analysis. Written consent was not used by nearly 40% of the researchers in their most recent studies. A large proportion of respondents recommended that human subject regulations should allow more flexibility in ways of documenting informed consent. 84% of researchers agreed that a mechanism to measure understanding should be incorporated in research studies as part of the process of informed consent. This paper is an empirical step in highlighting the ethical issues concerning disclosure. Health researchers in developing countries are well aware of the importance of consent in health research, and equally value the significance of educating human subjects regarding study protocols and associated risks and benefits. However, respondents emphasize the need for modifying ethical regulations in collaborative research.

  11. Research collaboration at a distance : changing spatial patterns of scientific collaboration in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekman, J.; Frenken, K.; Tijssen, R.J.W.

    2010-01-01

    This study analyses the changing effect of physical distance and territorial borders (regional, national, language) on the intensity of research collaboration across European regions. Using data on all co-publications between 313 regions in 33 European countries for the period 2000–2007, we find

  12. International collaboration including patients is essential to develop new therapies for patients with myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Ingrid E; Vencovsky, Jiri

    2017-05-01

    To discuss the needs for international collaborations between investigators in different disciplines working with myositis and with patients with myositis. Recent advances in detection of several myositis-specific autoantibodies that are associated with distinct clinical phenotypes, will enable studies in new well defined clinically homogenous subgroups of myositis This is likely to lead to development of new information on molecular pathogenesis that might be different in different myositis subgroups. Subgrouping patients according to autoantibody profile may also be important to assess outcome, to identify prognostic biomarkers and in clinical trials. As these are rare disorders international collaboration is essential to enrol large enough cohorts of the subgroups. To facilitate such collaboration we have developed a web-based international myositis register, www.euromyositis.eu, which includes validated outcome measures and patient reported outcome measures. This register is to support research but also to support decision-making in the clinic. We welcome investigators to join the Euromyositis register. Myositis is a heterogeneous disorder with varying treatment response and outcome. There is a high unmet need for new therapies which can only be achieved by increased knowledge on molecular disease mechanisms. Subgrouping patients according to autoantibody profile may be a new way forward to get a better understanding on disease mechanisms and to develop novel therapies.

  13. Collaborative Research for Water Resource Management under Climate Change Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundiers, K.; Garfin, G. M.; Gober, P.; Basile, G.; Bark, R. H.

    2010-12-01

    We present an ongoing project to co-produce science and policy called Collaborative Planning for Climate Change: An Integrated Approach to Water-Planning, Climate Downscaling, and Robust Decision-Making. The project responds to motivations related to dealing with sustainability challenges in research and practice: (a) state and municipal water managers seek research that addresses their planning needs; (b) the scientific literature and funding agencies call for more meaningful engagement between science and policy communities, in ways that address user needs, while advancing basic research; and (c) empirical research contributes to methods for the design and implementation of collaborative projects. To understand how climate change might impact water resources and management in the Southwest US, our project convenes local, state, and federal water management practitioners with climate-, hydrology-, policy-, and decision scientists. Three areas of research inform this collaboration: (a) the role of paleo-hydrology in water resources scenario construction; (b) the types of uncertainties that impact decision-making beyond climate and modeling uncertainty; and (c) basin-scale statistical and dynamical downscaling of climate models to generate hydrologic projections for regional water resources planning. The project engages all participants in the research process, from research design to workshops that build capacity for understanding data generation and sources of uncertainty to the discussion of water management decision contexts. A team of “science-practice translators” facilitates the collaboration between academic and professional communities. In this presentation we contextualize the challenges and opportunities of use-inspired science-policy research collaborations by contrasting the initial project design with the process of implementation. We draw from two sources to derive lessons learned: literature on collaborative research, and evaluations provided by

  14. Collaboratively Analysing Open Research Data in Virtual Research Environments–New Visionary Use Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuiderwijk-van Eijk, AMG; Matheus, R.

    Virtual Research Environments (VREs) offer new opportunities for collaboratively analysing open research data. This workshop builds on a workshop that we gave at CeDEM16 and aims to refine and discuss requirements for collaboratively analysing Open Government Data (OGD) and open research data

  15. Research and development at PSI and collaboration with Nagra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadermann, J.; Hagenlocher, I.

    1997-01-01

    PSI has been involved in all of Nagra's milestone projects to date (Project Gewaehr 1985, Kristallin-I synthesis, general licence application Wellenberg) and the fruitful research collaboration between the two organisations will continue in the future (e.g. with Project Entsorgungsnachweis). A research contract between the two partners specifies the areas of work covered by the collaboration, namely: waste matrices, repository near-field, repository far-field and performance assessment. Cost which arise are borne by the partners in equal shares. (author) 6 figs

  16. The International Energy Agency collaboration in wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beurskens, H.J.M.; Pershagen, B.

    1991-07-01

    The International Energy Agency (IEA) wind energy agreements have provided a useful framework for international cooperative efforts during more than thirteen years. Nine comprehensive research Tasks have been successfully completed and three Tasks are currently in progress. The sharing of research and information has clearly contributed to the development of wind technology, has eliminated unnecessary redundancy in national programmes, has encouraged utilization of the most efficient approaches to solve common problems, and has created a cooperative spirit among the professional groups that seems to be unique. After a brief introduction on the activities of the IEA on wind energy an overview is given of the ongoing tasks and other current activities with regard to the subject. 1 fig., 5 tabs., 9 refs

  17. Journaling and Self-Study in an International Research Collective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makaiau, Amber Strong; Leng, Lu; Fukui, Suguru

    2015-01-01

    Drawing from the theoretical foundations of reflective teaching, culturally responsive education, social constructivism, and self-study, this collaborative self-study investigates the role of an interactive online journal in an international research collective. Each from a different country, the authors came together through a common interest in…

  18. The complexity of collaboration: Opportunities and challenges in contracted research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Bowl

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores some of the challenges of utilising collaborative research approaches when undertaking contracted research projects for government and non-government agencies in the adult and community education (ACE sector. To discuss these challenges, the article draws on three recent examples of research projects undertaken for ACE sector organisations in Aotearoa New Zealand. These challenges include managing relationships with the different parties to the research; dealing with conflicting expectations of funding agencies, commissioning organisations and practitioners; and ownership and dissemination of findings. We highlight the complexity of notions of collaboration and the importance of deliberate trust-building in establishing credibility. We also open up for discussion the thorny issues of who owns the right to disseminate research findings and how far should researchers’ and universities’ responsibilities extend to ensure that research findings are put in the public domain?

  19. Developing a prelicensure exam for Canada: an international collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbins, Bonnie; Bradley, Pat

    2013-01-01

    Nine previously conducted studies indicate that Elsevier's HESI Exit Exam (E(2)) is 96.36%-99.16% accurate in predicting success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses. No similar standardized exam is available in Canada to predict Canadian Registered Nurse Examination (CRNE) success. Like the E(2), such an exam could be used to evaluate Canadian nursing students' preparedness for the CRNE, and scores on the numerous subject matter categories could be used to guide students' remediation efforts so that, ultimately, they are successful on their first attempt at taking the CRNE. The international collaboration between a HESI test construction expert and a nursing faculty member from Canada, who served as the content expert, resulted in the development of a 180-item, multiple-choice/single-answer prelicensure exam (PLE) that was pilot tested with Canadian nursing students (N = 175). Item analysis data obtained from this pilot testing were used to develop a 160-item PLE, which includes an additional 20 pilot test items. The estimated reliability of this exam is 0.91, and it exhibits congruent validity with the CRNE because the PLE test blueprint mimics the CRNE test blueprint. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Status of UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    While the United States research program for geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste over the past decades focused solely on an open tunnel emplacement in unsaturated densely fractured tuff, several international organizations have made significant progress in the characterization and performance evaluation of other disposal design options and host rock characteristics, most of which were very different from those studied in the U.S. As a result, areas of direct collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) and international geologic disposal programs were quite limited during that time. Recently, the decision by DOE to no longer pursue the geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel at the Yucca Mountain site has shifted the nation’s focus to disposal design options and geologic environments similar to those being investigated by other nations. DOE started to recognize that close international collaboration is a beneficial and costeffective strategy for advancing disposal science and, in FY12, embarked on a comprehensive effort to identify international collaboration opportunities, to interact with international organizations and advance promising collaborations, and to plan/develop specific R&D activities in cooperation with international partners. This report describes the active collaboration opportunities available to U.S. researchers as a result of this effort, and presents specific cooperative research activities that have been recently initiated within DOE’s disposal research program. The focus in this report is on those opportunities that provide access to field data (and respective interpretation/modeling), and/or may allow participation in ongoing and planned field experiments.

  1. The Healthy Aging Research Network: Modeling Collaboration for Community Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belza, Basia; Altpeter, Mary; Smith, Matthew Lee; Ory, Marcia G

    2017-03-01

    As the first Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Prevention Research Centers Program thematic network, the Healthy Aging Research Network was established to better understand the determinants of healthy aging within older adult populations, identify interventions that promote healthy aging, and assist in translating research into sustainable community-based programs throughout the nation. To achieve these goals requires concerted efforts of a collaborative network of academic, community, and public health organizational partnerships. For the 2001-2014 Prevention Research Center funding cycles, the Healthy Aging Research Network conducted prevention research and promoted the wide use of practices known to foster optimal health. Organized around components necessary for successful collaborations (i.e., governance and infrastructure, shaping focus, community involvement, and evaluation and improvement), this commentary highlights exemplars that demonstrate the Healthy Aging Research Network's unique contributions to the field. The Healthy Aging Research Network's collaboration provided a means to collectively build capacity for practice and policy, reduce fragmentation and duplication in health promotion and aging research efforts, maximize the efficient use of existing resources and generate additional resources, and ultimately, create synergies for advancing the healthy aging agenda. This collaborative model was built upon a backbone organization (coordinating center); setting of common agendas and mutually reinforcing activities; and continuous communications. Given its successes, the Healthy Aging Research Network model could be used to create new and evaluate existing thematic networks to guide the translation of research into policy and practice. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. CMS Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faridah Mohammad Idris; Wan Ahmad Tajuddin Wan Abdullah; Zainol Abidin Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: CMS Collaboration is an international scientific collaboration located at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Switzerland, dedicated in carried out research on experimental particle physics. Consisting of 179 institutions from 41 countries from all around the word, CMS Collaboration host a general purpose detector for example the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) for members in CMS Collaboration to conduct experiment from the collision of two proton beams accelerated to a speed of 8 TeV in the LHC ring. In this paper, we described how the CMS detector is used by the scientist in CMS Collaboration to reconstruct the most basic building of matter. (author)

  3. Research Collaboration Workshop for Women in Mathematical Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by the Research Collaboration Workshop for Women in Mathematical Biology, this volume contains research and review articles that cover topics ranging from models of animal movement to the flow of blood cells in the embryonic heart. Hosted by the National Institute for Mathematics and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS), the workshop brought together women working in biology and mathematics to form four research groups that encouraged multidisciplinary collaboration and lifetime connections in the STEM field. This volume introduces many of the topics from the workshop, including the aerodynamics of spider ballooning; sleep, circadian rhythms, and pain; blood flow regulation in the kidney; and the effects of antimicrobial therapy on gut microbiota and microbiota and Clostridium difficile. Perfect for students and researchers in mathematics and biology, the papers included in this volume offer an introductory glimpse at recent research in mathematical biology. .

  4. International strategy for Nanotechnology Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roco, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    The worldwide nanotechnology research and development (R and D) investment reported by government organizations has increased by a factor of 3.5 between 1997 and 2001, and the highest rate of 90% is in 2001. At least 30 countries have initiated or are beginning national activities in this field. Scientists have opened a broad net of discoveries that does not leave any major research area untouched in physical, biological, and engineering sciences. Industry has gained confidence that nanotechnology will bring competitive advantages. The worldwide annual industrial production is estimated to exceed $1 trillion in 10-15 years from now, which would require about 2 million nanotechnology workers. U.S. has initiated a multidisciplinary strategy for development of science and engineering fundamentals through the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Japan and Europe have broad programs, and their current plans look ahead to four to five years. Other countries have encouraged their own areas of strength, several of them focusing on fields of the potential markets. Differences among countries are observed in the research domain they are aiming for, the level of program integration into various industrial sectors, and in the time scale of their R and D targets. Nanotechnology is growing in an environment where international interactions accelerate in science, education and industrial R and D. A global strategy of mutual interest is envisioned by connecting individual programs of contributing countries, professional communities, and international organizations

  5. Collaborating in Life Science Research Groups: The Question of Authorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explores how life science postdocs' perceptions of contemporary academic career rationales influence how they relate to collaboration within research groups. One consequential dimension of these perceptions is the high value assigned to publications. For career progress, postdocs consider producing publications and…

  6. The Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration (GEMRIC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oltedal, Leif; Bartsch, Hauke; Sørhaug, Ole Johan Evjenth

    2017-01-01

    biological factors relating to or predictive of ECT-related therapeutic response. We have thus formed the Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration (GEMRIC) that aims to combine longitudinal neuroimaging as well as clinical, behavioral and other physiological data across multiple independent sites. Here, we...

  7. Collaborative Writing in a Statistics and Research Methods Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Dana S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a collaborative writing project in which students must identify key variables, search and read relevant literature, and reason through a research idea by working closely with a partner. The end result is a polished laboratory report in the APA style. The class includes a peer review workshop prior to final editing. (MJP)

  8. Using Social Network Analysis to Evaluate Research Productivity and Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth D.; Akers, Kathryn S.; Lybarger, Melanie A.; Zakrajsek, Todd D.

    2014-01-01

    Research productivity and collaborations are essential aspects of advancing academia. Publishing is a critical mechanism in higher education to allow faculty members to share new information in all disciplinary fields. Due to its importance, scholarly work is often heavily considered for promotion, tenure, compensation, and other merit decisions.…

  9. A Collaborative Action Research Approach to Professional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleicher, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    The field of professional development is moving towards the notion of professional learning, highlighting the active learning role that teachers play in changing their knowledge bases, beliefs and practice. This article builds on this idea and argues for creating professional learning that is guided by a collaborative action research (CAR)…

  10. The challenges of international collaboration: Perspectives from Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Almansour

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This case study addresses the international collaboration challenges faced by Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University for women in Saudi Arabia. The objectives of this investigation are to define the challenging sources of international program collaboration between Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University and foreign institutions from the perspective of the university staff who are involved in initiating these collaborations. A total of 27 university staff members who were involved in initiating institutional collaborations participated in semi-structured interviews. A thematic analysis of the interviews suggested that the major sources of challenges to the university’s international collaboration efforts are difficulties in making contacts with international institutions, language barriers, faculty resistance to international partnerships, cross-cultural issues, and establishing partnership agreements.

  11. Identity of the teacher-researcher in collaborative action research: concerns reflected in a research journal

    OpenAIRE

    Banegas, Darío Luis

    2012-01-01

    In this paper I report the insights of my personal research journal as part of a collaborative action research project I facilitated in a secondary school where I teach English as a foreign language. I kept a journal so as to offer the natural history of my research towards my doctoral degree. In this project I worked together with four participating teachers but I assumed a complex identity as I was a teacher-researcher i.e. doctoral researcher and a teacher. This entailed differe...

  12. Canada Research Chairs | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    aspx. International Research Chairs Initiative. The International Research Chairs Initiative pairs top research talent from universities in Canada with their counterparts in developing countries to address key development challenges. View more

  13. Network-based collaborative research environment LDRD final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, B.R.; McDonald, M.J.

    1997-09-01

    The Virtual Collaborative Environment (VCE) and Distributed Collaborative Workbench (DCW) are new technologies that make it possible for diverse users to synthesize and share mechatronic, sensor, and information resources. Using these technologies, university researchers, manufacturers, design firms, and others can directly access and reconfigure systems located throughout the world. The architecture for implementing VCE and DCW has been developed based on the proposed National Information Infrastructure or Information Highway and a tool kit of Sandia-developed software. Further enhancements to the VCE and DCW technologies will facilitate access to other mechatronic resources. This report describes characteristics of VCE and DCW and also includes background information about the evolution of these technologies.

  14. International Relations Research Methodology: Realism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Vladimirovich Shabaga

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the origins and conceptual analysis capabilities of international relations in the framework of a realistic paradigm. We research political conditions and preconditions of the creation of realism’s theory and axiological features of realism’s practice in international relations. We also analyze the basic concepts and schools of realism: Realpolitik, political realism, neorealism, neoclassical realism. It is shown that based on the balance of power in the Realpolitik Prussian and Austrian cases, this understanding of politics within the systematics of the XIX century; the adaptation of the bourgeois liberal and national ideas to the foreign-policy specifics Germany middle of the XIX century. It is shown that political realism is targeting an international actor on the desire to subjugate the greatest possible political space. In the case of political weakness (absolute or relative political realism indicates a way of adapting to circumstances in order to achieve the most desirable of the possible. The article discusses the concept A. Rochau, H. Morgenthau, H. Kissinger, K. Waltz, showing differences and instrumentality realistic theories and concludes that the main provisions of the concept as a whole.

  15. Exploring Forms of Triangulation to Facilitate Collaborative Research Practice: Reflections From a Multidisciplinary Research Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarja Tiainen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This article contains critical reflections of a multidisciplinary research group studying the human and technological dynamics around some newly offered electronic services in a specific rural area of Finland. For their research, the group adopted ethnography. On facing the challenges of doing ethnographic research in a multidisciplinary setting, the group evolved its own breed of research practice based on multiple forms of triangulation. This implied the use of multiple data sources, methods, theories, and researchers, in different combinations. One of the outcomes of the work is a model for collaborative research. It highlights, among others, the importance of creating a climate for collaboration within the research group and following a process of individual and collaborative writing to achieve the potential benefits of such research. The article also identifies a set of remaining challenges relevant to collaborative research.

  16. International Interdisciplinary Research Institute Project in Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueye, Paul

    2010-02-01

    The project of an interdisciplinary research institute in Senegal was initiated in 1993 in Senegal (West Africa) and became a template for a similar project in the US in 1999. Since then, numerous meetings and presentations have been held at various national and international institutions, workshops and conferences. The current development of this partnership includes drafts for a full design of all systems at each facility, as well as the physics, applied health and educational programs to be implemented. The Senegal facility was conceived for scientific capacity building and equally to act as a focal point aimed at using the local scientific expertise. An anticipated outcome would be a contribution to the reduction of an ever-growing brain drain process suffered by the country, and the African continent in general. The development of the project led also to a strong African orientation of the facility: built for international collaboration, it is to be a pan-African endeavor and to serve primarily African countries. The facility received a presidential approval in a 2003 meeting and will develop an interdisciplinary program centered on a strong materials science research which will also allow for the establishment of an advanced analytical (physical chemistry) laboratory. A central part of the facility will be linked to state-of-the art accelerator mass spectrometry, cyclotron and low energy electromagnetic accelerator systems. )

  17. Collaboration between physical activity researchers and transport planners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crist, Katie; Bolling, Khalisa; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2018-01-01

    Collaboration between physical activity (PA) researchers and transport planners is a recommended strategy to combat the physical inactivity epidemic. Data collected by PA researchers could be used to identify, implement and evaluate active transport (AT) projects. However, despite aligned interests......, researchers and transport planners rarely collaborate. This study utilized qualitative methods to 1) gain an in-depth understanding of the data utilized in AT planning, 2) explore the utility of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and accelerometer data in supporting the planning process, 3) identify...... expertise in health or transport planning. A thematic analysis was conducted following structural coding by two researchers. The analysis revealed that geographic and physical activity data that are current, local, objective and specific to individual AT trips would improve upon currently available data...

  18. Can we combine symptom scales for collaborative research projects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyne, John P

    2012-02-01

    Collaborative research projects have the potential to answer important research questions, which may otherwise require huge resources, funding, and time to complete. There are several scales for measuring psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, with the Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS), Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS), and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) being among the most commonly used. High quality research efforts have used these three scales in different projects, and in order to merge study efforts, some means of combining data from these scales may be necessary. We reviewed correlations in published studies for these three scales, finding them to be highly correlated, however on comparison of the three scales there were considerable clinical differences between them. The paper discusses potential methods for combining the scales in collaborative research, including use of the recently developed standardised remission criteria for schizophrenia.

  19. Improving Researcher-Patient Collaboration through Social Network Websites

    OpenAIRE

    Akindayo, Olayiwola; Dopgima, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study/thesis is to, through an interview with researchers in medical field in Jönköping,  provide an empirical analysis of the link or relationship between medical researcher and patient through social networking sites specifically for collaboration in order to improve relationships, dissemination of information and knowledge sharing. Background: The importance of social networking websites as a means of interaction between groups of individuals cannot be und...

  20. Building international collaborative capacity: contributions of community psychologists to a European network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramírez, Manuel; Paloma, Virginia; Suarez-Balcazar, Yolanda; Balcazar, Fabricio

    2009-09-01

    Europe is in the process of building a more participative, just, and inclusive European Union. The European Social Fund, which is an initiative developed to actively promote multinational partnerships that address pressing social issues, is a good example of the European transformation. This article describes the steps taken to develop and evaluate the activities of an international network promoting collaborative capacity among regional partners involved in the prevention of labor discrimination toward immigrants in three European countries-Spain, Belgium, and Italy. An international team of community psychologists proposed an empowering approach to assess the collaborative capacity of the network. This approach consisted of three steps: (1) establishing a collaborative relationship among partners, (2) building collaborative capacity, and (3) evaluating the collaborative capacity of the network. We conclude with lessons learned from the process and provide recommendations for addressing the challenges inherent in international collaboration processes.

  1. FEBEX: An example of a major international collaborative project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulibarri, A.M.; Olmo, C. del; Huertas, F.

    1996-01-01

    There are many similarities in the high-level waste (HLW) disposal programmes in Switzerland and Spain. In both cases, alternative crystalline and sedimentary host rocks are currently under investigation, options for disposal of both vitrified reprocessing waste and spent fuel are considered and repository designs utilize massive engineered barriers. For the case of HLW disposal in a granite rock, the reference engineered barrier system (EBS) concepts are almost identical. The waste, in its steel fabrication container, is sealed in a massive steel canister which is emplaced horizontally in drilled tunnels. The canister is surrounded by a highly compacted bentonite backfill. Individual components of this waste package have been tested in isolation or on a small scale, but the aim of the full-scale engineered barrier experiment is to examine some properties of a real size system in a realistic natural environment. FEBEX was proposed by ENRESA and the experimental studies at Grimsel are run as an ENRESA/NAGRA collaboration. The field experiments are, however, only one component of a project which includes a large-scale laboratory 'mockup' and supporting materials tests and modelling. FEBEX, as a whole, is sponsored by the European Union as part of the 'Nuclear Fission Safety' research programme (the Swiss component being supported by the Bundesamt fur Bildung und Wissenschaft)

  2. Infectious diseases | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-13

    Dec 13, 2010 ... Ecohealth Works: Health in Urban Environments ... To respond to this complexity, researchers from many disciplines need to work collaboratively with ... the house, where they fed on animals at a safe distance from people.

  3. Research award: Foundations for Innovation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... strengthen science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) skills ... What are barriers and enablers to academia/industry research collaborations for ... Prior field experience in a developing country will be considered an asset.

  4. Challenges and Opportunities of US and Arab Collaborations in Health Services Research: A Case Study from Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, Maya M.; Elnashar, Maha; Abdelrahim, Huda; Khidir, Amal; Elliott, Heather A.K.; Killawi, Amal; Padela, Aasim I.; Khal, Abdul Latif Al; Bener, Abdulbari; Fetters, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Economic globalization and advances in technology have made it more feasible and even necessary to develop international research collaborations in global public health. Historically, collaborations in global research described in the literature have been mostly “North-South” collaborations in which the more developed “North” country works together with a developing “South” country to conduct research in the latter. This type of collaboration has for the most part, represented unequal partnership and rarely left behind a lasting impact. Recently, the opportunity for a new kind of international research partnership has emerged in which the host country has significant financial resources, but relatively limited expertise in research methodology or techniques and research implementation. This type of collaboration features a relative equalization of power between the international partners. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of building a successful research collaboration between a team in the United States and a team in Qatar, a rich Arabic nation in Gulf. We present a case study that provides an overview of our own project focused on the development of a culturally and linguistically adapted health care quality instrument for Qatar, discussing many of the benefits and challenges we encountered during each phase of instrument development. We present recommendations for researchers seeking sustainable and equitable partnerships with the Arab World. PMID:23121751

  5. Preparation of IHY-2007 in Indonesia: Local Observational Facilities, International Collaborations, and the Use of International Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djamaluddin, T.

    2006-11-01

    t_djamal@hotmail.com Since 1980, the National Institute of Aeronautics and Space (LAPAN) has been carrying out integrated observations of solar activities, geomagnetic disturbance, and ionospheric parameters, as well as other solar-terrestrial relationship research. International collaboration, especially with Japan in the field of solar physics, geomagnetism and equatorial atmosphere and with Australia in the field of ionosphere and upper atmosphere, help us in increasing national capacity building. The international data available on the Internet also helps us in comparing our local data with the global one or in fulfilling our needs of data due to lack of facilities, ground based or space based data. Some results will be reviewed. Preparation for IHY-2007 will also be discussed.

  6. Building a Community of Practice for Researchers: The International Network for Simulation-Based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Adam; Auerbach, Marc; Calhoun, Aaron; Mackinnon, Ralph; Chang, Todd P; Nadkarni, Vinay; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Duval-Arnould, Jordan; Peiris, Nicola; Kessler, David

    2018-06-01

    The scope and breadth of simulation-based research is growing rapidly; however, few mechanisms exist for conducting multicenter, collaborative research. Failure to foster collaborative research efforts is a critical gap that lies in the path of advancing healthcare simulation. The 2017 Research Summit hosted by the Society for Simulation in Healthcare highlighted how simulation-based research networks can produce studies that positively impact the delivery of healthcare. In 2011, the International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education (INSPIRE) was formed to facilitate multicenter, collaborative simulation-based research with the aim of developing a community of practice for simulation researchers. Since its formation, the network has successfully completed and published numerous collaborative research projects. In this article, we describe INSPIRE's history, structure, and internal processes with the goal of highlighting the community of practice model for other groups seeking to form a simulation-based research network.

  7. A social epistemology of research groups collaboration in scientific practice

    CERN Document Server

    Wagenknecht, Susann

    2016-01-01

    This book investigates how collaborative scientific practice yields scientific knowledge. At a time when most of today’s scientific knowledge is created in research groups, the author reconsiders the social character of science to address the question of whether collaboratively created knowledge should be considered as collective achievement, and if so, in which sense. Combining philosophical analysis with qualitative empirical inquiry, this book provides a comparative case study of mono- and interdisciplinary research groups, offering insight into the day-to-day practice of scientists. The book includes field observations and interviews with scientists to present an empirically-grounded perspective on much-debated questions concerning research groups’ division of labor, relations of epistemic dependence and trust.

  8. Next-generation models for Canadian collaboration in international ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... enhanced and sustained collaboration between Canadian civil society and academia. ... with particular emphasis on the civil society and academic communities; ... in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).

  9. Learning from collaborative research on sustainably managing fresh water: implications for ethical research-practice engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret L. Ayre

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the mid-2000s, there has been increasing recognition of the promise of collaborative research and management for addressing complex issues in sustainably managing fresh water. A large variety of collaborative freshwater research and management processes is now evident around the world. However, how collective knowledge development, coproduction, or cocreation is carried out in an ethical manner is less well known. From the literature and our experiences as applied, transdisciplinary researchers and natural resource management practitioners, we seek to describe and explore these aspects of empirical cases of collaborative freshwater research and management. Drawing on cases from Indigenous community-based natural resource management in northern Australia, flood and drought risk management in Bulgaria, water management and climate change adaptation in the Pacific, and regional catchment and estuary management in Victoria and New South Wales in Australia, we identify lessons to support improved collaborative sustainable freshwater management research and practice. Cocreation represents an emerging approach to participation and collaboration in freshwater management research-practice and can be seen to constitute four interlinked and iterative phases: coinitiation, codesign, coimplementation, and coevaluation. For freshwater researchers and managers and their collaborators, paying attention to these phases and the ethical dilemmas that arise within each phase will support the cocreation of more effective and ethical research-practice through: sensitizing collaborators to the need for reflexivity in research-practice, proposing action research codesign as a method for managing emergent questions and outcomes, and supporting more equitable outcomes for collaborators through an emphasis on coevaluation and collaborative articulation of the links between research outputs and practice outcomes.

  10. Connecting Hydrologic Research and Management in American Samoa through Collaboration and Capacity Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, C. K.; El-Kadi, A. I.; Dulai, H.; Glenn, C. R.; Mariner, M. K. E.; DeWees, R.; Schmaedick, M.; Gurr, I.; Comeros, M.; Bodell, T.

    2017-12-01

    In small-island developing communities, effective communication and collaboration with local stakeholders is imperative for successful implementation of hydrologic or other socially pertinent research. American Samoa's isolated location highlights the need for water resource sustainability, and effective scientific research is a key component to addressing critical challenges in water storage and management. Currently, aquifer degradation from salt-water-intrusion or surface-water contaminated groundwater adversely affects much of the islands' municipal water supply, necessitating an almost decade long Boil-Water-Advisory. This presentation will share the approach our research group, based at the University of Hawaii Water Resources Research Center, has taken for successfully implementing a collaboration-focused water research program in American Samoa. Instead of viewing research as a one-sided activity, our program seeks opportunities to build local capacity, develop relationships with key on-island stakeholders, and involve local community through forward-looking projects. This presentation will highlight three applications of collaborative research with water policy and management, water supply and sustainability, and science education stakeholders. Projects include: 1) working with the island's water utility to establish a long-term hydrological monitoring network, motivated by a need for data to parameterize numerical groundwater models, 2) collaboration with the American Samoa Environmental Protection Agency to better understand groundwater discharge and watershed scale land-use impacts for management of nearshore coral reef ecosystems, and 3) participation of local community college and high school students as research interns to increase involvement in, and exposure to socially pertinent water focused research. Through these innovative collaborative approaches we have utilized resources more effectively, and focused research efforts on more pertinent

  11. International Business Research: Past, Present and Future

    OpenAIRE

    David A Ricks

    1985-01-01

    The Editors of the Journal of International Business Studies (JIBS) always try to publish the best international business research. Unfortunately, there will probably never be a simple response to the question, What constitutes excellent international business research? We might make some progress, however, if we first attempt to define international business research and then identify several noteworthy examples.© 1985 JIBS. Journal of International Business Studies (1985) 16, 1–4

  12. Cancer in Africa: opportunities for collaborative research and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebamowo, C A; Akarolo-Anthony, S

    2009-06-01

    Cancer is a worldwide public health problem causing increasing morbidity and mortality, particularly in the developing world. Underlying trends are changing the pattern of cancer and this is also being influenced by the HIV/AIDS pandemic, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Even though the pattern of cancer varies across Africa, there are identifiable trends. Breast and cervical cancers, and Kaposi sarcoma are the commonest cancers in women, while Kaposi sarcoma, liver and prostate cancers are the commonest in men. Cancer causes more morbidity and mortality in Africa compared to other parts of the world. Infections account for a disproportionate amount of cancers in Africa. The HIV epidemic is contributing to increased prevalence of many cancers particularly those associated with Herpes and Papilloma viruses. Tobacco use, another major carcinogen, is increasing, particularly among the young. Dietary factors, alcohol use, physical inactivity and environmental pollution are also important aetiological factors of cancer in Africa. In developing countries, poverty, limited government health budget and poor health care systems complicate cancer prevention, treatment and outcomes. Coordinated response by international agencies and NGOs is needed to help developing countries and several successful models exist. More action is also needed on ensuring safety and quality of chemotherapy and the price needs to be reduced. Responses advocated for cancer control in Africa include banning tobacco use, better regulation of alcohol sale, better environmental planning and immunization against cancer associated viruses. Training of health care workers to diagnose cancer and treat it effectively within limited budgets is needed. Research to develop these new treatments and others, particularly from natural products is urgently needed and this can be done safely within established health research ethics regulatory frameworks. Several opportunities for collaborative research and

  13. A study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of advanced nuclear energy technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Song, K. C.; Chang, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. J.; Lim, C. Y.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, Y. J. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    The objective of the study was to participate the GIF for the efficient propulsion of future nuclear system development. For achieving the objective of this study, the followings were carried out. {Omicron} Analyze the international/domestic trends in the future nuclear energy system {Omicron} Analyze the domestic long-term R and D program for the future nuclear system and assist its implementation - Review the agenda of the executive committee, the technical committee, and sub-technical committee - Assist the committee meetings and workshops related to the future nuclear energy system {Omicron} Develop the participation strategy for the collaborative development of Gen-IV technology and conducting the international cooperation activities - Support the delegation by reviewing the agenda of GIF meetings in the technical and legal perspective - Research the system R and D arrangement and report its progress - Participate in the SFR SIA PA negotiation meeting and report its progress {Omicron} Support the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. - Support a delegation by reviewing the agenda in the technical/legal point of view - Participate in the BINERIC meetings and Support the related activities The result of this study may be used for 1) contribution to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities between the advanced countries and Korea and 2) contribution effective management of Gen IV international collaboration by technical/legal supporting

  14. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J.

    2009-08-01

    The objective of the study was to participate the GIF for the efficient propulsion of future nuclear system development. For achieving the objective of this study, the followings were carried out. · Investigation and analysis of the international and domestic trends related to future nuclear system · To maximize the national interests by the strategic participation of GIF meeting - To participate of GIF meeting and to support of relative work - To investigate the System R and D Arrangement and to inform its progress situation · To maximize the propulsion results of Korea/U.S nuclear energy joint research(I-NERI) - To support a delegation by the review of agenda in aspect of the technical/legal point - To participate of BINERIC meeting and to support of relative work · Streamline the nuclear energy R and D due to the effective connection between domestic R and D and international collaboration The result of this study may be used for 1) contribution to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities between the advanced countries and Korea and 2) contribution effective management of Gen IV international collaboration by technical/legal supporting

  15. A study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of advanced nuclear energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Song, K. C.; Chang, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. J.; Lim, C. Y.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, Y. J.

    2011-03-01

    The objective of the study was to participate the GIF for the efficient propulsion of future nuclear system development. For achieving the objective of this study, the followings were carried out. Ο Analyze the international/domestic trends in the future nuclear energy system Ο Analyze the domestic long-term R and D program for the future nuclear system and assist its implementation - Review the agenda of the executive committee, the technical committee, and sub-technical committee - Assist the committee meetings and workshops related to the future nuclear energy system Ο Develop the participation strategy for the collaborative development of Gen-IV technology and conducting the international cooperation activities - Support the delegation by reviewing the agenda of GIF meetings in the technical and legal perspective - Research the system R and D arrangement and report its progress - Participate in the SFR SIA PA negotiation meeting and report its progress Ο Support the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. - Support a delegation by reviewing the agenda in the technical/legal point of view - Participate in the BINERIC meetings and Support the related activities The result of this study may be used for 1) contribution to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities between the advanced countries and Korea and 2) contribution effective management of Gen IV international collaboration by technical/legal supporting

  16. Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    . The Canadian International Food Security Research Fund(CIFSRF) is a program of Canada's International Development Research. Centre (IDRC) undertaken with the financial support of the. Government of Canada provided through Foreign ...

  17. Strategic Nuclear Research Collaboration - FY99 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. J. Leahy

    1999-07-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has created the Strategic Nuclear Research Collaboration. The SNRC brings together some of America's finest laboratory and university nuclear researchers in a carefully focused research program intended to produce ''breakthrough'' solutions to the difficult issues of nuclear economics, safety, non-proliferation, and nuclear waste. This integrated program aims to address obstacles that stand in the way of nuclear power development in the US These include fuel cycle concerns related to waste and proliferation, the need for more efficient regulatory practices, and the high cost of constructing and operating nuclear power plants. Funded at an FY99 level of $2.58M, the SNRC is focusing the efforts of scientists and engineers from the INEEL and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to solve complex nuclear energy challenges in a carefully chosen, integrated portfolio of research topics. The result of this collaboration will be research that serves as a catalyst for future direct-funded nuclear research and technology development and which preserves and enhances the INEEL's role as America's leading national laboratory for nuclear power research. In its first year, the SNRC has focused on four research projects each of which address one or more of the four issues facing further nuclear power development (economics, safety, waste disposition and proliferation-resistance). This Annual Report describes technical work and accomplishments during the first year of the SNRC's existence.

  18. Building Virtual Collaborative Research Community Using Knowledge Management Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Ling Shih

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Many online communities nowadays are emphasized more on peer interactions and information sharing among members; very few online communities are built with knowledge management in nature supported by knowledge management system (KMS. This study aims to present a community of practice on how to effectively adopt a knowledge management system (KMS to neutralize a cyber collaborative learning community for a research lab in a higher education setting. A longitudinal case for 7 years was used to analyze the retention and extension of participants‟ community of practice experiences. Interviews were conducted for the comparison between experiences and theories. It was found that the transformations of tacit and explicit knowledge are in accordance with the framework of Nonaka‟s model of knowledge management from which we elicit the strategies and suggestions to the adoption and implementation of virtual collaborative research community supported by KMS.

  19. Virtual Laboratory Enabling Collaborative Research in Applied Vehicle Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, John E.; Cronin, Catherine K.; Scott, Laura E.

    2005-01-01

    The virtual laboratory is a new technology, based on the internet, that has had wide usage in a variety of technical fields because of its inherent ability to allow many users to participate simultaneously in instruction (education) or in the collaborative study of a common problem (real-world application). The leadership in the Applied Vehicle Technology panel has encouraged the utilization of this technology in its task groups for some time and its parent organization, the Research and Technology Agency, has done the same for its own administrative use. This paper outlines the application of the virtual laboratory to those fields important to applied vehicle technologies, gives the status of the effort, and identifies the benefit it can have on collaborative research. The latter is done, in part, through a specific example, i.e. the experience of one task group.

  20. Research Collaboration in a Communication Rights Campaign: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    In building public support for social change, activists in communities of color routinely approach broader audiences via news media. Communities of color, however, routinely face disparities that limit their access to media including local news media outlets. This lack of access mirrors inequalities in political, social, and economic arenas and can slow public awareness campaigns to address disparities in health, environmental, and other quality-of-life issues. I describe two community-based collaborative action research studies that documented and challenged how local television newscasts underrepresented and misrepresented three communities of color in Boston. The linkage between communication rights and campaigns to address quality-of-life issues is presented, as well as unresolved challenges in the collaborative research process. The study has implications for environmental health campaigns.

  1. Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores collaboration between library media educators and regular classroom teachers. The article focuses on the context of the issue, positions on the issue, the impact of collaboration, and how to implement effective collaboration into the school system. Various books and professional journals are used to support conclusions…

  2. A Burning Plasma Experiment: the role of international collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Stewart

    2003-04-01

    The world effort to develop fusion energy is at the threshold of a new stage in its research: the investigation of burning plasmas. A burning plasma is self-heated. The 100 million degree temperature of the plasma is maintained by the heat generated by the fusion reactions themselves, as occurs in burning stars. The fusion-generated alpha particles produce new physical phenomena that are strongly coupled together as a nonlinear complex system, posing a major plasma physics challenge. Two attractive options are being considered by the US fusion community as burning plasma facilities: the international ITER experiment and the US-based FIRE experiment. ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) is a large, power-plant scale facility. It was conceived and designed by a partnership of the European Union, Japan, the Soviet Union, and the United States. At the completion of the first engineering design in 1998, the US discontinued its participation. FIRE (the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment) is a smaller, domestic facility that is at an advanced pre-conceptual design stage. Each facility has different scientific, programmatic and political implications. Selecting the optimal path for burning plasma science is itself a challenge. Recently, the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee recommended a dual path strategy in which the US seek to rejoin ITER, but be prepared to move forward with FIRE if the ITER negotiations do not reach fruition by July, 2004. Either the ITER or FIRE experiment would reveal the behavior of burning plasmas, generate large amounts of fusion power, and be a huge step in establishing the potential of fusion energy to contribute to the world's energy security.

  3. Collaboration in Research and Engineering for Advanced Technology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrieling, P. Douglas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    SNL/CA proposes the Collaboration in Research and Engineering for Advanced Technology and Education (CREATE) facility to support customer-driven national security mission requirements while demonstrating a fiscally responsible approach to cost-control. SNL/CA realizes that due to the current backlog of capital projects in NNSA that following the normal Line Item process to procure capital funding is unlikely and therefore SNL/CA will be looking at all options including Alternative Financing.

  4. A collaborative approach for research paper recommender system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruna, Khalid; Akmar Ismail, Maizatul; Damiasih, Damiasih; Sutopo, Joko; Herawan, Tutut

    2017-01-01

    Research paper recommenders emerged over the last decade to ease finding publications relating to researchers' area of interest. The challenge was not just to provide researchers with very rich publications at any time, any place and in any form but to also offer the right publication to the right researcher in the right way. Several approaches exist in handling paper recommender systems. However, these approaches assumed the availability of the whole contents of the recommending papers to be freely accessible, which is not always true due to factors such as copyright restrictions. This paper presents a collaborative approach for research paper recommender system. By leveraging the advantages of collaborative filtering approach, we utilize the publicly available contextual metadata to infer the hidden associations that exist between research papers in order to personalize recommendations. The novelty of our proposed approach is that it provides personalized recommendations regardless of the research field and regardless of the user's expertise. Using a publicly available dataset, our proposed approach has recorded a significant improvement over other baseline methods in measuring both the overall performance and the ability to return relevant and useful publications at the top of the recommendation list.

  5. Feasibility Study of Implementing a Mobile Collaborative Information Platform for International Safeguards Inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastelum, Zoe N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gitau, Ernest T. N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Doehle, Joel R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Toomey, Christopher M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    In response to the growing pervasiveness of mobile technologies such as tablets and smartphones, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories have been exploring the potential use of these platforms for international safeguards activities. Specifically of interest are information systems (software, and accompanying servers and architecture) deployed on mobile devices to increase the situational awareness and productivity of an IAEA safeguards inspector in the field, while simultaneously reducing paperwork and pack weight of safeguards equipment. Exploratory development in this area has been met with skepticism regarding the ability to overcome technology deployment challenges for IAEA safeguards equipment. This report documents research conducted to identify potential challenges for the deployment of a mobile collaborative information system to the IAEA, and proposes strategies to mitigate those challenges.

  6. A European collaboration research programme to study and test large scale base isolated structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renda, V.; Verzeletti, G.; Papa, L.

    1995-01-01

    The improvement of the technology of innovative anti-seismic mechanisms, as those for base isolation and energy dissipation, needs of testing capability for large scale models of structures integrated with these mechanisms. These kind experimental tests are of primary importance for the validation of design rules and the setting up of an advanced earthquake engineering for civil constructions of relevant interest. The Joint Research Centre of the European Commission offers the European Laboratory for Structural Assessment located at Ispra - Italy, as a focal point for an international european collaboration research programme to test large scale models of structure making use of innovative anti-seismic mechanisms. A collaboration contract, opened to other future contributions, has been signed with the national italian working group on seismic isolation (Gruppo di Lavoro sull's Isolamento Sismico GLIS) which includes the national research centre ENEA, the national electricity board ENEL, the industrial research centre ISMES and producer of isolators ALGA. (author). 3 figs

  7. Cancer Research UK | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cancer Research UK. Cancer Research UK. https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/. The Economics of Tobacco Control Research Initiative. The Economics of Tobacco Control Research Initiative funds innovative fiscal policy research supporting tobacco control in low and middle-income countries. View more. The Economics ...

  8. Summary of the findings of the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donovan, J.; Cancelliere, C.; Cassidy, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, the WHO Collaborating Centre for Neurotrauma, Prevention, Management and Rehabilitation Task Force published the first large systematic review and best evidence synthesis on the clinical course and prognosis for recovery after MTBI. Ten years later, the International Collaboration on Mil...

  9. Internal and External Scripts in Computer-Supported Collaborative Inquiry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollar, Ingo; Fischer, Frank; Slotta, James D.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated how differently structured external scripts interact with learners' internal scripts with respect to individual knowledge acquisition in a Web-based collaborative inquiry learning environment. Ninety students from two secondary schools participated. Two versions of an external collaboration script (high vs. low structured)…

  10. Emerging themes in international business research

    OpenAIRE

    David A Griffith; Salih Tamer Cavusgil; Shichun Xu

    2008-01-01

    This study is motivated by two research questions: (1) Which recent contributions have been driving the research agenda in international business? (2) Which emerging themes in the literature are likely to set the stage for future work? To examine these questions, the study examined scholarly work in international business over the time period 1996–2006 in six leading international business journals (Journal of International Business Studies, Management International Review, Journal of World B...

  11. Integrative review of international nursing research in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M; Wei, L; Liu, H; Tang, L

    2009-03-01

    Nursing research in Mainland China is divided into two parts: domestic nursing research, comprising all publications in Chinese; and international nursing research, comprising all publications in English. Domestic nursing research has been developing rapidly, demonstrated by the increase in new national or regional journals and publications. However, little is known about the extent of international research. To outline the development of international nursing research publications in Mainland China and to provide suggestions for future development. All of the papers were retrieved from PubMed. The key search phase was 'China or P.R.China NOT Hong Kong NOT Taiwan NOT Macao [AD]', with the limits of 'English', 'nursing journals' as well as the published date up to '2007/09/30'. PubMed recorded 57 English papers that were originally conducted in Mainland China during the search period from 1989 to 30 September 2007. Thirty-seven of the total 57 (65%) publications were contributed by Beijing, Shanghai and Hubei. Forty-four of the 57 publications were conducted with collaborators from Hong Kong, the USA, the UK and Canada. Thirteen publications were funded by international societies, while only three were funded by the Chinese government. The research topics mainly focused on clinical research, nursing education and nursing management. This study indicates that international nursing research has been growing slowly in Mainland China along with provincial variations. The suggestions to improve nursing research include the reform of nursing education, the enhancement of the collaboration with the international societies and the establishment of research priorities.

  12. "The good work is collaborative" | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-07-08

    Jul 8, 2011 ... ... own peer group and establish ongoing relations with them. “In my experience, economics is less and less a field where people are out there on their own, working independently in an isolated fashion. Nobody knows everything they need to know on a subject, so the good work these days is collaborative.

  13. Collaboration in sensor network research: an in-depth longitudinal analysis of assortative mixing patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Alberto; Rodriguez, Marko A

    2010-09-01

    Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on statistical analyses of large networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustrate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a relatively small network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research centerin the development and application of wireless and sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortative mixing of selected node characteristics, unveiling the researchers' propensity to collaborate preferentially with others with a similar academic profile. Our qualitative analysis of mixing patterns offers clues as to the nature of the scientific community being modeled in relation to its organizational, disciplinary, institutional, and international arrangements of collaboration.

  14. Derivation and validation of the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Michelle; Orbai, Ana-Maria; Alarcón, Graciela S

    2012-01-01

    The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) group revised and validated the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) classification criteria in order to improve clinical relevance, meet stringent methodology requirements, and incorporate new...

  15. Aligning Web-Based Tools to the Research Process Cycle: A Resource for Collaborative Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Geoffrey P.; Wright, Vivian H.

    2012-01-01

    Using John Creswell's Research Process Cycle as a framework, this article describes various web-based collaborative technologies useful for enhancing the organization and efficiency of educational research. Visualization tools (Cacoo) assist researchers in identifying a research problem. Resource storage tools (Delicious, Mendeley, EasyBib)…

  16. Impact of Antecedent Factors on Collaborative Technologies Usage among Academic Researchers in Malaysian Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Daud, Norzaidi; Zakaria, Halimi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of antecedent factors on collaborative technologies usage among academic researchers in Malaysian research universities. Design/methodology/approach: Data analysis was conducted on data collected from 156 academic researchers from five Malaysian research universities. This study…

  17. Respect, trust, and the management of sickle cell disease pain in hospital: comparative analysis of concern-raising behaviors, preliminary model, and agenda for international collaborative research to inform practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elander, James; Beach, Mary Catherine; Haywood, Carlton

    2011-01-01

    Background/objectives Qualitative interview studies suggest that adult patients’ experiences of hospital treatment for sickle cell disease (SCD) pain reflect an absence of respect by providers for patients, and an absence or breakdown of trust. Systematic comparisons between treatment settings could help identify contextual influences on respect and trust. Design Quantitative comparison of concern-raising behaviors (pain treatment outcomes indicating breakdowns of trust) among adult SCD patients in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, and London, UK, followed by analysis of potential explanations for differences, including socio-cultural and behavioral factors, with a preliminary model of the processes leading to concern-raising behaviors. Results Rates of concern-raising behaviors were significantly higher in Baltimore than London. The model identifies respect and trust as key factors which could be targeted in efforts to improve the quality of SCD pain management in hospital. Conclusion An agenda for international, interdisciplinary research to improve the treatment of SCD pain in hospital should include: comparative analyses between countries and treatment settings of factors that could influence respect and trust; research to test hypotheses derived from models about the roles of respect and trust in the treatment of pain; studies of the impact of healthcare structures and policy on patients’ experiences of care; research focusing on developmental and interpersonal processes related to respect and trust; applications of attribution and other social psychology theories; and development and evaluation of interventions to improve the hospital treatment of SCD pain by increasing respect and trust. PMID:21797726

  18. Research tools | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Through training materials and guides, we aim to build skills and knowledge to enhance the quality of development research. We also offer free access to our database of funded research projects, known as IDRIS+, and our digital library. Our research tools include. Guide to research databases at IDRC: How to access and ...

  19. Reflexively exploring knowledge and power in collaborative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Phillips, Louise Jane; Pedersen, Christina Hee

    will be designed in order to stimulate dialogue across different analytical perspectives and empirical research. The analytical perspectives on which facilitation will be based are rooted in social constructionist approaches to dialogic communication theory and action research. The challenges of collaborative...... knowledge forms, knowledge interests and wishes as to the research outcome. In official policy discourse and research practices, a positive picture is often painted of dialogue as a site for mutual learning on the basis of the different knowledge forms that the different participants bring with them...... of mutual learning. There are also tensions between processes of opening up for a plurality of knowledges and processes of closure in order to achieve strategic ends in the form of some kind of outcome. The basic premise underpinning this workshop is that we as researchers can best deal...

  20. Toward a New Understanding of Virtual Research Collaborations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsev Umur Aydinoglu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Virtual research collaborations (VRCs have become an important method of conducting scientific activity; however, they are often regarded and treated as traditional scientific collaborations. Their success is measured by scholarly productivity and adherence to budget by funding agencies, participating scientists, and scholars. VRCs operate in complex environments interacting with other complex systems. A holistic (or organicist approach is needed to make sense of this complexity. For that purpose, this study proposes using a new perspective, namely, the complex adaptive systems theory that can provide a better understanding of a VRC’s potential creativity, adaptability, resilience, and probable success. The key concepts of complex systems (diversity, interaction, interdependency, feedback, emergence, and adaptation utilized in organization studies are used to discuss the behaviors of VRCs, illustrated with real-life examples.

  1. Investigation of osteosarcoma genomics and its impact on targeted therapy: an international collaboration to conquer human osteosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ji-Long

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a genetically unstable malignancy that most frequently occurs in children and young adults. The lack of progress in managing this devastating disease in the clinic has prompted international researchers to collaborate to profile key genomic alterations that define osteosarcoma. A team of researchers and clinicians from China, Finland, and the United States investigated human osteosarcoma by integrating transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), high-density genome-wide array comparat...

  2. Building Partnerships and Research Collaborations to Address the Impacts of Arctic Change: The North Atlantic Climate Change Collaboration (NAC3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, J.; North, L. A.; Strenecky, B.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in Arctic warming influence the various atmospheric and oceanic patterns that drive Caribbean and mid-latitude climate events, including extreme events like drought, tornadoes, and flooding in Kentucky and the surrounding region. Recently, the establishment of the North Atlantic Climate Change Collaboration (NAC3) project at Western Kentucky University (WKU) in partnership with the University of Akureyri (UNAK), Iceland Arctic Cooperation Network (IACN), and Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) provides a foundation from which to engage students in applied research from the local to global levels and more clearly understand the many tenets of climate change impacts in the Arctic within both a global and local community context. The NAC3 project encompasses many facets, including joint international courses, student internships, economic development, service learning, and applied research. In its first phase, the project has generated myriad outcomes and opportunities for bridging STEM disciplines with other fields to holistically and collaboratively address specific human-environmental issues falling under the broad umbrella of climate change. WKU and UNAK students desire interaction and exposure to other cultures and regions that are threatened by climate change and Iceland presents a unique opportunity to study influences such as oceanic processes, island economies, sustainable harvest of fisheries, and Arctic influences on climate change. The project aims to develop a model to bring partners together to conduct applied research on the complex subject of global environmental change, particularly in the Arctic, while simultaneously focusing on changing how we learn, develop community, and engage internationally to understand the impacts and find solutions.

  3. Research Funding, Patent Search Training and Technology Transfer: a collaboration

    KAUST Repository

    Tyhurst, Janis

    2016-01-01

    This paper will focus on the collaboration efforts of three different university departments to create, teach and evaluate the benefits of a joint patent training series, as well as the future directions this collaboration will take. KAUST has as one of its goals the diversification of the Saudi economy. There is a strong focus at the university on developing entrepreneurial ideas and commercializing research done. The University Library supports this goal through the provision of electronic resources and introductory patent search training skills. However, the patent training class offered by the University Library is only one step in a process that faculty and students need when starting or taking their research to the next level. In the Fall of 2015, I met with representatives of the two major stakeholders in the patent arena, the office of Sponsored Research (OSR) and the Technology Transfer Office (TTO), to develop a patent training program to meet the needs of researchers. The OSR provides funding to researchers who have demonstrated that their ideas have merit with potential applications, the TTO works with researchers who are at the point of needing IP protection. The resulting discussion led us to collaborate on creating a workshop series that benefit the researcher’s information needs and each of our departments as well. In the first of the series of three 2 hour workshops, the Manager of TTO and the Lead Integrative Specialist from the OSR presented a workshop on an overview of Intellectual Property and the patenting process. These presentations focused on when and how to determine whether research is potentially patentable, why a researcher needs to protect his/her research and how to go about protecting it. The second workshop focused on introductory patent search skills and tools, how to expand a literature search to include the information found in patents, and how this kind of research will improve not only the literature search but the research

  4. Global Affairs Canada | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    For example, Vietnamese and Canadian research teams developed micronutrient-enriched instant flours and baby cereals using local crops and local processing facilities. Global Affairs Canada, IDRC, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research are collaborating to improve health outcomes for African mothers and ...

  5. Publications | Page 14 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 131 - 140 of 6379 ... This series of case studies emerged from an action-research project entitled Developing Evaluation and Communication Capacity in Information Society Research (DECI-2). The predecessor DECI-1 project focused only on evaluation mentoring in Asia. The subsequent DECI-2 project collaborated ...

  6. Nepal | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Plant breeding research in the 1980s and 1990s led to more productive cereals, such as finger millet and barley. Other efforts have strengthened farmers' ability to conserve the genetic diversity of their traditional crops. An improved rice variety — developed collaboratively by farmers and researchers — was introduced in ...

  7. Collaborative research between clinicians and researchers: a multiple case study of implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edlund Carrie

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bottom-up, clinician-conceived and directed clinical intervention research, coupled with collaboration from researcher experts, is conceptually endorsed by the participatory research movement. This report presents the findings of an evaluation of a program in the Veterans Health Administration meant to encourage clinician-driven research by providing resources believed to be critical. The evaluation focused on the extent to which funded projects: maintained integrity to their original proposals; were methodologically rigorous; were characterized by collaboration between partners; and resulted in sustained clinical impact. Methods Researchers used quantitative (survey and archival and qualitative (focus group data to evaluate the implementation, evaluation, and sustainability of four clinical demonstration projects at four sites. Fourteen research center mentors and seventeen clinician researchers evaluated the level of collaboration using a six-dimensional model of participatory research. Results Results yielded mixed findings. Qualitative and quantitative data suggested that although the process was collaborative, clinicians' prior research experience was critical to the quality of the projects. Several challenges were common across sites, including subject recruitment, administrative support and logistics, and subsequent dissemination. Only one intervention achieved lasting clinical effect beyond the active project period. Qualitative analyses identified barriers and facilitators and suggested areas to improve sustainability. Conclusions Evaluation results suggest that this participatory research venture was successful in achieving clinician-directed collaboration, but did not produce sustainable interventions due to such implementation problems as lack of resources and administrative support.

  8. Internal Validity: A Must in Research Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahit, Kaya

    2015-01-01

    In experimental research, internal validity refers to what extent researchers can conclude that changes in dependent variable (i.e. outcome) are caused by manipulations in independent variable. The causal inference permits researchers to meaningfully interpret research results. This article discusses (a) internal validity threats in social and…

  9. Australian International Food Security Research Centre | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Australian International Food Security Research Centre. Australian International Food Security Research Centre. http://aciar.gov.au/AIFSC. Cultivate Africa's Future. The Cultivate Africa's Future research partnership is designed to support applied research to combat hunger in sub-Saharan Africa by harnessing the potential ...

  10. Collaboration between infection control and occupational health in three continents: a success story with international impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndelu Lindiwe

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Globalization has been accompanied by the rapid spread of infectious diseases, and further strain on working conditions for health workers globally. Post-SARS, Canadian occupational health and infection control researchers got together to study how to better protect health workers, and found that training was indeed perceived as key to a positive safety culture. This led to developing information and communication technology (ICT tools. The research conducted also showed the need for better workplace inspections, so a workplace audit tool was also developed to supplement worker questionnaires and the ICT. When invited to join Ecuadorean colleagues to promote occupational health and infection control, these tools were collectively adapted and improved, including face-to-face as well as on-line problem-based learning scenarios. The South African government then invited the team to work with local colleagues to improve occupational health and infection control, resulting in an improved web-based health information system to track incidents, exposures, and occupational injury and diseases. As the H1N1 pandemic struck, the online infection control course was adapted and translated into Spanish, as was a novel skill-building learning tool that permits health workers to practice selecting personal protective equipment. This tool was originally developed in collaboration with the countries from the Caribbean region and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO. Research from these experiences led to strengthened focus on building capacity of health and safety committees, and new modules are thus being created, informed by that work. The products developed have been widely heralded as innovative and interactive, leading to their inclusion into “toolkits” used internationally. The tools used in Canada were substantially improved from the collaborative adaptation process for South and Central America and South Africa. This international

  11. Collaboration between infection control and occupational health in three continents: a success story with international impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassi, Annalee; Bryce, Elizabeth A; Breilh, Jaime; Lavoie, Marie-Claude; Ndelu, Lindiwe; Lockhart, Karen; Spiegel, Jerry

    2011-11-08

    Globalization has been accompanied by the rapid spread of infectious diseases, and further strain on working conditions for health workers globally. Post-SARS, Canadian occupational health and infection control researchers got together to study how to better protect health workers, and found that training was indeed perceived as key to a positive safety culture. This led to developing information and communication technology (ICT) tools. The research conducted also showed the need for better workplace inspections, so a workplace audit tool was also developed to supplement worker questionnaires and the ICT. When invited to join Ecuadorean colleagues to promote occupational health and infection control, these tools were collectively adapted and improved, including face-to-face as well as on-line problem-based learning scenarios. The South African government then invited the team to work with local colleagues to improve occupational health and infection control, resulting in an improved web-based health information system to track incidents, exposures, and occupational injury and diseases. As the H1N1 pandemic struck, the online infection control course was adapted and translated into Spanish, as was a novel skill-building learning tool that permits health workers to practice selecting personal protective equipment. This tool was originally developed in collaboration with the countries from the Caribbean region and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). Research from these experiences led to strengthened focus on building capacity of health and safety committees, and new modules are thus being created, informed by that work.The products developed have been widely heralded as innovative and interactive, leading to their inclusion into "toolkits" used internationally. The tools used in Canada were substantially improved from the collaborative adaptation process for South and Central America and South Africa. This international collaboration between occupational

  12. International Research Study of Public Procurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telgen, Jan; Harland, C.; Callender, G.; Harland, C.; Nassimbeni, G.; Schneller, E.

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter we examine the specific issue of public procurement, its importance to local, regional, national, and international economies as evidenced in a unique international comparative research study – the International Research Study of Public Procurement (IRSPP). First the public

  13. Collaborating With Businesses to Support and Sustain Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moch, Susan Diemert; Jansen, Debra A; Jadack, Rosemary A; Page, Phil; Topp, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Financial assistance is necessary for sustaining research at universities. Business collaborations are a potential means for obtaining these funds. To secure funding, understanding the process for obtaining these business funds is important for nursing faculty members. Although faculty rarely request funding from businesses, they are often in a position to solicit financial support due to existing relationships with clinical agency administrators, staff, and community leaders. The economic support received from businesses provides outcomes in nursing research, research education, academic-service partnerships, and client health care. This article describes the steps and processes involved in successfully obtaining research funding from businesses. In addition, case examples for securing and maintaining funding from health care agencies (evidence-based practice services) and from a health manufacturing company (product evaluation) are used to demonstrate the process. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Do Nobel Laureates Create Prize-Winning Networks? An Analysis of Collaborative Research in Physiology or Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, Caroline S.; Horlings, Edwin; Whetsell, Travis A.; Mattson, Pauline; Nordqvist, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine who received the Prize between 1969 and 2011 are compared to a matched group of scientists to examine productivity, impact, coauthorship and international collaboration patterns embedded within research networks. After matching for research domain, h-index,

  15. The International Context of Educational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husen, Torsten

    1983-01-01

    Comparative educational research and cross-national studies are described. The author suggests that such internationalism should not be the intent of university research. Rather, research universities should try to confine themselves to studying fundamental educational problems. (KC)

  16. Research Results Transfer towards the Productive Sector via Research Collaboration in Four Colombian Public Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eugenia Morales Rubiano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the determining factors in the research results transfer towards the productive sector via research collaboration in four Colombian public universities. Thirty heads of units in the aforementioned universities were interviewed, which served to determine eleven cases of study and conduct interviews with thirty-five participants ranging from researchers, participant in formation and business people, in each case, it was found that especially in the last decade universities have turned to creating capacities for research collaboration as well as an openness in participants to create links that not only go in favor of enriching the productive sector but also in strengthening formation and research processes. It was concluded that there is a recent growing interest in the different actors in strengthening the bonds between the universities and the productive sector, though there may be some difficulties in the process of research collaboration due to the lack of an appropriate regulatory framework.

  17. Graduate Education to Facilitate Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration: Identifying Individual Competencies and Developmental Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Valerie Ciocca

    2013-01-01

    Interdisciplinary research collaborations (IDRC) are considered essential for addressing the most complex global community problems concerning science, health, education, energy, the environment, and society. In spite of technological advances, supportive funding, and even researcher proclivity to collaborate, these complex interdisciplinary…

  18. International collaboration in science: The global map and the network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leydesdorff, L.; Wagner, C.S.; Park, H.W.; Adams, J.

    2013-01-01

    The network of international co-authorship relations has been dominated by certain European nations and the USA, but this network is rapidly expanding at the global level. Between 40 and 50 countries appear in the center of the international network in 2011, and almost all (201) nations are nowadays

  19. Promoting Cognitive Health: A Formative Research Collaboration of the Healthy Aging Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laditka, James N.; Beard, Renee L.; Bryant, Lucinda L.; Fetterman, David; Hunter, Rebecca; Ivey, Susan; Logsdon, Rebecca G.; Sharkey, Joseph R.; Wu, Bei

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests that healthy lifestyles may help maintain cognitive health. The Prevention Research Centers Healthy Aging Research Network, 9 universities collaborating with their communities and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is conducting a multiyear research project, begun in 2005, to understand how to translate this…

  20. Russian Minatom nuclear safety research strategic plan. An international review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royen, J.

    1999-01-01

    An NEA study on safety research needs of Russian-designed reactors, carried out in 1996, strongly recommended that a strategic plan for safety research be developed with respect to Russian nuclear power plants. Such a plan was developed at the Russian International Nuclear Safety Centre (RINSC) of the Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy (Minatom). The Strategic Plan is designed to address high-priority safety-research needs, through a combination of domestic research, the application of appropriate foreign knowledge, and collaboration. It represents major progress toward developing a comprehensive and coherent safety-research programme for Russian nuclear power plants (NPPs). The NEA undertook its review of the Strategic Plan with the objective of providing independent verification on the scope, priority, and content of the research described in the Plan based upon the experience of the international group of experts. The principal conclusions of the review and the general comments of the NEA group are presented. (K.A.)

  1. International collaborative study for the calibration of proposed International Standards for thromboplastin, rabbit, plain and for thromboplastin, recombinant, human, plain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Besselaar, A M H P; Chantarangkul, V; Angeloni, F

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The availability of International Standards for thromboplastin is essential for the calibration of routine reagents and hence the calculation of the International Normalized Ratio (INR). Stocks of the current 4(th) International Standards are running low. Candidate replacement materia......) international standard (rTF/09). The candidate materials have been accepted by WHO as the 5(th) International Standards for thromboplastin, rabbit plain, and thromboplastin, recombinant, human, plain. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.......BACKGROUND: The availability of International Standards for thromboplastin is essential for the calibration of routine reagents and hence the calculation of the International Normalized Ratio (INR). Stocks of the current 4(th) International Standards are running low. Candidate replacement materials...... have been prepared. This report describes the calibration of the proposed 5(th) International Standards for thromboplastin, rabbit, plain (coded RBT/16) and for thromboplastin, recombinant, human, plain (coded rTF/16). METHODS: An international collaborative study was carried out for the assignment...

  2. A Semantic Approach to Cross-Disciplinary Research Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurens De Vocht

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The latest developments in ICT, more specifically Social Media and Web 2.0 tools, facilitate the use of online services in research and education. This is also known as Research 2.0 and Technology Enhanced Learning. Web 2.0 tools are especially useful in cases where experts from different disciplines want to collaborate. We suggest an integrated method that embeds these services in research and learning processes, because it is a laborious task for researchers and learners to check and use all varying types of tools and services. We explain a flexible model that uses state-of-the-art semantic technologies to model both structured and unstructured research data. The research data is extracted from many online resources and Social Media. We implement learning objects as an abstraction of the semantically modeled research data. We propose an environment that improves the scientific research and learning process by allowing researchers to efficiently browse the information and concepts represented as learning objects.

  3. Game-based Research Collaboration adapted to Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke; Damgaard Hansen, Sidse; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents prospects for adapting scientific discovery games to science education. In the paper a prototype of The Quantum Computing Game is presented as a working example of adapting game-based research collaboration to physics education. The game concept is the initial result of a three......-year, inter-disciplinary project “Pilot Center for Community-driven Research” at Aarhus and Aalborg University in Denmark. The paper discusses how scientific discovery games can contribute to educating students in how to work with unsolved scientific problems and creation of new scientific knowledge. Based...

  4. Surface modification and characterization Collaborative Research Center at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Surface Modification and Characterization Collaborative Research Center (SMAC/CRC) is a unique facility for the alteration and characterization of the near-surface properties of materials. The SMAC/CRC facility is equipped with particle accelerators and high-powered lasers which can be used to improve the physical, electrical, and/or chemical properties of solids and to create unique new materials not possible to obtain with conventional ''equilibrium'' processing techniques. Surface modification is achieved using such techniques as ion implantation doping, ion beam mixing, laser mixing, ion deposition, and laser annealing

  5. Research Librarian | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Job Summary The Research Librarian is a key member of a team responsible for the delivery of comprehensive research information services which contribute strategic value to the work of clients. Intermediated search services at the expert level, the development and delivery of orientations, training/coaching, ...

  6. Trust Management - Building Trust for International Cross Disciplinary Collaboration on Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, K. V.; Gurney, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Successful communication and collaboration entails mutual understanding, and transfer, of information. The risk of misunderstanding and/or miscommunication between collaborating groups is tackled in different ways around the globe; some are well documented whereas others may be unknown outside particular groups, whether defined geographically or by specialism. For example; in some countries legally binding contracts define the terms of collaboration. Some regions place greater emphasis on developing trust relationships, and sometimes an official agreement is implied, such as many electronic data transfers on the web. International collaboration on climate change increasingly involves electronic data exchange (e.g. open access publications, shared documents, data repositories etc.) and with this increased reliance on electronic data a need has arisen for scientists to collaborate both internationally and cross-disciplinarily particularly with information technology and data management specialists. Trust of data and metadata on the internet (e.g. privacy, legitimacy etc.) varies, possibly due to a lack of internationally agreed standards for data governance and management, leaving many national, regional and institutional practices tailored to the needs of that group only. It is proposed that building trust relationships between cross-disciplinary and international groups could help facilitate further communication, understanding and benefits from the relationship, while still maintaining independence as separate groups. Complex international cross-disciplinary group relationship dynamics are not easily mapped and producing a set of trust building rules that can be applied to any current and future collaboration with equal validity may be unfeasible. An alternative to such a set of rules may be found in a Trust Manager, whose role is to improve mutually beneficial knowledge exchange between groups, build trust and increase future collaborative potential. This

  7. Stronger Collaborations Needed for Successful Space Weather Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasofu, Syun-Ichi

    2007-12-01

    One of the purposes of space weather research is to predict when and how the electromagnetic environment around the Earth will be disturbed after specific (solar storms,) which are defined here as various transient solar phenomena that occur at the time of solar flares [Akasofu and Chapman, 1972]. Accurate space weather predictions require an integrating and synthesizing research effort by a close collaboration among solar physicists, interplanetary physicists, magnetospheric physicists, and upper atmosphere physicists. Unfortunately, such integration/synthesis (I/S) projects in the past have often become an umbrella under which individual researchers in the four disciplines pursue only subjects of their own interests, disintegrate into individual projects, and even encourage the trend of infinite specialization because of the potential availability of additional funds.

  8. Providing Undergraduate Research Opportunities Through the World Rivers Observatory Collaborative Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, S. L.; Marsh, S. J.; Janmaat, A.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Voss, B.; Holmes, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Successful research collaboration exists between the University of the Fraser Valley (UFV), a primarily undergraduate-serving university located on the Fraser River in British Columbia, and the World Rivers Observatory that is coordinated through the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC). The World Rivers Observatory coordinates time-series sampling of 15 large rivers, with particular focus on the large Arctic rivers, the Ganges-Brahmaputra, Congo, Fraser, Yangtze (Changjiang), Amazon, and Mackenzie River systems. The success of this international observatory critically depends on the participation of local collaborators, such as UFV, that are necessary in order to collect temporally resolved data from these rivers. Several faculty members and undergraduate students from the Biology and Geography Departments of UFV received on-site training from the lead-PIs of the Global Rivers Observatory. To share information and ensure good quality control of sampling methods, WHOI and WHRC hosted two international workshops at Woods Hole for collaborators. For the past four years, faculty and students from UFV have been collecting a variety of bi-monthly water samples from the Fraser River for the World Rivers Observatory. UFV undergraduate students who become involved learn proper sampling techniques and are given the opportunity to design and conduct their own research. Students have collected, analyzed and presented data from this project at regional, national, and international scientific meetings. UFV undergraduate students have also been hosted by WHOI and WHRC as guest students to work on independent research projects. While at WHOI and WHRC, students are able to conduct research using state-of-the-art specialized research facilities not available at UFV.

  9. The British Neurosurgical Trainee Research Collaborative: Five years on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, Aswin; Jamjoom, Aimun A; Edlmann, Ellie; Ahmed, Aminul I; Coulter, Ian C; Ma, Ruichong; May, Paul; Brennan, Paul M; Hutchinson, Peter J A; Kolias, Angelos G

    2018-01-01

    Since its inception in 2012, the British Neurosurgical Trainee Research Collaborative (BNTRC) has established itself as a robust example of a trainee-led research collaborative. This article summarises the work of the collaborative over its first 5 years of existence, outlining the structure, its research projects, impact and future directions.

  10. The Human Genome Project: An Imperative for International Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is the Human Genome Project which aims to decipher the totality of the human genetic information. The historical background, the objectives, international cooperation, ethical discussion, and the role of UNESCO are included. (KR)

  11. Developing a Collaborative Agenda for Humanities and Social Scientific Research on Laboratory Animal Science and Welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Gail F; Greenhough, Beth J; Hobson-West, Pru; Kirk, Robert G W; Applebee, Ken; Bellingan, Laura C; Berdoy, Manuel; Buller, Henry; Cassaday, Helen J; Davies, Keith; Diefenbacher, Daniela; Druglitrø, Tone; Escobar, Maria Paula; Friese, Carrie; Herrmann, Kathrin; Hinterberger, Amy; Jarrett, Wendy J; Jayne, Kimberley; Johnson, Adam M; Johnson, Elizabeth R; Konold, Timm; Leach, Matthew C; Leonelli, Sabina; Lewis, David I; Lilley, Elliot J; Longridge, Emma R; McLeod, Carmen M; Miele, Mara; Nelson, Nicole C; Ormandy, Elisabeth H; Pallett, Helen; Poort, Lonneke; Pound, Pandora; Ramsden, Edmund; Roe, Emma; Scalway, Helen; Schrader, Astrid; Scotton, Chris J; Scudamore, Cheryl L; Smith, Jane A; Whitfield, Lucy; Wolfensohn, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Improving laboratory animal science and welfare requires both new scientific research and insights from research in the humanities and social sciences. Whilst scientific research provides evidence to replace, reduce and refine procedures involving laboratory animals (the '3Rs'), work in the humanities and social sciences can help understand the social, economic and cultural processes that enhance or impede humane ways of knowing and working with laboratory animals. However, communication across these disciplinary perspectives is currently limited, and they design research programmes, generate results, engage users, and seek to influence policy in different ways. To facilitate dialogue and future research at this interface, we convened an interdisciplinary group of 45 life scientists, social scientists, humanities scholars, non-governmental organisations and policy-makers to generate a collaborative research agenda. This drew on methods employed by other agenda-setting exercises in science policy, using a collaborative and deliberative approach for the identification of research priorities. Participants were recruited from across the community, invited to submit research questions and vote on their priorities. They then met at an interactive workshop in the UK, discussed all 136 questions submitted, and collectively defined the 30 most important issues for the group. The output is a collaborative future agenda for research in the humanities and social sciences on laboratory animal science and welfare. The questions indicate a demand for new research in the humanities and social sciences to inform emerging discussions and priorities on the governance and practice of laboratory animal research, including on issues around: international harmonisation, openness and public engagement, 'cultures of care', harm-benefit analysis and the future of the 3Rs. The process outlined below underlines the value of interdisciplinary exchange for improving communication across

  12. Developing a Collaborative Agenda for Humanities and Social Scientific Research on Laboratory Animal Science and Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Gail F.; Greenhough, Beth J; Hobson-West, Pru; Kirk, Robert G. W.; Applebee, Ken; Bellingan, Laura C.; Berdoy, Manuel; Buller, Henry; Cassaday, Helen J.; Davies, Keith; Diefenbacher, Daniela; Druglitrø, Tone; Escobar, Maria Paula; Friese, Carrie; Herrmann, Kathrin; Hinterberger, Amy; Jarrett, Wendy J.; Jayne, Kimberley; Johnson, Adam M.; Johnson, Elizabeth R.; Konold, Timm; Leach, Matthew C.; Leonelli, Sabina; Lewis, David I.; Lilley, Elliot J.; Longridge, Emma R.; McLeod, Carmen M.; Miele, Mara; Nelson, Nicole C.; Ormandy, Elisabeth H.; Pallett, Helen; Poort, Lonneke; Pound, Pandora; Ramsden, Edmund; Roe, Emma; Scalway, Helen; Schrader, Astrid; Scotton, Chris J.; Scudamore, Cheryl L.; Smith, Jane A.; Whitfield, Lucy; Wolfensohn, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Improving laboratory animal science and welfare requires both new scientific research and insights from research in the humanities and social sciences. Whilst scientific research provides evidence to replace, reduce and refine procedures involving laboratory animals (the ‘3Rs’), work in the humanities and social sciences can help understand the social, economic and cultural processes that enhance or impede humane ways of knowing and working with laboratory animals. However, communication across these disciplinary perspectives is currently limited, and they design research programmes, generate results, engage users, and seek to influence policy in different ways. To facilitate dialogue and future research at this interface, we convened an interdisciplinary group of 45 life scientists, social scientists, humanities scholars, non-governmental organisations and policy-makers to generate a collaborative research agenda. This drew on methods employed by other agenda-setting exercises in science policy, using a collaborative and deliberative approach for the identification of research priorities. Participants were recruited from across the community, invited to submit research questions and vote on their priorities. They then met at an interactive workshop in the UK, discussed all 136 questions submitted, and collectively defined the 30 most important issues for the group. The output is a collaborative future agenda for research in the humanities and social sciences on laboratory animal science and welfare. The questions indicate a demand for new research in the humanities and social sciences to inform emerging discussions and priorities on the governance and practice of laboratory animal research, including on issues around: international harmonisation, openness and public engagement, ‘cultures of care’, harm-benefit analysis and the future of the 3Rs. The process outlined below underlines the value of interdisciplinary exchange for improving communication across

  13. Developing a Collaborative Agenda for Humanities and Social Scientific Research on Laboratory Animal Science and Welfare.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail F Davies

    Full Text Available Improving laboratory animal science and welfare requires both new scientific research and insights from research in the humanities and social sciences. Whilst scientific research provides evidence to replace, reduce and refine procedures involving laboratory animals (the '3Rs', work in the humanities and social sciences can help understand the social, economic and cultural processes that enhance or impede humane ways of knowing and working with laboratory animals. However, communication across these disciplinary perspectives is currently limited, and they design research programmes, generate results, engage users, and seek to influence policy in different ways. To facilitate dialogue and future research at this interface, we convened an interdisciplinary group of 45 life scientists, social scientists, humanities scholars, non-governmental organisations and policy-makers to generate a collaborative research agenda. This drew on methods employed by other agenda-setting exercises in science policy, using a collaborative and deliberative approach for the identification of research priorities. Participants were recruited from across the community, invited to submit research questions and vote on their priorities. They then met at an interactive workshop in the UK, discussed all 136 questions submitted, and collectively defined the 30 most important issues for the group. The output is a collaborative future agenda for research in the humanities and social sciences on laboratory animal science and welfare. The questions indicate a demand for new research in the humanities and social sciences to inform emerging discussions and priorities on the governance and practice of laboratory animal research, including on issues around: international harmonisation, openness and public engagement, 'cultures of care', harm-benefit analysis and the future of the 3Rs. The process outlined below underlines the value of interdisciplinary exchange for improving

  14. Collaborative ethnography for information systems research Studying knowledge work practices and designing supportive information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Maier

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding knowledge work and supporting it with information systems (ISs are challenging tasks. Knowledge work has changed substantially recently and studies on how knowledge work is currently performed are scarce. Ethnography is the most suitable qualitative research method for studying knowledge work, yet too time-consuming, costly and unfocused for the fast changing IS domain. Moreover, results from qualitative studies need to be transformed into artefacts useful for IS requirements engineering and design. This paper proposes a procedure for collaborative ethnography to study knowledge work practices and inform IS requirements gathering and design illustrated with the case of a collaborative ethnographic study of seven organisations in four European countries performed in a large-scale international IS research and development project. The paper also critically discusses the procedure’s applicability and limitations.

  15. International Journal of Community Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    : 2384 - 6828] is a peer reviewed journal publication of Anthonio Research Center. IJCR publishes research articles, review articles, short reports and commentaries that are community-based or inter and intra-cultural based. IJCR also accepts ...

  16. IDRC Connect | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-07-20

    All IDRC-funded researchers have access to IDRC Connect, our project portal and collaborative workspace. For projects approved after July 20, 2015, IDRC Connect must be used to submit technical reports project outputs funding requests for open access journal publishing charges You need a password to access IDRC ...

  17. Gender | Page 240 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Waterborne and helminthic diseases are rampant, as are respiratory and digestive illnesses. But the situation is improving dramatically for the city's poor, thanks to a unique collaboration between Nepalese and Canadian researchers and the work of a local nongovernmental organization. Read more about CASE STUDY: ...

  18. Software for justice | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-10-28

    Oct 28, 2010 ... To collaborate in the fight against human rights violations such as covert ... It is just one resource in a set of information tools designed and made ... have been much studied and debated in western research literature, yet little ...

  19. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    elearning

    2008-03-04

    Mar 4, 2008 ... international forum for the communication and evaluation of data, methods and findings in health sciences and related disciplines. ... school students in Benin City is still poor and the adolescents still engage in ... people often have to overcome the stigma and discrimination, and address some of the most ...

  20. IDRC - International Development Research Centre |

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Learn moreArtificial intelligence and human development ... Our experts share insights on the issues and approaches challenging the international ... Shadow Libraries: Access to Knowledge in Global Higher Education · Book cover: ... Social Theories of Urban Violence in the Global South: Towards Safe and Inclusive Cities.

  1. Collaboration under the International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy (IPHE) and the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, H.J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    The objectives and achievements of the International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy (IPHE) and the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) will be described. Both are agreements between governments and aim at identifying and promoting potential areas of bilateral and multilateral collaboration on new and advanced energy technologies. The IPHE has analysed priorities for international collaboration in research, development, demonstration and utilisation of hydrogen equipment in five areas: hydrogen production, fuel cells, hydrogen storage, codes and standards, socio-economic research. A report on such options is available and a series of IPHE conferences and workshops will pave the way to concrete collaboration projects. The CSLF is focused on development of improved cost-effective technologies for the cost-efficient capture and safe, long-term storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) for fossil power plants. The mission of the CSLF is to facilitate the development and deployment of such technologies via collaborative efforts that address key technical issues, as well as economic, and environmental challenges. The CSLF also promotes awareness and champion legal, regulatory, financial, and institutional environments conducive to such technologies. The CSLF has worked out a Technology Roadmap as a guide for the CSLF and its Members that describes possible routes to future CO2 capture, transport and storage needs. Included are modules on the current status of these technologies, ongoing activities in CO{sub 2} capture, transport and storage, and identification of technology gaps and non-technology needs that should be addressed over the next decade. The Technology Roadmap indicates areas where the CSLF can add value through international collaborative effort. Both, hydrogen technologies and CO2 sequestration, are closely connected and will serve an overall strategic framework with clean fossil fuels as a key element of a sustainable energy portfolio

  2. Large Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Systems for International Collaboration In Fluid Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEligot, Donald M.; Becker, Stefan; McIlroy, Hugh M. Jr.

    2010-01-01

    In recent international collaboration, INL and Uni. Erlangen have developed large MIR flow systems which can be ideal for joint graduate student education and research. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages and around objects to be obtained without locating a disturbing transducer in the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. The MIR technique is not new itself; others employed it earlier. The innovation of these MIR systems is their large size relative to previous experiments, yielding improved spatial and temporal resolution. This report will discuss the benefits of the technique, characteristics of the systems and some examples of their applications to complex situations. Typically their experiments have provided new fundamental understanding plus benchmark data for assessment and possible validation of computational thermal fluid dynamic codes.

  3. Large Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Systems for International Collaboration In Fluid Mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald M. McEligot; Stefan Becker; Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.

    2010-07-01

    In recent international collaboration, INL and Uni. Erlangen have developed large MIR flow systems which can be ideal for joint graduate student education and research. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages and around objects to be obtained without locating a disturbing transducer in the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. The MIR technique is not new itself; others employed it earlier. The innovation of these MIR systems is their large size relative to previous experiments, yielding improved spatial and temporal resolution. This report will discuss the benefits of the technique, characteristics of the systems and some examples of their applications to complex situations. Typically their experiments have provided new fundamental understanding plus benchmark data for assessment and possible validation of computational thermal fluid dynamic codes.

  4. The role of international collaboration in knowledge development in creation of TSO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackowski, Tomasz Marian; Skrzypek, Elena; Spirzewski, Michal [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Otwock (Poland)

    2014-12-15

    National Centre for Nuclear Research has been created on September the 1{sup st} 2011 by the decree of the Polish Government with a clear goal to form Technical Support Organization for Polish regulator and public administration. It was done by merging two institutes, the former Institute of Atomic Energy POLATOM and the former Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, which worldwide reputation and successful research in various fields of nuclear power-related studies are well known. The fields of activity are widely focused on the nuclear physics, cosmology, electronics as well as detectors, accelerators, material research and many more. The main factor of National Center for Nuclear Research development was the participation in the European Structural Founds program ''Swierk Computing Centre'' from the beginning. In the frame of this particular program, the collaboration with the IAEA, NEA OECD, Euratom and research and TSO organizations from different countries began. The international collaboration plays the key role in the development of the Technical Support Organization expertise, which aim is to become the institution able to provide experts' support for decision-makers in nuclear power industry in Poland. Expertise and knowledge is expanded by the engagement in the code users international trainings, by being involved in various projects and benchmarks. The National Centre for Nuclear Research participates in, among the others, EURATOM projects such as NURESAFE (creation of BE Codes platform). Moreover NCBJ is involved in EURATOM FP7 projects such as NC2I-R (Cogeneration Initiative), ASAMPSAE (Advanced PSA), and ALLIANCE as part of the ALLEGRO project. In most of these groups our centre is taking active part in development as well as in management activities. Thanks to experiences gained and with work on research we are effectively expanding knowledge, experience and expertise to meet future's demands as a Technical

  5. The role of international collaboration in knowledge development in creation of TSO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackowski, Tomasz Marian; Skrzypek, Elena; Spirzewski, Michal

    2014-01-01

    National Centre for Nuclear Research has been created on September the 1 st 2011 by the decree of the Polish Government with a clear goal to form Technical Support Organization for Polish regulator and public administration. It was done by merging two institutes, the former Institute of Atomic Energy POLATOM and the former Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, which worldwide reputation and successful research in various fields of nuclear power-related studies are well known. The fields of activity are widely focused on the nuclear physics, cosmology, electronics as well as detectors, accelerators, material research and many more. The main factor of National Center for Nuclear Research development was the participation in the European Structural Founds program ''Swierk Computing Centre'' from the beginning. In the frame of this particular program, the collaboration with the IAEA, NEA OECD, Euratom and research and TSO organizations from different countries began. The international collaboration plays the key role in the development of the Technical Support Organization expertise, which aim is to become the institution able to provide experts' support for decision-makers in nuclear power industry in Poland. Expertise and knowledge is expanded by the engagement in the code users international trainings, by being involved in various projects and benchmarks. The National Centre for Nuclear Research participates in, among the others, EURATOM projects such as NURESAFE (creation of BE Codes platform). Moreover NCBJ is involved in EURATOM FP7 projects such as NC2I-R (Cogeneration Initiative), ASAMPSAE (Advanced PSA), and ALLIANCE as part of the ALLEGRO project. In most of these groups our centre is taking active part in development as well as in management activities. Thanks to experiences gained and with work on research we are effectively expanding knowledge, experience and expertise to meet future's demands as a Technical Support Organization for first Nuclear

  6. Needed: Global Collaboration for Comparative Research on Cities and Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K. Gusmano

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Over half of the world’s population lives in cities and United Nations (UN demographers project an increase of 2.5 billion more urban dwellers by 2050. Yet there is too little systematic comparative research on the practice of urban health policy and management (HPAM, particularly in the megacities of middle-income and developing nations. We make a case for creating a global database on cities, population health and healthcare systems. The expenses involved in data collection would be difficult to justify without some review of previous work, some agreement on indicators worth measuring, conceptual and methodological considerations to guide the construction of the global database, and a set of research questions and hypotheses to test. We, therefore, address these issues in a manner that we hope will stimulate further discussion and collaboration.

  7. Needed: Global Collaboration for Comparative Research on Cities and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusmano, Michael K; Rodwin, Victor G

    2016-04-16

    Over half of the world's population lives in cities and United Nations (UN) demographers project an increase of 2.5 billion more urban dwellers by 2050. Yet there is too little systematic comparative research on the practice of urban health policy and management (HPAM), particularly in the megacities of middle-income and developing nations. We make a case for creating a global database on cities, population health and healthcare systems. The expenses involved in data collection would be difficult to justify without some review of previous work, some agreement on indicators worth measuring, conceptual and methodological considerations to guide the construction of the global database, and a set of research questions and hypotheses to test. We, therefore, address these issues in a manner that we hope will stimulate further discussion and collaboration. © 2016 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  8. International Business Research: Coauthorship Patterns and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kam C; Fung, Hung-Gay; Leung, Wai K.

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigate published international business research in four international business journals over a 10-year period, 1995-2004: (a) patterns of coauthorship across regions, and (b) the relation between coauthorship patterns and the quality of international business (IB) articles. A cross-region coauthorship enhances the quality of an…

  9. CLIC/ILC Researchers Explore New Avenues for Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Researchers from CLIC and ILC met for their first common International Workshop on Linear Colliders, which was held in Geneva from 18 to 22 October. Although the talks were mostly scientific and technical, the political message behind them was a breakthrough, as the workshop showed the progress made in unifying the two communities.   The International Workshop on Linear Colliders (IWLC), which was organised by the European Committee for Future Accelerators, hosted by CERN, and held at CERN and the International Conference Centre in Geneva, attracted a large audience of about 500 experts. Although there have been other joint conferences between the CLIC and ILC communities before, they have all been focused on specific technical and/or managerial issues. The IWLC was part of an ongoing effort by CLIC and ILC to provide an environment in which researchers can exchange ideas, inform their peers about their most recent achievements and work together on common issues. Given the possible technical ov...

  10. Software Engineering Research/Developer Collaborations (C104)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Elaine; Shull, Forrest

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this collaboration was to produce Flight Software Branch (FSB) process standards for software inspections which could be used across three new missions within the FSB. The standard was developed by Dr. Forrest Shull (Fraunhofer Center for Experimental Software Engineering, Maryland) using the Perspective-Based Inspection approach, (PBI research has been funded by SARP) , then tested on a pilot Branch project. Because the short time scale of the collaboration ruled out a quantitative evaluation, it would be decided whether the standard was suitable for roll-out to other Branch projects based on a qualitative measure: whether the standard received high ratings from Branch personnel as to usability and overall satisfaction. The project used for piloting the Perspective-Based Inspection approach was a multi-mission framework designed for reuse. This was a good choice because key representatives from the three new missions would be involved in the inspections. The perspective-based approach was applied to produce inspection procedures tailored for the specific quality needs of the branch. The technical information to do so was largely drawn through a series of interviews with Branch personnel. The framework team used the procedures to review requirements. The inspections were useful for indicating that a restructuring of the requirements document was needed, which led to changes in the development project plan. The standard was sent out to other Branch personnel for review. Branch personnel were very positive. However, important changes were identified because the perspective of Attitude Control System (ACS) developers had not been adequately represented, a result of the specific personnel interviewed. The net result is that with some further work to incorporate the ACS perspective, and in synchrony with the roll out of independent Branch standards, the PBI approach will be implemented in the FSB. Also, the project intends to continue its collaboration with

  11. Guide to effective research-management collaboration at long-term environmental research sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick J. Swanson; Steve Eubanks; Mary Beth Adams; John C. Brissette

    2010-01-01

    The Forest Service system of experimental forests and ranges (EFRs) and other sites of long-term silvicultural, watershed, and ecological research have contributed to science and natural resource management for more than a century. An important aspect of the success of EFR programs is strong collaboration between the research and land manager communities. This guide...

  12. Collaborative Professional Development in Chemistry Education Research: Bridging the Gap between Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szteinberg, Gabriela; Balicki, Scott; Banks, Gregory; Clinchot, Michael; Cullipher, Steven; Huie, Robert; Lambertz, Jennifer; Lewis, Rebecca; Ngai, Courtney; Weinrich, Melissa; Talanquer, Vicente; Sevian, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Professional development that bridges gaps between educational research and practice is needed. However, bridging gaps can be difficult because teachers and educational researchers often belong to different Communities of Practice, as their activities, goals, and means of achieving those goals often differ. Meaningful collaboration among teachers…

  13. Health cyberinfrastructure for collaborative use-inspired research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chismar, William; Horan, Thomas A; Hesse, Bradford W; Feldman, Sue S; Shaikh, Abdul R

    2011-05-01

    Rapid advances in information and networking technologies have greatly expanded the modes for conducting business and science. For the past two decades, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has been supporting efforts to develop a comprehensive cyberinfrastructure with the goal of transforming the nature of scientific investigations. More recently, the NIH began supporting efforts to develop a cyberinfrastructure of healthcare research and practice. However, the best structure and applications of cyberinfrastructure in health care have yet to be defined. To address these issues, the NIH and the Kay Center for E-Health Research at Claremont Graduate University sponsored a symposium on "Cyberinfrastructure for Public Health and Health Services: Research and Funding Directions." The symposium convened researchers, practitioners, and federal funders to discuss how to further cyberinfrastructure systems and research in the public health and health services sectors. This paper synthesizes findings of the symposium, the goals of which were to determine the dynamics necessary for executing and utilizing cyberinfrastructure in public health and health services; examine the requirements of transdisciplinary collaboration; and identify future research directions. A multi-faceted conception of use-inspired research for cyberinfrastructure is developed. Use-inspired research aims to further basic theory but is grounded, inspired, and informed by practical problems. A cyberinfrastructure framework is presented that incorporates three intersecting dimensions: research-practice, health services-public health, and social-technical dimensions. Within this framework, this paper discusses the ways in which cyberinfrastructure provides opportunities to integrate across these dimensions to develop research and actions that can improve both clinical outcomes and public health. Copyright © 2011 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  14. A new approach in cross-domain collaborative research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diviacco, Paolo; Fox, Peter; Busato, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Scientific research commonly faces the study of complex systems where multiple skills and competences are needed at the same time. Effective collaboration among researchers then becomes of paramount importance. Multidisciplinary studies imply the use of information and knowledge from domains that can be rather far from each other. Notwithstanding this, researchers, need to understand: what they handle, how to extract what they need and eventually produce something that can be used also by others. The management of information and knowledge in this perspective is not trivial. To develop methods and tools able to support such activities we need to analyze how collaborative research takes place. Besides the standard view that picture scientists committed to their endeavour to achieve solid and undebatable results, modern epistemology and sociology of science added a more fluid perspective where science can be considered mostly a social construct conditioned also by cognitive issues. These aspects cannot be obliterated; on the contrary they need to be carefully taken into consideration. Information is to be built from different perspectives and ways of thinking by actors with different point of views, approaches and aims, and in this, data should be understandable by all the designated community. In fact different communities develop their own ways of thinking, language and even myths, in other words they can be considered such as different cultures. To address these issues we invoke two strategies: (I) to formalize all the knowledge relevant for the study. This will means resolving all conflicting models among actors; something that is theoretically and has been demonstrated practically, very difficult to achieve. (II) Exploit the results of ethnographic studies conducted in the 1990's that explained how the introduction of representative artifacts allow different cultures to understand and use the same concepts in a different way. Both approaches have limitations and

  15. Publications | Page 25 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 241 - 250 of 6341 ... Journal articles. Papers. Reports. Research in Action. Studies ... Half a year later, on. ... Over the past two decades, the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) has established and subsequently devolved ...

  16. International Society for Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... renowned stem cell and regenerative medicine community. More stem cell research Take a closer look Recent Blogs View ... story independent nonprofit organization & the voice of the stem cell research community The International Society for Stem Cell ...

  17. International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research (IJMBR) is a peer-reviewed ... useful to researchers in all aspects of Clinical and Basic Medical Sciences including Anatomical Sciences, Biochemistry, Dentistry, Genetics, ...

  18. Telework 96: An International Collaborative Learning Package for Information Entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Elisabeth; Wormell, Irene

    1997-01-01

    Describes the implementation of an international joint course developed by Queen Margaret College in Scotland and the Royal School of Librarianship in Denmark introducing undergraduate students to tools and issues relevant to teleworking, or working at home. Discusses course objectives, class assignments, student assessment, and program…

  19. The North American Development Partnership: Experiment in International Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Burton L.; Goguen, Robert A.; Jarvis, Phillip S.; Lester, Juliette N.

    2000-01-01

    Describes how career development programs became the focus of an international partnership between the United States and Canada. Discusses the partnership's efforts at developing training and materials that promote the use of occupational and labor markets information and the creation of a computer-based career information delivery system.…

  20. International cooperation in heavy-ion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    The rapidly growing research applications of heavy ions in basic biology and medicine have stimulated interest in this field in many countries. LBL, with its unique facilities and its scientific programs, is the focal point of interest. Plans are underway in several countries, including France, Japan, West Germany, and Canada, to build heavy-ion facilities, and to collaborate with our staff at LBL in heavy-ion research in physics, biology, and medicine

  1. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Research on this matter should also be encouraged to inform future practice. Keywords: Volunteering; Health research; Nonprofit organization. Mohammad A Al- ... “organizations”. According to Porter and Kramer. [3], the number of volunteer organizations in the. USA is increasing which might help address the society's high ...

  2. Global regulatory developments for clinical stem cell research: diversification and challenges to collaborations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemann, Achim; Bortz, Gabriela; Vasen, Federico; Sleeboom-Faulkner, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    In this article, we explore regulatory developments in stem cell medicine in seven jurisdictions: Japan, China, India, Argentina, Brazil, the USA and the EU. We will show that the research methods, ethical standards and approval procedures for the market use of clinical stem cell interventions are undergoing an important process of global diversification. We will discuss the implications of this process for international harmonization and the conduct of multicountry clinical research collaborations. It will become clear that the increasing heterogeneity of research standards and regulations in the stem cell field presents a significant challenge to international clinical trial partnerships, especially with countries that diverge from the regulatory models that have been developed in the USA and the EU.

  3. Impact of International Collaborative Project on Cultural Competence among Occupational Therapy Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Sood OTD, OTR/L

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Occupational therapy (OT educators recognize a need to ensure that OT students are culturally competent. The researchers developed the International Collaborative Project on Cultural Competence (ICPCC to help students understand the impact of cultural context on client care. Entry-level MOT students from a university in the US (N = 18 collaborated with BOT students (N = 4 and advanced MOT students (N = 9 from two universities in India using an online course management system WebCT. The study explored the impact of the ICPCC on OT students’ cultural competence and discusses students’ perceptions of culture on the OT process. The Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among Health Care Professionals Revised© measured students’ cultural competence at baseline and immediately after participation in the ICPCC. Qualitative data was collected using a Self-Reflection Form. There was an increase in the cultural competence scores among all three groups of students after participating in the ICPCC at p value < .05. Three themes emerged from the qualitative data analysis: meaning of the term culture, impact of cultural on client- centered practice, and impact of cultural on OT outcomes. OT students recognized the role that cultural differences play in OT evaluation and intervention.

  4. Energy technologies at the cutting edge: international energy technology collaboration IEA Implementing Agreements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pottinger, C. (ed.)

    2007-05-15

    Ensuring energy security and addressing climate change issues in a cost-effective way are the main challenges of energy policies and in the longer term will be solved only through technology cooperation. To encourage collaborative efforts to meet these energy challenges, the IEA created a legal contract - Implementing Agreement - and a system of standard rules and regulations. This allows interested member and non-member governments or other organisations to pool resources and to foster the research, development and deployment of particular technologies. For more than 30 years, this international technology collaboration has been a fundamental building block in facilitating progress of new or improved energy technologies. There are now 41 Implementing Agreements. This is the third in the series of publications highlighting the recent results and achievements of the IEA Implementing Agreements. This document is arranged in the following sections: Cross-cutting activities (sub-sectioned: Climate technology initiative; Energy Technology Data Eexchange; and Energy technology systems analysis programme); End-use technologies (sub-sectioned: Buildings; Electricity; Industry; and Transport; Fossil fuels (sub-sectioned: Clean Coal Centre; Enhanced oil recovery Fluidized bed conversion; Greenhouse Gas R & D; Multiphase flow sciences); Fusion power; Renewable energies and hydrogen; and For more information (including detail on the IEA energy technology network; IEA Secretariat Implementing Agreement support; and IEA framework. Addresses are given for the Implementing Agreements. The publication is based on core input from the Implementing Agreement Executive Committee.

  5. A pilot study of neurointerventional research level of evidence and collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargen, Kyle M; Mocco, J; Spiotta, Alejandro M; Rai, Ansaar; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2017-07-01

    No studies have sought to provide a quantitative or qualitative critique of research in the field of neurointerventional surgery. To analyze recent publications from the Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery ( JNIS ) to test a new method for assessing research and collaboration. We reviewed all JNIS Online First publications from 25 February 2015 to 24 February 2016. All publications-human or non-human research, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, or literature reviews-were included; editorials and commentaries were excluded. For each publication, study design, number of patients, authors, contributing centers, and study subject were recorded. Level of evidence was defined using a new scale. A total of 206 articles met inclusion criteria. Only 4% were prospective studies. Twenty-eight per cent of scientific research featured patient series of nine or less. The majority of publications were categorized as low-level evidence (91%). Forty-seven per cent involved individuals from a single center, with 87% having collaboration from three or fewer centers. International collaboration was present in 19%. While 256 institutions from 31 countries were represented, 66% were represented in only one publication. We queried JNIS Online First articles from a 1-year period in a pilot study to test a new method of analyzing research quality and collaboration. The methodology appears to adequately quantify the studies into evidence tiers that emulate previously published, widely accepted scales. This may be useful for future comparison of peer-reviewed journals or for studying the quality of research being performed in different disease processes or medical specialties. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. US and Cuban Scientists Forge Collaboration on Arbovirus Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ávila, Jorge; Guzmán-Tirado, Maria G; Fraga-Nodarse, Jorge; Handley, Gray; Meegan, James; Pelegrino-Martínez de la Cotera, Jose L; Fauci, Anthony S

    2018-04-01

    After December 17, 2014, when the US and Cuban governments announced their intent to restore relations, the two countries participated in various exchange activities in an effort to encourage cooperation in public health, health research and biomedical sciences. The conference entitled Exploring Opportunities for Arbovirus Research Collaboration, hosted at Havana's Hotel Nacional, was part of these efforts and was the first major US-Cuban scientific conference in over 50 years. Its purpose was to share information about current arbovirus research and recent findings, and to explore opportunities for future joint research. The nearly 100 participants included leading arbovirus and vector transmission experts from ten US academic institutions, NIH, CDC, FDA and the US Department of Defense. Cuban participants included researchers, clinicians and students from Cuba's Ministry of Public Health, Pedro Kourí Tropical Medicine Institute, Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Center for State Control of Medicines and Medical Devices and other health research and regulatory organizations. Topics highlighted at the three-day meeting included surveillance, research and epidemiology; pathogenesis, immunology and virology; treatment and diagnosis; vector biology and control; vaccine development and clinical trials; and regulatory matters. Concurrent breakout discussions focused on novel vector control, nonvector transmission, community engagement, Zika in pregnancy, and workforce development. Following the conference, the Pedro Kourí Tropical Medicine Institute and the US National Institute of Allergic and Infectious Diseases have continued to explore ways to encourage and support scientists in Cuba and the USA who wish to pursue arbovirus research cooperation to advance scientific discovery to improve disease prevention and control. KEYWORDS Arboviruses, flavivirus, Zika virus, chikungunya virus, dengue virus, research, disease vectors, Cuba, USA.

  7. Research, Collaboration, and Open Science Using Web 2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Shee

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available There is little doubt that the Internet has transformed the world in which we live. Information that was once archived in bricks and mortar libraries is now only a click away, and people across the globe have become connected in a manner inconceivable only 20 years ago. Although many scientists and educators have embraced the Internet as an invaluable tool for research, education and data sharing, some have been somewhat slower to take full advantage of emerging Web 2.0 technologies. Here we discuss the benefits and challenges of integrating Web 2.0 applications into undergraduate research and education programs, based on our experience utilizing these technologies in a summer undergraduate research program in synthetic biology at Harvard University. We discuss the use of applications including wiki-based documentation, digital brainstorming, and open data sharing via the Web, to facilitate the educational aspects and collaborative progress of undergraduate research projects. We hope to inspire others to integrate these technologies into their own coursework or research projects.

  8. Mapping Global Research on International Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzhabekova, Aliya; Hendel, Darwin D.; Chapman, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to map global research in international higher education. Specifically, the study uses bibliometric and social network analysis methods to identify key individuals, institutions, countries, and disciplines contributing to research in international higher education and to investigate patterns of connectivity among…

  9. Search | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Social exclusion, poor economic opportunities, restrictive gender roles, and lack of access to basic services for certain groups are some of the main factors ... Canadian International Food Security Research Fund | IDRC ... The Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF) invests in scaling up solutions that ...

  10. Emerging Economies Research Dialogue | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant will allow the Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations to bridge the gap by organizing two research dialogues in the form of international conferences for emerging economy professionals, academics and policymakers on issues of contemporary relevance to the global economy and polity.

  11. The International Research Experience: Executive MBA Distinctiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, David M.; Pol, Louis G.

    1995-01-01

    The University of Nebraska's Executive Master's in Business Administration (MBA) program has integrated international research activities into the curriculum. The university contracted with domestic corporations to conduct studies on prospects for international business. Research assignments include assessment of competitors, economic evaluations,…

  12. Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease: Collaboration Patterns and Research Core Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Alejandro; González, Gregorio; Manuel Ramos, Jose

    2016-09-01

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are important health problems in developing countries. The study aim was to provide a review and content analysis of the scientific literature on rheumatic fever and RHD over a 70-year period. Medline was employed via the online PubMed service of the US National Library of Medicine, to search for all documents containing the MeSH terms 'rheumatic fever' or 'rheumatic heart disease' between January 1945 and December 2013. A total of 18,552 references was retrieved. Between 1945 and 1970 the number of annual publications containing the search terms increased, but decreased between 1971 and 2013. Between 1990 and 2013, national collaboration (co-authorship) was greatly increased, from 8.7% to 41.7% of the total reports. International collaboration also increased, from 2.5% to 14.8% (p = 0.001). The United States was the main collaborating country, sharing ties mainly with India, South Africa and Brazil. A content analysis led to the identification of three prominent core research topics, chief among which were heart diseases (rheumatic fever diseases, mitral valve diseases and endocarditis). Other areas of note included streptococcal infections and rheumatic diseases (which, in addition to rheumatic fever, also highlighted arthritis and juvenile arthritis). Publications on rheumatic fever and RHD had a major impact during the 1960s, but research groups interest has since declined overall, in line with a decreasing interest in these diseases in developed countries. In contrast, national and international collaboration has increased, a phenomenon that should be encouraged for research into these and other diseases that affect developing countries.

  13. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The journal welcomes original research papers, reviews and case reports on current topics of special interest and relevance. ... Lipid solubility and molecular size are the major limiting factors for ... as natural digestive aids and as carriers for.

  14. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    disciplines (including medicine, pharmacy, nursing, biotechnology, cell and ... The journal welcomes original research papers, reviews and case reports on current ..... Asian J. Pharm. 2008; 2:73-76. 5. Rasenack N, Muller BW. Dissolution rate.

  15. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2008-06-12

    Jun 12, 2008 ... The journal welcomes original research papers, reviews and case reports on current ... serpentine, reserpine, narcotine, caffeine, ... were fed on healthy diet and maintained in ... (i) Effect of methanolic extract of Plumeria.

  16. Improving Virtual Collaborative Learning through Canonical Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Peter; Lehr, Christian; Gersch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Virtual collaboration continues to gain in significance and is attracting attention also as virtual collaborative learning (VCL) in education. This paper addresses aspects of VCL that we identified as critical in a series of courses named "Net Economy": (1) technical infrastructure, (2) motivation and collaboration, and (3) assessment…

  17. Delivering accessible fieldwork: preliminary findings from a collaborative international study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Alison; Atchison, Christopher; Feig, Anthony; Gilley, Brett

    2017-04-01

    Students with disabilities are commonly excluded from full participation in geoscience programs, and encounter significant barriers when accessing field-learning experiences. In order to increase talent and diversity in the geoscience workforce, more inclusive learning experiences must be developed that will enable all students to complete the requirements of undergraduate degree programs, including fieldwork. We discuss the outcomes of a completely accessible field course developed through the collaborative effort of geoscience education practitioners from the US, Canada and the UK. This unique field workshop has brought together current geoscience academics and students with disabilities to share perspectives on commonly-encountered barriers to learning in the field, and explore methods and techniques for overcoming them. While the student participants had the opportunity to learn about Earth processes while situated in the natural environment, participating geoscience instructors began to identify how to improve the design of field courses, making them fully inclusive of learners with disabilities. The outcomes from this experience will be used to develop guidelines to facilitate future development and delivery of accessible geoscience fieldwork.

  18. Standard methods for sampling freshwater fishes: opportunities for international collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Bonar, Scott A.; Mercado-Silva, Norman; Hubert, Wayne A.; Beard, T. Douglas; Dave, Göran; Kubečka, Jan; Graeb, Brian D.S.; Lester, Nigel P.; Porath, Mark; Winfield, Ian J.

    2017-01-01

    With publication of Standard Methods for Sampling North American Freshwater Fishes in 2009, the American Fisheries Society (AFS) recommended standard procedures for North America. To explore interest in standardizing at intercontinental scales, a symposium attended by international specialists in freshwater fish sampling was convened at the 145th Annual AFS Meeting in Portland, Oregon, in August 2015. Participants represented all continents except Australia and Antarctica and were employed by...

  19. Project-based learning with international collaboration for training biomedical engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Shankar

    2011-01-01

    Training biomedical engineers while effectively keeping up with the fast paced scientific breakthroughs and the growth in technical innovations poses arduous challenges for educators. Traditional pedagogical methods are employed for coping with the increasing demands in biomedical engineering (BME) training and continuous improvements have been attempted with some success. Project-based learning (PBL) is an academic effort that challenges students by making them carry out interdisciplinary projects aimed at accomplishing a wide range of student learning outcomes. PBL has been shown to be effective in the medical field and has been adopted by other fields including engineering. The impact of globalization in healthcare appears to be steadily increasing which necessitates the inclusion of awareness of relevant international activities in the curriculum. Numerous difficulties are encountered when the formation of a collaborative team is tried, and additional difficulties occur as the collaboration team is extended to international partners. Understanding and agreement of responsibilities becomes somewhat complex and hence the collaborative project has to be planned and executed with clear understanding by all partners and participants. A model for training BME students by adopting PBL with international collaboration is proposed. The results of previous BME project work with international collaboration fit partially into the model. There were many logistic issues and constraints; however, the collaborative projects themselves greatly enhanced the student learning outcomes. This PBL type of learning experience tends to promote long term retention of multidisciplinary material and foster high-order cognitive activities such as analysis, synthesis and evaluation. In addition to introducing the students to experiences encountered in the real-life workforce, the proposed approach enhances developing professional contracts and global networking. In conclusion, despite

  20. Anthropology and Geosciences: Training and Collaboration Advancing Interdisciplinary Research of Human-environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondizio, E.; Moran, E.

    2005-05-01

    Over the past thirteen years the Anthropological Center for Training and Research on Global Environmental Change (ACT) at Indiana University has pioneered the use of anthropological and environmental research approaches to address issues of land use change, and population-environment interaction, particularly in the Amazon. Our research and training objectives focus on how particular local populations manage resources and how those activities may be studied by integrating time-tested ethnographic methods, survey instruments, ecological field studies, and the spatial and temporal perspectives of remote sensing and Geographical Information Systems. The globalization of the environment crisis bears the risk of the research and training at universities being purely global or large scale in nature. This would fail to take into account the highly variable local causes of human activities or to discover sustainable solutions to the use, conservation, and restoration of human ecosystems. Our approach combines institutional and international collaboration, formal and hands-on laboratory and field activities developed within an interdisciplinary environment, but based on the strength of disciplinary programs. Over the past years, we have particularly emphasized collaboration between American and Brazilian scholars and students and intense work with local farmers and communities both during data collection and field research, as well as in returning data and results using different formats. In this paper, we address our experience, the challenges and advantages of theoretical and methodological development for students approaching interdisciplinary problems, innovations in linking levels of analysis, and new opportunities for international and collaborative training and research on human-environment interaction.