WorldWideScience

Sample records for international building code

  1. International building code for bamboo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.J.A.; Kumar, Arun; Ramanuja Rao, I.V.; Sastry, Cherla

    2002-01-01

    One of the recommendations in the International Bamboo Congress and Workshop, held at Bali in 1995, requested the International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR), "to organize a task force to discuss and finalize a building code for bamboo". Consequently a draft was prepared under the title, "An

  2. The Role of the International Code Council in the U.S. Building Regukation System and Green Building Contruction

    OpenAIRE

    David Walls

    2015-01-01

    This paper will address the components of the International Code Council (ICC) as one of the most important organizations in terms of developing the model building codes for the US: the international codes. This membership-driven organization has the task of providing the building industry and all its stakeholders with the necessary regulatory documents, training, certification, plan check, product evaluation, and accreditation services to achieve safer and more sustainable building construct...

  3. 78 FR 18321 - International Code Council: The Update Process for the International Codes and Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... Energy Conservation Code. International Existing Building Code. International Fire Code. International... Code. International Property Maintenance Code. International Residential Code. International Swimming Pool and Spa Code International Wildland-Urban Interface Code. International Zoning Code. ICC Standards...

  4. 75 FR 19944 - International Code Council: The Update Process for the International Codes and Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... documents from ICC's Chicago District Office: International Code Council, 4051 W Flossmoor Road, Country... Energy Conservation Code. International Existing Building Code. International Fire Code. International...

  5. Building Codes and Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John L.

    The hazard of fire is of great concern to libraries due to combustible books and new plastics used in construction and interiors. Building codes and standards can offer architects and planners guidelines to follow but these standards should be closely monitored, updated, and researched for fire prevention. (DS)

  6. National Tribal Building Codes Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Tribal Building Codes summit statement developed to support tribes interested in adopting green and culturally-appropriate building systems to ensure safe, sustainable, affordable, and culturally-appropriate buildings on tribal lands.

  7. Building a Better Campus: An Update on Building Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the implications for higher education institutions in terms of facility planning, design, construction, and renovation of the move from regionally-developed model-building codes to two international sets of codes. Also addresses the new performance-based design option within the codes. (EV)

  8. Building codes : obstacle or opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto Goetzl; David B. McKeever

    1999-01-01

    Building codes are critically important in the use of wood products for construction. The codes contain regulations that are prescriptive or performance related for various kinds of buildings and construction types. A prescriptive standard might dictate that a particular type of material be used in a given application. A performance standard requires that a particular...

  9. Tribal Green Building Administrative Code Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Tribal Green Building Administrative Code Example can be used as a template for technical code selection (i.e., building, electrical, plumbing, etc.) to be adopted as a comprehensive building code.

  10. Building an "International Code for Public Education": Behind the Scenes at the International Bureau of Education (1925-1946)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The founders of the International Bureau of Education (IBE) in Geneva were convinced the best way to develop understanding between peoples was by disseminating knowledge: collecting pedagogical materials from around the world, making them accessible to all, and enriching them through collective studies and conferences where attendees could engage…

  11. 75 FR 20833 - Building Energy Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ...-0012] Building Energy Codes AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of... the current model building energy codes or their equivalent. DOE is interested in better understanding... codes, Standard 90.1-2007, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (or...

  12. A Comparative Study on Seismic Analysis of Bangladesh National Building Code (BNBC) with Other Building Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Md. S.; Das, T.

    2013-09-01

    Tectonic framework of Bangladesh and adjoining areas indicate that Bangladesh lies well within an active seismic zone. The after effect of earthquake is more severe in an underdeveloped and a densely populated country like ours than any other developed countries. Bangladesh National Building Code (BNBC) was first established in 1993 to provide guidelines for design and construction of new structure subject to earthquake ground motions in order to minimize the risk to life for all structures. A revision of BNBC 1993 is undergoing to make this up to date with other international building codes. This paper aims at the comparison of various provisions of seismic analysis as given in building codes of different countries. This comparison will give an idea regarding where our country stands when it comes to safety against earth quake. Primarily, various seismic parameters in BNBC 2010 (draft) have been studied and compared with that of BNBC 1993. Later, both 1993 and 2010 edition of BNBC codes have been compared graphically with building codes of other countries such as National Building Code of India 2005 (NBC-India 2005), American Society of Civil Engineering 7-05 (ASCE 7-05). The base shear/weight ratios have been plotted against the height of the building. The investigation in this paper reveals that BNBC 1993 has the least base shear among all the codes. Factored Base shear values of BNBC 2010 are found to have increased significantly than that of BNBC 1993 for low rise buildings (≤20 m) around the country than its predecessor. Despite revision of the code, BNBC 2010 (draft) still suggests less base shear values when compared to the Indian and American code. Therefore, this increase in factor of safety against the earthquake imposed by the proposed BNBC 2010 code by suggesting higher values of base shear is appreciable.

  13. Implementation of Energy Code Controls Requirements in New Commercial Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hatten, Mike [Solarc Energy Group, LLC, Seattle, WA (United States); Jones, Dennis [Group 14 Engineering, Inc., Denver, CO (United States); Cooper, Matthew [Group 14 Engineering, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

    2017-03-24

    Most state energy codes in the United States are based on one of two national model codes; ANSI/ASHRAE/IES 90.1 (Standard 90.1) or the International Code Council (ICC) International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Since 2004, covering the last four cycles of Standard 90.1 updates, about 30% of all new requirements have been related to building controls. These requirements can be difficult to implement and verification is beyond the expertise of most building code officials, yet the assumption in studies that measure the savings from energy codes is that they are implemented and working correctly. The objective of the current research is to evaluate the degree to which high impact controls requirements included in commercial energy codes are properly designed, commissioned and implemented in new buildings. This study also evaluates the degree to which these control requirements are realizing their savings potential. This was done using a three-step process. The first step involved interviewing commissioning agents to get a better understanding of their activities as they relate to energy code required controls measures. The second involved field audits of a sample of commercial buildings to determine whether the code required control measures are being designed, commissioned and correctly implemented and functioning in new buildings. The third step includes compilation and analysis of the information gather during the first two steps. Information gathered during these activities could be valuable to code developers, energy planners, designers, building owners, and building officials.

  14. Impacts of Model Building Energy Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sivaraman, Deepak [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Elliott, Douglas B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Liu, Bing [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bartlett, Rosemarie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-10-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) periodically evaluates national and state-level impacts associated with energy codes in residential and commercial buildings. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), funded by DOE, conducted an assessment of the prospective impacts of national model building energy codes from 2010 through 2040. A previous PNNL study evaluated the impact of the Building Energy Codes Program; this study looked more broadly at overall code impacts. This report describes the methodology used for the assessment and presents the impacts in terms of energy savings, consumer cost savings, and reduced CO2 emissions at the state level and at aggregated levels. This analysis does not represent all potential savings from energy codes in the U.S. because it excludes several states which have codes which are fundamentally different from the national model energy codes or which do not have state-wide codes. Energy codes follow a three-phase cycle that starts with the development of a new model code, proceeds with the adoption of the new code by states and local jurisdictions, and finishes when buildings comply with the code. The development of new model code editions creates the potential for increased energy savings. After a new model code is adopted, potential savings are realized in the field when new buildings (or additions and alterations) are constructed to comply with the new code. Delayed adoption of a model code and incomplete compliance with the code’s requirements erode potential savings. The contributions of all three phases are crucial to the overall impact of codes, and are considered in this assessment.

  15. Building Standards and Codes for Energy Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, James G.; Pierlert, James H.

    1977-01-01

    Current activity intended to lead to energy conservation measures in building codes and standards is reviewed by members of the Office of Building Standards and Codes Services of the National Bureau of Standards. For journal availability see HE 508 931. (LBH)

  16. New "Risk-Targeted" Seismic Maps Introduced into Building Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luco, Nicholas; Garrett, B.; Hayes, J.

    2012-01-01

    Throughout most municipalities of the United States, structural engineers design new buildings using the U.S.-focused International Building Code (IBC). Updated editions of the IBC are published every 3 years. The latest edition (2012) contains new "risk-targeted maximum considered earthquake" (MCER) ground motion maps, which are enabling engineers to incorporate a more consistent and better defined level of seismic safety into their building designs.

  17. Pinoleville Pomo Nation Tribal Green Building Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pinoleville Pomo Nation (PPN) worked with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Development Center for Appropriate Technology (DCAT) to create this framework for tribal building codes.

  18. Radon Protection in the Technical Building Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frutos, B.; Garcia, J. P.; Martin, J. L.; Olaya, M.; Serrano, J I.; Suarez, E.; Fernandez, J. A.; Rodrigo, F.

    2003-01-01

    Building construction in areas with high radon gas contamination in land requires the incorporation of certain measures in order to prevent the accumulation of this gas on the inside of buildings. These measures should be considered primarily in the design and construction phases and should take the area of the country into consideration where the construction will take place depending on the potential risk of radon entrance. Within the Technical Building Code, radon protection has been considered through general classification of the country and specific areas where building construction is to take place, in different risk categories and in the introduction of building techniques appropriate for each area. (Author) 17 refs

  19. Economic aspects and models for building codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonke, Jens; Pedersen, Dan Ove; Johnsen, Kjeld

    It is the purpose of this bulletin to present an economic model for estimating the consequence of new or changed building codes. The object is to allow comparative analysis in order to improve the basis for decisions in this field. The model is applied in a case study.......It is the purpose of this bulletin to present an economic model for estimating the consequence of new or changed building codes. The object is to allow comparative analysis in order to improve the basis for decisions in this field. The model is applied in a case study....

  20. Code Compliant School Buildings Boost Student Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald B. Lumpkin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Much of the focus in the literature in raising student achievement has included parental involvement, principal leadership, quality of instruction, students’ socioeconomic status, curriculum, and use of technology. Limited empirical research relates the condition of the school building as a variable that affects student achievement. Furthermore, there is no research that has examined the impact of building codes on achievement outcomes in the state of Florida. This research determined whether academic achievement of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students as measured by the mathematics and reading subtests of the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test (FCAT increased in new school buildings compliant to the 2000 Florida State Requirements for Educational Facilities. A causal-comparative design determined whether the independent variables, old and new school building influenced student achievement as measured by students’ FCAT mathematics and reading subtest scores. The control group was two cohorts of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students who attended school in old buildings. The experimental group was two cohorts of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students who attended school in new buildings. Transition from an old school into a new school was the treatment. Two hypotheses were formulated for testing and the research question for the inquiry was whether the percentage of students passing the FCAT mathematics and reading subtests increases after transitioning from an old school building into a new 2000 UBC (Uniform Building Code compliant facility.

  1. Code for Internal Dosimetry (CINDY)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strenge, D.L.; Peloquin, R.A.; Sula, M.J.; Johnson, J.R.

    1990-10-01

    The CINDY (Code for Internal Dosimetry) Software Package has been developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to address the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.11 by providing the capabilities to calculate organ dose equivalents and effective dose equivalents using the approach of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 30. The code assist in the interpretation of bioassay data, evaluates committed and calendar-year doses from intake or bioassay measurement data, provides output consistent with revised DOE orders, is easy to use, and is generally applicable to DOE sites. Flexible biokinetics models are used to determine organ doses for annual, 50-year, calendar-year, or any other time-point dose necessary for chronic or acute intakes. CINDY is an interactive program that prompts the user to describe the cases to be analyzed and calculates the necessary results for the type of analysis being performed. Four types of analyses may be specified. 92 figs., 10 tabs

  2. The internal dosimetry code PLEIADES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fell, T P; Phipps, A W; Smith, T J

    2007-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has published dose coefficients for the ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides in a series of reports covering intakes by workers and members of the public, including children and pregnant or lactating women. The calculation of these coefficients divides naturally into two distinct parts-the biokinetic and dosimetric. This paper describes in detail the methods used to solve the biokinetic problem in the generation of dose coefficients on behalf of the ICRP, as implemented in the Health Protection Agency's internal dosimetry code PLEIADES. A summary of the dosimetric treatment is included.

  3. The internal dosimetry code PLEIADES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fell, T. P.; Phipps, A. W.; Smith, T. J.

    2007-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has published dose coefficients for the ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides in a series of reports covering intakes by workers and members of the public, including children and pregnant or lactating women. The calculation of these coefficients divides naturally into two distinct parts - the biokinetic and dosimetric. This paper describes in detail the methods used to solve the biokinetic problem in the generation of dose coefficients on behalf of the ICRP, as implemented in the Health Protection Agency's internal dosimetry code PLEIADES. A summary of the dosimetric treatment is included. (authors)

  4. International assessment of PCA codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neymotin, L.; Lui, C.; Glynn, J.; Archarya, S.

    1993-11-01

    Over the past three years (1991-1993), an extensive international exercise for intercomparison of a group of six Probabilistic Consequence Assessment (PCA) codes was undertaken. The exercise was jointly sponsored by the Commission of European Communities (CEC) and OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. This exercise was a logical continuation of a similar effort undertaken by OECD/NEA/CSNI in 1979-1981. The PCA codes are currently used by different countries for predicting radiological health and economic consequences of severe accidents at nuclear power plants (and certain types of non-reactor nuclear facilities) resulting in releases of radioactive materials into the atmosphere. The codes participating in the exercise were: ARANO (Finland), CONDOR (UK), COSYMA (CEC), LENA (Sweden), MACCS (USA), and OSCAAR (Japan). In parallel with this inter-code comparison effort, two separate groups performed a similar set of calculations using two of the participating codes, MACCS and COSYMA. Results of the intercode and inter-MACCS comparisons are presented in this paper. The MACCS group included four participants: GREECE: Institute of Nuclear Technology and Radiation Protection, NCSR Demokritos; ITALY: ENEL, ENEA/DISP, and ENEA/NUC-RIN; SPAIN: Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM) and Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear; USA: Brookhaven National Laboratory, US NRC and DOE

  5. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd; Lin, H.; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing; Song, Bo; Somasundaram, Sriram

    2009-04-15

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in China, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope and HVAC) for commercial and residential buildings in China.

  6. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd

    2009-04-30

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in U.S., including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, lighting, and water heating) for commercial and residential buildings in the U.S.

  7. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd; Somasundaram, Sriram

    2009-04-02

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Australia, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, and lighting) for commercial and residential buildings in Australia.

  8. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Meredydd; Shui, Bin; Takagi, T.

    2009-04-15

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Japan, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, and lighting) for commercial and residential buildings in Japan.

  9. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd

    2009-04-06

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America . This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Canada, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, lighting, and water heating) for commercial and residential buildings in Canada.

  10. Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Technologies in Residential Building Codes: June 15, 1998 to September 15, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wortman, D.; Echo-Hawk, L.

    2005-02-01

    This report is an attempt to describe the building code requirements and impediments to the application of EE and RE technologies in residential buildings. Several modern model building codes were reviewed. These are representative of the codes that will be adopted by most locations in the coming years. The codes reviewed for this report include: International Residential Code, First Draft, April 1998; International Energy Conservation Code, 1998; International Mechanical Code, 1998; International Plumbing Code, 1997; International Fuel Gas Code, 1997; National Electrical Code, 1996. These codes were reviewed as to their application to (1) PV systems in buildings and building-integrated PV systems and (2) active solar domestic hot water and space-heating systems. A discussion of general code issues that impact these technologies is also included. Examples of this are solar access and sustainability.

  11. Building Energy Codes: Policy Overview and Good Practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Sadie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-02-19

    Globally, 32% of total final energy consumption is attributed to the building sector. To reduce energy consumption, energy codes set minimum energy efficiency standards for the building sector. With effective implementation, building energy codes can support energy cost savings and complementary benefits associated with electricity reliability, air quality improvement, greenhouse gas emission reduction, increased comfort, and economic and social development. This policy brief seeks to support building code policymakers and implementers in designing effective building code programs.

  12. Policy Pathways: Modernising Building Energy Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-01

    Buildings are the largest consumers of energy worldwide and will continue to be a source of increasing energy demand in the future. Globally, the sector’s final energy consumption doubled between 1971 and 2010 to reach 2 794 million tonnes of oil equivalent (Mtoe), driven primarily by population increase and economic growth. Under current policies, the global energy demand of buildings is projected by the IEA experts to grow by an additional 838 Mtoe by 2035 compared to 2010. The challenges of the projected increase of energy consumption due to the built environment vary by country. In IEA member countries, much of the future buildings stock is already in place, and so the main challenge is to renovate existing buildings stock. In non-IEA countries, more than half of the buildings stock needed by 2050 has yet to be built. The IEA and the UNDP partnered to analyse current practices in the design and implementation of building energy codes. The aim is to consolidate existing efforts and to encourage more attention to the role of the built environment in a low-carbon and climate-resilient world. This joint IEA-UNDP Policy Pathway aims to share lessons learned between IEA member countries and non-IEA countries. The objective is to spread best practices, limit pressures on global energy supply, improve energy security, and contribute to environmental sustainability. Part of the IEA Policy Pathway series, Modernising building energy codes to secure our global energy future sets out key steps in planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. The Policy Pathway series aims to help policy makers implement the IEA 25 Energy Efficiency Policy Recommendations endorsed by IEA Ministers (2011).

  13. Integrating Renewable Energy Requirements Into Building Energy Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, John R.; Hand, James R.; Halverson, Mark A.

    2011-07-01

    This report evaluates how and when to best integrate renewable energy requirements into building energy codes. The basic goals were to: (1) provide a rough guide of where we’re going and how to get there; (2) identify key issues that need to be considered, including a discussion of various options with pros and cons, to help inform code deliberations; and (3) to help foster alignment among energy code-development organizations. The authors researched current approaches nationally and internationally, conducted a survey of key stakeholders to solicit input on various approaches, and evaluated the key issues related to integration of renewable energy requirements and various options to address those issues. The report concludes with recommendations and a plan to engage stakeholders. This report does not evaluate whether the use of renewable energy should be required on buildings; that question involves a political decision that is beyond the scope of this report.

  14. The Influence of Building Codes on Recreation Facility Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Thomas A.

    1989-01-01

    Implications of building codes upon design and construction of recreation facilities are investigated (national building codes, recreation facility standards, and misperceptions of design requirements). Recreation professionals can influence architectural designers to correct past deficiencies, but they must understand architectural and…

  15. Kayenta Township Building & Safety Department, Tribal Green Building Code Summit Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribal Green Building Code Summit Presentation by Kayenta Township Building & Safety Department showing how they established the building department, developed a code adoption and enforcement process, and hired staff to carry out the work.

  16. 76 FR 64931 - Building Energy Codes Cost Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ...-0046] Building Energy Codes Cost Analysis AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy... reopening of the time period for submitting comments on the request for information on Building Energy Codes... the request for information on Building Energy Code Cost Analysis and provide docket number EERE-2011...

  17. ICAN Computer Code Adapted for Building Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has been involved in developing composite micromechanics and macromechanics theories over the last three decades. These activities have resulted in several composite mechanics theories and structural analysis codes whose applications range from material behavior design and analysis to structural component response. One of these computer codes, the Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN), is designed primarily to address issues related to designing polymer matrix composites and predicting their properties - including hygral, thermal, and mechanical load effects. Recently, under a cost-sharing cooperative agreement with a Fortune 500 corporation, Master Builders Inc., ICAN was adapted to analyze building materials. The high costs and technical difficulties involved with the fabrication of continuous-fiber-reinforced composites sometimes limit their use. Particulate-reinforced composites can be thought of as a viable alternative. They are as easily processed to near-net shape as monolithic materials, yet have the improved stiffness, strength, and fracture toughness that is characteristic of continuous-fiber-reinforced composites. For example, particlereinforced metal-matrix composites show great potential for a variety of automotive applications, such as disk brake rotors, connecting rods, cylinder liners, and other hightemperature applications. Building materials, such as concrete, can be thought of as one of the oldest materials in this category of multiphase, particle-reinforced materials. The adaptation of ICAN to analyze particle-reinforced composite materials involved the development of new micromechanics-based theories. A derivative of the ICAN code, ICAN/PART, was developed and delivered to Master Builders Inc. as a part of the cooperative activity.

  18. Building Energy Efficiency in India: Compliance Evaluation of Energy Conservation Building Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Delgado, Alison

    2014-03-26

    s enactment, only two states and one territory out of 35 Indian states and union territories formally adopted ECBC and six additional states are in the legislative process of approving ECBC. There are several barriers that slow down the process. First, stakeholders, such as architects, developers, and state and local governments, lack awareness of building energy efficiency, and do not have enough capacity and resources to implement ECBC. Second, institution for implementing ECBC is not set up yet; ECBC is not included in local building by-laws or incorporated into the building permit process. Third, there is not a systematic approach to measuring and verifying compliance and energy savings, and thus the market does not have enough confidence in ECBC. Energy codes achieve energy savings only when projects comply with codes, yet only few countries measure compliance consistently and periodic checks often indicate poor compliance in many jurisdictions. China and the U.S. appear to be two countries with comprehensive systems in code enforcement and compliance The United States recently developed methodologies measuring compliance with building energy codes at the state level. China has an annual survey investigating code compliance rate at the design and construction stages in major cities. Like many developing countries, India has only recently begun implementing an energy code and would benefit from international experience on code compliance. In this paper, we examine lessons learned from the U.S. and China on compliance assessment and how India can apply these lessons to develop its own compliance evaluation approach. This paper also provides policy suggestions to national, state, and local governments to improve compliance and speed up ECBC implementation.

  19. International codes concerning the security of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Keiji

    2013-01-01

    Explained is the title subject with international and Japanese official argument or publications and actions, where the security is defined as protection of sealed and unsealed radioisotopes (RI) from malicious acts. IAEA worked out the Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources in 2004 based on its preceding argument and with the turning point of the terrorism 3.11 (2001), and Nuclear Security Recommendations on radioactive material and associated facilities (2011), for whose prerequisite, Security of radioactive sources: implementing guide (2009) and Security in the transport of radioactive material (2008) had been drawn up. The Code of Conduct indicates the security system to regulate the sealed sources that each nation has to build up through legislation, setup of regulatory agency, registration of the sources, provision of concerned facilities with radiation protection, etc. For attaining this purpose, IAEA defined Guidance on the Import and Export of Radioactive Sources (2005, 2012), Categorization of radioactive sources (2005) and Dangerous quantities of radioactive material (D-VALUES) (2006). For updating the related matters, IAEA holds international conferences somewhere in the world every year. The Nuclear Security Recommendations indicate the nation's responsibility of building up and maintaining the security system above with well-balanced measures between the safe and secure use of RI without the invalid inhibition of their usage. Japan government worked out the concept essential for ensuring the nuclear security in Sep. 2011, in which for RI, defined were the risk and benefit in use and security, and securing role of the present legal systems concerning the safety handling and objective RI involved in their registration system. Securing measures of RI in such usage as medical and industrial aids must be of advanced usefulness and safety in harmony with activities of other countries. (T.T)

  20. SAFETY IN THE DESIGN OF SCIENCE LABORATORIES AND BUILDING CODES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HOROWITZ, HAROLD

    THE DESIGN OF COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS USED FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND EDUCATION IS DISCUSSED IN TERMS OF LABORATORY SAFETY AND BUILDING CODES AND REGULATIONS. MAJOR TOPIC AREAS ARE--(1) SAFETY RELATED DESIGN FEATURES OF SCIENCE LABORATORIES, (2) LABORATORY SAFETY AND BUILDING CODES, AND (3) EVIDENCE OF UNSAFE DESIGN. EXAMPLES EMPHASIZE…

  1. Performance-based building codes: a call for injury prevention indicators that bridge health and building sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, N

    2008-10-01

    The international introduction of performance-based building codes calls for a re-examination of indicators used to monitor their implementation. Indicators used in the building sector have a business orientation, target the life cycle of buildings, and guide asset management. In contrast, indicators used in the health sector focus on injury prevention, have a behavioural orientation, lack specificity with respect to features of the built environment, and do not take into account patterns of building use or building longevity. Suggestions for metrics that bridge the building and health sectors are discussed. The need for integrated surveillance systems in health and building sectors is outlined. It is time to reconsider commonly used epidemiological indicators in the field of injury prevention and determine their utility to address the accountability requirements of performance-based codes.

  2. Comparison of energy conservation building codes of Iran, Turkey, Germany, China, ISO 9164 and EN 832

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayaz, Rima; Kari, Behrouz M.

    2009-01-01

    To improve the energy efficiency of buildings via compliance to regulation in Iran, Code No. 19 was devised in 1991. The code lacks high level aims and objectives, addressing the characteristics of Iranian buildings. As a consequence, the code has been revised and is not completely implemented in practice, and still remains inefficient. As with any energy coding system, this code has to identify the right balance between the different energy variables for the Iranian climate and way of life. In order to assist improvements to high level objectives of Code 19, this code is compared with ISO 9164, EN 832, German regulation, TS 825 of Turkey and China's GB 50189 to understand how these have adapted international standards to national features. In order to test the appropriateness of Code 19, five case study buildings in Iran are assessed against Code 19 as well as Turkish standard TS 825 and the results are compared. The results demonstrate that Code 19 is efficient in calculations of building envelope, but it needs improvements in the areas of ventilation, gains from internal and solar sources. The paper concludes by offering suggestions for improving the code.

  3. The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Alison [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Vine, Ed [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Price, Sarah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sturges, Andrew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rosenquist, Greg [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to summarize key findings regarding the costs associated with enforcing building energy code compliance—primarily focusing on costs borne by local government. The review takes into consideration over 150 documents that discuss, to some extent, code enforcement. This review emphasizes those documents that specifically focus on costs associated with energy code enforcement. Given the low rates of building energy code compliance that have been reported in existing studies, as well as the many barriers to both energy code compliance and enforcement, this study seeks to identify the costs of initiatives to improve compliance and enforcement. Costs are reported primarily as presented in the original source. Some costs are given on a per home or per building basis, and others are provided for jurisdictions of a certain size. This literature review gives an overview of state-based compliance rates, barriers to code enforcement, and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and key stakeholder involvement in improving compliance with building energy codes. In addition, the processes and costs associated with compliance and enforcement of building energy codes are presented. The second phase of this study, which will be presented in a different report, will consist of surveying 34 experts in the building industry at the national and state or local levels in order to obtain additional cost information, building on the findings from the first phase, as well as recommendations for where to most effectively spend money on compliance and enforcement.

  4. Building codes as barriers to solar heating and cooling of buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeker, F.O. III

    1978-04-01

    The application of building codes to solar energy systems for heating and cooling of buildings is discussed, using as typical codes the three model building codes most widely adopted by states and localities. Some potential barriers to solar energy systems are found, federal and state programs to deal with these barriers are discussed, and alternatives are suggested. To remedy this, a federal program is needed to encourage state adoption of standards and acceptance of certification of solar systems for code approval, and to encourage revisions to codes based on model legislation prepared for the federal government by the model codes groups.

  5. 1995 building energy codes and standards workshops: Summary and documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandahl, L.J.; Shankle, D.L.

    1996-02-01

    During the spring of 1995, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted four two-day Regional Building Energy Codes and Standards workshops across the US. Workshops were held in Chicago, Denver, Rhode Island, and Atlanta. The workshops were designed to benefit state-level officials including staff of building code commissions, energy offices, public utility commissions, and others involved with adopting/updating, implementing, and enforcing building energy codes in their states. The workshops provided an opportunity for state and other officials to learn more about residential and commercial building energy codes and standards, the role of the US Department of Energy and the Building Standards and Guidelines Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Home Energy Rating Systems (HERS), Energy Efficient Mortgages (EEM), training issues, and other topics related to the development, adoption, implementation, and enforcement of building energy codes. Participants heard success stories, got tips on enforcement training, and received technical support materials. In addition to receiving information on the above topics, workshop participants had an opportunity to provide input on code adoption issues, building industry training issues, building design issues, and exemplary programs across the US. This paper documents the workshop planning, findings, and follow-up processes.

  6. Building energy, building leadership : recommendations for the adoption, development, and implementation of a commercial building energy code in Manitoba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akerstream, T. [Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Allard, K. [City of Thompson, Thompson, MB (Canada); Anderson, N.; Beacham, D. [Manitoba Office of the Fire Commissioner, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Andrich, R. [The Forks North Portage Partnership, MB (Canada); Auger, A. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Office of Energy Efficiency; Downs, R.G. [Shindico Realty Inc., Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Eastwood, R. [Number Ten Architectural Group, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Hewitt, C. [SMS Engineering Ltd., Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Joshi, D. [City of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Klassen, K. [Manitoba Dept. of Energy Science and Technology, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Phillips, B. [Unies Ltd., Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Wiebe, R. [Ben Wiebe Construction Ltd., Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Woelk, D. [Bockstael Construction Ltd., Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Ziemski, S. [CREIT Management LLP, Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    2006-09-15

    This report presented a strategy and a set of recommendations for the adoption, development and implementation of an energy code for new commercial construction in Manitoba. The report was compiled by an advisory committee comprised of industry representatives and government agency representatives. Recommendations were divided into 4 categories: (1) advisory committee recommendations; (2) code adoption recommendations; (3) code development recommendations; and (4) code implementation recommendations. It was suggested that Manitoba should adopt an amended version of the Model National Energy Code for Buildings (1997) as a regulation under the Buildings and Mobile Homes Act. Participation in a national initiative to update the Model National Energy Code for Buildings was also advised. It was suggested that the energy code should be considered as the first step in a longer-term process towards a sustainable commercial building code. However, the code should be adopted within the context of a complete market transformation approach. Other recommendations included: the establishment of a multi-stakeholder energy code task group; the provision of information and technical resources to help build industry capacity; the establishment of a process for energy code compliance; and an ongoing review of the energy code to assess impacts and progress. Supplemental recommendations for future discussion included the need for integrated design by building design teams in Manitoba; the development of a program to provide technical assistance to building design teams; and collaboration between post-secondary institutions to develop and deliver courses on integrated building design to students and professionals. 17 refs.

  7. Building guide : how to build Xyce from source code.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric Richard; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Sholander, Peter E.; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Mei, Ting; Verley, Jason C.

    2013-08-01

    While Xyce uses the Autoconf and Automake system to configure builds, it is often necessary to perform more than the customary %E2%80%9C./configure%E2%80%9D builds many open source users have come to expect. This document describes the steps needed to get Xyce built on a number of common platforms.

  8. Energy Efficiency Building Code for Commercial Buildings in Sri Lanka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busch, John; Greenberg, Steve; Rubinstein, Francis; Denver, Andrea; Rawner, Esther; Franconi, Ellen; Huang, Joe; Neils, Danielle

    2000-09-30

    1.1.1 To encourage energy efficient design or retrofit of commercial buildings so that they may be constructed, operated, and maintained in a manner that reduces the use of energy without constraining the building function, the comfort, health, or the productivity of the occupants and with appropriate regard for economic considerations. 1.1.2 To provide criterion and minimum standards for energy efficiency in the design or retrofit of commercial buildings and provide methods for determining compliance with them. 1.1.3 To encourage energy efficient designs that exceed these criterion and minimum standards.

  9. Energy Efficiency Building Code for Commercial Buildings in Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, John; Greenberg, Steve; Rubinstein, Francis; Denver, Andrea; Rawner, Esther; Franconi, Ellen; Huang, Joe; Neils, Danielle

    2000-01-01

    1.1.1 To encourage energy efficient design or retrofit of commercial buildings so that they may be constructed, operated, and maintained in a manner that reduces the use of energy without constraining the building function, the comfort, health, or the productivity of the occupants and with appropriate regard for economic considerations. 1.1.2 To provide criterion and minimum standards for energy efficiency in the design or retrofit of commercial buildings and provide methods for determining compliance with them. 1.1.3 To encourage energy efficient designs that exceed these criterion and minimum standards

  10. Development of Probabilistic Internal Dosimetry Computer Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Siwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Tae-Eun [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jai-Ki [Korean Association for Radiation Protection, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Internal radiation dose assessment involves biokinetic models, the corresponding parameters, measured data, and many assumptions. Every component considered in the internal dose assessment has its own uncertainty, which is propagated in the intake activity and internal dose estimates. For research or scientific purposes, and for retrospective dose reconstruction for accident scenarios occurring in workplaces having a large quantity of unsealed radionuclides, such as nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and facilities in which nuclear medicine is practiced, a quantitative uncertainty assessment of the internal dose is often required. However, no calculation tools or computer codes that incorporate all the relevant processes and their corresponding uncertainties, i.e., from the measured data to the committed dose, are available. Thus, the objective of the present study is to develop an integrated probabilistic internal-dose-assessment computer code. First, the uncertainty components in internal dosimetry are identified, and quantitative uncertainty data are collected. Then, an uncertainty database is established for each component. In order to propagate these uncertainties in an internal dose assessment, a probabilistic internal-dose-assessment system that employs the Bayesian and Monte Carlo methods. Based on the developed system, we developed a probabilistic internal-dose-assessment code by using MATLAB so as to estimate the dose distributions from the measured data with uncertainty. Using the developed code, we calculated the internal dose distribution and statistical values (e.g. the 2.5{sup th}, 5{sup th}, median, 95{sup th}, and 97.5{sup th} percentiles) for three sample scenarios. On the basis of the distributions, we performed a sensitivity analysis to determine the influence of each component on the resulting dose in order to identify the major component of the uncertainty in a bioassay. The results of this study can be applied to various

  11. Development of Probabilistic Internal Dosimetry Computer Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Siwan; Kwon, Tae-Eun; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2017-01-01

    Internal radiation dose assessment involves biokinetic models, the corresponding parameters, measured data, and many assumptions. Every component considered in the internal dose assessment has its own uncertainty, which is propagated in the intake activity and internal dose estimates. For research or scientific purposes, and for retrospective dose reconstruction for accident scenarios occurring in workplaces having a large quantity of unsealed radionuclides, such as nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and facilities in which nuclear medicine is practiced, a quantitative uncertainty assessment of the internal dose is often required. However, no calculation tools or computer codes that incorporate all the relevant processes and their corresponding uncertainties, i.e., from the measured data to the committed dose, are available. Thus, the objective of the present study is to develop an integrated probabilistic internal-dose-assessment computer code. First, the uncertainty components in internal dosimetry are identified, and quantitative uncertainty data are collected. Then, an uncertainty database is established for each component. In order to propagate these uncertainties in an internal dose assessment, a probabilistic internal-dose-assessment system that employs the Bayesian and Monte Carlo methods. Based on the developed system, we developed a probabilistic internal-dose-assessment code by using MATLAB so as to estimate the dose distributions from the measured data with uncertainty. Using the developed code, we calculated the internal dose distribution and statistical values (e.g. the 2.5 th , 5 th , median, 95 th , and 97.5 th percentiles) for three sample scenarios. On the basis of the distributions, we performed a sensitivity analysis to determine the influence of each component on the resulting dose in order to identify the major component of the uncertainty in a bioassay. The results of this study can be applied to various situations. In cases

  12. Energy Efficiency Program Administrators and Building Energy Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Explore how energy efficiency program administrators have helped advance building energy codes at federal, state, and local levels—using technical, institutional, financial, and other resources—and discusses potential next steps.

  13. 76 FR 57982 - Building Energy Codes Cost Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy [Docket No. EERE-2011-BT-BC-0046] Building Energy Codes Cost Analysis Correction In notice document 2011-23236 beginning on page...-23236 Filed 9-16-11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 1505-01-P ...

  14. The fundamentals of structural building codes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrouwenvelder, A.C.W.M.

    2001-01-01

    Partial Factor Design is nowadays a generally accepted design method for building and civil engineering structures. For most engineers the general philosophy that the safety factors depend on the type of the load and on the limit state under consideration makes sense. However, the background, in

  15. Office of Codes and Standards resource book. Section 1, Building energy codes and standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattrup, M.P.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Codes and Standards has developed this Resource Book to provide: A discussion of DOE involvement in building codes and standards; a current and accurate set of descriptions of residential, commercial, and Federal building codes and standards; information on State contacts, State code status, State building construction unit volume, and State needs; and a list of stakeholders in the building energy codes and standards arena. The Resource Book is considered an evolving document and will be updated occasionally. Users are requested to submit additional data (e.g., more current, widely accepted, and/or documented data) and suggested changes to the address listed below. Please provide sources for all data provided.

  16. Building codes: An often overlooked determinant of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, James; Pauls, Jake; Strobl, Linda

    2016-05-01

    Although the vast majority of the world's population spends most of their time in buildings, building codes are not often thought of as 'determinants of health'. The standards that govern the design, construction, and use of buildings affect our health, security, safety, and well-being. This is true for dwellings, schools, and universities, shopping centers, places of recreation, places of worship, health-care facilities, and workplaces. We urge proactive engagement by the global public health community in developing these codes, and in the design and implementation of health protection and health promotion activities intended to reduce the risk of injury, disability, and death, particularly when due to poor building code adoption/adaption, application, and enforcement.

  17. Potential Job Creation in Nevada as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2013-09-01

    Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

  18. Potential Job Creation in Tennessee as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2013-09-01

    Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

  19. Potential Job Creation in Rhode Island as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2013-09-01

    Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

  20. Potential Job Creation in Minnesota as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2013-09-01

    Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

  1. The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Alison [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Price, Sarah K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Vine, Ed [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    The purpose of this study is to present key findings regarding costs associated with enforcing building energy code compliance–primarily focusing on costs borne by local government. Building codes, if complied with, have the ability to save a significant amount of energy. However, energy code compliance rates have been significantly lower than 100%. Renewed interest in building energy codes has focused efforts on increasing compliance, particularly as a result of the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) requirement that in order for states to receive additional energy grants, they must have “a plan for the jurisdiction achieving compliance with the building energy code…in at least 90 percent of new and renovated residential and commercial building space” by 2017 (Public Law 111-5, Section 410(2)(C)). One study by the Institute for Market Transformation (IMT) estimated the costs associated with reaching 90% compliance to be $810 million, or $610 million in additional funding over existing expenditures, a non-trivial value. [Majersik & Stellberg 2010] In this context, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) conducted a study to better pinpoint the costs of enforcement through a two-phase process.

  2. A long-term, integrated impact assessment of alternative building energy code scenarios in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Sha; Eom, Jiyong; Evans, Meredydd; Clarke, Leon

    2014-01-01

    China is the second largest building energy user in the world, ranking first and third in residential and commercial energy consumption. Beginning in the early 1980s, the Chinese government has developed a variety of building energy codes to improve building energy efficiency and reduce total energy demand. This paper studies the impact of building energy codes on energy use and CO 2 emissions by using a detailed building energy model that represents four distinct climate zones each with three building types, nested in a long-term integrated assessment framework GCAM. An advanced building stock module, coupled with the building energy model, is developed to reflect the characteristics of future building stock and its interaction with the development of building energy codes in China. This paper also evaluates the impacts of building codes on building energy demand in the presence of economy-wide carbon policy. We find that building energy codes would reduce Chinese building energy use by 13–22% depending on building code scenarios, with a similar effect preserved even under the carbon policy. The impact of building energy codes shows regional and sectoral variation due to regionally differentiated responses of heating and cooling services to shell efficiency improvement. - Highlights: • We assessed long-term impacts of building codes and climate policy using GCAM. • Building energy codes would reduce Chinese building energy use by 13–22%. • The impacts of codes on building energy use vary by climate region and sub-sector

  3. Development of a definitive internal dosimetry code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.; Inkret, W.C.; Schillaci, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    Internal dosimetry may be divided into tow main problems: (1) the forward (scientific) problem of determining biokinetics models that describe how radionuclides are taken into the body, distributed in body tissues, and excreted, and (2) the inverse (mathematical) problem: given the measured amounts in excreta and assuming a biokinetic model, to determine the times and amounts of intakes into the body. The inverse problem of internal dosimetry is, in fact, a generic problem studied in other fields (e.g., image reconstruction, spectral deconvulution, and model parameter fitting). We have developed a code for plutonium internal dosimetry using the maximum entropy method, a method for solving underdetermined inverse problems with a positivity constraint. Within the framework of Bayesian statistics, we believe the definitive approach is to examine the Bayesian posterior probability describing the probability of an intake scenario (X i ) read ( ... ) as open-quotes the set of,close quotes where X i denotes the intake amount that occurs on the with day. For plutonium, for a worker with a long employment history, this is a very high dimensional probability space, since there may be on the order of 10,000 days when intakes may have occurred. Within this high dimensional space, we calculate the mean intake scenario as i > where denotes the expectation value over the posterior probability distribution. Similarly, we calculate uncertainties and other relevant quantities, such as X 2 , as expectation values over the posterior distribution. Thanks to a recent breakthrough in describing the mathematical structure of the intake process (a Poisson sum representation of intakes), we have developed the initial version of a Bayesian expectation-value algorithm for internal dosimetry reconstructions

  4. An Examination of the Performance Based Building Code on the Design of a Commercial Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Greenwood

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Building Code of Australia (BCA is the principal code under which building approvals in Australia are assessed. The BCA adopted performance-based solutions for building approvals in 1996. Performance-based codes are based upon a set of explicit objectives, stated in terms of a hierarchy of requirements beginning with key general objectives. With this in mind, the research presented in this paper aims to analyse the impact of the introduction of the performance-based code within Western Australia to gauge the effect and usefulness of alternative design solutions in commercial construction using a case study project. The research revealed that there are several advantages to the use of alternative designs and that all parties, in general, are in favour of the performance-based building code of Australia. It is suggested that change in the assessment process to streamline the alternative design path is needed for the greater use of the performance-based alternative. With appropriate quality control measures, minor variations to the deemed-to-satisfy provisions could easily be managed by the current and future building surveying profession.

  5. Energy Efficiency Requirements in Building Codes, Energy Efficiency Policies for New Buildings. IEA Information Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laustsen, Jens

    2008-03-15

    The aim of this paper is to describe and analyse current approaches to encourage energy efficiency in building codes for new buildings. Based on this analysis the paper enumerates policy recommendations for enhancing how energy efficiency is addressed in building codes and other policies for new buildings. This paper forms part of the IEA work for the G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action. These recommendations reflect the study of different policy options for increasing energy efficiency in new buildings and examination of other energy efficiency requirements in standards or building codes, such as energy efficiency requirements by major renovation or refurbishment. In many countries, energy efficiency of buildings falls under the jurisdiction of the federal states. Different standards cover different regions or climatic conditions and different types of buildings, such as residential or simple buildings, commercial buildings and more complicated high-rise buildings. There are many different building codes in the world and the intention of this paper is not to cover all codes on each level in all countries. Instead, the paper details different regions of the world and different ways of standards. In this paper we also evaluate good practices based on local traditions. This project does not seek to identify one best practice amongst the building codes and standards. Instead, different types of codes and different parts of the regulation have been illustrated together with examples on how they have been successfully addressed. To complement this discussion of efficiency standards, this study illustrates how energy efficiency can be improved through such initiatives as efficiency labelling or certification, very best practice buildings with extremely low- or no-energy consumption and other policies to raise buildings' energy efficiency beyond minimum requirements. When referring to the energy saving potentials for buildings, this study uses the analysis of recent IEA

  6. Building climate change into infrastructure codes and standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auld, H.; Klaasen, J.; Morris, R.; Fernandez, S.; MacIver, D.; Bernstein, D.

    2009-01-01

    'Full text:' Building codes and standards and the climatic design values embedded within these legal to semi-legal documents have profound safety, health and economic implications for Canada's infrastructure systems. The climatic design values that have been used for the design of almost all of today's more than $5.5 Trillion in infrastructure are based on historical climate data and assume that the extremes of the past will represent future conditions. Since new infrastructure based on codes and standards will be built to survive for decades to come, it is critically important that existing climatic design information be as accurate and up-to-date as possible, that the changing climate be monitored to detect and highlight vulnerabilities of existing infrastructure, that forensic studies of climate-related failures be undertaken and that codes and standards processes incorporate future climates and extremes as much as possible. Uncertainties in the current climate change models and their scenarios currently challenge our ability to project future extremes regionally and locally. Improvements to the spatial and temporal resolution of these climate change scenarios, along with improved methodologies to treat model biases and localize results, will allow future codes and standards to better reflect the extremes and weathering conditions expected over the lifespan of structures. In the meantime, other information and code processes can be used to incorporate changing climate conditions into upcoming infrastructure codes and standards, to “bridge” the model uncertainty gap and to complement the state of existing projections. This presentation will outline some of the varied information and processes that will be used to incorporate climate change adaptation into the next development cycle of the National Building Code of Canada and numerous other national CSA infrastructure standards. (author)

  7. 7 CFR Exhibit E to Subpart A of... - Voluntary National Model Building Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary National Model Building Codes E Exhibit E... National Model Building Codes The following documents address the health and safety aspects of buildings and related structures and are voluntary national model building codes as defined in § 1924.4(h)(2) of...

  8. Environmental performance of green building code and certification systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Sangwon; Tomar, Shivira; Leighton, Matthew; Kneifel, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    We examined the potential life-cycle environmental impact reduction of three green building code and certification (GBCC) systems: LEED, ASHRAE 189.1, and IgCC. A recently completed whole-building life cycle assessment (LCA) database of NIST was applied to a prototype building model specification by NREL. TRACI 2.0 of EPA was used for life cycle impact assessment (LCIA). The results showed that the baseline building model generates about 18 thousand metric tons CO2-equiv. of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and consumes 6 terajoule (TJ) of primary energy and 328 million liter of water over its life-cycle. Overall, GBCC-compliant building models generated 0% to 25% less environmental impacts than the baseline case (average 14% reduction). The largest reductions were associated with acidification (25%), human health-respiratory (24%), and global warming (GW) (22%), while no reductions were observed for ozone layer depletion (OD) and land use (LU). The performances of the three GBCC-compliant building models measured in life-cycle impact reduction were comparable. A sensitivity analysis showed that the comparative results were reasonably robust, although some results were relatively sensitive to the behavioral parameters, including employee transportation and purchased electricity during the occupancy phase (average sensitivity coefficients 0.26-0.29).

  9. A novel method of generating and remembering international morse codes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Charyulu, R.J.K.

    untethered communications have been advanced, despite as S.O.S International Morse Code will be at rescue as an emergency tool, when all other modes fail The details of hte method and actual codes have been enumerated....

  10. Nuclear component design ontology building based on ASME codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Shiyi; Zhou Yu; He Shuyan

    2005-01-01

    The adoption of ontology analysis in the study of concept knowledge acquisition and representation for the nuclear component design process based on computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) makes it possible to share and reuse numerous concept knowledge of multi-disciplinary domains. A practical ontology building method is accordingly proposed based on Protege knowledge model in combination with both top-down and bottom-up approaches together with Formal Concept Analysis (FCA). FCA exhibits its advantages in the way it helps establish and improve taxonomic hierarchy of concepts and resolve concept conflict occurred in modeling multi-disciplinary domains. With Protege-3.0 as the ontology building tool, a nuclear component design ontology based ASME codes is developed by utilizing the ontology building method. The ontology serves as the basis to realize concept knowledge sharing and reusing of nuclear component design. (authors)

  11. Coding Theory and Applications : 4th International Castle Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Malonek, Paula; Vettori, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The topics covered in this book, written by researchers at the forefront of their field, represent some of the most relevant research areas in modern coding theory: codes and combinatorial structures, algebraic geometric codes, group codes, quantum codes, convolutional codes, network coding and cryptography. The book includes a survey paper on the interconnections of coding theory with constrained systems, written by an invited speaker, as well as 37 cutting-edge research communications presented at the 4th International Castle Meeting on Coding Theory and Applications (4ICMCTA), held at the Castle of Palmela in September 2014. The event’s scientific program consisted of four invited talks and 39 regular talks by authors from 24 different countries. This conference provided an ideal opportunity for communicating new results, exchanging ideas, strengthening international cooperation, and introducing young researchers into the coding theory community.

  12. use of the RESRAD-BUILD code to calculate building surface contamination limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faillace, E.R.; LePoire, D.; Yu, C.

    1996-01-01

    Surface contamination limits in buildings were calculated for 226 Ra, 230 Th, 232 Th, and natural uranium on the basis of 1 mSv y -1 (100 mrem y -1 ) dose limit. The RESRAD-BUILD computer code was used to calculate these limits for two scenarios: building occupancy and building renovation. RESRAD-BUILD is a pathway analysis model designed to evaluate the potential radiological dose incurred by individuals working or living inside a building contaminated with radioactive material. Six exposure pathways are considered in the RESRAD-BUILD code: (1) external exposure directly from the source; (2) external exposure from materials deposited on the floor; (3) external exposure due to air submersion; (4) inhalation of airborne radioactive particles; (5) inhalation of aerosol indoor radon progeny; and (6) inadvertent ingestion of radioactive material, either directly from the sources or from materials deposited on the surfaces. The code models point, line, area, and volume sources and calculates the effects of radiation shielding, building ventilation, and ingrowth of radioactive decay products. A sensitivity analysis was performed to determine how variations in input parameters would affect the surface contamination limits. In most cases considered, inhalation of airborne radioactive particles was the primary exposure pathway. However, the direct external exposure contribution from surfaces contaminated with 226 Ra was in some cases the dominant pathway for building occupancy depending on the room size, ventilation rates, and surface release fractions. The surface contamination limits are most restrictive for 232 Th, followed by 230 Th, natural uranium, and 226 Ra. The results are compared with the surface contamination limits in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.86, which are most restrictive for 226 Ra and 230 Th, followed by 232 Th, and are least restrictive for natural uranium

  13. International Accreditation of ASME Codes and Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Mervin R.

    1989-01-01

    ASME established a Boiler Code Committee to develop rules for the design, fabrication and inspection of boilers. This year we recognize 75 years of that Code and will publish a history of that 75 years. The first Code and subsequent editions provided for a Code Symbol Stamp or mark which could be affixed by a manufacturer to a newly constructed product to certify that the manufacturer had designed, fabricated and had inspected it in accordance with Code requirements. The purpose of the ASME Mark is to identify those boilers that meet ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code requirements. Through thousands of updates over the years, the Code has been revised to reflect technological advances and changing safety needs. Its scope has been broadened from boilers to include pressure vessels, nuclear components and systems. Proposed revisions to the Code are published for public review and comment four times per year and revisions and interpretations are published annually; it's a living and constantly evolving Code. You and your organizations are a vital part of the feedback system that keeps the Code alive. Because of this dynamic Code, we no longer have columns in newspapers listing boiler explosions. Nevertheless, it has been argued recently that ASME should go further in internationalizing its Code. Specifically, representatives of several countries, have suggested that ASME delegate to them responsibility for Code implementation within their national boundaries. The question is, thus, posed: Has the time come to franchise responsibility for administration of ASME's Code accreditation programs to foreign entities or, perhaps, 'institutes.' And if so, how should this be accomplished?

  14. Evaluating the benefits of commercial building energy codes and improving federal incentives for code adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbraith, Nathaniel; Azevedo, Inês L; Jaramillo, Paulina

    2014-12-16

    The federal government has the goal of decreasing commercial building energy consumption and pollutant emissions by incentivizing the adoption of commercial building energy codes. Quantitative estimates of code benefits at the state level that can inform the size and allocation of these incentives are not available. We estimate the state-level climate, environmental, and health benefits (i.e., social benefits) and reductions in energy bills (private benefits) of a more stringent code (ASHRAE 90.1-2010) relative to a baseline code (ASHRAE 90.1-2007). We find that reductions in site energy use intensity range from 93 MJ/m(2) of new construction per year (California) to 270 MJ/m(2) of new construction per year (North Dakota). Total annual benefits from more stringent codes total $506 million for all states, where $372 million are from reductions in energy bills, and $134 million are from social benefits. These total benefits range from $0.6 million in Wyoming to $49 million in Texas. Private benefits range from $0.38 per square meter in Washington State to $1.06 per square meter in New Hampshire. Social benefits range from $0.2 per square meter annually in California to $2.5 per square meter in Ohio. Reductions in human/environmental damages and future climate damages account for nearly equal shares of social benefits.

  15. Empirical evidence for site coefficients in building code provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, R.D.

    2002-01-01

    Site-response coefficients, Fa and Fv, used in U.S. building code provisions are based on empirical data for motions up to 0.1 g. For larger motions they are based on theoretical and laboratory results. The Northridge earthquake of 17 January 1994 provided a significant new set of empirical data up to 0.5 g. These data together with recent site characterizations based on shear-wave velocity measurements provide empirical estimates of the site coefficients at base accelerations up to 0.5 g for Site Classes C and D. These empirical estimates of Fa and Fnu; as well as their decrease with increasing base acceleration level are consistent at the 95 percent confidence level with those in present building code provisions, with the exception of estimates for Fa at levels of 0.1 and 0.2 g, which are less than the lower confidence bound by amounts up to 13 percent. The site-coefficient estimates are consistent at the 95 percent confidence level with those of several other investigators for base accelerations greater than 0.3 g. These consistencies and present code procedures indicate that changes in the site coefficients are not warranted. Empirical results for base accelerations greater than 0.2 g confirm the need for both a short- and a mid- or long-period site coefficient to characterize site response for purposes of estimating site-specific design spectra.

  16. 78 FR 55245 - Activities and Methodology for Assessing Compliance With Building Energy Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ...-0036] Activities and Methodology for Assessing Compliance With Building Energy Codes AGENCY: Office of... available to states to evaluate compliance with building energy codes and general approaches towards... building energy codes and general approaches towards compliance. The comment period ended on September 5...

  17. The International Atomic Energy Agency Flag Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the IAEA Flag Code which was promulgated by the Director General on 15 September 1999, pursuant to the decision of the Board of Governors on 10 June 1999 to adopt an Agency flag as described in document GOV/1999/41 and its use in accordance with a flag code to be promulgated by the Director General

  18. The International Atomic Energy Agency Flag Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-17

    The document reproduces the text of the IAEA Flag Code which was promulgated by the Director General on 15 September 1999, pursuant to the decision of the Board of Governors on 10 June 1999 to adopt an Agency flag as described in document GOV/1999/41 and its use in accordance with a flag code to be promulgated by the Director General.

  19. Building Bridges: Psi Chi and International Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes A McCormick

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available “How can Psi Chi best partner with international psychologists to expand the honor society world-wide?” This has been an important question since 2009, when the 1,100 chapters of Psi Chi in the United States voted to become “The International Honor Society in Psychology”. This report updates and expands on a unique symposium offered at the 120th meeting of the American Psychological Association in Orlando, Florida, in August of 2012 - the first symposium on the Presidential theme of “Building Bridges” between Psi Chi and international psychology [8]. Here, seven leaders in international psychology in North and South America join to address different aspects of this timely question--with many suggestions on how to “build bridges” to expand Psi Chi globally. It was in part due to this historic symposium that in 2013 Guatemala became the first nation in Latin America, and Russia the first nation in mainland Europe to launch a chapter of Psi Chi.

  20. The impact of international codes of conduct on employment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined how international codes of conduct address employment conditions and gender issues in the Chinese flower industry. A sample of 20 companies was purposively selected and 200 workers from these companies were interviewed. The adoption of international codes did not improve workers conditions ...

  1. Intracoin - International Nuclide Transport Code Intercomparison Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    The purpose of the project is to obtain improved knowledge of the influence of various strategies for radionuclide transport modelling for the safety assessment of final repositories for nuclear waste. This is a report of the first phase of the project which was devoted to a comparison of the numerical accuracy of the computer codes used in the study. The codes can be divided into five groups, namely advection-dispersion models, models including matrix diffusion and chemical effects and finally combined models. The results are presented as comparisons of calculations since the objective of level 1 was code verification. (G.B.)

  2. A MODEL BUILDING CODE ARTICLE ON FALLOUT SHELTERS WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR INCLUSION OF REQUIREMENTS FOR FALLOUT SHELTER CONSTRUCTION IN FOUR NATIONAL MODEL BUILDING CODES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Inst. of Architects, Washington, DC.

    A MODEL BUILDING CODE FOR FALLOUT SHELTERS WAS DRAWN UP FOR INCLUSION IN FOUR NATIONAL MODEL BUILDING CODES. DISCUSSION IS GIVEN OF FALLOUT SHELTERS WITH RESPECT TO--(1) NUCLEAR RADIATION, (2) NATIONAL POLICIES, AND (3) COMMUNITY PLANNING. FALLOUT SHELTER REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIELDING, SPACE, VENTILATION, CONSTRUCTION, AND SERVICES SUCH AS ELECTRICAL…

  3. Building AN International Polar Data Coordination Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsifer, P. L.; Yarmey, L.; Manley, W. F.; Gaylord, A. G.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    In the spirit of the World Data Center system developed to manage data resulting from the International Geophysical Year of 1957-58, the International Polar Year 2007-2009 (IPY) resulted in significant progress towards establishing an international polar data management network. However, a sustained international network is still evolving. In this paper we argue that the fundamental building blocks for such a network exist and that the time is right to move forward. We focus on the Arctic component of such a network with linkages to Antarctic network building activities. A review of an important set of Network building blocks is presented: i) the legacy of the IPY data and information service; ii) global data management services with a polar component (e.g. World Data System); iii) regional systems (e.g. Arctic Observing Viewer; iv) nationally focused programs (e.g. Arctic Observing Viewer, Advanced Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service, Polar Data Catalogue, Inuit Knowledge Centre); v) programs focused on the local (e.g. Exchange for Local Observations and Knowledge of the Arctic, Geomatics and Cartographic Research Centre). We discuss current activities and results with respect to three priority areas needed to establish a strong and effective Network. First, a summary of network building activities reports on a series of productive meetings, including the Arctic Observing Summit and the Polar Data Forum, that have resulted in a core set of Network nodes and participants and a refined vision for the Network. Second, we recognize that interoperability for information sharing fundamentally relies on the creation and adoption of community-based data description standards and data delivery mechanisms. There is a broad range of interoperability frameworks and specifications available; however, these need to be adapted for polar community needs. Progress towards Network interoperability is reviewed, and a prototype distributed data systems is demonstrated. We

  4. Comparing internal and external run-time coupling of CFD and building energy simulation software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djunaedy, E.; Hensen, J.L.M.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a comparison between internal and external run-time coupling of CFD and building energy simulation software. Internal coupling can be seen as the "traditional" way of developing software, i.e. the capabilities of existing software are expanded by merging codes. With external

  5. 24 CFR 200.926a - Residential building code comparison items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Residential building code comparison items. 200.926a Section 200.926a Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and... § 200.926a Residential building code comparison items. HUD will review each local and State code...

  6. Lost opportunities: Modeling commercial building energy code adoption in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Hal T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper models the adoption of commercial building energy codes in the US between 1977 and 2006. Energy code adoption typically results in an increase in aggregate social welfare by cost effectively reducing energy expenditures. Using a Cox proportional hazards model, I test if relative state funding, a new, objective, multivariate regression-derived measure of government capacity, as well as a vector of control variables commonly used in comparative state research, predict commercial building energy code adoption. The research shows little political influence over historical commercial building energy code adoption in the sample. Colder climates and higher electricity prices also do not predict more frequent code adoptions. I do find evidence of high government capacity states being 60 percent more likely than low capacity states to adopt commercial building energy codes in the following year. Wealthier states are also more likely to adopt commercial codes. Policy recommendations to increase building code adoption include increasing access to low cost capital for the private sector and providing noncompetitive block grants to the states from the federal government. - Highlights: ► Model the adoption of commercial building energy codes from 1977–2006 in the US. ► Little political influence over historical building energy code adoption. ► High capacity states are over 60 percent more likely than low capacity states to adopt codes. ► Wealthier states are more likely to adopt commercial codes. ► Access to capital and technical assistance is critical to increase code adoption.

  7. Is the international safety management code an organisational tool ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The birth of the International Management Code for the Safe Operation of Ships and for Pollution Prevention (hereinafter ISM Code) is said to a reaction to the sinking of the Herald of free Enterprise on 6th March 1987.The human element is said to be a generic term used to describe what makes humans behave the way ...

  8. Development and Application of a Code for Internal Exposure (CINEX) based on the CINDY code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchik, T.; Duchan, N.; Sarah, R.; Gabay, Y.; Kol, R.

    2004-01-01

    Internal exposure to radioactive materials at the NRCN is evaluated using the CINDY (Code for Internal Dosimetry) Package. The code was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to assist the interpretation of bioassay data, provide bioassay projections and evaluate committed and calendar-year doses from intake or bioassay measurement data. It provides capabilities to calculate organ dose and effective dose equivalents using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 30 approach. The CINDY code operates under DOS operating system and consequently its operation needs a relatively long procedure which also includes a lot of manual typing that can lead to personal human mistakes. A new code has been developed at the NRCN, the CINEX (Code for Internal Exposure), which is an Excel application and leads to a significant reduction in calculation time (in the order of 5-10 times) and in the risk of personal human mistakes. The code uses a database containing tables which were constructed by the CINDY and contain the bioassay values predicted by the ICRP30 model after an intake of an activity unit of each isotope. Using the database, the code than calculates the appropriate intake and consequently the committed effective dose and organ dose. Calculations with the CINEX code were compared to similar calculations with the CINDY code. The discrepancies were less than 5%, which is the rounding error of the CINDY code. Attached is a table which compares parameters calculated with the CINEX and the CINDY codes (for a class Y uranium). The CINEX is now used at the NRCN to calculate occupational intakes and doses to workers with radioactive materials

  9. [The ICOH International Code of Ethics for Occupational Health Professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foà, V

    2010-01-01

    In the paper all the steps are described which are followed by ICOH to finalize the International Code of Ethics for Occupational Health Professionals (OHP). The Code is composed by a "Preface" in which is explained why the Occupational Health Professionals need a specific Code different from other Codes built up for general practitioners or other specializations, followed by an "Introduction" where the targets of Occupational Health are underlined and which professionals contribute to achieve the defined target. These two parts are followed by a more substantial description of the tasks and duties of the OHP. In the last part of the Code it is illustrated how to carry out the above mentioned duties. The principles inserted in the ICOH Code of Ethics have been worldwide accepted by the OHP and particularly in Italy where they have been included in the Legislative Decree 81/08.

  10. International conventions for measuring radioactivity of building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Chenglong

    2004-01-01

    In buildings, whether civil or industrial, natural radioactivity always occurs at different degrees in the materials (main building materials, decorative materials). Concerns on radioactivity from building materials is unavoidable for human living and developing. As a member of WTO, China's measuring method of radioactivity for building materials, including radionuclides limitation for building materials, hazard evaluation system etc, should keep accordance with the international rules and conventions. (author)

  11. Fusion safety codes International modeling with MELCOR and ATHENA- INTRA

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, T; Topilski, L; Merrill, B

    2002-01-01

    For a number of years, the world fusion safety community has been involved in benchmarking their safety analyses codes against experiment data to support regulatory approval of a next step fusion device. This paper discusses the benchmarking of two prominent fusion safety thermal-hydraulic computer codes. The MELCOR code was developed in the US for fission severe accident safety analyses and has been modified for fusion safety analyses. The ATHENA code is a multifluid version of the US-developed RELAP5 code that is also widely used for fusion safety analyses. The ENEA Fusion Division uses ATHENA in conjunction with the INTRA code for its safety analyses. The INTRA code was developed in Germany and predicts containment building pressures, temperatures and fluid flow. ENEA employs the French-developed ISAS system to couple ATHENA and INTRA. This paper provides a brief introduction of the MELCOR and ATHENA-INTRA codes and presents their modeling results for the following breaches of a water cooling line into the...

  12. Innovation and Standardization in School Building: A Proposal for the National Code in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Giuseppe

    This document discusses the University of Florence's experience and concepts as it developed the research to define a proposal for designing a new national school building code. Section 1 examines the current school building code and the Italian Reform Process in Education between 1960 and 2000. Section 2 details and explains the new school…

  13. Cost and code study of underground building: a report to the Minnesota Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterling, R L

    1979-11-01

    The rapidly intensifying interest in the possible energy savings and environmental and land-use benefits associated with underground buildings has led increasing numbers of people to question restrictions that existing building codes place on underground construction and to make cost comparisons between underground structures and more-conventional buildings. Information in this report on earth-sheltered houses covers public policy issues (building code restrictions, taxation, insurance) and residential construction costs (cost breakdowns, general factors affecting costs, and life-cycle costs). The report also deals with regulatory and insurance issues (building codes, fire protection, insurance provisions) and construction costs for large underground buildings. The report recommends that: (1) the Minnesota Energy Agency consult with the Building Code Division of the Department of Administration on HUD Minimum Property Standards to examine the possibility of modifying several building-code requirements that affect earth-sheltered housing design; (2) HUD Minimum Property Standards be brought into line with the major building codes on the question of optional mechanical ventilation in houses; (3) model ordinances concerning setbacks, basement house provisions, and minimum square footage provisions to be drafted; (4) legal questions concerning the separation of ownership of the surface from that subsurface space be resolved; (5) questions concerning taxation of mined space be resolved; and (6) a life-cost inventory of underground residences and buildings in Minnesota be compiled.

  14. Updates to building-code maps for the 2015 NEHRP recommended seismic provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luco, Nicolas; Bachman, Robert; Crouse, C.B; Harris, James R.; Hooper, John D.; Kircher, Charles A.; Caldwell, Phillp; Rukstales, Kenneth S.

    2015-01-01

    With the 2014 update of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM) as a basis, the Building Seismic Safety Council (BSSC) has updated the earthquake ground motion maps in the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) Recommended Seismic Provisions for New Buildings and Other Structures, with partial funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Anticipated adoption of the updated maps into the American Society of Civil Engineers Minimum Design Loads for Building and Other Structures and the International Building and Residential Codes is underway. Relative to the ground motions in the prior edition of each of these documents, most of the updated values are within a ±20% change. The larger changes are, in most cases, due to the USGS NSHM updates, reasons for which are given in companion publications. In some cases, the larger changes are partly due to a BSSC update of the slope of the fragility curve that is used to calculate the risk-targeted ground motions, and/or the introduction by BSSC of a quantitative definition of “active faults” used to calculate deterministic ground motions.

  15. International Code Assessment and Applications Program: Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, P.; Hanson, R.; Jenks, R.

    1987-03-01

    This is the first annual report of the International Code Assessment and Applications Program (ICAP). The ICAP was organized by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) in 1985. The ICAP is an international cooperative reactor safety research program planned to continue over a period of approximately five years. To date, eleven European and Asian countries/organizations have joined the program through bilateral agreements with the USNRC. Seven proposed agreements are currently under negotiation. The primary mission of the ICAP is to provide independent assessment of the three major advanced computer codes (RELAP5, TRAC-PWR, and TRAC-BWR) developed by the USNRC. However, program activities can be expected to enhance the assessment process throughout member countries. The codes were developed to calculate the reactor plant response to transients and loss-of-coolant accidents. Accurate prediction of normal and abnormal plant response using the codes enhances procedures and regulations used for the safe operation of the plant and also provides technical basis for assessing the safety margin of future reactor plant designs. The ICAP is providing required assessment data that will contribute to quantification of the code uncertainty for each code. The first annual report is devoted to coverage of program activities and accomplishments during the period between April 1985 and March 1987

  16. Automation of Geometry Input for Building Code Compliance Check

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrova, Ekaterina Aleksandrova; Johansen, Peter Lind; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2017-01-01

    Documentation of compliance with the energy performance regulations at the end of the detailed design phase is mandatory for building owners in Denmark. Therefore, besides multidisciplinary input, the building design process requires various iterative analyses, so that the optimal solutions can....... That has left the industry in constant pursuit of possibilities for integration of the tool within the Building Information Modelling environment so that the potential provided by the latter can be harvested and the processed can be optimized. This paper presents a solution for automated data extraction...... from building geometry created in Autodesk Revit and its translation to input for compliance check analysis....

  17. Breathing (and Coding?) a Bit Easier: Changes to International Classification of Disease Coding for Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, Stephen C; Mathew, Sherin

    2018-04-20

    International Classification of Disease (ICD) coding system is broadly utilized by healthcare providers, hospitals, healthcare payers, and governments to track health trends and statistics at the global, national, and local levels and to provide a reimbursement framework for medical care based upon diagnosis and severity of illness. The current iteration of the ICD system, ICD-10, was implemented in 2015. While many changes to the prior ICD-9 system were included in the ICD-10 system, the newer revision failed to adequately reflect advances in the clinical classification of certain diseases such as pulmonary hypertension (PH). Recently, a proposal to modify the ICD-10 codes for PH was considered and ultimately adopted for inclusion as updates to ICD-10 coding system. While these revisions better reflect the current clinical classification of PH, in the future, further changes should be considered to improve the accuracy and ease of coding for all forms of PH. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Automation of Geometry Input for Building Code Compliance Check

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrova, Ekaterina Aleksandrova; Johansen, Peter Lind; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2017-01-01

    Documentation of compliance with the energy performance regulations at the end of the detailed design phase is mandatory for building owners in Denmark. Therefore, besides multidisciplinary input, the building design process requires various iterative analyses, so that the optimal solutions can b...

  19. 49 CFR 41.120 - Acceptable model codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 1991 International Conference of Building Officials (ICBO) Uniform Building Code, published by the... Supplement to the Building Officials and Code Administrators International (BOCA) National Building Code, published by the Building Officials and Code Administrators, 4051 West Flossmoor Rd., Country Club Hills...

  20. Integrating Branding Strategy Across Markets: Building International Brand Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, S.P.; Craig, S.; Nijssen, E.J.

    2001-01-01

    Brands play a critical role in establishing a firm’s visibility and position in international markets. Building a coherent international brand architecture is a key component of the firm’s overall international marketing strategy, because it provides a structure to leverage strong brands into other

  1. Automation of Geometry Input for Building Code Compliance Check

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrova, Ekaterina Aleksandrova; Johansen, Peter Lind; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2017-01-01

    Documentation of compliance with the energy performance regulations at the end of the detailed design phase is mandatory for building owners in Denmark. Therefore, besides multidisciplinary input, the building design process requires various iterative analyses, so that the optimal solutions can...... be identified amongst multiple alternatives. However, meeting performance criteria is often associated with manual data inputs and retroactive modifications of the design. Due to poor interoperability between the authoring tools and the compliance check program, the processes are redundant and inefficient...... from building geometry created in Autodesk Revit and its translation to input for compliance check analysis....

  2. Building a dynamic code to simulate new reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catsaros, N.; Gaveau, B.; Jaekel, M.-T.; Maillard, J.; Maurel, G.; Savva, P.; Silva, J.; Varvayanni, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We develop a stochastic neutronic code based on an existing High Energy Physics code. ► The code simulates innovative reactor designs including Accelerator Driven Systems. ► Core materials evolution will be dynamically simulated, including fuel burnup. ► Continuous feedback between the main inter-related parameters will be established. ► A description of the current research development and achievements is also given. - Abstract: Innovative nuclear reactor designs have been proposed, such as the Accelerator Driven Systems (ADSs), the “candle” reactors, etc. These reactor designs introduce computational nuclear technology problems the solution of which necessitates a new, global and dynamic computational approach of the system. A continuous feedback procedure must be established between the main inter-related parameters of the system such as the chemical, physical and isotopic composition of the core, the neutron flux distribution and the temperature field. Furthermore, as far as ADSs are concerned, the ability of the computational tool to simulate the nuclear cascade created from the interaction of accelerated protons with the spallation target as well as the produced neutrons, is also required. The new Monte Carlo code ANET (Advanced Neutronics with Evolution and Thermal hydraulic feedback) is being developed based on the GEANT3 High Energy Physics code, aiming to progressively satisfy all the above requirements. A description of the capabilities and methodologies implemented in the present version of ANET is given here, together with some illustrative applications of the code.

  3. Business Ethics: International Analysis of Codes of Ethics and Conduct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josmar Andrade

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Codes of ethics and code of conduct formalize an ideal of expected behavior patterns to managers and employees of organizations, providing standards and orientation that states companies interactions with the community, through products /services, sales force, marketing communications, investments, and relationships with other stakeholders, influencing company reputation and overall Marketing performance. The objective of this study is to analyze the differences in codes of ethics of the largest companies based in Brazil and in Portugal, given their cultural and linguistic similarities. Findings show that the use of codes of ethics are more common in Brazil than in Portugal and that codes of ethics are substantially more extensive and cover a larger number of categories in Brazilian companies, reflecting the organizations’ mission and perception of stakeholders concerns and priorities. We conclude that ethical issues severely impact company reputation and, in a comprehensive sense, overall Marketing performance. Marketing professionals should be systematically aware of how company core values are transmitted to different audiences, including the use of code of ethics to communicate both with internal and external publics. 0 0 1 171 966 CASA DOS ANDRADES 23 14 1123 14.0 96 800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE  

  4. Does a code make a difference – assessing the English code of practice on international recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mensah Kwadwo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper draws from research completed in 2007 to assess the effect of the Department of Health, England, Code of Practice for the international recruitment of health professionals. The Department of Health in England introduced a Code of Practice for international recruitment for National Health Service employers in 2001. The Code required National Health Service employers not to actively recruit from low-income countries, unless there was government-to-government agreement. The Code was updated in 2004. Methods The paper examines trends in inflow of health professionals to the United Kingdom from other countries, using professional registration data and data on applications for work permits. The paper also provides more detailed information from two country case studies in Ghana and Kenya. Results Available data show a considerable reduction in inflow of health professionals, from the peak years up to 2002 (for nurses and 2004 (for doctors. There are multiple causes for this decline, including declining demand in the United Kingdom. In Ghana and Kenya it was found that active recruitment was perceived to have reduced significantly from the United Kingdom, but it is not clear the extent to which the Code was influential in this, or whether other factors such as a lack of vacancies in the United Kingdom explains it. Conclusion Active international recruitment of health professionals was an explicit policy intervention by the Department of Health in England, as one key element in achieving rapid staffing growth, particularly in the period 2000 to 2005, but the level of international recruitment has dropped significantly since early 2006. Regulatory and education changes in the United Kingdom in recent years have also made international entry more difficult. The potential to assess the effect of the Code in England is constrained by the limitations in available databases. This is a crucial lesson for those considering a

  5. CASE STUDY: Building better health | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Building Better Health A short video on the importance of community involvement to effective health systems. ... They discovered that the World Bank would fund the lion's share of the cost of installing piped water in Kilimani if the villagers raised a portion of the money themselves. Villagers decided to create a fund based on ...

  6. Building resilience in Cartagena Bay | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    It is a major tourist attraction, yet access to clean water is limited because ... industries — compete for water resources with the natural ecosystems. ... be integrated into the capacity building component to strengthen young leaders' ... Universidad de Cartagena will manage the health component and implement the training of ...

  7. A Perspective of Energy Codes and Regulations for the Buildings of the Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Michael [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory,2032 Todd Street,Eugene, OR 97405e-mail: michael.rosenberg@pnnl.gov; Jonlin, Duane [Seattle Department ofConstruction and Inspections,P.O. Box 34019,Seattle, WA 98124e-mail: duane.jonlin@seattle.gov; Nadel, Steven [American Council for anEnergy-Efficient Economy,529 14th Street NW #600,Washington, DC 20045e-mail: snadel@aceee.org

    2016-10-13

    Today’s building energy codes focus on prescriptive requirements for features of buildings that are directly controlled by the design and construction teams and verifiable by municipal inspectors. Although these code requirements have had a significant impact, they fail to influence a large slice of the building energy use pie – including not only miscellaneous plug loads, cooking equipment and commercial/industrial processes, but the maintenance and optimization of the code-mandated systems as well. Currently, code compliance is verified only through the end of construction, and there are no limits or consequences for the actual energy use in an occupied building. In the future, our suite of energy regulations will likely expand to include building efficiency, energy use or carbon emission budgets over their full life cycle. Intelligent building systems, extensive renewable energy, and a transition from fossil fuel to electric heating systems will likely be required to meet ultra-low-energy targets. This paper lays out the authors’ perspectives on how buildings may evolve over the course of the 21st century and the roles that codes and regulations will play in shaping those buildings of the future.

  8. 4th international conference in sustainability in energy and buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Höjer, Mattias; Howlett, Robert; Jain, Lakhmi

    2013-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Sustainability in Energy and Buildings, SEB12, held in Stockholm, Sweden, and is organised by KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden in partnership with KES International. The International Conference on Sustainability in Energy and Buildings focuses on a broad range of topics relating to sustainability in buildings but also encompassing energy sustainability more widely. Following the success of earlier events in the series, the 2012 conference includes the themes Sustainability, Energy, and Buildings and Information and Communication Technology, ICT. The SEB’12 proceedings includes invited participation and paper submissions across a broad range of renewable energy and sustainability-related topics relevant to the main theme of Sustainability in Energy and Buildings. Applicable areas include technology for renewable energy and sustainability in the built environment, optimisation and modeling techniques, informati...

  9. Energy and Environment Guide to Action - Chapter 4.3: Building Codes for Energy Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides guidance and recommendations for establishing, implementing, and evaluating state building codes for energy efficiency, which improve energy efficiency in new construction and major renovations. State success stories are included for reference.

  10. International political symbolism of the architecture of government buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kochetkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes international political architecture of government buildings in Russia, the U.S., Western Europe (UK, France, Germany and Asia (China, India, Japan. Conclusions that the architecture of government buildings reflects the values of the dominant society’s political culture. Some government buildings are prototypes constructed previously in other societies and cultural traditions (for instance, the Capitol in Washington, USA, and the Capitoline temple in Rome.

  11. International Code Centres Network. Summary Report of the Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H-K.

    2011-01-01

    Fifteen international experts on computational aspects of atomic, molecular and particle surface interaction data for fusion energy research participated in the 2nd technical meeting of the International Code Centres Network. Participants reported their research on data production and computational capabilities at their institutions. Experts in the field of plasma modeling of magnetic fusion research joined this meeting to present the data needs and bring the perspective of data users. The interaction and discussion among data producers and data users in this two-day meeting led to an agreement that the scope and function of Code Centres Network should be reformulated to serve the needs of fusion community in more effective way. (author)

  12. International piping benchmarks: Use of simplified code PACE 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, J; Spence, J [University of Strathclyde (United Kingdom); Blundell, C [Risley Nuclear Power Development Establishment, Central Technical Services, Risley, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    1979-06-01

    This report compares the results obtained using the code PACE 2 with the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) International Piping Benchmark solutions. PACE 2 is designed to analyse systems of pipework using a simplified method which is economical of computer time and hence inexpensive. This low cost is not achieved without some loss of accuracy in the solution, but for most parts of a system this inaccuracy is acceptable and those sections of particular importance may be reanalysed using more precise methods in order to produce a satisfactory analysis of the complete system at reasonable cost. (author)

  13. International piping benchmarks: Use of simplified code PACE 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, J.; Spence, J.; Blundell, C.

    1979-01-01

    This report compares the results obtained using the code PACE 2 with the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) International Piping Benchmark solutions. PACE 2 is designed to analyse systems of pipework using a simplified method which is economical of computer time and hence inexpensive. This low cost is not achieved without some loss of accuracy in the solution, but for most parts of a system this inaccuracy is acceptable and those sections of particular importance may be reanalysed using more precise methods in order to produce a satisfactory analysis of the complete system at reasonable cost. (author)

  14. Towards an International Code for administrative cooperation in tax matter and international tax governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Andrés Aucejo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available There is not a “Global Code” that encodes the duty of cooperation between tax authorities in the world, concerning the global tax system. This article addresses this issue by proposing a global Code of administrative cooperation in tax matters including both tax relations: between States, and between States, taxpayers and intermediary’s agents. It follows a wide concept of tax governance. The findings of this research have highlighted several practical applications for future practice. article analyses, firstly, the State of the question, starting with the legal sources (international and European sources of hard law and soft law reviewing the differences with the Code as here proposed. It also examines some important Agents who emit relevant normative in international administrative tax cooperation and the role that these agents are developing nowadays (sometimes international organizations but also States like the United States, which Congress enacted the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act, FATCA. Overlapping and gaps between different regulations are underlined. Finally, the consequences of this “General Code” lack for the functioning of a good international governance, are described. Hence, the need to create an International Cooperation Code on tax matters and international fiscal governance is concluded. That Code could be proposed by any International Organization as the World Bank nature, for instance, or the International Monetary Fund or whichever International or European Organization. This instrument could be documented through a multilateral instrument (soft law, to be signed by the States to become an international legal source (hard law. Filling this Code as Articulated Text (form could be very useful for the International Community towards an International Tax Governance.

  15. 77 FR 29322 - Updating State Residential Building Energy Efficiency Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    ... Glass Company North America (AGC). However, DOE notes that PNA/AGC's comment was received late. Although... following. Steel-framed wall insulation Air barrier location Changes whose effect is unclear: Fenestration... code's primary regulation of a home's envelope thermal resistance, or the resistance of the ceilings...

  16. Automation of Geometry Input for Building Code Compliance Check

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrova, Ekaterina Aleksandrova; Johansen, Peter Lind; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2017-01-01

    . That has left the industry in constant pursuit of possibilities for integration of the tool within the Building Information Modelling environment so that the potential provided by the latter can be harvested and the processed can be optimized. This paper presents a solution for automated data extraction...

  17. Building America Guidance for Identifying and Overcoming Code, Standard, and Rating Method Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, P. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, M. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    This guidance document was prepared using the input from the meeting summarized in the draft CSI Roadmap to provide Building America research teams and partners with specific information and approaches to identifying and overcoming potential barriers to Building America innovations arising in and/or stemming from codes, standards, and rating methods.

  18. Growing confidence, building skills | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In 2012 Rashid explored the influence of think tanks on policy in Bangladesh, as well as their relationships with international donors and media. In 2014, he explored two-way student exchanges between Canadian and ... his IDRC experience “gave me the confidence to conduct high quality research in social sciences.”.

  19. Capturing Energy-Saving Opportunities: Improving Building Efficiency in Rajasthan through Energy Code Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Qing [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Yu, Sha [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Evans, Meredydd [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mathur, Jyotirmay [Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur (India); Vu, Linh D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    India adopted the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) in 2007. Rajasthan is the first state to make ECBC mandatory at the state level. In collaboration with Malaviya National Institute of Technology (MNIT) Jaipur, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been working with Rajasthan to facilitate the implementation of ECBC. This report summarizes milestones made in Rajasthan and PNNL's contribution in institutional set-ups, capacity building, compliance enforcement and pilot building construction.

  20. Assessment of codes, by-laws and regulations relating to air wells in building design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadzil, Sharifah Fairuz Syed; Karamazaman, Nazli

    2017-10-01

    Codes and by-laws concerning air well design (for buildings and lavatories) in Malaysia has been established in the Malaysian Uniform Building By-Laws UBBL number 40 (1) and (2) since the 1980s. Wells are there to fulfill the ventilation and daylighting requirements. The minimum well area according to building storey height are compared between UBBL and the Singapore's well requirements from the Building Construction Authority BCA. A visual and graphical representation (with schematics building and well diagrams drawn to scale) of the minimum well sizes and dimensions is given. It can be seen that if the minimum requirement of well size is used for buildings above 8 storeys high, a thin well resulted which is not proportionate to the building height. A proposed dimension is graphed and given to be used in the UBBL which translated to graphics (3 dimensional buildings drawn to scale) created a much better well proportion.

  1. Internal structure of reactor building for Madras Atomic Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandit, D.P.

    1975-01-01

    The structural configuration and analysis of structural elements of the internal structure of reactor building for the Madras Atomic Power Project has been presented. Two methods of analysis of the internal structure, viz. Equivalent Plane Frame and Finite Element Method, are explained and compared with the use of bending moments obtained. (author)

  2. Compatibility of global environmental assessment methods of buildings with an Egyptian energy code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Kamal Mohamed Shamseldin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Several environmental assessment methods of buildings had emerged over the world to set environmental classifications for buildings, such as the American method “Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design” (LEED the most widespread one. Several countries decided to put their own assessment methods to catch up with the previous orientation, such as Egypt. The main goal of putting the Egyptian method was to impose the voluntary local energy efficiency codes. Through a local survey, it was clearly noted that many of the construction makers in Egypt do not even know the local method, and whom are interested in the environmental assessment of buildings seek to apply LEED rather than anything else. Therefore, several questions appear about the American method compatibility with the Egyptian energy codes – that contain the most exact characteristics and requirements and give the outmost credible energy efficiency results for buildings in Egypt-, and the possibility of finding another global method that gives closer results to those of the Egyptian codes, especially with the great variety of energy efficiency measurement approaches used among the different assessment methods. So, the researcher is trying to find the compatibility of using non-local assessment methods with the local energy efficiency codes. Thus, if the results are not compatible, the Egyptian government should take several steps to increase the local building sector awareness of the Egyptian method to benefit these codes, and it should begin to enforce it within the building permits after a proper guidance and feedback.

  3. Building America Guidance for Identifying and Overcoming Code, Standard, and Rating Method Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Pamala C.; Halverson, Mark A.

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building America program implemented a new Codes and Standards Innovation (CSI) Team in 2013. The Team’s mission is to assist Building America (BA) research teams and partners in identifying and resolving conflicts between Building America innovations and the various codes and standards that govern the construction of residences. A CSI Roadmap was completed in September, 2013. This guidance document was prepared using the information in the CSI Roadmap to provide BA research teams and partners with specific information and approaches to identifying and overcoming potential barriers to Building America (BA) innovations arising in and/or stemming from codes, standards, and rating methods. For more information on the BA CSI team, please email: CSITeam@pnnl.gov

  4. International collaboration for nuclear competence building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapalehto, T.; Storey, P.

    2004-01-01

    The life cycle of the nuclear industry is no different to that of any other industry, indeed to most forms of human activity: birth, growth, maturity, decline, rebirth and renewal or death. As a result of the twin facets of long time scales and essential technical competence the industry now faces two problems: how to retain existing skills and competences for the 50 plus years that a plant is operating and how to develop and retain new skills and competences in the areas of decommissioning and radioactive waste management. Different countries are at different stages of the nuclear technology life cycle, a competence that may have declined or be lost in one country may be strong in another. And therein lies one solution to the problems the sector faces - international collaboration. The initiatives such as the NEA Halden project and the Generation IV International Forum lay a ground for quiet optimism that collaboration, information exchange and exchange of personnel continue to be an integral part of the development of nuclear power. Also there is evidence that myriad initiatives are underway in the area of nuclear education and training. Though, national surveys show that still more engineers and scientists having nuclear knowledge are required than are graduating. (author)

  5. Energy conservation according to the building codes of the National Board of Housing, Building and Planning; Energihushaallning enligt Boverkets byggregler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-10-15

    To comply with international and national targets for energy use, the National Board has adopted rules setting the levels to be met in order to conserve energy in buildings. The rules for buildings are shown in Boverkets building regulations (BBR). The BBR lists comprehensive requirements in order to ensure that a building must not use more than a certain number of kilowatt hours per square meter and year. There are more detailed requirements for thermal insulation, heating, cooling and air conditioning installations, efficient use of electricity and installation of metering systems for monitoring of building energy. The latest version of the BBR came into force on February 1, 2009 and has more stringent requirements for the buildings heated by electricity or comfort cooling powered by electricity. This handbook presents comments and answers to questions about the new rules for energy conservation. It replaces our previous handbook 'Thermal calculations'

  6. Thermal Comfort and Ventilation Criteria for low Energy Residential Buildings in Building Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Guangyu; Kurnitski, Jarek; Awbi, Hazim

    2012-01-01

    of the indoor air quality in such buildings. Currently, there are no global guidelines for specifying the indoor thermal environment in such low-energy buildings. The objective of this paper is to analyse the classification of indoor thermal comfort levels and recommended ventilation rates for different low...

  7. 2nd International Conference on Construction and Building Research

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Plazaola, Igor; Hidalgo-Delgado, Francisco; Martínez-Valenzuela, María; Medina-Ramón, Francisco; Oliver-Faubel, Inmaculada; Rodríguez-Abad, Isabel; Salandin, Andrea; Sánchez-Grandia, Rafael; Tort-Ausina, Isabel; Construction and Building Research

    2014-01-01

    Many areas of knowledge converge in the building industry and therefore research in this field necessarily involves an interdisciplinary approach. Effective research requires strong relations between a broad variety of scientific and technological domains and more conventional construction or craft processes, while also considering advanced management processes, where all the main actors permanently interact. This publication takes an interdisciplinary approach grouping various studies on the building industry chosen from among the works presented for the 2nd International Conference on Construction and Building Research. The papers examine aspects of materials and building systems; construction technology; energy and sustainability; construction management; heritage, refurbishment and conservation. The information contained within these pages may be of interest to researchers and practitioners in construction and building activities from the academic sphere, as well as public and private sectors.

  8. Presentation of the International Building Physics Toolbox for Simulink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitzmann, Peter; Sasic Kalagasidis, Angela; Nielsen, Toke Rammer

    2003-01-01

    The international building physics toolbox (IBPT) is a software library specially constructed for HAM system analysis in building physics. The toolbox is constructed as a modular structure of the standard building elements using the graphical programming language Simulink. Two research groups have...... participated in this project. In order to enable the development of the toolbox, a common modelling platform was defined: a set of unique communication signals, material database and documentation protocol. The IBPT is open source and publicly available on the Internet. Any researcher and student can use...

  9. 76 FR 13101 - Building Energy Codes Program: Presenting and Receiving Comments to DOE Proposed Changes to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 430 [Docket No. EERE-2011-BT-BC-0009] Building Energy Codes.... The IgCC is intended to provide a green model building code provisions for new and existing commercial... Code (IgCC) AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION...

  10. Modules in historic building construction according to the Copenhagen Building Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kudsk, Anders; Thuesen, Christian Langhoff; Hvam, Lars

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of building works from Copenhagen, Denmark in the period 1850 to 1950. In the study we investigate, based on the theory of product architecture and product modularization, if examples of the use of well-defined interfaces can be found. Furthermore, the aim...... is to study how the use of such interfaces has influenced former building processes and how they were implemented and kept stable over decades. The result of the study is that at that time a number of standardized interfaces between the individual parts of the building work existed, and that these interfaces...

  11. Assessing Potential Energy Cost Savings from Increased Energy Code Compliance in Commercial Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Michael I.; Hart, Philip R.; Athalye, Rahul A.; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Weimin

    2016-02-15

    The US Department of Energy’s most recent commercial energy code compliance evaluation efforts focused on determining a percent compliance rating for states to help them meet requirements under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. That approach included a checklist of code requirements, each of which was graded pass or fail. Percent compliance for any given building was simply the percent of individual requirements that passed. With its binary approach to compliance determination, the previous methodology failed to answer some important questions. In particular, how much energy cost could be saved by better compliance with the commercial energy code and what are the relative priorities of code requirements from an energy cost savings perspective? This paper explores an analytical approach and pilot study using a single building type and climate zone to answer those questions.

  12. Earth Sciences' Capacity Building In Developing Countries through International Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, W.

    2007-12-01

    Within the framework of "traditional" programmes, like the joint UNESCO-IUGS "International Geoscience Programme" (IGCP), the "International Continental Scientific Drilling Program" (ICDP), the "Integrated Ocean Drilling Program" (IODP) or the "International Lithosphere Programme" (ILP) numerous opportunities are provided to strengthen postgraduate geo-scientific education of representatives from developing countries. Recently established new initiatives, such as the "International Year of Planet Earth" (IYPE) or UNESCO's Global Network of Geoparks complement these in addition as important components to UNESCO's 'Education for All' programme, notably the youth, as well as to the United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (2005 - 2014). The "International Year of Planet Earth" is a joint initiative of the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) and UNESCO. The central aims and ambitions of the Year, proclaimed for 2008 by the UN General Assembly, are to demonstrate the great potential of the Earth sciences in building a safer, healthier and wealthier society, and to encourage more widespread and effective application of this potential by targeting politicians and other decision-makers, educational systems, and the general public. Promotion of international collaboration, as well as capacity building and training of students of developing countries in all fields of Earth Sciences seem to be the most appropriate way to meet also the challenges of the IYPE. Another opportunity to improve the international recognition of Earth Scinces, also in developing countries, is the use of Geoparks as a promotional tool for education and popularization of Earth Sciences. Geoparks, notably those included in the European and/or Global Geoparks Networks, provide an international platform of cooperation and exchange between experts and practitioners in geological heritage matters, and are as such excellent instruments in highlighting Earth sciences. The

  13. Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Updating the Commercial Building Energy Code in Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

    2002-09-07

    The state of Iowa is considering adpoting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 as its commercial building energy code. In an effort to evaluate whether or not this is an appropraite code for the state, the potential benefits and costs of adopting this standard are considered. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits are assessed. The energy simulation and economic results suggest that adopting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 would provide postitive net benefits to the state relative to the building and design requirements currently in place.

  14. International transitional administrations and the politics of authority building

    OpenAIRE

    Zaum, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    This article critically examines authority-building practices in the context of statebuilding through the lens of one particular form of external statebuilding interventions: international transitional administrations (ITAs), which are established by international organisations (mainly the UN) to exercise governmental functions over a territory, and in some cases to engage in the establishment or reform of political, administrative, and economic institutions. Drawing in particular on one ITA,...

  15. Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Updating the Commercial Building Energy Code in North Dakota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.

    2004-04-30

    The state of North Dakota is considering updating its commercial building energy code. This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to North Dakota residents from updating and requiring compliance with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed in the analysis. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST simulation combined with a Life-cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess correspodning economic costs and benefits.

  16. Low-energy office buildings using existing technology. Simulations with low internal heat gains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flodberg, Kajsa; Blomsterberg, Aake; Dubois, Marie-Claude [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Energy and Building Design

    2012-11-01

    Although low-energy and nearly zero-energy residential houses have been built in Sweden in the past decade, there are very few examples of low-energy office buildings. This paper investigates the design features affecting energy use in office buildings and suggests the optimal low-energy design from a Swedish perspective. Dynamic simulations have been carried out with IDA ICE 4 on a typical narrow office building with perimeter cell rooms. The results from the parametric study reveal that the most important design features for energy saving are demand-controlled ventilation as well as limited glazing on the facade. Further energy-saving features are efficient lighting and office equipment which strongly reduce user-related electricity and cooling energy. Together, the simulation results suggest that about 48% energy can be saved compared to a new office building built according to the Swedish building code. Thus, it is possible, using a combination of simple and well-known building technologies and configurations, to have very low energy use in new office buildings. If renewable energy sources, such as solar energy and wind power, are added, there is a potential for the annual energy production to exceed the annual energy consumption and a net zero-energy building can be reached. One aspect of the results concerns user-related electricity, which becomes a major energy post in very low-energy offices and which is rarely regulated in building codes today. This results not only in high electricity use, but also in large internal heat gains and unnecessary high cooling loads given the high latitude and cold climate. (orig.)

  17. Verification of RESRAD-build computer code, version 3.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    RESRAD-BUILD is a computer model for analyzing the radiological doses resulting from the remediation and occupancy of buildings contaminated with radioactive material. It is part of a family of codes that includes RESRAD, RESRAD-CHEM, RESRAD-RECYCLE, RESRAD-BASELINE, and RESRAD-ECORISK. The RESRAD-BUILD models were developed and codified by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); version 1.5 of the code and the user's manual were publicly released in 1994. The original version of the code was written for the Microsoft DOS operating system. However, subsequent versions of the code were written for the Microsoft Windows operating system. The purpose of the present verification task (which includes validation as defined in the standard) is to provide an independent review of the latest version of RESRAD-BUILD under the guidance provided by ANSI/ANS-10.4 for verification and validation of existing computer programs. This approach consists of a posteriori V and V review which takes advantage of available program development products as well as user experience. The purpose, as specified in ANSI/ANS-10.4, is to determine whether the program produces valid responses when used to analyze problems within a specific domain of applications, and to document the level of verification. The culmination of these efforts is the production of this formal Verification Report. The first step in performing the verification of an existing program was the preparation of a Verification Review Plan. The review plan consisted of identifying: Reason(s) why a posteriori verification is to be performed; Scope and objectives for the level of verification selected; Development products to be used for the review; Availability and use of user experience; and Actions to be taken to supplement missing or unavailable development products. The purpose, scope and objectives for the level of verification selected are described in this section of the Verification Report. The development products that were used

  18. ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] reactor building design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, S.L.; Blevins, J.D.; Delisle, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is at the midpoint of a two-year conceptual design. The ITER reactor building is a reinforced concrete structure that houses the tokamak and associated equipment and systems and forms a barrier between the tokamak and the external environment. It provides radiation shielding and controls the release of radioactive materials to the environment during both routine operations and accidents. The building protects the tokamak from external events, such as earthquakes or aircraft strikes. The reactor building requirements have been developed from the component designs and the preliminary safety analysis. The equipment requirements, tritium confinement, and biological shielding have been studied. The building design in progress requires continuous iteraction with the component and system designs and with the safety analysis. 8 figs

  19. Energy Code Compliance in a Detailed Commercial Building Sample: The Effects of Missing Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biyani, Rahul K.; Richman, Eric E.

    2003-09-30

    Most commercial buildings in the U.S. are required by State or local jurisdiction to meet energy standards. The enforcement of these standards is not well known and building practice without them on a national scale is also little understood. To provide an understanding of these issues, a database has been developed at PNNL that includes detailed energy related building characteristics of 162 commercial buildings from across the country. For this analysis, the COMcheck? compliance software (developed at PNNL) was used to assess compliance with energy codes among these buildings. Data from the database for each building provided the program input with percentage energy compliance to the ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999 energy as the output. During the data input process it was discovered that some essential data for showing compliance of the building envelope was missed and defaults had to be developed to provide complete compliance information. This need for defaults for some data inputs raised the question of what the effect on documenting compliance could be due to missing data. To help answer this question a data collection effort was completed to assess potential differences. Using the program Dodge View, as much of the missing envelope data as possible was collected from the building plans and the database input was again run through COMcheck?. The outputs of both compliance runs were compared to see if the missing data would have adversely affected the results. Both of these results provided a percentage compliance of each building in the envelope and lighting categories, showing by how large a percentage each building either met or fell short of the ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999 energy code. The results of the compliance runs showed that 57.7 % of the buildings met or exceeded envelope requirements with defaults and that 68 % met or exceeded envelope requirements with the actual data. Also, 53.6 % of the buildings met or surpassed the lighting requirements

  20. Learning by Doing: Teaching Decision Making through Building a Code of Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Mark D.

    2001-01-01

    Notes that applying abstract ethical principles to the practical business of building a code of applied ethics for a technical communication department teaches students that they share certain unarticulated or unconscious values that they can translate into ethical principles. Suggests that combining abstract theory with practical policy writing…

  1. Building code challenging the ethics behind adobe architecture in North Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurol, Yonca; Yüceer, Hülya; Şahali, Öznem

    2015-04-01

    Adobe masonry is part of the vernacular architecture of Cyprus. Thus, it is possible to use this technology in a meaningful way on the island. On the other hand, although adobe architecture is more sustainable in comparison to other building technologies, the use of it is diminishing in North Cyprus. The application of Turkish building code in the north of the island has created complications in respect of the use of adobe masonry, because this building code demands that reinforced concrete vertical tie-beams are used together with adobe masonry. The use of reinforced concrete elements together with adobe masonry causes problems in relation to the climatic response of the building as well as causing other technical and aesthetic problems. This situation makes the design of adobe masonry complicated and various types of ethical problems also emerge. The objective of this article is to analyse the ethical problems which arise as a consequence of the restrictive character of the building code, by analysing two case studies and conducting an interview with an architect who was involved with the use of adobe masonry in North Cyprus. According to the results of this article there are ethical problems at various levels in the design of both case studies. These problems are connected to the responsibilities of architects in respect of the social benefit, material production, aesthetics and affordability of the architecture as well as presenting distrustful behaviour where the obligations of architects to their clients is concerned.

  2. Impact of risk analysis on ITER nuclear buildings internal layout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lignini, F.; Sabathe, L.; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L.; Uzan-Elbez, J.; Girard, J.-P.

    2006-01-01

    The internal layout of ITER nuclear buildings (Tokamak, Tritium, Hot cell and Radwaste buildings) is the result of an iterative process. Notwithstanding civil engineering requirements, technical and functional requirements for the processes housed in the buildings, the internal layout must also take into account safety requirements and workers protection requirements in normal, incidental and accidental conditions. Potential hazards and constraints result in the definition of various zonings. Each room is classified depending on the level of risk induced by normal and incidental or accidental conditions : - radiological exposure to tritium, and activated products → radiological zoning - exposure to beryllium (vacuum vessel blankets) → beryllium zoning - exposure to electromagnetic fields during plasma shots → electromagnetic zoning - fire hazard : fire compartmentalisation - explosion hazard → anti-blast zoning - waste treatment → waste zoning Prevention of common mode failure due to internal hazards (fire, flooding, load drop ...) for redundant safety important components is also taken into account by geographical separation or by installation of protections between components (either in the same room or preferably when possible by segregation in different rooms). The designer also has to take into account access requirements to equipment and circulation rules for personal, material and substances in ITER nuclear buildings. Risk analyses are performed in the Preliminary Safety Report in order to demonstrate that the layout of ITER nuclear buildings allows to meet the safety objectives and takes into account the requirements associated with the zonings classifications and complies with the regulation. When necessary, modifications are implemented in the design. For example, recent layout modifications were included in the tritium building : utility rooms (electrical supply) were transferred outside the radiological hazard zones. A direct access from the

  3. Residential building codes, affordability, and health protection: a risk-tradeoff approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammitt, J K; Belsky, E S; Levy, J I; Graham, J D

    1999-12-01

    Residential building codes intended to promote health and safety may produce unintended countervailing risks by adding to the cost of construction. Higher construction costs increase the price of new homes and may increase health and safety risks through "income" and "stock" effects. The income effect arises because households that purchase a new home have less income remaining for spending on other goods that contribute to health and safety. The stock effect arises because suppression of new-home construction leads to slower replacement of less safe housing units. These countervailing risks are not presently considered in code debates. We demonstrate the feasibility of estimating the approximate magnitude of countervailing risks by combining the income effect with three relatively well understood and significant home-health risks. We estimate that a code change that increases the nationwide cost of constructing and maintaining homes by $150 (0.1% of the average cost to build a single-family home) would induce offsetting risks yielding between 2 and 60 premature fatalities or, including morbidity effects, between 20 and 800 lost quality-adjusted life years (both discounted at 3%) each year the code provision remains in effect. To provide a net health benefit, the code change would need to reduce risk by at least this amount. Future research should refine these estimates, incorporate quantitative uncertainty analysis, and apply a full risk-tradeoff approach to real-world case studies of proposed code changes.

  4. Building Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Rasmussen, Birgit

    1996-01-01

    A state-of-the-art survey concerning acoustic conditions in dwellings has been carried out in 1994. A review of existing investigations related to subjective and/or objective evaluation of dwellings was done, and several countries were contacted to get up-to-date information about the legal acous...

  5. Effect of URM infills on seismic vulnerability of Indian code designed RC frame buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Putul; Singh, Yogendra; Paul, D. K.

    2012-03-01

    Unreinforced Masonry (URM) is the most common partitioning material in framed buildings in India and many other countries. Although it is well-known that under lateral loading the behavior and modes of failure of the frame buildings change significantly due to infill-frame interaction, the general design practice is to treat infills as nonstructural elements and their stiffness, strength and interaction with the frame is often ignored, primarily because of difficulties in simulation and lack of modeling guidelines in design codes. The Indian Standard, like many other national codes, does not provide explicit insight into the anticipated performance and associated vulnerability of infilled frames. This paper presents an analytical study on the seismic performance and fragility analysis of Indian code-designed RC frame buildings with and without URM infills. Infills are modeled as diagonal struts as per ASCE 41 guidelines and various modes of failure are considered. HAZUS methodology along with nonlinear static analysis is used to compare the seismic vulnerability of bare and infilled frames. The comparative study suggests that URM infills result in a significant increase in the seismic vulnerability of RC frames and their effect needs to be properly incorporated in design codes.

  6. Internal radiation dose calculations with the INREM II computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Killough, G.G.

    1978-01-01

    A computer code, INREM II, was developed to calculate the internal radiation dose equivalent to organs of man which results from the intake of a radionuclide by inhalation or ingestion. Deposition and removal of radioactivity from the respiratory tract is represented by the Internal Commission on Radiological Protection Task Group Lung Model. A four-segment catenary model of the gastrointestinal tract is used to estimate movement of radioactive material that is ingested, or swallowed after being cleared from the respiratory tract. Retention of radioactivity in other organs is specified by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions. The formation and decay of radioactive daughters is treated explicitly, with each radionuclide in the decay chain having its own uptake and retention parameters, as supplied by the user. The dose equivalent to a target organ is computed as the sum of contributions from each source organ in which radioactivity is assumed to be situated. This calculation utilizes a matrix of dosimetric S-factors (rem/μCi-day) supplied by the user for the particular choice of source and target organs. Output permits the evaluation of components of dose from cross-irradiations when penetrating radiations are present. INREM II has been utilized with current radioactive decay data and metabolic models to produce extensive tabulations of dose conversion factors for a reference adult for approximately 150 radionuclides of interest in environmental assessments of light-water-reactor fuel cycles. These dose conversion factors represent the 50-year dose commitment per microcurie intake of a given radionuclide for 22target organs including contributions from specified source organs and surplus activity in the rest of the body. These tabulations are particularly significant in their consistent use of contemporary models and data and in the detail of documentation

  7. Using Third-Party Inspectors in Building Energy Codes Enforcement in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Kumar, Pradeep; Van Wie, Laura; Bhatt, Vatsal

    2013-01-31

    India is experiencing fast income growth and urbanization, and this leads to unprecedented increases in demand for building energy services and resulting energy consumption. In response to rapid growth in building energy use, the Government of India issued the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) in 2007, which is consistent with and based on the 2001 Energy Conservation Act. ECBC implementation has been voluntary since its enactment and a few states have started to make progress towards mandatory implementation. Rajasthan is the first state in India to adopt ECBC as a mandatory code. The State adopted ECBC with minor additions on March 28, 2011 through a stakeholder process; it became mandatory in Rajasthan on September 28, 2011. Tamil Nadu, Gujarat, and Andhra Pradesh have started to draft an implementation roadmap and build capacity for its implementation. The Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) plans to encourage more states to adopt ECBC in the near future, including Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra, West Bengal, and Delhi. Since its inception, India has applied the code on a voluntary basis, but the Government of India is developing a strategy to mandate compliance. Implementing ECBC requires coordination between the Ministry of Power and the Ministry of Urban Development at the national level as well as interdepartmental coordination at the state level. One challenge is that the Urban Local Bodies (ULBs), the enforcement entities of building by-laws, lack capacity to implement ECBC effectively. For example, ULBs in some states might find the building permitting procedures to be too complex; in other cases, lack of awareness and technical knowledge on ECBC slows down the amendment of local building by-laws as well as ECBC implementation. The intent of this white paper is to share with Indian decision-makers code enforcement approaches: through code officials, third-party inspectors, or a hybrid approach. Given the limited capacity and human

  8. Implementation of probabilistic safety concepts in international codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, J.F.

    1977-01-01

    Recent progress in the implementation of safety concepts in international structure codes is briefly presented. Special attention is paid to the work of the Joint-Committee on Structural Safety. The discussion is centered on some problems such as: safety differentiation, definition and combination of actions, spaces for checking safety and non-linear structural behaviour. When discussing safety differentiation it should be considered that the total probability of failure derives from a theoretical probability of failure and a probability of failure due to error and gross negligence. Optimization of design criteria should take into account both causes of failure. The quantification of reliability implies a probabilistic idealization of all basic variables. Steps taken to obtain an improved definition of different types of actions and rules for their combination are described. Safety checking can be carried out in terms of basic variables, action-effects, or any other suitable variable. However, the advantages and disadvantages of the different types of formulation should be discussed, particularly in the case of non-linear structural behaviour. (orig.) [de

  9. Experience with COSYMA in an international intercomparison of probabilistic accident consequence assessment codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasemann, I.; Jones, J.A.; Steen, J. van der; Wonderen, E. van

    1996-01-01

    The Commission of the European Communities and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD have organized an international exercise to compare the predictions of accident consequence assessment codes, and to identify those features of the models which lead to differences in the predicted results. Alongside this, a further exercise was undertaken in which the COSYMA code was used independently by several different organizations. Some of the findings of the COSYMA users' exercise are described that have general applications to accident consequence assessments. A number of areas are identified in which further work on accident consequence models may be justified. These areas, which are also of interest for codes other than COSYMA, are (a) the calculation and averaging of doses and risks to people sheltered in different types of buildings, particularly with respect to the evaluation of early health effects; (b) the modeling of long-duration releases and their description as a series of shorter releases; (c) meteorological sampling for results at a certain location, specifically for use with trajectory models of atmospheric dispersion; and (d) aspects of calculating probabilities of consequences at a point

  10. Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Waste; Code De Bonne Pratique Sur Le Mouvement Transfrontiere International De Dechets Radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-11-03

    On 21 September 1990, the General Conference, by resolution GC(XXXIV)/RES/530, adopted a Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Waste and requested the Director General - inter alia - to take all necessary steps to ensure wide dissemination of the Code of Practice at both the national and the international level. The Code of Practice was elaborated by a Group of Experts established pursuant to resolution GC(XXXII)/RES/490 adopted by the General Conference in 1988. The text of the Code of Practice is reproduced herewith for the information of all Member States [French] Le 21 septembre 1990, la Conference generale, par la resolution GC(XXXIV)/RES/530, a adopte le Code de bonne pratique sur le mouvement transfrontiere international de dechets radioactifs et a prie le Directeur general-notamment-de prendre toutes les mesures necessaires pour assurer une large diffusion du Code de bonne pratique aux niveaux tant national qu'international. Le Code de bonne pratique a ete elabore par un groupe d'experts cree en application de la resolution GC(XXXII)/RES/490 adoptee par la Conference generale en 1988. Le texte du Code de bonne pratique est reproduit ci-apres pour l'information de tous les Etats Membres.

  11. Evaluation of internal/external exposure from interior building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Etsuko; Morita-Murase, Yuko; Yoshizawa, Yukio

    2008-01-01

    Internal exposure to alpha particles emitted from 222 Rn (radon) and its daughters is the second leading cause of lung cancer. As a source of indoor radon in home, there are interior building materials that contain radioactive minerals. These radioactive consumer products have been claimed by distributors to have effect of 'minus-ion' or 'radon spring' for healthy promotion. We analyzed radioactive nuclides contained in the interior building materials, and measured radon levels released from them. The results of gamma-ray spectrometry revealed that these interior building materials contain U- and Th-series nuclides. The densities of some radioactive nuclides in the tile used for a bathroom exceeded the exempt limits of International Basic Safety Standards. However, the radon densities released from the tile was lower than detectable limit. In contrast, one of the wallpaper released 34 Bq·m -3 of radon gas in a 50-liter container. This value is two times higher than the average radon level in Japanese homes. The minus-ion effect' wallpapers are thought to be a cause of residential exposure to radon. (author)

  12. Comparison of SISEC code simulations with earthquake data of ordinary and base-isolated buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.Y.; Gvildys, J.

    1991-01-01

    At Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), a 3-D computer program SISEC (Seismic Isolation System Evaluation Code) is being developed for simulating the system response of isolated and ordinary structures (Wang et al. 1991). This paper describes comparison of SISEC code simulations with building response data of actual earthquakes. To ensure the accuracy of analytical simulations, recorded data of full-size reinforced concrete structures located in Sendai, Japan are used in this benchmark comparison. The test structures consist of two three-story buildings, one base-isolated and the other one ordinary founded. They were constructed side by side to investigate the effect of base isolation on the acceleration response. Among 20 earthquakes observed since April 1989, complete records of three representative earthquakes, no.2, no.6, and no.17, are used for the code validation presented in this paper. Correlations of observed and calculated accelerations at all instrument locations are made. Also, relative response characteristics of ordinary and isolated building structures are investigated. (J.P.N.)

  13. Estimation of skyshine dose from turbine building of BWR plant using Monte Carlo code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuji, Nemoto; Toshihisa, Tsukiyama; Shigeki, Nemezawa [Hitachi. Ltd., Saiwai-cho, Hitachi (Japan); Tadashi, Yamasaki; Hidetsugu, Okada [Chubu Electric Power Company, Inc., Odaka-cho, Midori-ku Nagoya (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    The Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP) was adopted to calculate the skyshine dose from the turbine building of a BWR plant for obtaining precise estimations at the site boundary. In MCNP calculation, the equipment and piping arranged on the operating floor of the turbine building were considered and modeled in detail. The inner and outer walls of the turbine building, the shielding materials around the high-pressure turbine, and the piping connected from the moisture separator to the low-pressure turbine were all considered. A three-step study was conducted to estimate the applicability of MCNP code. The first step is confirming the propriety of calculation models. The atmospheric relief diaphragms, which are installed on top of the low-pressure turbine exhaust hood, are not considered in the calculation model. There was little difference between the skyshine dose distributions that were considered when using and not using the atmospheric relief diaphragms. The calculated dose rates agreed well with the measurements taken around the turbine. The second step is estimating the dose rates on the outer roof surface of the turbine building. This calculation was made to confirm the dose distribution of gamma-rays on the turbine roof before being scattered into the air. The calculated dose rates agreed well with the measured data. The third step is making a final confirmation by comparing the calculations and measurements of skyshine dose rates around the turbine building. The source terms of the main steam system are based on the measured activity data of N-16 and C-15. As a conclusion, we were able to calculate reasonable skyshine dose rates by using MCNP code. (authors)

  14. Building International Business Theory: A Grounded Theory Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Gligor, David; Esmark, Carol; Golgeci, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    The field of international business (IB) is in need of more theory development (Morck & Yeung, 2007). As such, the main focus of our manuscript was to provide guidance on how to build IB specific theory using grounded theory (GT). Moreover, we contribute to future theory development by identifying areas within IB where GT can be applied and the type of research issues that can be addressed using this methodology. Finally, we make a noteworthy contribution by discussing some of GT’s caveats an...

  15. Reliability of cause of death coding: an international comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antini, Carmen; Rajs, Danuta; Muñoz-Quezada, María Teresa; Mondaca, Boris Andrés Lucero; Heiss, Gerardo

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluates the agreement of nosologic coding of cardiovascular causes of death between a Chilean coder and one in the United States, in a stratified random sample of death certificates of persons aged ≥ 60, issued in 2008 in the Valparaíso and Metropolitan regions, Chile. All causes of death were converted to ICD-10 codes in parallel by both coders. Concordance was analyzed with inter-coder agreement and Cohen's kappa coefficient by level of specification ICD-10 code for the underlying cause and the total causes of death coding. Inter-coder agreement was 76.4% for all causes of death and 80.6% for the underlying cause (agreement at the four-digit level), with differences by the level of specification of the ICD-10 code, by line of the death certificate, and by number of causes of death per certificate. Cohen's kappa coefficient was 0.76 (95%CI: 0.68-0.84) for the underlying cause and 0.75 (95%CI: 0.74-0.77) for the total causes of death. In conclusion, causes of death coding and inter-coder agreement for cardiovascular diseases in two regions of Chile are comparable to an external benchmark and with reports from other countries.

  16. Can envelope codes reduce electricity and CO2 emissions in different types of buildings in the hot climate of Bahrain?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhi, H.

    2009-01-01

    The depletion of non-renewable resources and the environmental impact of energy consumption, particularly energy use in buildings, have awakened considerable interest in energy efficiency. Building energy codes have recently become effective techniques to achieve efficiency targets. The Electricity and Water Authority in Bahrain has set a target of 40% reduction of building electricity consumption and CO 2 emissions to be achieved by using envelope thermal insulation codes. This paper investigates the ability of the current codes to achieve such a benchmark and evaluates their impact on building energy consumption. The results of a simulation study are employed to investigate the impact of the Bahraini codes on the energy and environmental performance of buildings. The study focuses on air-conditioned commercial buildings and concludes that envelope codes, at best, are likely to reduce the energy use of the commercial sector by 25% if the building envelope is well-insulated and efficient glazing is used. Bahraini net CO 2 emissions could drop to around 7.1%. The simulation results show that the current energy codes alone are not sufficient to achieve a 40% reduction benchmark, and therefore, more effort should be spent on moving towards a more comprehensive approach

  17. Building an International Collaboration for GeoInformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, W. S.; Lehnert, K.; Klump, J.

    2005-12-01

    Geoinformatics (cyberinfrastructure for the geosciences) is being developed as a linked system of sites that provide to the Earth science community a library of research data research-grade tools to manipulate, mine, analyze and model interdisciplinary data, and mechanisms to provide the necessary computational resources for these activities. Our science is global in scope and hence, geoinformatics (GI) must be an international effort. How do we build this international GI? What are the main challenges presented by the political, cultural, organizational, and technical diversity of the global science community that we need to address to achieve a truly global cyberinfrastructure for the Geosciences? GI needs to be developed in an internet-like fashion establishing connections among independent globally distributed sites (`nodes') that will share, link, and integrate their data holdings and services. Independence of the GI pieces with respect to goals, scope, and approaches is critical to sustain commitment from people to build a GI node for which they feel ownership and get credit. This should not be fought by funding agencies - and certainly not by state and federal agencies. Communication, coordination, and collaboration are the core efforts to build the connections, but incentives and resources are required to advance and support them. Part of the coordination effort is development and maintenance of standards. Who should set these standards and govern their modification? Do we need an official international body to do so, and should this be a "governing body" or an "advisory body"? What role should international commissions and bodies such as CODATA/ICSU or IUGS-CGI, international societies and unions, the national geological surveys and other federal agencies play? Guidance from the science community is key to construct a system that geo-researchers will want to use, and that meets their needs. Only when the community endorses GI as a fundamental platform to

  18. 41 CFR 102-80.85 - Are Federally owned and leased buildings exempt from State and local code requirements in fire...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... leased buildings exempt from State and local code requirements in fire protection? 102-80.85 Section 102... Fire Prevention State and Local Codes § 102-80.85 Are Federally owned and leased buildings exempt from State and local code requirements in fire protection? Federally owned buildings are generally exempt...

  19. Deregulation of the Building Code and the Norwegian Approach to Regulation of Accessibility in the Built Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyngstad, Pål

    2016-01-01

    Deregulation is on the political agenda in the European countries. The Norwegian building code related to universal design and accessibility is challenged. To meet this, the Norwegian Building Authority have chosen to examine established truths and are basing their revised code on scientific research and field tests. But will this knowledge-based deregulation comply within the framework of the anti-discrimination act and, and if not: who suffers and to what extent?

  20. Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    On 21 September 1990, the General Conference, by resolution GC(XXXIV)/RES/530, adopted a Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Waste and requested the Director General - inter alia - to take all necessary steps to ensure wide dissemination of the Code of Practice at both the national and the international level. The Code of Practice was elaborated by a Group of Experts established pursuant to resolution GC(XXXII)/RES/490 adopted by the General Conference in 1988. The text of the Code of Practice is reproduced herewith for the information of all Member States

  1. Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    On 21 September 1990, the General Conference, by resolution GC(XXXIV)/RES/530, adopted a Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Waste and requested the Director General - inter alia - to take all necessary steps to ensure wide dissemination of the Code of Practice at both the national and the international level. The Code of Practice was elaborated by a Group of Experts established pursuant to resolution GC(XXXII)/RES/490 adopted by the General Conference in 1988. The text of the Code of Practice is reproduced herewith for the information of all Member States [fr

  2. Guidelines and procedures for the International Code Assessment and Applications Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    This document presents the guidelines and procedures by which the International Code Assessment and Applications Program (ICAP) will be conducted. The document summarizes the management structure of the program and the relationships between and responsibilities of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and the international participants. The procedures for code maintenance and necessary documentation are described. Guidelines for the performance and documentation of code assessment studies are presented. An overview of an effort to quantify code uncertainty, which the ICAP supports, is included

  3. Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-11-14

    On 21 September 1990, the General Conference, by resolution GC(XXXIV)/RES/530, adopted a Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Waste and requested the Director General - inter alia - to take all necessary steps to ensure wide dissemination of the Code of Practice at both the national and the international level. The Code of Practice was elaborated by a Group of Experts established pursuant to resolution GC(XXXII)/RES/490 adopted by the General Conference in 1988. The text of the Code of Practice is reproduced herewith for the information of all Member States.

  4. Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-11-15

    On 21 September 1990, the General Conference, by resolution GC(XXXIV)/RES/530, adopted a Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Waste and requested the Director General - inter alia - to take all necessary steps to ensure wide dissemination of the Code of Practice at both the national and the international level. The Code of Practice was elaborated by a Group of Experts established pursuant to resolution GC(XXXII)/RES/490 adopted by the General Conference in 1988. The text of the Code of Practice is reproduced herewith for the information of all Member States.

  5. Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    On 21 September 1990, the General Conference, by resolution GC(XXXIV)/RES/530, adopted a Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Waste and requested the Director General - inter alia - to take all necessary steps to ensure wide dissemination of the Code of Practice at both the national and the international level. The Code of Practice was elaborated by a Group of Experts established pursuant to resolution GC(XXXII)/RES/490 adopted by the General Conference in 1988. The text of the Code of Practice is reproduced herewith for the information of all Member States

  6. Guide to the Changes between the 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mapes, Terry S.; Conover, David R.

    2012-05-31

    The International Code Council (ICC) published the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code{reg_sign} (IECC) in early 2012. The 2012 IECC is based on revisions, additions, and deletions to the 2009 IECC that were considered during the ICC code development process conducted in 2011. Solid vertical lines, arrows, or asterisks printed in the 2012 IECC indicate where revisions, deletions, or relocations of text respectively were made to 2009 IECC. Although these marginal markings indicate where changes have been made to the code, they do not provide any further guidance, leaving the reader to consult and compare the 2009 and 2012 IECC for more detail.

  7. Internal Corrosion Control of Water Supply Systems Code of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Code of Practice is part of a series of publications by the IWA Specialist Group on Metals and Related Substances in Drinking Water. It complements the following IWA Specialist Group publications: 1. Best Practice Guide on the Control of Lead in Drinking Water 2. Best Prac...

  8. An Internal Audit Perspective on Differences between European Corporate Governance Codes and OECD Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Ivan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research is to realize an analysis from an internal audit perspective of European Corporate Governance Codes, in regards with Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development – OECD Principles of Corporate Governance. The research methodology used a classification of countries by legal regime, trying to obtain a global view over the differences between the European corporate governance codes and the OECD Principles provisions, from internal audit’s perspective. The findings suggest that the specificities of internal audit function when studying the differences between European Corporate Governance Codes and OECD Principles lead to different treatment.

  9. Building energy performance analysis by an in-house developed dynamic simulation code: An investigation for different case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonomano, Annamaria; Palombo, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new dynamic simulation code for building energy performance analysis is presented. • The thermal behavior of each building element is modeled by a thermal RC network. • The physical models implemented in the code are illustrated. • The code was validated by the BESTEST standard procedure. • We investigate residential buildings, offices and stores in different climates. - Abstract: A novel dynamic simulation model for the building envelope energy performance analysis is presented in this paper. This tool helps the investigation of many new building technologies to increase the system energy efficiency and it can be carried out for scientific research purposes. In addition to the yearly heating and cooling load and energy demand, the obtained output is the dynamic temperature profile of indoor air and surfaces and the dynamic profile of the thermal fluxes through the building elements. The presented simulation model is also validated through the BESTEST standard procedure. Several new case studies are developed for assessing, through the presented code, the energy performance of three different building envelopes with several different weather conditions. In particular, dwelling and commercial buildings are analysed. Light and heavyweight envelopes as well as different glazed surfaces areas have been used for every case study. With the achieved results interesting design and operating guidelines can be obtained. Such data have been also compared vs. those calculated by TRNSYS and EnergyPlus. The detected deviation of the obtained results vs. those of such standard tools are almost always lower than 10%

  10. Energy conservation: policy issues and end-use scenarios of savings potential. Part V. Energy efficient buildings: the causes of litigation against energy conservation building codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benenson, P.; Codina, R.; Cornwall, B.

    1978-09-01

    The guidelines laid out for the five subjects investigated in this series are to take a holistic view of energy conservation policies by describing the overall system in which they are implemented; provide analytical tools and sufficiently disagregated data bases that can be adapted to answer a variety of questions by the users; identify and discuss some of the important issues behind successful energy conservation policy; and develop an energy conservation policy in depth. Three specific cases reviewed are: the California nonresidential code (1976); the California residential code (1978); and the Farmers Home Administration code (1978). Although these three suits were brought by the building industry, this report also discusses considerations relevant to architects, bankers, and building inspectors. These cases are discussed from three perspectives: (1) objections to the codes explicitly stated in court, (2) industry conditions and practices behind objections stated in court, and (3) general beliefs not stated in court. This discussion focuses on suits intended to limit those building codes which the building industry sees as too strong. However, some energy conservation industries may sue to strengthen codes which they consider too weak. An example of such a case is Polarized Corporation's current suit against the Lighting section of ASHRAE 90-75 (Los Angeles Federal District Court, see Murnane, 1978). (MCW)

  11. The extensive international use of commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmut Wider

    2005-01-01

    What are the main reasons for the extensive international success of commercial CFD codes? This is due to their ability to calculate the fine structures of the investigated processes due to their versatility, their numerical stability and that they can guarantee the proper solution in most cases. This was made possible by the constantly increasing computer power at an ever more affordable prize. Furthermore it is much more efficient to have researchers use a CFD code rather than to develop a similar code system due to the time consuming nature of this activity and the high probability of hidden coding errors. The centralized development and upgrading makes these reliable CFD codes possible and affordable. However, the CFD companies' developments are naturally concentrated on the most profitable areas, and thus, if one works in a 'non-priority' field one cannot use them. Moreover, the prize of renting CFD codes, applications to complex systems such as whole nuclear reactors and the need to teach students gives the development of self-made codes still plenty of room. But CFD codes can model detailed aspects of large systems and subroutines generated by users can be added. Since there are only a few heavily used CFD codes such as FLUENT, STAR-CD, ANSYS CFX, these are used in many countries. Also international training courses are given and the news bulletins of these codes help to spread the news on further developments. A larger number of international codes would increase the competition but would at the same time make it harder to select the most appropriate CFD code for a given problem. Examples will be presented of uses of CFD codes as more detailed system codes for the decay heat removal from reactors, the application to aerosol physics and the application to heavy metal fluids using different turbulence models. (author)

  12. Microdosimetry computation code of internal sources - MICRODOSE 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weibo; Zheng Wenzhong; Ye Changqing

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a microdosimetry computation code, MICRODOSE 1, on the basis of the following described methods: (1) the method of calculating f 1 (z) for charged particle in the unit density tissues; (2) the method of calculating f(z) for a point source; (3) the method of applying the Fourier transform theory to the calculation of the compound Poisson process; (4) the method of using fast Fourier transform technique to determine f(z) and, giving some computed examples based on the code, MICRODOSE 1, including alpha particles emitted from 239 Pu in the alveolar lung tissues and from radon progeny RaA and RAC in the human respiratory tract. (author). 13 refs., 6 figs

  13. OECD International Standard Problem number 34. Falcon code comparison report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.A.

    1994-12-01

    ISP-34 is the first ISP to address fission product transport issues and has been strongly supported by a large number of different countries and organisations. The ISP is based on two experiments, FAL-ISP-1 and FAL-ISP-2, which were conducted in AEA's Falcon facility. Specific features of the experiments include quantification of chemical effects and aerosol behaviour. In particular, multi-component aerosol effects and vapour-aerosol interactions can all be investigated in the Falcon facility. Important parameters for participants to predict were the deposition profiles and composition, key chemical species and reactions, evolution of suspended material concentrations, and the effects of steam condensation onto aerosols and particle hygroscopicity. The results of the Falcon ISP support the belief that aerosol physics is generally well modelled in primary circuit codes, but the chemistry models in many of the codes need to be improved, since chemical speciation is one of the main factors which controls transport and deposition behaviour. The importance of chemical speciation, aerosol nucleation, and the role of multi-component aerosols in determining transport and deposition behaviour are evident. The role of re-vaporization in these Falcon experiments is not clear; it is not possible to compare those codes which predicted re-vaporization with quantitative data. The evidence from this ISP exercise indicates that the containment codes can predict thermal-hydraulics conditions satisfactorily. However, the differences in the predicted aerosol locations in the Falcon tests had shown that aerosol behaviour was very susceptible to parameters such as particle size distribution

  14. International codes and model intercomparison for intermediate energy activation yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolf, M.; Nagel, P.

    1997-01-01

    The motivation for this intercomparison came from data needs of accelerator-based waste transmutation, energy amplification and medical therapy. The aim of this exercise is to determine the degree of reliability of current nuclear reaction models and codes when calculating activation yields in the intermediate energy range up to 5000 MeV. Emphasis has been placed for a wide range of target elements ( O, Al, Fe, Co, Zr and Au). This work is mainly based on calculation of (P,xPyN) integral cross section for incident proton. A qualitative description of some of the nuclear models and code options employed is made. The systematics of graphical presentation of the results allows a quick quantitative measure of agreement or deviation. This code intercomparison highlights the fact that modeling calculations of energy activation yields may at best have uncertainties of a factor of two. The causes of such discrepancies are multi-factorial. Problems are encountered which are connected with the calculation of nuclear masses, binding energies, Q-values, shell effects, medium energy fission and Fermi break-up. (A.C.)

  15. Compliance Behavior Analysis of the Ship Crew to the International Safety Management (Ism) Code in Indonesia???

    OpenAIRE

    Desi Albert Mamahit; Heny K Daryanto; Ujang Sumarwan; Eva Zhoriva Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this code is to provide international standards for the management and safe operation of ships and pollution prevention Furthermore, this study has the objective to identify the role of the ISM Code on maritime activities in Indonesia, knowing the perceptions and attitudes regarding the conduct of the crew boat ISM Code. Location research is conducted on the crew that was in the Port of Tanjung Priok in Jakarta. Data collection and processing is done for 3 months. The study was...

  16. Seafloor 2030 - Building a Global Ocean Map through International Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrini, V. L.; Wigley, R. A.; Falconer, R. K. H.; Jakobsson, M.; Allen, G.; Mayer, L. A.; Schmitt, T.; Rovere, M.; Weatherall, P.; Marks, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    With more than 85% of the ocean floor unmapped, a huge proportion of our planet remains unexplored. Creating a comprehensive map of seafloor bathymetry remains a true global challenge that can only be accomplished through collaboration and partnership between governments, industry, academia, research organizations and non-government organizations. The objective of Seafloor 2030 is to comprehensively map the global ocean floor to resolutions that enable exploration and improved understanding of ocean processes, while informing maritime policy and supporting the management of natural marine resources for a sustainable Blue Economy. Seafloor 2030 is the outcome of the Forum for Future of Ocean Floor Mapping held in Monaco in June 2016, which was held under the auspices of GEBCO and the Nippon Foundation of Japan. GEBCO is the only international organization mandated to map the global ocean floor and is guided by the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO. The task of completely mapping the ocean floor will require new global coordination to ensure that both existing data are identified and that new mapping efforts are coordinated to help efficiently "map the gaps." Fundamental to achieving Seafloor 2030 will be greater access to data, tools and technology, particularly for developing and coastal nations. This includes bathymetric post-processing and analysis software, database technology, computing infrastructure and gridding techniques as well as the latest developments in seafloor mapping methods and emerging crowd-sourced bathymetry initiatives. The key to achieving this global bathymetric map is capacity building and education - including greater coordination between scientific research and industry and the effective engagement of international organizations such as the United Nations.

  17. INTRANS. A computer code for the non-linear structural response analysis of reactor internals under transient loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramani, D.T.

    1977-01-01

    The 'INTRANS' system is a general purpose computer code, designed to perform linear and non-linear structural stress and deflection analysis of impacting or non-impacting nuclear reactor internals components coupled with reactor vessel, shield building and external as well as internal gapped spring support system. This paper describes in general a unique computational procedure for evaluating the dynamic response of reactor internals, descretised as beam and lumped mass structural system and subjected to external transient loads such as seismic and LOCA time-history forces. The computational procedure is outlined in the INTRANS code, which computes component flexibilities of a discrete lumped mass planar model of reactor internals by idealising an assemblage of finite elements consisting of linear elastic beams with bending, torsional and shear stiffnesses interacted with external or internal linear as well as non-linear multi-gapped spring support system. The method of analysis is based on the displacement method and the code uses the fourth-order Runge-Kutta numerical integration technique as a basis for solution of dynamic equilibrium equations of motion for the system. During the computing process, the dynamic response of each lumped mass is calculated at specific instant of time using well-known step-by-step procedure. At any instant of time then, the transient dynamic motions of the system are held stationary and based on the predicted motions and internal forces of the previous instant. From which complete response at any time-step of interest may then be computed. Using this iterative process, the relationship between motions and internal forces is satisfied step by step throughout the time interval

  18. Use of AERIN code for determining internal doses of transuranic isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    The AERIN computer code is a mathematical expression of the ICRP Lung Model. The code was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to compute the body organ burdens and absorbed radiation doses resulting from the inhalation of transuranic isotopes and to predict the amount of activity excreted in the urine and feces as a function of time. Over forty cases of internal exposure have been studied using the AERIN code. The code, as modified, has proven to be extremely versatile. The case studies presented demonstrate the excellent correlation that can be obtained between code predictions and observed bioassay data. In one case study a discrepancy was observed between an in vivo count of the whole body and the application of the code using urine and fecal data as input. The discrepancy was resolved by in vivo skull counts that showed the code had predicted the correct skeletal burden

  19. Performance Assessment and analysis of national building codes with fire safety in all wards of a hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mahdinia

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aimsAIDS as a re-emergent disease and Viral hepatitis (B and C as one of thBackground and objective: Fire safety is an important problem in hospitals. Movement less, lack of awareness and special situation of residents are the reasons of this subject. In more countries such as Iran, fire protection regulations have compiled within the framework of national building codes. Current building codes don't create sufficient safety for patient in the hospitals in different situations and more of the advanced countries in the world effort to establish building code, base  on performance. This study to be accomplished with this goal that determination of fire risk level in the wards of a hospital and survey the efficiency of the national building codes. Methodsfire risk assesses is done, using "engineering fire risk assessment method" with the checklist for Data gathering. In this manner, risk calculate in all compartments and in the next  stage for survey the effect of building codes, with this supposition that all compartment is  conforming to building code requirement, risk level calculate in two situation.Resultsthe results of present study reveals that, risk level in all wards is more than one and even though risk less than one is acceptable, consequently minimum of safely situations didn't  produce in most wards. The results show the national building code in the different conditions  don't have appropriate efficient for creation of suitable safety. Conclusionin order to access to a fire safety design with sufficient efficiency, suitable selection is use of risk assessment based on, design methods.

  20. An Internal Audit Perspective on Differences between European Corporate Governance Codes and OECD Principles

    OpenAIRE

    Raluca Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this research is to realize an analysis from an internal audit perspective of European Corporate Governance Codes, in regards with Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development – OECD Principles of Corporate Governance. The research methodology used a classification of countries by legal regime, trying to obtain a global view over the differences between the European corporate governance codes and the OECD Principles provisions, from internal audit’s perspective. T...

  1. New Site Coefficients and Site Classification System Used in Recent Building Seismic Code Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobry, R.; Borcherdt, R.D.; Crouse, C.B.; Idriss, I.M.; Joyner, W.B.; Martin, G.R.; Power, M.S.; Rinne, E.E.; Seed, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    Recent code provisions for buildings and other structures (1994 and 1997 NEHRP Provisions, 1997 UBC) have adopted new site amplification factors and a new procedure for site classification. Two amplitude-dependent site amplification factors are specified: Fa for short periods and Fv for longer periods. Previous codes included only a long period factor S and did not provide for a short period amplification factor. The new site classification system is based on definitions of five site classes in terms of a representative average shear wave velocity to a depth of 30 m (V?? s). This definition permits sites to be classified unambiguously. When the shear wave velocity is not available, other soil properties such as standard penetration resistance or undrained shear strength can be used. The new site classes denoted by letters A - E, replace site classes in previous codes denoted by S1 - S4. Site classes A and B correspond to hard rock and rock, Site Class C corresponds to soft rock and very stiff / very dense soil, and Site Classes D and E correspond to stiff soil and soft soil. A sixth site class, F, is defined for soils requiring site-specific evaluations. Both Fa and Fv are functions of the site class, and also of the level of seismic hazard on rock, defined by parameters such as Aa and Av (1994 NEHRP Provisions), Ss and S1 (1997 NEHRP Provisions) or Z (1997 UBC). The values of Fa and Fv decrease as the seismic hazard on rock increases due to soil nonlinearity. The greatest impact of the new factors Fa and Fv as compared with the old S factors occurs in areas of low-to-medium seismic hazard. This paper summarizes the new site provisions, explains the basis for them, and discusses ongoing studies of site amplification in recent earthquakes that may influence future code developments.

  2. Procedures of ASME code case N-201 for KALIMER. Reactor internal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Yoo, B.

    2001-02-01

    The main objective of this report is to describe the design procedure of ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Code Case N-201-4, which is an elevated temperature structural design code of the Nuclear reactor internal structures, checking the criteria of stress limit, accumulated inelastic strain and deformation, creep-fatigue damage, and buckling limit. As one of examples, the creep-fatigue damage evaluations are carried out for the KALIMER reactor internal structures of baffle annulus. This report is expected to be very useful in evaluating the structural integrity of the liquid metal reactor operating under an elevated temperature

  3. Proposal to change General Consideration 5 and Principle 2 of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Aharon; Garrity, George M

    2014-01-01

    A proposal is submitted to the ICSP to change the wording of General Consideration 5 of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP), deleting the words Schizophycetes, Cyanophyceae and Cyanobacteria from the groups of organisms whose nomenclature is covered by the Code. It is further proposed to change the terms Zoological Code and International Code of Botanical Nomenclature in General Consideration 5 and in Principle 2 to International Code of Zoological Nomenclature and International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants, respectively.

  4. Code de droit international privé suisse annoté Code DIP annoté

    CERN Document Server

    Suisse; Geisinger, Elliott

    1995-01-01

    La loi fédérale sur le droit international privé : édition complétée par le texte des principaux traités internationaux et par le Règlement d'arbitrage de la Chambre de commerce internationale

  5. International Capacity-Building Initiatives for National Bioethics Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gefenas, Eugenijus; Lukaseviciene, Vilma

    2017-05-01

    During the last two decades, national bioethics committees have been established in many countries all over the world. They vary with respect to their structure, composition, and working methods, but the main functions are similar. They are supposed to facilitate public debate on controversial bioethical issues and produce opinions and recommendations that can help inform the public and policy-makers. The dialogue among national bioethics committees is also increasingly important in the globalized world, where biomedical technologies raise ethical dilemmas that traverse national borders. It is not surprising, therefore, that the committees are established and active in the technologically advanced countries. There have also been a few international capacity-building initiatives in bioethics that have had a dual task: networking among existing national bioethics committees and helping establish such committees in those countries that still lack them. The problem is that, due to a lack of information, it is not clear what problems and challenges committees face in the transitioning societies often characterized as low- and middle-income countries. © 2017 The Hastings Center.

  6. The Apparel Industry and Codes of Conduct: A Solution to the International Child Labor Problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of International Labor Affairs (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Corporate codes of conduct prohibiting the use of child labor are becoming more common as consumers are increasingly calling upon companies to take responsibility for the conditions under which the goods they sell are manufactured. This report (the third volume in the Bureau of International Labor Affairs' international child labor series) details…

  7. HBT+: an improved code for finding subhaloes and building merger trees in cosmological simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiaxin; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos S.; Benitez-Llambay, Alejandro; Helly, John

    2018-02-01

    Dark matter subhalos are the remnants of (incomplete) halo mergers. Identifying them and establishing their evolutionary links in the form of merger trees is one of the most important applications of cosmological simulations. The HBT (Hierachical Bound-Tracing) code identifies haloes as they form and tracks their evolution as they merge, simultaneously detecting subhaloes and building their merger trees. Here we present a new implementation of this approach, HBT+ , that is much faster, more user friendly, and more physically complete than the original code. Applying HBT+ to cosmological simulations, we show that both the subhalo mass function and the peak-mass function are well fitted by similar double-Schechter functions. The ratio between the two is highest at the high-mass end, reflecting the resilience of massive subhaloes that experience substantial dynamical friction but limited tidal stripping. The radial distribution of the most-massive subhaloes is more concentrated than the universal radial distribution of lower mass subhaloes. Subhalo finders that work in configuration space tend to underestimate the masses of massive subhaloes, an effect that is stronger in the host centre. This may explain, at least in part, the excess of massive subhaloes in galaxy cluster centres inferred from recent lensing observations. We demonstrate that the peak-mass function is a powerful diagnostic of merger tree defects, and the merger trees constructed using HBT+ do not suffer from the missing or switched links that tend to afflict merger trees constructed from more conventional halo finders. We make the HBT+ code publicly available.

  8. International standard problem (ISP) no. 41 follow up exercise: Containment iodine computer code exercise: parametric studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, J.; Glowa, G.; Wren, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Ewig, F. [GRS Koln (Germany); Dickenson, S. [AEAT, (United Kingdom); Billarand, Y.; Cantrel, L. [IPSN (France); Rydl, A. [NRIR (Czech Republic); Royen, J. [OECD/NEA (France)

    2001-11-01

    This report describes the results of the second phase of International Standard Problem (ISP) 41, an iodine behaviour code comparison exercise. The first phase of the study, which was based on a simple Radioiodine Test Facility (RTF) experiment, demonstrated that all of the iodine behaviour codes had the capability to reproduce iodine behaviour for a narrow range of conditions (single temperature, no organic impurities, controlled pH steps). The current phase, a parametric study, was designed to evaluate the sensitivity of iodine behaviour codes to boundary conditions such as pH, dose rate, temperature and initial I{sup -} concentration. The codes used in this exercise were IODE(IPSN), IODE(NRIR), IMPAIR(GRS), INSPECT(AEAT), IMOD(AECL) and LIRIC(AECL). The parametric study described in this report identified several areas of discrepancy between the various codes. In general, the codes agree regarding qualitative trends, but their predictions regarding the actual amount of volatile iodine varied considerably. The largest source of the discrepancies between code predictions appears to be their different approaches to modelling the formation and destruction of organic iodides. A recommendation arising from this exercise is that an additional code comparison exercise be performed on organic iodide formation, against data obtained front intermediate-scale studies (two RTF (AECL, Canada) and two CAIMAN facility, (IPSN, France) experiments have been chosen). This comparison will allow each of the code users to realistically evaluate and improve the organic iodide behaviour sub-models within their codes. (author)

  9. International standard problem (ISP) no. 41 follow up exercise: Containment iodine computer code exercise: parametric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.; Glowa, G.; Wren, J.; Ewig, F.; Dickenson, S.; Billarand, Y.; Cantrel, L.; Rydl, A.; Royen, J.

    2001-11-01

    This report describes the results of the second phase of International Standard Problem (ISP) 41, an iodine behaviour code comparison exercise. The first phase of the study, which was based on a simple Radioiodine Test Facility (RTF) experiment, demonstrated that all of the iodine behaviour codes had the capability to reproduce iodine behaviour for a narrow range of conditions (single temperature, no organic impurities, controlled pH steps). The current phase, a parametric study, was designed to evaluate the sensitivity of iodine behaviour codes to boundary conditions such as pH, dose rate, temperature and initial I - concentration. The codes used in this exercise were IODE(IPSN), IODE(NRIR), IMPAIR(GRS), INSPECT(AEAT), IMOD(AECL) and LIRIC(AECL). The parametric study described in this report identified several areas of discrepancy between the various codes. In general, the codes agree regarding qualitative trends, but their predictions regarding the actual amount of volatile iodine varied considerably. The largest source of the discrepancies between code predictions appears to be their different approaches to modelling the formation and destruction of organic iodides. A recommendation arising from this exercise is that an additional code comparison exercise be performed on organic iodide formation, against data obtained front intermediate-scale studies (two RTF (AECL, Canada) and two CAIMAN facility, (IPSN, France) experiments have been chosen). This comparison will allow each of the code users to realistically evaluate and improve the organic iodide behaviour sub-models within their codes. (author)

  10. Internal Carotid Artery Hypoplasia: Role of Color-Coded Carotid Duplex Sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Ya; Liu, Hung-Yu; Lim, Kun-Eng; Lin, Shinn-Kuang

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of color-coded carotid duplex sonography for diagnosis of internal carotid artery hypoplasia. We retrospectively reviewed 25,000 color-coded carotid duplex sonograms in our neurosonographic database to establish more diagnostic criteria for internal carotid artery hypoplasia. A definitive diagnosis of internal carotid artery hypoplasia was made in 9 patients. Diagnostic findings on color-coded carotid duplex imaging include a long segmental small-caliber lumen (52% diameter) with markedly decreased flow (13% flow volume) in the affected internal carotid artery relative to the contralateral side but without intraluminal lesions. Indirect findings included markedly increased total flow volume (an increase of 133%) in both vertebral arteries, antegrade ipsilateral ophthalmic arterial flow, and a reduced vessel diameter with increased flow resistance in the ipsilateral common carotid artery. Ten patients with distal internal carotid artery dissection showed a similar color-coded duplex pattern, but the reductions in the internal and common carotid artery diameters and increase in collateral flow from the vertebral artery were less prominent than those in hypoplasia. The ipsilateral ophthalmic arterial flow was retrograde in 40% of patients with distal internal carotid artery dissection. In addition, thin-section axial and sagittal computed tomograms of the skull base could show the small diameter of the carotid canal in internal carotid artery hypoplasia and help distinguish hypoplasia from distal internal carotid artery dissection. Color-coded carotid duplex sonography provides important clues for establishing a diagnosis of internal carotid artery hypoplasia. A hypoplastic carotid canal can be shown by thin-section axial and sagittal skull base computed tomography to confirm the final diagnosis. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  11. International Code Assessment and Applications Program: Summary of code assessment studies concerning RELAP5/MOD2, RELAP5/MOD3, and TRAC-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, R.R.

    1993-12-01

    Members of the International Code Assessment Program (ICAP) have assessed the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) advanced thermal-hydraulic codes over the past few years in a concerted effort to identify deficiencies, to define user guidelines, and to determine the state of each code. The results of sixty-two code assessment reviews, conducted at INEL, are summarized. Code deficiencies are discussed and user recommended nodalizations investigated during the course of conducting the assessment studies and reviews are listed. All the work that is summarized was done using the RELAP5/MOD2, RELAP5/MOD3, and TRAC-B codes

  12. Reducing Seismic Hazard and Building Capacity Through International Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergino, E. S.; Arakelyan, A.; Babayan, H.; Durgaryan, R.; Elashvili, M.; Godoladze, T.; Javakhishvili, Z.; Kalogeras, I.; Karakhanyan, A.; Martin, R. J.; Yetirmishli, G.

    2012-12-01

    During the last 50 years, the Caucasus, Central Asia and the Caspian Sea regions have experienced several devastating earthquakes. While each country in the region has worked with its neighbors on small, ad-hoc projects to improve preparedness, deeply ingrained political and ethnic rivalries, and severely stressed economies have severely hindered sustained regional cooperation. Future damaging earthquakes are inevitable and without proper planning the negative impact on public safety, security, economics and stability in these regions will be devastating. We have, through twelve years of international scientific cooperation, focused on the development of an expanded skill base and infrastructure, through the installation of new, modern, digital seismic monitoring networks, building of historic databases, sharing seismic, geologic and geophysical data, conducting joint scientific investigations utilizing the new digital data and applying modern techniques, as well as the development of regional hazard models that the scientists of the region share with their governments and use to advise them on the best ways to mitigate the impact of a damaging earthquake. We have established specialized regional scientific task-force teams who can carry out seismological, geological and engineering studies in the epicentral zone, including the collection of new scientific data, for better understanding of seismic and geodynamic processes as well to provide emergency support in crisis and post-crisis situations in the Southern Caucasus countries. "Secrecy" in crisis and post-crisis situations in the former Soviet Union countries, as well as political instabilities, led to an absence of seismic risk reduction and prevention measures as well as little to no training of scientific-technical personnel who could take action in emergency situations. There were few opportunities for the development of a next generation of scientific experts, thus we have placed emphasis on the inclusion

  13. International codes and agreements to restrict the promotion of harmful products can hold lessons for the control of alcohol marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Jane; Lobstein, Tim; Godfrey, Fiona; Johns, Paula; Brookes, Chris; Jernigan, David

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims The 2011 UN Summit on Non-Communicable Disease failed to call for global action on alcohol marketing despite calls in the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Action Plan on Non-Communicable Diseases 2013-20 to restrict or ban alcohol advertising. In this paper we ask what it might take to match the global approach to tobacco enshrined in the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), and suggest that public health advocates can learn from the development of the FCTC and the Code of Marketing on infant formula milks and the recent recommendations on restricting food marketing to children. Methods Narrative review of qualitative accounts of the processes that created and monitor existing codes and treaties to restrict the marketing of consumer products, specifically breast milk substitutes, unhealthy foods and tobacco. Findings The development of treaties and codes for market restrictions include: (i) evidence of a public health crisis; (ii) the cost of inaction; (iii) civil society advocacy; (iv) the building of capacity; (v) the management of conflicting interests in policy development; and (vi) the need to consider monitoring and accountability to ensure compliance. Conclusion International public health treaties and codes provide an umbrella under which national governments can strengthen their own legislation, assisted by technical support from international agencies and non-governmental organizations. Three examples of international agreements, those for breast milk substitutes, unhealthy foods and tobacco, can provide lessons for the public health community to make progress on alcohol controls. Lessons include stronger alliances of advocates and health professionals and better tools and capacity to monitor and report current marketing practices and trends. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  14. 76 FR 37034 - Certain Employee Remuneration in Excess of $1,000,000 Under Internal Revenue Code Section 162(m)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... Certain Employee Remuneration in Excess of $1,000,000 Under Internal Revenue Code Section 162(m) AGENCY... remuneration in excess of $1,000,000 under the Internal Revenue Code (Code). The proposed regulations clarify... stock options, it is intended that the directors may retain discretion as to the exact number of options...

  15. Manual for IRS Coding. Joint IAEA/NEA International Reporting System for Operating Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The International Reporting System for Operating Experience (IRS) is jointly operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/NEA). In early 2010, the IAEA and OECD/NEA jointly issued the IRS Guidelines, which described the reporting system and process and gave users the necessary elements to enable them to produce IRS reports to a high standard of quality while retaining the effectiveness of the system expected by all Member States operating nuclear power plants. The purpose of the present Manual for IRS Coding is to provide supplementary guidance specifically on the coding element of IRS reports to ensure uniform coding of events that are reported through IRS. This Coding Manual does not supersede the IRS Guidelines, but rather, supports users and preparers in achieving a consistent and high level of quality in their IRS reports. Consistency and high quality in the IRS reports allow stakeholders to search and retrieve specific event information with ease. In addition, well-structured reports also enhance the efficient management of the IRS database. This Coding Manual will give specific guidance on the application of each section of the IRS codes, with examples where necessary, of when and how these codes are to be applied. As this reporting system is owned by the Member States, this manual has been developed and approved by the IRS National Coordinators with the assistance of the IAEA and NEA secretariats

  16. Climate Change Mitigation through Energy Benchmarking in the GCC Green Buildings Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Alhorr

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC of countries resides at or close to the top of the global table of CO2 emissions per capita and its economy relies heavily on its fossil fuels. This provides a context for green building programs that initially aim to create an understanding of emission pathways within the GCC and hence develop approaches to their reduction in the built environment. A set of criteria will allow specific analysis to be undertaken linked to the spatial dimensions of the sector under study. In this paper, approaches to modelling energy consumption and CO2 emissions are presented. As investment in the built environment continues, natural resources dwindle and the cost of energy increases, delivering low-energy buildings will become mandatory. In this study, a hybrid modelling approach (bottom-top & top-bottom is presented. Energy benchmarks are developed for different buildings’ uses and compared with international standards. The main goals are to establish design benchmarks and develop a modelling tool that contains specific information for all buildings types (existing and new, as well as planned and projected growths within the various city districts, then integrate this database within a geospatial information system that will allow us to answer a range of “what-if”-type questions about various intervention strategies, emissions savings, and acceptability of pre-defined course of actions in the city sector under consideration. The spatial carbon intensity may be adjusted over a certain period, (e.g., through local generation (microgeneration or due to an increasing proportion of lower carbon-energy in the generation mix and this can be related to the sector and city overall consumption.

  17. Code of practice on the international transboundary movement of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    This Code of Practice should serve as guidelines of the IAEA to the States for the development and harmonization of policies and laws on the international transboundary movement of radioactive wastes. It relies on international standards for the safe transport of radioactive material and the physical protection of nuclear material, as well as the standards for basic nuclear safety and radiation protection and radioactive waste management; it does not establish separate guidance in these areas. Furthermore, this Code, which is advisory, does not affect in any way existing and future arrangements among States which relate to matters covered by it and are compatible with its objectives

  18. Feedback Codes and Action Plans: Building the Capacity of First-Year Students to Apply Feedback to a Scientific Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Fiona L.; Yucel, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    Effective feedback can build self-assessment skills in students so that they become more competent and confident to identify and self-correct weaknesses in their work. In this study, we trialled a feedback code as part of an integrated programme of formative and summative assessment tasks, which provided feedback to first-year students on their…

  19. PIConGPU - How to build one of the fastest GPU particle-in-cell codes in the world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burau, Heiko; Debus, Alexander; Helm, Anton; Huebl, Axel; Kluge, Thomas; Widera, Rene; Bussmann, Michael; Schramm, Ulrich; Cowan, Thomas [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); Juckeland, Guido; Nagel, Wolfgang [TU Dresden (Germany); ZIH, Dresden (Germany); Schmitt, Felix [NVIDIA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    We present the algorithmic building blocks of PIConGPU, one of the fastest implementations of the particle-in-cell algortihm on GPU clusters. PIConGPU is a highly-scalable, 3D3V electromagnetic PIC code that is used in laser plasma and astrophysical plasma simulations.

  20. Photovoltaics in buildings - international market and state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toggweiler, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The author examines the use of PV technology in buildings and stresses the importance of PV integration into the architectural design. The status of European collaboration is briefly reviewed with emphasis on IEA Task VII: PV in the built environment

  1. Building new foundations for Arab youth | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-03-16

    With economic crisis accompanying the instability, there is tremendous pressure to ... Building new foundations for Arab youth. March 16, 2015. Image ... and dialogue on issues that directly affect them, IDRC is equipping a new generation to ...

  2. Implementation of the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes in the Eastern Mediterranean Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Jawaldeh, Ayoub; Sayed, Ghada

    2018-04-05

    Optimal breastfeeding practices and appropriate complementary feeding improve child health, survival and development. The countries of the Eastern Mediterranean Region have made significant strides in formulation and implementation of legislation to protect and promote breastfeeding based on The International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes (the Code) and subsequent relevant World Health Assembly resolutions. To assess the implementation of the Code in the Region. Assessment was conducted by the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean using a WHO standard questionnaire. Seventeen countries in the Region have enacted legislation to protect breastfeeding. Only 6 countries have comprehensive legislation or other legal measures reflecting all or most provisions of the Code; 4 countries have legal measures incorporating many provisions of the Code; 7 countries have legal measures that contain a few provisions of the Code; 4 countries are currently studying the issue; and only 1 country has no measures in place. Further analysis of the legislation found that the text of articles in the laws fully reflected the Code articles in only 6 countries. Most countries need to revisit and amend existing national legislation to implement fully the Code and relevant World Health Assembly resolutions, supported by systematic monitoring and reporting. Copyright © World Health Organization (WHO) 2018. Some rights reserved. This work is available under the CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/igo).

  3. A strategy for building public service motivation research Internationally

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, S.; Vandenabeele, W.V.

    2010-01-01

    As public service motivation research grows qualitatively and quantitatively, some scholars question its appropriateness for international applications. This essay sets out a strategy of convergence for international research and measurement approaches. Studies that assess commonalities in public

  4. International standards: the World Organisation for Animal Health Terrestrial Animal Health Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiermann, A B

    2015-04-01

    This paper provides a description of the international standards contained in the TerrestrialAnimal Health Code of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) that relate to the prevention and control of vector-borne diseases. It identifies the rights and obligations of OIE Member Countries regarding the notification of animal disease occurrences, as well as the recommendations to be followed for a safe and efficient international trade of animals and their products.

  5. Implementation of international code of marketing breast-milk substitutes in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aihua; Dai, Yaohua; Xie, Xiaohua; Chen, Li

    2014-11-01

    Breastmilk is the best source of nourishment for infants and young children, and breastfeeding is one of the most effective ways to ensure child health and survival. In May 1981, the World Health Assembly adopted the International Code of Marketing Breast-Milk Substitutes. Since then several subsequent resolutions have been adopted by the World Health Assembly, which both update and clarify the articles within the International Code (herein after the term "Code" refers to both the International Code and all subsequent resolutions). The Code is designed to regulate "inappropriate sales promotion" of breastmilk substitutes and instructs signatory governments to ensure the implementation of its aims through legislation. The Chinese Regulations of the Code were adopted by six government sectors in 1995. However, challenges in promotion, protection, and support of breastfeeding remain. This study aimed to monitor the implementation of the Code in China. Six cities were selected with considerable geographic coverage. In each city three hospitals and six stores were surveyed. The International Baby Food Action Network Interview Form was adapted, and direct observations were made. Research assistants administered the questionnaires to a random sample of mothers of infants under 6 months old who were in the outpatient department of the hospitals. In total, 291 mothers of infants, 35 stores, 17 hospitals, and 26 companies were surveyed. From the whole sample of 291 mothers, the proportion who reported exclusively breastfeeding their infant was 30.9%; 69.1% of mothers reported feeding their infant with commercially available formula. Regarding violations of the Code, 40.2% of the mothers reported receiving free formula samples. Of these, 76.1% received the free samples in or near hospitals. Among the stores surveyed, 45.7% were found promoting products in a way that violates the Code. Also, 69.0% of the labeling on the formula products did not comply with the regulations set

  6. Sustainability in Energy and Buildings : Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference in Sustainability in Energy and Buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Namaane, Aziz; Howlett, Robert; Jain, Lakhmi

    2012-01-01

    Welcome to the proceedings of the Third International Conference on Sustainability in Energy and Buildings, SEB’11, held in Marseilles in France, organised by the Laboratoire des Sciences del'Information et des Systèmes (LSIS) in Marseille, France in partnership with KES International.   SEB'11 formed a welcome opportunity for researchers in subjects related to sustainability, renewable energy technology, and applications in the built environment to mix with other scientists, industrialists and stakeholders in the field.   The conference featured presentations on a range of renewable energy and sustainability related topics. In addition the conference explored two innovative themes: - the application of intelligent sensing, control, optimisation and modelling techniques to sustainability and - the technology of sustainable buildings.  These two themes combine synergetically to address issues relating to The Intelligent Building.   SEB’11 attracted a significant number of submissions from around the w...

  7. Radiation dosimetry with plane-parallel ionization chambers: An international (IAEA) code of practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreo, P.

    1996-01-01

    Research on plane-parallel ionization chambers since the IAEA Code of Practice (TRS-277) was published in 1987 has expanded our knowledge on perturbation and other correction factors in ionization chamber dosimeter, and also constructional details of these chambers have been shown to be important. Different national organizations have published, or are in the process of publishing, recommendations on detailed procedures for the calibration and use of plane-parallel ionization chambers. An international working group was formed under the auspices of the IAEA, first to assess the status and validity of IAEA TRS-277, and second to develop an international Code of Practice for the calibration and use of plane-parallel ionization chambers in high-energy electron and photon beams. The purpose of this work is to describe the forthcoming Code of Practice. (author). 39 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  8. GATO: an MHD stability code for axisymmetric plasmas with internal separatrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, L.C.; Helton, F.J.; Moore, R.W.

    1981-07-01

    The GATO code computes the growth rate of ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in axisymmetric geometries with internal separatrices such as doublet and expanded spheromak. The basic method, which uses a variational principle and a Galerkin procedure to obtain a matrix eigenvalue problem, is common to the ERATO and PEST codes. A new coordinate system has been developed to handle the internal separatrix. Efficient algorithms have been developed to solve the matrix eigenvalue problem for matrices of rank as large as 40,000. Further improvement is expected using graph theoretical techniques to reorder the matrices. Using judicious mesh repartition, the marginal point can be determined with great precision. The code has been extensively used to optimize doublet and general tokamak plasmas

  9. GATO: An MHD stability code for axisymmetric plasmas with internal separatrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, L.C.; Helton, F.J.; Moore, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    The GATO code computes the growth rate of ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in axisymmetric geometries with internal separatrices such as doublet and expanded spheromak. The basic method, which uses a variational principle and a Galerkin procedure to obtain a matrix eigenvalue problem, is common to the ERATO and PEST codes. A new coordinate system has been developed to handle the internal separatrix. Efficient algorithms have been developed to solve the matrix eigenvalue problem for matrices of rank as large as 40 000. Further improvement is expected using graph theoretical techniques to reorder the matrices. Using judicious mesh repartition, the marginal point can be determined with great precision. The code has been extensively used to optimize doublet and general tokamak plasmas. (orig.)

  10. Radiation dosimetry with plane-parallel ionization chambers: An international (IAEA) code of practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreo, P [Lunds Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Radiophysics Dept.; Almond, P R [J.G. Brown Cancer Center, Univ. of Lousville, Lousville, KY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Mattsson, O [Sahlgrenska Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Nahum, A E [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton (United Kingdom). Joint Dept. of Physics; Roos, M [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1996-08-01

    Research on plane-parallel ionization chambers since the IAEA Code of Practice (TRS-277) was published in 1987 has expanded our knowledge on perturbation and other correction factors in ionization chamber dosimeter, and also constructional details of these chambers have been shown to be important. Different national organizations have published, or are in the process of publishing, recommendations on detailed procedures for the calibration and use of plane-parallel ionization chambers. An international working group was formed under the auspices of the IAEA, first to assess the status and validity of IAEA TRS-277, and second to develop an international Code of Practice for the calibration and use of plane-parallel ionization chambers in high-energy electron and photon beams. The purpose of this work is to describe the forthcoming Code of Practice. (author). 39 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs.

  11. Building physics from physical principles to international standards

    CERN Document Server

    Pinterić, Marko

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides thorough coverage of the most important building physics phenomena: heat transfer, moisture, sound/acoustics, and illumination. Since the book is primarily aimed at engineers, it addresses professional issues with due pragmatism, and by including many practical examples and related ISO standards. Nevertheless, in order to guarantee full comprehension, it also explains the underlying physical principles and relates them to practical aspects in a simple and clear way. This is achieved with the aid of more than 100 figures and consistent cross-referencing of formulas and ideas. In addition, interrelationships between the different building physics phenomena are elucidated in a way that will enable readers to develop performance specifications that inform the design process. The book will primarily appeal to students of civil engineering and architecture, as well as to all practitioners in these areas who wish to broaden their fundamental understanding of topics in building physics.

  12. The World Anti-Doping Code 2015: ASSER International Sports Law Blog symposium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duval, A.; Ram, H.; Viret, M.; Wisnosky, E.; Jacobs, H.L.; Morgan, M.

    This article brings together the contributions to a blog symposium on the new World Anti-Doping Code 2015 published on the ASSER International Sports Law Blog in October 2015. The contributions cover a variety of subjects, including the new sanctioning regime, the role of national anti-doping

  13. Assessment of the Portuguese building thermal code: Newly revised requirements for cooling energy needs used to prevent the overheating of buildings in the summer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Panao, Marta J.N.; Camelo, Susana M.L.; Goncalves, Helder J.P.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, cooling energy needs are calculated by the steady-state methodology of the Portuguese building thermal code. After the first period of building code implementation, re-evaluation according to EN ISO 13790 is recommended in order to compare results with the dynamic simulation results. From these analyses, a newly revised methodology arises including a few corrections in procedure. This iterative result is sufficiently accurate to calculate the building's cooling energy needs. Secondly, results show that the required conditions are insufficient to prevent overheating. The use of the gain utilization factor as an overheating risk index is suggested, according to an adaptive comfort protocol, and is integrated in the method used to calculate the maximum value for cooling energy needs. This proposed streamlined method depends on reference values: window-to-floor area ratio, window shading g-value, integrated solar radiation and gain utilization factor, which leads to threshold values significantly below the ones currently used. These revised requirements are more restrictive and, therefore, will act to improve a building's thermal performance during summer. As a rule of thumb applied for Portuguese climates, the reference gain utilization factor should assume a minimum value of 0.8 for a latitude angle range of 40-41 o N, 0.6 for 38-39 o N and 0.5 for 37 o N. -- Highlights: → A newly revised methodology for Portuguese building thermal code. → The use of the gain utilization factor as an overheating risk index is suggested. → The proposed streamlined method depends on reference values. → Threshold maximum values are significantly below the ones currently used.

  14. Robonaut 2 - Building a Robot on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diftler, Myron; Badger, Julia; Joyce, Charles; Potter, Elliott; Pike, Leah

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, the Robonaut Project embarked on a multi-phase mission to perform technology demonstrations on-board the International Space Station (ISS), showcasing state of the art robotics technologies through the use of Robonaut 2 (R2). This phased approach implements a strategy that allows for the use of ISS as a test bed during early development to both demonstrate capability and test technology while still making advancements in the earth based laboratories for future testing and operations in space. While R2 was performing experimental trials onboard the ISS during the first phase, engineers were actively designing for Phase 2, Intra-Vehicular Activity (IVA) Mobility, that utilizes a set of zero-g climbing legs outfitted with grippers to grasp handrails and seat tracks. In addition to affixing the new climbing legs to the existing R2 torso, it became clear that upgrades to the torso to both physically accommodate the climbing legs and to expand processing power and capabilities of the robot were required. In addition to these upgrades, a new safety architecture was also implemented in order to account for the expanded capabilities of the robot. The IVA climbing legs not only needed to attach structurally to the R2 torso on ISS, but also required power and data connections that did not exist in the upper body. The climbing legs were outfitted with a blind mate adapter and coarse alignment guides for easy installation, but the upper body required extensive rewiring to accommodate the power and data connections. This was achieved by mounting a custom adapter plate to the torso and routing the additional wiring through the waist joint to connect to the new set of processors. In addition to the power and data channels, the integrated unit also required updated electronics boards, additional sensors and updated processors to accommodate a new operating system, software platform, and custom control system. In order to perform the unprecedented task of building a robot

  15. Who's keeping the code? Compliance with the international code for the marketing of breast-milk substitutes in Greater Glasgow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Rhona J; Wright, Charlotte; Haq, Shogufta; McGranachan, Margaret

    2007-07-01

    To evaluate compliance with the World Health Organization's International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes in primary care, after the introduction of strict local infant feeding guidelines. An audit form was sent to all community-based health professionals with an infant feeding remit. Walking tours were conducted in a random sample of community care facilities. Greater Glasgow Primary Care Division. (1) Primary-care staff with an infant feeding remit; (2) community health-care facilities. Contact with manufacturers of breast-milk substitutes (BMS) and BMS company personnel, free samples or incentives, and advertising of BMS. Contact with company personnel was minimal, usually unsolicited and was mainly to provide product information. Free samples of BMS or feeding equipment were rare but childcare or parenting literature was more prevalent. Staff voiced concerns about the lack of relevant information for bottle-feeding mothers and the need to support the mother's feeding choice. One-third of facilities were still displaying materials non-compliant with the Code, with the most common materials being weight conversion charts and posters. Contact between personnel from primary care and BMS companies was minimal and generally unsolicited. The presence of materials from BMS companies in health-care premises was more common. Due to the high level of bottle-feeding in Glasgow, primary-care staff stated a need for information about BMS.

  16. Building an Africa open data network | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Building an Africa open data network. Open data is data that is available online that can be freely used, re-used, and redistributed by anyone. When used effectively, open data drives accountability in governments, creates innovations in service delivery, and improves participation in key decisions. Committed to harnessing ...

  17. Building International Sustainable Partnerships in Occupational Therapy: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupe, Debra Ann; Kern, Stephen B; Salvant, Sabrina; Talero, Pamela

    2015-09-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners frequently identify opportunities for international practice. The World Health Organization and the World Federation of Occupational Therapists have encouraged occupational therapists to address transnational issues, social inclusion, and equal access to opportunities grounded in meaningful occupation (WFOT, 2012). This case study describes a partnership between two U.S. schools of occupational therapy and a Cuban community based pediatric clinic. It examines the dynamics that have sustained the partnership despite political, economic, and logistical barriers. The literature is scrutinized to show how this case study fits into other accounts of collaborative international partnerships. Particularly, it investigates structural and institutional conditions that shape international sustainable partnerships. In doing so, we answer the following questions: (1) Under which circumstances do international partnerships emerge and flourish? (2) What structural and institutional conditions shape international sustainable partnerships? And (3) How do partners perceive and experience the bilateral international partnership? It also discusses and illustrates the foundations and development of international partnerships that succeed. Through the use of a case study we illustrate the development of this partnership. Finally, we consider the next steps of this particular sustainable and collaborative international partnership. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Coding Bootcamps : Building Future-Proof Skills through Rapid Skills Training

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2017-01-01

    This report studies coding bootcamps. A new kind of rapid skills training program for the digital age. Coding bootcamps are typically short-term (three to six months), intensive and applied training courses provided by a third party that crowdsources the demand for low-skills tech talent. Coding bootcamps aim at low-entry level tech employability (for example, junior developer), providing a ...

  19. International outage coding system for nuclear power plants. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-05-01

    The experience obtained in each individual plant constitutes the most relevant source of information for improving its performance. However, experience of the level of the utility, country and worldwide is also extremely valuable, because there are limitations to what can be learned from in-house experience. But learning from the experience of others is admittedly difficult, if the information is not harmonized. Therefore, such systems should be standardized and applicable to all types of reactors satisfying the needs of the broad set of nuclear power plant operators worldwide and allowing experience to be shared internationally. To cope with the considerable amount of information gathered from nuclear power plants worldwide, it is necessary to codify the information facilitating the identification of causes of outages, systems or component failures. Therefore, the IAEA established a sponsored Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the International Outage Coding System to develop a general, internationally applicable system of coding nuclear power plant outages, providing worldwide nuclear utilities with a standardized tool for reporting outage information. This TECDOC summarizes the results of this CRP and provides information for transformation of the historical outage data into the new coding system, taking into consideration the existing systems for coding nuclear power plant events (WANO, IAEA-IRS and IAEA PRIS) but avoiding duplication of efforts to the maximum possible extent

  20. Comparative Study on Code-based Linear Evaluation of an Existing RC Building Damaged during 1998 Adana-Ceyhan Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toprak, A. Emre; Guelay, F. Guelten; Ruge, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Determination of seismic performance of existing buildings has become one of the key concepts in structural analysis topics after recent earthquakes (i.e. Izmit and Duzce Earthquakes in 1999, Kobe Earthquake in 1995 and Northridge Earthquake in 1994). Considering the need for precise assessment tools to determine seismic performance level, most of earthquake hazardous countries try to include performance based assessment in their seismic codes. Recently, Turkish Earthquake Code 2007 (TEC'07), which was put into effect in March 2007, also introduced linear and non-linear assessment procedures to be applied prior to building retrofitting. In this paper, a comparative study is performed on the code-based seismic assessment of RC buildings with linear static methods of analysis, selecting an existing RC building. The basic principles dealing the procedure of seismic performance evaluations for existing RC buildings according to Eurocode 8 and TEC'07 will be outlined and compared. Then the procedure is applied to a real case study building is selected which is exposed to 1998 Adana-Ceyhan Earthquake in Turkey, the seismic action of Ms = 6.3 with a maximum ground acceleration of 0.28 g It is a six-storey RC residential building with a total of 14.65 m height, composed of orthogonal frames, symmetrical in y direction and it does not have any significant structural irregularities. The rectangular shaped planar dimensions are 16.40 mx7.80 m = 127.90 m 2 with five spans in x and two spans in y directions. It was reported that the building had been moderately damaged during the 1998 earthquake and retrofitting process was suggested by the authorities with adding shear-walls to the system. The computations show that the performing methods of analysis with linear approaches using either Eurocode 8 or TEC'07 independently produce similar performance levels of collapse for the critical storey of the structure. The computed base shear value according to Eurocode is much higher

  1. Comparative Study on Code-based Linear Evaluation of an Existing RC Building Damaged during 1998 Adana-Ceyhan Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprak, A. Emre; Gülay, F. Gülten; Ruge, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Determination of seismic performance of existing buildings has become one of the key concepts in structural analysis topics after recent earthquakes (i.e. Izmit and Duzce Earthquakes in 1999, Kobe Earthquake in 1995 and Northridge Earthquake in 1994). Considering the need for precise assessment tools to determine seismic performance level, most of earthquake hazardous countries try to include performance based assessment in their seismic codes. Recently, Turkish Earthquake Code 2007 (TEC'07), which was put into effect in March 2007, also introduced linear and non-linear assessment procedures to be applied prior to building retrofitting. In this paper, a comparative study is performed on the code-based seismic assessment of RC buildings with linear static methods of analysis, selecting an existing RC building. The basic principles dealing the procedure of seismic performance evaluations for existing RC buildings according to Eurocode 8 and TEC'07 will be outlined and compared. Then the procedure is applied to a real case study building is selected which is exposed to 1998 Adana-Ceyhan Earthquake in Turkey, the seismic action of Ms = 6.3 with a maximum ground acceleration of 0.28 g It is a six-storey RC residential building with a total of 14.65 m height, composed of orthogonal frames, symmetrical in y direction and it does not have any significant structural irregularities. The rectangular shaped planar dimensions are 16.40 m×7.80 m = 127.90 m2 with five spans in x and two spans in y directions. It was reported that the building had been moderately damaged during the 1998 earthquake and retrofitting process was suggested by the authorities with adding shear-walls to the system. The computations show that the performing methods of analysis with linear approaches using either Eurocode 8 or TEC'07 independently produce similar performance levels of collapse for the critical storey of the structure. The computed base shear value according to Eurocode is much higher

  2. Reconciliation of international administrative coding systems for comparison of colorectal surgery outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munasinghe, A; Chang, D; Mamidanna, R; Middleton, S; Joy, M; Penninckx, F; Darzi, A; Livingston, E; Faiz, O

    2014-07-01

    Significant variation in colorectal surgery outcomes exists between different countries. Better understanding of the sources of variable outcomes using administrative data requires alignment of differing clinical coding systems. We aimed to map similar diagnoses and procedures across administrative coding systems used in different countries. Administrative data were collected in a central database as part of the Global Comparators (GC) Project. In order to unify these data, a systematic translation of diagnostic and procedural codes was undertaken. Codes for colorectal diagnoses, resections, operative complications and reoperative interventions were mapped across the respective national healthcare administrative coding systems. Discharge data from January 2006 to June 2011 for patients who had undergone colorectal surgical resections were analysed to generate risk-adjusted models for mortality, length of stay, readmissions and reoperations. In all, 52 544 case records were collated from 31 institutions in five countries. Mapping of all the coding systems was achieved so that diagnosis and procedures from the participant countries could be compared. Using the aligned coding systems to develop risk-adjusted models, the 30-day mortality rate for colorectal surgery was 3.95% (95% CI 0.86-7.54), the 30-day readmission rate was 11.05% (5.67-17.61), the 28-day reoperation rate was 6.13% (3.68-9.66) and the mean length of stay was 14 (7.65-46.76) days. The linkage of international hospital administrative data that we developed enabled comparison of documented surgical outcomes between countries. This methodology may facilitate international benchmarking. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  3. Reactor building with internal structure of which the movements are independent of those of the general raft and process for building these internal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hista, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    This reactor building includes a containment enclosure for the internal structures composed of a slab wedged on its periphery against the containment enclosure gusset and resting on the general raft by means of a peripheral bearing ring, a compressible layer being provided between the general raft and the slab [fr

  4. Building an International Financial Services Firm: How to design and execute cross-border strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Markus Venzin

    2009-01-01

    A new era of global banking and insurance is emerging, with leading banks eager to serve international markets. This book explores the issues that arise for banks in their strategic choices as they move into these new international markets. Building an International Financial Services Firm challenges conventional assumptions from the international management literature on topics such as the limits of globalization, the importance of cultural and institutional distance, the nature of economies...

  5. Simulation of International Standard Problem No. 44 'KAEVER' experiments on aerosol behaviour with the CONTAIN code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljenak, I.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments on aerosol behavior in a vapor-saturated atmosphere, which were performed in the KAEVER experimental facility and proposed for the OECD International Standard Problem No. 44, were simulated with the CONTAIN thermal-hydraulic computer code. The purpose of the work was to assess the capability of the CONTAIN code to model aerosol condensation and deposition in a containment of a light-water-reactor nuclear power plant at severe accident conditions. Results of dry and wet aerosol concentrations are presented and analyzed.(author)

  6. Net Zero Energy Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marszal, Anna Joanna; Bourrelle, Julien S.; Gustavsen, Arild

    2010-01-01

    and identify possible renewable energy supply options which may be considered in calculations. Finally, the gap between the methodology proposed by each organisation and their respective national building code is assessed; providing an overview of the possible changes building codes will need to undergo......The international cooperation project IEA SHC Task 40 / ECBCS Annex 52 “Towards Net Zero Energy Solar Buildings”, attempts to develop a common understanding and to set up the basis for an international definition framework of Net Zero Energy Buildings (Net ZEBs). The understanding of such buildings...

  7. Method for calculating internal radiation and ventilation with the ADINAT heat-flow code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butkovich, T.R.; Montan, D.N.

    1980-01-01

    One objective of the spent fuel test in Climax Stock granite (SFTC) is to correctly model the thermal transport, and the changes in the stress field and accompanying displacements from the application of the thermal loads. We have chosen the ADINA and ADINAT finite element codes to do these calculations. ADINAT is a heat transfer code compatible to the ADINA displacement and stress analysis code. The heat flow problem encountered at SFTC requires a code with conduction, radiation, and ventilation capabilities, which the present version of ADINAT does not have. We have devised a method for calculating internal radiation and ventilation with the ADINAT code. This method effectively reproduces the results from the TRUMP multi-dimensional finite difference code, which correctly models radiative heat transport between drift surfaces, conductive and convective thermal transport to and through air in the drifts, and mass flow of air in the drifts. The temperature histories for each node in the finite element mesh calculated with ADINAT using this method can be used directly in the ADINA thermal-mechanical calculation

  8. Lessons learned from new construction utility demand side management programs and their implications for implementing building energy codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, B.K.; Hughes, K.R.; Danko, S.L.; Gilbride, T.L.

    1994-07-01

    This report was prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Codes and Standards by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) through its Building Energy Standards Program (BESP). The purpose of this task was to identify demand-side management (DSM) strategies for new construction that utilities have adopted or developed to promote energy-efficient design and construction. PNL conducted a survey of utilities and used the information gathered to extrapolate lessons learned and to identify evolving trends in utility new-construction DSM programs. The ultimate goal of the task is to identify opportunities where states might work collaboratively with utilities to promote the adoption, implementation, and enforcement of energy-efficient building energy codes.

  9. Comparison of computer codes related to the sodium oxide aerosol behavior in a containment building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermandjian, J.

    1984-09-01

    In order to ensure that the problems of describing the physical behavior of sodium aerosols, during hypothetical fast reactor accidents, were adequately understood, a comparison of the computer codes (ABC/INTG, PNC, Japan; AEROSIM, UKAEA/SRD, United Kingdom; PARDISEKO IIIb, KfK, Germany; AEROSOLS/A2 and AEROSOLS/B1, CEA France) was undertaken in the frame of the CEC: exercise in which code users have run their own codes with a prearranged input

  10. INLUX-DBR - A calculation code to calculate indoor natural illuminance inside buildings under various sky conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraro, V.; Igawa, N.; Marinelli, V.

    2010-01-01

    A calculation code, named INLUX-DBR, is presented, which is a modified version of INLUX code, able to predict the illuminance distribution on the inside surfaces of a room with six walls and a window, and on the work plane. At each desired instant the code solves the system of the illuminance equations of each surface element, characterized by the latter's reflection coefficient and its view factors toward the other elements. In the model implemented in the code, the sky-diffuse luminance distribution, the sun beam light and the light reflected from the ground toward the room are considered. The code was validated by comparing the calculated values of illuminance with the experimental values measured inside a scale model (1:5) of a building room, in various sky conditions of overcast, clear and intermediate days. The validation is performed using the sky luminance data measured by a sky scanner and the measured beam illuminance of the sun as input data. A comparative analysis of some of the well-known calculation models of sky luminance, namely Perez, Igawa and CIE models was also carried out, comparing the code predictions and the measured values of inside illuminance in the scale model.

  11. INLUX-DBR - A calculation code to calculate indoor natural illuminance inside buildings under various sky conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraro, V.; Igawa, N.; Marinelli, V. [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Calabria, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (CS) (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    A calculation code, named INLUX-DBR, is presented, which is a modified version of INLUX code, able to predict the illuminance distribution on the inside surfaces of a room with six walls and a window, and on the work plane. At each desired instant the code solves the system of the illuminance equations of each surface element, characterized by the latter's reflection coefficient and its view factors toward the other elements. In the model implemented in the code, the sky-diffuse luminance distribution, the sun beam light and the light reflected from the ground toward the room are considered. The code was validated by comparing the calculated values of illuminance with the experimental values measured inside a scale model (1:5) of a building room, in various sky conditions of overcast, clear and intermediate days. The validation is performed using the sky luminance data measured by a sky scanner and the measured beam illuminance of the sun as input data. A comparative analysis of some of the well-known calculation models of sky luminance, namely Perez, Igawa and CIE models was also carried out, comparing the code predictions and the measured values of inside illuminance in the scale model. (author)

  12. Energy Building Regulations: The Effect of the Federal Performance Standards on Building Code Administration and the Conservation of Energy in New Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopper, William D.

    1980-01-01

    Explores the changes in the administration and enforcement of building regulations that will be engendered by the proposed federal energy building standards. Also evaluates the effectiveness of those standards in meeting congressional intent. Available from U.C. Davis Law Review, School of Law, Martin Luther King Jr. Hall, University of…

  13. Comparison of european computer codes relative to the aerosol behavior in PWR containment buildings during severe core damage accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermandjian, J.; Beonio-Brocchieri, F.

    1986-09-01

    The present study concerns a comparative exercise, performed within the framework of the Commission of the European Communities, of the computer codes used in reactor safety in order to assess their capability of realistically describing the aerosol behavior in PWR reactor containment buildings during severe accidents. The codes included in the present study are the following: AEROSIM-M, AEROSOLS/Bl, CORRAL-2, NAUA Mod5. In AEROSIM-M, AEROSOLS/Bl and NAUA Mod5, the integro-differential equation for the evolution of the particle mass distribution is approximated by a set of coupled first order differential equations. To this end, the particle distribution function is replaced by a number of discrete monodisperse fractions. The CORRAL-2 has an essentially empirical basis (processes not explicitely modelled, but their net effects accounted for). The physical processes taken into account in the codes are shown finally

  14. Building International Relations for Children through Sister Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Carolyn B.

    1992-01-01

    Inspired by Sister Cities International and the NASSP's school-to-school exchange program, "sister school" pairings have proved to be workable educational programs with long-range impact on participants. Some post-cold war efforts include U.S.-USSR High School Academic Partnerships, Project Harmony, and Center for U.S.-USSR Initiatives.…

  15. Integrity Analysis of Turbine Building for the MSLB Using GOTHIC code for Wolsong NPP Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Bong-Jin; Jin, Dong-Sik; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Han, Sang-Koo; Choi, Hoon; Kho, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    A break in the piping between the steam generators and the turbine can lead to rapid loss of secondary circuit inventory. A break inside the turbine building leads to pressure differentials between different areas of the turbine building. In order to improve the environmental protection of various components within the turbine building, a wall has been erected which effectively separates the area in which these components are housed from the rest of the turbine building. Relief panels installed in the turbine building ensure that the pressure differential across the wall would be less than that required to jeopardize the wall integrity. The turbine building service wing is excluded from the scope of this analysis. It is further assumed that any doors in the heavy wall are as strong as the wall itself, with no gaps or leakage around the doors. For the full scope safety analysis of turbine building for Wolsong NPP unit 2, input decks for the various objectives, which can be read by GOTHIC 7.2a, are developed and tested for the steady state simulation. The input data files provide simplified representations of the geometric layout of the turbine building (volumes, dimensions, flow paths, doors, panels, etc.) and the performance characteristics of the various turbine building subsystems

  16. Integrity Analysis of Turbine Building for the MSLB Using GOTHIC code for Wolsong NPP Unit 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Bong-Jin; Jin, Dong-Sik; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Han, Sang-Koo [ACT, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hoon; Kho, Dong-Wook [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    A break in the piping between the steam generators and the turbine can lead to rapid loss of secondary circuit inventory. A break inside the turbine building leads to pressure differentials between different areas of the turbine building. In order to improve the environmental protection of various components within the turbine building, a wall has been erected which effectively separates the area in which these components are housed from the rest of the turbine building. Relief panels installed in the turbine building ensure that the pressure differential across the wall would be less than that required to jeopardize the wall integrity. The turbine building service wing is excluded from the scope of this analysis. It is further assumed that any doors in the heavy wall are as strong as the wall itself, with no gaps or leakage around the doors. For the full scope safety analysis of turbine building for Wolsong NPP unit 2, input decks for the various objectives, which can be read by GOTHIC 7.2a, are developed and tested for the steady state simulation. The input data files provide simplified representations of the geometric layout of the turbine building (volumes, dimensions, flow paths, doors, panels, etc.) and the performance characteristics of the various turbine building subsystems.

  17. Women's Center Volunteer Intern Program: Building Community While Advancing Social and Gender Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Margaret A.; Vlasnik, Amber L.

    2015-01-01

    This program description explores the purpose, structure, activities, and outcomes of the volunteer intern program at the Wright State University Women's Center. Designed to create meaningful, hands-on learning experiences for students and to advance the center's mission, the volunteer intern program builds community while advancing social and…

  18. A development of computer code for evaluating internal radiation dose through ingestion and inhalation pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Lee, Chang Woo; Choi, Yong Ho; Chun, Ki Jung; Kim, Kook Chan; Kim, Sang Bok; Kim, Jin Kyu

    1991-07-01

    The computer codes were developed to evaluate internal radiation dose when radioactive isotopes released from nuclear facilities are taken through ingestion and inhalation pathways. Food chain models and relevant data base representing the agricultural and social environment of Korea are set up. An equilibrium model-KFOOD, which can deal with routine releases from a nuclear facility and a dynamic model-ECOREA, which is suitable for the description of acute radioactivity release following nuclear accident. (Author)

  19. International Code Centres Network. Summary Report of the 3rd Biennial Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hyun-Kyung

    2013-07-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the third Technical Meeting of the International Code Centres Network held on 6-8 May in 2013. Ten experts from seven member states and four IAEA staff members attended the three-day meeting held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna to discuss issues on uncertainty estimates of theoretical atomic and molecular data. The report includes discussions on data issues, meeting conclusions and recommendations for the IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit. (author)

  20. International piping benchmarks: use of the simplified code PACE 2. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, J T; Spence, J [University of Strathclyde (United Kingdom); Blundell, C [Risley Nuclear Power Development Establishment, Central Technical Services, Risley, Warrington (United Kingdom); ed.

    1979-05-15

    This report compares the results obtained using the code PACE 2 with the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) International Piping Benchmark solutions. PACE 2 is designed to analyse systems of pipework using a simplified method which is economical of computer time and hence inexpensive. This low cost is not achieved without some loss of accuracy in the solution, but for most parts of a system this inaccuracy is acceptable and those sections of particular importance may be reanalysed using more precise methods in order to produce a satisfactory analysis of the complete system at reasonable cost.

  1. Second International Workshop on Software Engineering and Code Design in Parallel Meteorological and Oceanographic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    OKeefe, Matthew (Editor); Kerr, Christopher L. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This report contains the abstracts and technical papers from the Second International Workshop on Software Engineering and Code Design in Parallel Meteorological and Oceanographic Applications, held June 15-18, 1998, in Scottsdale, Arizona. The purpose of the workshop is to bring together software developers in meteorology and oceanography to discuss software engineering and code design issues for parallel architectures, including Massively Parallel Processors (MPP's), Parallel Vector Processors (PVP's), Symmetric Multi-Processors (SMP's), Distributed Shared Memory (DSM) multi-processors, and clusters. Issues to be discussed include: (1) code architectures for current parallel models, including basic data structures, storage allocation, variable naming conventions, coding rules and styles, i/o and pre/post-processing of data; (2) designing modular code; (3) load balancing and domain decomposition; (4) techniques that exploit parallelism efficiently yet hide the machine-related details from the programmer; (5) tools for making the programmer more productive; and (6) the proliferation of programming models (F--, OpenMP, MPI, and HPF).

  2. URBAN AGRICULTURE DIVERSITY IN BRITAIN: BUILDING RESILIENCE THROUGH INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCES

    OpenAIRE

    Gerrard , Ailbhe

    2010-01-01

    N° ISBN - 978-2-7380-1284-5; International audience; Diversity of urban agriculture (UA) in Britain could reduce food security impacts if a crisis occured in industrial food production systems. Industrial agriculture (IA) both causes and suffers from a lack of resilience: environmental, financial and structural. In Britain, the allotment system, previously an important form of UA, now grossly insufficient to replace the output of industrial agriculture, particularly in London. With these poin...

  3. Defining pediatric traumatic brain injury using International Classification of Diseases Version 10 Codes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vincy; Thurairajah, Pravheen; Colantonio, Angela

    2015-02-04

    Although healthcare administrative data are commonly used for traumatic brain injury (TBI) research, there is currently no consensus or consistency on the International Classification of Diseases Version 10 (ICD-10) codes used to define TBI among children and youth internationally. This study systematically reviewed the literature to explore the range of ICD-10 codes that are used to define TBI in this population. The identification of the range of ICD-10 codes to define this population in administrative data is crucial, as it has implications for policy, resource allocation, planning of healthcare services, and prevention strategies. The databases MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, Embase, PsychINFO, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were systematically searched. Grey literature was searched using Grey Matters and Google. Reference lists of included articles were also searched for relevant studies. Two reviewers independently screened all titles and abstracts using pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. A full text screen was conducted on articles that met the first screen inclusion criteria. All full text articles that met the pre-defined inclusion criteria were included for analysis in this systematic review. A total of 1,326 publications were identified through the predetermined search strategy and 32 articles/reports met all eligibility criteria for inclusion in this review. Five articles specifically examined children and youth aged 19 years or under with TBI. ICD-10 case definitions ranged from the broad injuries to the head codes (ICD-10 S00 to S09) to concussion only (S06.0). There was overwhelming consensus on the inclusion of ICD-10 code S06, intracranial injury, while codes S00 (superficial injury of the head), S03 (dislocation, sprain, and strain of joints and ligaments of head), and S05 (injury of eye and orbit) were only used by articles that examined head injury, none of which specifically examined children and

  4. A Bibliometric Review on Risk Management and Building Information Modeling for International Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Ganbat, Tsenguun; Chong, Heap-Yih; Liao, Pin-Chao; Wu, You-Di

    2018-01-01

    International construction is complicated and involves high risks. However, with the development of technological innovation, Building Information Modeling (BIM) emerged and seems to be able to address certain risks. To understand BIM applications in risk management for international construction, a state-of-the-art review is required. Therefore, this paper aims to identify the research trends and opportunities for risk management in BIM-enabled international construction by reviewing 526 pee...

  5. Darlington GS vacuum building - internal structures and foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huterer, J.; Brown, D.G.; Yanchula, S.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of the internal structure from initial concept to final design. Fundamental changes to the original configuration were precipitated by the action of large seismic forces acting on a top-heavy configuration. Prestressing was eliminated in deference to high humidity. Aspects of the elevated water tank's peripheral support beam are discussed vis-a-vis an adjacent slipforming operation, and practical construction limitations on steel placement. Also reviewed are the shortening of peripheral columns due to shrinkage and creep, and considerations of crack control for purposes of water-tightness. The authors justify the choice of stainless steel for fabrication of the siphon system's riser pipes. The foundation slab must resist the combined effects of vacuum pressure, hydrostatic uplift, and the seismic reactions of the internal structure and perimeter wall. The dependency of a key foundation component, the gallery roof slab, on the dome tendon layout is high-lighted; and aspects of its constructability are reviewed in light of congestion of vertical tendon anchorages, and of reinforcement. The design of the air-tight slab liner is reviewed, attention focusing on weld design under vacuum and accident temperature loads; on corrosion protection; and on the related construction access bulkhead - its ASME requirements and fabrication tolerances. (orig.)

  6. Building

    OpenAIRE

    Seavy, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Building for concrete is temporary. The building of wood and steel stands against the concrete to give form and then gives way, leaving a trace of its existence behind. Concrete is not a building material. One does not build with concrete. One builds for concrete. MARCH

  7. A SciCode web site: building bridges between owners and users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaver, C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    Web technology is a tool that is gaining in popularity. Properly used, it is a powerful tool that has tremendous potential for providing better communication. It can also be effective as a training tool, an information-sharing tool, and as a means of simplifying work load, and facilitating compliance with Company procedures. The issue is one of communication. The challenge facing many large or geographically-distributed companies is how to communicate information to their staff and to their customers. Procedures overseeing quality-assurance programs and commitment to ensuring the quality of products need to be communicated to customers. Equally important is customer feedback. This information from users becomes the kernel for future product development. The issue is even more important when speaking of scientific analysis computer programs (SciCodes). Regular ongoing communication between Primary Holders and End Users is essential in the development and use of SciCodes. Without this communication, quality assurance is at risk. Quality assurance processes are an integral part in developing any SciCode. End Users also have a role to play. Primary Holders keep End Users informed of improvements or new releases. End Users must ensure they act on this information. Equally important, End Users must communicate problems or suggestions to the Primary Holder to remedy or incorporate in new releases. In other words, quality assurance processes become most effective when both Primary Holder and End Users are involved. This requires communication. Web technology offers AECL a means of providing regular, ongoing communication between its scientific-code (SciCode) Primary Holders-Owner Branches and the End Users of these codes within and outside the Company. Using the experience we have gained by developing the Y2K SciCode Web sites, setting up online documentation systems, and incorporating lessons learned from the Y2K project we have developed a model that is geared to

  8. A SciCode web site: building bridges between owners and users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaver, C.

    2000-01-01

    Web technology is a tool that is gaining in popularity. Properly used, it is a powerful tool that has tremendous potential for providing better communication. It can also be effective as a training tool, an information-sharing tool, and as a means of simplifying work load, and facilitating compliance with Company procedures. The issue is one of communication. The challenge facing many large or geographically-distributed companies is how to communicate information to their staff and to their customers. Procedures overseeing quality-assurance programs and commitment to ensuring the quality of products need to be communicated to customers. Equally important is customer feedback. This information from users becomes the kernel for future product development. The issue is even more important when speaking of scientific analysis computer programs (SciCodes). Regular ongoing communication between Primary Holders and End Users is essential in the development and use of SciCodes. Without this communication, quality assurance is at risk. Quality assurance processes are an integral part in developing any SciCode. End Users also have a role to play. Primary Holders keep End Users informed of improvements or new releases. End Users must ensure they act on this information. Equally important, End Users must communicate problems or suggestions to the Primary Holder to remedy or incorporate in new releases. In other words, quality assurance processes become most effective when both Primary Holder and End Users are involved. This requires communication. Web technology offers AECL a means of providing regular, ongoing communication between its scientific-code (SciCode) Primary Holders-Owner Branches and the End Users of these codes within and outside the Company. Using the experience we have gained by developing the Y2K SciCode Web sites, setting up online documentation systems, and incorporating lessons learned from the Y2K project we have developed a model that is geared to

  9. International filiation in the new Civil and Commercial Code of Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana BEATRIZ SCOTTI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Argentine Private International Law omitted from yesteryear, legislate on international filiation, both in relation to jurisdiction and applicable law in matters of contesting paternity, establishment and recognition of parentage as regards the extraterritorial recognition of parental filiation. Indeed, given the particularities of this issue, the responses from our discipline were delayed. The Argentina did not have regulation of internal source, and conventional rules are scarce and inadequate for today.In comparative law and in a wide sector of the national and foreign doctrine, the tendency is to adopt a connecting element focused on the child: his domicile or habitual residence, with some nuances of different interpretation and potential accumulation of laws. Also on jurisdiction, we note a clear orientation towards the opening of forums available.In the present work, we try to provide some guidelines for coding this sensitive issue, which involves primarily the human rights of children, with special consideration the provisions of the recently adopted Civil and Commercial Code of Argentina, and the current context in which the techniques of assisted human reproduction claim a starring role, with serious and concrete effects on Private International Law.

  10. Teaching interpersonal skills in an international design-build course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jørgen Erik; Karhu, Markku; Christensen, Cecillia

    2011-01-01

    in that its chief purpose is to bring into focus the fact that students have to take an active part in the exercises as well as involve themselves in the interactive communication process. This is in stark contrast to a teacher giving lectures about communication, leaving the students passive listeners......The Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and Helsinki Metropolia University of Applied Sciences (Metropolia) started the CDIO concept in the autumn of 2008. The aim with this was to reform the B.Sc. courses to guide students to become better and more efficient engineers. The working conditions...... of an International Communication Course for the engineering students and to emphasize the importance of including a course like this into the CDIO concept, to be worked on in the process of further development. The course described in this paper is a strictly non-engineering course in communication; it is special...

  11. Building credibility in international banking and financial markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Poul Erik Flyvholm; Isaksson, Maria

    2008-01-01

    . There is also clear evidence that corporate advertising is in fact strongly focussed on communicating credibility with less than 10% of discourse and visuals devoted to credibility-free themes and issues. Research implications/limitations - The study takes a production perspective, using discourse......Purpose - The research draws a detailed picture of how international corporate banks and financial institutions approach image advertising to enhance impressions of their credibility. The purpose of the work is twofold, namely to demonstrate (1) how corporate credibility can be conceptualised...... appeal forms. A corpus of 74 print adverts was then analysed in order to establish how financial marketers use the appeal forms to strengthen their corporate reputations. The patterns of credibility appeals obtained were then linked to the supporting visuals to provide a fuller picture of the industry...

  12. Potential impacts of climate change on the built environment: ASHRAE climate zones, building codes and national energy efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Kumar, Jitendra [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M. [ORNL

    2017-10-01

    Statement of the Problem: ASHRAE releases updates to 90.1 “Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings” every three years resulting in a 3.7%-17.3% increase in energy efficiency for buildings with each release. This is adopted by or informs building codes in nations across the globe, is the National Standard for the US, and individual states elect which release year of the standard they will enforce. These codes are built upon Standard 169 “Climatic Data for Building Design Standards,” the latest 2017 release of which defines climate zones based on 8, 118 weather stations throughout the world and data from the past 8-25 years. This data may not be indicative of the weather that new buildings built today, will see during their upcoming 30-120 year lifespan. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Using more modern, high-resolution datasets from climate satellites, IPCC climate models (PCM and HadGCM), high performance computing resources (Titan) and new capabilities for clustering and optimization the authors briefly analyzed different methods for redefining climate zones. Using bottom-up analysis of multiple meteorological variables which were the subject matter, experts selected as being important to energy consumption, rather than the heating/cooling degree days currently used. Findings: We analyzed the accuracy of redefined climate zones, compared to current climate zones and how the climate zones moved under different climate change scenarios, and quantified the accuracy of these methods on a local level, at a national scale for the US. Conclusion & Significance: There is likely to be a significant annual, national energy and cost (billions USD) savings that could be realized by adjusting climate zones to take into account anticipated trends or scenarios in regional weather patterns.

  13. Recommendations for Adopting the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes Into U.S. Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldavini, Jessica; Taillie, Lindsey Smith

    2017-08-01

    In 1981, the World Health Organization adopted the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes ( International Code), with subsequent resolutions adopted since then. The International Code contributes to the safe and adequate provision of nutrition for infants by protecting and promoting breastfeeding and ensuring that human milk substitutes, when necessary, are used properly through adequate information and appropriate marketing and distribution. Despite the World Health Organization recommendations for all member nations to implement the International Code in its entirety, the United States has yet to take action to translate it into any national measures. In 2012, only 22.3% of infants in the United States met the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation of at least 6 months of exclusive breastfeeding. Countries adopting legislation reflecting the provisions of the International Code have seen increases in breastfeeding rates. This article discusses recommendations for translating the International Code into U.S. policy. Adopting legislation that implements, monitors, and enforces the International Code in its entirety has the potential to contribute to increased rates of breastfeeding in the United States, which can lead to improved health outcomes in both infants and breastfeeding mothers.

  14. INTDOS: a computer code for estimating internal radiation dose using recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.T.

    1981-09-01

    INTDOS is a user-oriented computer code designed to calculate estimates of internal radiation dose commitment resulting from the acute inhalation intake of various radionuclides. It is designed so that users unfamiliar with the details of such can obtain results by answering a few questions regarding the exposure case. The user must identify the radionuclide name, solubility class, particle size, time since exposure, and the measured lung burden. INTDOS calculates the fractions of the lung burden remaining at time, t, postexposure considering the solubility class and particle size information. From the fraction remaining in the lung at time, t, the quantity inhaled is estimated. Radioactive decay is accounted for in the estimate. Finally, effective committed dose equivalents to various organs and tissues of the body are calculated using inhalation committed dose factors presented by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This computer code was written for execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 computer and is written in Fortran IV. A flow chart and example calculations are discussed in detail to aid the user who is unfamiliar with computer operations

  15. Development of application program and building database to increase facilities for using the radiation effect assessment computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun Seok Ko; Young Min Kim; Suk-Hoon Kim; Dong Hoon Shin; Chang-Sun Kang

    2005-01-01

    The current radiation effect assessment system is required the skillful technique about the application for various code and high level of special knowledge classified by field. Therefore, as a matter of fact, it is very difficult for the radiation users' who don't have enough special knowledge to assess or recognize the radiation effect properly. For this, we already have developed the five Computer codes(windows-based), that is the radiation effect assessment system, in radiation utilizing field including the nuclear power generation. It needs the computer program that non-specialist can use the five computer codes to have already developed with ease. So, we embodied the A.I-based specialist system that can infer the assessment system by itself, according to the characteristic of given problem. The specialist program can guide users, search data, inquire of administrator directly. Conceptually, with circumstance which user to apply the five computer code may encounter actually, we embodied to consider aspects as follows. First, the accessibility of concept and data to need must be improved. Second, the acquirement of reference theory and use of corresponding computer code must be easy. Third, Q and A function needed for solution of user's question out of consideration previously. Finally, the database must be renewed continuously. Actually, to express this necessity, we develop the client program to organize reference data, to build the access methodology(query) about organized data, to load the visible expression function of searched data. And It is embodied the instruction method(effective theory acquirement procedure and methodology) to acquire the theory referring the five computer codes. It is developed the data structure access program(DBMS) to renew continuously data with ease. For Q and A function, it is embodied the Q and A board within client program because the user of client program can search the content of question and answer. (authors)

  16. Simulation of international standard problem no. 44 open tests using Melcor computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.M.; Cho, S.W.

    2001-01-01

    MELCOR 1.8.4 code has been employed to simulate the KAEVER test series of K123/K148/K186/K188 that were proposed as open experiments of International Standard Problem No.44 by OECD-CSNI. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of the MELCOR aerosol model which calculates the aerosol distribution and settlement in a containment. For this, thermal hydraulic conditions are simulated first for the whole test period and then the behavior of hygroscopic CsOH/CsI and unsoluble Ag aerosols, which are predominant activity carriers in a release into the containment, is compared between the experimental results and the code predictions. The calculation results of vessel atmospheric concentration show a good simulation for dry aerosol but show large difference for wet aerosol due to a data mismatch in vessel humidity and the hygroscopicity. (authors)

  17. Inventory of U.S.-led International Activities on Building Energy Efficiency Initial Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, Alison; Evans, Meredydd

    2010-04-01

    Several U.S. Government agencies promote energy efficiency in buildings internationally. The types and scope of activities vary by agency. Those with the largest role include the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the U.S. Department of State and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Both USAID and the Department of State have a substantial presence overseas, which may present some complementarities with the Department of Energy’s efforts to reach out to other countries. Generally speaking, USAID focuses on capacity building and policy issues; the Department of State focuses on broad diplomatic efforts and some targeted grants in support of these efforts, and EPA has more targeted roles linked to ENERGY STAR appliances and a few other activities. Several additional agencies are also involved in trade-related efforts to promote energy efficiency in buildings. These include the Department of Commerce, the Export-Import Bank, the Overseas Private Investment Corporation and the Trade and Development Agency (TDA). This initial synthesis report is designed to summarize broad trends and activities relating to international cooperation on energy efficiency in buildings, which can help the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in developing its own strategy in this area. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will develop a more complete synthesis report later in 2010 as it populates a database on international projects on building energy efficiency.

  18. Comparison Of Seismic Performance Of Erciş Cultural Center Building With Observed And Calculated By Turkish Earthquake Code-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Ali Dedecan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to review the validity of seismic assessment procedure given in the Turkish Earthquake Code by comparing the assessment results with real structures from Eastern Turkey, where the 2011 Van earthquake occurred. To test the analysis methods for a typically suitable structure, the cultural center building at Erciş with 3 stories, is selected. In order to compare the results of the three different analysis techniques, for an identical earthquake, the ground motion used in analysis was characterized by equivalent elastic earthquake spectra, which were developed from available time history at the nearest construction site. It was found that the damage predictions by using the by Turkish Earthquake Code procedures point out the different level of damages. But, it is concluded that nonlinear time history analysis calculated the best estimation of the damage observed in the site.

  19. Code for ethical international recruitment practices: the CGFNS alliance case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Franklin A; Bakhshi, Mukul; Dutka, Julia To; Phillips, Janice

    2016-06-30

    Projections indicate a global workforce shortage of approximately 4.3 million across the health professions. The need to ensure an adequate supply of health workers worldwide has created a context for the increased global migration of these professionals. The global trend in the migration of health professionals has given rise to the international recruitment industry to facilitate the passage of health workers from source to destination countries. This is particularly the case in the United States, where the majority of immigrant health professionals have come by way of the recruiting industry. This industry is largely unregulated in the United States as well as in many other countries, for which voluntary codes have been used as a means to increase transparency of the recruitment process, shape professional conduct, and mitigate harm to foreign-educated health workers. The CGFNS Alliance case study presented herein describes a multi-stakeholder effort in the United States to promote ethical recruitment practices. Such codes not only complement the WHO Global Code of Practice but are necessary to maximize the impact of these global standards on local settings. This case study offers both a historical perspective and a conceptual framework for examining the multiplicity of factors affecting the migration of human resources for health. The lessons learned provide critical insights into the factors pertaining to the relevancy and effectiveness of the WHO Code from the perspectives of both source and destination countries. This study provides a conceptual model for examining the usefulness of the WHO Code as well as how best to ensure its viability, sustainability, relevancy, and effectiveness in the global environment. This case study concludes with recommendations for evolving business models that need to be in place to strengthen the effectiveness of the WHO Code in the marketplace and to ensure its impact on the international recruitment industry in advancing

  20. ISO 639-1 and ISO 639-2: International Standards for Language Codes. ISO 15924: International Standard for Names of Scripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrum, John D.

    This paper describes two international standards for the representation of the names of languages. The first (ISO 639-1), published in 1988, provides two-letter codes for 136 languages and was produced primarily to meet terminological needs. The second (ISO 639-2) appeared in late 1998 and includes three-letter codes for 460 languages. This list…

  1. A self-organized internal models architecture for coding sensory-motor schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esaú eEscobar Juárez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive robotics research draws inspiration from theories and models on cognition, as conceived by neuroscience or cognitive psychology, to investigate biologically plausible computational models in artificial agents. In this field, the theoretical framework of Grounded Cognition provides epistemological and methodological grounds for the computational modeling of cognition. It has been stressed in the literature that textit{simulation}, textit{prediction}, and textit{multi-modal integration} are key aspects of cognition and that computational architectures capable of putting them into play in a biologically plausible way are a necessity.Research in this direction has brought extensive empirical evidencesuggesting that textit{Internal Models} are suitable mechanisms forsensory-motor integration. However, current Internal Models architectures show several drawbacks, mainly due to the lack of a unified substrate allowing for a true sensory-motor integration space, enabling flexible and scalable ways to model cognition under the embodiment hypothesis constraints.We propose the Self-Organized Internal ModelsArchitecture (SOIMA, a computational cognitive architecture coded by means of a network of self-organized maps, implementing coupled internal models that allow modeling multi-modal sensory-motor schemes. Our approach addresses integrally the issues of current implementations of Internal Models.We discuss the design and features of the architecture, and provide empirical results on a humanoid robot that demonstrate the benefits and potentialities of the SOIMA concept for studying cognition in artificial agents.

  2. Internal heat gain from different light sources in the building lighting systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suszanowicz Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available EU directives and the Construction Law have for some time required investors to report the energy consumption of buildings, and this has indeed caused low energy consumption buildings to proliferate. Of particular interest, internal heat gains from installed lighting affect the final energy consumption for heating of both public and residential buildings. This article presents the results of analyses of the electricity consumption and the luminous flux and the heat flux emitted by different types of light sources used in buildings. Incandescent light, halogen, compact fluorescent bulbs, and LED bulbs from various manufacturers were individually placed in a closed and isolated chamber, and the parameters for their functioning under identical conditions were recorded. The heat flux emitted by 1 W nominal power of each light source was determined. Based on the study results, the empirical coefficients of heat emission and energy efficiency ratios for different types of lighting sources (dependent lamp power and the light output were designated. In the heat balance of the building, the designated rates allow for precise determination of the internal heat gains coming from lighting systems using various light sources and also enable optimization of lighting systems of buildings that are used in different ways.

  3. Internal heat gain from different light sources in the building lighting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suszanowicz, Dariusz

    2017-10-01

    EU directives and the Construction Law have for some time required investors to report the energy consumption of buildings, and this has indeed caused low energy consumption buildings to proliferate. Of particular interest, internal heat gains from installed lighting affect the final energy consumption for heating of both public and residential buildings. This article presents the results of analyses of the electricity consumption and the luminous flux and the heat flux emitted by different types of light sources used in buildings. Incandescent light, halogen, compact fluorescent bulbs, and LED bulbs from various manufacturers were individually placed in a closed and isolated chamber, and the parameters for their functioning under identical conditions were recorded. The heat flux emitted by 1 W nominal power of each light source was determined. Based on the study results, the empirical coefficients of heat emission and energy efficiency ratios for different types of lighting sources (dependent lamp power and the light output) were designated. In the heat balance of the building, the designated rates allow for precise determination of the internal heat gains coming from lighting systems using various light sources and also enable optimization of lighting systems of buildings that are used in different ways.

  4. NARMER-1: a photon point-kernel code with build-up factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visonneau, Thierry; Pangault, Laurence; Malouch, Fadhel; Malvagi, Fausto; Dolci, Florence

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of NARMER-1, the new generation of photon point-kernel code developed by the Reactor Studies and Applied Mathematics Unit (SERMA) at CEA Saclay Center. After a short introduction giving some history points and the current context of development of the code, the paper exposes the principles implemented in the calculation, the physical quantities computed and surveys the generic features: programming language, computer platforms, geometry package, sources description, etc. Moreover, specific and recent features are also detailed: exclusion sphere, tetrahedral meshes, parallel operations. Then some points about verification and validation are presented. Finally we present some tools that can help the user for operations like visualization and pre-treatment.

  5. Marketing of breast-milk substitutes in Zambia: evaluation of compliance to the international regulatory code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funduluka, P; Bosomprah, S; Chilengi, R; Mugode, R H; Bwembya, P A; Mudenda, B

    2018-03-01

    We sought to assess the level of non-compliance with the International Code of Marketing breast-milk substitutes (BMS) and/or Statutory Instrument (SI) Number 48 of 2006 of the Laws of Zambia in two suburbs, Kalingalinga and Chelstone, in Zambia. This was a cross sectional survey. Shop owners (80), health workers (8) and mothers (214) were interviewed. BMS labels and advertisements (62) were observed. The primary outcome was mean non-compliance defined as the number of article violations divided by the total 'obtainable' violations. The score ranges from 0 to 1 with 0 representing no violations in all the articles and one representing violations in all the articles. A total of 62 BMS were assessed. The mean non-compliance score by manufacturers in terms of violations in labelling of BMS was 0.33 (SD = 0.28; 95% CI: 0.26, 0.40). These violations were mainly due to labels containing pictures or graphics representing an infant. 80 shops were also assessed with mean non-compliance score in respect of violations in tie-in-sales, special display, and contact with mothers at the shop estimated as 0.14 (SD = 0.14; 95% CI: 0.11, 0.18). Non-compliance with the Code and/or the local SI is high after 10 years of domesticating the Code.

  6. Heap leach cyanide irrigation and risk to wildlife: Ramifications for the international cyanide management code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, D B; Madden-Hallett, D M; Smith, G B; Gursansky, W

    2017-06-01

    Exposed cyanide-bearing solutions associated with gold and silver recovery processes in the mining industry pose a risk to wildlife that interact with these solutions. This has been documented with cyanide-bearing tailings storage facilities, however risks associated with heap leach facilities are poorly documented, monitored and audited. Gold and silver leaching heap leach facilities use cyanide, pH-stabilised, at concentrations deemed toxic to wildlife. Their design and management are known to result in exposed cyanide-bearing solutions that are accessible to and present a risk to wildlife. Monitoring of the presence of exposed solutions, wildlife interaction, interpretation of risks and associated wildlife deaths are poorly documented. This paper provides a list of critical monitoring criteria and attempts to predict wildlife guilds most at risk. Understanding the significance of risks to wildlife from exposed cyanide solutions is complex, involving seasonality, relative position of ponding, temporal nature of ponding, solution palatability, environmental conditions, in situ wildlife species inventory and provision of alternative drinking sources for wildlife. Although a number of heap leach operations are certified as complaint with the International Cyanide Management Code (Cyanide Code), these criteria are not considered by auditors nor has systematic monitoring regime data been published. Without systematic monitoring and further knowledge, wildlife deaths on heap leach facilities are likely to remain largely unrecorded. This has ramifications for those operations certified as compliance with the Cyanide Code. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. INDOSE V2.1.1, Internal Dosimetry Code Using Biokinetics Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, Ido

    2002-01-01

    A - Description of program or function: InDose is an internal dosimetry code developed to enable dose estimations using the new biokinetic models (presented in ICRP-56 to ICRP71) as well as the old ones. The code is written in FORTRAN90 and uses the ICRP-66 respiratory tract model and the ICRP-30 gastrointestinal tract model as well as the new and old biokinetic models. The code has been written in such a way that the user is able to change any of the parameters of any one of the models without recompiling the code. All the parameters are given in well annotated parameters files that the user may change and the code reads during invocation. As default, these files contains the values listed in ICRP publications. The full InDose code is planed to have three parts: 1) the main part includes the uptake and systemic models and is used to calculate the activities in the body tissues and excretion as a function of time for a given intake. 2) An optimization module for automatic estimation of the intake for a specific exposure case. 3) A module to calculate the dose due to the estimated intake. Currently, the code is able to perform only its main task (part 1) while the other two have to be done externally using other tools. In the future we would like to add these modules in order to provide a complete solution for the people in the laboratory. The code has been tested extensively to verify the accuracy of its results. The verification procedure was divided into three parts: 1) verification of the implementation of each model, 2) verification of the integrity of the whole code, and 3) usability test. The first two parts consisted of comparing results obtained with InDose to published results for the same cases. For example ICRP-78 monitoring data. The last part consisted of participating in the 3. EIE-IDA and assessing some of the scenarios provided in this exercise. These tests where presented in a few publications. It has been found that there is very good agreement

  8. Abstract feature codes: The building blocks of the implicit learning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Katharina; Esser, Sarah; Haider, Hilde

    2017-07-01

    According to the Theory of Event Coding (TEC; Hommel, Müsseler, Aschersleben, & Prinz, 2001), action and perception are represented in a shared format in the cognitive system by means of feature codes. In implicit sequence learning research, it is still common to make a conceptual difference between independent motor and perceptual sequences. This supposedly independent learning takes place in encapsulated modules (Keele, Ivry, Mayr, Hazeltine, & Heuer 2003) that process information along single dimensions. These dimensions have remained underspecified so far. It is especially not clear whether stimulus and response characteristics are processed in separate modules. Here, we suggest that feature dimensions as they are described in the TEC should be viewed as the basic content of modules of implicit learning. This means that the modules process all stimulus and response information related to certain feature dimensions of the perceptual environment. In 3 experiments, we investigated by means of a serial reaction time task the nature of the basic units of implicit learning. As a test case, we used stimulus location sequence learning. The results show that a stimulus location sequence and a response location sequence cannot be learned without interference (Experiment 2) unless one of the sequences can be coded via an alternative, nonspatial dimension (Experiment 3). These results support the notion that spatial location is one module of the implicit learning system and, consequently, that there are no separate processing units for stimulus versus response locations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. International symposium on standards and codes of practice in medical radiation dosimetry. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The development of radiation measurement standards by National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) and their dissemination to Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), cancer therapy centres and hospitals represent essential aspects of the radiation dosimetry measurement chain. Although the demands for accuracy in radiotherapy initiated the establishment of such measurement chains, similar traceable dosimetry procedures have been implemented, or are being developed, in other areas of radiation medicine (e.g. diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine), in radiation protection and in industrial applications of radiation. In the past few years the development of primary standards of absorbed dose to water in 60 Co for radiotherapy dosimetry has made direct calibrations in terms of absorbed dose to water available in many countries for the first time. Some laboratories have extended the development of these standards to high energy photon and electron beams and to low and medium energy x-ray beams. Other countries, however, still base their dosimetry for radiotherapy on air kerma standards. Dosimetry for conventional external beam radiotherapy was probably the field where standardized procedures adopted by medical physicists at hospitals were developed first. Those were related to exposure and air kerma standards. The recent development of Codes of Practice (or protocols) based on the concept of absorbed dose to water has led to changes in calibration procedures at hospitals. The International Code of Practice for Dosimetry Based on Standards of Absorbed Dose to Water (TRS 398) was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), World Health Organization (WHO), Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) and the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) and is expected to be adopted in many countries worldwide. It provides recommendations for the dosimetry of all types of beams (except neutrons) used in external radiotherapy and satisfies

  10. International symposium on standards and codes of practice in medical radiation dosimetry. Book of extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The development of radiation measurement standards by National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) and their dissemination to Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), cancer therapy centres and hospitals represent essential aspects of the radiation dosimetry measurement chain. Although the demands for accuracy in radiotherapy initiated the establishment of such measurement chains, similar traceable dosimetry procedures have been implemented, or are being developed, in other areas of radiation medicine (e.g. diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine), in radiation protection and in industrial applications of radiation. In the past few years the development of primary standards of absorbed dose to water in {sup 60}Co for radiotherapy dosimetry has made direct calibrations in terms of absorbed dose to water available in many countries for the first time. Some laboratories have extended the development of these standards to high energy photon and electron beams and to low and medium energy x-ray beams. Other countries, however, still base their dosimetry for radiotherapy on air kerma standards. Dosimetry for conventional external beam radiotherapy was probably the field where standardized procedures adopted by medical physicists at hospitals were developed first. Those were related to exposure and air kerma standards. The recent development of Codes of Practice (or protocols) based on the concept of absorbed dose to water has led to changes in calibration procedures at hospitals. The International Code of Practice for Dosimetry Based on Standards of Absorbed Dose to Water (TRS 398) was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), World Health Organization (WHO), Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) and the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) and is expected to be adopted in many countries worldwide. It provides recommendations for the dosimetry of all types of beams (except neutrons) used in external radiotherapy and

  11. International integral experiments databases in support of nuclear data and code validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J. Blair; Gado, Janos; Hunter, Hamilton; Kodeli, Ivan; Salvatores, Massimo; Sartori, Enrico

    2002-01-01

    The OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) has identified the need to establish international databases containing all the important experiments that are available for sharing among the specialists. The NSC has set up or sponsored specific activities to achieve this. The aim is to preserve them in an agreed standard format in computer accessible form, to use them for international activities involving validation of current and new calculational schemes including computer codes and nuclear data libraries, for assessing uncertainties, confidence bounds and safety margins, and to record measurement methods and techniques. The databases so far established or in preparation related to nuclear data validation cover the following areas: SINBAD - A Radiation Shielding Experiments database encompassing reactor shielding, fusion blanket neutronics, and accelerator shielding. ICSBEP - International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments Project Handbook, with more than 2500 critical configurations with different combination of materials and spectral indices. IRPhEP - International Reactor Physics Experimental Benchmarks Evaluation Project. The different projects are described in the following including results achieved, work in progress and planned. (author)

  12. Violations of the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes: Indonesia context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayana, Irma; Februhartanty, Judhiastuty; Parady, Vida A

    2017-01-01

    To measure compliance with the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes ('the Code') in Indonesia. The study was a cross-sectional survey using the Interagency Group on Breastfeeding Monitoring protocol. Public and private health facilities in six provinces on Java island in Indonesia. A total of 874 women (382 pregnant women and 492 breast-feeding mothers of infants below 6 months) and seventy-seven health workers were recruited from eighteen participating health facilities. The study also analysed a total of forty-four labels of breast-milk substitute products, twenty-seven television commercials for growing-up milk (for children >12 months) of nine brands and thirty-four print advertisements of fourteen brands. The study found that 20 % of the women had received advice and information on the use of breast-milk substitutes and 72 % had seen promotional materials for breast-milk substitutes. About 15 % reported receiving free samples and 16 % received gifts. Nearly a quarter of the health workers confirmed receiving visits from representatives of breast-milk substitute companies. Two health workers reported having received gifts from the companies. The most common labelling violations found were statements or visuals that discouraged breast-feeding and the absence of mention about the consideration of local climate in the expiration date. Violations of the Code by health workers, breast-milk substitute companies and their representatives were found in all provinces studied. A regular monitoring system should be in place to ensure improved compliance with and enforcement of the Code.

  13. Compliance status of product labels to the international code on marketing of breast milk substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergin, Ahmet; Hatipoğlu, Celile; Bozkurt, Ali Ihsan; Erdoğan, Aslı; Güler, Serdar; Ince, Gülberat; Kavurgacı, Nuran; Oz, Ahmet; Yeniay, Mustafa K

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the compliance status of product labels regarding Article 9 of the International Code on Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes (the Code) in Denizli province, Turkey. A cross-sectional study design was employed to determine the compliance status. The product labels were obtained from a convenience sample of five supermarkets, one store and 5 pharmacies in the City centre and district of Honaz. Using a data collection form prepared by previously published studies, data were collected between July 26, 2010 and August 06, 2010. Data collection form included 13 criteria. In addition, we checked the boxes for the availability of a Turkish written label. Forty product labels of 7 companies were reached and evaluated. These products consisted of 83.0% of the products marketed by these companies in Turkey. Thirty seven (92.5%) of the labels violated Article 9 of the Code in terms of one or more criteria. Thirty four (85.0%) of the labels had photos or pictures idealizing the use of infant formula. Nine (22.5%) had a photo, a picture or any representation of an infant, and five (12.5%) had text which idealize the use of infant formula or discouraging breastfeeding. Eight (20%) did not state that breastfeeding is the best. Four (10%) had a term such as 'similar to breast milk or human milk'. In conclusion, the majority of the product labels of breast milk substitutes marketed in our country violate the Code. It is appropriate that the Turkish Ministry of Health, medical organizations, companies, and NGOs work more actively to increase awareness of this issue.

  14. Confidence building on the total system performance assessment code, MASCOT-K for permanent disposal of HLW in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, S. G.; Kang, C. H

    2002-12-01

    To perform Total System Performance Assessment(TSPA) of a potential HLW repository, it is necessary to develop the TSPA code. KAERI has developed the one-dimensional PSA code MASCOT-K since 1997 and verified special modules dedicated for the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel. In the second R and D phase, MASCOT-K is once again verified as a part of the confidence building for TSPA. The AMBER code based on the totally different mathematical approach, compartment theory is used together with MASCOT-K to assess the annual individual doses for given K- and Q- scenarios. Results indicate that both AMBER and MASCOT-K simulate the annual individual doses to a potential biosphere. And the MASCOT-K is more flexible to describe the natural barrier such as a fracture for sensitivity studies. In the third R and D phase, MASCOT-K will be actively used to check whether the proposed KAERI reference disposal concept is solid or not.

  15. Confidence building on the total system performance assessment code, MASCOT-K for permanent disposal of HLW in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, S. G.; Kang, C. H.

    2002-12-01

    To perform Total System Performance Assessment(TSPA) of a potential HLW repository, it is necessary to develop the TSPA code. KAERI has developed the one-dimensional PSA code MASCOT-K since 1997 and verified special modules dedicated for the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel. In the second R and D phase, MASCOT-K is once again verified as a part of the confidence building for TSPA. The AMBER code based on the totally different mathematical approach, compartment theory is used together with MASCOT-K to assess the annual individual doses for given K- and Q- scenarios. Results indicate that both AMBER and MASCOT-K simulate the annual individual doses to a potential biosphere. And the MASCOT-K is more flexible to describe the natural barrier such as a fracture for sensitivity studies. In the third R and D phase, MASCOT-K will be actively used to check whether the proposed KAERI reference disposal concept is solid or not

  16. Building international collaborative capacity: contributions of community psychologists to a European network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramírez, Manuel; Paloma, Virginia; Suarez-Balcazar, Yolanda; Balcazar, Fabricio

    2009-09-01

    Europe is in the process of building a more participative, just, and inclusive European Union. The European Social Fund, which is an initiative developed to actively promote multinational partnerships that address pressing social issues, is a good example of the European transformation. This article describes the steps taken to develop and evaluate the activities of an international network promoting collaborative capacity among regional partners involved in the prevention of labor discrimination toward immigrants in three European countries-Spain, Belgium, and Italy. An international team of community psychologists proposed an empowering approach to assess the collaborative capacity of the network. This approach consisted of three steps: (1) establishing a collaborative relationship among partners, (2) building collaborative capacity, and (3) evaluating the collaborative capacity of the network. We conclude with lessons learned from the process and provide recommendations for addressing the challenges inherent in international collaboration processes.

  17. Building 1D resonance broadened quasilinear (RBQ) code for fast ions Alfvénic relaxations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Duarte, Vinicius; Berk, Herbert

    2016-10-01

    The performance of the burning plasma is limited by the confinement of superalfvenic fusion products, e.g. alpha particles, which are capable of resonating with the Alfvénic eigenmodes (AEs). The effect of AEs on fast ions is evaluated using a resonance line broadened diffusion coefficient. The interaction of fast ions and AEs is captured for cases where there are either isolated or overlapping modes. A new code RBQ1D is being built which constructs diffusion coefficients based on realistic eigenfunctions that are determined by the ideal MHD code NOVA. The wave particle interaction can be reduced to one-dimensional dynamics where for the Alfvénic modes typically the particle kinetic energy is nearly constant. Hence to a good approximation the Quasi-Linear (QL) diffusion equation only contains derivatives in the angular momentum. The diffusion equation is then one dimensional that is efficiently solved simultaneously for all particles with the equation for the evolution of the wave angular momentum. The evolution of fast ion constants of motion is governed by the QL diffusion equations which are adapted to find the ion distribution function.

  18. Application of the new International Code of Practice for dosimetry in diagnostic radiology to conventional exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Gonzalez, A.; Cardenas Herrera, J.; Walwyn Salas, G.; Machado, A.; Mora Machado, R. de la

    2008-01-01

    Full text: During the recent years, a policy for updating and installation of the X-ray equipment, specialized as well as conventional, have been carrying out, in Cuba. Conventional equipment has reached almost the whole primary level. Considering this situation, the quality control programs and clinical dosimetry have become even more important. Regarding the last one, an International Code of Practice for Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology had been published by the International Atomic Energy Agency in order to been used as a guide and to standardize the methodologies used to evaluate the patient exposure in radiodiagnostic. Taken into consideration the above reasons, an assessment of the aforementioned code of practice was done in order to choose the most feasible methodology to implement in the country. The evaluation was performed considering the lack of dosimetric equipment and medical physicists in this practice, in the interests of increasing the measurements scope to a large number of services as well as to standardize the methodology on a national scale. The present work shows the results obtained from the application of the new code of practice to conventional radiology exams in some medical institutions. Out of 3 on patients measurements methodologies described in the code of practice, the one of measurement of the incident air kerma was chosen. This methodology allow to the physicist to focus on the diagnostic equipment tests and to delegate the collection of the patient and exposure parameters data to the technicians, which make the increased of the patient and diagnostic departments sample, possible. The measurements were carried out in 2 hospital of the capital. The exams involved in the assessments were thorax PA, lumbar spine AP and lumbar spine LAT. In every diagnostic service, 25 patients were chosen on each projection. The weight and height average of the patient sample were 68 kg and 167 cm respectively. In the assessment were considered only

  19. International pressure vessels and piping codes and standards. Volume 2: Current perspectives; PVP-Volume 313-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.R.; Asada, Yasuhide; Adams, T.M.

    1995-01-01

    The topics in this volume include: (1) Recent or imminent changes to Section 3 design sections; (2) Select perspectives of ASME Codes -- Section 3; (3) Select perspectives of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Codes -- an international outlook; (4) Select perspectives of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Codes -- ASME Code Sections 3, 8 and 11; (5) Codes and Standards Perspectives for Analysis; (6) Selected design perspectives on flow-accelerated corrosion and pressure vessel design and qualification; (7) Select Codes and Standards perspectives for design and operability; (8) Codes and Standards perspectives for operability; (9) What's new in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code?; (10) A look at ongoing activities of ASME Sections 2 and 3; (11) A look at current activities of ASME Section 11; (12) A look at current activities of ASME Codes and Standards; (13) Simplified design methodology and design allowable stresses -- 1 and 2; (14) Introduction to Power Boilers, Section 1 of the ASME Code -- Part 1 and 2. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the individual papers

  20. Qualification and application of nuclear reactor accident analysis code with the capability of internal assessment of uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Ronaldo Celem

    2001-10-01

    This thesis presents an independent qualification of the CIAU code ('Code with the capability of - Internal Assessment of Uncertainty') which is part of the internal uncertainty evaluation process with a thermal hydraulic system code on a realistic basis. This is done by combining the uncertainty methodology UMAE ('Uncertainty Methodology based on Accuracy Extrapolation') with the RELAP5/Mod3.2 code. This allows associating uncertainty band estimates with the results obtained by the realistic calculation of the code, meeting licensing requirements of safety analysis. The independent qualification is supported by simulations with RELAP5/Mod3.2 related to accident condition tests of LOBI experimental facility and to an event which has occurred in Angra 1 nuclear power plant, by comparison with measured results and by establishing uncertainty bands on safety parameter calculated time trends. These bands have indeed enveloped the measured trends. Results from this independent qualification of CIAU have allowed to ascertain the adequate application of a systematic realistic code procedure to analyse accidents with uncertainties incorporated in the results, although there is an evident need of extending the uncertainty data base. It has been verified that use of the code with this internal assessment of uncertainty is feasible in the design and license stages of a NPP. (author)

  1. International common-cause failure data exchange. ICDE general coding guidelines - Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johanson, Gunnar; Werner, Wolfgang; Concepcion Capote, Marina; Kreuser, Albert; Rasmuson, Dale; Jonsson, Esther; Pereira Pagan, Begona; Tirira, Jorge; Morris, Ian; Morales, Rosa; Oxberry, Anna; Kreuser, Albert

    2004-01-01

    Several Member countries of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/NEA) have established the International Common-Cause Failure Data Exchange Project (ICDE Project) to encourage multilateral co-operation in the collection and analysis of data relating to Common-Cause Failure (CCF) events. The objectives of the ICDE Project are to: a) Collect and analyse CCF events over the long term so as to better understand such events, their causes, and their prevention; b) Generate qualitative insights into the root causes of CCF events which can then be used to derive approaches or mechanisms for their prevention or for mitigating their consequences; c) Establish a mechanism for the efficient feedback of experience gained in connection with CCF phenomena, including the development of defences against their occurrence, such as indicators for risk based inspections; and d) Record event attributes to facilitate quantification of CCF frequencies when so decided by the Project Working Group. The ICDE Project is envisaged to comprise all possible events of interest, including both complete and partial ICDE events. The ICDE Project will cover the key components of the main safety systems. Presently, the components listed below are included in the ICDE Project. Data have been collected for the six first components in the list: Centrifugal pumps, Diesel generators, Motor operated valves, Safety relief valves/power operated relief valves, Check valves, Batteries, Level measurement, Breakers, Control rod drive assemblies. Others will be added to this list later on. In this component coding guidelines, explanations on the ICDE General coding format are given. The guide reflects present experience with the data format and with the collected data. Further interpretations and clarifications will be added, should they become necessary. For each component analysed in the ICDE project, separate coding guidance is provided in the appendices

  2. International Common Cause Failure Data Exchange (ICDE). General Coding Guidelines - Updated Version, October 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johanson, Gunnar; Werner, Wolfgang; Capote, Marina Concepcion; Kreuser, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Several OECD/NEA member countries have established the International Common-Cause Failure Data Exchange Project ('ICDE Project') to encourage multilateral cooperation in the collection and analysis of data relating to Common-Cause Failure (CCF) events. The objectives of the ICDE Project are to: a) Collect and analyse CCF events over the long term so as to better understand such events, their causes, and their prevention. b) Generate qualitative insights into the root causes of CCF events which can then be used to derive approaches or mechanisms for their prevention or for mitigating their consequences. c) Establish a mechanism for the efficient feedback of experience gained in connection with CCF phenomena, including the development of defenses against their occurrence, such as indicators for risk based inspections. d) Record event attributes to facilitate quantification of CCF frequencies when so decided by the Project Working Group. The ICDE Project is envisaged to comprise all possible events of interest, including both complete and partial ICDE events. The ICDE Project will cover the key components of the main safety systems. Presently, the components listed below are included in the ICDE Project. Data have been collected for the six first components in the list: Centrifugal pumps, Diesel generators, Motor operated valves, Safety relief valves/power operated relief valves, Check valves, Batteries, Level measurement, Breakers, Control rod drive assemblies. Others will be added to this list later on. In this component coding guidelines, explanations on the ICDE general coding format are given. The guide reflects present experience with the data format and with the collected data. Further interpretations and clarifications will be added, should they become necessary. For each component analysed in the ICDE project, separate coding guidance is provided in the appendices ICDECG 01-06, specifying details relevant to the respective components

  3. Should International Classification of Diseases codes be used to survey hospital-acquired pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfensberger, A; Meier, A H; Kuster, S P; Mehra, T; Meier, M-T; Sax, H

    2018-05-01

    As surveillance of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is very resource intensive, alternatives for HAP surveillance are needed urgently. This study compared HAP rates according to routine discharge diagnostic codes of the International Classification of Diseases, 10 th Revision (ICD-10; ICD-HAP) with HAP rates according to the validated surveillance definitions of the Hospitals in Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance (HELICS/IPSE; HELICS-HAP) by manual retrospective re-evaluation of patient records. The positive predictive value of ICD-HAP for HELICS-HAP was 0.35, and sensitivity was 0.59. Therefore, the currently available ICD-10-based routine discharge data do not allow reliable identification of patients with HAP. Copyright © 2018 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A2 Code - Internal Accident Report. Does it ring a bell?

    CERN Document Server

    HSE Unit

    2015-01-01

    A2 Code* - It is under this designation (used by the CERN community) that the form for internal accident reports is hidden. More specifically it refers to the CERN Safety Code A2 “Reporting of Accidents and Near Misses” (EDMS: 335502 or here via the official Safety Rules website).   Which events should be declared? All accidental events, which cause or could have caused injuries or damage to property or the environment, must be reported especially if they involve: a) a member of the personnel, visitor, temporary labourer or contractor if it occurred on the CERN site or between sites. b) a member of the personnel if it occurred while commuting or during duty travel. Who can fill in the report? The reporting of occurred accidents or near misses should be made by the person involved or by any direct or indirect witness of the event as soon as possible after the event. Contribute to the improvement of Safety within the Organizatio...

  5. Active Fault Near-Source Zones Within and Bordering the State of California for the 1997 Uniform Building Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, M.D.; Toppozada, Tousson R.; Cao, T.; Cramer, C.H.; Reichle, M.S.; Bryant, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    The fault sources in the Project 97 probabilistic seismic hazard maps for the state of California were used to construct maps for defining near-source seismic coefficients, Na and Nv, incorporated in the 1997 Uniform Building Code (ICBO 1997). The near-source factors are based on the distance from a known active fault that is classified as either Type A or Type B. To determine the near-source factor, four pieces of geologic information are required: (1) recognizing a fault and determining whether or not the fault has been active during the Holocene, (2) identifying the location of the fault at or beneath the ground surface, (3) estimating the slip rate of the fault, and (4) estimating the maximum earthquake magnitude for each fault segment. This paper describes the information used to produce the fault classifications and distances.

  6. Trust Management - Building Trust for International Cross Disciplinary Collaboration on Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, K. V.; Gurney, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Successful communication and collaboration entails mutual understanding, and transfer, of information. The risk of misunderstanding and/or miscommunication between collaborating groups is tackled in different ways around the globe; some are well documented whereas others may be unknown outside particular groups, whether defined geographically or by specialism. For example; in some countries legally binding contracts define the terms of collaboration. Some regions place greater emphasis on developing trust relationships, and sometimes an official agreement is implied, such as many electronic data transfers on the web. International collaboration on climate change increasingly involves electronic data exchange (e.g. open access publications, shared documents, data repositories etc.) and with this increased reliance on electronic data a need has arisen for scientists to collaborate both internationally and cross-disciplinarily particularly with information technology and data management specialists. Trust of data and metadata on the internet (e.g. privacy, legitimacy etc.) varies, possibly due to a lack of internationally agreed standards for data governance and management, leaving many national, regional and institutional practices tailored to the needs of that group only. It is proposed that building trust relationships between cross-disciplinary and international groups could help facilitate further communication, understanding and benefits from the relationship, while still maintaining independence as separate groups. Complex international cross-disciplinary group relationship dynamics are not easily mapped and producing a set of trust building rules that can be applied to any current and future collaboration with equal validity may be unfeasible. An alternative to such a set of rules may be found in a Trust Manager, whose role is to improve mutually beneficial knowledge exchange between groups, build trust and increase future collaborative potential. This

  7. International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes: Building and Sustaining Capacity. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the conference are to: • Review developments in the global status of HRD since the 2010 international conference; • Emphasize the role of human resources and capacity building programmes at the national and organizational level for achieving safe, secure and sustainable nuclear power programmes; • Discuss the importance of building competence in nuclear safety and security; • Provide a forum for information exchange on national, as well as international, policies and practices; • Share key elements and best practices related to the experience of Member States that are introducing, operating or expanding nuclear power programmes; • Highlight the practices and issues regarding HRD at the organizational and national level; • Highlight education and training programmes and practices; • Emphasize the role of nuclear knowledge management for knowledge transfer and HRD; and • Elaborate on the role and scope of various knowledge networks

  8. International vs. domestic technology in-licensing: How do Chinese firms build their technological capabilities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ying; Wang, Yuandi

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the different impacts of international and domestic technology in-licensing for Chinese firms as licensees on their technological capability building. The evolution of firms in developing countries and development of their technological capabilities has received increasing...... attention in the extant literature on both innovation management and international business. However, little has been done to reach a clear understanding on whether Chinese firms can benefit from international or domestic technology in-licensing and improve their own technological capabilities. This study......, therefore, pursues this endeavor by using a unique dataset from China State of Intellectual Property Office (SIPO) containing information on large Chinese firms. The findings of this empirical study indicate that firms with international technology in-licensing possess stronger technological innovation...

  9. Comparative Education and Research Capacity Building: Reflections on International Transfer and the Significance of Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Crossley

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen a resurgence of interest in comparative and international education, along with a fundamental reconceptualisation of this distinctive multidisciplinary field of study. The nature and significance of these developments are explored with particular reference to their implications for broader research capacity building initiatives worldwide. In doing so, a critique of the international transfer of globally dominant research modalities and strategies is presented--along with arguments for increased attention to context sensitivity in both international development cooperation and educational research in general. Illustrative examples that support these arguments are drawn from the author's own research, from an analysis of emergent educational policy debates in the UK, and from related studies being carried out in Malaysia. In concluding, the strategic role of comparative research traditions and perspectives in a rapidly globalizing world is highlighted, while supporting the promotion of new initiative and research centres for comparative and international education.

  10. Modelling of internal structure in seismic analysis of a PHWR building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, G.R.; Vaze, K.K.; Kushawaha, H.S.; Ingle, R.K.; Subramanian, K.V.

    1991-01-01

    Seismic analysis of complex and large structures, consisting of thick shear walls, such as Reactor Building is very involved and time consuming. It is a standard practice to model the structure as a stick model to predict reasonably the dynamic behaviour of the structure. It is required to determine approximate equivalent sectional properties of Internal Structure for representation in the stick model. The restraint to warping can change the stress distribution thus affecting the centre of rigidity and torsional inertia, Hence, standard formulae does not hold good for determination of sectional properties of the Internal Structure. In this case the equivalent sectional properties for the Internal Structure are calculated using a Finite Element Model (FEM) of the Internal Structure and applying unit horizontal forces in each direction. A 3-D stick model is developed using the guidelines. Using the properties calculated by FEM and also by standard formulae, the responses of the 3-D stick model are compared. (J.P.N.)

  11. Representation of bidirectional ground motions for design spectra in building codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jonathan P.; Abrahamson, Norman A.; Atkinson, Gail M.; Beker, Jack W.; Boore, David M.; Bozorgnia, Yousef; Campbell, Kenneth W.; Comartin, Craig D.; Idriss, I.M.; Lew, Marshall; Mehrain, Michael; Moehle, Jack P.; Naeim, Farzad; Sabol, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 NEHRP Provisions modified the definition of horizontal ground motion from the geometric mean of spectral accelerations for two components to the peak response of a single lumped mass oscillator regardless of direction. These maximum-direction (MD) ground motions operate under the assumption that the dynamic properties of the structure (e.g., stiffness, strength) are identical in all directions. This assumption may be true for some in-plan symmetric structures, however, the response of most structures is dominated by modes of vibration along specific axes (e.g., longitudinal and transverse axes in a building), and often the dynamic properties (especially stiffness) along those axes are distinct. In order to achieve structural designs consistent with the collapse risk level given in the NEHRP documents, we argue that design spectra should be compatible with expected levels of ground motion along those principal response axes. The use of MD ground motions effectively assumes that the azimuth of maximum ground motion coincides with the directions of principal structural response. Because this is unlikely, design ground motions have lower probability of occurrence than intended, with significant societal costs. We recommend adjustments to make design ground motions compatible with target risk levels.

  12. Improving the coding and classification of ambulance data through the application of International Classification of Disease 10th revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, Kate; Morgans, Amee; Smith, Karen; Livingston, Michael; Dietze, Paul

    2014-02-01

    This paper aims to examine whether an adaptation of the International Classification of Disease (ICD) coding system can be applied retrospectively to final paramedic assessment data in an ambulance dataset with a view to developing more fine-grained, clinically relevant case definitions than are available through point-of-call data. Over 1.2 million case records were extracted from the Ambulance Victoria data warehouse. Data fields included dispatch code, cause (CN) and final primary assessment (FPA). Each FPA was converted to an ICD-10-AM code using word matching or best fit. ICD-10-AM codes were then converted into Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC). CN was aligned with the ICD-10-AM codes for external cause of morbidity and mortality. The most accurate results were obtained when ICD-10-AM codes were assigned using information from both FPA and CN. Comparison of cases coded as unconscious at point-of-call with the associated paramedic assessment highlighted the extra clinical detail obtained when paramedic assessment data are used. Ambulance paramedic assessment data can be aligned with ICD-10-AM and MDC with relative ease, allowing retrospective coding of large datasets. Coding of ambulance data using ICD-10-AM allows for comparison of not only ambulance service users but also with other population groups. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC? There is no reliable and standard coding and categorising system for paramedic assessment data contained in ambulance service databases. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD? This study demonstrates that ambulance paramedic assessment data can be aligned with ICD-10-AM and MDC with relative ease, allowing retrospective coding of large datasets. Representation of ambulance case types using ICD-10-AM-coded information obtained after paramedic assessment is more fine grained and clinically relevant than point-of-call data, which uses caller information before ambulance attendance. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTITIONERS? This paper describes

  13. Strategies for Promoting Green Building Technologies Adoption in the Construction Industry—An International Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Ping Chuen Chan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Because green building technologies (GBTs adoption is a promising way of ameliorating the sustainability performance of buildings, GBTs are receiving increased interest in the global construction community. The barriers to the adoption of GBTs, such as higher cost and lack of awareness, further indicate that proper strategies need to be devised for promoting the wider adoption of GBTs in buildings development. However, there exist limited empirical studies identifying the strategies for promoting GBTs adoption in the construction industry. This study aims to identify the strategies that are important for promoting GBTs adoption in construction. After a comprehensive literature review to identify strategies for the promotion of GBTs adoption, empirical data were gleaned through a questionnaire survey with 104 green building experts around the world. The analysis results validated the importance of all of the 12 promotion strategies used for the study. Green building experts from different countries and with different backgrounds had significant agreement on the relative importance ranking of the promotion strategies. Furthermore, “financial and further market-based incentives for GBTs adopters”, “availability of better information on cost and benefits of GBTs”, “mandatory governmental policies and regulations”, and “green rating and labeling” were identified as the top four important promotion strategies. The research findings provide a valuable reference to assist practitioners and policy makers in developing practical strategies for promoting GBTs adoption to eventually achieve the sustainable development of buildings. From the perspective of international experts, this study adds to the green building literature by offering empirical evidence of the important strategies for promoting GBTs adoption in the construction industry. Future research will investigate the interrelationships among the promotion strategies and their

  14. Participation in the international comparison of probabilistic consequence assessment codes organized by OECD/NEA and CEC. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, J.

    1994-02-01

    Probabilistic Consequence Assessment (PCA) methods are exploited not only in risk evaluation but also to study alternative design features, reactor siting recommendations and to obtain acceptable dose criteria by the radiation safety authorities. The models are programmed into computer codes for these kind of assessment. To investigate the quality and competence of different models, OECD/NEA and CEC organized the international code comparison exercise, which was participated by the organizations from 15 countries. There were seven codes participating in the exercise. The objectives of the code comparison exercise were to compare the results by the codes, to contribute to PCA code quality assurance, to harmonize the codes, to provide a forum for discussion on various approaches and to produce the report on the exercise. The project started in 1991 and the results of the calculations were completed in autumn 1992. The international report consists of two parts: the Overview Report for decision makers and the supporting detailed Technical Report. The results of the project are reviewed as an user of the ARANO-programme of VTT and trends of it's further development are indicated in this report. (orig.) (11 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.)

  15. Good collaborative practice: reforming capacity building governance of international health research partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Claire Leonie; Shaw, David; Sprumont, Dominique; Sankoh, Osman; Tanner, Marcel; Elger, Bernice

    2018-01-08

    In line with the policy objectives of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, this commentary seeks to examine the extent to which provisions of international health research guidance promote capacity building and equitable partnerships in global health research. Our evaluation finds that governance of collaborative research partnerships, and in particular capacity building, in resource-constrained settings is limited but has improved with the implementation guidance of the International Ethical Guidelines for Health-related Research Involving Humans by The Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS) (2016). However, more clarity is needed in national legislation, industry and ethics guidelines, and regulatory provisions to address the structural inequities and power imbalances inherent in international health research partnerships. Most notably, ethical partnership governance is not supported by the principal industry ethics guidelines - the International Conference on Harmonization Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceutical for Human Use (ICH) Good Clinical Practice (ICH-GCP). Given the strategic value of ICH-GCP guidelines in defining the role and responsibility of global health research partners, we conclude that such governance should stipulate the minimal requirements for creating an equitable environment of inclusion, mutual learning, transparency and accountability. Procedurally, this can be supported by i) shared research agenda setting with local leadership, ii) capacity assessments, and iii) construction of a memorandum of understanding (MoU). Moreover, the requirement of capacity building needs to be coordinated amongst partners to support good collaborative practice and deliver on the public health goals of the research enterprise; improving local conditions of health and reducing global health inequality. In this respect, and in order to develop consistency between sources of research governance, ICH

  16. Comparison of european computer codes relative to the aerosol behavior in PWR containment buildings during severe core damage accidents. (Modelling of steam condensation on the particles)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunz, H.; Dunbar, L.H.; Fermandjian, J.; Lhiaubet, G.

    1987-11-01

    An aerosol code comparison exercise was performed within the framework of the Commission of European Communities (Division of Safety of Nuclear Installations). This exercise, focused on the process of steam condensation onto the aerosols occurring in PWR containment buildings during severe core damage accidents, has allowed to understand the discrepancies between the results obtained. These discrepancies are due, in particular, to whether the curvature effect is modelled or not in the codes

  17. Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 as a Commercial Building Energy Code in Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Halverson, Mark A.; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

    2002-09-30

    The state of Michigan is considering adpoting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 as its commercial building energy code. In an effort to evaluate whether or not this is an appropraite code for the state, the potential benefits and costs of adopting this standard are considered. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits are assessed. The energy simulation and economic results suggest that adopting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 would provide postitive net benefits to the state relative to the building and design requirements currently in place.

  18. Building an International Geosciences Network (i-GEON) for cyberinfrastructure-based Research and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seber, D.; Baru, C.

    2007-05-01

    The Geosciences Network (GEON) project is a collaboration among multiple institutions to develop a cyberinfrastructure (CI) platform in support of integrative geoscience research activities. Taking advantage of the state-of-the-art information technology resources GEON researchers are building a cyberinfrastructure designed to enable data sharing, resource discovery, semantic data integration, high-end computations and 4D visualization in an easy-to-use web-based environment. The cyberinfrastructure in GEON is required to support an inherently distributed system, since the scientists, who are users as well as providers of resources, are themselves distributed. International collaborations are a natural extension of GEON; the geoscience research requires strong international collaborations. The goals of the i-GEON activities are to collaborate with international partners and jointly build a cyberinfrastructure for the geosciences to enable collaborative work environments. International partners can participate in GEON efforts, establish GEON nodes at their universities, institutes, or agencies and also contribute data and tools to the network. Via jointly run cyberinfrastructure workshops, the GEON team also introduces students, scientists, and research professionals to the concepts of IT-based geoscience research and education. Currently, joint activities are underway with the Chinese Academy of Sciences in China, the GEO Grid project at AIST in Japan, and the University of Hyderabad in India (where the activity is funded by the Indo-US Science and Technology Forum). Several other potential international partnerships are under consideration. iGEON is open to all international partners who are interested in working towards the goal of data sharing, managing and integration via IT-based platforms. Information about GEON and its international activities can be found at http:www.geongrid.org/

  19. Comparison of computer codes relative to the aerosol behavior in the reactor containment building during severe core damage accidents in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermandjian, J.; Bunz, H.; Dunbar, I.; Gauvain, J.; Ricchena, R.

    1986-01-01

    The present study concerns a comparative exercise, performed within the framework of the Commission of the European Communities, of the computer codes (AEROSIM-M, UK; AEROSOLS/B1, France; CORRAL-2, CEC and NAUA Mod5, Germany) used in order to assess the aerosol behavior in the reactor containment building during severe core damage accidents in a PWR. Topics considered in this paper include aerosols, containment buildings, reactor safety, fission product release, reactor cores, meltdown, and monitoring

  20. Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 as a Commercial Building Energy Code in Illinois Jurisdictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.; Friedrich, Michele

    2002-05-01

    ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 was developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for energy efficienty design and construction of new commercial buildings. This report assesses the benefits and costs of adopting this standard as the building energy code in Illinois. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using BLAST combined with a Life-Cycle Cost approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits.

  1. Catalytic allylic oxidation of internal alkenes to a multifunctional chiral building block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayeh, Liela; Le, Phong Q.; Tambar, Uttam K.

    2017-07-01

    The stereoselective oxidation of hydrocarbons is one of the most notable advances in synthetic chemistry over the past fifty years. Inspired by nature, enantioselective dihydroxylations, epoxidations and other oxidations of unsaturated hydrocarbons have been developed. More recently, the catalytic enantioselective allylic carbon-hydrogen oxidation of alkenes has streamlined the production of pharmaceuticals, natural products, fine chemicals and other functional materials. Allylic functionalization provides a direct path to chiral building blocks with a newly formed stereocentre from petrochemical feedstocks while preserving the olefin functionality as a handle for further chemical elaboration. Various metal-based catalysts have been discovered for the enantioselective allylic carbon-hydrogen oxidation of simple alkenes with cyclic or terminal double bonds. However, a general and selective allylic oxidation using the more common internal alkenes remains elusive. Here we report the enantioselective, regioselective and E/Z-selective allylic oxidation of unactivated internal alkenes via a catalytic hetero-ene reaction with a chalcogen-based oxidant. Our method enables non-symmetric internal alkenes to be selectively converted into allylic functionalized products with high stereoselectivity and regioselectivity. Stereospecific transformations of the resulting multifunctional chiral building blocks highlight the potential for rapidly converting internal alkenes into a broad range of enantioenriched structures that can be used in the synthesis of complex target molecules.

  2. Proposal to consistently apply the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP) to names of the oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (cyanobacteria), including those validly published under the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN)/International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants (ICN), and proposal to change Principle 2 of the ICNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinevich, Alexander V

    2015-03-01

    This taxonomic note was motivated by the recent proposal [Oren & Garrity (2014) Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 64, 309-310] to exclude the oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (cyanobacteria) from the wording of General Consideration 5 of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP), which entails unilateral coverage of these prokaryotes by the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN; formerly the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, ICBN). On the basis of key viewpoints, approaches and rules in the systematics, taxonomy and nomenclature of prokaryotes it is reciprocally proposed to apply the ICNP to names of cyanobacteria including those validly published under the ICBN/ICN. For this purpose, a change to Principle 2 of the ICNP is proposed to enable validation of cyanobacterial names published under the ICBN/ICN rules. © 2015 IUMS.

  3. Building a "National Civilization" at Home and Abroad: International Students and Changing U.S. Political Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Fanta

    2011-01-01

    The research study examines the relationship of international students to changing U.S. political economy. The research attempts to move international students from the periphery to the center of understanding the changing U.S. political economy in the twenty-first century. I argue that international students play an important role in building a…

  4. Training program for energy conservation in new building construction. Volume III. Energy conservation technology for plan examiners and code administrators. Energy Conservation Technology Series 200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    Under the sponsorship of the United States Department of Energy, a Model Code for Energy Conservation in New Building Construction has been developed by those national organizations primarily concerned with the development and promulgation of model codes. The technical provisions are based on ASHRAE Standard 90-75 and are intended for use by state and local officials. The subject of regulation of new building construction to assure energy conservation is recognized as one in which code officials have not had previous exposure. It was also determined that application of the model code would be made at varying levels by officials with both a specific requirement for knowledge and a differing degree of prior training in the state-of-the-art. Therefore, a training program and instructional materials were developed for code officials to assist them in the implementation and enforcement of energy efficient standards and codes. The training program for Energy Conservation Tehnology for Plan Examiners and Code Administrators (ECT Series 200) is presented.

  5. Building midwifery educator capacity using international partnerships: Findings from a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Florence; Dawson, Angela; Homer, Caroline S E

    2017-07-01

    Midwifery educators play a critical role in strengthening the midwifery workforce globally, including in low and lower-middle income countries (LMIC) to ensure that midwives are adequately prepared to deliver quality midwifery care. The most effective approach to building midwifery educator capacity is not always clear. The aim of this study was to determine how one capacity building approach in Papua New Guinea (PNG) used international partnerships to improve teaching and learning. A qualitative exploratory case study design was used to explore the perspectives of 26 midwifery educators working in midwifery education institutions in PNG. Seven themes were identified which provide insights into the factors that enable and constrain midwifery educator capacity building. The study provides insights into strategies which may aid institutions and individuals better plan and implement international midwifery partnerships to strengthen context-specific knowledge and skills in teaching. Further research is necessary to assess how these findings can be transferred to other contexts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Bibliometric Review on Risk Management and Building Information Modeling for International Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsenguun Ganbat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available International construction is complicated and involves high risks. However, with the development of technological innovation, Building Information Modeling (BIM emerged and seems to be able to address certain risks. To understand BIM applications in risk management for international construction, a state-of-the-art review is required. Therefore, this paper aims to identify the research trends and opportunities for risk management in BIM-enabled international construction by reviewing 526 peer-reviewed journal articles for the years 2007–2017. Thus five steps of bibliometric analysis were conducted based on the proposed frameworks of BIM risk management in international construction (BIM-RM-INTL. The results show that the popularization of BIM not only attracts all stakeholders’ interests but also brings some risks. For example, financial factors are hard to detect and control through BIM, information loss during transmission stands out, and BIM has no unified standards and regulations for international construction. The research has mapped existing research results and their relationships for future risk management in BIM-enabled international construction.

  7. Design and operation of ventilation in low energy residences – A survey on code requirements and building reality from six European countries and China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    del Carmen Bocanegra-Yanez, Maria; Rojas, Gabriel; Zukowska-Tejsen, Daria

    involved in the Annex. There were two main objectives, firstly, to describe and analyse a transition between actual requirements (national building codes and standards) and current practice. Secondly, to investigate current barriers and challenges regarding installation of mechanical ventilation......One of the key objectives of the IEA Annex 68 research programme entitled “Indoor Air Quality Design and Control in Low Energy Residential Buildings” is to provide a generic guideline for the design and operation of ventilation in residential buildings. Modern and refurnished domestic buildings...

  8. University Education Of Specialists In International Affairs As A Way Of Passing Cultural Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina M. Shepeleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the cultural code approach to the process of higher education requires global understanding and awareness of the integrity of academic studies at the university, comprising both professional and humanitarian disciplines, such as philosophy, history, ethnography, psychology etc. International communication playing the key role in the development of the world community presupposes systemic and interdisciplinary approach to solving problems and facing challenges arising in the modern times. Language is the most essential component of communication whose organization is based on the principles of interaction, cooperation and politeness ensuring the molding of communicative norms of social behavior. Compliance with these norms creates conditions for effective exchange of opinions, shapes an environment for positive interaction and implementation of communicative strategies by participants in verbal disquisition. On the other hand, national pictures of the world, implanted in the conscience of a child by their family and society serve as natural limits to international communication and understanding cross-cultural peculiarities. They often prevent people from reaching rapport with their foreign counterparts, as their worldviews come into contradiction. National and cultural distinctions cause main differences between systems, norms and uses. National stereotypes, focusing on most typical features of a nation, could serve as a tool for overcoming this discrepancy. Holistic approach to studying a foreign language as an integral part of the culture, alongside with other humanitarian and social disciplines, involves a deep insight into core mental and spiritual values of the society. So, the guiding role of the university teacher consists in dealing with professional issues while addressing the wide cultural content and intercultural objectives.

  9. UNIVERSITY EDUCATION OF SPECIALISTS IN INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS AS A WAY OF PASSING CULTURAL CODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina M. Shepeleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the cultural code approach to the process of higher education requires global understanding and awareness of the integrity of academic studies at the university, comprising both professional and humanitarian disciplines, such as philosophy, history, ethnography, psychology etc. International communication playing the key role in the development of the world community presupposes systemic and interdisciplinary approach to solving problems and facing challenges arising in the modern times. Language is the most essential component of communication whose organization is based on the principles of interaction, cooperation and politeness ensuring the molding of communicative norms of social behavior. Compliance with these norms creates conditions for effective exchange of opinions, shapes an environment for positive interaction and implementation of communicative strategies by participants in verbal disquisition. On the other hand, national pictures of the world, implanted in the conscience of a child by their family and society serve as natural limits to international communication and understanding cross-cultural peculiarities. They often prevent people from reaching rapport with their foreign counterparts, as their worldviews come into contradiction. National and cultural distinctions cause main differences between systems, norms and uses. National stereotypes, focusing on most typical features of a nation, could serve as a tool for overcoming this discrepancy. Holistic approach to studying a foreign language as an integral part of the culture, alongside with other humanitarian and social disciplines, involves a deep insight into core mental and spiritual values of the society. So, the guiding role of the university teacher consists in dealing with professional issues while addressing the wide cultural content and intercultural objectives.

  10. Differences in perception of the WHO International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes between pediatricians and obstetricians in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macnab Iona

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes (WHO Code aims to protect and promote breastfeeding. Japan ratified the WHO Code in 1994, but most hospitals in Japan continue to receive free supplies of infant formula and distribute discharge packs to new mothers provided by infant formula companies. The aim of this study was to explore the knowledge and attitudes of pediatricians and obstetricians in Japan to the WHO Code. Methods A self-completion questionnaire was sent to 132 pediatricians in the 131 NICUs which belonged to the Neonatal Network of Japan, and to 96 chief obstetricians in the general hospitals in the Kanto area of Japan, in 2004. Results Responses were received from 68% of pediatricians and 64% of obstetricians. Sixty-six percent of pediatricians agreed that "Breastmilk is the best", compared to only 13% of obstetricians. Likewise, pediatricians were more likely to be familiar with the WHO Code (51% than obstetricians (18%. Conclusion In Japan, pediatricians and obstetricians, in general, have low levels of support for breastfeeding and low levels of familiarity with the WHO Code. To increase the breastfeeding rates in Japan, both pediatricians and obstetricians need increased knowledge about current infant feeding practices and increased awareness of international policies to promote breastfeeding.

  11. A computational code for resolution of general compartment models applied to internal dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claro, Thiago R.; Todo, Alberto S., E-mail: claro@usp.br, E-mail: astodo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The dose resulting from internal contamination can be estimated with the use of biokinetic models combined with experimental results obtained from bio analysis and the knowledge of the incorporation time. The biokinetics models can be represented by a set of compartments expressing the transportation, retention and elimination of radionuclides from the body. The ICRP publications, number 66, 78 and 100, present compartmental models for the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and for systemic distribution for an array of radionuclides of interest for the radiological protection. The objective of this work is to develop a computational code for designing, visualization and resolution of compartmental models of any nature. There are available four different techniques for the resolution of system of differential equations, including semi-analytical and numerical methods. The software was developed in C{ne} programming, using a Microsoft Access database and XML standards for file exchange with other applications. Compartmental models for uranium, thorium and iodine radionuclides were generated for the validation of the CBT software. The models were subsequently solved by SSID software and the results compared with the values published in the issue 78 of ICRP. In all cases the system is in accordance with the values published by ICRP. (author)

  12. A computational code for resolution of general compartment models applied to internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claro, Thiago R.; Todo, Alberto S.

    2011-01-01

    The dose resulting from internal contamination can be estimated with the use of biokinetic models combined with experimental results obtained from bio analysis and the knowledge of the incorporation time. The biokinetics models can be represented by a set of compartments expressing the transportation, retention and elimination of radionuclides from the body. The ICRP publications, number 66, 78 and 100, present compartmental models for the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and for systemic distribution for an array of radionuclides of interest for the radiological protection. The objective of this work is to develop a computational code for designing, visualization and resolution of compartmental models of any nature. There are available four different techniques for the resolution of system of differential equations, including semi-analytical and numerical methods. The software was developed in C≠ programming, using a Microsoft Access database and XML standards for file exchange with other applications. Compartmental models for uranium, thorium and iodine radionuclides were generated for the validation of the CBT software. The models were subsequently solved by SSID software and the results compared with the values published in the issue 78 of ICRP. In all cases the system is in accordance with the values published by ICRP. (author)

  13. Concorde noise-induced building vibrations: International Airport Dulles. [studies by Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, W. H.; Scholl, H. F.; Stephens, D. G.; Holliday, B. G.; Deloach, R.; Finley, T. D.; Holmes, H. K.; Lewis, R. B.; Lynch, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A series of studies were conducted to assess the noise-induced building vibrations associated with Concorde operations. The vibration levels of windows, walls, and floors were measured along with the associated noise levels of Concorde, subsonic aircraft and some nonaircraft events. Test sites included Sully Plantation which is adjacent to Dulles International Airport and three residential homes located in Montgomery County, Maryland. The measured vibration response levels due to Concorde operations were found to be: (1) higher than the levels due to other aircraft, (2) less than the levels due to certain household events which involve direct impulsive loading such as door and window closing, (3) less than criteria levels for building damage, and (4) comparable to levels which are perceptible to people.

  14. Teaching & Learning for International Students in a 'Learning Community': Creating, Sharing and Building Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linzi Kemp, PhD

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the culture of learning communities for effective teaching. A learning community is defined here as an environment where learners are brought together to share information, to learn from each other, and to create new knowledge. The individual student develops her/his own learning by building on learning from others. In a learning community approach to teaching, educators can ensure that students gain workplace skills such as collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, and problem solving. In this case study, it is shown how an active learning community, introduced into a blended teaching environment (face-to-face and virtual, effectively supported international undergraduates in the building of knowledge and workplace skills.

  15. Comparison of computer codes relative to the aerosol behavior in the reactor containment building during severe core damage accidents in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermandjian, J.; Dunbar, I.; Gauvain, J.; Ricchena, R.

    1986-02-01

    The present study concerns a comparative exercise, performed within the framework of the Commission of the European Communities, of the computer codes (AEROSISM-M, UK; AEROSOLS/BI, France; CORRAL-2, CEC and NAUA Mod5, Germany) used in order to assess the aerosol behavior in the reactor containment building during severe core damage accidents in a PWR

  16. Development of 3D models of buildings for containment of the nuclear power plant of Almaraz and of the Trillo Nuclear with the GOTHIC 8.0 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, G.; Bocanegra Melian, R.; Fernandez Cosils, K.; Barreira Pereira, P.; Rey Peinado, L.; Posada Barral, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the first phase of the research of CNAT and the UPM project is the construction of several three-dimensional models detailed GOTHIC 8.0 code of containment of a buildings plant type PWR-W and KWU, corresponding to the Central Nuclear de Almaraz (CNA) and Trillo (CNT) respectively. (Author)

  17. 76 FR 77237 - U.S. National Authority for the WHO Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration U.S. National Authority for the WHO Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS; Office of Global Affairs...

  18. The added value of international benchmarks for fuel performance codes: an illustration on the basis of TRANSURANUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Uffelen, P.; Schubert, A.; Gyeori, C.; Van De Laar, J.

    2009-01-01

    Safety authorities and fuel designers, as well as nuclear research centers rely heavily on fuel performance codes for predicting the behaviour and life-time of fuel rods. The simulation tools are developed and validated on the basis of experimental results, some of which is in the public domain such as the International Fuel Performance Experiments database of the OECD/NEA and IAEA. Publicly available data constitute an excellent basis for assessing codes themselves, but also to compare codes that are being developed by independent teams. The present report summarises the advantages for the TRANSURANUS code by taking part in previous benchmarks organised by the IAEA, and outlines the preliminary results along with the perspectives of our participation in the current coordinated research project FUMEXIII

  19. Zero Energy Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marszal, Anna Joanna; Heiselberg, Per; Bourrelle, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    The concept of Zero Energy Building (ZEB) has gained wide international attention during last few years and is now seen as the future target for the design of buildings. However, before being fully implemented in the national building codes and international standards, the ZEB concept requires......, (4) the type of energy balance, (5) the accepted renewable energy supply options, (6) the connection to the energy infrastructure and (7) the requirements for the energy efficiency, the indoor climate and in case of gird connected ZEB for the building–grid interaction. This paper focuses...

  20. Validity of International Classification of Diseases (ICD) coding for dengue infections in hospital discharge records in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, Yuan-Liang; Lee, Keng-Yee; Mohd Anuar, Siti Fatimah Zahra; Goh, Pik-Pin; Lim, Teck-Onn

    2018-04-20

    Hospitalization due to dengue illness is an important measure of dengue morbidity. However, limited studies are based on administrative database because the validity of the diagnosis codes is unknown. We validated the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD) diagnosis coding for dengue infections in the Malaysian Ministry of Health's (MOH) hospital discharge database. This validation study involves retrospective review of available hospital discharge records and hand-search medical records for years 2010 and 2013. We randomly selected 3219 hospital discharge records coded with dengue and non-dengue infections as their discharge diagnoses from the national hospital discharge database. We then randomly sampled 216 and 144 records for patients with and without codes for dengue respectively, in keeping with their relative frequency in the MOH database, for chart review. The ICD codes for dengue were validated against lab-based diagnostic standard (NS1 or IgM). The ICD-10-CM codes for dengue had a sensitivity of 94%, modest specificity of 83%, positive predictive value of 87% and negative predictive value 92%. These results were stable between 2010 and 2013. However, its specificity decreased substantially when patients manifested with bleeding or low platelet count. The diagnostic performance of the ICD codes for dengue in the MOH's hospital discharge database is adequate for use in health services research on dengue.

  1. Milk and social media: online communities and the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, Sheryl W

    2012-08-01

    The advent of social networking sites and other online communities presents new opportunities and challenges for the promotion, protection, and support of breastfeeding. This study examines the presence of infant formula marketing on popular US social media sites, using the World Health Organization International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes (the Code) as a framework. We examined to what extent each of 11 infant formula brands that are widely available in the US had established a social media presence in popular social media venues likely to be visited by expectant parents and families with young children. We then examined current marketing practices, using the Code as a basis for ethical marketing. Infant formula manufacturers have established a social media presence primarily through Facebook pages, interactive features on their own Web sites, mobile apps for new and expecting parents, YouTube videos, sponsored reviews on parenting blogs, and other financial relationships with parenting blogs. Violations of the Code as well as promotional practices unforeseen by the Code were identified. These practices included enabling user-generated content that promotes the use of infant formula, financial relationships between manufacturers and bloggers, and creation of mobile apps for use by parents. An additional concern identified for Code enforcement is lack of transparency in social media-based marketing. The use of social media for formula marketing may demand new strategies for monitoring and enforcing the Code in light of emerging challenges, including suggested content for upcoming consideration for World Health Assembly resolutions.

  2. Development of Automated Procedures to Generate Reference Building Models for ASHRAE Standard 90.1 and India’s Building Energy Code and Implementation in OpenStudio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Andrew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Haves, Philip [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jegi, Subhash [International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderabad (India); Garg, Vishal [International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderabad (India); Ravache, Baptiste [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-09-14

    This paper describes a software system for automatically generating a reference (baseline) building energy model from the proposed (as-designed) building energy model. This system is built using the OpenStudio Software Development Kit (SDK) and is designed to operate on building energy models in the OpenStudio file format.

  3. Fire risk assessment method under the technical building code; Metodo de evaluacion del reisgo de incendio en el marco del Codigo Tecnico de la Edificacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Martin, J. C.; Diaz-Diaz, R.; Santos-Garcia, R.

    2010-07-01

    The high complexity of measuring and comparing the risk level of performance based design allowed by the Spain Building Code (CTE) and the lack of Spanish legislation on the matter makes a fire risk evaluation tool highly useful guiding the project's and the control authority over the feasibility of these complicated projects. A fire Risk Evaluation Method within the frame of the Spanish Building Code (MEREDICTE) has been developed trying to balance input sources, simplicity and clearness in its use. The number of parameters implied guarantees sound, exhaustive and reliable outputs. MEREDICTE is made of 73 parameters: 31 calculate potential risk and 42 obtain protection level. In an orientative way, MEREDICTE's parameters triple those of the most referred and extended evaluation method: the Gretener Method. The article shows the MEREDICTE technique and foundations, the methodology used in its investigation and development, its most significant innovation and its possible applications. Regarding the protection level, its formulation and applications re referred to the Windsor buildings of Madrid comparing the results obtained on the building as it was devastated by the fire of February 2005 and whether it fulfilled the Spanish building code conditions. (Author) 8 refs.

  4. Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001 as the Commercial Building Energy Code in Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Belzer, David B.; Richman, Eric E.

    2004-09-30

    ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001 Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (hereafter referred to as ASHRAE 90.1-2001 or 90.1-2001) was developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for the energy efficient design and construction of new commercial buildings. The State of Tennessee is considering adopting ASHRAE 90.1-2001 as its commercial building energy code. In an effort to evaluate whether or not this is an appropriate code for the state, the potential benefits and costs of adopting this standard are considered in this report. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST) simulations combined with a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits. Tennessee currently has ASHRAE Standard 90A-1980 as the statewide voluntary/recommended commercial energy standard; however, it is up to the local jurisdiction to adopt this code. Because 90A-1980 is the recommended standard, many of the requirements of ASHRAE 90A-1980 were used as a baseline for simulations.

  5. Flood-resilient waterfront development in New York City: bridging flood insurance, building codes, and flood zoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Jeroen C J H; Botzen, W J Wouter

    2011-06-01

    Waterfronts are attractive areas for many-often competing-uses in New York City (NYC) and are seen as multifunctional locations for economic, environmental, and social activities on the interface between land and water. The NYC waterfront plays a crucial role as a first line of flood defense and in managing flood risk and protecting the city from future climate change and sea-level rise. The city of New York has embarked on a climate adaptation program (PlaNYC) outlining the policies needed to anticipate the impacts of climate change. As part of this policy, the Department of City Planning has recently prepared Vision 2020: New York City Comprehensive Waterfront Plan for the over 500 miles of NYC waterfront (NYC-DCP, 2011). An integral part of the vision is to improve resilience to climate change and sea-level rise. This study seeks to provide guidance for advancing the goals of NYC Vision 2020 by assessing how flood insurance, flood zoning, and building code policies can contribute to waterfront development that is more resilient to climate change. © 2011 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Effects of internal and external scatter on the build-up characteristics of Monte Carlo calculated absorbed dose for electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.; Wu, DS.; Wu, AD.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of internal and external scatter on surface, build-up and depth dose characteristics simulated by Monte Carlo code EGSnrc for varying field size and SSD for a 10 MeV monoenergetic electron beam with and without an accelerator model are extensively studied in this paper. In particular, sub-millimetre surface PDD was investigated. The percentage depth doses affected significantly by the external scatter show a larger build-up dose. A forward shifted Dmax depth and a sharper fall-off region compared to PDDs with only internal scatter considered. The surface dose with both internal and external scatter shows a marked decrease at 110 cm SSD, and then slight further changes with the increasing SSD since few external scattered particles from accelerator model can reach the phantom for large SSDs. The sharp PDD increase for the 5 cm x 5 cm field compared to other fields seen when only internal scatter is considered is significantly less when external scatter is also present. The effect of external scatter on surface PDD is more pronounced for large fields than small fields (5 cm x 5 cm field)

  7. SOME CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING THE AD-HOC INTERNAL ARBITRATION PROCEDURE IN THE NEW CODE OF CIVIL PROCEDURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cristina Creţ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the institutions to have undergone essential changes as a result of the 2013 entry into force of the New Code of civil procedure is arbitration. Arbitration is an alternative way of settling conflicts by means of a specialized person or institution, based on the will of the parties or on an international convention. This article will present a few introductory aspects that are essential for a foray into the field, as well as analyze the main aspects of arbitral procedure from the perspective of novelties and changes brought to the provisions of the New Code of civil procedure (hereinafter referred to as N.C.C.P..

  8. EFFECTS OF COLUMN FAILURES ON THE INTERNAL FORCES OF ORTHOGONAL REINFORCED CONCRETE BUILDING FRAMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilay KAYA

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of column failures which may take place due to the special causes such as blast, vehicle impact, insufficient or deficient design, on the internal forces of orthogonal reinforced concrete building frames have been investigated. Calculations have been performed with SAP2000 structural analysis program, under static conditions. For a typical frame system, firstly, various column failure scenarios have been considered for uninfilled case and internal forces have been calculated and compared with those in the intact case. Then, similar calculations have been implemented for the case of presence of infill walls. The results of analyses have shown that the effects of column failures had condensed on the neighbor columns and beams of orthogonal frames on which the columns had been failed. Moreover, it has been determined that, while the bending moment capacities of the connected beams to the failed columns had exceeded in the bare frames, in the masonry infilled frames, walls give substantial support to the structural elements of the building, and capacities of the beams had not exceeded.

  9. Research capacity building in midwifery: Case study of an Australian Graduate Midwifery Research Intern Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Yvonne L; Lewis, Lucy; Bayes, Sara; Keyes, Louise

    2015-09-01

    Having the research capacity to identify problems, create new knowledge and most importantly translate this knowledge into practice is essential within health care. Midwifery, as well as other health professions in Australia, is challenged in building its research capacity to contribute evidence to inform clinical practice. The aim of this project was to evaluate an innovative Graduate Midwifery Research Intern Programme offered at a tertiary obstetric hospital in Western Australia, to determine what was working well and how the programme could be improved. A case study approach was used to gain feedback from graduate midwives within a Graduate Research Intern (GRI) Programme. In addition outcomes were compiled of all projects the GRI midwives contributed to. Six GRI midwives participated in a survey comprising of four open ended questions to provide feedback about the programme. Findings confirm that the GRI programme increased the graduates understanding of how research works, its capacity to define a problem, generate new knowledge and inform clinical practice. The GRI midwives' feedback suggested the programme opened their thinking to future study and gave them enhanced insight into women's experiences around childbirth. To grow our knowledge as a professional group, midwives must develop and promote programmes to build our pool of research capable midwives. By sharing our programme evaluation we hope to entice other clinical settings to consider the value in replicating such a programme within their context. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Child labor and multinational conduct : a comparison of international business and stakeholder codes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.; van Tulder, R.

    2002-01-01

    Increasing attention to the issue of child labor has been reflected in codes of conduct that emerged in the past decade in particular. This paper examines the way in which multinationals, business associations, governmental and non-governmental organizations deal with child labor in their codes.

  11. Turbine Internal and Film Cooling Modeling For 3D Navier-Stokes Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Kenneth; Garg Vijay; Ameri, Ali

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this research project is to make use of NASA Glenn on-site computational facilities in order to develop, validate and apply aerodynamic, heat transfer, and turbine cooling models for use in advanced 3D Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes such as the Glenn-" code. Specific areas of effort include: Application of the Glenn-HT code to specific configurations made available under Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC), and Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) projects. Validating the use of a multi-block code for the time accurate computation of the detailed flow and heat transfer of cooled turbine airfoils. The goal of the current research is to improve the predictive ability of the Glenn-HT code. This will enable one to design more efficient turbine components for both aviation and power generation. The models will be tested against specific configurations provided by NASA Glenn.

  12. The accuracy of International Classification of Diseases coding for dental problems not associated with trauma in a hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Rafael L F; Singhal, Sonica; Dempster, Laura; Hwang, Stephen W; Quinonez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) visits for nontraumatic dental conditions (NTDCs) may be a sign of unmet need for dental care. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of the International Classification of Diseases codes (ICD-10-CA) for ED visits for NTDC. ED visits in 2008-2099 at one hospital in Toronto were identified if the discharge diagnosis in the administrative database system was an ICD-10-CA code for a NTDC (K00-K14). A random sample of 100 visits was selected, and the medical records for these visits were reviewed by a dentist. The description of the clinical signs and symptoms were evaluated, and a diagnosis was assigned. This diagnosis was compared with the diagnosis assigned by the physician and the code assigned to the visit. The 100 ED visits reviewed were associated with 16 different ICD-10-CA codes for NTDC. Only 2 percent of these visits were clearly caused by trauma. The code K0887 (toothache) was the most frequent diagnostic code (31 percent). We found 43.3 percent disagreement on the discharge diagnosis reported by the physician, and 58.0 percent disagreement on the code in the administrative database assigned by the abstractor, compared with what it was suggested by the dentist reviewing the chart. There are substantial discrepancies between the ICD-10-CA diagnosis assigned in administrative databases and the diagnosis assigned by a dentist reviewing the chart retrospectively. However, ICD-10-CA codes can be used to accurately identify ED visits for NTDC. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  13. Nomenclature for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease: the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC) and the Eleventh Iteration of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Rodney C G; Béland, Marie J; Colan, Steven D; Walters, Henry L; Aiello, Vera D; Anderson, Robert H; Bailliard, Frédérique; Boris, Jeffrey R; Cohen, Meryl S; Gaynor, J William; Guleserian, Kristine J; Houyel, Lucile; Jacobs, Marshall L; Juraszek, Amy L; Krogmann, Otto N; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Lopez, Leo; Maruszewski, Bohdan J; St Louis, James D; Seslar, Stephen P; Srivastava, Shubhika; Stellin, Giovanni; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Weinberg, Paul M; Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2017-12-01

    An internationally approved and globally used classification scheme for the diagnosis of CHD has long been sought. The International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC), which was produced and has been maintained by the International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease (the International Nomenclature Society), is used widely, but has spawned many "short list" versions that differ in content depending on the user. Thus, efforts to have a uniform identification of patients with CHD using a single up-to-date and coordinated nomenclature system continue to be thwarted, even if a common nomenclature has been used as a basis for composing various "short lists". In an attempt to solve this problem, the International Nomenclature Society has linked its efforts with those of the World Health Organization to obtain a globally accepted nomenclature tree for CHD within the 11th iteration of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11). The International Nomenclature Society has submitted a hierarchical nomenclature tree for CHD to the World Health Organization that is expected to serve increasingly as the "short list" for all communities interested in coding for congenital cardiology. This article reviews the history of the International Classification of Diseases and of the IPCCC, and outlines the process used in developing the ICD-11 congenital cardiac disease diagnostic list and the definitions for each term on the list. An overview of the content of the congenital heart anomaly section of the Foundation Component of ICD-11, published herein in its entirety, is also included. Future plans for the International Nomenclature Society include linking again with the World Health Organization to tackle procedural nomenclature as it relates to cardiac malformations. By doing so, the Society will continue its role in standardising nomenclature for CHD across the globe, thereby promoting research and better outcomes for fetuses

  14. Relative political and value proximity in mediated public diplomacy: The effect of state-level homophily on international frame building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheafer, T.; Shenhav, S.R.; Takens, J.H.; van Atteveldt, W.H.

    2014-01-01

    This article applies the homophily thesis to public diplomacy and offers an empirical examination of a country's success in its mediated public diplomacy efforts. It analyzes international frame building, the process of creating or changing media frames in the international communications arena, by

  15. Transoptr-a second order beam transport design code with automatic internal optimization and general constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heighway, E.A.

    1980-07-01

    A second order beam transport design code with parametric optimization is described. The code analyzes the transport of charged particle beams through a user defined magnet system. The magnet system parameters are varied (within user defined limits) until the properties of the transported beam and/or the system transport matrix match those properties requested by the user. The code uses matrix formalism to represent the transport elements and optimization is achieved using the variable metric method. Any constraints that can be expressed algebraically may be included by the user as part of his design. Instruction in the use of the program is given. (auth)

  16. Coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic code benchmark activities at the International Nuclear Safety Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlazov, L. N.

    1998-01-01

    Two realistic benchmark problems are defined and used to assess the performance of coupled thermal-hydraulic and neutronic codes used in simulating dynamic processes in VVER-1000 and RBMK reactor systems. One of the problems simulates a design basis accident involving the ejection of three control and protection system rods from a VVER-1000 reactor. The other is based on a postulated rod withdrawal from an operating RBMK reactor. Preliminary results calculated by various codes are compared. While these results show significant differences, the intercomparisons performed so far provide a basis for further evaluation of code limitations and modeling assumptions

  17. Proposals to clarify and enhance the naming of fungi under the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawksworth, David L

    2015-06-01

    Twenty-three proposals to modify the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants adopted in 2011 with respect to the provisions for fungi are made, in accordance with the wishes of mycologists expressed at the 10(th) International Mycological Congress in Bangkok in 2014, and with the support of the International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi (ICTF), the votes of which are presented here. The proposals relate to: conditions for epitypification, registration of later typifications, protected lists of names, removal of exemptions for lichen-forming fungi, provision of a diagnosis when describing a new taxon, citation of sanctioned names, avoiding homonyms in other kingdoms, ending preference for sexually typified names, and treatment of conspecific names with the same epithet. These proposals are also being published in Taxon, will be considered by the Nomenclature Committee for Fungi and General Committee on Nomenclature, and voted on at the 19(th) International Botanical Congress in Shenzhen, China, in 2017.

  18. Using Administrative Mental Health Indicators in Heart Failure Outcomes Research: Comparison of Clinical Records and International Classification of Disease Coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Miriam; Smith, Tyler C

    2016-01-01

    Use of mental indication in health outcomes research is of growing interest to researchers. This study, as part of a larger research program, quantified agreement between administrative International Classification of Disease (ICD-9) coding for, and "gold standard" clinician documentation of, mental health issues (MHIs) in hospitalized heart failure (HF) patients to determine the validity of mental health administrative data for use in HF outcomes research. A 13% random sample (n = 504) was selected from all unique patients (n = 3,769) hospitalized with a primary HF diagnosis at 4 San Diego County community hospitals during 2009-2012. MHI was defined as ICD-9 discharge diagnostic coding 290-319. Records were audited for clinician documentation of MHI. A total of 43% (n = 216) had mental health clinician documentation; 33% (n = 164) had ICD-9 coding for MHI. ICD-9 code bundle 290-319 had 0.70 sensitivity, 0.97 specificity, and kappa 0.69 (95% confidence interval 0.61-0.79). More specific ICD-9 MHI code bundles had kappas ranging from 0.44 to 0.82 and sensitivities ranging from 42% to 82%. Agreement between ICD-9 coding and clinician documentation for a broadly defined MHI is substantial, and can validly "rule in" MHI for hospitalized patients with heart failure. More specific MHI code bundles had fair to almost perfect agreement, with a wide range of sensitivities for identifying patients with an MHI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Internal background build-up measurements in CaF2:Mn thermoluminescent dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasybrahmanyam, V.; Measures, M.P.

    1977-01-01

    Some problems associated with the internal background build-up (IBB) of CaF 2 :Mn thermoluminescent dosimeters are reported. As a result of an investigation of batches of the EG and G model 15 dosimeter it is considered that measurements using this type of dosimeter are accurate and reproducible once the IBB has been determined. However, the use of the Manufacturer's claimed average of 0.064 mR/day can lead to erroneous results when determining environmental background dose rates. The authors therefore urge a rigid quality control program by the manufacturer and suggest that purchasers should be supplied with IBB information of each batch of dosimeters. Meanwhile each user should be aware of the IBB problem and be extremely cautious when using these dosimeters for environmental monitoring purposes. (U.K.)

  20. Fibre Reinforced Polymer Composites as Internal and External Reinforcements for Building Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin Banu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available During the latest decades fibre reinforced polymer (FRP composite materials have proven valuable properties and suitable to be used in construction of new buildings and in upgrading the existing ones. These materials have covered the road from research laboratory and demonstration projects to implementation in actual structures. Nowadays the civil and structural engineering communities are about to commence the stage in which the use of FRP composites is becoming a routine similar to that of traditional material such as concrete, masonry and wood. Two main issues are presented in this paper, the use of FRP composite materials for new structural members (internal reinforcements and strengthening of existing members (externally bonded reinforcements. The advantages and disadvantages as well as the problems and constraints associated with both issues are discussed in detail mainly related to concrete members.

  1. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Meredydd; Runci, Paul; Meier, Alan

    2008-08-01

    This report presents results from a program evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy?s Buildings Technologies Program (BTP) participation in collaborative international technology implementing agreements. The evaluation was conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the fall of 2007 and winter 2008 and was carried out via interviews with stakeholders in four implementing agreements in which BTP participates, reviews of relevant program reports, websites and other published materials. In addition to these findings, the report includes a variety of supporting materials such that aim to assist BTP managers who currently participate in IEA implementing agreements or who may be considering participation.

  2. Data for occupancy internal heat gain calculation in main building categories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiser Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Heat losses from occupant body by means of convection, radiation, vapor, and sweat are essential data for indoor climate and energy simulations. Heat losses depend on the metabolic activity and body surface area. Higher variations of body surface area of occupants are observed in day care centers, kinder gardens and schools compared to other building categories (Tables 2 and 3 and these variations need to be accounted, otherwise in these building categories heat gains, CO2 and humidity generation are overestimated. Indoor temperature, humidity level, air velocity, and clothing insulation have significant influences on dry and total heat losses from occupant body leading to typical values for summer and winter. The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled Occupancy schedules for energy simulation in new prEN16798-1 and ISO/FDIS 17772-1 standards (Ahmed et al., 2017 [1]. Keywords: Body surface area, Metabolic rate, Dry heat loss, Total heat loss, Internal heat gain

  3. VS30 – A site-characterization parameter for use in building Codes, simplified earthquake resistant design, GMPEs, and ShakeMaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, Roger D.

    2012-01-01

    VS30, defined as the average seismic shear-wave velocity from the surface to a depth of 30 meters, has found wide-spread use as a parameter to characterize site response for simplified earthquake resistant design as implemented in building codes worldwide. VS30 , as initially introduced by the author for the US 1994 NEHRP Building Code, provides unambiguous definitions of site classes and site coefficients for site-dependent response spectra based on correlations derived from extensive borehole logging and comparative ground-motion measurement programs in California. Subsequent use of VS30 for development of strong ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) and measurement of extensive sets of VS borehole data have confirmed the previous empirical correlations and established correlations of SVS30 with VSZ at other depths. These correlations provide closed form expressions to predict S30 V at a large number of additional sites and further justify S30 V as a parameter to characterize site response for simplified building codes, GMPEs, ShakeMap, and seismic hazard mapping.

  4. Quality improvement of International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, diagnosis coding in radiation oncology: single-institution prospective study at University of California, San Francisco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien P; Braunstein, Steve; Mourad, Michelle; Hsu, I-Chow J; Haas-Kogan, Daphne; Roach, Mack; Fogh, Shannon E

    2015-01-01

    Accurate International Classification of Diseases (ICD) diagnosis coding is critical for patient care, billing purposes, and research endeavors. In this single-institution study, we evaluated our baseline ICD-9 (9th revision) diagnosis coding accuracy, identified the most common errors contributing to inaccurate coding, and implemented a multimodality strategy to improve radiation oncology coding. We prospectively studied ICD-9 coding accuracy in our radiation therapy--specific electronic medical record system. Baseline ICD-9 coding accuracy was obtained from chart review targeting ICD-9 coding accuracy of all patients treated at our institution between March and June of 2010. To improve performance an educational session highlighted common coding errors, and a user-friendly software tool, RadOnc ICD Search, version 1.0, for coding radiation oncology specific diagnoses was implemented. We then prospectively analyzed ICD-9 coding accuracy for all patients treated from July 2010 to June 2011, with the goal of maintaining 80% or higher coding accuracy. Data on coding accuracy were analyzed and fed back monthly to individual providers. Baseline coding accuracy for physicians was 463 of 661 (70%) cases. Only 46% of physicians had coding accuracy above 80%. The most common errors involved metastatic cases, whereby primary or secondary site ICD-9 codes were either incorrect or missing, and special procedures such as stereotactic radiosurgery cases. After implementing our project, overall coding accuracy rose to 92% (range, 86%-96%). The median accuracy for all physicians was 93% (range, 77%-100%) with only 1 attending having accuracy below 80%. Incorrect primary and secondary ICD-9 codes in metastatic cases showed the most significant improvement (10% vs 2% after intervention). Identifying common coding errors and implementing both education and systems changes led to significantly improved coding accuracy. This quality assurance project highlights the potential problem

  5. Locally orderless registration code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    This is code for the TPAMI paper "Locally Orderless Registration". The code requires intel threadding building blocks installed and is provided for 64 bit on mac, linux and windows.......This is code for the TPAMI paper "Locally Orderless Registration". The code requires intel threadding building blocks installed and is provided for 64 bit on mac, linux and windows....

  6. International assessment of application of the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokr, A.M. [Atomic Energy Authority, Abouzabal (Egypt). Egypt Second Research Reactor

    2015-11-15

    The self-assessments performed by thirty-eight countries on application of the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors were analyzed and discussed. The results of this analysis were used to identify areas of satisfactory application of the Code and area needing improvements, and therefore require more attention worldwide. The results showed improvement in application of the Code provisions; notably in aging management, regulatory supervision, and consideration of human factors. However, there is a continuing need for further improvement in these areas, as well as in operational radiation protection, emergency preparedness and decommissioning planning. Additionally, increased attention needs to be given to periodic safety reviews, evaluation of site-specific hazards, and assessment of extreme external events. The results showed consistency with the feedback from other sources of information on generic safety issues for research reactors.

  7. International assessment of application of the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokr, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The self-assessments performed by thirty-eight countries on application of the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors were analyzed and discussed. The results of this analysis were used to identify areas of satisfactory application of the Code and area needing improvements, and therefore require more attention worldwide. The results showed improvement in application of the Code provisions; notably in aging management, regulatory supervision, and consideration of human factors. However, there is a continuing need for further improvement in these areas, as well as in operational radiation protection, emergency preparedness and decommissioning planning. Additionally, increased attention needs to be given to periodic safety reviews, evaluation of site-specific hazards, and assessment of extreme external events. The results showed consistency with the feedback from other sources of information on generic safety issues for research reactors.

  8. Comparative analyses of the internal radiation exposures due to food chain pathway using food III code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Ho; Chung, Kyu Hoi; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Jeong Ho

    1988-01-01

    In order to develop a food-chain computer code suitable to the environmental conditions of Korea, the FOOD III code was partially modified. The execution results for Korean male-adult were compared to those from the Canadian version of FOOD III to deduce a more realistic approach in dose assessment. The amounts of Mn-54, Co-50, Co-60, I-131 and I-132 released from Kori unit 1 in 1984 were used as the source terms for the sample calculation. The maximum atmospheric dispersion factor(X/Q) value on the site boundary was applied. Through the code modification, organ doses decreased by about 20∼70% and the effective committed dose equivalent by about 40% to be 7.935x10 -6 Sv/y which is 0.16% of the ICRP limit, 5x10 -3 Sv/y. (Author)

  9. Compliance with the International Code of Marketing of breast-milk substitutes: an observational study of pediatricians' waiting rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodgson, Joan E; Watkins, Amanda L; Bond, Angela B; Kintaro-Tagaloa, Cheryl; Arellano, Alondra; Allred, Patrick A

    2014-04-01

    Abstract The importance of breastmilk as a primary preventative intervention is widely known and understood by most healthcare providers. The actions or non-actions that heathcare providers take toward promoting and supporting breastfeeding families make a difference in the success and duration of breastfeeding. Recognizing this relationship, the World Health Organization developed the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes (the Code), which defines best practices in breastfeeding promotion, including physicians' offices. The pediatric practices' waiting rooms are often a family's first experience with pediatric care. The specific aims of this study were to describe (1) Code compliance, (2) the demographic factors affecting the Code compliance, and (3) the amount and type of breastfeeding-supportive materials available in the pediatricians' waiting rooms. An observational cross-sectional design was used to collect data from 163 (82%) of the pediatric practices in Maricopa County, Arizona. None of the 100 waiting rooms that had any materials displayed (61%) was found to be completely Code compliant, with 81 of the offices having formula-promotional materials readily available. Waiting rooms in higher income areas offered more non-Code-compliant materials and gifts. Breastfeeding support information and materials were lacking in all but 18 (18%) offices. A positive relationship (t97=-2.31, p=0.02) occurred between the presence of breastfeeding educational materials and higher income areas. We were able to uncover some practice-related patterns that impact families and potentially undermine breastfeeding success. To move current practices toward breastfeeding-friendly physicians' offices, change is needed.

  10. Identifying Adverse Events Using International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision Y Codes in Korea: A Cross-sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsu Ock

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The use of administrative data is an affordable alternative to conducting a difficult large-scale medical-record review to estimate the scale of adverse events. We identified adverse events from 2002 to 2013 on the national level in Korea, using International Classification of Diseases, tenth revision (ICD-10 Y codes. Methods We used data from the National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort (NHIS-NSC. We relied on medical treatment databases to extract information on ICD-10 Y codes from each participant in the NHIS-NSC. We classified adverse events in the ICD-10 Y codes into 6 types: those related to drugs, transfusions, and fluids; those related to vaccines and immunoglobulin; those related to surgery and procedures; those related to infections; those related to devices; and others. Results Over 12 years, a total of 20 817 adverse events were identified using ICD-10 Y codes, and the estimated total adverse event rate was 0.20%. Between 2002 and 2013, the total number of such events increased by 131.3%, from 1366 in 2002 to 3159 in 2013. The total rate increased by 103.9%, from 0.17% in 2002 to 0.35% in 2013. Events related to drugs, transfusions, and fluids were the most common (19 446, 93.4%, followed by those related to surgery and procedures (1209, 5.8% and those related to vaccines and immunoglobulin (72, 0.3%. Conclusions Based on a comparison with the results of other studies, the total adverse event rate in this study was significantly underestimated. Improving coding practices for ICD-10 Y codes is necessary to precisely monitor the scale of adverse events in Korea.

  11. Impact of e-publication changes in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants (Melbourne Code, 2012) - did we need to "run for our lives"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolson, Nicky; Challis, Katherine; Tucker, Allan; Knapp, Sandra

    2017-05-25

    At the Nomenclature Section of the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne, Australia (IBC), the botanical community voted to allow electronic publication of nomenclatural acts for algae, fungi and plants, and to abolish the rule requiring Latin descriptions or diagnoses for new taxa. Since the 1st January 2012, botanists have been able to publish new names in electronic journals and may use Latin or English as the language of description or diagnosis. Using data on vascular plants from the International Plant Names Index (IPNI) spanning the time period in which these changes occurred, we analysed trajectories in publication trends and assessed the impact of these new rules for descriptions of new species and nomenclatural acts. The data show that the ability to publish electronically has not "opened the floodgates" to an avalanche of sloppy nomenclature, but concomitantly neither has there been a massive expansion in the number of names published, nor of new authors and titles participating in publication of botanical nomenclature. The e-publication changes introduced in the Melbourne Code have gained acceptance, and botanists are using these new techniques to describe and publish their work. They have not, however, accelerated the rate of plant species description or participation in biodiversity discovery as was hoped.

  12. The Dynamics of Daylighting at a Residential College Building with the Internal Courtyard Arrangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Ainurzaman Jamaludin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dayasari residential college building was designed with the internal courtyard that allows for numerous implementations of bioclimatic design strategies, especially on daylighting. The field measurement was conducted at eight unoccupied student rooms, selected as samples to represent ten scenarios and orientations that concerned with the level of radiation and penetration of sunlight. This study reveals the contribution of the internal courtyard in the residential college which allows the daylight penetration at the corridor areas and interior of the rooms through the transom over the entrance door, up to ten hours daily. Different amounts of daylight were measured in specific room scenarios to suggest on the most comfortable indoor living space. The recorded mean value for indoor varied from 37 to 286 lux, while in the corridor area 192 to 3,848 lux. However, the use of the large overhangs over the windows, wall openings in the room and trees with large canopy in the landscape setting should critically justify when the adequacy of daylight was drastically reduced in certain rooms.

  13. The European Union Building Peace Near and Afar: Monitoring the Implementation of International Peace Agreements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Máire Braniff

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The European Union’s (EU support and contribution to international peace and security continues to develop with involvement in the Balkans, South Caucasus, Africa, Middle East and South Asia (Council of the European Union 2005. Within the broad range of civilian and military interventions under the Common Security and Defence policy (CSDP there have been two monitoring missions that have emerged from peace agreements, in Aceh (2005-2006 and in Georgia (2008 to date. This article maps the evolution EU’s role in international peace building by focusing on how this role is increasingly constructed by the scope of monitoring missions which it has embarked upon outside of its borders. A thematic analysis of literature is used to explore how the EU’s monitoring role has evolved regarding the different degrees of intervention, time-frame and size of the monitoring mission which have resulted in a multi-level impact regarding societal transition. The article finds that political will, shadows of past and future missions and intergovernmental concerns dominates how the EU’s monitoring missions unfurl, affecting the practice of monitors and other EU actors in local conflict settings and contemplates scenarios for future monitoring missions.

  14. Analysis of the Explosive Internal Impact on the Barriers of Building Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwiński, Jarosław; Stolarski, Adam

    2017-10-01

    Work issues concern the safety of construction in relation to the hazards arising from explosion of the explosive charge located inside the building. The algorithms proposed in the paper for determining the parameters of the overpressure wave resulting from the detonation of clustered explosive charges, determine the basis for numerical simulation analyzes. Determination of the maximum value of peak pressure on the wave forehead of an internal explosion is presented on the basis of reflected wave analysis. Changeability in time of the internal explosion action describes the overpressure phase only. The analysis of the load caused by the internal explosive charge detonation was carried out under conditions of the undisturbed standard atmosphere. A load determination algorithm has been developed, taking into account the geometrical characteristics of the building barriers and the rooms as well as the parameters of environment in which the detonation occurs. The way of taking into account the influence of venting surfaces, i.e. windows, doors, ventilation ducts, on the overpressure wave parameters, was presented. Discloses a method to take into account the effect of the surface relief, i.e. windows, doors, air ducts, pressure wave parameters. Modification of the method for explosive overpressure determination presented by Cormie, Smith, Mays (2009), was proposed in the paper. This modification was developed on the basis of substitute impulse analysis for multiple overpressure pulses. In order to take into account the pressure distribution of explosive gases on the barrier surface, the method of modification the relationship for determination the changeability over time and space of the pressure of explosive gases, was presented. For this purpose, the changeability of the pressure wave angles of incidence to the barrier and the distance of the explosive charge to any point on the surface of the barrier, was taken into account. Based on the developed procedure, the

  15. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, A.; Prahl, D.

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are (1) the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and (2) the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  16. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, A. [ABT Systems, LLC, Annville, PA (United States); Prahl, D. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  17. Neutron Fluence Evaluation of Reactor Internal Structure Using 3D Transport Calculation Code, RAPTOR-M3G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeng, YoungJae; Lim, MiJoung; Kim, KyungSik; Cho, YoungKi; Yoo, ChoonSung; Kim, ByoungChul

    2015-01-01

    Age-related degradation mechanisms are including the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking(IASCC), void swelling, stress relaxation, fatigue, and etc. A lot of Baffle Former Bolts(BFBs) was installed at the former plate ends between baffle and barrel structure. These would undergo severe experiences, which are high temperature and pressure, bypass water flow and neutron exposure and have some radioactive limitation in inspecting their integrity. The objectives of this paper is to evaluate fast neutron fluence(n/cm 2 , E>1.0MeV) for PWR internals using 3D transport calculation code, RAPTOR-M3G, and to figure out a strategy to manage the effects of aging in PWR internals. One of age-related degradation mechanisms, IASCC, which is affected by fast neutron exposure rate, has been currently issued for PWR internals and has 2 x 10 21 (n/cm 2 ) of the threshold value by MRP-175. Because a lot of BFBs was installed around the internal components, closer inspections are required. As part of an aging management for Kori unit 2, 3D transport calculation code, RAPTOR-M3G, was applied for determining fast neutron fluence at baffle, barrel and former plates regions. As a result, the fast neutron fluence exceeds the screening or threshold values of IASCC in all of baffle, barrel and former plate region. And the most significant region is the baffle because it is located closest to the core. In addition, some regions including former plate tend to be more damaged because of less moderate ability than water. In conclusion, Ice's has been progressed for PWR internals of Kori unit 2. Several regions of internal components were damaged by fast neutron exposure and increase in size as time goes by

  18. MISTRA facility for containment lumped parameter and CFD codes validation. Example of the International Standard Problem ISP47

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkatschenko, I.; Studer, E.; Paillere, H.

    2005-01-01

    During a severe accident in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), the formation of a combustible gas mixture in the complex geometry of the reactor depends on the understanding of hydrogen production, the complex 3D thermal-hydraulics flow due to gas/steam injection, natural convection, heat transfer by condensation on walls and effect of mitigation devices. Numerical simulation of such flows may be performed either by Lumped Parameter (LP) or by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. Advantages and drawbacks of LP and CFD codes are well-known. LP codes are mainly developed for full size containment analysis but they need improvements, especially since they are not able to accurately predict the local gas mixing within the containment. CFD codes require a process of validation on well-instrumented experimental data before they can be used with a high degree of confidence. The MISTRA coupled effect test facility has been built at CEA to fulfil this validation objective: with numerous measurement points in the gaseous volume - temperature, gas concentration, velocity and turbulence - and with well controlled boundary conditions. As illustration of both experimental and simulation areas of this topic, a recent example in the use of MISTRA test data is presented for the case of the International Standard Problem ISP47. The proposed experimental work in the MISTRA facility provides essential data to fill the gaps in the modelling/validation of computational tools. (author)

  19. The HART II International Workshop: An Assessment of the State-of-the-Art in Comprehensive Code Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWall, Berend G.; Lim, Joon W.; Smith, Marilyn J.; Jung, Sung N.; Bailly, Joelle; Baeder, James D.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Significant advancements in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and their coupling with computational structural dynamics (CSD, or comprehensive codes) for rotorcraft applications have been achieved recently. Despite this, CSD codes with their engineering level of modeling the rotor blade dynamics, the unsteady sectional aerodynamics and the vortical wake are still the workhorse for the majority of applications. This is especially true when a large number of parameter variations is to be performed and their impact on performance, structural loads, vibration and noise is to be judged in an approximate yet reliable and as accurate as possible manner. In this article, the capabilities of such codes are evaluated using the HART II International Workshop database, focusing on a typical descent operating condition which includes strong blade-vortex interactions. A companion article addresses the CFD/CSD coupled approach. Three cases are of interest: the baseline case and two cases with 3/rev higher harmonic blade root pitch control (HHC) with different control phases employed. One setting is for minimum blade-vortex interaction noise radiation and the other one for minimum vibration generation. The challenge is to correctly predict the wake physics-especially for the cases with HHC-and all the dynamics, aerodynamics, modifications of the wake structure and the aero-acoustics coming with it. It is observed that the comprehensive codes used today have a surprisingly good predictive capability when they appropriately account for all of the physics involved. The minimum requirements to obtain these results are outlined.

  20. La mise en oeuvre des codes d'éthique par le control interne

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Elst, C.F.

    2014-01-01

    The real value of the internal control system lies in the animation of the ethical values in the organization. The integration of ethical risks in the internal control process enables the moving notions of ethical behaviour and accommodate the training and inducement programs of all employees

  1. Challenges to implementation of the WHO Global Code of Practice on International Recruitment of Health Personnel: the case of Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuagla, Ayat; Badr, Elsheikh

    2016-06-30

    The WHO Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel (hereafter the WHO Code) was adopted by the World Health Assembly in 2010 as a voluntary instrument to address challenges of health worker migration worldwide. To ascertain its relevance and effectiveness, the implementation of the WHO Code needs to be assessed based on country experience; hence, this case study on Sudan. This qualitative study depended mainly on documentary sources in addition to key informant interviews. Experiences of the authors has informed the analysis. Migration of Sudanese health workers represents a major health system challenge. Over half of Sudanese physicians practice abroad and new trends are showing involvement of other professions and increased feminization. Traditional destinations include Gulf States, especially Saudi Arabia and Libya, as well as the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. Low salaries, poor work environment, and a lack of adequate professional development are the leading push factors. Massive emigration of skilled health workers has jeopardized coverage and quality of healthcare and health professional education. Poor evidence, lack of a national policy, and active recruitment in addition to labour market problems were barriers for effective migration management in Sudan. Response of destination countries in relation to cooperative arrangements with Sudan as a source country has always been suboptimal, demonstrating less attention to solidarity and ethical dimensions. The WHO Code boosted Sudan's efforts to address health worker migration and health workforce development in general. Improving migration evidence, fostering a national dialogue, and promoting bilateral agreements in addition to catalysing health worker retention strategies are some of the benefits accrued. There are, however, limitations in publicity of the WHO Code and its incorporation into national laws and regulatory frameworks for ethical recruitment. The

  2. Qualitative Research in an International Research Program: Maintaining Momentum while Building Capacity in Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Mill RN, PhD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nurses are knowledgeable about issues that affect quality and equity of care and are well qualified to inform policy, yet their expertise is seldom acknowledged and their input infrequently invited. In 2007, a large multidisciplinary team of researchers and decision-makers from Canada and five low- and middle-income countries (Barbados, Jamaica, Uganda, Kenya, and South Africa received funding to implement a participatory action research (PAR program entitled “Strengthening Nurses' Capacity for HIV Policy Development in sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean.” The goal of the research program was to explore and promote nurses' involvement in HIV policy development and to improve nursing practice in countries with a high HIV disease burden. A core element of the PAR program was the enhancement of the research capacity, and particularly qualitative capacity, of nurses through the use of mentorship, role-modeling, and the enhancement of institutional support. In this article we: (a describe the PAR program and research team; (b situate the research program by discussing attitudes to qualitative research in the study countries; (c highlight the incremental formal and informal qualitative research capacity building initiatives undertaken as part of this PAR program; (d describe the approaches used to maintain rigor while implementing a complex research program; and (e identify strategies to ensure that capacity building was locally-owned. We conclude with a discussion of challenges and opportunities and provide an informal analysis of the research capacity that was developed within our international team using a PAR approach.

  3. International benchmark study of advanced thermal hydraulic safety analysis codes against measurements on IEA-R1 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hainoun, A., E-mail: pscientific2@aec.org.sy [Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS), Nuclear Engineering Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Doval, A. [Nuclear Engineering Department, Av. Cmdt. Luis Piedrabuena 4950, C.P. 8400 S.C de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Umbehaun, P. [Centro de Engenharia Nuclear – CEN, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242-Cidade Universitaria, CEP-05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Chatzidakis, S. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Ghazi, N. [Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS), Nuclear Engineering Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Park, S. [Research Reactor Design and Engineering Division, Basic Science Project Operation Dept., Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Mladin, M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Campului Street No. 1, P.O. Box 78, 115400 Mioveni, Arges (Romania); Shokr, A. [Division of Nuclear Installation Safety, Research Reactor Safety Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A set of advanced system thermal hydraulic codes are benchmarked against IFA of IEA-R1. • Comparative safety analysis of IEA-R1 reactor during LOFA by 7 working teams. • This work covers both experimental and calculation effort and presents new out findings on TH of RR that have not been reported before. • LOFA results discrepancies from 7% to 20% for coolant and peak clad temperatures are predicted conservatively. - Abstract: In the framework of the IAEA Coordination Research Project on “Innovative methods in research reactor analysis: Benchmark against experimental data on neutronics and thermal hydraulic computational methods and tools for operation and safety analysis of research reactors” the Brazilian research reactor IEA-R1 has been selected as reference facility to perform benchmark calculations for a set of thermal hydraulic codes being widely used by international teams in the field of research reactor (RR) deterministic safety analysis. The goal of the conducted benchmark is to demonstrate the application of innovative reactor analysis tools in the research reactor community, validation of the applied codes and application of the validated codes to perform comprehensive safety analysis of RR. The IEA-R1 is equipped with an Instrumented Fuel Assembly (IFA) which provided measurements for normal operation and loss of flow transient. The measurements comprised coolant and cladding temperatures, reactor power and flow rate. Temperatures are measured at three different radial and axial positions of IFA summing up to 12 measuring points in addition to the coolant inlet and outlet temperatures. The considered benchmark deals with the loss of reactor flow and the subsequent flow reversal from downward forced to upward natural circulation and presents therefore relevant phenomena for the RR safety analysis. The benchmark calculations were performed independently by the participating teams using different thermal hydraulic and safety

  4. Search Codes for a Bibliography for the Study of African International Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Soja (1970). A high speed ln-house reference system was needed to facilitate storage, search, and retrieval of bibliographic reference materlal...REfUBLIC 0F (N0R™ KUW KUWAIT LAB LABOR UNIONS, INTERNATIONAL ASPECTS l- LA LAND LOCKED NATIONS LAO LAOS LAT LATIN AliERICA LAW I AW, INTERNATIONAL...IOCRATIC PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF (NORTH) KÜS KOREA (SOUTH) KUW KUWA I T LAb LABOR UNIONS, INTERNATIONAL ASPECTS LAU LA )S I.AT LATIN AiiEUICA LAN

  5. From the ethical code to the international convention. A critical panorama of the World Tourism Organization from the cosmopolitanism perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. López-González

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses a critical analysis of the nature of cosmopolitan order encouraged by the World Tourism Organization. Given the growth of tourism activity and the challenges that it poses, this specialized agency of the United Nations has formally promoted equitable, responsible and sustainable development of tourism. However, the criticism of the principles from which the organization shapes tourism has put the focus on the objectives pursued. The conversion of these principles, included in the Global Code of Ethics for Tourism, adopted in 1999, into an international convention, approved in September 2017, presents a new scene that this work outlines from the cosmopolitanism perspective.

  6. Capacity Building in Southern Africa: Experiences and Reflections--Towards Joint Knowledge Production and Social Change in International Development Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeelen, Jacques; van der Linden, Josje

    2009-01-01

    The intent of capacity building in international development cooperation is to enable people to control their own development. Important premises are ownership, choice and self-esteem. The authors analyse the dynamics of the enabling process in practice, based on their own experiences working for several years in universities in developing…

  7. The Role of International Investment Law in Renewable Energy Investment; focus on Build Operate and Transfer (BOT) Contracts

    OpenAIRE

    Adetiloye, Idowu Adejoke

    2014-01-01

    Renewable energy is one of the ways of reducing greenhouse gas emission. There is need for more investment in this sector. However, lack of stable regulatory framework and change in policy makes it unattractive to investors. International investment laws through its protections in investment agreement can help to mitigate risks considered by investors especially those with Build, Operate and Transfer (BOT) type of contracts.

  8. International standard problem (ISP) No. 41. Containment iodine computer code exercise based on a radioiodine test facility (RTF) experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    International Standard Problem (ISP) exercises are comparative exercises in which predictions of different computer codes for a given physical problem are compared with each other or with the results of a carefully controlled experimental study. The main goal of ISP exercises is to increase confidence in the validity and accuracy of the tools, which were used in assessing the safety of nuclear installations. Moreover, they enable code users to gain experience and demonstrate their competence. The ISP No. 41 exercise, computer code exercise based on a Radioiodine Test Facility (RTF) experiment on iodine behaviour in containment under severe accident conditions, is one of such ISP exercises. The ISP No. 41 exercise was borne at the recommendation at the Fourth Iodine Chemistry Workshop held at PSI, Switzerland in June 1996: 'the performance of an International Standard Problem as the basis of an in-depth comparison of the models as well as contributing to the database for validation of iodine codes'. [Proceedings NEA/CSNI/R(96)6, Summary and Conclusions NEA/CSNI/R(96)7]. COG (CANDU Owners Group), comprising AECL and the Canadian nuclear utilities, offered to make the results of a Radioiodine Test Facility (RTF) test available for such an exercise. The ISP No. 41 exercise was endorsed in turn by the FPC (PWG4's Task Group on Fission Product Phenomena in the Primary Circuit and the Containment), PWG4 (CSNI Principal Working Group on the Confinement of Accidental Radioactive Releases), and the CSNI. The OECD/NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) has sponsored forty-five ISP exercises over the last twenty-four years, thirteen of them in the area of severe accidents. The criteria for the selection of the RTF test as a basis for the ISP-41 exercise were; (1) complementary to other RTF tests available through the PHEBUS and ACE programmes, (2) simplicity for ease of modelling and (3) good quality data. A simple RTF experiment performed under controlled

  9. Building international experiences into an engineering curriculum - a design project-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Victor; Castillo, Luciano; Carbajal, Gerardo; Hajela, Prabhat

    2014-07-01

    This paper is a descriptive account of how short-term international and multicultural experiences can be integrated into early design experiences in an aerospace engineering curriculum. Such approaches are considered as important not only in fostering a student's interest in the engineering curriculum, but also exposing them to a multicultural setting that they are likely to encounter in their professional careers. In the broader sense, this programme is described as a model that can be duplicated in other engineering disciplines as a first-year experience. In this study, undergraduate students from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) and Universidad del Turabo (UT) in Puerto Rico collaborated on a substantial design project consisting of designing, fabricating, and flight-testing radio-controlled model aircraft as a capstone experience in a semester-long course on Fundamentals of Flight. The two-week long experience in Puerto Rico was organised into academic and cultural components designed with the following objectives: (i) to integrate students in a multicultural team-based academic and social environment, (ii) to practise team-building skills and develop students' critical thinking and analytical skills, and finally (iii) to excite students about their engineering major through practical applications of aeronautics and help them decide if it is a right fit for them.

  10. A Comparison Among Plastic Deformation Capacities of RC Members According to International Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripepi, C.; Failla, G.; Santini, A.; Nucera, F.

    2008-01-01

    The aim is to compare plastic deformation capacities of flexure-controlled reinforced concrete members, as predicted by the Italian Seismic Code, Eurocode 8 and FEMA356. For completeness, recent studies in the literature are also referred to. The comparison is pursued in context with a nonlinear static analysis run on 2D frame structures. This allows to assess whether and to which extent plastic deformation capacities may be affected by variations in those quantities, such as shear span and/or axial load, depending on which plastic deformation capacities are generally given

  11. International nuclear model and code comparison on pre-equilibrium effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruppelaar, H.; van der Kamp, H.A.J.; Nagel, P.

    1983-01-01

    This paper gives the specification of an intercomparison of statistical nuclear models and codes with emphasis on pre-equilibrium effects. It is partly based upon the conclusions of a meeting of an ad-hoc working group on this subject. The parameters studied are: masses, Q values, level scheme data, optical model parameters, X-ray competition parameters, total level-density specifications, for 86 Rb, 89 Sr, 90 Y, 92 Y, 92 Zr, 93 Zr, 89 Y, 91 Nb, 92 Nb and 93 Nb

  12. INCAS residential building energy savings design code: User's guide. INCAS: guida all'uso del codice di calcolo di diagnosi energetica nell'abitazione

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carderi, A.

    1991-01-01

    The INCAS residential building energy savings design code comes complete with data banks giving designers all the necessary technical and economic information and energy savings options for the code's efficacious application to obtain the optimum energy efficient/cost beneficial solution. This user's manual contains descriptions of the types of data to be input, the code's methodology, the data banks, and complete instructions for the code's implementation. The energy savings alternatives include: choice of heating plant and fuel; choice, application location and thickness of thermal insulation. For the case of building heating system retrofits, the code takes into account the existing condition of building components.

  13. Verification of the code DYN3D/R with the help of international benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundmann, U.; Rohde, U.

    1997-10-01

    Different benchmarks for reactors with quadratic fuel assemblies were calculated with the code DYN3D/R. In this report comparisons with the results of the reference solutions are carried out. The results of DYN3D/R and the reference calculation for the eigenvalue k eff and the power distribution are shown for the steady-state 3-dimensional IAEA-Benchmark. The results of NEACRP-Benchmarks on control rod ejections in a standard PWR were compared with the reference solutions published by the NEA Data Bank. For assessing the accuracy of DYN3D/R results in comparison to other codes the deviations to the reference solutions are considered. Detailed comparisons with the published reference solutions of the NEA-NSC Benchmarks on uncontrolled withdrawal of control rods are made. The influence of the axial nodalization is also investigated. All in all, a good agreement of the DYN3D/R results with the reference solutions can be seen for the considered benchmark problems. (orig.) [de

  14. Development of an international code of practice for dosimetry in X-ray diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernicka, F.; Carlsson, G.A.; Dance, D.R.; DeWerd, L.A.; Kramer, H.-M.; Ng, K.-H.

    2001-01-01

    Medical x-ray examinations contribute greatly to the population dose from man-made radiation sources. There is a need to control this dose and therefore to optimise the design and use of x-ray imaging systems. A key stage in this process is the standardisation of the procedures for dose measurement in the clinic. The Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics Section of the IAEA has a number of activities to further advance the standards for x-ray diagnostics. One of these activities is the coordination of a working group to develop a code of practice, which will facilitate the IAEA calibration activities, TLD intercomparisons and audits, educational activities, and technical assistance to Member States. The code of practice will aid in the standardisation of various dosimetric techniques in x-ray diagnostic radiology. The CoP working group has had an initial meeting to review the current status of dosimetry for conventional radiology, fluoroscopy, mammography, computed tomography and dental radiology. The CoP will include the establishment of standards and calibrations at the SSDLs, phantom and patient measurements and procedures for dosimetry in the clinic. (author)

  15. Comparison of MACCS users calculations for the international comparison exercise on probabilistic accident consequence assessment code, October 1989--June 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neymotin, L.

    1994-04-01

    Over the past several years, the OECD/NEA and CEC sponsored an international program intercomparing a group of six probabilistic consequence assessment (PCA) codes designed to simulate health and economic consequences of radioactive releases into atmosphere of radioactive materials following severe accidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs): ARANO (Finland), CONDOR (UK), COSYMA (CEC), LENA (Sweden), MACCS (USA), and OSCAAR (Japan). In parallel with this effort, two separate groups performed similar calculations using the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Results produced in the MACCS Users Group (Greece, Italy, Spain, and USA) calculations and their comparison are contained in the present report. Version 1.5.11.1 of the MACCS code was used for the calculations. Good agreement between the results produced in the four participating calculations has been reached, with the exception of the results related to the ingestion pathway dose predictions. The main reason for the scatter in those particular results is attributed to the lack of a straightforward implementation of the specifications for agricultural production and counter-measures criteria provided for the exercise. A significantly smaller scatter in predictions of other consequences was successfully explained by differences in meteorological files and weather sampling, grids, rain distance intervals, dispersion model options, and population distributions

  16. Protecting breastfeeding in West and Central Africa: over 25 years of implementation of the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Ellen; Clark, David; Aguayo, Victor M

    2008-09-01

    In 1981 the World Health Assembly (WHA) adopted the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes out of concern that inappropriate marketing of breastmilk substitutes was contributing to the alarming decline in breastfeeding worldwide and the increase in child malnutrition and mortality, particularly in developing countries. To document progress, challenges, and lessons learned in the implementation of the International Code in West and Central Africa. Data were obtained by literature review and interviews with key informants. Twelve of the 24 countries have laws, decrees, or regulations that implement all or most of the provisions of the Code, 6 countries have a draft law or decree that is awaiting government approval or have a government committee that is studying how best to implement the Code, 3 countries have a legal instrument that enacts a few provisions of the Code, and 3 countries have not taken any action to implement the Code. International declarations and initiatives for child nutrition and survival have provided impetus for national implementation of the Code. National action to regulate the marketing of breastmilk substitutes needs to be linked to national priorities for nutrition and child survival. A clearly defined scope is essential for effective implementation of national legislation. Leadership and support by health professionals is essential to endorse and enforce national legislation. Training on Code implementation is instrumental for national action; national implementation of the Code requires provisions and capacity to monitor and enforce the legislative framework and needs to be part of a multipronged strategy to advance national child nutrition and survival goals. Nations in West and Central Africa have made important progress in implementing the International Code. More than 25 years after its adoption by the WHA, the Code remains as important as ever for child survival and development in West and Central Africa.

  17. Model of the containment building of Almaraz NPP and the system of recombiners PARs, with the GOTHIC code, for the study of the diffusion of combustible gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Gonzalez, M.; Huelamo, E.; Mazrtinez, M.; Perez, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of distribution of gases within the containment building carried out a simulation model with the code Thermo hydraulic GOTHIC, which has been evaluated based on passive autocatalytic recombiners gas control system. The model considers scenarios of severe accident with specific conditions that produce the most hydrogen generation rates. Intended to verify the effectiveness of the control system of gas expected to be installed in the Almaraz Nuclear power plant so that the number and location of recombiners equipment meets its function of preventing the formation of explosive atmospheres which impairs the integrity of the containment, reducing and limiting the concentration of combustible gases during the postulated accident. (Author)

  18. MeshVoro: A Three-Dimensional Voronoi Mesh Building Tool for the TOUGH Family of Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, C. M.; Boyle, K. L.; Reagan, M.; Johnson, J.; Rycroft, C.; Moridis, G. J.

    2013-09-30

    Few tools exist for creating and visualizing complex three-dimensional simulation meshes, and these have limitations that restrict their application to particular geometries and circumstances. Mesh generation needs to trend toward ever more general applications. To that end, we have developed MeshVoro, a tool that is based on the Voro (Rycroft 2009) library and is capable of generating complex threedimensional Voronoi tessellation-based (unstructured) meshes for the solution of problems of flow and transport in subsurface geologic media that are addressed by the TOUGH (Pruess et al. 1999) family of codes. MeshVoro, which includes built-in data visualization routines, is a particularly useful tool because it extends the applicability of the TOUGH family of codes by enabling the scientifically robust and relatively easy discretization of systems with challenging 3D geometries. We describe several applications of MeshVoro. We illustrate the ability of the tool to straightforwardly transform a complex geological grid into a simulation mesh that conforms to the specifications of the TOUGH family of codes. We demonstrate how MeshVoro can describe complex system geometries with a relatively small number of grid blocks, and we construct meshes for geometries that would have been practically intractable with a standard Cartesian grid approach. We also discuss the limitations and appropriate applications of this new technology.

  19. Data for occupancy internal heat gain calculation in main building categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Kaiser; Kurnitski, Jarek; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2017-01-01

    , kinder gardens and schools compared to other building categories (Tables 2 and 3) and these variations need to be accounted, otherwise in these building categories heat gains, CO2 and humidity generation are overestimated. Indoor temperature, humidity level, air velocity, and clothing insulation have...

  20. An International Project on Indoor Air Quality Design and Control in Low Energy Residential Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Abadie, Marc; Qin, Menghao

    2016-01-01

    focal points to limiting energy consumption for thermally conditioning the indoor environment will be to possibly reducing the ventilation rate, or making it in a new way demand controlled. However, this must be done such that it does not have adverse effects on indoor air quality (IAQ). Annex 68......In order to achieve nearly net zero energy use, both new and energy refurbished existing buildings will in the future need to be still more efficient and optimized. Since such buildings can be expected to be already well insulated, airtight, and have heat recovery systems installed, one of the next......, Indoor Air Quality Design and Control in Low Energy Residential Buildings, is a project under IEA’s Energy Conservation in Buildings and Communities Program (EBC), which will endeavor to investigate how future residential buildings are able to have very high energy performance whilst providing...

  1. AECL international standard problem ISP-41 FU/1 follow-up exercise (Phase 1): Containment Iodine Computer Code Exercise: Parametric Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.; Glowa, G.; Wren, J.; Ewig, F.; Dickenson, S.; Billarand, Y.; Cantrel, L.; Rydl, A.; Royen, J.

    2001-06-01

    This report describes the results of the second phase of International Standard Problem (ISP) 41, an iodine behaviour code comparison exercise. The first phase of the study, which was based on a simple Radioiodine Test Facility (RTF) experiment, demonstrated that all of the iodine behaviour codes had the capability to reproduce iodine behaviour for a narrow range of conditions (single temperature, no organic impurities, controlled pH steps). The current phase, a parametric study, was designed to evaluate the sensitivity of iodine behaviour codes to boundary conditions such as pH, dose rate, temperature and initial I- concentration. The codes used in this exercise were IODE (IPSN), IODE (NRIR), IMPAIR (GRS), INSPECT (AEAT), IMOD (AECL) and LIRIC (AECL). The parametric study described in this report identified several areas of discrepancy between the various codes. In general, the codes agree regarding qualitative trends, but their predictions regarding the actual amount of volatile iodine varied considerably. The largest source of the discrepancies between code predictions appears to be their different approaches to modelling the formation and destruction of organic iodides. A recommendation arising from this exercise is that an additional code comparison exercise be performed on organic iodide formation, against data obtained from intermediate-scale studies (two RTF (AECL, Canada) and two CAIMAN facility (IPSN, France) experiments have been chosen). This comparison will allow each of the code users to realistically evaluate and improve the organic iodide behaviour sub-models within their codes. (authors)

  2. Preserving Envelope Efficiency in Performance Based Code Compliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, Brian A. [Thornton Energy Consulting (United States); Sullivan, Greg P. [Efficiency Solutions (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baechler, Michael C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-20

    The City of Seattle 2012 Energy Code (Seattle 2014), one of the most progressive in the country, is under revision for its 2015 edition. Additionally, city personnel participate in the development of the next generation of the Washington State Energy Code and the International Energy Code. Seattle has pledged carbon neutrality by 2050 including buildings, transportation and other sectors. The United States Department of Energy (DOE), through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) provided technical assistance to Seattle in order to understand the implications of one potential direction for its code development, limiting trade-offs of long-lived building envelope components less stringent than the prescriptive code envelope requirements by using better-than-code but shorter-lived lighting and heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) components through the total building performance modeled energy compliance path. Weaker building envelopes can permanently limit building energy performance even as lighting and HVAC components are upgraded over time, because retrofitting the envelope is less likely and more expensive. Weaker building envelopes may also increase the required size, cost and complexity of HVAC systems and may adversely affect occupant comfort. This report presents the results of this technical assistance. The use of modeled energy code compliance to trade-off envelope components with shorter-lived building components is not unique to Seattle and the lessons and possible solutions described in this report have implications for other jurisdictions and energy codes.

  3. PUDEQ: a computer code for calculating dose equivalent from internal deposition of plutonium at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.R.; Heid, K.R.

    1975-10-01

    Presented here are the procedures and mathematical models used in developing PUDEQ, a computer program for computing the dose equivalent to body organs from intake of Pu. The program was designed specifically to use the data recorded on the Hanford Internal Exposure (HIE) System magnetic tape as input. Insofar as was possible, the recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Dose from Plutonium and other Transuranics was followed. Some deviations were made where errors, omissions, or inconsistencies were found, after consultation with members of the Committee. In the current version of the program only Pu and its immediate important daughters are considered. The program could, however, be expanded to include other transuranic nuclides. At present, only a few depositions of transuranic nuclides other than plutonium are recorded out of about 450 individuals involved in a total of over 700 plutonium intakes

  4. Comprehensive safety analysis code system for nuclear fusion reactors II: Thermal analysis during plasma disruptions for international thermonuclear experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, T.; Maki, K.; Okazaki, T.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal characteristics of a fusion reactor [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Conceptual Design Activity] during plasma disruptions have been analyzed by using a comprehensive safety analysis code for nuclear fusion reactors. The erosion depth due to disruptions for the armor of the first wall depends on the current quench time of disruptions occurring in normal operation. If it is possible to extend the time up to ∼50 ms, the erosion depth is considerably reduced. On the other hand, the erosion depth of the divertor is ∼570 μm for only one disruption, which is determined only by the thermal flux during the thermal quench. This means that the divertor plate should be exchanged after about nine disruptions. Counter-measures are necessary for the divertor to relieve disruption influences. As other scenarios of disruptions, beta-limit disruptions and vertical displacement events were also investigated quantitatively. 13 refs., 5 figs

  5. Proposal to modify Rule 6, Rule 10a, and Rule 12c of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Aharon; Garrity, George M; Schink, Bernhard

    2014-04-01

    According to the current versions of Rule 10a and Rule 12c of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes, names of a genus or subgenus and specific epithets may be taken from any source and may even be composed in an arbitrary manner. Based on these rules, names may be composed of any word or any combination of elements derived from any language with a Latin ending. We propose modifying these rules by adding the text, currently part of Recommendation 6, according to which words from languages other than Latin or Greek should be avoided as long as equivalents exist in Latin or Greek or can be constructed by combining word elements from these two languages. We also propose modification of Rule 6 by adopting some of the current paragraphs of Recommendation 6 to become part of the Rule.

  6. Surrogate motherhood and Private International Law: Perspectives in the light of the new Civil and Commercial Code of Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana B. Scotti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The gestation by substitution, commonly called surrogacy, is undoubtedly a complex legal concept that has as many detractors as supporters. This technique of assisted human reproduction, unlike other traditionally accepted, puts into question the famous maxim of Roman law mater semper certa est. Though this practice is not new, it has gained popularity in recent years and in Argentina reached a noticeable impact due to a series of court decisions and particularly when it was incorporated into the Draft Civil and Commercial Code of Argentina and subsequently removed from the final text adopted by Congress. Given the legislative gap of the new Argentinean Code, approved by Act 26994, in force since 1 August 2015, we will often see cases of people making use of this technique in a foreign country. However, the effects of filiation obtained under foreign law that allows for substitution gestation, usually pose a problem of recognition in our country, to be analyzed in the light of the rules of Private International Law.

  7. Internal insulation applied in heritage multi-storey buildings with wooden beams embedded in solid masonry brick facades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrestrup, Maria; Svendsen, Svend

    2016-01-01

    The use of internal insulation is investigated in a heritage building block with wooden beam construction and masonry brick walls as part of an energy renovation. Measurements were carried out and compared to results from a hygrothermal simulation model. The risk of mould growth in the wooden beams...... insulation on north-orientated walls, since the drying potential is reduced. Additionally, caution should be exercised also with west-orientated walls....

  8. Partnership in civil society : a case of building trust between non-profit associations and international NGOs in Lao PDR

    OpenAIRE

    Purdin, Sky

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this Master's thesis is to develop a context-specific substantive theory of trust building based on the experiences of development workers in Laos, as well as the methods they identify as keys to a better partnership. The research material is based on eleven interviews with civil society development workers in Vientiane, Laos. The study context is partnerships between in-country International Non-Governmental Organizations and local Non-Profit Associations. ...

  9. Assessment of the safety of aquatic animal commodities for international trade: the OIE Aquatic Animal Health code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oidtmann, B; Johnston, C; Klotins, K; Mylrea, G; Van, P T; Cabot, S; Martin, P Rosado; Ababouch, L; Berthe, F

    2013-02-01

    Trading of aquatic animals and aquatic animal products has become increasingly globalized during the last couple of decades. This commodity trade has increased the risk for the spread of aquatic animal pathogens. The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) is recognized as the international standard-setting organization for measures relating to international trade in animals and animal products. In this role, OIE has developed the Aquatic Animal Health Code, which provides health measures to be used by competent authorities of importing and exporting countries to avoid the transfer of agents pathogenic for animals or humans, whilst avoiding unjustified sanitary barriers. An OIE ad hoc group developed criteria for assessing the safety of aquatic animals or aquatic animal products for any purpose from a country, zone or compartment not declared free from a given disease 'X'. The criteria were based on the absence of the pathogenic agent in the traded commodity or inactivation of the pathogenic agent by the commercial processing used to produce the commodity. The group also developed criteria to assess the safety of aquatic animals or aquatic animal products for retail trade for human consumption from potentially infected areas. Such commodities were assessed considering the form and presentation of the product, the expected volume of waste tissues generated by the consumer and the likely presence of viable pathogenic agent in the waste. The ad hoc group applied the criteria to commodities listed in the individual disease chapters of the Aquatic Animal Health Code (2008 edition). Revised lists of commodities for which no additional measures should be required by the importing countries regardless of the status for disease X of the exporting country were developed and adopted by the OIE World Assembly of Delegates in May 2011. The rationale of the criteria and their application will be explained and demonstrated using examples. © 2012 Crown Copyright. Reproduced

  10. Awareness and reported violations of the WHO International Code and Pakistan's national breastfeeding legislation; a descriptive cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faragher Brian

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background National legislation in Pakistan adopted the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes in 2002 to restrict the promotion of infant formula feeding. Our objectives were to assess health professionals' awareness of this law in urban government hospitals and describe their reports of violations, including receiving free samples, gifts and sponsorship. Methods Structured interviews were conducted with health staff between July and August 2006 at 12 urban government hospitals in Islamabad, Rawalpindi and Peshawar including paediatricians, obstetricians, nurses, resident doctors, midwives and lady health visitors (LHVs. Results Of the 427 health workers interviewed, the majority were not aware of the national breastfeeding law (70.5%; n = 301 or the International Code (79.6%; n = 340. Paediatricians, and staff who had been working for 10 years or more, were more likely to be aware of the law [OR = 7.00, 95% CI 3.12, 15.7 (paediatricians; OR = 2.48, 95% CI 1.45, 4.24 (10 years working]. More than one third (38.4%, n = 164 had received small gifts such as pens, pencils and calendars; 12.4% (n = 53 had received sponsorship for training or conferences; and 15.9% (n = 68 had received free samples of infant formula from the Companies. Staff who were aware of the law were also more likely to report receiving gifts (OR = 1.64, 95% CI 1.08, 2.51 and free samples (OR = 1.86, 95% CI 1.09, 3.19. Conclusion Most hospital health professionals were unaware of national breastfeeding legislation in Pakistan, and infant formula companies were continuing to flout the ban on gifts, free samples and sponsorship for health staff.

  11. Joseph A. Burton Forum Award Lecture: Managing Nuclear and Biological Risks: Building Resilience through International Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregenzer, Arian

    2012-03-01

    International technical cooperation has long been an important nonproliferation strategy, especially since the 1990s when cooperative threat reduction (CTR) to prevent theft or illicit transfer of nuclear weapons, material and expertise in the former Soviet Union became a keystone of U.S. policy. The CTR approach expanded to include engagement with scientists and engineers with expertise relevant to biological and chemical weapons, and continued in the 2000s with efforts in Iraq and Libya, and cooperation with a wide range of countries on export control and nuclear and biological security. In general, the goal of such efforts has been to prevent proliferation or WMD terrorism. In most cases, the United States (or the West) defines the threat, and then funds partner countries to implement solutions. This presentation will argue that the future requires a new approach. Nuclear capabilities are more widely available than ever before, repercussions of the A.Q. Khan network continue to unfurl, and countries such as the DPRK engage in illicit cooperation. In addition, there has been a global boom in biotechnology with many nations, particularly across South and East Asia, investing in the biotech industry as a source of fuels, food, and materials for their rapidly expanding populations. Compared to the 1990s, today's threat is more diffuse, and the line between legitimate and illegitimate technical capability is no longer so clear. In addition, the West has many fewer resources to invest due to the global economic downturn. In this environment, full commitment of all countries that benefit from nuclear and biological advances will be required to assure the safety and security of all. Technical cooperation can continue to play an important role, but with some significant changes: First, challenges should be defined from a local perspective to ensure full commitment and participation. Second, the goal of cooperation should shift from preventing specific threats to building

  12. Center for Corporate Climate Leadership Building Internal Support in Supply Chain Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organizations build support for addressing GHG emissions by developing key allies in business units, leveraging one business unit to drive change across the organization, and securing executive support while communicating resource needs.

  13. International survey on current occupant modelling approaches in building performance simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Brien, W.; Gaetani, I.; Gilani, S.; Carlucci, S.; Hoes, P.; Hensen, J.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    It is not evident that practitioners have kept pace with latest research developments in building occupant behaviour modelling; nor are the attitudes of practitioners regarding occupant behaviour modelling well understood. In order to guide research and development efforts, researchers,

  14. Building sustainable institutions ? : the results of international administration in Bosnia & Herzegovina and Kosovo: 1995-2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willigen, Niels Johannes Gerard van

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, there have been several large and ambitious international administrations established to govern territories plagued by war and left without effective governments. The international administrations in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia) and in Kosovo were among those established.

  15. Politics of Internationalism - Danish Women's Movements Participating in the Building of International Women's Organizations (1888-1919)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiig, Christina; Nielsen, Jytte

    2016-01-01

    The struggle for universal enfranchisement in Denmark went on for almost 70 years and was part of a broader struggle for democratization. Granting women the vote was controversial and affected fundamental power structures and male privileges in marriage, in the labor market and in politics (Fiig...... & Siim 2008: 61). The context for this political and ideological struggle was primarily local and national; however there are reasons to investigate the international inspiration and activism as a central part of the debate and struggle for enfranchisement. In this article, we move beyond the “national...... container” (Beck XX) of Denmark in the time period of 1888-1915 and analyze both the international inspiration in relation to the women’s organizations and the Danish women’s movements’ important role on the international scene....

  16. Building an International Student Market: Educational-Balanced Scorecard Solutions for Regional Australian Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Linda; Hamilton, John

    2004-01-01

    There is an international student market suitable for regional Australia, but each region is different. Hence, each region must determine, target and niche market to its best potential international student customer base. For international education there remains scant, relevant, data for regional Australia, hence complete regional approaches to…

  17. International technology transfer: building theory from a multiple case-study in the aircraft industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    International technology transfer occurs frequently in international operations, for example in cases of foreign direct investment where companies set-up existing manufacturing lines in new locations. It also occurs in situations of international outsourcing where a new supplier receives product

  18. Helping Students Move from Coding to Publishing - Teaching Scientific Communication to Science Interns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, R.; Haacker-Santos, R.; Pandya, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    To help young scientists succeed in our field we should not only model scientific methods and inquiry, but also train them in the art of scientific writing - after all, poorly written proposals, reports or journal articles can be a show stopper for any researcher. Research internships are an effective place to provide such training, because they offer a unique opportunity to integrate writing with the process of conducting original research. This presentation will describe how scientific communication is integrated into the SOARS program. Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research and Science (SOARS) is an undergraduate-to graduate bridge program that broadens participation in the geosciences. SOARS aims to foster the next generation of leaders in the atmospheric and related sciences by helping students develop investigative expertise complemented by leadership and communication skills. Each summer, interns (called protégés) attend a weekly seminar designed to help them learn scientific writing and communication skills. The workshop is organized around the sections of a scientific paper. Workshop topics include reading and citing scientific literature, writing an introduction, preparing a compelling abstract, discussing results, designing effective figures, and writing illuminating conclusions. In addition, protégés develop the skills required to communicate their research to both scientists and non-scientists through the use of posters, presentations and informal 'elevator' speeches. Writing and communication mentors guide protégés in applying the ideas from the workshop to the protégés' required summer scientific paper, poster and presentation, while a strong peer-review component of the program gives the protégés a taste of analyzing, critiquing and collaborating within a scientific forum. This presentation will provide practical tips and lessons learned from over ten years of scientific communications workshops within the SOARS program

  19. Woodland carbon code: building an evidence base for the "4 per mil" initiative in land converted to forestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannam, Jacqueline; Vanguelova, Elena; West, Vicky

    2017-04-01

    The Woodland Carbon Code is a voluntary standard for woodland creation projects in the UK. Carbon sequestration resulting from certified projects will contribute directly to the UK's national targets for reducing emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). Whilst this is concerned primarily with above ground capture there is little empirical evidence of the longer term carbon sequestration potential of soils under this land use change in the UK. We present preliminary results from a resurvey of 20 sites originally sampled as part of the soil survey of England and Wales. It includes soil carbon stocks assessed within the soil profile (up to 1m depth) where sites have been converted to forestry in the last 40 years. The small number of sites (n=20) and high variability in soil type, forest type and original land use prevented detailed analysis between these different factors, but overall there was an increase in carbon concentration in the whole profile, driven primarily by an increase the surface organic layers. For all sites combined there was no significant difference in the C stocks between the two survey periods. The increase in carbon stock in the surface organic horizons tended to be offset by a decrease in the mineral subsoils (specifically in Brown Earth soils) primarily as a result of bulk density changes. There are presently insufficient measured data from a range of UK climate, land-use and soil type conditions to quantify with confidence soil C changes during afforestation. This is partly because of the difficulties of detecting relatively slow changes in spatially heterogeneous soils and also obtaining good examples of sites that have undergone documented land use change. Reviewing results from all ongoing afforestation projects in the UK will provide better quantification of the C sequestration potential of forest soils to be accounted for in the Woodland Carbon Code's overall GHG mitigation potential.

  20. Administrative database concerns: accuracy of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision coding is poor for preoperative anemia in patients undergoing spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golinvaux, Nicholas S; Bohl, Daniel D; Basques, Bryce A; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2014-11-15

    Cross-sectional study. To objectively evaluate the ability of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes, which are used as the foundation for administratively coded national databases, to identify preoperative anemia in patients undergoing spinal fusion. National database research in spine surgery continues to rise. However, the validity of studies based on administratively coded data, such as the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, are dependent on the accuracy of ICD-9 coding. Such coding has previously been found to have poor sensitivity to conditions such as obesity and infection. A cross-sectional study was performed at an academic medical center. Hospital-reported anemia ICD-9 codes (those used for administratively coded databases) were directly compared with the chart-documented preoperative hematocrits (true laboratory values). A patient was deemed to have preoperative anemia if the preoperative hematocrit was less than the lower end of the normal range (36.0% for females and 41.0% for males). The study included 260 patients. Of these, 37 patients (14.2%) were anemic; however, only 10 patients (3.8%) received an "anemia" ICD-9 code. Of the 10 patients coded as anemic, 7 were anemic by definition, whereas 3 were not, and thus were miscoded. This equates to an ICD-9 code sensitivity of 0.19, with a specificity of 0.99, and positive and negative predictive values of 0.70 and 0.88, respectively. This study uses preoperative anemia to demonstrate the potential inaccuracies of ICD-9 coding. These results have implications for publications using databases that are compiled from ICD-9 coding data. Furthermore, the findings of the current investigation raise concerns regarding the accuracy of additional comorbidities. Although administrative databases are powerful resources that provide large sample sizes, it is crucial that we further consider the quality of the data source relative to its intended purpose.

  1. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.K. Morton

    2012-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  2. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.K. Morton

    2011-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  3. Improvement of the WBC calibration of the Internal Dosimetry Laboratory of the CDTN/CNEN using MCNPX code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra P, F.; Heeren de O, A. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Programa de Pos Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Melo, B. M.; Lacerda, M. A. S.; Da Silva, T. A.; Ferreira F, T. C., E-mail: tcff01@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, Programa de Pos Graduacao / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    The Plan of Radiological Protection licensed by the National Nuclear Energy Commission - CNEN in Brazil includes the risks of assessment of internal and external exposure by implementing a program of individual monitoring which is responsible of controlling exposures and ensuring the maintenance of radiation safety. The Laboratory of Internal Dosimetry of the Center for Development of Nuclear Technology - LID/CDTN is responsible for routine monitoring of internal contamination of the Individuals Occupationally Exposed (IOEs). These are, the IOEs involved in handling {sup 18}F produced by the Unit for Research and Production of Radiopharmaceuticals sources; as well a monitoring of the entire body of workers from the Research Reactor TRIGA IPR-R1/CDTN or whenever there is any risk of accidental incorporation. The determination of photon emitting radionuclides from the human body requires calibration techniques of the counting geometries, in order to obtain a curve of efficiency. The calibration process normally makes use of physical phantoms containing certified activities of the radionuclides of interest. The objective of this project is the calibration of the WBC facility of the LID/CDTN using the BOMAB physical phantom and Monte Carlo simulations. Three steps were needed to complete the calibration process. First, the BOMAB was filled with a KCl solution and several measurements of the gamma ray energy (1.46 MeV) emitted by {sup 40}K were done. Second, simulations using MCNPX code were performed to calculate the counting efficiency (Ce) for the BOMAB model phantom and compared with the measurements Ce results. Third and last step, the modeled BOMAB phantom was used to calculate the Ce covering the energy range of interest. The results showed a good agreement and are within the expected ratio between the measured and simulated results. (Author)

  4. Improvement of the WBC calibration of the Internal Dosimetry Laboratory of the CDTN/CNEN using MCNPX code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra P, F.; Heeren de O, A.; Melo, B. M.; Lacerda, M. A. S.; Da Silva, T. A.; Ferreira F, T. C.

    2015-10-01

    The Plan of Radiological Protection licensed by the National Nuclear Energy Commission - CNEN in Brazil includes the risks of assessment of internal and external exposure by implementing a program of individual monitoring which is responsible of controlling exposures and ensuring the maintenance of radiation safety. The Laboratory of Internal Dosimetry of the Center for Development of Nuclear Technology - LID/CDTN is responsible for routine monitoring of internal contamination of the Individuals Occupationally Exposed (IOEs). These are, the IOEs involved in handling 18 F produced by the Unit for Research and Production of Radiopharmaceuticals sources; as well a monitoring of the entire body of workers from the Research Reactor TRIGA IPR-R1/CDTN or whenever there is any risk of accidental incorporation. The determination of photon emitting radionuclides from the human body requires calibration techniques of the counting geometries, in order to obtain a curve of efficiency. The calibration process normally makes use of physical phantoms containing certified activities of the radionuclides of interest. The objective of this project is the calibration of the WBC facility of the LID/CDTN using the BOMAB physical phantom and Monte Carlo simulations. Three steps were needed to complete the calibration process. First, the BOMAB was filled with a KCl solution and several measurements of the gamma ray energy (1.46 MeV) emitted by 40 K were done. Second, simulations using MCNPX code were performed to calculate the counting efficiency (Ce) for the BOMAB model phantom and compared with the measurements Ce results. Third and last step, the modeled BOMAB phantom was used to calculate the Ce covering the energy range of interest. The results showed a good agreement and are within the expected ratio between the measured and simulated results. (Author)

  5. Description of the COMRADEX code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spangler, G.W.; Boling, M.; Rhoades, W.A.; Willis, C.A.

    1967-01-01

    The COMRADEX Code is discussed briefly and instructions are provided for the use of the code. The subject code was developed for calculating doses from hypothetical power reactor accidents. It permits the user to analyze four successive levels of containment with time-varying leak rates. Filtration, cleanup, fallout and plateout in each containment shell can also be analyzed. The doses calculated include the direct gamma dose from the containment building, the internal doses to as many as 14 organs including the thyroid, bone, lung, etc. from inhaling the contaminated air, and the external gamma doses from the cloud. While further improvements are needed, such as a provision for calculating doses from fallout, rainout and washout, the present code capabilities have a wide range of applicability for reactor accident analysis

  6. Nation-building e segurança internacional: Um debate em construção Nation-building and international security: A debate under construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aureo de Toledo Gomes

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo almeja analisar as operações de nation-building, que, desde os atentados terroristas de 11 de setembro de 2001, são consideradas uma das maneiras para se lidar com as novas ameaças de segurança internacional, principalmente os ditos Estados Falidos. Assim sendo, revisaremos a bibliografia sobre o tema, procurando identificar as origens destas operações, assim como as definições utilizadas pelos principais autores e os problemas que elas possam apresentar.This article aims to analyze nation-building operations, which have been considered, since September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, one of the ways to cope with the new threats to international security, mainly the so-called Failed States. Therefore, we will review the bibliography published, trying to identity not only the origins of such operations but also the definitions used by the main authors and the problems that they might present.

  7. Theoretical study of the building principal of internal and external energy balances structures in diesel engine

    OpenAIRE

    Djallel ZEBBAR; Salaheddine ZEBBAR; Sidali HORR

    2016-01-01

    Distribution knowledge of the energy introduced into the combustion chamber is of great importance in the theory of internal combustion engines. This work aims to highlight the very complex relationship, often indistinguishable between internal and external energy balances components. The scrutiny of internal balance components has permitted to trace back up to the external balance. This can be easily established on a test bench equipped for the occasion. It will assess the perfection of ener...

  8. Russia and China hydrocarbon relations. A building block toward international hydrocarbon regulation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locatelli, Catherine; Abbas, Mehdi; Rossiaud, Sylvain

    2015-12-01

    This article is a first step of a research agenda on international hydrocarbon regulations. With regards to both: i) the new wealth and power equilibrium in the international political economy and ii) the new political economy of carbon that is emerging from The Paris agreement on Climate changes, this research agenda aims at analysing the changing national structures of governance and the ways these changes lead to international, bilateral, pluri-lateral or multilateral hydrocarbon regulation

  9. Tribal Green Building Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Tribal Green Building Toolkit (Toolkit) is designed to help tribal officials, community members, planners, developers, and architects develop and adopt building codes to support green building practices. Anyone can use this toolkit!

  10. Nuclear fission energy: new build, operation, fuel cycle and decommissioning in the international perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niessen, Stefan [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Over 60 nuclear power reactors are in construction today and over 400 are connected to the grid. The presentation will show where. A nuclear new build project involves a team of several thousand people. Some pictures from ongoing new build projects will illustrate this. Using concrete examples from the AREVA group, the nuclear fuel cycle from uranium mines in Niger, Kazakhstan or Canada to chemical conversion, enrichment and fuel manufacturing will be explained. Also the recycling of used fuel and the fabrication of MOX fuel is addressed. The presentation closes with an overview on decommissioning and final storage projects.

  11. THE CAPACITY AND CIRCULATION OF PASSENGER TERMINAL BUILDING IN REGIONAL AIRPORT (CASE: MINANGKABAU AND ADISUTJIPTO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORTS OF INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Defiani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The dissertation explains about capacity and flow inside terminal buildings in two regional airports in Indonesia: Minangkabau and Adisutjipto International Airports. Both airports have similar characteristics of passengers’ number and locations as tourism areas. Secondary data in the form of existing terminal layouts and air traffic numbers were gained from both airports authorities in Indonesia. The analysis was carried out using the formulas from Japan International Cooperation Agency – Directorate General of Civil Aviation of Indonesia(JICA-DGCA studies in 1996 for significant areas in the terminal building, Ashford and Wright formula for calculating aircraft movement per hour, Microsoft Excel for calculating the 10-year passenger growth rate, and SPSS for determining the linear equation for domestic departure resulted in the forecasted saturation in the near 2020 for both of airports, especially on passengers’ handling areas such as boarding lounge (for departure and baggage claim area (for arrival. The research resulted in ideas to overcome problems related to the increasing capacity by adding areas (if possible and changing layouts. Some other options such as implementation of more effective signage and the suggestion of centralizing security checking areas also are being brought—though needed further research. There should be an addition of numbers of security check lines, appropriately to the increasing number of passengers. If a single queuing line creates delays, then the need for extra line(s is a necessity Keywords: Airport, Terminal Building, Capacity, Flow, Minangkabau, Adisutjipto

  12. Contribution of International and Regional Networks in Developing and Maintaining Human Capacity Building for Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, O. E.

    2015-01-01

    Capacity is defined as; the ability of individuals and organizations or organizational units to perform functions effectively, efficiently and sustainably. Capacity building is an evidence-driven process of strengthening the abilities of individuals, organizations, and systems to perform core functions sustainably, and to continue to improve and develop over time. This article will explain the contributions of knowledge networks at the national, regional and international level in developing the existing capacity building and human resources for regulatory body in Sudan, to confront the future challenges regarding to nuclear power program- safety and security. The article will compare the advantages and effectiveness of these knowledge networks (IAEA, ANNuR, FNRBA) in capacity building and enhance the infrastructure of national regulatory body. And how these networks contribute to enable the regulatory bodies in Africa and Arab countries, to establish and strengthen their regulatory infrastructure for nuclear power programme consistent with international standards and recommendations. As well as the recommendations resulting and deduced from comparative study to promote the exchange of knowledge, experience and information among its members. (author)

  13. Analysis of Circular Development and Investment Possibilities (Transport, Energy and Building Related to International Sports Event Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horváth Bálint

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the possibilities of various development areas (transport, energy, building to make the cost-efficient realisation of high-profile investments, and organising and holding international sports events possible. Using a case study, the paper introduces development routes based on the evaluation of environmental and economic perspectives. The current research introduces the investment characteristics based on the development of the Hungarian building, energy and transport sectors for the 2017-2030 period. The main criterion is the integration of ‘circular economy’. For sectors which operate with high material and energy consumption, the consideration of circular economy principles may prove to be important for sustainable development. Through planning highvolume sports and worldwide events, the usual development strategy for traffic systems focuses on public transport and rentable vehicles (f. e. electric scooter, or bicycle which can decrease CO2 emissions via modern technological solutions. Regarding the buildings, sports arenas and related facilities, besides the existing low-carbon solutions, the functions of buildings must be expanded and their usage prolonged. The management of waste left after the life cycle is expended has to be pre-planned. These are the options for making the sector’s GHG emissions decrease apart from circular tenders, which can be further combined with SMART energetic solutions.

  14. Considering soil-structure interaction effects in the equivalent static analysis method of the Iranian of the Iranian seismic building code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakib, H.; Dehghani Ashkezari, G.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, based on the equivalent static analysis method of the Iranian seismic code, an algorithm is presented to consider the soil-structure interaction (SSI) effects. Modifications of free field motion and structural properties like period and damping due to soil situation are considered in the proposed algorithm. An increase for fundamental period of structure and a modification (usually increase) for it's effective damping are observed. The increase of period is due to the flexibility of the soil foundation and modification of damping is due to the dissipating energy in soil. In order to propose the relative expressions in the presented algorithm, the soil-structure analyses of 8, 10, 13 and 16 stories frames are carried out. By considering the NEHRP soil-structure interaction algorithm and findings of soil-structure interaction analyses carried out in this study, the algorithm based on the equivalent static analysis method of the Iranian seismic building code to consider the effect of soil-structure interaction

  15. Transformative Learning through International Immersion: Building Multicultural Competence in Family Therapy and Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Teresa; Goessling, Kristen; Melendez, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the experiences of graduate students who completed one of two international courses facilitated by family therapy faculty in a U.S. master's-level counseling psychology department. Participants reported that international courses were personally and professionally transformative. Spending time in a foreign country gave them…

  16. Coding for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    Hands-on exercises help you learn to code like a pro No coding experience is required for Coding For Dummies,your one-stop guide to building a foundation of knowledge inwriting computer code for web, application, and softwaredevelopment. It doesn't matter if you've dabbled in coding or neverwritten a line of code, this book guides you through the basics.Using foundational web development languages like HTML, CSS, andJavaScript, it explains in plain English how coding works and whyit's needed. Online exercises developed by Codecademy, a leading online codetraining site, help hone coding skill

  17. From chain liability to chain responsibility: MNE approaches to implement safety and health codes in international supply chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tulder, R.; van Wijk, J.; Kolk, A.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines whether the involvement of stakeholders in the design of corporate codes of conduct leads to a higher implementation likelihood of the code. The empirical focus is on Occupational Safety and Health (OSH). The article compares the inclusion of OSH issues in the codes of conduct

  18. Development of a computational code for the internal doses assessment of the main radionuclides of occupational exposure at IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claro, Thiago Ribeiro

    2011-01-01

    The dose resulting from internal contamination can be estimated with the use of biokinetic models combined with experimental results obtained from bioanalysis and assessment of the time of incorporation. The biokinetics models are represented by a set of compartments expressing the transportation, retention and elimination of radionuclides from the body. The ICRP publications, number 66, 78 and 100, present compartmental models for the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and for systemic distribution for an array of radionuclides of interest for the radiological protection. The objective of this work is to develop a computational code for the internal doses assessment of the main radionuclides of occupational exposure at IPEN. Consequently serving as a agile and efficient tool for the designing, visualization and resolution of compartmental models of any nature. The architecture of the system was conceived containing two independent software: CBT - responsible for the setup and manipulation of models and SSID - responsible for the mathematical solution of the models. Four different techniques are offered for the resolution of system of equations, including semi-analytical and numerical methods, allowing for comparison of precision and performance of both. The software was developed in C≠ programming, using a Microsoft Access database and XML standards for file exchange with other applications. Compartmental models for uranium, thorium and iodine radionuclides were generated for the validation of the CBT software. The models were subsequently solved via SSID software and the results compared with the values published in the issue 78 of ICRP. In all cases the system replicated the values published by ICRP. (author)

  19. Proposal to modify Rule 10a and to delete Recommendation 10a(3) from the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Aharon

    2017-09-01

    Principle 2 of the Prokaryotic Code, as modified by the ICSP in 1999, reads: 'The nomenclature of prokaryotes is not independent of botanical and zoological nomenclature. When naming new taxa in the rank of genus or higher, due consideration is to be given to avoiding names which are regulated by the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature and the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants'. But in the current version of the Prokaryotic Code no Rule implements this version of Principle 2. I therefore propose adding the following sentence to Rule 10a: 'As from January 2001, newly proposed generic names must not be later homonyms of names in use in botany or zoology'. Recommendation 10a(3) of the Code states: 'Avoid introducing into bacteriology as generic names such names as are in use in botany or zoology, in particular well-known names'. This Recommendation contravenes the current version of Principle 2 and the proposed new version of Rule 10a. Therefore I propose to delete Recommendation 10a(3) from the Prokaryotic Code.

  20. Monitoring compliance with the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes in west Africa: multisite cross sectional survey in Togo and Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo, Victor M; Ross, Jay S; Kanon, Souleyman; Ouedraogo, Andre N

    2003-01-18

    To monitor compliance with the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes in health systems, sales outlets, distribution points, and the news media in Togo and Burkina Faso, west Africa. Multisite cross sectional survey. Staff at 43 health facilities and 66 sales outlets and distribution points, 186 health providers, and 105 mothers of infants aged market commercial breast milk substitutes were found in 29 (44%) sales and distribution points. Forty commercial breast milk substitutes violated the labelling standards of the code: 21 were manufactured by Danone, 11 by Nestlé, and eight by other national and international manufacturers. Most (148, 90%) health providers had never heard of the code, and 66 mothers (63%) had never received any counselling on breast feeding by their health providers. In west Africa manufacturers are violating the code of marketing of breast milk substitutes. Comparable levels of code violations are observed with (Burkina Faso) or without (Togo) regulating legislation. Legislation must be accompanied by effective information, training, and monitoring systems to ensure that healthcare providers and manufacturers comply with evidence based practice and the code.

  1. Validation of the coupling of mesh models to GEANT4 Monte Carlo code for simulation of internal sources of photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caribe, Paulo Rauli Rafeson Vasconcelos; Cassola, Vagner Ferreira; Kramer, Richard; Khoury, Helen Jamil

    2013-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional models described by polygonal meshes in numerical dosimetry enables more accurate modeling of complex objects than the use of simple solid. The objectives of this work were validate the coupling of mesh models to the Monte Carlo code GEANT4 and evaluate the influence of the number of vertices in the simulations to obtain absorbed fractions of energy (AFEs). Validation of the coupling was performed to internal sources of photons with energies between 10 keV and 1 MeV for spherical geometries described by the GEANT4 and three-dimensional models with different number of vertices and triangular or quadrilateral faces modeled using Blender program. As a result it was found that there were no significant differences between AFEs for objects described by mesh models and objects described using solid volumes of GEANT4. Since that maintained the shape and the volume the decrease in the number of vertices to describe an object does not influence so meant dosimetric data, but significantly decreases the time required to achieve the dosimetric calculations, especially for energies less than 100 keV

  2. The IAEA's activities in safeguarding nuclear materials and in developing internationally acceptable safety codes and guides for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rometsch, Rudolf; Specter, Herschel

    1977-01-01

    Promoting the peaceful use of nuclear energy and aiming at the international sharing of its benefits are objectives that guide the activities of the Agency. But this promotional work is carried out on condition that security and safety are provided for. All Agency assistance involving nuclear facilities will be subjected to standards of safety or other standards, which are proposed by a State the Agency finds essentially equivalent. Safeguards are always applied on the basis of agreement. States party to NPT are obligated to negotiate and conclude with the Agency agreements which cover all their peaceful nuclear activities. Safeguards agreements concluded outside NPT are applied to specific supplies of facilities, equipment and material. To assist countries in laying down their nuclear safety regulations the Agency's program for the developing of codesof practice and safety guides for nuclear power plants draws up guidelines for governmental organizations, siting, design, operation and quality assurance. Codes are the fundamental documents laying down the objectives of each field of nuclear safety

  3. Implementation of the International Code of Practice on Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology (TRS 457): Review of Test Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the IAEA published Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology: An International Code of Practice (IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 457). This publication recommends procedures for calibration and dosimetric measurement for the attainment of standardized dosimetry. It also addresses requirements both in standards dosimetry laboratories, especially Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), and in clinical centres for radiology, as found in most hospitals. The implementation of TRS No. 457 decreases the uncertainty in the dosimetry of diagnostic radiology beams and provides Member States with a unified and consistent framework for dosimetry in diagnostic radiology, which previously did not exist. A coordinated research project (CRP E2.10.06) was established in order to provide practical guidance to professionals at SSDLs and to clinical medical physicists on the implementation of TRS No. 457. This includes the calibration of radiological dosimetry instrumentation, the dissemination of calibration coefficients to clinical centres and the establishment of dosimetric measurement processes in clinical settings. The main goals of the CRP were to: Test the procedures recommended in TRS No. 457 for calibration of radiation detectors in different types of diagnostic beams and measuring instruments for varying diagnostic X ray modalities; Test the clinical dosimetry procedures, including the use of phantoms and patient dose surveys; Report on the practical implementation of TRS No. 457 at both SSDLs and hospital sites. Testing of TRS No. 457 was performed by a group of medical physicists from hospitals and SSDLs from various institutions worldwide

  4. Rational designing of the internal water supply system in reconstructed residential buildings of mass standard series

    OpenAIRE

    Orlov Evgeny

    2018-01-01

    The issues of water supply system reconstruction in mass series buildings are reviewed with consideration of water- and resource saving. Principal points for location of plumbing cells in apartments, arrangement of water devices and wastewater receivers, selection of pipelines for reconstructed water line are described. Comparative analysis of design variants of inner water line before and following reconstruction are given. It was found that applying the developed system design approaches th...

  5. Financing the energy renovation of public buildings through Internal Contracting. Infinite Solutions Guidebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilken, Peter; Turner, Ian; Kuehnbach, Matthias; Simic, Ivan; Kuharic, Boris; Laranjeira, Celia; Rodrigues, Carlos; Couceiro, Carla; Presotto, Agnese; Mazzeschi, Alessandro; Cleto, Joao

    2017-02-01

    Meeting the European energy and climate policy objectives will require the mobilisation of substantial energy efficiency and renewable energy investments at the local level. Given both the substantial effort necessary to finance the energy transition and restricted municipal budgets, it is clear that these objectives cannot be met through traditional public financing such as grants or direct investment, but by finding a new approach to financing solutions. This Energy Cities guidebook is built upon a comprehensive analysis of Stuttgart's Internal Contracting scheme and a detailed questioning of it by the learning authorities within the INFINITE Solutions project. It is intended to offer guidelines to municipalities as well as universities, hospitals or other institutions interested in applying Internal Contracting to improve their energy consumption and efficiency performance. The approach of this guidebook is developed as follows: The concept of contracting - especially Internal Contracting - is introduced. Universal guidance is offered on how to implement an Internal Contracting scheme and keep it working over the long term. The Internal Contracting scheme is presented in practice. Several cities describe their individual approaches to Internal Contracting and the various ways they have been able to adapt the scheme

  6. The use of plane parallel ionization chambers in high energy electron and photon beams. An international code of practice for dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Research on plane-parallel ionization chambers since the IAEA code of practice (TRS-277) was published in 1987 has explained our knowledge on perturbation and other correction factors in ionization chamber, and also constructional details of these chambers have been shown to be important. Different countries have published, or are in the process of publishing, dosimetry recommendations which include specific procedures for the use of plan parallel ionization chambers. An international working group was formed under the auspieces of the IAEA, first to review the status and the actual validity of the code of practice and second to develop an international code of practice of the use of plane parallel ionization chambers in high energy electron and photon beams used in radiotherapy. This document fulfills the second taste. 153 refs, 21 figs, 18 tabs

  7. Report on corrections and future considerations for Appendices II–VIII of the International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi, and Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the first time, the main text and Appendices II–VIII of the International Code of Nomenclature were separately published following decisions of the Melbourne Nomenclature Section, which contributed to subsequent development of an online resource capable of producing the Appendices in real time. ...

  8. Threats to Validity When Using Open-Ended Items in International Achievement Studies: Coding Responses to the PISA 2012 Problem-Solving Test in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arffman, Inga

    2016-01-01

    Open-ended (OE) items are widely used to gather data on student performance in international achievement studies. However, several factors may threaten validity when using such items. This study examined Finnish coders' opinions about threats to validity when coding responses to OE items in the PISA 2012 problem-solving test. A total of 6…

  9. Enforcing the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes for Better Promotion of Exclusive Breastfeeding: Can Lessons Be Learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barennes, Hubert; Slesak, Guenther; Goyet, Sophie; Aaron, Percy; Srour, Leila M

    2016-02-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding, one of the best natural resources, needs protection and promotion. The International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes (the Code), which aims to prevent the undermining of breastfeeding by formula advertising, faces implementation challenges. We reviewed frequently overlooked challenges and obstacles that the Code is facing worldwide, but particularly in Southeast Asia. Drawing lessons from various countries where we work, and following the example of successful public health interventions, we discussed legislation, enforcement, and experiences that are needed to successfully implement the Code. Successful holistic approaches that have strengthened the Code need to be scaled up. Community-based actions and peer-to-peer promotions have proved successful. Legislation without stringent enforcement and sufficient penalties is ineffective. The public needs education about the benefits and ways and means to support breastfeeding. It is crucial to combine strong political commitment and leadership with strict national regulations, definitions, and enforcement. National breastfeeding committees, with the authority to improve regulations, investigate violations, and enforce the laws, must be established. Systematic monitoring and reporting are needed to identify companies, individuals, intermediaries, and practices that infringe on the Code. Penalizing violators is crucial. Managers of multinational companies must be held accountable for international violations, and international legislative enforcement needs to be established. Further measures should include improved regulations to protect the breastfeeding mother: large-scale education campaigns; strong penalties for Code violators; exclusion of the formula industry from nutrition, education, and policy roles; supportive legal networks; and independent research of interventions supporting breastfeeding. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Positive Predictive Values of International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision Coding Algorithms to Identify Patients With Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinusha Kalatharan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision codes (ICD-10 for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is used within several administrative health care databases. It is unknown whether these codes identify patients who meet strict clinical criteria for ADPKD. Objective: The objective of this study is (1 to determine whether different ICD-10 coding algorithms identify adult patients who meet strict clinical criteria for ADPKD as assessed through medical chart review and (2 to assess the number of patients identified with different ADPKD coding algorithms in Ontario. Design: Validation study of health care database codes, and prevalence. Setting: Ontario, Canada. Patients: For the chart review, 201 adult patients with hospital encounters between April 1, 2002, and March 31, 2014, assigned either ICD-10 codes Q61.2 or Q61.3. Measurements: This study measured positive predictive value of the ICD-10 coding algorithms and the number of Ontarians identified with different coding algorithms. Methods: We manually reviewed a random sample of medical charts in London, Ontario, Canada, and determined whether or not ADPKD was present according to strict clinical criteria. Results: The presence of either ICD-10 code Q61.2 or Q61.3 in a hospital encounter had a positive predictive value of 85% (95% confidence interval [CI], 79%-89% and identified 2981 Ontarians (0.02% of the Ontario adult population. The presence of ICD-10 code Q61.2 in a hospital encounter had a positive predictive value of 97% (95% CI, 86%-100% and identified 394 adults in Ontario (0.003% of the Ontario adult population. Limitations: (1 We could not calculate other measures of validity; (2 the coding algorithms do not identify patients without hospital encounters; and (3 coding practices may differ between hospitals. Conclusions: Most patients with ICD-10 code Q61.2 or Q61.3 assigned during their hospital encounters have ADPKD according to the clinical

  11. Green Building Tools for Tribes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribal green building tools and funding information to support tribal building code adoption, healthy building, siting, energy efficiency, renewable energy, water conservation, green building materials, recycling and adaptation and resilience.

  12. International standard problem (ISP) No. 43 Rapid boron-dilution transient tests for code verification. Comparison report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    International Standard Problem No. 43 (ISP 43) addresses the nuclear industries present capabilities of simulating fluid dynamics aspects of a subset of rapid boron dilution transients. Specifically, the exercise focuses on the sequence involving the transport of a boron-dilute slug through the actuation of a pump. The slug is formed on the primary side of the steam generator as a consequence of in interfacing system leak from the secondary un-borated coolant. Experimental data was collected using the University of Maryland 2 x 4 Thermalhydraulic Loop (UM 2 x 4 Loop) and the Boron-mixing Visualization Facility. Two blind test series were proposed during the first workshop (October 1998) and refined using participant input. The first series, test series A, deals with the injection of a front, i.e., a single interface between borated and dilute fluids. The second blind series, test series B, is the more realistic injection of a slug, i.e., a dilute fluid volume preceded and followed by the borated coolant of the primary system. Data are collected in the UM 2 x 4 Loop and refined details are obtained from the Visualization Facility, which represents a replica of the Loop.s vessel downcomer. In the Loop experimental program, the dilute volume is simulated by cold water and the borated primary coolant is simulated by hot water. The Visualization Facility uses dye to mark the diluted front or slug. The measured boundary conditions for both test series include the initial temperature of the primary system, the front/slug injection flowrate and temperature, and the pressure drop across the core. Temperature data is collected at 185 thermocouple positions in the downcomer and 38 positions in the lower plenum. The advancement of the front/slug through the system is monitored at discrete horizontal levels that contain the thermocouples. The performance of codes is measured relative to a set of figures of merit. During the first workshop, the principal figure of merit was

  13. Theoretical study of the building principal of internal and external energy balances structures in diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djallel ZEBBAR

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Distribution knowledge of the energy introduced into the combustion chamber is of great importance in the theory of internal combustion engines. This work aims to highlight the very complex relationship, often indistinguishable between internal and external energy balances components. The scrutiny of internal balance components has permitted to trace back up to the external balance. This can be easily established on a test bench equipped for the occasion. It will assess the perfection of energy's use, the heat loss and the possibility of their reducing, the energy efficiency of exhaust gas use, the possibility and ways of engine operating parameters improving and finally it will allowing to calculate the cooling and energy recovery systems.

  14. The role of the International Space University in building capacity in emerging space nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Robert

    The International Space University provides graduate-level training to the future leaders of the emerging global space community at its Central Campus in Strasbourg, France, and at locations around the world. In its two-month Summer Session and one-year Masters program, ISU offers its students a unique Core Curriculum covering all disciplines related to space programs and enterprises - space science, space engineering, systems engineering, space policy and law, business and management, and space and society. Both programs also involve an intense student research Team Project providing international graduate students and young space professionals the opportunity to solve complex problems by working together in an intercultural environment. Since its founding in 1987, ISU has graduated more than 2500 students from 96 countries. Together with hundreds of ISU faculty and lecturers from around the world, ISU alumni comprise an extremely effective network of space professionals and leaders that actively facilitates individual career growth, professional activities and international space cooperation.

  15. Main results of the analysis of internal flooding in the reactor building of Kozloduy NPP Unit 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demireva, E.; Goranov, S.; Horstmann, R.

    2004-01-01

    For modernization of Units 5 and 6 of Kozloduy NPP, a comprehensive analysis of internal flooding scenarios has been carried out for the reactor building outside the containment and for the turbine hall by FRAMATOME ANP and ENPRO Consult. The objective of the presentation is to provide information on the main results obtained in the flooding analysis of the reactor building (outside containment). The flooding analysis is being performed under application of the 'Methodology and boundary conditions'. Flooding calculations are provided for all of the rooms in the reactor building outside the containment in which the fluid systems, having the capacity for flooding, are mounted. The performed functional analysis shows whether the consequences of a postulated initial event are within the NPP design or could lead to situations which are not taken into account in the design. The proposals for overcoming of identified unacceptable situations and the possible strategy of room draining are also given. Several cases of leaks inside the sealed rooms in the restricted area lead to the situation that the rooms will get totally flooded. Even if this should be acceptable from the point of view of loss of system function, the water pressure effect on the structural elements, as walls and doors, does not allow such complete filling-up. The second relevant identified effect was spreading of humidity and high temperatures to adjacent rooms. Long-lasting effects of this type have to be avoided, in order to prevent potential common cause effects on safety system equipment (authors)

  16. International cryospheric science capacity building and its role in policy and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A. M.; Armstrong, R. L.; Armstrong, B. R.; Barrett, A. P.; Brodzik, M. J.; Fetterer, F. M.; Fluri, J. L.; Hill, A. F.; Kayastha, R. B.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Khan, A. L.; Miller, H. A.; Minbaeva, C.; Racoviteanu, A.; Raup, B. H.; Rittger, K.

    2017-12-01

    The USAID-funded Contribution to High Asia Runoff from Ice and Snow (CHARIS) project has operated since 2012 with dual goals of research and capacity building. The scientific goal is to quantify snowmelt and ice melt and is tackled in tandem with capacity building activities for partner institutions in eight countries across High Asia. We held project workshops covering topics such as snow and glacier melt modeling, remote sensing of snow and ice, hydrochemistry-based hydrograph separation, and data management. CHARIS also facilitated the start of the first glacier mass balance program in Afghanistan, the first water chemistry laboratory in Bhutan, and supported eight students from four countries in earning Masters of Science by Research in Glaciology degrees from Kathmandu University. Capacity building outcomes are tracked through surveys and interviews with project partners. This feedback, both quantitative and qualitative, improves our understanding of how skills fostered by CHARIS are translated into different workplace contexts and in different political settings. Through this feedback, we document how CHARIS collaborations promote analytical skill development and provide the benefit of improved communication among colleagues across borders in a region where resource management requires a trans-boundary approach. Additionally, we are gathering feedback from partners on ways their hydrology and glaciology research is translated to the policy and management realms. Partners anecdotally report a range of policy relationships, especially with respect to management strategies for water intensive developments such as hydropower and mining. Here we present findings from these surveys, which will guide future development-oriented, science-driven resource management projects. Such endeavors must be tailored to large regional differences in expertise, capacities, policy settings, and research infrastructures, and CHARIS demonstrates ways this can be done effectively.

  17. Monitoring compliance with the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes in west Africa: multisite cross sectional survey in Togo and Burkina Faso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo, Victor M; Ross, Jay S; Kanon, Souleyman; Ouedraogo, Andre N

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To monitor compliance with the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes in health systems, sales outlets, distribution points, and the news media in Togo and Burkina Faso, west Africa. Design Multisite cross sectional survey. Participants Staff at 43 health facilities and 66 sales outlets and distribution points, 186 health providers, and 105 mothers of infants aged ⩽5 months in 16 cities. Results Six (14%) health facilities had received donations of breast milk substitutes. All donations were being given to mothers free of charge. Health providers in five (12%) health facilities had received free samples of breast milk substitutes for purposes other than professional research or evaluation. Health professionals in five (12%) health facilities had received promotional gifts from manufacturers. Promotional materials of commercial breast milk substitutes were found in seven (16%) health facilities. Special displays to market commercial breast milk substitutes were found in 29 (44%) sales and distribution points. Forty commercial breast milk substitutes violated the labelling standards of the code: 21 were manufactured by Danone, 11 by Nestlé, and eight by other national and international manufacturers. Most (148, 90%) health providers had never heard of the code, and 66 mothers (63%) had never received any counselling on breast feeding by their health providers. Conclusion In west Africa manufacturers are violating the code of marketing of breast milk substitutes. Comparable levels of code violations are observed with (Burkina Faso) or without (Togo) regulating legislation. Legislation must be accompanied by effective information, training, and monitoring systems to ensure that healthcare providers and manufacturers comply with evidence based practice and the code. What is already known on this topicAll member states of the World Health Assembly have reaffirmed their support for the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk

  18. 3-dimensional finite element modelling of reactor building internal structure for static analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, M.H.; Reddy, V.J.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Reddy, G.R.; Karandikar, G.V.

    1991-01-01

    a) Thin shell element gives fairly accurate results when compared to 3-D Brick element for the type of structure and loading in Reactor Building. b) The maximum element size is fixed from model 3(c) i.e. 2.0 m. c) Openings with size smaller than 0.5 m can be neglected without affecting the results very much. d) For any such problem, the methodology described in this paper can be used to take rational decisions which will ensure reasonable accuracy. (author)

  19. NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: Building Collaboration Through International Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, K. E.; Schmidt, G. K.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is a virtual institute focused on re-search at the intersection of science and exploration, training the next generation of lunar scientists, and community development. As part of the SSERVI mission, we act as a hub for opportunities that engage the larger scientific and exploration communities in order to form new interdisciplinary, research-focused collaborations. This talk will describe the international partner re-search efforts and how we are engaging the international science and exploration communities through workshops, conferences, online seminars and classes, student exchange programs and internships.

  20. Theory building trends in international management research: an archival review of preferred methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drikus Kriek

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A number of distinguished scholars believe that for theory development to occur within a field, qualitative research must precede quantitative research in order for the field to progress toward maturity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the international management literature from 1991-2007 to ascertain current levels of use of qualitative, quantitative, conceptual and joint (quantitative and qualitative research methods in the field.  Results indicate scholars employ quantitative methods more than qualitative methods.  The implications of these findings for future theory development and the generation of context relevant international management knowledge are discussed.

  1. Building on the International Polar Year: Discovering Interdisciplinary Data Through Federated Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Yarmey

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The legacy of the International Polar Year 2007–2008 (IPY includes advances in open data and meaningful progress towards interoperability of data, systems, and standards. Enabled by metadata brokering technologies and by the growing adoption of international metadata standards, federated data search welcomes diversity in Arctic data and recognizes the value of expertise in community data repositories. Federated search enables specialized data holdings to be discovered by broader audiences and complements the role of metadata registries such as the Global Change Master Directory, providing interoperability across the Arctic web-of-repositories.

  2. Building a Political Settlement: The International Approach to Kenya’s 2008 Post-Election Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karuti Kanyinga

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents findings from an empirical study of the 2008 Kenyan crisis, aimed at exploring the role and effectiveness of the international development and diplomatic communities’ response. This response involved working to ameliorate the fragile political environment that followed the disputed 2007 elections. Thus, this case study was selected as an archetype to demonstrate how international actors can work cooperatively on political settlements. The key objective of this research is to analyse and share lessons about how those international actors present in Kenya engaged with the evolving political settlement to address the conflict. This study draws upon evolving political economy and political settlement debates in its analysis and uses the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD Fragile States Principles as a framework. Adopting such an analytical lens encourages examination of the multiple, context-specific underlying dynamics that influenced the role of international actors during this period of political transition. It also enables a study of the operational factors facing external actors when they attempt to work more politically, and recognition of how carefully these actors need to use the limited role they have in shaping the internal institutional arrangements and dynamics of the countries within which they work. The study’s main findings indicate that in the 2008 post-election period the international development and diplomatic communities collectively commanded substantive influence over the nature and trajectory of Kenya’s evolving political settlement. It argues that these actors enhanced their influence over many important political issues principally as a result of applying good practice in fragile situations: understanding the context, adopting a unified and legitimate stance, coordinating and collaborating closely and acting fast to prevent conflict. They also laid the foundations for

  3. Shell finite element of reinforced concrete for internal pressure analysis of nuclear containment building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hong Pyo, E-mail: hplee@kepri.re.k [Nuclear Power Laboratory, Korea Electric Power Research Institute, 103-16 Munji-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-380 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Research highlights: Finite element program with 9-node degenerated shell element was developed. The developed program was mainly forced to analyze nuclear containment building. Concrete material model is adapted Niwa and Yamada failure criteria. The performance of program developed is verified through various numerical examples. The numerical analysis results similar to the experimental data. - Abstract: This paper describes a 9-node degenerated shell finite element (FE), an analysis program developed for ultimate pressure capacity evaluation and nonlinear analysis of a nuclear containment building. The shell FE developed adopts the Reissner-Mindlin (RM) assumptions to consider the degenerated shell solidification technique and the degree of transverse shear strain occurring in the structure. The material model of the concrete determines the level of the concrete stress and strain by using the equivalent stress-equivalent strain relationship. When a crack occurs in the concrete, the material behavior is expressed through the tension stiffening model that takes adhesive stress into account and through the shear transfer mechanism and compressive strength reduction model of the crack plane. In addition, the failure envelope proposed by Niwa is adopted as the crack occurrence criteria for the compression-tension region, and the failure envelope proposed by Yamada is used for the tension-tension region. The performance of the program developed is verified through various numerical examples. The analysis based on the application of the shell FE developed from the results of verified examples produced results similar to the experiment or other analysis results.

  4. Shell finite element of reinforced concrete for internal pressure analysis of nuclear containment building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hong Pyo

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Finite element program with 9-node degenerated shell element was developed. → The developed program was mainly forced to analyze nuclear containment building. → Concrete material model is adapted Niwa and Yamada failure criteria. → The performance of program developed is verified through various numerical examples. → The numerical analysis results similar to the experimental data. - Abstract: This paper describes a 9-node degenerated shell finite element (FE), an analysis program developed for ultimate pressure capacity evaluation and nonlinear analysis of a nuclear containment building. The shell FE developed adopts the Reissner-Mindlin (RM) assumptions to consider the degenerated shell solidification technique and the degree of transverse shear strain occurring in the structure. The material model of the concrete determines the level of the concrete stress and strain by using the equivalent stress-equivalent strain relationship. When a crack occurs in the concrete, the material behavior is expressed through the tension stiffening model that takes adhesive stress into account and through the shear transfer mechanism and compressive strength reduction model of the crack plane. In addition, the failure envelope proposed by Niwa is adopted as the crack occurrence criteria for the compression-tension region, and the failure envelope proposed by Yamada is used for the tension-tension region. The performance of the program developed is verified through various numerical examples. The analysis based on the application of the shell FE developed from the results of verified examples produced results similar to the experiment or other analysis results.

  5. Silicon Savanna? Local Competence Building and International Venture Capital in Low Income Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hain, Daniel; Jurowetzki, Roman

    2015-01-01

    , or business models which are potentially fit for international or even global markets. In this paper we investigate the pattern of current technology investments in Kenya – one of sub-Saharan Africa’s buzzing ICT centers. In many cases these financial investments are accompanied by intensive technical...

  6. Building a University Brand from within: A Comparison of Coaches' Perspectives of Internal Branding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Kimberly M.; Gorchels, Linda; Aurand, Timothy W.

    2006-01-01

    Branding efforts have typically focused on external promotional strategies to develop brand image. Recently, the brand messages conveyed to employees of an organization have been recognized as being equally as important as the brand messages sent to external stakeholders. This study investigates the internal communication of the university brand…

  7. International Children's Trade Books: Building Blocks for Character Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Terrell A.; Hadaway, Nancy L.; Ward, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of character education has been emphasized since ancient times across cultures and religions as a way to develop morals and values of the younger generations. In this article, the authors highlight several award-winning international children's trade books that reflect the core values recurring in literature and scriptures…

  8. Local Competence Building and International Venture Capital in Low Income Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hain, Daniel; Jurowetzki, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: In this paper, we explore the new phenomenon of international high-tech investments into entrepreneurial ventures at the case of Kenya. Classifying investors and start-ups, and mapping the interaction structure between them, we aim at identifying investment patterns that can contribute...

  9. Defining a Communications Satellite Policy System for the 21st Century: A Model for a International Legal Framework and A New _Code of Conduct_

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, Joseph N.

    1996-02-01

    This paper addresses the changing international communications environment and explores the key elements of a new policy framework for the 21st Century. It addresses the issues related to changing markets, trade considerations, standards, regulatory changes and international institutions and law. The most important aspects will related to new international policy and regulatory frameworks and in particular to a new international code of ethics and behavior in the field of satellite communications. A new communications satellite policy framework requires systematically addressing the following points: • Multi-lateral agreements at the nation state and the operating entity level • Systematic means to access both private and public capital • Meshing ITU regulations with regional and national policy guidelines including • landing rights" and national allocation procedures. • Systematic approach to local partnerships • Resolving the issue of the relative standing of various satellite systems (i.e. GEO, MEO, and LEO systems) • Resolving the rights, duties, and priorities of satellite facility providers versus types of service prviders. Beyond this policy framework and generalized legal infrastructure there is also another need. This is a need that arises from both increased globalism and competitive international markets. This is what might quite simply be called a "code of reasonable conduct:" To provide global and international communications services effectively and well in the 21st Century will require more than meeting minimum international legal requirements. A new "code of conduct" for global satellite communications will thus likely need to address: • Privacy and surveillance • Ethics of transborder data flow • Censorship and moral values • Cultural and linguistic sensitivity • Freedom of the press and respect for journalistic standards As expanding global information and telecommunications systems grow and impact every aspect of modern

  10. Trust Building as a Strategy to Avoid Unintended Consequences of Education. The Case Study of International Summer Camps Designed to Promote Peace and Intercultural Dialogue among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farini, Federico

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to offer both a theoretical contribution and examples of practices of trust building in peace education; the article presents an empirical analysis of videotaped interactions in the context of peace education activities in international groups of adolescents. The analysis regards two international summer camps promoted by the…

  11. Relevance and Effectiveness of the WHO Global Code Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel--Ethical and Systems Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugha, Ruairí; Crowe, Sophie

    2015-05-20

    The relevance and effectiveness of the World Health Organization's (WHO's) Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel is being reviewed in 2015. The Code, which is a set of ethical norms and principles adopted by the World Health Assembly (WHA) in 2010, urges members states to train and retain the health personnel they need, thereby limiting demand for international migration, especially from the under-staffed health systems in low- and middle-income countries. Most countries failed to submit a first report in 2012 on implementation of the Code, including those source countries whose health systems are most under threat from the recruitment of their doctors and nurses, often to work in 4 major destination countries: the United States, United Kingdom, Canada and Australia. Political commitment by source country Ministers of Health needs to have been achieved at the May 2015 WHA to ensure better reporting by these countries on Code implementation for it to be effective. This paper uses ethics and health systems perspectives to analyse some of the drivers of international recruitment. The balance of competing ethics principles, which are contained in the Code's articles, reflects a tension that was evident during the drafting of the Code between 2007 and 2010. In 2007-2008, the right of health personnel to migrate was seen as a preeminent principle by US representatives on the Global Council which co-drafted the Code. Consensus on how to balance competing ethical principles--giving due recognition on the one hand to the obligations of health workers to the countries that trained them and the need for distributive justice given the global inequities of health workforce distribution in relation to need, and the right to migrate on the other hand--was only possible after President Obama took office in January 2009. It is in the interests of all countries to implement the Global Code and not just those that are losing their health

  12. Neurosurgery in Iraqi Kurdistan: An Example of International Neurosurgery Capacity Building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossani, Rimal Hanif; Carr, Steven; Bolles, Gene; Balata, Razvan; Guthikonda, Bharat

    2016-08-01

    The medical infrastructure of Iraqi Kurdistan, a semiautonomous region in the northern part of Iraq, lags disproportionately behind relative to the otherwise booming industrial advances of the region. Although neurosurgical training is available, the local population lacks trust in its own neurosurgeons. Medical facilities suffer from a lack of basic resources, such as high-speed drills, intracranial pressure monitoring, and stereotaxy to care for neurosurgical patients. Since 2012, American volunteer neurosurgeons have delivered lectures and mentored local neurosurgeons in performing neurosurgical procedures. Over the last 4 years, the visiting neurosurgical team has seen hundreds of patients in consultation and performed more than 50 complex cranial and spinal operations jointly with local neurosurgeons. This article discusses our experience as volunteer neurosurgeons in building neurosurgical capacity in Iraqi Kurdistan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. FameLab: A Communication Skills-Building Program Disguised as an International Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalice, D.

    2015-12-01

    One of the key pieces of training missing from most graduate studies in science is skills-building in communication. Beyond the responsibility to share their work with the public, good communication skills enhance a scientist's career path, facilitating comprehension of their work by stakeholders and funders, as well as increasing the ability to collaborate interdisciplinarily. FameLab, an American Idol-style communication competition for early career scientists, helps fill this void, and provides an opportunity to pratice communication skills, with the coaching of professionals, in a safe space. The focus is on training and networking with like-minded scientists. NASA's Astrobiology Program has been implementing FameLab in the US since 2011, but over 25 countries take part globally. Come learn about this innovative program, what impact it's had on participants, and how you can get involved.

  14. Smart solutions for low-income buildings rehabilitation: international researches and experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Arbizzani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Smart City concept briefly refers to a sustainable city where innovative Smart strategies will be adopted to an efficient management of resources flows and social interoperability. Aligned with the most relevant European research experiences, the paper describes the relations between an on-going research from the PDTA Dept., centered on a knowledge platform tool for energy-efficient interactive buildings design, and the contribution of the ELIH-MED project on the use of industrialized solutions and smart devices during the rehabilitation process in Mediterranean low-income housings. A pilot project in the Spanish climate context reveals the important role of Smart Monitoring Devices to encourage energy savings and tackle recognized needs through a participative process where stakeholders and beneficiaries are actively involved.

  15. How to build confidence in climate science and politics? Return on an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aykut, Stefan C.

    2015-01-01

    Taking as a starting point the communications at an international conference held in Paris in 2014, the article analyzes the construction of confidence in climate sciences and politics. How, by which methods and procedures, do climate modeling communities establish the validity of their models? What link can be established between the confidence in numerical simulations of global warming and in the capacity of the international system to successfully tackle the climate issue? The article shows that the existence of a close link between these different forms of confidence questions common belief that expertise should be completely separated from the political process. More generally, it examines the necessity of a 'constitution' for the science-policy relationship at the global level at a time where new paradigms for research and for policy converge toward increasing importance of regional and local levels

  16. Internal sources of risk in building employees’ attitudes of safe work in metallurgical enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Grzybowska

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is the identification of the internal sources of risk in the process of improving the system of safety and work hygiene management. After conduction of the analysis the conclusion is that the significant source of risk in the process of improvement of safety and work hygiene management is the human factor and, in particular, the lack of employees’ awareness concerning the importance of their attitudes in the improvement of the system.

  17. General Principles of the WTO and European Community Laws in Building International Competition Norms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Mo Chung

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The World Trade Organization (WTO established a Working Group on the interaction between trade and competition policy in 1996. By the Doha Ministerial Declaration, it recognized the case for international competition policy framework and agreed that the relevant negotiations take place after the Fifth Session of the Ministerial Conference. The Working Group is meant to focus on the clarification of: core principles, including transparency, non-discrimination and procedural fairness among others in the period until the Fifth Session. This article attempts to clarify the implications of the core (WTO principles to the would-be international competition laws and practices. It further tries to get lessons from competition law and practices of the European Community. Protection of fundamental rights, proportionality, non-discrimination, transparency, supremacy, subsidiarity and direct effect are the general principles of the European Community law to be discussed in relation to the competition law and policy. It concludes that the general principles of the WTO and EC laws provide guiding principles for the future international competition norms, and makes some preliminary assessment of the present Korean competition law and policy in the light of those principles.

  18. Interrelations of codes in human semiotic systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Somov, Georgij

    2016-01-01

    Codes can be viewed as mechanisms that enable relations of signs and their components, i.e., semiosis is actualized. The combinations of these relations produce new relations as new codes are building over other codes. Structures appear in the mechanisms of codes. Hence, codes can be described as transformations of structures from some material systems into others. Structures belong to different carriers, but exist in codes in their "pure" form. Building of codes over other codes fosters t...

  19. Assessment of the Internal Pressure Fragility of the Hanul NPP Units 3 and 4 Containment Building Using a Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyung Kui; Hahm, Dea Gi; Choi, In Kil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The sensitivity of the concrete strength is relatively higher compared to that of the steel strength. According to changes in the structure of the material, about 6-10% ultimate internal pressure differences occurred. Thirty sets of an FE model considering the material uncertainty of concrete and steel were composed for the internal pressure fragility assessment. From the internal pressure fragility assessment of the target containment building, the median capacity of liner leakage is estimated to be 116 psi. As can be seen from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, the containment building is the final protecting shield to prevent radiation leakage. Thus, a structural soundness evaluation for the containment pressure loads owing to a severe accident is very important. Recently, a probabilistic safety assessment has been commonly used to take into account the possible factors of uncertainty in a structural system. An assessment of the internal pressure fragility of the CANDU type containment buildings considering the correlation of structural material variables, and an assessment of the internal pressure fragility of the CANDU type containment buildings using a nonlinear finite element analysis, were also performed. However, for PWR type containment buildings, a fragility assessment has not been performed yet using a nonlinear finite element model (FEM) analysis. In this study, for the Hanul NPP units 3 and 4 containment building, the internal pressure fragility assessment was established using an FEM analysis. To do this, a three-dimensional finite element model, material property values, and a sensitive analysis were developed. A nonlinear finite element analysis of the Hanul NPP units 3 and 4 containment building was performed for a material sensitivity analysis and internal pressure fragility assessment.

  20. Assessment of the Internal Pressure Fragility of the Hanul NPP Units 3 and 4 Containment Building Using a Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyung Kui; Hahm, Dea Gi; Choi, In Kil

    2013-01-01

    The sensitivity of the concrete strength is relatively higher compared to that of the steel strength. According to changes in the structure of the material, about 6-10% ultimate internal pressure differences occurred. Thirty sets of an FE model considering the material uncertainty of concrete and steel were composed for the internal pressure fragility assessment. From the internal pressure fragility assessment of the target containment building, the median capacity of liner leakage is estimated to be 116 psi. As can be seen from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, the containment building is the final protecting shield to prevent radiation leakage. Thus, a structural soundness evaluation for the containment pressure loads owing to a severe accident is very important. Recently, a probabilistic safety assessment has been commonly used to take into account the possible factors of uncertainty in a structural system. An assessment of the internal pressure fragility of the CANDU type containment buildings considering the correlation of structural material variables, and an assessment of the internal pressure fragility of the CANDU type containment buildings using a nonlinear finite element analysis, were also performed. However, for PWR type containment buildings, a fragility assessment has not been performed yet using a nonlinear finite element model (FEM) analysis. In this study, for the Hanul NPP units 3 and 4 containment building, the internal pressure fragility assessment was established using an FEM analysis. To do this, a three-dimensional finite element model, material property values, and a sensitive analysis were developed. A nonlinear finite element analysis of the Hanul NPP units 3 and 4 containment building was performed for a material sensitivity analysis and internal pressure fragility assessment

  1. The Aster code; Code Aster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delbecq, J.M

    1999-07-01

    The Aster code is a 2D or 3D finite-element calculation code for structures developed by the R and D direction of Electricite de France (EdF). This dossier presents a complete overview of the characteristics and uses of the Aster code: introduction of version 4; the context of Aster (organisation of the code development, versions, systems and interfaces, development tools, quality assurance, independent validation); static mechanics (linear thermo-elasticity, Euler buckling, cables, Zarka-Casier method); non-linear mechanics (materials behaviour, big deformations, specific loads, unloading and loss of load proportionality indicators, global algorithm, contact and friction); rupture mechanics (G energy restitution level, restitution level in thermo-elasto-plasticity, 3D local energy restitution level, KI and KII stress intensity factors, calculation of limit loads for structures), specific treatments (fatigue, rupture, wear, error estimation); meshes and models (mesh generation, modeling, loads and boundary conditions, links between different modeling processes, resolution of linear systems, display of results etc..); vibration mechanics (modal and harmonic analysis, dynamics with shocks, direct transient dynamics, seismic analysis and aleatory dynamics, non-linear dynamics, dynamical sub-structuring); fluid-structure interactions (internal acoustics, mass, rigidity and damping); linear and non-linear thermal analysis; steels and metal industry (structure transformations); coupled problems (internal chaining, internal thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling, chaining with other codes); products and services. (J.S.)

  2. Numerical modelling of the processes in the WWER-1000 containment building during cold leg LOCA using the CONTEMPT-LT/026 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, N.I.; Sybotinov, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    The CONTEMPT-LT/026 code has been used to produce numerical results for the processes in a WWER-1000 containment building during cold leg LOCA with break at the reactor vessel. The objective of the analysis is to estimate the maximal loads on the containment in case of LOCA. Available design data for the geometry and for the operational characteristics of the low-pressure ECC system and the sprinkler system have been used. Boundary conditions such as mass flow and enthalpies at the breach are given by a RELAP4/MOD6 computation. Hydrogen explosions in the containment are not considered. It is found that in case of normal functioning of the low-pressure ECC system the maximal pressure is 3,26±0,44 bar. In the case of malfunctioning of the low-pressure ECC system, the predicted maximal pressure is 4±0,44 bar, when: a) only 50% of the heat transfer surface of the heat exchanger is effectively used due to pollution; b) the main pipeline of the sprinkler is broken; c) the pipeline to the heat exchanger is partially broken so that the mass flow through the exchanger is only 50% of the nominal; and d) ECC low-pressure ECC system attains its maximal efficiency within 3 min, the predicted maximal pressure is 4±0,44 bar

  3. Shifting views and building bonds: Narratives of internationally adopted children about their dual culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Laelia; Harf, Aurélie; Sarmiento, Laura; Skandrani, Sara; Moro, Marie Rose

    2018-06-01

    American literature on international adoption suggests that adoptees' pride in the culture of their birth country improves their self-esteem and helps them to cope with experiences of racism. Parents are therefore encouraged to teach their adopted children multicultural skills to improve their psychological well-being. French psychologists, on the contrary, suggest that adoptees should feel fully members of their adoptive country and families. These practices shed light on the respective multicultural and universalist paradigms in the US and France. Few papers, however, consider the opinions of adoptees. This study explores internationally adopted children raised in France and their spontaneous curiosity about their birth country. The present study used semi-structured interviews with 19 adoptees aged 8-18 years old, to explore their attitudes towards the culture of their birth country. Transcripts of recorded interviews were analyzed according to interpretative phenomenological analysis. While there was striking consistency of interest in birth countries, adoptees' expression of curiosity varied across time. Children described distinctive goals: knowing more about their history, finding relatives, becoming a multicultural citizen, or simply helping people. Their parents' involvement was thus seen as helpful, but adoptees stress the need to feel ready and may prefer independent ways of learning about their birth country. Adoptees' multiple feelings of belonging derive not only from multicultural training but from a lifelong construction of self. Professionals and parents may need to adapt to adoptees' individual development, distinctive time frames, and ways of learning to provide better support to them.

  4. Opening new horizons, building new synergies : 1998 annual report of Hydro-Quebec International

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Hydro-Quebec International (HQI) was established in 1978 as a wholly owned subsidiary of Hydro-Quebec. Its mission is to contribute to Hydro-Quebec's growth and profitability by investing in energy partnerships and by selling Hydro-Quebec expertise internationally. This annual report presents highlights of the company's operations, balance sheet, financial position, and investments. 1998 proved to be a year of market development and prospecting which yielded promising results. The expanded scope of the company that now includes investment and infrastructure construction was already generating $ 26 million in economic spinoff for Quebec. The report highlights HQI's involvement in Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and Asia. Great strides have been made also in ensuring the most rigorous practices possible to assess and manage risk and to bolster the company's ability to take unforeseen events in stride. On the investment side, in 1998, the first year of its involvement as an investor, HQI initiated investments amounting to $137 million. Plans are to double that figure in 1999. tabs., figs

  5. Relevance and Effectiveness of the WHO Global Code Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel – Ethical and Systems Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruairi Brugha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The relevance and effectiveness of the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel is being reviewed in 2015. The Code, which is a set of ethical norms and principles adopted by the World Health Assembly (WHA in 2010, urges members states to train and retain the health personnel they need, thereby limiting demand for international migration, especially from the under-staffed health systems in low- and middle-income countries. Most countries failed to submit a first report in 2012 on implementation of the Code, including those source countries whose health systems are most under threat from the recruitment of their doctors and nurses, often to work in 4 major destination countries: the United States, United Kingdom, Canada and Australia. Political commitment by source country Ministers of Health needs to have been achieved at the May 2015 WHA to ensure better reporting by these countries on Code implementation for it to be effective. This paper uses ethics and health systems perspectives to analyse some of the drivers of international recruitment. The balance of competing ethics principles, which are contained in the Code’s articles, reflects a tension that was evident during the drafting of the Code between 2007 and 2010. In 2007-2008, the right of health personnel to migrate was seen as a preeminent principle by US representatives on the Global Council which co-drafted the Code. Consensus on how to balance competing ethical principles – giving due recognition on the one hand to the obligations of health workers to the countries that trained them and the need for distributive justice given the global inequities of health workforce distribution in relation to need, and the right to migrate on the other hand – was only possible after President Obama took office in January 2009. It is in the interests of all countries to implement the Global Code and not just those that

  6. Regulatory Capacity Building in Romania – an International Nuclear Safety Cooperation between Norway, Romania and the IAEA 2013-2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattsson, H.

    2016-01-01

    The Romanian National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN), the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is cooperating on a project named “Regional Excellence Project on Regulatory Capacity Building in Nuclear and Radiological Safety, Emergency Preparedness and Response in Romania“. The project started in the end of 2013 and will be completed in 2017. The project has a budget of 4.2 million euros, where 85% is covered by Norway Grants and 15% covered by Romania. Norway Grants is the contribution of Norway to reducing economical and social disparities and strengthening bilateral relations with 16 EU countries in Central and Southern Europe. The entire project is organised through an IAEA extra-budgetary programme. This project is a continuation of a similar project with the same partners that was successfully implemented in the period 2009-2011.

  7. Measurements of 222Rn and its daughters and estimation of internal doses to workers in underground buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Jianping; Lu Zhizhao; Li Yuanshan

    1993-03-01

    The results of concentration measuring of 222 Ru and its daughters and estimation of internal doses to workers in the underground buildings at Nanjing city are presented. The double filtering membrane method and Thomas method were used in the monitoring of 222 Rn and its daughters, and the dose conversion factor was taken from the latest UNSCEAR report. Concentration distributions of 222 Rn and its daughters were approximately log-normal. The geometric means for 222 Rn was 40.5 Bq · m -3 and for its daughters was 1.4 x 10 -7 J · m -3 . The equilibrium factor was 0.63. The radioactive equilibrium ratio between short-lived 222 Rn daughters was 1:0.57:0.49. The estimation value of annual effective dose equivalent from 222 Rn daughters to workers working at underground sites was 1.3 mSv, which was 86% higher than that of those working on ground sites

  8. AAA and PBC calculation accuracy in the surface build-up region in tangential beam treatments. Phantom and breast case study with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panettieri, Vanessa; Barsoum, Pierre; Westermark, Mathias; Brualla, Lorenzo; Lax, Ingmar

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: In tangential beam treatments accurate dose calculation of the absorbed dose in the build-up region is of major importance, in particular when the target has superficial extension close to the skin. In most analytical treatment planning systems (TPSs) calculations depend on the experimental measurements introduced by the user in which accuracy might be limited by the type of detector employed to perform them. To quantify the discrepancy between analytically calculated and delivered dose in the build-up region, near the skin of a patient, independent Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the PENELOPE code were performed. Dose distributions obtained with MC simulations were compared with those given by the Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) algorithm and the Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) implemented in the commercial TPS Eclipse. Material and methods: A cylindrical phantom was used to approximate the breast contour of a patient for MC simulations and the TPS. Calculations of the absorbed doses were performed for 6 and 18 MV beams for four different angles of incidence: 15 deg., 30 deg., 45 deg. and 75 deg. and different field sizes: 3 x 3 cm 2 , 10 x 10 cm 2 and 40 x 40 cm 2 . Absorbed doses along the phantom central axis were obtained with both the PBC algorithm and the AAA and compared to those estimated by the MC simulations. Additionally, a breast patient case was calculated with two opposed 6 MV photon beams using all the aforementioned analytical and stochastic algorithms. Results: For the 6 MV photon beam in the phantom case, both the PBC algorithm and the AAA tend to underestimate the absorbed dose in the build-up region in comparison to MC results. These differences are clinically irrelevant and are included in a 1 mm range. This tendency is also confirmed in the breast patient case. For the 18 MV beam the PBC algorithm underestimates the absorbed dose with respect to the AAA. In comparison to MC simulations the PBC algorithm tends

  9. Global Justice: Building International and Supranational Structures on the Basis of Fundamental Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Lammertse

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is intended to share a few thoughts, notions and questions about regulatory and governmental structures, both national and international, with regard to the development of global justice. It will highlight the issue whether or not local wisdom can contribute to global justice. In addition, this writing will discover legal problems that arise from the idea of global society and global justice by analyzing jurisdictional aspects and by explaining a little bit about dematerialization of crime, as it has been affected by the changing of communities’ behavior in global contexts after the era of computer and information and communication technology (ICT. Progressive development in Europe, especially regarding the European Union Law, will also be explored in order to describe the respect for fundamental rights in this region.

  10. Building a Collaborative Network for Education and Training in International Trade Facilitation Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clendenin, John A.; Petrova, Nadya N.; Gill, Joshua K.

    The authors present the benefits of collaboration rather than competition in developing educational and training resources for international trade within a geographic region and explore the challenges for business partners, governments and educational institutions. The paper indicates that flexibility in the 21st Century is critical, particularly when striving for virtual implementations of the solution services. It is essential, say the authors, for educators, governments and business executives to focus on performance and the careful orchestration and integration of business, policy and information technology for “Networking” that successfully stimulates inter-governmental cooperation and innovative policies that foster Regional trade facilitation. An innovative way to enhance 21st Century Trade Facilitation is offered with Supply Chain Centers of Regional Excellence (SCcORE).

  11. Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Waste; Codigo De Practica Sobre Movimientos Internacionales Transfronterizos De Desechos Radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-11-14

    On 21 September 1990, the General Conference, by resolution GC(XXXIV)/RES/530, adopted a Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Waste and requested the Director General - inter alia - to take all necessary steps to ensure wide dissemination of the Code of Practice at both the national and the international level. The Code of Practice was elaborated by a Group of Experts established pursuant to resolution GC(XXXII)/RES/490 adopted by the General Conference in 1988. The text of the Code of Practice is reproduced herewith for the information of all Member States [Spanish] El 21 de septiembre de 1990, la Conferencia General, en su resolueion GC(XXXIV)/RES/53O, aprobo un Codigo de Practica sobre movimientos internacionales transfronterizos de desechos radiactivos y pidio al Director General, entre otras cosas, que tomase todas las medidas necesarias para lograr una amplia difusion del Codigo de Practica en los planos nacional e internacional. El Codigo de Practica lo elaboro un Grupo de Expertos establecido en cumplimiento de la resolucion GC(XXXII)/RES/49O aprobada por la Conferencia General en 1988. En el presente documento se reproduce el texto del Codigo de Practica para informacion de todos los Estados Miembros.

  12. Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Waste; Kodeks Praktiki V Oblasti Meikduiarodnog0 Transgranichnogo Peremeshhenija Radioaktivnyh Othodov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-11-15

    On 21 September 1990, the General Conference, by resolution GC(XXXIV)/RES/530, adopted a Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Waste and requested the Director General - inter alia - to take all necessary steps to ensure wide dissemination of the Code of Practice at both the national and the international level. The Code of Practice was elaborated by a Group of Experts established pursuant to resolution GC(XXXII)/RES/490 adopted by the General Conference in 1988. The text of the Code of Practice is reproduced herewith for the information of all Member States [Russian] 21 sentjabrja 1990 goda General'naja konferencija prinjala rezoljuciju GC(XXXIV)/RES/530 o Kodekse praktiki v oblasti mezhdunarodnogo transgranichnogo peremeshhenija radioaktivnyh othodov i predlozhila General'nomu direktoru , v chastnosti, prinjat' vse neobhodimye mery dlja obespechenija shirokogo rasprostranenija Kodeksa praktiki kak na nacional'nom, tak i na mezhdunarodnom urovnjah. Kodeks praktiki byl podgotovlen gruppoj jekspertov , uchrezhdennoj vo ispolnenie rezoljucii GC(XXXII)/RES/490, prinjatoj General'noj konferenciej v 1988 godu. Tekst Kodeksa praktiki vosproizvoditsja nizhe dlja informacii vseh gosudarstv-chlenov.

  13. International Collaboration on Building Local Technical Capacities for Monitoring Volcanic Activity at Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Wolf, R. P.; Chigna, G.; Morales, H.; Waite, G. P.; Oommen, T.; Lechner, H. N.

    2015-12-01

    Pacaya volcano is a frequently active and potentially dangerous volcano situated in the Guatemalan volcanic arc. It is also a National Park and a major touristic attraction, constituting an important economic resource for local municipality and the nearby communities. Recent eruptions have caused fatalities and extensive damage to nearby communities, highlighting the need for risk management and loss reduction from the volcanic activity. Volcanic monitoring at Pacaya is done by the Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), instrumentally through one short period seismic station, and visually by the Parque Nacional Volcan de Pacaya y Laguna de Calderas (PNVPLC) personnel. We carry out a project to increase the local technical capacities for monitoring volcanic activity at Pacaya. Funding for the project comes from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists through the Geoscientists Without Borders program. Three seismic and continuous GPS stations will be installed at locations within 5 km from the main vent at Pacaya, and one webcam will aid in the visual monitoring tasks. Local educational and outreach components of the project include technical workshops on data monitoring use, and short thesis projects with the San Carlos University in Guatemala. A small permanent exhibit at the PNVPLC museum or visitor center, focusing on the volcano's history, hazards and resources, will also be established as part of the project. The strategy to involve a diverse group of local collaborators in Guatemala aims to increase the chances for long term sustainability of the project, and relies not only on transferring technology but also the "know-how" to make that technology useful. Although not a primary research project, it builds on a relationship of years of joint research projects at Pacaya between the participants, and could be a model of how to increase the broader impacts of such long term collaboration partnerships.

  14. Building Internal Strength, Sustainable Self-Esteem, and Inner Motivation as a Researcher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Andres Trujillo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Having a "normal" professional job and doing research impose different social and personal connotations. These differences materialize at least in two clear ways. First, it is common that researchers in the making find it very difficult to communicate to their closest social network (e.g., family and old close friends the content and the importance of their work, as they lose known sources of social comparison. Meanwhile, professional job titles (e.g., brand manager, auditor, lawyer are self-explanatory, and they provide for the owner an immediate social contextualization and recognition. Second, students normally receive delayed and ambiguous feedback and reinforcement while doing a PhD, contrasting with the continuous flow of assessment that companies give to their employees. In this article, I analyze how young researchers may develop a feeling of social isolation as the communication bridges with family, old friends, and undergraduate colleagues become narrower than before, making it difficult to receive external reinforcement on their social position and comparative achievement. This feeling, combined with the ambiguous feedback during the early stages of a research career, challenges the self-esteem of PhD students, forcing them to develop a self-contained personal security in order to cope with those two social contexts. Some young researchers might even withdraw from PhD programs should they fail to develop such psychological strength. I approach the issue through my own experience, first as a junior consultant in a multinational firm and then as a PhD candidate in economics. Second, I explore the behavioral phenomena that occur beneath those feelings in order to understand how to build such psychological strength. My goal is, through the exploration of my personal experience of becoming a researcher, to offer young researchers a useful narrative to help face the potentially negative feelings that may emerge when learning to balance

  15. Building Transnational Bodies: Norway and the International Development of Laboratory Animal Science, ca. 1956–1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druglitrø, Tone; Kirk, Robert G. W.

    2015-01-01

    Argument This article adopts a historical perspective to examine the development of Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine, an auxiliary field which formed to facilitate the work of the biomedical sciences by systematically improving laboratory animal production, provision, and maintenance in the post Second World War period. We investigate how Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine co-developed at the local level (responding to national needs and concerns) yet was simultaneously transnational in orientation (responding to the scientific need that knowledge, practices, objects and animals circulate freely). Adapting the work of Tsing (2004), we argue that national differences provided the creative “friction” that helped drive the formation of Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine as a transnational endeavor. Our analysis engages with the themes of this special issue by focusing on the development of Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine in Norway, which both informed wider transnational developments and was formed by them. We show that Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine can only be properly understood from a spatial perspective; whilst it developed and was structured through national “centers,” its orientation was transnational necessitating international networks through which knowledge, practice, technologies, and animals circulated. More and better laboratory animals are today required than ever before, and this demand will continue to rise if it is to keep pace with the quickening tempo of biological and veterinary research. The provision of this living experimental material is no longer a local problem; local, that is, to the research institute. It has become a national concern, and, in some of its aspects . . . even international. (William Lane-Petter 1957, 240) PMID:24941794

  16. International recommendations for national patient safety incident reporting systems: an expert Delphi consensus-building process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Ann-Marie; Burns, Elaine M; Hull, Louise; Mayer, Erik; Sevdalis, Nick; Darzi, Ara

    2017-02-01

    Patient safety incident reporting systems (PSRS) have been established for over a decade, but uncertainty remains regarding the role that they can and ought to play in quantifying healthcare-related harm and improving care. To establish international, expert consensus on the purpose of PSRS regarding monitoring and learning from incidents and developing recommendations for their future role. After a scoping review of the literature, semi-structured interviews with experts in PSRS were conducted. Based on these findings, a survey-based questionnaire was developed and subsequently completed by a larger expert panel. Using a Delphi approach, consensus was reached regarding the ideal role of PSRSs. Recommendations for best practice were devised. Forty recommendations emerged from the Delphi procedure on the role and use of PSRS. Experts agreed reporting system should not be used as an epidemiological tool to monitor the rate of harm over time or to appraise the relative safety of hospitals. They agreed reporting is a valuable mechanism for identifying organisational safety needs. The benefit of a national system was clear with respect to medication error, device failures, hospital-acquired infections and never events as these problems often require solutions at a national level. Experts recommended training for senior healthcare professionals in incident investigation. Consensus recommendation was for hospitals to take responsibility for creating safety solutions locally that could be shared nationally. We obtained reasonable consensus among experts on aims and specifications of PSRS. This information can be used to reflect on existing and future PSRS, and their role within the wider patient safety landscape. The role of PSRS as instruments for learning needs to be elaborated and developed further internationally. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. [Comparative analysis of occupational health physician's duties based upon legislative decree 81/2008 art. 25 and upon the Ethics Code of the International Commission on Occupational Health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, G; Mora, Erika

    2009-01-01

    Ethical behaviour consists ofindividual choices inspired by knowledge and professional experience derived from the universally acknowledged ethical principles of beneficience/nonmaleficience, autonomy and justice. However, in spite of the unanimous consent on their universal importance, such principles do not usually have the strength of a law. The recently introduced Italian law on the protection of workers' health represents a novelty because it gives the Ethics Code of the International Commission on Occupational Health legal strength. This paper aims at examining article 25 of legislative decree 81/2008 by comparing the points of the Ethics Code and the Deontology Code of the Italian medical profession. The relationships between the 12 points of paragraph 1 of article 25, the 26 points ofthe Code ofEthics and the 75 articles of the Deontology Code are described with regard to the occupational health physician's duties (i) of collaboration with other occupational health professionals, (ii) of organization and execution of health surveillance, (iii) of recording, securing, transmitting of medical files on workers' health and (iv) of employee and employer information on the importance and meaning of health surveillance.

  18. Positive predictive values of the International Classification of Disease, 10th edition diagnoses codes for diverticular disease in the Danish National Registry of Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Erichsen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Rune Erichsen1, Lisa Strate2, Henrik Toft Sørensen1, John A Baron31Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark; 2Division of Gastroenterology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 3Departments of Medicine and of Community and Family Medicine, Dartmouth Medical School, NH, USAObjective: To investigate the accuracy of diagnostic coding for diverticular disease in the Danish National Registry of Patients (NRP.Study design and setting: At Aalborg Hospital, Denmark, with a catchment area of 640,000 inhabitants, we identified 100 patients recorded in the NRP with a diagnosis of diverticular disease (International Classification of Disease codes, 10th revision [ICD-10] K572–K579 during the 1999–2008 period. We assessed the positive predictive value (PPV as a measure of the accuracy of discharge codes for diverticular disease using information from discharge abstracts and outpatient notes as the reference standard.Results: Of the 100 patients coded with diverticular disease, 49 had complicated diverticular disease, whereas 51 had uncomplicated diverticulosis. For the overall diagnosis of diverticular disease (K57, the PPV was 0.98 (95% confidence intervals [CIs]: 0.93, 0.99. For the more detailed subgroups of diagnosis indicating the presence or absence of complications (K573–K579 the PPVs ranged from 0.67 (95% CI: 0.09, 0.99 to 0.92 (95% CI: 0.52, 1.00. The diagnosis codes did not allow accurate identification of uncomplicated disease or any specific complication. However, the combined ICD-10 codes K572, K574, and K578 had a PPV of 0.91 (95% CI: 0.71, 0.99 for any complication.Conclusion: The diagnosis codes in the NRP can be used to identify patients with diverticular disease in general; however, they do not accurately discern patients with uncomplicated diverticulosis or with specific diverticular complications.Keywords: diverticulum, colon, diverticulitis, validation studies

  19. Population-based evaluation of a suggested anatomic and clinical classification of congenital heart defects based on the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goffinet François

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classification of the overall spectrum of congenital heart defects (CHD has always been challenging, in part because of the diversity of the cardiac phenotypes, but also because of the oft-complex associations. The purpose of our study was to establish a comprehensive and easy-to-use classification of CHD for clinical and epidemiological studies based on the long list of the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC. Methods We coded each individual malformation using six-digit codes from the long list of IPCCC. We then regrouped all lesions into 10 categories and 23 subcategories according to a multi-dimensional approach encompassing anatomic, diagnostic and therapeutic criteria. This anatomic and clinical classification of congenital heart disease (ACC-CHD was then applied to data acquired from a population-based cohort of patients with CHD in France, made up of 2867 cases (82% live births, 1.8% stillbirths and 16.2% pregnancy terminations. Results The majority of cases (79.5% could be identified with a single IPCCC code. The category "Heterotaxy, including isomerism and mirror-imagery" was the only one that typically required more than one code for identification of cases. The two largest categories were "ventricular septal defects" (52% and "anomalies of the outflow tracts and arterial valves" (20% of cases. Conclusion Our proposed classification is not new, but rather a regrouping of the known spectrum of CHD into a manageable number of categories based on anatomic and clinical criteria. The classification is designed to use the code numbers of the long list of IPCCC but can accommodate ICD-10 codes. Its exhaustiveness, simplicity, and anatomic basis make it useful for clinical and epidemiologic studies, including those aimed at assessment of risk factors and outcomes.

  20. Responses of a tall building with U.S. code-type instrumentation in Tokyo, Japan, to events before, during and after the Tohoku earthquake of 11 March 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebi, Mehmet; Kashima, Toshihide; Ghahari, S. Farid; Abazarsa, Fariba; Taciroglu, Ertugrul

    2016-01-01

    The 11 March 2011 M 9.0 Tohoku earthquake generated long-duration shaking that propagated hundreds of kilometers from the epicenter and affected tall buildings in urban areas several hundred kilometers from the epicenter of the main shock. Recorded responses show that tall buildings were affected by long-period motions. This study presents the behavior and performance of a 37-story building in the Tsukuda area of Tokyo, Japan, as inferred from modal analyses of records retrieved for a time interval covering a few days before, during, and for several months after the main shock. The U.S. “code-type” array comprises three triaxial accelerometers deployed at three levels in the superstructure. Such a sparse array in a tall structure limits a reliable assessment, because its performance must be based on only the average drift ratios. Based on the inferred values of this parameter, the subject building was not structurally damaged.

  1. Building community in international politics: A study of political press conferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Bhatia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In today’s increasingly globalised yet disconnected world, especially in the contemporary context of a turbulent political landscape, there has been an increasing effort made by socio-political leaders at solidifying alliances and drawing support from different corners of the world in order to neutralize policies. Drawing on a multidimensional framework, in particular, critical discourse analysis and membership categorization analysis, this paper explores the various strategies employed by political leaders, attempting to reconcile disparate perspectives in the face of increasing socio-economic inter-connection and political dependence. More often than not, it was discovered, political leaders drew upon the somewhat “illusory” notion of “international community”, turning it into a tool of persuasion and membership category. In doing so, this paper aims to illustrate how the creation of illusive categories and perceptions are intended as a means of drawing support from diverse political leaders and projecting a united front before scrutinizing press and public.

  2. Building on the International Year of Astronomy: The Dark Skies Awareness Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.

    2010-08-01

    The International Year of Astronomy (IYA2009) offered opportunities to create exemplary educational programs in astronomy, such as those through the cornerstone project, Dark Skies Awareness (DSA). The preservation of dark skies is important for many reasons including astronomy, energy conservation, wildlife conservation, and even human health. Light pollution is a growing concern, yet it is one of the easiest global environmental problems citizen scientists can address on a local level. The Dark Skies workshop imparted the skills necessary for participants to lead activities at their home institution for conserving dark skies. Workshop participants experienced the hands-on activities, which are suitable for use in a variety of settings including museums, science centers, planetariums, schools, university outreach efforts, and astronomy club events. Participants were immersed in activities that illustrate proper lighting, light pollution's effects on wildlife, and how to measure the darkness of your skies. Several citizen science projects were highlighted, including GLOBE at Night, the Great World Wide Star Count, and How Many Stars. These programs enlist the help of students and the general public to collect data on the night sky conditions in their community and contribute to a worldwide database on light pollution. The data can be analyzed using various online tools. A CD of activities, a light shielding demonstration, a book, a two DVD set with a planetarium show, and many other resources are included in a Dark Skies Education Kit, which workshop participants received at the close of the workshop.

  3. Stakeholder involvement in building and maintaining national and international radiation safety infrastructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, K.

    2004-01-01

    Society's expectations with regard to policy towards risky technologies have changed significantly over the past 50 years, and perhaps most dramatically, over the past decade. Arrangements for the development and implementation of such policy may well fit with traditional theories from the disciplines of law, political science and engineering regarding democratic legitimacy, the delegation of power and the role of the expert. They may, however, no longer fit with a policy environment that is considerably more complex than those theories allow. The stakes are high for the radiation protection community as it seeks to recognize and accommodate these changed and changing expectations.For many years, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and its Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has an active work programme on details and implications of stakeholder involvement in radiological protection decision making processes. The series of workshops in Villigen, Switzerland (in 1998 and 2002) and related follow-up work, offer assistance to the international radiological protection community on how to better integrate radiological protection into modern society. The lessons that have been learned in this area carry implications on national policy and on the governmental infrastructures necessary to carry it out

  4. Building Baluchitherium and Indricotherium: imperial and international networks in early-twentieth century paleontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Over the first decades of the twentieth century, the fragmentary remains of a huge prehistoric ungulate were unearthed in scientific expeditions in India, Turkestan and Mongolia. Following channels of formal and informal empire, these were transported to collections in Britain, Russia and the United States. While striking and of immense size, the bones proved extremely difficult to interpret. Alternately naming the creature Paraceratherium, Baluchitherium and Indricotherium, paleontologists Clive Forster-Cooper, Alexei Borissiak and Henry Fairfield Osborn struggled over the reconstruction of this gigantic fossil mammal. However, despite these problems, shared work on the creature served as a focus for collaboration and exchange rather than rivalry between these three scientific communities. Not only did the initial interpretation and analysis depend on pre-existing connections between British and American paleontological institutions, but the need for comparative material, recognition and contacts brought British and American scholars into communication and exchange with their counterparts in the Soviet Union. This article examines these processes. It first uses these excavations as a comparative case-study of different manifestations of colonial science in this period, examining how scholars in the Britain, the Russian Empire and the United States used formal and informal colonial links to Asia to pursue new research. It then moves to examine how the common problem of reconstructing this giant animal drew metropolitan scientific communities together, at least for a time. The construction of the Baluchitherium and Indricotherium illustrates the drives to expand research both imperially and internationally in the early-twentieth century, but also the continual problems in resources, institutionalization, transport and communication that could run up against scientific work.

  5. Influence of internal thermal mass on the indoor thermal dynamics and integration of phase change materials in furniture for building energy storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johra, Hicham; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    2017-01-01

    The increasing share of intermittent renewable energy on the grid encourages researchers to develop demand-side management strategies. Passive heat storage in the indoor space is a promising solution to improve the building energy flexibility. It relies on an accurate control of the transient...... building temperature. However, many of the current numerical models for building energy systems assume empty rooms and do not account entirely for the internal thermal inertia of objects like furniture. This review article points out that such assumption is not valid for dynamic calculations...

  6. Internal exposure from building materials exhaling (222)Rn and (220)Rn as compared to external exposure due to their natural radioactivity content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujić, Predrag; Celiković, Igor; Kandić, Aleksandar; Vukanac, Ivana; Durasević, Mirjana; Dragosavac, Dusan; Zunić, Zora S

    2010-01-01

    The main scope of this paper is to point out the importance of introducing radon and thoron exhalation measurements from building materials in the regulating frame. Currently (2009), such a regulation of this kind of exposure is not explicitly included in the Serbian regulating network. To this end, this work reports concentration measurements of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K and radon and thoron exhalation rates from building materials used in Serbia. Following detailed analysis, it was noticed that both internal exposures to radon and/or thoron exhaling from building materials may exceed external exposures to their precursors contained therein.

  7. Post remedial action survey report for Building 003, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California, October 1981; April 1982. Surplus Facilities Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-10-01

    Rockwell International's Santa Susana Laboratories in Ventura County, California, have been the site of numerous Federally-funded projects involving the use of radioactive materials. One such project was the System for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. Building 003 on the Santa Susana site was used in conjunction with the SNAP Program and contained a highly shielded area designed for remote manipulation of radioactive materials. Such facilities are commonly referred to as hot caves. During the SNAP Program, fuel burnup samples were analyzed and irradiation experiments were evaluated in the Building 003 hot cave. Use of the hot cave facility ended when the SNAP Program was terminated in 1973. Subsequently, the Building 003 facilities were declared excess and were decontaminaed and decommissioned during the first half of calendar year 1975. At that time, the building was given a preliminary release. In 1981, a post-remedial-action (certification) survey of Building 003 was conducted at the request of the Department of Energy. Significant levels of residual contamination were found in various parts of the building. Consequently, additional decontamination was conducted by Rockwell International. A final post-remedial-action survey was conducted during April 1982, and those areas in Building 003 that had been found contaminated in 1981 were now found to be free of detectable radioactive contamination. Sludge samples taken from the sewer sump showed elevated levels of enriched uranium contaminant. Hence, all sewer lines within Building 003 were removed. This permitted unconditional release of the building for unrestricted use. However, the sewer lines exterior to the building, which remain in place, must be considered potentially contaminated and, therefore, subject to restricted use

  8. Green Building Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many organizations have developed model codes or rating systems that communities may use to develop green building programs or revise building ordinances. Some of the major options are listed on this page.

  9. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 7.1: Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Cole, Pamala C.; Hefty, Marye G.; Love, Pat M.

    2010-08-30

    This report for DOE's Building America program helps builders identify which Building America climate region they are building in. The guide includes maps comparing the Building America regions with climate designations used in the International Energy Conservation Code for Residential Buildings and lists all U.S. counties by climate zone. A very brief history of the development of the Building America climate map and descriptions of each climate zone are provided. This report is available on the Building America website www.buildingamerica.gov.

  10. The extent and nature of food advertising to children on Spanish television in 2012 using an international food-based coding system and the UK nutrient profiling model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royo-Bordonada, M Á; León-Flández, K; Damián, J; Bosqued-Estefanía, M J; Moya-Geromini, M Á; López-Jurado, L

    2016-08-01

    To examine the extent and nature of food television advertising directed at children in Spain using an international food-based system and the United Kingdom nutrient profile model (UKNPM). Cross-sectional study of advertisements of food and drinks shown on five television channels over 7 days in 2012 (8am-midnight). Showing time and duration of each advertisement was recorded. Advertisements were classified as core (nutrient-rich/calorie-low products), non-core, or miscellaneous based on the international system, and either healthy/less healthy, i.e., high in saturated fats, trans-fatty acids, salt, or free sugars (HFSS), according to UKNPM. The food industry accounted for 23.7% of the advertisements (4212 out of 17,722) with 7.5 advertisements per hour of broadcasting. The international food-based coding system classified 60.2% of adverts as non-core, and UKNPM classified 64.0% as HFSS. Up to 31.5% of core, 86.8% of non-core, and 8.3% of miscellaneous advertisements were for HFSS products. The percentage of advertisements for HFSS products was higher during reinforced protected viewing times (69.0%), on weekends (71.1%), on channels of particular appeal to children and teenagers (67.8%), and on broadcasts regulated by the Spanish Code of self-regulation of the advertising of food products directed at children (70.7%). Both schemes identified that a majority of foods advertised were unhealthy, although some classification differences between the two systems are important to consider. The food advertising Code is not limiting Spanish children's exposure to advertisements for HFSS products, which were more frequent on Code-regulated broadcasts and during reinforced protected viewing time. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Media audit reveals inappropriate promotion of products under the scope of the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes in South-East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinje, Kristine Hansen; Phan, Linh Thi Hong; Nguyen, Tuan Thanh; Henjum, Sigrun; Ribe, Lovise Omoijuanfo; Mathisen, Roger

    2017-06-01

    To review regulations and to perform a media audit of promotion of products under the scope of the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes ('the Code') in South-East Asia. We reviewed national regulations relating to the Code and 800 clips of editorial content, 387 advertisements and 217 Facebook posts from January 2015 to January 2016. We explored the ecological association between regulations and market size, and between the number of advertisements and market size and growth of milk formula. Cambodia, Indonesia, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam. Regulations on the child's age for inappropriate marketing of products are all below the Code's updated recommendation of 36 months (i.e. 12 months in Thailand and Indonesia; 24 months in the other three countries) and are voluntary in Thailand. Although the advertisements complied with the national regulations on the age limit, they had content (e.g. stages of milk formula; messages about the benefit; pictures of a child) that confused audiences. Market size and growth of milk formula were positively associated with the number of newborns and the number of advertisements, and were not affected by the current level of implementation of breast-milk substitute laws and regulations. The present media audit reveals inappropriate promotion and insufficient national regulation of products under the scope of the Code in South-East Asia. Strengthened implementation of regulations aligned with the Code's updated recommendation should be part of comprehensive strategies to minimize the harmful effects of advertisements of breast-milk substitutes on maternal and child nutrition and health.

  12. Absorbed dose determination in external beam radiotherapy. An international code of practice for dosimetry based on standards of absorbed dose to water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency published in 1987 an International Code of Practice entitled 'Absorbed Dose Determination in Photon and Electron Beams' (IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 277 (TRS-277)), recommending procedures to obtain the absorbed dose in water from measurements made with an ionization chamber in external beam radiotherapy. A second edition of TRS-277 was published in 1997 updating the dosimetry of photon beams, mainly kilovoltage X rays. Another International Code of Practice for radiotherapy dosimetry entitled 'The Use of Plane-Parallel Ionization Chambers in High Energy Electron and Photon Beams' (IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 381 (TRS-381)) was published in 1997 to further update TRS-277 and complement it with respect to the area of parallel-plate ionization chambers. Both codes have proven extremely valuable for users involved in the dosimetry of the radiation beams used in radiotherapy. In TRS-277 the calibration of the ionization chambers was based on primary standards of air kerma; this procedure was also used in TRS-381, but the new trend of calibrating ionization chambers directly in a water phantom in terms of absorbed dose to water was introduced. The development of primary standards of absorbed dose to water for high energy photon and electron beams, and improvements in radiation dosimetry concepts, offer the possibility of reducing the uncertainty in the dosimetry of radiotherapy beams. The dosimetry of kilovoltage X rays, as well as that of proton and heavy ion beams, interest in which has grown considerably in recent years, can also be based on these standards. Thus a coherent dosimetry system based on standards of absorbed dose to water is possible for practically all radiotherapy beams. Many Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (PSDLs) already provide calibrations in terms of absorbed dose to water at the radiation quality of 60 Co gamma rays. Some laboratories have extended calibrations to high energy photon and

  13. An Assessment of Comprehensive Code Prediction State-of-the-Art Using the HART II International Workshop Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWall, Berend G.; Lim, Joon W.; Smith, Marilyn J.; Jung, Sung N.; Bailly, Joelle; Baeder, James D.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advancements in computational fluid dynamics and their coupling with computational structural dynamics (= CSD, or comprehensive codes) for rotorcraft applications, CSD codes with their engineering level of modeling the rotor blade dynamics, the unsteady sectional aerodynamics and the vortical wake are still the workhorse for the majority of applications. This is especially true when a large number of parameter variations is to be performed and their impact on performance, structural loads, vibration and noise is to be judged in an approximate yet reliable and as accurate as possible manner. In this paper, the capabilities of such codes are evaluated using the HART II Inter- national Workshop data base, focusing on a typical descent operating condition which includes strong blade-vortex interactions. Three cases are of interest: the baseline case and two cases with 3/rev higher harmonic blade root pitch control (HHC) with different control phases employed. One setting is for minimum blade-vortex interaction noise radiation and the other one for minimum vibration generation. The challenge is to correctly predict the wake physics - especially for the cases with HHC - and all the dynamics, aerodynamics, modifications of the wake structure and the aero-acoustics coming with it. It is observed that the comprehensive codes used today have a surprisingly good predictive capability when they appropriately account for all of the physics involved. The minimum requirements to obtain these results are outlined.

  14. The International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes: lessons learned and implications for the regulation of marketing of foods and beverages to children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, Chessa K

    2013-10-01

    To identify lessons learned from 30 years of implementing the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes (‘the Code’) and identify lessons learned for the regulation of marketing foods and beverages to children. Historical analysis of 30 years of implementing the Code. Latin America and the Caribbean. None. Legislation to restrict marketing of breast-milk substitutes is necessary but not sufficient; equally important are the promulgation of implementing regulations, effective enforcement and public monitoring of compliance. A system of funding for regular monitoring of compliance with legislation should be explicitlyd eveloped and funded from the beginning. Economic sanctions, while important, are likely to be less effective than reports that affect a company’s public image negatively. Non-governmental organizations play a critical role in leveraging public opinion and galvanizing consumer pressure to ensure that governments adopt regulations and companies adhere to them. Continual clinical, epidemiological and policy research showing the link between marketing and health outcomes and between policy and better health is essential. Implementation of the Code has not come easily as it places the interests of underfinanced national governments and international and non-governmental organizations promoting breast-feeding against those of multinational corporations that make hundreds of millions of dollars annually marketing infant formulas. Efforts to protect, promote and support breast-feeding have been successful with indicators of breast-feeding practices increasing globally. The lessons learned can inform current efforts to regulate the marketing of foods and beverages to children.

  15. Development and verification of coupled fluid-structural dynamic codes for stress analysis of reactor vessel internals under blowdown loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, R.; Schlechtendahl, E.G.

    1977-01-01

    YAQUIR has been applied to large PWR blowdown problems and compared with LECK results. The structural model of CYLDY2 and the fluid model of YAQUIR have been coupled in the code STRUYA. First tests with the fluid dynamic systems code FLUST have been successful. The incompressible fluid version of the 3D coupled code FLUX for HDR-geometry was checked against some analytical test cases and was used for evaluation of the eigenfrequencies of the coupled system. Several test cases were run with the two phase flow code SOLA-DF with satisfactory results. Remarkable agreement was found between YAQUIR results and experimental data obtained from shallow water analogy experiments. A test for investigation of nonequilibrium twophase flow dynamics has been specified in some detail. The test is to be performed early 1978 in the water loop of the IRB. Good agreement was found between the natural frequency predictions for the core barrel obtained from CYLDY2 and STRUDL/DYNAL. Work started on improvement of the beam mode treatment in CYLDY2. The name of this modified version will be CYLDY3. The fluiddynamic code SING1, based on an advanced singularity method and applicable to a broad class of highly transient, incompressible 3D-problems with negligible viscosity has been developed and tested. It will be used in connection with the planned laboratory experiments in order to investigate the effect of the core structure on the blowdown process. Coupling of SING1 with structural dynamics is on the way. (orig./RW) [de

  16. Revision of the recommended international general standard for irradiated foods and of the recommended international code of practice for the operation of radiation facilities used for the treatment of foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    In view of the findings and statements of the Joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Expert Committee on the Wholesomeness of Irradiated Food, convened in Geneva from 27 October to 3 November 1980, a Consultation Group, convened in Geneva from 1 to 3 July 1981 suggested the revision of the Recommended International General Standard for Irradiated Foods and of the Recommended International Code of Practice for the Operation of Radiation Facilities. The proposed changes are given and justified and the revised wording of the documents presented

  17. SIOS: A regional cooperation of international research infrastructures as a building block for an Arctic observing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmen, K. J.; Lønne, O. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Svalbard Integrated Earth Observing System (SIOS) is a regional response to the Earth System Science (ESS) challenges posed by the Amsterdam Declaration on Global Change. SIOS is intended to develop and implement methods for how observational networks in the Arctic are to be designed in order to address such issues in a regional scale. SIOS builds on the extensive observation capacity and research installations already in place by many international institutions and will provide upgraded and relevant Observing Systems and Research Facilities of world class in and around Svalbard. It is a distributed research infrastructure set up to provide a regional observational system for long term measurements under a joint framework. As one of the large scale research infrastructure initiatives on the ESFRI roadmap (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures), SIOS is now being implemented. The new research infrastructure organization, the SIOS Knowledge Center (SIOS-KC), is instrumental in developing methods and solutions for setting up its regional contribution to a systematically constructed Arctic observational network useful for global change studies. We will discuss cross-disciplinary research experiences some case studies and lessons learned so far. SIOS aims to provide an effective, easily accessible data management system which makes use of existing data handling systems in the thematic fields covered by SIOS. SIOS will, implement a data policy which matches the ambitions that are set for the new European research infrastructures, but at the same time be flexible enough to consider `historical' legacies. Given the substantial international presence in the Svalbard archipelago and the pan-Arctic nature of the issue, there is an opportunity to build SIOS further into a wider regional network and pan-Arctic context, ideally under the umbrella of the Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks (SAON) initiative. It is necessary to anchor SIOS strongly in a European

  18. International

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This rubric reports on 10 short notes about international economical facts about nuclear power: Electricite de France (EdF) and its assistance and management contracts with Eastern Europe countries (Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria); Transnuclear Inc. company (a 100% Cogema daughter company) acquired the US Vectra Technologies company; the construction of the Khumo nuclear power plant in Northern Korea plays in favour of the reconciliation between Northern and Southern Korea; the delivery of two VVER 1000 Russian reactors to China; the enforcement of the cooperation agreement between Euratom and Argentina; Japan requested for the financing of a Russian fast breeder reactor; Russia has planned to sell a floating barge-type nuclear power plant to Indonesia; the control of the Swedish reactor vessels of Sydkraft AB company committed to Tractebel (Belgium); the renewal of the nuclear cooperation agreement between Swiss and USA; the call for bids from the Turkish TEAS electric power company for the building of the Akkuyu nuclear power plant answered by three candidates: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Westinghouse (US) and the French-German NPI company. (J.S.)

  19. A model of turbocharger radial turbines appropriate to be used in zero- and one-dimensional gas dynamics codes for internal combustion engines modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, J.R.; Arnau, F.J.; Dolz, V.; Tiseira, A. [CMT-Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Cervello, C. [Conselleria de Cultura, Educacion y Deporte, Generalitat Valenciana (Spain)

    2008-12-15

    The paper presents a model of fixed and variable geometry turbines. The aim of this model is to provide an efficient boundary condition to model turbocharged internal combustion engines with zero- and one-dimensional gas dynamic codes. The model is based from its very conception on the measured characteristics of the turbine. Nevertheless, it is capable of extrapolating operating conditions that differ from those included in the turbine maps, since the engines usually work within these zones. The presented model has been implemented in a one-dimensional gas dynamic code and has been used to calculate unsteady operating conditions for several turbines. The results obtained have been compared with success against pressure-time histories measured upstream and downstream of the turbine during on-engine operation. (author)

  20. A model of turbocharger radial turbines appropriate to be used in zero- and one-dimensional gas dynamics codes for internal combustion engines modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, J.R.; Arnau, F.J.; Dolz, V.; Tiseira, A.; Cervello, C.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a model of fixed and variable geometry turbines. The aim of this model is to provide an efficient boundary condition to model turbocharged internal combustion engines with zero- and one-dimensional gas dynamic codes. The model is based from its very conception on the measured characteristics of the turbine. Nevertheless, it is capable of extrapolating operating conditions that differ from those included in the turbine maps, since the engines usually work within these zones. The presented model has been implemented in a one-dimensional gas dynamic code and has been used to calculate unsteady operating conditions for several turbines. The results obtained have been compared with success against pressure-time histories measured upstream and downstream of the turbine during on-engine operation