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Sample records for internal transport barriers

  1. Formation and collapse of internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, A.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.I.; Yagi, M.

    1999-01-01

    A theoretical model of internal transport barrier (ITB) is developed. The transport model based on the self-sustained turbulence theory of the current-diffusive ballooning mode is extended to include the effects of ExB rotation shear. Delayed formation of ITB is observed in transport simulations. The influence of finite gyroradius is also discussed. Simulation of the current ramp-up experiment successfully described the radial profile of density, temperature and safety factor. A model of ITB collapse due to magnetic braiding is proposed. Sudden enhancement of transport triggered by overlapping of magnetic islands terminates ITB. The possibility of destabilizing global low-n modes is also discussed. (author)

  2. Internal Transport Barrier Physics in Helical Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, M.; Maassberg, H.; Ida, K.; Estrada, T.; Castejon, F.; Minami, T.; Fujisawa, A.; Yamagishi, O.; Shats, M. G.; Dinklage, A.; Tribaldos, V.; Beidler, C. D.; Shimozuma, T.; Takeiri, Y.; Herranz, J.; Murakami, S.; Yamada, H.

    2005-01-01

    The characteristics of electron internal transport barriers (eITBs) in helical systems are reviewed. The common features are highly peaked Te profile with strongly positive Er in the core region. The transition nature of Er based on neoclassical (NC) ambipolarity, with the clear threshold feature such as ECH power and Ohmic current, is the common mechanism for the eITB formation. The electron heat confinement improvement has been revealed within the eITB region. The ECH power threshold can be lowered in the presence of ripple-trapped electrons-induced convective flux, and rational surfaces at the core region. The gyrokinetic calculations, for example eITB in LHD, have shown that the ETG mode is unstable in eITB region due to the large Te gradient. A larger zonal flow amplitude has been observed in eITB phase in CHS. The geodesic transfer of energy from stationary zonal flow to oscillatory modes (GAMs) recognized in H-1 implies that the stationary zonal flows can be maintained at a higher level by reducing the geodesic curvature in helical systems. This is the first report of the eITB branch in the framework of the International Stellarator Profile DataBase (ISPDB). (Author)

  3. Internal transport barriers in plasmas with reversed plasma flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, R. M.; Caldas, I. L.

    2018-04-01

    Evidences of internal particle transport barriers have been observed in plasma discharges with reversed plasma flow. To investigate the influence of the radial electric field profile on these barriers, we apply a drift wave map that describe the plasma particle transport and allows the integration of particle drift in the presence of a given electrostatic turbulence spectrum. With this procedure we show that transport barriers due to the shearless flow invariant lines are created inside the plasma. Moreover, by varying the radial electric field profile, we observe the formation and destruction of internal transport barriers constituted by shearless invariant lines, as well as its effects on the transport in the map's phase space. Applicability of our results are discussed for the Texas Helimak, a toroidal plasma device in which the radial electric field can be changed by application of bias potential.

  4. Control of electron internal transport barriers in TCV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, M A; Behn, R; Coda, S; Condrea, I; Duval, B P; Goodman, T P; Karpushov, A; Martin, Y; Martynov, An; Moret, J-M; Nikkola, P; Porte, L; Sauter, O; Scarabosio, A; Zhuang, G

    2004-01-01

    Current profile tailoring has been performed by application of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron cyclotron current drive, leading to improved energy confinement in the plasma core of the TCV tokamak. The improved confinement is characterized by a substantial enhancement (H-factor) of the global electron energy confinement time relative to the prediction of the RLW scaling law (Rebut P H et al 1989 Proc. 12th Int. Conf. of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Research (Nice, 1988) vol 2 (Vienna: IAEA) p 191), which predicts well Ohmic and standard ECH discharges on TCV. The improved confinement is attributed to a hollow current density profile producing a reversed shear profile creating an electron internal transport barrier. We relate the strength of the barrier to the depth of the hollow current density profile and the volume enclosed by the radial location of the peak current density. The ρ T * (Tresset G et al 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 520) criterion is used to evaluate the performance of the barrier relative to changes in the ECH parameters or the addition of Ohmic current, which aid in identifying the control parameters available for improving either the strength or volume of the barrier for enhanced performance. A figure of merit for the global scaling factor is used that scales the confinement enhancement as the product of the barrier volume and strength

  5. Effect of Internal and Edge Transport Barriers in ITER Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pianroj, Y.; Onjun, T.; Suwanna, S.; Picha, R.; Poolyarat, N.

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Predictive simulations of ITER with the presence of both an edge transport barrier (ETB) and an internal transport barrier (ITB) are carried out using the BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code. In these simulations, the boundary is taken at the top of the pedestal, where the pedestal values are described using the theory-based pedestal models. These pedestal temperature models are based on three different pedestal width scalings: magnetic and flow shear stabilization (δ α ρ ζ 2 ), flow shear stabilization (δ α Root ρ Rq), and normalized poloidal pressure (δ α R Root βθ, ped). The pedestal width scalings are combined with a pedestal pressure gradient scaling based on ballooning mode limit to predict the pedestal temperature. A version of the semi-empirical Mixed Bohm/gyro Bohm (Mixed B/gB) core transport model that includes ITB effects is used to compute the evolution of plasma profiles and plasma performance, which defined by Fusion Q factor. The results from the cases excluding and including ITB are compared. The preliminary results show the Q value resulted from ITB-excluded simulation is less than the one with ITB included

  6. Formation of the internal transport barrier in KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, J.; Kim, H. S.; Jeon, Y. M.; Kim, J.; Choi, M. J.; Ko, J.; Lee, K. D.; Lee, H. H.; Yi, S.; Kwon, J. M.; Hahn, S.-H.; Ko, W. H.; Lee, J. H.; Yoon, S. W.

    2018-01-01

    One of key objectives of tokamak experiments is the exploration of enhanced confinement regimes, and the access of the internal transport barrier (ITB) formation is dealt with an important physics issue in the most of major tokamaks. Also, the advanced tokamak scenario with ITB is expected to lead to a continuous reactor with high fusion power density. From that point of view, the formation of the ITB in KSTAR which is designed for long pulse operation capability is very important although its heating and current drive systems are not fully equipped yet. We have therefore assumed that an early injection of the full NBI power (∼5.5 MW) during the current ramp-up would give a chance to form an internal barrier if the plasma could stay in the L-mode. To avoid the H-mode transition, we have produced inboard limited plasmas with detaching from the both upper and lower divertors. Using this approach, an ITB formation during L-mode has been observed which shows improved core confinement. Ion and electron temperature profiles show the barrier clearly in the temperature, and it was sustained for about 7 s in the dedicated experiment. This is the first stationary ITB observed in a full superconducting tokamak. This operation scenario with the ITB could be an alternative way to achieve a high performance regime in KSTAR, and the length of the ITB discharge could be extended even longer. In this paper, we present the formation of the ITB using measured and simulated characteristic profiles.

  7. Internal transport barrier in tokamak and helical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, K.; Fujita, T.

    2018-03-01

    The differences and similarities between the internal transport barriers (ITBs) of tokamak and helical plasmas are reviewed. By comparing the characteristics of the ITBs in tokamak and helical plasmas, the mechanisms of the physics for the formation and dynamics of the ITB are clarified. The ITB is defined as the appearance of discontinuity of temperature, flow velocity, or density gradient in the radius. From the radial profiles of temperature, flow velocity, and density the ITB is characterized by the three parameters of normalized temperature gradient, R/{L}T, the location, {ρ }{ITB}, and the width, W/a, and can be expressed by ‘weak’ ITB (small R/{L}T) or ‘strong’ (large R/{L}T), ‘small’ ITB (small {ρ }{ITB}) or ‘large’ ITB (large {ρ }{ITB}), and ‘narrow’ (small W/a) or ‘wide’ (large W/a). Three key physics elements for the ITB formation, radial electric field shear, magnetic shear, and rational surface (and/or magnetic island) are described. The characteristics of electron and ion heat transport and electron and impurity transport are reviewed. There are significant differences in ion heat transport and electron heat transport. The dynamics of ITB formation and termination is also discussed. The emergence of the location of the ITB is sometimes far inside the ITB foot in the steady-state phase and the ITB region shows radial propagation during the formation of the ITB. The non-diffusive terms in momentum transport and impurity transport become more dominant in the plasma with the ITB. The reversal of the sign of non-diffusive terms in momentum transport and impurity transport associated with the formation of the ITB reported in helical plasma is described. Non-local transport plays an important role in determining the radial profile of temperature and density. The spontaneous change in temperature curvature (second radial derivative of temperature) in the ITB region is described. In addition, the key parameters of the control of the

  8. Comparison of Edge and Internal Transport Barriers in Drift Wave Predictive Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiland, J.; Crombe, K.; Mantica, P.

    2011-01-01

    We have simulated the formation of an internal transport barrier on JET including a self-consistent treatment of ion and electron temperatures and poloidal and toroidal momentum. Similar simulations of edge transport barriers, including the L-H transition have also been made. However, here only p...... for the internal barrier. For the edge barrier the edge density was varied and it turned out that a lower edge density gave a stronger barrier. Electromagnetic and nonlocal effects were important for both types of barriers. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]......We have simulated the formation of an internal transport barrier on JET including a self-consistent treatment of ion and electron temperatures and poloidal and toroidal momentum. Similar simulations of edge transport barriers, including the L-H transition have also been made. However, here only...... polodal momentum and the temperatures were simulated. The internal barrier included an anomalous spinup of poloidal momentum similar to that in the experiment. Also the edge barrier was accompanied by a spinup of poloidal momentum. The experimental density (with no barrier) was used and kept fixed...

  9. Transition phenomena and thermal transport properties in LHD plasmas with an electron internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Idei, H.; Inagaki, S.; Tamura, N.; Tokuzawa, T.; Morisaki, T.; Watanabe, K.Y.; Ida, K.; Yamada, I.; Narihara, K.; Muto, S.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshimura, Y.; Notake, T.; Ohkubo, K.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T.; Watari, T.; Komori, A.

    2005-01-01

    Two types of improved core confinement were observed during centrally focused electron cyclotron heating (ECH) into plasmas sustained by counter (CNTR) and Co neutral beam injections (NBI) in the Large Helical Device. The CNTR NBI plasma displayed transition phenomena to the high-electron-temperature state and had a clear electron internal transport barrier, while the Co NBI plasma did not show a clear transition or an ECH power threshold but showed broad high temperature profiles with moderate temperature gradient. This indicated that the Co NBI plasma with additional ECH also had an improved core confinement. The electron heat transport characteristics of these plasmas were directly investigated using heat pulse propagation excited by modulated ECH. These effects appear to be related to the m/n = 2/1 rational surface or the island induced by NBI beam-driven current

  10. Efficiency of LH current drive in tokamaks featuring an internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C I de; Ziebell, L F; Rosa, P R da S

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of the occurrence of radial transport of particles in a tokamak on the efficiency of the current drive by lower hybrid (LH) waves, in the presence of an internal transport barrier. The results are obtained by numerical solution of the Fokker-Planck equation which rules the evolution of the electron distribution function. We assume that the radial transport of particles can be due to magnetic or electrostatic fluctuations. In both cases the efficiency of the current drive is shown to increase with the increase of the fluctuations that originate the transport. The dependence of the current drive efficiency on the depth and position of the barrier is also investigated

  11. Modelling of tokamak plasmas with internal transport barriers using ion temperature gradient based models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsey, J.E.; Waltz, R.E.; Staebler, G.M.; St.John, H.

    1999-01-01

    The dynamic formation of an internal transport barrier resulting from an ExB driven bifurcation has been demonstrated in simulations of a DIII-D NCS discharge with an L-mode edge using the GLF23 model. Taking the sources, sinks, equilibrium, and the density profile from a power balance analysis, the thermal and toroidal momentum transport were simultaneously evolved while computing the effects of rotational shear stabilization. As the bifurcation point is approached, the mode growth rate and ExB shear become tangential and the profiles exhibit a dithering behavior. The input power, in particular the toroidal momentum, is sufficient to overcome the ITB threshold and a bifurcation in both the momentum and heat flux is observed. While the ion thermal and momentum transport show an significant improvement in confinement, the electron thermal transport remains anomalous due to the continued presence of the ETG mode. Comparing JET OS discharges to DIII-DNCS discharges, it is found that the ExB shear rate needs to be enhanced by a factor 2.65 in order to obtain profiles consistent with experimental data. Future work will focus on improving the robustness and efficiency of numerical techniques to allow wider application and increased predictive capability needed to conduct power threshold studies of internal transport barriers. (author)

  12. Core density fluctuations in reverse magnetic shear plasmas with internal transport barrier on JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazikian, R.; Shinohara, K.; Yoshino, R.; Fujita, T.; Shirai, H.; Kramer, G.T.

    1999-01-01

    First measurements of the radial correlation length of density fluctuations in JT-60U plasmas with internal transport barrier (ITB) is reported. The measurements are obtained using a newly installed correlation reflectometer operating in the upper X-mode. Before transport barrier formation in the low beam power current ramp-up phase of the discharge, reflectometer measurements indicate density fluctuation levels n-tilde/n∼0.1-0.2% and radial correlation lengths 2-3 cm (k r p i ≤0.5) in the central plasma region (r/a r p i ∼3. However, fluctuation levels are considerably higher than measured near the magnetic axis. Reflectometer measurements obtained at the foot of the ITB also indicate high fluctuation levels compared to measurements in the central region of the discharge. (author)

  13. Core density fluctuations in reverse magnetic shear plasmas with internal transport barrier on JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazikian, R.; Shinohara, K.; Yoshino, R.; Fujita, T.; Shirai, H.; Kramer, G.J.

    2001-01-01

    First measurements of the radial correlation length of density fluctuations in JT-60U plasmas with internal transport barrier (ITB) is reported. The measurements are obtained using a newly installed correlation reflectometer operating in the upper X-mode. Before transport barrier formation in the low beam power current ramp-up phase of the discharge, reflectometer measurements indicate density fluctuation levels n-tilde/n ∼ 0.1 - 0.2% and radial correlation lengths 2-3 cm (k r ρ i ≤ 0.5) in the central plasma region ( r/a r ρ i ∼ 3. However, fluctuation levels are considerably higher than measured near the magnetic axis. Reflectometer measurements obtained at the foot of the ITB also indicate high fluctuation levels compared to measurements in the central region of the discharge. (author)

  14. Progress towards increased understanding and control of internal transport barriers (ITBs) on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, E.J.; Greenfield, C.M.; Austin, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made towards both understanding and control of internal transport barriers (ITBs) on DIII-D, resulting in the discovery of a new sustained high performance operating mode termed the Quiescent Double-Barrier (QDB) regime. The QDB regime combines core transport barriers with a quiescent, ELM-free H-mode edge (termed QH-mode), giving rise to separate (double) core and edge transport barriers. The core and edge barriers are mutually compatible and do not merge, resulting in broad core profiles with an edge pedestal. The QH-mode edge is characterized by ELM-free behavior with continuous multiharmonic MHD activity in the pedestal region, and has provided density and impurity control for 3.5 s (>20 τ E ) with divertor pumping. QDB plasmas are long-pulse high-performance candidates, having maintained a β N H 89 product of 7 for 5 energy confinement times (T i ≤16 keV, β N ≤2.9, H 89 ≤2.4, τ E ≤150 ms, DD neutron rate S n ≤4x10 15 s -1 ). The QDB regime has only been obtained in counter-NBI discharges (injection anti-parallel to plasma current) with divertor pumping. Other results include successful expansion of the ITB radius using (separately) both impurity injection and counter-NBI, and the formation of ITBs in the electron thermal channel using both ECH and strong negative central shear (NCS) at high power. These results are interpreted within a theoretical framework in which turbulence suppression is the key to ITB formation and control, and a decrease in core turbulence is observed in all cases of ITB formation. (author)

  15. Characteristics of internal transport barriers from the JET optimised shear database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochard, F.; Litaudon, X.; Soeldner, F.

    2000-02-01

    The general features of the Internal Transport Barriers (ITBs) obtained in the JET 'Optimised Shear' regime are deduced from the analyses of a large database of discharges including the experiments performed with a mixture of Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) ions. The coupled and complex spatio-temporal dynamics of the ITBs are studied from the radial profiles measurements of the thermal ion and electron temperatures. The spatial locations of the ITBs inside the plasma column are deduced from the radial derivatives of the plasmas profiles. In particular, our analyses show that the radial positions of the ITB follow the same evolution for both the electron and ion temperature profiles. Among the JET 'Optimised Shear' database, we propose to distinguish two categories of discharges depending on the edge conditions: the ITBs are triggered either with an L-mode edge or simultaneously with an edge transport barrier (H-mode). The characteristics of the ITBs and plasma performances of these two categories are compared. Experimental conditions to successfully combine the edge and core transport barriers are given. In particular, emphasis is given on the description and analyses of the 'Optimised Shear' discharges which combine an ITB with an ELMy edge since this operating mode opens the route to high performance regimes which could be extrapolated towards steady-state conditions. (author)

  16. Analysis of space-time structure of Internal Transport Barrier in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neudatchin, S.V.; Takizuka, Tomonori; Shirai, Hiroshi; Fujita, Takaaki; Takeji, Satoshi; Isei, Nobuaki; Kamada, Yutaka.

    1997-08-01

    Characteristics of the structure of Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) for reversed shear (RS) plasmas as well as for normal shear plasmas in JT-60U are studied. The fast-time-scale outward expansion of the ITB position is seen at the phase q min passes across 3 in RS discharges. The steep features of the T e and T i profiles in RS plasmas are measured during the programmed-motion phase. The discontinuous change of the electron heat diffusivity χ e within 3 cm distance near the ITB 'shoulder' is found and the χ e value in the ITB region is 1/10 of that inside the ITB 'shoulder'. It is observed that locations of the ITB for T e and T i are slightly different from each other. The BLM (Barrier Localized Mode) -induced L-H transition and the H-L back transition in a high β p plasma with normal shear are studied. The BLM suddenly relaxes the T e profile but does not deteriorate the improved transport property. The H-L back transition causes the simultaneous degradation of transport near the ITB region. The χ e jump is estimated as about 1 m 2 /s. After the back transition, the transport is discontinuously improved in time and the ITB properties are recovered. Global natures of these transient processes are noticeable. A new experimental technique called 'multi-step programmed motion' is proposed to measure the steep structure of the ITB. (author)

  17. Impact of the α parameter on the microstability of internal transport barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdelle, C.; Hoang, G. T.; Litaudon, X.; Roach, C. M.; Tala, T.; ITPA Topical Group on Transport; Physics, ITB; International ITB Database Working Group

    2005-02-01

    In plasmas exhibiting an internal transport barrier (ITB), locally very high pressure gradient (∇P) is obtained. It induces high values of the magnetohydrodynamic α parameter (α = -q 2 βR∇P/P, with R the major radius, q the safety factor, P the pressure, ∇ the radial gradient and β the ratio between kinetic and magnetic pressure). Similarly to low or negative magnetic shear (s), high α reduces the curvature and ∇ B drifts driving curvature-type microinstabilities. Therefore, high values of α can stabilize part of the microturbulence, which leads to higher pressure gradient and to even higher α. This possibility for entering a positive feedback loop is very attractive to sustain ITBs in high performance plasmas. Indeed, α scales favourably with higher pressure and does not require any external momentum input. In this paper, after having discussed the α stabilization mechanism in detail, we report the experimental microstability analyses of ITBs from an international multi-machine database—the International Tokamak Physics Activity database, accessible on the webhttp://tokamak-profiledb.ukaea.org.uk/ . We show that α is indeed a relevant parameter of ITB physics that should be taken into account in interpretative and predictive one-dimensional transport codes.

  18. Synergistic effects of the safety factor and shear flows on development of internal transport barriers in reversed shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, A.K.; Dong, J.Q.; Qu, W.X.; Qiu, X.M.

    2002-01-01

    A new suppression mechanism of turbulent transport, characteristic of the synergism between safety factor and shear flows, is proposed to explain the internal transport barriers (ITBs) observed in neutral-beam-heated tokamak discharges with reversed magnetic shear. It is shown that the evolution of turbulent transport with the strength of the suppression mechanism reproduces the basic features of the formation and development of ITBs observed in experiments. In addition, the present analyses predict the possibility of global ion and electron heat transport barriers

  19. Density fluctuation measurement at edge and internal transport barriers in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, N; Bruskin, L G; Takenaga, H; Shinohara, K; Isayama, A; Ide, S; Sakamoto, Y; Suzuki, T; Fujita, T; Kamada, Y; Miura, Y

    2004-01-01

    A new analytical method using a combination of the O-mode reflectometer and a time-dependent two-dimensional full-wave simulation code has been developed for the quantitative evaluation of density fluctuations in JT-60U. Two statistical parameters of the reflectometer signals, fluctuation index (F) and elongation factor (χ), are introduced as measures of the fluctuation amplitude (γ) and the width of the poloidal wave number spectrum (k θ0 ). This method is applied to the edge transport barrier (ETB) and internal transport barrier (ITB). At the transition to the ELM free H-mode phase, analysis suggests that the density fluctuation level reduced from 1.9-3.2% to 0.29-0.44%, while the value of k θ0 changed from 1.6-2.0 to 0.77-0.81 cm -1 in the ETB region. On the other hand, the amplitude of the density fluctuation was evaluated as 1.0-2.0% at the ITB region, even after the formation of the box type ITB. Instead, when a pellet was injected into the plasma with a box type ITB as an external perturbation, a remarkable change in the frequency spectrum was observed. Analysis suggests a reduction in the density fluctuation level to 0.4-0.6% after the pellet injection

  20. Study of internal transport barriers in the initial phase of Ohmic discharges in TUMAN-3M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askinazi, L G; Bulanin, V V; Vildjunas, M I; Golant, V E; Gorokhov, M V; Kornev, V A; Krikunov, S V; Lebedev, S V; Petrov, A V; Rozhdestvensky, V V; Tukachinsky, A S; Zhubr, N A

    2004-01-01

    A regime with electron heat confinement improvement was recently found in the initial phase of discharges in the TUMAN-3M tokamak. An internal transport barrier (ITB) formation in this regime was confirmed by Thomson scattering measurements and by transport modelling. Two possible reasons for the ITB formation are discussed in the paper: by reduction of turbulent transport in the presence of low magnetic shear or by plasma sheared rotation. It is demonstrated that low magnetic shear formation is possible in the current ramp-up phase of the Ohmic discharge. The low magnetic shear does not seem to be the only reason for the transport reduction. Results of Doppler reflectometry measurements of poloidal rotation of density fluctuations are presented. It is found that core confinement improvement correlates with the appearance of sheared rotation of the density fluctuations and with a burst of the MHD activity. The ITB formation in the regime seems to be a result of a combined action of reduced magnetic shear and plasma sheared rotation

  1. Electron internal transport barriers and magnetic topology in the stellarator TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada, T.; Alonso, A.; Castejon, F.; Hidalgo, C.; Pablos, J.L. de; Tereshin, V.; Krupnik, L.; Chmyga, A.A.; Dreval, N.; Khrebtov, S.M.; Komarov, A.D.; Kozachok, A.S.; Eliseev, L.; Melnikov, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    Electron Internal Transport Barriers (e-ITBs) are frequently observed in helical systems. e-ITBs are characterized by an increase in core electron temperature and plasma potential as well as an improvement in core electron heat confinement. A comparative study of transport barriers in different helical devices will be presented by Yokoyama et al at this conference. In most helical systems, and in particular in TJ-II stellarator, the formation of e-ITBs is observed in Electron Cyclotron Heated plasmas with high heating power density. In TJ-II, e-ITBs are also formed in magnetic configurations having a low order rational surface close to the plasma core where the ECH power is deposited. In such configurations the key element to improve heat confinement, i.e. the strong radial electric field, results from a synergistic effect between enhanced electron heat fluxes through the low order rational surface and pump-out mechanisms in the heat deposition zone. Recent experiments show a quasi-coherent mode associated with a rational surface that triggers the formation of the e-ITB. This quasi-coherent mode is observed by both ECE and HIBP diagnostics. The mode is found to be localized within the radial range ρ: 0.0 - 0.4, with a maximum amplitude around ρ: 0.25 - 0.35, close to the foot of the e- ITB. The quasi-coherent mode evolves during the formation/annihilation of the e-ITB and vanishes as the barrier is fully developed. These observations indicate that the quasi-coherent modes are modified by the radial electric fields that develop at the transitions, thereby showing the importance of ExB flows in the evolution of MHD instabilities linked to low-order rational surfaces. Further studies are in progress to investigate the influence of the order of the low rational surfaces (3/2, 5/3,...) in triggering core transitions. (author)

  2. Noble internal transport barriers and radial subdiffusion of toroidal magnetic lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misguich, J.H.; Reuss, J.D. [Association Euratom-CEA sur la Fusion, CEA/DSM/DRFC, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Constantinescu, D.; Steinbrecher, G. [Association Euratom-N.A.S.T.I., Dept. of Physics, University of Craiova (Romania); Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F. [Association Euratom-N.A.S.T.I., National Institute of Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Weyssow, B.; Balescu, R. [Association Euratom-Etat Belge sur la Fusion, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2002-02-01

    Internal transport barriers (ITB's) observed in tokamaks are described by a purely magnetic approach. Magnetic line motion in toroidal geometry with broken magnetic surfaces is studied from a previously derived Hamiltonian map in situation of incomplete chaos. This appears to reproduce in a realistic way the main features of a tokamak, for a given safety factor profile and in terms of a single parameter L representing the amplitude of the magnetic perturbation. New results are given concerning the Shafranov shift as function of L. For small values of L, closed magnetic surfaces exist (KAM tori) and island chains begin to appear on rational surfaces for higher values of L, with chaotic zones around hyperbolic points, as expected. Single trajectories of magnetic line motion indicate the persistence of a central protected plasma core, surrounded by a chaotic shell enclosed in a double-sided transport barrier. Magnetic lines which succeed to escape across this barrier begin to wander in a wide chaotic sea extending up to a very robust barrier (as long as L{<=}1). For values of L{>=}1, above the escape threshold, most magnetic lines succeed to escape out of the external barrier which has become a permeable Cantorus. Statistical analysis of a large number of trajectories, representing the evolution of a bunch of magnetic lines, indicate that the flux variable {psi} asymptotically grows in a diffuse manner as (L{sup 2}t) with a L{sup 2} scaling as expected, but that the average radial position r{sub m}(t) asymptotically grows as (L{sup 2}t){sup 1/4} while the mean square displacement around this average radius asymptotically grows in a sub-diffusive manner as (L{sup 2}t){sup 1/2}. This result shows the slower dispersion in the present incomplete chaotic regime, which is different from the usual quasilinear diffusion in completely chaotic situations. For physical times t{sub {phi}} of the order of the escape time defined by x{sub m}(t{sub {phi}}) {approx}1, the motion

  3. Characteristics of internal transport barrier in JT-60U reversed shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Y.; Kamada, Y.; Ide, S.; Fujita, T.; Shirai, H.; Takizuka, T.; Koide, Y.; Fukuda, T.; Oikawa, T.; Suzuki, T.; Shinohara, K.; Yoshino, R.

    2001-01-01

    Characteristics of internal transport barrier (ITB) structure are studied and the active ITB control has been developed in JT-60U reversed shear plasmas. The following results are found. Outward propagation of the ITB with steep T i gradient is limited to the minimum safety factor location (ρ qmin ). However the ITB with reduced T i gradient can move to the outside of ρ qmin . Lower boundary of ITB width is proportional to the ion poloidal gyroradius at the ITB center. Furthermore the demonstration of the active control of the ITB strength based on the modification of the radial electric field shear profile is successfully performed by the toroidal momentum injection in different directions or the increase of heating power by neutral beams. (author)

  4. Perspectives of extremely low q operation with internal transport barrier in KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jayhyun; Park, H. K.; Chung, J.; Choi, M. J.; Kim, H. S.; Jeon, Y., M.; Ko, J. S.; Lee, H. H.; Lee, K. D.; Kstar Team

    2017-10-01

    For an ideal fusion reactor, discharges with internal transport barrier (ITB) can be the most attractive operation mode due to high core temperature and low transient heat flux. However, the ITB mode inherently has problems such as collapse by MHD instability. Recently, it has been proved in KSTAR that stable operation of more than several seconds is possible even in the ITB mode due to the existence of benign bursting mode which prevents the formation of steep pressure gradient. On the other hand, KSTAR also demonstrated the stabilization of potentially dangerous instabilities of low mode numbers through low q ( 2) operation. In this study, we will discuss the perspectives of low q operation with ITB mainly considering their MHD characteristics. During a preliminary attempt in 2017 campaign, transient ITB of H89L 1.9 was obtained in NBI heated L-mode discharge after entering relatively low q (heating.

  5. EC + LH current drive efficiency in the presence of an internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, P.R. da S; Ziebell, L.F.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we study the effects of the presence of an internal transport barrier (ITB) on the current drive efficiency and power deposition profiles in the case of electron cyclotron waves interacting with an extended tail generated by lower hybrid (LH) waves. We study the subject by numerically solving the Fokker-Planck equation, with temperature and density profiles corrected along the time evolution at each collision time, based on the actual time-evolving electron distribution function. The results obtained show that the LH and electron cyclotron (EC) power absorption profiles and the current driven by the combined action of both types of waves are weakly dependent on the depth of the ITB, slightly more dependent on the level of magnetic turbulence and much more dependent on the level of EC wave power. (author)

  6. Internal transport barrier and β limit in ohmically heated plasma in TUMAN-3M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreiko, M.V.; Askinazi, L.G.; Golant, V.E.

    2001-01-01

    An Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) was found in ohmically heated plasma in TUMAN-3M (R 0 =53 cm, a l =22 cm - circular limiter configuration, B t ≤0.7T, I p ≤175 kA, ≤6.0·10 19 m -3 ). The barrier reveals itself as a formation of a steep gradient on electron temperature and density radial profiles. The regions with reduced diffusion and electron thermal diffusivity are in between r=0.5a and r=0.7a. The ITB appears more frequently in the shots with higher plasma current. At lower currents (I p N limit in the ohmically heated plasma are presented. Stored energy was measured using diamagnetic loops and compared with W calculated from kinetic data obtained by Thomson scattering and microwave interferometry. Measurements of the stored energy and of the β were performed in the ohmic H-mode before and after boronization and in the scenario with the fast Current Ramp-Down in the ohmic H-mode. Maximum value of β T of 2.0 % and β N of 2 were achieved. The β N limit achieved is 'soft' (nondisruptive) limit. The stored energy slowly decays after the Current Ramp-Down. No correlation was found between beta restriction and MHD phenomena. (author)

  7. Internal transport barrier and β limit in ohmically heated plasma in TUMAN-3M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreiko, M.V.; Askinazi, L.G.; Golant, V.E.

    1999-01-01

    An Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) was found in ohmically heated plasma in TUMAN-3M (R 0 = 53 cm, a l = 22 cm - circular limiter configuration, B t ≤ 0.7 T, I p ≤ 175 kA, ≤ 6.0·10 19 m -3 ). The barrier reveals itself as a formation of a steep gradient on electron temperature and density radial profiles. The regions with reduced diffusion and electron thermal diffusivity are in between r = 0.5a and r = 0.7a. The ITB appears more frequently in the shots with higher plasma current. At lower currents (I p N limit in the ohmically heated plasma are presented. Stored energy was measured using diamagnetic loops and compared with W calculated from kinetic data obtained by Thomson scattering and microwave interferometry. Measurements of the stored energy and of the β were performed in the ohmic H-mode before and after boronization and in the scenario with the fast Current Ramp-Down in the ohmic H-mode. Maximum value of β T of 2.0% and β N of 2 were achieved. The β N limit achieved is 'soft' (non-disruptive) limit. The stored energy slowly decays after the Current Ramp-Down. No correlation was found between beta restriction and MHD phenomena. (author)

  8. Noble Cantor sets acting as partial internal transport barriers in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misguich, J.H.; Reuss, J.D.; Constantinescu, D.; Steinbrecher, G.; Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.; Weyssow, B.; Balescu, R.

    2002-03-01

    In hot laboratory plasmas, Internal Transport Barriers (ITB) have recently been observed, localized in the radial profile 'around' rational values of the winding number ω(r)=1/q(r). Such barriers are obviously related to the perturbed magnetic structure, described by a 1+1/2 Hamiltonian in presence of a perturbation. From the point of view of non-linear Hamiltonian dynamical systems this experimental result appears highly paradoxical since rational q-values generally correspond to the less robust tori. We have studied the appearance of chaos of toroidal magnetic lines by a discrete area-preserving map named 'tokamap'. By increasing the perturbation, we have observed in a wide chaotic sea the destruction of the last confining Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) surfaces, broken and transformed into permeable Cantor sets (Cantori). The flux across a Cantorus has been computed by using refined mathematical techniques due to MacKay, Mather and Aubry. We have proved that the ITB observed in the tokamap is actually composed of two permeable Cantori with 'noble' values of ω (in the definition of Percival). More generally, between the dominant chains of rational islands q = m/m-1, the most resistant barriers between q = m+2/m+1 and m+1/m have been checked (Green, MacKay and Stark) to be localized on the 'most irrational' numbers in these Farey intervals, i.e. on the noble numbers N(1,m)≡ 1+[1/(m+1/G)] (where G is the Golden number) defined by their continuous fraction expansion N(i,m) = [i,m,(1) ∞ ]. In conclusion, the study of the tokamap mapping allowed us to predict on mathematical basis that ITB can occur in tokamak plasmas not only 'around' rational magnetic surfaces but more precisely on noble q-values of irrational surfaces, and to localize them by the Fibonacci series of their convergent. (authors)

  9. Production of internal transport barriers via self-generated mean flows in Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, C. L.; Ernst, D. R.; Podpaly, Y. A.; Mikkelsen, D.; Howard, N. T.; Lee, Jungpyo; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Ma, Y.; Rowan, W. L.; Bespamyatnov, I.

    2012-05-01

    New results suggest that changes observed in the intrinsic toroidal rotation influence the internal transport barrier (ITB) formation in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [E. S. Marmar and Alcator C-Mod group, Fusion Sci. Technol. 51, 261 (2007)]. These arise when the resonance for ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) minority heating is positioned off-axis at or outside of the plasma half-radius. These ITBs form in a reactor relevant regime, without particle or momentum injection, with Ti ≈ Te, and with monotonic q profiles (qmin 1.5 × 105 rad/s) in the region where the ITB foot is observed. Gyrokinetic analyses indicate that this spontaneous shearing rate is comparable to the linear ion temperature gradient (ITG) growth rate at the ITB location and is sufficient to reduce the turbulent particle and energy transport. New and detailed measurement of the ion temperature demonstrates that the radial profile flattens as the ICRF resonance position moves off axis, decreasing the drive for the ITG the instability as well. These results are the first evidence that intrinsic rotation can affect confinement in ITB plasmas.

  10. Rotation and impurity studies in the presence of MHD activity and internal transport barriers on TCV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federspiel, L. I.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on measurements of toroidal rotation and impurity profiles in improved plasma scenarios and in the presence of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) activity. Experiments were performed on TCV, the Tokamak a Configuration Variable in Lausanne. In TCV, plasma rotation is measured by the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic (CXRS). The CXRS is associated with a low power diagnostic neutral beam injector (DNBI) that provides CX emission from the hot plasma core, without perturbing the plasma with additional torque. The beam is observed transversally by the CXRS diagnostic so that local ion temperature, density and intrinsic velocity measurements are obtained. The three systems composing the present day CXRS2013 diagnostic cover the entire TCV radial midplane with up to 80 measurement locations separated by around 7 mm with a time resolution ranging from 2-30 ms. The main upgrades concerned the installation of new sensitive cameras, the overhaul of the toroidal system, the extended-chord configuration and the automation of the acquisition and analysis processes. These new Cars capabilities permitted the investigation of more complex scenarios featuring low intensity and/or fast events, like the low density electron internal transport barriers (eITBs) and the sawtooth (ST) instability. A comparison between rotation profiles measured over several sawtooth events and across a 'canonical' sawtooth cycle has been undertaken in limited L-mode plasmas. The averaged rotation profiles obtained with the upgraded CXRS diagnostic show that ST restrict the maximum attainable and that the rotation profiles are flattened and almost always display a small co-current contribution. It is this effect that results in the 1/I p scaling observed in TCV limited L-mode plasmas. The co-current core contribution is related to the ST crash, whilst, during the quiescent ramp of the sawtooth period, a plasma recoil outside the mixing radius is observed. A high

  11. Progress towards steady-state operation and real time control of internal transport barriers in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litaudon, X.; Becoulet, A.; Crisanti, F.

    2003-01-01

    In JET advanced tokamak research mainly focuses on plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITBs), generated by modifications of the current profile. The formerly developed optimised shear regime with low magnetic shear in the plasma center has been extended to deeply reversed magnetic shear configurations. High fusion performance with wide ITBs has been obtained transiently in deeply reversed magnetic shear configuration: H IPB98(y,2) ∼1.9, β N =2.4 at I p =2.5MA. At somewhat reduced performance electron and ion ITBs have been sustained in full current drive operation with 1MA of bootstrap current: H IPB98(y,2) ∼1, β N =1.7 at I p =2.0MA. The ITBs have been maintained up to 11s. This duration, much larger than the energy confinement time (37 times larger), is already approaching a current resistive time. New real-time measurements and feedback control algorithms have been developed and implemented in JET for successfully controlling the ITB dynamics and the current density profile in the highly non-inductive regime. (author)

  12. Driftwave-based modeling of poloidal spin-up precursor and step-wise expansion of internal transport barriers in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, G.M.; Waltz, R.E.; Kinsey, J.E.; Bateman, G.; Kritz, A.H.; Onjun, T.; Pankin, A.; Zhu, P.; Horton, W.

    2001-01-01

    The rich phenomenology of internal transport barriers observed in tokamaks includes a poloidal spin-up precursor for balanced injection neutral beam heating and step-wise expansion of the barrier for unbalanced injection. Examples of numerical simulations of these phenomena are presented. Two driftwave-based predictive transport models (GLF23 and Multi-Mode) are used. Both models include the suppression of ion temperature gradient modes as the EB shear approaches the computed maximum linear growth rate. Modeling of discharges with internal transport barriers from the DIII-D, JET and TFTR tokamaks are compared. (author)

  13. Formation of an internal transport barrier in the ohmic H-mode in the TUMAN-3M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrejko, M.V.; Askinazi, L.G.; Golant, V.E.; Zhubr, N.A.; Kornev, V.A.; Krikunov, S.V.; Lebedev, S.V.; Levin, L.S.; Razdobarin, G.T.; Rozhdestvensky, V.V.; Smirnov, A.I.; Tukachinsky, A.S.; Yaroshevich, S.P.

    2000-01-01

    In experiments on studying the ohmic H-mode in the TUMAN-3M tokamak, it is found that, in high-current (I p ∼ 120-170 kA) discharges, a region with high electron-temperature and density gradients is formed in the plasma core. In this case, the energy confinement time τ E attains 9-18 ms, which is nearly twice as large as that predicted by the ELM-free ITER-93H scaling. This is evidence that the internal transport barrier in a plasma can exist without auxiliary heating. Calculations of the effective thermal diffusivity by the ASTRA transport code demonstrate a strong suppression of heat transport in the region where the temperature and density gradients are high

  14. Internal transport barrier triggered by non-linear lower hybrid wave deposition under condition of beam-driven toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Q. D.; Budny, R. V.

    2015-01-01

    By using gyro-Landau fluid transport model (GLF23), time-dependent integrated modeling is carried out using TRANSP to explore the dynamic process of internal transport barrier (ITB) formation in the neutral beam heating discharges. When the current profile is controlled by LHCD (lower hybrid current drive), with appropriate neutral beam injection, the nonlinear interplay between the transport determined gradients in the plasma temperature (T i,e ) and toroidal velocity (V ϕ ) and the E×B flow shear (including q-profile) produces transport bifurcations, generating spontaneously a stepwise growing ITB. In the discharge, the constraints imposed by the wave propagation condition causes interplay of the LH driven current distribution with the plasma configuration modification, which constitutes non-linearity in the LH wave deposition. The non-linear effects cause bifurcation in LHCD, generating two distinct quasi-stationary reversed magnetic shear configurations. The change of current profile during the transition period between the two quasi-stationary states results in increase of the E×B shearing flow arising from toroidal rotation. The turbulence transport suppression by sheared E×B flow during the ITB development is analysed, and the temporal evolution of some parameters characterized the plasma confinement is examined. Ample evidence shows that onset of the ITB development is correlated with the enhancement of E×B shearing rate caused by the bifurcation in LHCD. It is suggested that the ITB triggering is associated with the non-linear effects of the LH power deposition

  15. Dynamic behavior of transport in normal and reversed shear plasmas with internal barriers in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neudatchin, Sergi V.; Takizuka, Tomonori; Shirai, Hiroshi; Fujita, Takaaki; Isayama, Akihiko; Kamada, Yutaka; Koide, Yoshihiko

    2001-12-01

    Transport evolution in normal shear (NrS) and reversed shear (RS) JT-60U tokamak plasmas with internal transport barrier (ITB) is described as a combination of various fast and slow time scale processes. Abrupt in time (ms time scale) and wide in space (∼0.3 of minor radius) variations of electron and ion heat diffusivities χ e,i (δχ e,i ), which are called ITB-events and seen as simultaneous rise and decay of electron and ion temperatures in two spatial zones, are found for weak ITBs in both NrS and RS plasmas. Profiles of δχ e in RS plasmas with strong ITBs are usually localized near ITB foot inside smaller space region. The maximum of the heat flux variation is located near position of the minimum of safety factor in various RS plasmas, and variation is extended in positive shear region. Inward and outward heat pulse propagations created by the jump of χ e and the sawtooth-like crash are analyzed. Small values of χ e and the absence of heat pinch are found inside strong ITBs. Another non-local abrupt variations of χ e inside most of the plasma volume, including significant part of weak ITB inside RS zone of RS plasmas, are seen at the ELM-induced H-L transition and the L-H recovery. (author)

  16. Development of Integrated Real-Time Control of Internal Transport Barriers in Advanced Operation Scenarios on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.; Crisanti, F.; Laborde, L.

    2005-01-01

    An important experimental programme is in progress on JET to investigate plasma control schemes which, with a limited number of actuators, could eventually enable ITER to sustain steady state burning plasmas in an 'advanced tokamak' operation scenario. A multi-variable model-based technique was recently developed for the simultaneous control of several plasma parameter profiles in discharges with internal transport barriers (ITB), using lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) together with neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). The proposed distributed-parameter control scheme relies on the experimental identification of an integral linear response model operator and retains the intrinsic couplings between the plasma parameter profiles. A first set of experiments was performed to control the current density profile in the low-density/low-power LH-driven phase of the JET advanced scenarios, using only one actuator (LHCD) and a simplified (lumped-parameter) version of the control scheme. Several requested steady state magnetic equilibria were thus obtained and sustained for about 7s, up to full relaxation of the ohmic current throughout the plasma. A second set of experiments was dedicated to the control of the q-profile with 3 actuators (LHCD, NBI and ICRH) during the intense heating phase of advanced scenarios. The safety factor profile was also shown to approach a requested profile within about 5s. The achieved plasma equilibrium was close to steady state. Finally, during the recent high power experimental campaign, experiments have been conducted in a 3T/1.7MA plasma, achieving the simultaneous control of the current density and electron temperature profiles in ITB plasmas. Here, the distributed-parameter version of the algorithm was used for the first time, again with 3 actuators. Real-time control was applied during 7s, and allowed to reach successfully different target q-profiles (monotonic and reversed-shear ones) and different ITB

  17. Transport in high-performance plasmas with a transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatani, M.

    1998-01-01

    In recent tokamak experiments several types of high-performance plasmas were obtained. One is the H (high)-mode triggered by the L (low) to H (high) transition. In this case the transport barrier is generated at the edge region. The obtained high confinement plasmas are characterized by gyro-Bohm-type transport from the scaling law. Another is the negative (central) shear or (enhanced) reverse shear mode with the transport barrier at the inner region close to the minimum point of the safety factor profile. With the internal transport barrier (ITB) the turbulent transport is suppressed significantly; however, the scaling study is primitive for the core plasma. To understand the negative shear configuration with the transport barrier, the high-β p plasmas are useful, since the ion thermal transport is improved without the reversal of magnetic shear. One key ingredient to obtain the above high-performance plasmas is the ExB velocity shear which may suppress the turbulence and associated anomalous transport in general. Shafranov shift is also favourable. However, it is a difficult task to predict by what degree the anomalous transport is suppressed, particularly compared to L-mode plasmas. Some theoretical efforts into the understanding of high-performance plasmas are discussed. (author)

  18. The stability of internal transport barriers to MHD ballooning modes and drift waves: A formalism for low magnetic shear and for velocity shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.W.; Hastie, R.J.; Webster, A.J.; Wilson, H.R.

    2005-01-01

    Tokamak discharges with internal transport barriers (ITBs) provide improved confinement, so it is important to understand their stability properties. The stability to an important class of modes with high wave-numbers perpendicular to the magnetic field, is usually studied with the standard ballooning transformation and eikonal approach. However, ITBs are often characterised by radial q profiles that have regions of negative or low magnetic shear and by radially sheared electric fields. Both these features affect the validity of the standard method. A new approach to calculating stability in these circumstances is developed and applied to ideal MHD ballooning modes and to micro-instabilities responsible for anomalous transport. (author)

  19. Advanced transport modeling of toroidal plasmas with transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, A.; Murakami, S.; Honda, M.; Izumi, Y.; Yagi, M.; Nakajima, N.; Nakamura, Y.; Ozeki, T.

    2005-01-01

    Transport modeling of toroidal plasmas is one of the most important issue to predict time evolution of burning plasmas and to develop control schemes in reactor plasmas. In order to describe the plasma rotation and rapid transition self-consistently, we have developed an advanced scheme of transport modeling based on dynamical transport equation and applied it to the analysis of transport barrier formation. First we propose a new transport model and examine its behavior by the use of conventional diffusive transport equation. This model includes the electrostatic toroidal ITG mode and the electromagnetic ballooning mode and successfully describes the formation of internal transport barriers. Then the dynamical transport equation is introduced to describe the plasma rotation and the radial electric field self-consistently. The formation of edge transport barriers is systematically studied and compared with experimental observations. The possibility of kinetic transport modeling in velocity space is also examined. Finally the modular structure of integrated modeling code for tokamaks and helical systems is discussed. (author)

  20. Low-impact, high toughness transportation barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Alternatives to existing transportation truck escape ramps and crash barriers are examined using arrays of : wood, bamboo, and fiberglass structural elements that act as energy absorbers as they deform. The : behaviors of each material type are analy...

  1. Structural Stability of Tokamak Equilibrium: Transport Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solano, E. R.

    2001-07-01

    A generalised theory of structural stability of differential equations is introduced and applied to the Grad-Shafranov equation. It is discussed how the formation and loss of transport barrier could be associated with the appearance/disappearance of equilibria. The equilibrium conjecture is presented: transport barriers are associated with locally diamagnetic regions in the plasma, and affected by the paramagnetism of the bootstrap current. (Author) 18 refs.

  2. Balance of the stored energies sustained by the internal and edge transport barriers and effects of ELMs and L-H transitions in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Koide, Y.; Oyama, N.; Urano, H.; Kamiya, K.; Suzuki, T.; Isayama, A.

    2009-01-01

    To understand key physics processes determining radial profiles of the kinetic plasma parameters in the advanced tokamak operation scenarios, correlations between the edge transport barrier (ETB) and the internal transport barrier (ITB) have been studied in the JT-60U tokamak device. It has been found that the edge pedestal poloidal beta, β p -ped, increases almost linearly with the total poloidal beta, β p -tot, over a wide range of the plasma current for type I ELMing H-mode plasmas, and this dependence becomes stronger with increasing triangularity. This dependence is not due to the profile stiffness, since the dependence is the same regardless of the existence of ITB. As the stored energy inside the ITB-foot radius (W ITB ) increases, the total thermal stored energy (W th ) increases and then the pedestal stored energy (W ped ) increases. On the other hand, as W ped increases, the ELM penetration expands more inwards and finally reaches the ITB-foot radius. At this situation, the ITB-foot radius cannot move outwards because of the erosion by ELMs. Then the fractions of W ITB /W th and W ped /W th become almost constant. It has also been found that the type I ELM expels/decreases the edge toroidal momentum larger than the edge ion thermal energy. The ELM penetration for the toroidal rotation tends to be deeper than that for the ion temperature and can exceed the ITB-foot radius. The ELM penetration is deeper for CO-rotating plasmas than CTR rotating plasmas. In both cases, the ELM penetration is deeper in the order of the toroidal rotation (V t ), the ion temperature (T i ) and then the electron temperature (T e ). The L-H transition also changes the V t profile more significantly than the T i profile. At the L-H transition, the pedestal V t shifts into the CTR-direction deeply and suddenly without a change in T i , and then the pedestal V t grows further together with a growth of the pedestal T i in a slower timescale. Such changes in V t by ELMs and L

  3. Opportunities and barriers for international bioenergy trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junginger, H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/202130703; van Dam, J.M.C.; Zarrilli, S.; Mohamed, F.A.; Marchal, D.; Faaij, A.P.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/10685903X

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the international trade of various bioenergy commodities has grown rapidly, yet this growth is also hampered by some barriers. The aim of this paper is to obtain an overview of what market actors currently perceive as major opportunities and barriers for the development of international

  4. Stochastic transport of particles across single barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreuter, Christian; Siems, Ullrich; Henseler, Peter; Nielaba, Peter; Leiderer, Paul; Erbe, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Transport phenomena of interacting particles are of high interest for many applications in biology and mesoscopic systems. Here we present measurements on colloidal particles, which are confined in narrow channels on a substrate and interact with a barrier, which impedes the motion along the channel. The substrate of the particle is tilted in order for the particles to be driven towards the barrier and, if the energy gained by the tilt is large enough, surpass the barrier by thermal activation. We therefore study the influence of this barrier as well as the influence of particle interaction on the particle transport through such systems. All experiments are supported with Brownian dynamics simulations in order to complement the experiments with tests of a large range of parameter space which cannot be accessed in experiments.

  5. Scenario development for high β p low torque plasma with q min above 2 and large-radius internal transport barrier in DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, S.; Xu, G. S.; Wang, Q.; Solomon, W. M.; Zhao, Y.; Gong, X.; Garofalo, A. M.; Holcomb, C. T.; McKee, G.; Yan, Z.; Wang, H. Q.; Qian, J.; Wan, B. N.

    2017-02-01

    A recent experiment on DIII-D, which was conducted by the joint research team from DIII-D and EAST, has extended the previous high {β\\text{p}} , high q min regime, which has been tested in the 2013 DIII-D/EAST joint experiment, to inductive operation at higher plasma current ({{I}\\text{p}}=0.8 MA) and significantly higher normalized fusion performance (G={{H}89}{β\\text{N}}/q952=0.16 ). The experiment aims at exploring high performance scenario with {{q}\\text{min}}>2 and reduced torque for long pulse operation, which can be potentially extrapolated to EAST. The effort was largely motivated by the interest in developing a feasible scenario for long-pulse high performance operation with low torque on EAST. Very high confinement, H 89  =  3.5 or {{H}98,\\text{y2}}=2.1 with {β\\text{N}}∼ 3.0 , has been achieved transiently in this experiment together with {{q}\\text{min}}>2 and reduced NBI torque (3∼ 5 N m). The excellent confinement is associated with the spontaneous formation of an internal transport barrier (ITB) in plasmas with {{I}\\text{p}}=0.8 MA at large minor radius (normalized ρ ∼ 0.7 ) in all channels (n e, T e, T i, {{V}φ} , especially strong in the T e channel). Fluctuation measurements show a significant reduction in the fluctuation levels, including AE modes and broadband turbulence, at the location where an ITB forms. Linear gyrokinetic simulations also support the decrease of the growth rate of the most unstable mode during strong ITB formation. The simulation implies that strong suppression of turbulence and a positive feedback loop may be active in this process and is responsible for the spontaneous formation of large-radius ITB. In an unstable ITB phase, an ELM crash is observed to have a positive effect on transient formation of large-radius ITB. The formation of this kind of ITB is found to have a shielding (protecting) effect on the core plasma while isolating the perturbation due to ELM crash.

  6. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L. Friedman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenation or fluorination of graphene can be used to create a tunnel barrier. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures, and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect. We compare the results for hydrogenated and fluorinated tunnel and we discuss the possibility that ferromagnetic moments in the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barrier affect the spin transport of our devices.

  7. The barrier within: endothelial transport of hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolka, Cathryn M; Bergman, Richard N

    2012-08-01

    Hormones are involved in a plethora of processes including development and growth, metabolism, mood, and immune responses. These essential functions are dependent on the ability of the hormone to access its target tissue. In the case of endocrine hormones that are transported through the blood, this often means that the endothelium must be crossed. Many studies have shown that the concentrations of hormones and nutrients in blood can be very different from those surrounding the cells on the tissue side of the blood vessel endothelium, suggesting that transport across this barrier can be rate limiting for hormone action. This transport can be regulated by altering the surface area of the blood vessel available for diffusion through to the underlying tissue or by the permeability of the endothelium. Many hormones are known to directly or indirectly affect the endothelial barrier, thus affecting their own distribution to their target tissues. Dysfunction of the endothelial barrier is found in many diseases, particularly those associated with the metabolic syndrome. The interrelatedness of hormones may help to explain why the cluster of diseases in the metabolic syndrome occur together so frequently and suggests that treating the endothelium may ameliorate defects in more than one disease. Here, we review the structure and function of the endothelium, its contribution to the function of hormones, and its involvement in disease.

  8. The Barrier Within: Endothelial Transport of Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolka, Cathryn M.; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Hormones are involved in a plethora of processes including development and growth, metabolism, mood, and immune responses. These essential functions are dependent on the ability of the hormone to access its target tissue. In the case of endocrine hormones that are transported through the blood, this often means that the endothelium must be crossed. Many studies have shown that the concentrations of hormones and nutrients in blood can be very different from those surrounding the cells on the tissue side of the blood vessel endothelium, suggesting that transport across this barrier can be rate limiting for hormone action. This transport can be regulated by altering the surface area of the blood vessel available for diffusion through to the underlying tissue or by the permeability of the endothelium. Many hormones are known to directly or indirectly affect the endothelial barrier, thus affecting their own distribution to their target tissues. Dysfunction of the endothelial barrier is found in many diseases, particularly those associated with the metabolic syndrome. The interrelatedness of hormones may help to explain why the cluster of diseases in the metabolic syndrome occur together so frequently and suggests that treating the endothelium may ameliorate defects in more than one disease. Here, we review the structure and function of the endothelium, its contribution to the function of hormones, and its involvement in disease. PMID:22875454

  9. Report on the combined meeting of the core confinement and internal transport barrier expert group, confinement database and modeling expert group and edge pedestal expert group, 12-16 April 1999, Garching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeschitz, G.; Connor, J.W.; Cordey, G.; Kardaun, O.; Mukhovatov, V.; Stambaugh, R.; Ryter, F.; Wakatani, M.

    1999-01-01

    This contribution to the ITER EDA Newsletter reports on the combined meeting of the core confinement and internal transport barrier expert group, confinement database and modeling expert group and edge pedestal expert group in Garching, Germany. This is the first workshop of its kind after the re-organisation of the expert groups. The new scheme of the meetings, namely to permit more interaction between groups by arranging them at the same time and location turned out to be very successful. The main issues discussed were for the Confinement Database: merging of edge pedestal and confinement data, improvement of the density- and magnetic shape parameters, addition of new dedicated threshold data, the effect of different divertors in JET; for the H-Mode Power Threshold Database: assembly of a new version of the database with about 650 time points from 10 tokamaks; for the 1-D Modelling Workshop: management of the database after the re-organisation of the Joint Central Team an ongoing efforts in plasma transport modelling; for the newly formed pedestal group: issues of the H-mode shear layer at the plasma edge. There was also an executive summary given of a recent USA workshop on internal transport barriers and regimes with weak or negative magnetic shear

  10. Schottky Barrier Transport for Multiphase Gallium Nitride Nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartz, Steven; Xie, Kan; Liu, Zhun; Ayres, Virginia

    2013-03-01

    Our group has shown that gallium nitride nanowires grown by catalyst-free vapor deposition at 850oC have multiple internal crystalline regions that may be zinc blende or wurtzite phase. Stability is enabled by one or more totally coherent (0001)/(111) internal interfaces. Cross-section HRTEM has further demonstrated that, while the transverse nanowire profile appears triangular, it is actually made up of two or more surface orientations corresponding to the multi-phase internal regions. We present results of a transport investigation of these multiphase nanowires within a nanoFET circuit architecture, focusing on injection from the contacts into the nanowires. Experimental results demonstrated that a variety of surface state derived Schottky barriers could be present at the contact-nanowire interfaces. Transport across the Schottky barriers was modeled using a combined thermionic emission-tunnelling approach, leading to information about barrier height, carrier concentrations, and expected temperature behavior. The experimental and theoretical results indicate that with optimal design taking surface and internal structures into account, high current densities can be supported.

  11. Operational Control of Internal Transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.R. van der Meer (Robert)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractOperational Control of Internal Transport considers the control of guided vehicles in vehicle-based internal transport systems found in facilities such as warehouses, production plants, distribution centers and transshipment terminals. The author's interest of research having direct use

  12. Self-regulation of turbulence bursts and transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floriani, E; Ciraolo, G; Ghendrih, Ph; Sarazin, Y; Lima, R

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between turbulent bursts and transport barriers is analyzed with a simplified model of interchange turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas. The turbulent bursts spread into the transport barriers and, depending on the competing magnitude of the burst and stopping capability of the barrier, can burn through. Simulations of two models of transport barriers are presented: a hard barrier where interchange turbulence modes are stable in a prescribed region and a soft barrier with external plasma biasing. The response of the transport barriers to the non-linear perturbations of the turbulent bursts, addressed in a predator–prey approach, indicates that the barriers monitor an amplification factor of the turbulent bursts, with amplification smaller than one for most bursts and, in some cases, amplification factors that can significantly exceed unity. The weak barriers in corrugated profiles and magnetic structures, as well as the standard barriers, are characterized by these transmission properties, which then regulate the turbulent burst transport properties. The interplays of barriers and turbulent bursts are modeled as competing stochastic processes. For different classes of the probability density function (PDF) of these processes, one can predict the heavy tail properties of the bursts downstream from the barrier, either exponential for a leaky barrier, or with power laws for a tight barrier. The intrinsic probing of the transport barriers by the turbulent bursts thus gives access to the properties of the barriers. The main stochastic variables are the barrier width and the spreading distance of the turbulent bursts within the barrier, together with their level of correlation. One finds that in the case of a barrier with volumetric losses, such as radiation or particle losses as addressed in our present simulations, the stochastic model predicts a leaky behavior with an exponential PDF of escaping turbulent bursts in agreement with the simulation

  13. Barriers between international students and Swedish companies

    OpenAIRE

    Qytyku, Silvana Agolli and Sokol

    2008-01-01

    Title: Barriers between international student’s and Swedish companies Course: Master thesis in business administration, 15 ECTS Date: June 2008 Authors: Silvana Agolli and Sokol Qytyku Supervisor: Dr. Per Eisele In this thesis report we have conduct a primary research on Blekinge area, while it is a shortage of IT workers and at the same time there were a lot of internationals students that graduated every year and didn’t get those available jobs. In this investigation we wanted to find out t...

  14. Observation of m/n=2/1 magnetic island on the foot point of electron internal transport barrier using soft x-ray CCD camera in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobuchi, T [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi, 980-8679 (Japan); Liang, Y [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 (Germany); Ida, K; Yoshinuma, M; Watanabe, K Y [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, 509-5292 (Japan)], E-mail: takashi.kobuchi@qse.tohoku.ac.jp

    2008-07-15

    The existence of m/n=2/1 magnetic islands in the plasma with an electron internal transport barrier (ITB) is identified in tangential soft x-ray emission images measured with a soft x-ray CCD camera using the Fourier-Bessel expansion reconstruction technique in the Large Helical Device. A clear m/n=2/1 magnetic island is observed in the discharge with ECRH and NBI in the direction antiparallel to the equivalent plasma current (counter-NBI), where the magnetic shear is expected to become small enough to cause the formation of a magnetic island. On the other hand, no magnetic island is observed in the ECRH and NBI in the direction parallel to the equivalent plasma current (co-NBI), where the magnetic shear is expected to be sufficiently high.

  15. International Collaboration Activities on Engineered Barrier Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) within the DOE Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) program has been engaging in international collaborations between repository R&D programs for high-level waste (HLW) disposal to leverage on gathered knowledge and laboratory/field data of near- and far-field processes from experiments at underground research laboratories (URL). Heater test experiments at URLs provide a unique opportunity to mimetically study the thermal effects of heat-generating nuclear waste in subsurface repository environments. Various configurations of these experiments have been carried out at various URLs according to the disposal design concepts of the hosting country repository program. The FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier Experiment in Crystalline Host Rock) project is a large-scale heater test experiment originated by the Spanish radioactive waste management agency (Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos S.A. – ENRESA) at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) URL in Switzerland. The project was subsequently managed by CIEMAT. FEBEX-DP is a concerted effort of various international partners working on the evaluation of sensor data and characterization of samples obtained during the course of this field test and subsequent dismantling. The main purpose of these field-scale experiments is to evaluate feasibility for creation of an engineered barrier system (EBS) with a horizontal configuration according to the Spanish concept of deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste in crystalline rock. Another key aspect of this project is to improve the knowledge of coupled processes such as thermal-hydro-mechanical (THM) and thermal-hydro-chemical (THC) operating in the near-field environment. The focus of these is on model development and validation of predictions through model implementation in computational tools to simulate coupled THM and THC processes.

  16. Transport barrier fluctuations governed by SOL turbulence spreading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghendrih, Ph.; Sarazin, Y.; Ciraolo, G.; Darmet, G.; Garbet, X.; Grangirard, V.; Tamain, P.; Benkadda, S.; Beyer, P.

    2007-01-01

    Turbulence spreading, namely turbulent transport extending into a stable region is reported both for the flat density profiles in the far SOL and into a modeled H-mode barrier. It is shown that due to turbulence penetration, the pedestal width fluctuates and that its effective width is a factor 2 smaller than the linear predicted width. Turbulence overshooting throughout the pedestal leads to a non-vanishing turbulent transport within the barrier and provides a coupling of core and SOL turbulence despite the transport barrier

  17. Partitioning of methyl internal rotational barrier energy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The nature of methyl internal rotational barrier in thioacetaldehyde has been investigated by relaxation effect, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and. Pauling exchange interactions. The true experimental barrier can be obtained by considering fully relaxed rotation. Nuclear-electron attraction term is a barrier.

  18. Partitioning of methyl internal rotational barrier energy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The nature of methyl internal rotational barrier in thioacetaldehyde has been investigated by relaxation effect, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and Pauling exchange interactions. The true experimental barrier can be obtained by considering fully relaxed rotation. Nuclear-electron attraction term is a barrier forming term in ...

  19. Transport barrier formation by LHCD on TRIAM-1M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanada, K.; Iyomasa, A.; Zushi, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Nakamura, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Sato, K.N.; Idei, H.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Sasaki, K.; Hoshika, H.

    2004-01-01

    Internal transport barrier (ITB) has been obtained in full lower hybrid current driven (LHCD) plasmas on a superconducting tokamak, TRIMA-1M (R 0.84 m, a x b = 0.12 m x 0.18 m, B T L/R . ITB is terminated by the reduction of current drive efficiency caused by metal impurities accumulation. In some condition, self organized slow sawtooth oscillations (SSSO) of plasma current, density, temperature, and so on with the period comparable to the current diffusion time have been also observed during ITB discharge. The oscillation has the capability of particle exhaust, as the result, it may play an role in the avoidance of the impurity accumulation and the dilution in the future steady state fusion plasma with ITB, as the edge-localized mode in H-mode. (authors)

  20. Transport phenomena in sharply contrasting media with a diffusion barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvoretskaya, O A; Kondratenko, P S

    2011-01-01

    Using the advection–diffusion equation, we analytically study contaminant transport in a sharply contrasting medium with a diffusion barrier due to localization of a contaminant source in a low-permeability medium. Anomalous diffusion behavior and a crossover between different transport regimes are observed. The diffusion barrier results in exponential attenuation of the source power, retardation of the contaminant plume growth and modification of the concentration distribution at large distances. (paper)

  1. Development of international transport in transboundary regions

    OpenAIRE

    Прокудін, Георгій; Чупайленко, Олексій

    2015-01-01

    Formation of an international cross-border transport and logistics infrastructure meets international standards, increased productivity, transport and innovation activity of enterprises in the cluster, and provide for accelerated socio - economic development of the regions.

  2. The Gendered International School: Barriers to Women Managers' Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Ruth Elizabeth; Whitehead, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the barriers women identify to their promotion in international schools and also the ways in which women can overcome these barriers. Design/methodology/approach: The field of enquiry is international schools, with the study drawing on qualitative research. The researchers interviewed 11 women from…

  3. Endogenous transport costs in international trade

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinert, Jörn; Spies, Julia

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we claim that distance alone is a poor proxy for international transport costs in empirical studies. We model a manufacturing and a transport sector and let the level of manufacturing exports determine the demand for transport services. Above a particular trade level, transport service suppliers find it profit-maximizing to invest in an advanced transport technology, which lowers their marginal costs and as a consequence, equilibrium transport prices. Transport costs thus vary w...

  4. Transport properties of damaged materials. Cementitious barriers partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) project is to develop tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term structural, hydraulic, and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in low-level waste storage applications. One key concern for the long-term durability of concrete is the degradation of the cementitious matrix, which occurs as a result of aggressive chemical species entering the material or leaching out in the environment, depending on the exposure conditions. The objective of the experimental study described in this report is to provide experimental data relating damage in cementitious materials to changes in transport properties, which can eventually be used to support predictive model development. In order to get results within a reasonable timeframe and to induce as much as possible uniform damage level in materials, concrete samples were exposed to freezing and thawing (F/T) cycles. The methodology consisted in exposing samples to F/T cycles and monitoring damage level with ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements. Upon reaching pre-selected damage levels, samples were tested to evaluate changes in transport properties. Material selection for the study was motivated by the need to get results rapidly, in order to assess the relevance of the methodology. Consequently, samples already available at SIMCO from past studies were used. They consisted in three different concrete mixtures cured for five years in wet conditions. The mixtures had water-to-cement ratios of 0.5, 0.65 and 0.75 and were prepared with ASTM Type I cement only. The results showed that porosity is not a good indicator for damage caused by the formation of microcracks. Some materials exhibited little variations in porosity even for high damage levels. On the other hand, significant variations in tortuosity were measured in all materials. This implies that damage caused by internal pressure does not necessarily create additional pore space in

  5. Transport properties of damaged materials. Cementitious barriers partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) project is to develop tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term structural, hydraulic, and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in low-level waste storage applications. One key concern for the long-term durability of concrete is the degradation of the cementitious matrix, which occurs as a result of aggressive chemical species entering the material or leaching out in the environment, depending on the exposure conditions. The objective of the experimental study described in this report is to provide experimental data relating damage in cementitious materials to changes in transport properties, which can eventually be used to support predictive model development. In order to get results within a reasonable timeframe and to induce as much as possible uniform damage level in materials, concrete samples were exposed to freezing and thawing (F/T) cycles. The methodology consisted in exposing samples to F/T cycles and monitoring damage level with ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements. Upon reaching pre-selected damage levels, samples were tested to evaluate changes in transport properties. Material selection for the study was motivated by the need to get results rapidly, in order to assess the relevance of the methodology. Consequently, samples already available at SIMCO from past studies were used. They consisted in three different concrete mixtures cured for five years in wet conditions. The mixtures had water-to-cement ratios of 0.5, 0.65 and 0.75 and were prepared with ASTM Type I cement only. The results showed that porosity is not a good indicator for damage caused by the formation of microcracks. Some materials exhibited little variations in porosity even for high damage levels. On the other hand, significant variations in tortuosity were measured in all materials. This implies that damage caused by internal pressure does not necessarily create additional pore space in

  6. Dynamics of the edge transport barrier at plasma biasing on the CASTOR tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stöckel, Jan; Spolaore, M.; Peleman, P.; Brotánková, Jana; Horáček, Jan; Dejarnac, Renaud; Devynck, P.; Ďuran, Ivan; Gunn, J. P.; Hron, Martin; Kocan, M.; Martines, E.; Pánek, Radomír; Sharma, A.; Van Oost, G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 6 (2006), s. 19-23 ISSN 1562-6016. [International Conference on Plasma Physics and Technology/11th./. Alushta, 11.9.2006-16.9.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : tokamak * plasma * transport barrier * relaxations Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http:// vant .kipt.kharkov.ua/TABFRAME.html

  7. Relaxation oscillations and transport barrier dynamics in tokamak edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benkadda, Sadruddin; Beyer, Peter; Fuhr-Chaudier, Guillaume; Garbet, Xavier; Ghendrih, Philippe; Sarazin, Yanick

    2004-01-01

    Oscillations of turbulent transport of particles and energy in magnetically confined plasmas can be easily observed in simulations of a variety of turbulence models. These oscillations typically involve a mechanism of energy exchange between fluctuations and a poloidal shear flow. This kind of ''predator-prey'' mechanism is found to be not relevant for transport barrier relaxations. In RBM simulations of resistive ballooning turbulence with transport barrier, relaxation oscillations of the latter are observed even in the case of frozen poloidal shear flow. These relaxations are due to a transitory growth of a mode localized at the barrier center. A one-dimensional model for the evolution of such a mode in the presence of a shear flow describes a transitory growth of an initial perturbation. Oscillations in the case of a finite steady-state shear flow are possible due to the coupling of the mode to the dynamics of the pressure profile. (author)

  8. Iron uptake and transport at the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Moos, Torben

    The mechanism by which iron is transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains controversial, and in this study we aimed to further clarify mechanisms by which iron is transported into the brain. We analyzed and compared the mRNA and protein expression of a variety of proteins involved...... space on its non-toxic ferric form to become accessible for iron uptake by neurons and glia....

  9. Electron thermal transport in RTP: filaments, barriers and bifurcations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Hogeweij, G.M.D.; Baar, M. de; Barth, C.J.; Beurskens, M.N.A.; Donne, A.J.H.; Gelder, J.F.M. van; Groot, B. de; Karelse, F.A.; Kloe, J. de; Kruijt, O.G.; Lok, J.; Meiden, H.J. van der; Oomens, A.A.M.; Oyevaar, Th.; Pijper, R.J.; Polman, R.W.; Salzedas, F.; Schueller, F.C.; Westerhof, E.; De Luca, F.; Galli, P.; Gorini, G.; Jacchia, A.; Mantica, P.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments with strong localized electron cyclotron heating (ECH) in the RTP tokamak show that electron heat transport is governed by alternating layers of good and bad thermal conduction. For central deposition hot T e filaments are observed inside the q = 1 radius. Moving the ECH resonance from the centre to the edge of the plasma results in discrete steps of the central electron temperature. The transitions occur when the minimum q value crosses q = 1,2,5/2 or 3, and correspond to the loss of a transport barrier situated close to the rational q value. Close to the transitions a new type of sawtooth activity is observed, characterized by the formation of sharp off-axis maxima on the T e profile, which collapse abruptly. The formation of the off-axis maxima is attributed to heat deposition precisely 'on top of' a transport barrier. (author)

  10. Information Asymmetries as Trade Barriers: ISO 9000 Increases International Commerce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potoski, Matthew; Prakash, Aseem

    2009-01-01

    Spatial, cultural, and linguistic barriers create information asymmetries between buyers and sellers that impede international trade. The International Organization for Standardization's ISO 9000 program is designed to reduce these information asymmetries by providing assurance about the product quality of firms that receive its certification.…

  11. Internal transport control in pot plant production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annevelink, E.

    1999-01-01

    Drawing up internal transport schedules in pot plant production is a very complex task. Scheduling internal transport at the operational level and providing control on a day-to-day or even hour-to-hour basis in particular requires a new approach. A hierarchical planning approach based on

  12. Information Literacy and International Students: cultural barriers and language preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Lenkart, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Even with the prevalence of a global culture, cultural and language barriers continue to present challenges for information professionals. Furthermore, international students are increasingly turning to library instruction classes for discovering library programs and resources. With the presence of cultural and language barriers, information literacy initiatives are forced to address the disparity in cultural displacement. The inclusion of language preferences in library instruction classes a...

  13. 2nd International Conference on Intelligent Transportation

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings present the latest information on intelligent- transportation technologies and their applications in real-world cases. The Second International Conference on Intelligent Transportation was held in Chengdu, China on November 25–27, 2015, to present the latest research in the field, including intelligent-transportation management, intelligent vehicles, rail transportation systems, traffic transportation networks, as well as road traffic element simulations and their industrial development. The aim of conference was to bring together academics, researchers, engineers and students from across the world to discuss state-of-the-art technologies related to intelligent transportation.

  14. Barriers to Healthcare Access for International Students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M I; Li, X G; Valentino, W; Ray, A

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify different barriers to healthcare access for international students in China. The study employed a cross sectional descriptive study using both qualitative and quantitative method. A representative sample of international students of a reputed university in China completed a mail back survey having a response rate of 7.5%. Identified barriers are classified as Cognitive, Financial and Structural barriers. One third (36.9%) international students perceived their health condition in China as bad in comparison with their home countries. More than two third of the students did not know their health insurance coverage. Around 71% students agreed that language was a barrier to health care access in China and majority of them think that interpreter service should be available at hospitals. To improve healthcare access - formal interpreter services, translated materials, reconsideration of health insurance should be taken into account. As per our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate healthcare access barriers for international students in China. Further large scale study should be undertaken.

  15. Eco-labelling: Barrier or incentive of international trade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Milica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eco-labeling plays an important role in international trade. It is necessary to put emphasis on the importance of eco-labels as potential barriers and potential incentives for international trade. Demand for products with eco-labels is increasing. However, the use of eco-labels can lead to discrimination against foreign products in the domestic market. The paper points out the great importance of the World Trade Organization and the International Organization for Standardization in the field of eco-labeling and international trade.

  16. Frontiers in Cancer Nanomedicine: Directing Mass Transport through Biological Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    The physics of mass transport within body compartments and across biological barriers differentiates cancers from healthy tissues. Variants of nanoparticles can be manufactured in combinatorially large sets, varying only one transport-affecting design parameter at a time. Nanoparticles can also be used as building blocks for systems that perform sequences of coordinated actions, in accordance to a prescribed logic. These are referred to as Logic-Embedded Vectors “(LEV)” in the following. Nanoparticles and LEVs are ideal probes for the determination of mass transport laws in tumors, acting as imaging contrast enhancers, and can be employed for the lesion-selective delivery of therapy. Their size, shape, density and surface chemistry dominate convective transport in the blood stream, margination, cell adhesion, selective cellular uptake, as well as sub-cellular trafficking and localization. As argued here, the understanding of transport differentials in cancer, termed ‘transport oncophysics’ unveils a new promising frontier in oncology: the development of lesion-specific delivery particulates that exploit mass transport differentials to deploy treatment of greater efficacy and reduced side effects. PMID:20079548

  17. Intelligent transportation system (ITS) international research exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    ITS applications address surface transportation challenges in safety, mobility, and : sustainability that are similar in cause and impact worldwide. International ITS : exchange allows cooperating nations to benefit from each others pre-competitiv...

  18. Partitioning of methyl internal rotational barrier energy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    the theoretical point of view and the potential energy surfaces governing large amplitude motions have been calculated directly by ab initio molecular orbital procedures 3–6. Recently, the role of lone-pair electrons on methyl internal rotational barrier of dimethyl ether and its homologues has been analysed theoretically.

  19. Barriers to International Student Mobility: Evidence from the Erasmus Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto-Otero, Manuel; Huisman, Jeroen; Beerkens, Maarja; de Wit, Hans; Vujic, Suncica

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we look at the barriers to international student mobility, with particular reference to the European Erasmus program. Much is known about factors that support or limit student mobility, but very few studies have made comparisons between participants and nonparticipants. Making use of a large data set on Erasmus and non-Erasmus…

  20. Announcement by the Internal Transport Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    The Shipping Service requests all users of wooden pallets, freight containers and lids that are no longer in use to contact the Internal Transport Service of the GS department (George Truelove), which is responsible for collecting and returning them to the Goods Reception Service in Buildings 904 and 194. Please also contact Mr. Truelove if you receive an order that is not meant for you. Internal Transport Service

  1. Barriers and Solutions to Conducting Large International, Interdisciplinary Research Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischke, Erin C; Knowlton, Jessie L; Phifer, Colin C; Gutierrez Lopez, Jose; Propato, Tamara S; Eastmond, Amarella; de Souza, Tatiana Martins; Kuhlberg, Mark; Picasso Risso, Valentin; Veron, Santiago R; Garcia, Carlos; Chiappe, Marta; Halvorsen, Kathleen E

    2017-12-01

    Global environmental problems such as climate change are not bounded by national borders or scientific disciplines, and therefore require international, interdisciplinary teamwork to develop understandings of their causes and solutions. Interdisciplinary scientific work is difficult enough, but these challenges are often magnified when teams also work across national boundaries. The literature on the challenges of interdisciplinary research is extensive. However, research on international, interdisciplinary teams is nearly non-existent. Our objective is to fill this gap by reporting on results from a study of a large interdisciplinary, international National Science Foundation Partnerships for International Research and Education (NSF-PIRE) research project across the Americas. We administered a structured questionnaire to team members about challenges they faced while working together across disciplines and outside of their home countries in Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico. Analysis of the responses indicated five major types of barriers to conducting interdisciplinary, international research: integration, language, fieldwork logistics, personnel and relationships, and time commitment. We discuss the causes and recommended solutions to the most common barriers. Our findings can help other interdisciplinary, international research teams anticipate challenges, and develop effective solutions to minimize the negative impacts of these barriers to their research.

  2. Barriers and Solutions to Conducting Large International, Interdisciplinary Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischke, Erin C.; Knowlton, Jessie L.; Phifer, Colin C.; Gutierrez Lopez, Jose; Propato, Tamara S.; Eastmond, Amarella; de Souza, Tatiana Martins; Kuhlberg, Mark; Picasso Risso, Valentin; Veron, Santiago R.; Garcia, Carlos; Chiappe, Marta; Halvorsen, Kathleen E.

    2017-12-01

    Global environmental problems such as climate change are not bounded by national borders or scientific disciplines, and therefore require international, interdisciplinary teamwork to develop understandings of their causes and solutions. Interdisciplinary scientific work is difficult enough, but these challenges are often magnified when teams also work across national boundaries. The literature on the challenges of interdisciplinary research is extensive. However, research on international, interdisciplinary teams is nearly non-existent. Our objective is to fill this gap by reporting on results from a study of a large interdisciplinary, international National Science Foundation Partnerships for International Research and Education (NSF-PIRE) research project across the Americas. We administered a structured questionnaire to team members about challenges they faced while working together across disciplines and outside of their home countries in Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico. Analysis of the responses indicated five major types of barriers to conducting interdisciplinary, international research: integration, language, fieldwork logistics, personnel and relationships, and time commitment. We discuss the causes and recommended solutions to the most common barriers. Our findings can help other interdisciplinary, international research teams anticipate challenges, and develop effective solutions to minimize the negative impacts of these barriers to their research.

  3. Ab initio transport across bismuth selenide surface barriers

    KAUST Repository

    Narayan, Awadhesh

    2014-11-24

    © 2014 American Physical Society. We investigate the effect of potential barriers in the form of step edges on the scattering properties of Bi2Se3(111) topological surface states by means of large-scale ab initio transport simulations. Our results demonstrate the suppression of perfect backscattering, while all other scattering processes, which do not entail a complete spin and momentum reversal, are allowed. Furthermore, we find that the spin of the surface state develops an out-of-plane component as it traverses the barrier. Our calculations reveal the existence of quasibound states in the vicinity of the surface barriers, which appear in the form of an enhanced density of states in the energy window corresponding to the topological state. For double barriers we demonstrate the formation of quantum well states. To complement our first-principles results we construct a two-dimensional low-energy effective model and illustrate its shortcomings. Our findings are discussed in the context of a number of recent experimental works.

  4. Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.L. Hardin

    2000-07-17

    The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II).

  5. Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E.L. Hardin

    2000-01-01

    The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II)

  6. Edge transport barrier formation in compact helical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, S; Minami, T; Oishi, T; Suzuki, C; Ida, K; Isobe, M; Yoshimura, Y; Nagaoka, K; Toi, K; Fujisawa, A; Akiyama, T; Iguchi, H; Ikeda, R; Kado, S; Matsuoka, K; Matsushita, H; Nakamura, K; Nakano, H; Nishimura, S; Nishiura, M; Ohshima, S; Shimizu, A; Takagi, S; Takahashi, C; Takeuchi, M; Yoshinuma, M

    2004-01-01

    The edge transport barrier (ETB) for particle transport is formed in the neutral beam (NB) heated hydrogen discharges in compact helical system (CHS). The transition to the ETB formation and the back transition are controlled by the heating power. The existence of the heating power threshold is confirmed and it is roughly proportional to the density. The Hα emission signal shows a clear drop at the transition (the timescale of signal decrease is ∼1 ms for the high heating power case). The ETB formation continues for the full duration of NB injection (100 ms) with a moderate level of radiation power loss. Local density profile measurement shows increase of the edge density and the movement of the density gradient region towards the edge

  7. Glutamate Transporters in the Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Waagepetersen, Helle Sønderby

    2017-01-01

    The amino acid L-glutamate serves a number of roles in the central nervous system, being an excitatory neurotransmitter, metabolite, and building block in protein synthesis. During pathophysiological events, where L-glutamate homeostasis cannot be maintained, the increased brain interstitial fluid...... studies have demonstrated blood-to-brain transport of L-glutamate, at least during pathological events. A number of studies have shown that brain endothelial cells express excitatory amino acid transporters, which may account for abluminal concentrative uptake of L-glutamate into the capillary endothelial...... concentration of L-glutamate causes excitotoxicity. A tight control of the brain interstitial fluid L-glutamate levels is therefore imperative, in order to maintain optimal neurotransmission and to avoid such excitotoxicity. The blood-brain barrier, i.e., the endothelial lining of the brain capillaries...

  8. Transport rankings of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs across blood-brain barrier in vitro models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta Novakova

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to conduct a comprehensive study about the transport properties of NSAIDs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB in vitro. Transport studies with celecoxib, diclofenac, ibuprofen, meloxicam, piroxicam and tenoxicam were accomplished across Transwell models based on cell line PBMEC/C1-2, ECV304 or primary rat brain endothelial cells. Single as well as group substance studies were carried out. In group studies substance group compositions, transport medium and serum content were varied, transport inhibitors verapamil and probenecid were added. Resulted permeability coefficients were compared and normalized to internal standards diazepam and carboxyfluorescein. Transport rankings of NSAIDs across each model were obtained. Single substance studies showed similar rankings as corresponding group studies across PBMEC/C1-2 or ECV304 cell layers. Serum content, glioma conditioned medium and inhibitors probenecid and verapamil influenced resulted permeability significantly. Basic differences of transport properties of the investigated NSAIDs were similar comparing all three in vitro BBB models. Different substance combinations in the group studies and addition of probenecid and verapamil suggested that transporter proteins are involved in the transport of every tested NSAID. Results especially underlined the importance of same experimental conditions (transport medium, serum content, species origin, cell line for proper data comparison.

  9. Transport rankings of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs across blood-brain barrier in vitro models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, Iveta; Subileau, Eva-Anne; Toegel, Stefan; Gruber, Daniela; Lachmann, Bodo; Urban, Ernst; Chesne, Christophe; Noe, Christian R; Neuhaus, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to conduct a comprehensive study about the transport properties of NSAIDs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro. Transport studies with celecoxib, diclofenac, ibuprofen, meloxicam, piroxicam and tenoxicam were accomplished across Transwell models based on cell line PBMEC/C1-2, ECV304 or primary rat brain endothelial cells. Single as well as group substance studies were carried out. In group studies substance group compositions, transport medium and serum content were varied, transport inhibitors verapamil and probenecid were added. Resulted permeability coefficients were compared and normalized to internal standards diazepam and carboxyfluorescein. Transport rankings of NSAIDs across each model were obtained. Single substance studies showed similar rankings as corresponding group studies across PBMEC/C1-2 or ECV304 cell layers. Serum content, glioma conditioned medium and inhibitors probenecid and verapamil influenced resulted permeability significantly. Basic differences of transport properties of the investigated NSAIDs were similar comparing all three in vitro BBB models. Different substance combinations in the group studies and addition of probenecid and verapamil suggested that transporter proteins are involved in the transport of every tested NSAID. Results especially underlined the importance of same experimental conditions (transport medium, serum content, species origin, cell line) for proper data comparison.

  10. Estrogen and insulin transport through the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Aaron A; Bedel, Nicholas D; Shen, Ling; Woods, Stephen C; Liu, Min

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and reduced transport of insulin through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Reversal of high-fat diet-induced obesity (HFD-DIO) by dietary intervention improves the transport of insulin through the BBB and the sensitivity of insulin in the brain. Although both insulin and estrogen (E2), when given alone, reduce food intake and body weight via the brain, E2 actually renders the brain relatively insensitive to insulin's catabolic action. The objective of these studies was to determine if E2 influences the ability of insulin to be transported into the brain, since the receptors for both E2 and insulin are found in BBB endothelial cells. E2 (acute or chronic) was systemically administered to ovariectomized (OVX) female rats and male rats fed a chow or a high-fat diet. Food intake, body weight and other metabolic parameters were assessed along with insulin entry into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Acute E2 treatment in OVX female and male rats reduced body weight and food intake, and chronic E2 treatment prevented or partially reversed high-fat diet-induced obesity. However, none of these conditions increased insulin transport into the CNS; rather, chronic E2 treatment was associated less-effective insulin transport into the CNS relative to weight-matched controls. Thus, the reduction of brain insulin sensitivity by E2 is unlikely to be mediated by increasing the amount of insulin entering the CNS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. THE PROBLEMS OF PASSENGER TRANSPORTATIONS IN AN INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. S. Barash

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The basic aspects of international passenger transportations in Ukraine are represented. The analysis of present situation in these transportations is carried out. Some variants of solving the problems of passenger transportations in an international communication are considered.

  12. Contracting Parties in the International Successive Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IORGA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Sometimes, the carrier, in order to accomplish the task of moving goods to its destination, he appeals to other carriers, for various reasons, concluding another contract of carriage, whichcircumscribes the initial contract and it entrusts the achievement of the entire transportation or only a part of it. Sometimes, there are precise stipulations in the main contract of carriage concerning thisissue. Besides the movement of goods, which we may call traditional, defined as using means of transportation of the same kind, lately we can observe the proliferation of more complex operations, which have the generic name of successive transportation. In such shipments, the multimodal transport plays an important role. Thus, the present approach focuses on some features of the legal relationships which may arise between the contracting carrier, surrogate carrier, consignor and consignee, and also on the results from the analysis of the concerned international conventions.

  13. International Congress of Automotive and Transport Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Ispas, Nicolae

    2017-01-01

    The volume will include selected and reviewed papers from CONAT - International Congress of Automotive and Transport Engineering to be held in Brasov, Romania, in October 2016. Authors are experts from research, industry and universities coming from 14 countries worldwide. The papers are covering the latest developments in automotive vehicles and environment, advanced transport systems and road traffic, heavy and special vehicles, new materials, manufacturing technologies and logistics, accident research and analysis and innovative solutions for automotive vehicles. The conference will be organized by SIAR (Society of Automotive Engineers from Romania) in cooperation with FISITA. .

  14. Determination of membrane behaviour during transport of pollutants n clay barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musso, M.; Pejon, O.

    2010-01-01

    The study of the transport of contaminants in clay barriers had a extensive development in environmental geotechnics. The most studied transport processes are solutes by advection - dispersion and diffusion generated by hydraulic and chemical gradients respectively. Greater attention should be given to the chemical - osmotic flow and behavior membrane clay barriers, since in one case the water molecules move through the existence of a chemical gradient and on the other the means totally or partially inhibits the passage of solutes. The team developed to measure these processes was constructed based on items international literature and performance was verified using two types of materials KCl solution . One material is a bentonite geocomposite (Geosynthetic Clay Liner GCL ) similar to that used by other researchers. The other material is a soil barrier compacted clay (Compacted Clay Liner CCL) Fm. Corumbataí (Permian), belonging to the Paraná basin in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil . The results show the proper performance of the equipment built . Osmotic pressure generation and membrane performance was verified for both samples. Further corroborated influence of the type of clay mineral in the osmotic pressure generated value and membrane behavior

  15. Liability for international nuclear transport: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, O.F.; Horbach, N.

    2000-01-01

    Many elements can bear on liability for nuclear damage during transport. For example, liability may depend upon a number of facts that may be categorized as follows: shipment, origin or destination of the shipment, deviation from the planed route, temporary storage incidental to carriage; content of shipment, type of nuclear material involved, whether its origin is civilian or defence-related; sites of accident, number and type of territories damaged (i.e. potential conventions involved), applicable territorial limits, exclusive economic zone, high seas, etc.; nature of damages, personal injury, property damage, damage to the means of carriage, indirect damage, preventive measures, environmental cleanup or retrieval at seas, res communis, transboundary damages etc.; victims involved, nationality and domiciles of victims; jurisdiction, flag (for ships) or national registration (for aircraft) of the transporting vessel, courts of one or more states may have (or assert) jurisdiction to hear claims, and may have to determine what law to apply to a particular accident; applicable law, the applicability laws and/or international nuclear liability conventions; the extent to which any applicable convention has been implemented or modified by domestic legislation, conflicts with the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention or other applicable international agreements, and finally, also written agreements between installation operators and carriers can define applicable law as well as responsibilities. Harmonizing nuclear liability protection and applying it to additional international shipments would be facilitated by more countries being in treaty relations with each other as soon as possible. Adherence to an international convention by more countries (including China, Russia, the United States, etc.) would promote the open flow of services and advanced technology, and better facilitate international transport. The conventions protect the public, harmonize legislation in the

  16. Hydrophilic solute transport across the rat blood-brain barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucchesi, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Brain capillary permeability-surface area products (PS) of hydrophilic solutes ranging in size from 180 to 5,500 Daltons were measured in rats according to the method of Ohno, Pettigrew and Rapoport. The distribution volume of 70 KD dextran at 10 minutes after i.v. injection was also measured to determine the residual volume of blood in brain tissue at the time of sacrifice. Small test solutes were injected in pairs in order to elucidate whether their transfer into the brain proceeds by diffusion through water- or lipid-filled channels or by vesicular transport. This issue was examined in rats whose blood-brain barrier (BBB) was presumed to be intact (untreated) and in rats that received intracarotid infusions to open the BBB (isosmotic salt (ISS) and hyperosmolar arabinose). Ohno PS values of 3 H-inulin and 14 C-L-glucose in untreated rats were found to decrease as the labelling time was lengthened. This was evidence that a rapidly equilibrating compartment exists between blood and brain that renders the Ohno two-compartment model inadequate for computing true transfer rate constants. When the data were reanalyzed using a multi-compartment graphical analysis, solutes with different molecular radii were found to enter the brain at approximately equal rates. Furthermore, unidirectional transport is likely to be initiated by solute adsorption to a glycocalyx coat on the luminal surface of brain capillary endothelium. Apparently, more inulin than L-glucose was adsorbed, which may account for its slightly faster transfer across the BBB. After rats were treated with intracarotid infusions of ISS or hyperosmolar arabinose, solute PS values were significantly increased, but the ratio of PS for each of the solute pairs approached that of their free-diffusion coefficients

  17. U.S. and Texas international trade and transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    This report, funded by the Southwest Region University Transportation Center, examines various : aspects of international trade, transportation, and foreign practices implemented facilitate and fund : transport-related infrastructure. The report is c...

  18. Impulse Artificial Neural Networks in Internal Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochelska-Mierzejewska Joanna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The second most important function of a warehouse, apart from the storing of goods, is internal transport with a focus on time-effectiveness. When there is a time gap between the production and export of products, the goods need to be stored until they are dispatched to the consumers. An important problem that concerns both large and small warehouses is the selection of priorities, that is handling the tasks in order of importance. Another problem is to identify the most efficient routes for forklift trucks to transport goods from a start-point to a desired destination and prevent the routes from overlapping. In automated warehouses, the transport of objects (the so called pallets of goods is performed by machines controlled by a computer instead of a human operator. Thus, it is the computer, not the man, that makes the difficult decisions regarding parallel route planning, so that the materials are transported within the warehouse in near-optimal time. This paper presents a method for enhancing this process.

  19. Internally shielded beam transport and support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schildkamp, W.; Brewer, H.

    1996-01-01

    Due to environmental concerns, the Advanced Photon Source has a policy that disallows any exposed lead within the facility. This creates a real problem for the beam transport system, not so much for the pipe but for the flexible coupling (bellows) sections. A complete internally shielded x-ray transport system, consisting of long transport lines joined by flexible coupling sections, has been designed for CARS sector 14 to operate either at high vacuum or as a helium flight tube. It can effectively shield against air scattering of wiggler or undulator white beam with proper placement of apertures, collimators, and masks for direct beam control. The system makes use of male- and female-style fittings that create a labyrinth allowing for continuous shielding through the flexible coupling sections. These parts are precision machined from a ternary hypereutectic lead alloy (cast under 15 inches of head pressure to assure a pinhole-free casting) then pressed into either end (rotatable vacuum flanges) of the bellows assembly. The transport pipe itself consists of a four part construction using a stepped transition ring (Z-ring) to connect an inner tube to the vacuum flange and also to a protective and supportive outer tube. The inner tube is wrapped with 1/16 double-prime pure lead sheet to a predetermined thickness following the shape of the stepped transition ring for continuous shielding. This design has been prototyped and radiation tested. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  20. Representing solute transport through the multi-barrier disposal system by simplified concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poteri, A.; Nordman, H.; Pulkkanen, V-M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Kekaelaeinen, P. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. pf Physics; Hautojaervi, A.

    2012-02-15

    The repository system chosen in Finland for spent nuclear fuel is composed of multiple successive transport barriers. If a waste canister is leaking, this multi-barrier system retards and limits the release rates of radionuclides into the biosphere. Analysis of radionuclide migration in the previous performance assessments has largely been based on numerical modelling of the repository system. The simplified analytical approach introduced here provides a tool to analyse the performance of the whole system using simplified representations of the individual transport barriers. This approach is based on the main characteristics of the individual barriers and on the generic nature of the coupling between successive barriers. In the case of underground repository the mass transfer between successive transport barriers is strongly restricted by the interfaces between barriers leading to well-mixed conditions in these barriers. The approach here simplifies the barrier system so that it can be described with a very simple compartment model, where each barrier is represented by a single, or in the case of buffer, by not more than two compartments. This system of compartments could be solved in analogy with a radioactive decay chain. The model of well mixed compartments lends itself to a very descriptive way to represent and analyse the barrier system because the relative efficiency of the different barriers in hindering transport of solutes can be parameterised by the solutes half-times in the corresponding compartments. In a real repository system there will also be a delay between the start of the inflow and the start of the outflow from the barrier. This delay can be important for the release rates of the short lived and sorbing radionuclides, and it was also included in the simplified representation of the barrier system. In a geological multi-barrier system, spreading of the outflowing release pulse is often governed by the typical behaviour of one transport barrier

  1. Parameters and characteristics governing cellular internalization and trans-barrier trafficking of nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugan K

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Karmani Murugan, Yahya E Choonara, Pradeep Kumar, Divya Bijukumar, Lisa C du Toit, Viness Pillay Wits Advanced Drug Delivery Platform Research Unit, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, School of Therapeutic Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa Abstract: Cellular internalization and trans-barrier transport of nanoparticles can be manipulated on the basis of the physicochemical and mechanical characteristics of nanoparticles. Research has shown that these factors significantly influence the uptake of nanoparticles. Dictating these characteristics allows for the control of the rate and extent of cellular uptake, as well as delivering the drug-loaded nanosystem intra-cellularly, which is imperative for drugs that require a specific cellular level to exert their effects. Additionally, physicochemical characteristics of the nanoparticles should be optimal for the nanosystem to bypass the natural restricting phenomena of the body and act therapeutically at the targeted site. The factors at the focal point of emerging smart nanomedicines include nanoparticle size, surface charge, shape, hydrophobicity, surface chemistry, and even protein and ligand conjugates. Hence, this review discusses the mechanism of internalization of nanoparticles and ideal nanoparticle characteristics that allow them to evade the biological barriers in order to achieve optimal cellular uptake in different organ systems. Identifying these parameters assists with the progression of nanomedicine as an outstanding vector of pharmaceuticals. Keywords: nanoparticles, transport mechanisms, cellular uptake, size, shape, charge

  2. Kinetics of Transferrin and Transferrin-Receptor during Iron Transport through Blood Brain Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aminul; Liu, Jin; Dutta, Prashanta

    2017-11-01

    Transferrin and its receptors play an important role during the uptake and transcytosis of iron by blood brain barrier (BBB) endothelial cells to maintain iron homeostasis in BBB endothelium and brain. In the blood side of BBB, ferric iron binds with the apo-transferrin to form holo-transferrin which enters the endothelial cell via transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis. Depending on the initial concentration of iron inside the cell endocytosed holo-transferrin can either be acidified in the endosome or exocytosed through the basolateral membrane. Acidification of holo-transferrin in the endosome releases ferrous irons which may either be stored and used by the cell or transported into brain side. Exocytosis of the holo-transferrin through basolateral membrane leads to transport of iron bound to transferrin into brain side. In this work, kinetics of internalization, recycling and exocytosis of transferrin and its receptors are modeled by laws of mass action during iron transport in BBB endothelial cell. Kinetic parameters for the model are determined by least square analysis. Our results suggest that the cell's initial iron content determines the extent of the two possible iron transport pathways, which will be presented in this talk Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01GM122081.

  3. Barriers and Perceived Stress Levels of Internationals Living in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Terah L.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the perceived stress level of international students who faced barriers to employment upon graduation from an American post-secondary institution. The Barriers to Employment Success Inventory (BESI) was used to assess employment barriers and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) assessed the perceived level of stress experienced by…

  4. Velocity barrier-controlled of spin-valley polarized transport in monolayer WSe2 junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xuejun; Lv, Qiang; Cao, Zhenzhou

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we have theoretically investigated the influence of velocity barrier on the spin-valley polarized transport in monolayer (ML) WSe2 junction with a large spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Both the spin-valley resolved transmission probabilities and conductance are strong dependent on the velocity barrier, as the velocity barrier decreases to 0.06, a spin-valley polarization of exceeding 90% is observed, which is distinct from the ML MoS2 owing to incommensurable SOC. In addition, the spin-valley polarization is further increased above 95% in a ML WSe2 superlattice, in particular, it's found many extraordinary velocity barrier-dependent transport gaps for multiple barrier due to evanescent tunneling. Our results may open an avenue for the velocity barrier-controlled high-efficiency spin and valley polarizations in ML WSe2-based electronic devices.

  5. The Impact of Transport on International Trade Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Duško

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available International trade implies transport of specific quantity of goods to (frequently large distances, the success of which depends on the safety and speed of delivery. These are greatly conditioned by the quality of means of transport and infrastructure. This is why international trade development is affected by transport, and the development of means of transport and infrastructure is, to a great extent, influenced by demand for international delivery of various commodities. This paper looks at the interdependence of international trade and transport, showing how transport played a very significant role in international trade development in the past as it does today, commensurate to the role of international trade in the development of carriers and transport infrastructure.

  6. Interpretation of transport barriers and of subneoclassical transport in the framework of the revisited neoclassical theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogister, A.L.

    1999-01-01

    'Subneoclassical' heat fluxes are predicted in the high collisionality regime by the revisited neoclassical theory, which includes the roles of Finite Larmor Radius effects and Inertia, that we published earlier. Unlike conventional neoclassical theory, the revisited theory further provides a non degenerate ambipolarity constraint which defines unambiguously the radial electric field. Together with the parallel momentum equation, the ambipolarity constraint leads, under some conditions, to radial electric field profiles with high negative shear akin to those observed in spontaneous edge transport barriers. The predictions of the theory are outlined, with emphasis laid on the interpretation of experimental results such as magnitude of the jumps, width of the shear layer, local scaling laws. Extension of the theory to triggered transitions and cold pulse propagation studies is suggested. (author)

  7. Challenges in teaching international students: group separation, language barriers and culture differences

    OpenAIRE

    Medved, Dennis; Franco, Antonio; Gao, Xiang; Yang, Fangfang

    2013-01-01

    Every year, there are more than 2500 new international students coming to Lund University and starting their higher education path. A higher number of foreign students increased the international competitiveness of Lund University, but at the same time the international students had to face many problems for instance, culture shock and language barriers. In this report we focused on issues in teaching international students, specifically group separation, language barriers and cultural differ...

  8. International bioenergy transport costs and energy balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamelinck, Carlo N.; Suurs, Roald A.A.; Faaij, Andre P.C.

    2005-01-01

    To supply biomass from production areas to energy importing regions, long-distance international transport is necessary, implying additional logistics, costs, energy consumption and material losses compared to local utilisation. A broad variety of bioenergy chains can be envisioned, comprising different biomass feedstock production systems, pre-treatment and conversion operations, and transport of raw and refined solid biomass and liquid bio-derived fuels. A tool was developed to consistently compare the possible bioenergy supply chains and assess the influence of key parameters, such as distance, timing and scale on performance. Chains of European and Latin American bioenergy carriers delivered to Western Europe were analysed using generic data. European biomass residues and crops can be delivered at 90 and 70 euros/tonne dry (4.7 and 3.7 euros/GJ HHV ) when shipped as pellets. South American crops are produced against much lower costs. Despite the long shipping distance, the costs in the receiving harbour can be as low as 40 euros/tonne dry or 2.1 euros/GJ HHV ; the crop's costs account for 25-40% of the delivered costs. The relatively expensive truck transport from production site to gathering point restricts the size of the production area; therefore, a high biomass yield per hectare is vital to enable large-scale systems. In all, 300 MW HHV Latin American biomass in biomass integrated gasification/combined cycle plants may result in cost of electricity as little as 3.5 euros cent/kWh, competitive with fossil electricity. Methanol produced in Latin America and delivered to Europe may cost 8-10 euros/GJ HHV , when the pellets to methanol conversion is done in Europe the delivered methanol costs are higher. The energy requirement to deliver solid biomass from both crops and residues from the different production countries is 1.2-1.3 MJ primary /MJ delivered (coal ∼ 1.1 MJ/MJ). International bioenergy trade is possible against low costs and modest energy loss

  9. Leakage current transport mechanism under reverse bias in Au/Ni/GaN Schottky barrier diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peta, Koteswara Rao; Kim, Moon Deock

    2018-01-01

    The leakage current transport mechanism under reverse bias of Au/Ni/GaN Schottky diode is studied using temperature dependent current-voltage (I-V-T) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics. I-V measurement in this study is in the range of 140 K-420 K in steps of 10 K. A reduction in voltage dependent barrier height and a strong internal electric field in depletion region under reverse bias suggested electric field enhanced thermionic emission in carrier transport via defect states in Au/Ni/GaN SBD. A detailed analysis of reverse leakage current revealed two different predominant transport mechanisms namely variable-range hopping (VRH) and Poole-Frenkel (PF) emission conduction at low (260 K) temperatures respectively. The estimated thermal activation energies (0.20-0.39 eV) from Arrhenius plot indicates a trap assisted tunneling of thermally activated electrons from a deep trap state into a continuum of states associated with each conductive threading dislocation.

  10. Observation of a spontaneous particle-transport barrier in the HL-2A tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, W W; Zou, X L; Ding, X T; Yao, L H; Feng, B B; Song, X M; Song, S D; Zhou, Y; Liu, Z T; Yuan, B S; Sun, H J; Ji, X Q; Gao, Y D; Li, Y G; Yan, L W; Yang, Q W; Liu, Yi; Dong, J Q; Duan, X R; Liu, Yong; Pan, C H

    2010-05-28

    Using the profile analysis, the density perturbation transport analysis, and the Doppler reflectometry measurement, for the first time a spontaneous and steady-state particle-transport barrier has been evidenced in the Ohmic plasmas in the HL-2A tokamak with no externally applied momentum or particle input except the gas puffing. A threshold in density has been found for the observation of the barrier. The particle diffusivity is well-like, and the convection is found to be inward outside the well and outward inside the well. The formation of the barrier coincides with the transition between the trapped electron mode and the ion temperature gradient driven mode.

  11. TOPICAL PROBLEMS AND DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVES OF INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT TRANSPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Sulce, Anastasija

    2014-01-01

    The title of thesis is Typical Problems and Development Perspectives of International Freight Transport. This work is dedicated to different modes of international transportation, freight and logistics their advantages and disadvantages. Another essential part of the work related to different way for transport development and its efficient usage The objective is to explore modes of freight transport and logistics in details and, thereof, reveal advantages and disadvantages. On the basis ...

  12. OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL, NATURAL BARRIERS THRUST OVERVIEW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B. Bodvarsson; Y. Tsang

    2006-01-01

    The Natural Barriers Thrust supports scientific studies of the natural system at the proposed repository site of Yucca Mountain. It stresses the realistic representation of the natural system with respect to processes and parameters, by means of laboratory, field, and modeling studies. It has the objectives to demonstrate that the natural barriers can make large contributions to repository performance, supporting the multiple-barrier concept for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste; and to reduce the overall cost of repository development by elimination of unnecessary engineered components, given the demonstrated natural barriers performance. In this overview we enumerate the research projects within the Natural Barriers Thrust grouped under five elements: (1) Drift Seepage, (2) In-drift Environment, (3) Drift Shadow, (4) Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport, and (5) Saturated Zone Flow and Transport. The long-term strategic plan of the Natural Barriers Thrust and some key results are also briefly described

  13. Barriers to global health development: An international quantitative survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahr Weiss

    Full Text Available Global health's goal of reducing low-and-middle-income country versus high-income country health disparities faces complex challenges. Although there have been discussions of barriers, there has not been a broad-based, quantitative survey of such barriers.432 global health professionals were invited via email to participate in an online survey, with 268 (62% participating. The survey assessed participants' (A demographic and global health background, (B perceptions regarding 66 barriers' seriousness, (C detailed ratings of barriers designated most serious, (D potential solutions.Thirty-four (of 66 barriers were seen as moderately or more serious, highlighting the widespread, significant challenges global health development faces. Perceived barrier seriousness differed significantly across domains: Resource Limitations mean = 2.47 (0-4 Likert scale, Priority Selection mean = 2.20, Corruption, Lack of Competence mean = 1.87, Social and Cultural Barriers mean = 1.68. Some system-level predictors showed significant but relatively limited relations. For instance, for Global Health Domain, HIV and Mental Health had higher levels of perceived Social and Cultural Barriers than other GH Domains. Individual-level global health experience predictors had small but significant effects, with seriousness of (a Corruption, Lack of Competence, and (b Priority Selection barriers positively correlated with respondents' level of LMIC-oriented (e.g., weeks/year spent in LMIC but Academic Global Health Achievement (e.g., number of global health publications negatively correlated with overall barrier seriousness.That comparatively few system-level predictors (e.g., Organization Type were significant suggests these barriers may be relatively fundamental at the system-level. Individual-level and system-level effects do have policy implications; e.g., Priority Selection barriers were among the most serious, yet effects on seriousness of how LMIC-oriented a professional

  14. Barriers to global health development: An international quantitative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Bahr; Pollack, Amie Alley

    2017-01-01

    Global health's goal of reducing low-and-middle-income country versus high-income country health disparities faces complex challenges. Although there have been discussions of barriers, there has not been a broad-based, quantitative survey of such barriers. 432 global health professionals were invited via email to participate in an online survey, with 268 (62%) participating. The survey assessed participants' (A) demographic and global health background, (B) perceptions regarding 66 barriers' seriousness, (C) detailed ratings of barriers designated most serious, (D) potential solutions. Thirty-four (of 66) barriers were seen as moderately or more serious, highlighting the widespread, significant challenges global health development faces. Perceived barrier seriousness differed significantly across domains: Resource Limitations mean = 2.47 (0-4 Likert scale), Priority Selection mean = 2.20, Corruption, Lack of Competence mean = 1.87, Social and Cultural Barriers mean = 1.68. Some system-level predictors showed significant but relatively limited relations. For instance, for Global Health Domain, HIV and Mental Health had higher levels of perceived Social and Cultural Barriers than other GH Domains. Individual-level global health experience predictors had small but significant effects, with seriousness of (a) Corruption, Lack of Competence, and (b) Priority Selection barriers positively correlated with respondents' level of LMIC-oriented (e.g., weeks/year spent in LMIC) but Academic Global Health Achievement (e.g., number of global health publications) negatively correlated with overall barrier seriousness. That comparatively few system-level predictors (e.g., Organization Type) were significant suggests these barriers may be relatively fundamental at the system-level. Individual-level and system-level effects do have policy implications; e.g., Priority Selection barriers were among the most serious, yet effects on seriousness of how LMIC-oriented a professional was

  15. National Transportation Safety Board : weak internal control impaired financial accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-28

    The U. S. General Accounting Office (GAO) was asked to review the National Transportation Safety Board's (NTSB) internal controls over selected types of fiscal year expenditures. They were asked to determine whether internal control weaknesses were a...

  16. Study of Heat Flux Threshold and Perturbation Effect on Transport Barrier Formation Based on Bifurcation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatthong, B.; Onjun, T.; Imbeaux, F.; Sarazin, Y.; Strugarek, A.; Picha, R.; Poolyarat, N.

    2011-06-01

    Full text: Formation of transport barrier in fusion plasma is studied using a simple one-field bistable S-curve bifurcation model. This model is characterized by an S-line with two stable branches corresponding to the low (L) and high (H) confinement modes, connected by an unstable branch. Assumptions used in this model are such that the reduction in anomalous transport is caused by v E velocity shear effect and also this velocity shear is proportional to pressure gradient. In this study, analytical and numerical approaches are used to obtain necessary conditions for transport barrier formation, i.e. the ratio of anomalous over neoclassical coefficients and heat flux thresholds which must be exceeded. Several profiles of heat sources are considered in this work including constant, Gaussian, and hyperbolic tangent forms. Moreover, the effect of perturbation in heat flux is investigated with respect to transport barrier formation

  17. Spatial configuration and composition of charge modulates transport into a mucin hydrogel barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Leon D; Crouzier, Thomas; Sarkar, Aniruddh; Dunphy, Laura; Han, Jongyoon; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2013-09-17

    The mucus barrier is selectively permeable to a wide variety of molecules, proteins, and cells, and establishes gradients of these particulates to influence the uptake of nutrients, the defense against pathogens, and the delivery of drugs. Despite its importance for health and disease, the criteria that govern transport through the mucus barrier are largely unknown. Studies with uniformly functionalized nanoparticles have provided critical information about the relevance of particle size and net charge for mucus transport. However, these particles lack the detailed spatial arrangements of charge found in natural mucus-interacting substrates, such as certain viruses, which may have important consequences for transport through the mucus barrier. Using a novel, to our knowledge, microfluidic design that enables us to measure real-time transport gradients inside a hydrogel of mucins, the gel-forming glycoprotein component of mucus, we show that two peptides with the same net charge, but different charge arrangements, exhibit fundamentally different transport behaviors. Specifically, we show that certain configurations of positive and negative charges result in enhanced uptake into a mucin barrier, a remarkable effect that is not observed with either charge alone. Moreover, we show that the ionic strength within the mucin barrier strongly influences transport specificity, and that this effect depends on the detailed spatial arrangement of charge. These findings suggest that spatial charge distribution is a critical parameter to modulate transport through mucin-based barriers, and have concrete implications for the prediction of mucosal passage, and the design of drug delivery vehicles with tunable transport properties. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Barriers to Superfast Water Transport in Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Jens Honore; Ritos, Konstantinos; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes hold the promise of extraordinary fast water transport for applications such as energy efficient filtration and molecular level drug delivery. However, experiments and computations have reported flow rate enhancements over continuum hydrodynamics that contradict each...... over the continuum predictions. These rates are far below those reported experimentally. The results suggest that the reported superfast water transport rates cannot be attributed to interactions of water with pristine CNTs alone....

  19. Transportation vulnerability as a barrier to service utilization for HIV-positive individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagrestano, Lynda M; Clay, Joy; Finerman, Ruthbeth; Gooch, Jennifer; Rapino, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that transportation vulnerability can negatively impact adherence to HIV-related medical treatment. Moreover, transportation can be a barrier to accessing ancillary services which can increase positive health outcomes for HIV-positive individuals. This study examines transportation vulnerability and its impact on HIV-related health and ancillary service utilization in the Mid-South Region. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with service providers and HIV-positive individuals, and survey data were collected from HIV-positive individuals (N=309) using the five A's of access to frame transportation vulnerability: availability, accessibility, accommodation, affordability, and acceptability. Study results indicate that transportation vulnerability can present significant barriers to service utilization for HIV-positive individuals, including insufficient transportation infrastructure, incompatible fit between transportation and health systems, and insensitivity to privacy issues. One consequence of transportation vulnerability is reliance upon weaving together multiple modes of transport to access care and ancillary services, creating additional barriers to service utilization and medical adherence. The research team recommends more investment in public transit systems, expanded services, and innovative approaches to solving procedural problems.

  20. PREFACE: 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizuka, Tomonori

    2008-07-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains papers based on invited talks and contributed posters presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers. This meeting was held at the Tsukuba International Congress Center in Tsukuba, Japan, on 26-28 September 2007, and was organized jointly by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency and the University of Tsukuba. The previous ten meetings in this series were held in San Diego (USA) 1987, Gut Ising (Germany) 1989, Abingdon (UK) 1991, Naka (Japan) 1993, Princeton (USA) 1995, Kloster Seeon (Germany) 1997, Oxford (UK) 1999, Toki (Japan) 2001, San Diego (USA) 2003, and St Petersburg (Russia) 2005. The purpose of the eleventh meeting was to present and discuss new results on H-mode (edge transport barrier, ETB) and internal transport barrier, ITB, experiments, theory and modeling in magnetic fusion research. It was expected that contributions give new and improved insights into the physics mechanisms behind high confinement modes of H-mode and ITBs. Ultimately, this research should lead to improved projections for ITER. As has been the tradition at the recent meetings of this series, the program was subdivided into six topics. The topics selected for the eleventh meeting were: H-mode transition and the pedestal-width Dynamics in ETB: ELM threshold, non-linear evolution and suppression, etc Transport relations of various quantities including turbulence in plasmas with ITB: rotation physics is especially highlighted Transport barriers in non-axisymmetric magnetic fields Theory and simulation on transport barriers Projections of transport barrier physics to ITER For each topic there was an invited talk presenting an overview of the topic, based on contributions to the meeting and on recently published external results. The six invited talks were: A Leonard (GA, USA): Progress in characterization of the H-mode pedestal and L-H transition N Oyama (JAEA, Japan): Progress and issues in

  1. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement - 4. International meeting. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The 4. edition of the International Meeting 'Clays in Natural and Engineered Barriers for Radioactive Waste Confinement' took place at the 'Cite Internationale des Congres' of Nantes (France). Approximately 500 participants (from about 20 different countries) attended the meeting. All the abstracts (oral and poster sessions) are included in these proceedings. The purpose of this 4. international conference is to gather specialists in the different disciplines related to clays and clay minerals, with scientists from organisations engaged in radioactive waste disposal, in order to evaluate the progress of the research conducted in that field. Multidisciplinary approaches including geology, mineralogy, geochemistry, rheology, geomechanics of clays are required in order to provide a detailed characterisation of the geological host formations considered for the disposal of radioactive waste and to assess the behaviour of engineered and natural barriers when submitted to various types of perturbations induced by disposal facilities. The major objectives for the experimental programs are constituted by the performance evaluation for the natural barrier as well as the impact of repository-induced disturbances upon the confinement properties of clay-rich geological formations. This is being or will be conducted in underground research laboratories, for interpreting the subsequent scientific results, for modelling the long-term behaviour of radioactive waste repositories and for carrying out safety assessment exercises. This conference covers all the aspects of clay characterisation and behaviour relevant to the confinement of radionuclides in clay, considered at various time scales and locations, from the descriptions of basic phenomenological processes to the global understanding of the performance and safety at repository and geological scales. Most of the topics covered by the programme of the conference are in line with the general objectives

  2. Charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers: A theoretical and experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Haijian; Liu, Zhenghui; Xu, Gengzhao; Shi, Lin; Fan, Yingmin; Yang, Hui; Xu, Ke; Wang, Jianfeng; Ren, Guoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Graphene has been proposed as a material for semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices. Understanding the charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers will be crucial for future applications. Here, we report a theoretical model to describe the transport mechanisms at the interface of graphene and semiconductors based on conventional semiconductor Schottky theory and a floating Fermi level of graphene. The contact barrier heights can be estimated through this model and be close to the values obtained from the experiments, which are lower than those of the metal/semiconductor contacts. A detailed analysis reveals that the barrier heights are as the function of the interface separations and dielectric constants, and are influenced by the interfacial states of semiconductors. Our calculations show how this behavior of lowering barrier heights arises from the Fermi level shift of graphene induced by the charge transfer owing to the unique linear electronic structure

  3. Charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers: A theoretical and experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Haijian; Liu, Zhenghui; Xu, Gengzhao; Shi, Lin; Fan, Yingmin; Yang, Hui [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215123 (China); Xu, Ke, E-mail: kxu2006@sinano.ac.cn; Wang, Jianfeng; Ren, Guoqiang [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215123 (China); Suzhou Nanowin Science and Technology Co., Ltd., Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2014-01-07

    Graphene has been proposed as a material for semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices. Understanding the charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers will be crucial for future applications. Here, we report a theoretical model to describe the transport mechanisms at the interface of graphene and semiconductors based on conventional semiconductor Schottky theory and a floating Fermi level of graphene. The contact barrier heights can be estimated through this model and be close to the values obtained from the experiments, which are lower than those of the metal/semiconductor contacts. A detailed analysis reveals that the barrier heights are as the function of the interface separations and dielectric constants, and are influenced by the interfacial states of semiconductors. Our calculations show how this behavior of lowering barrier heights arises from the Fermi level shift of graphene induced by the charge transfer owing to the unique linear electronic structure.

  4. The international radioactive transportation regulations: A model for national regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, R.B.; Rawl, R.R.

    1990-06-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, Safety Series No. 6 (herein after denoted as the ''International Regulations'') serve as the model for the regulations for individual countries and international modal organizations controlling the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials. The purpose of this paper is to outline the background and history of the International Regulations, the general principles behind the requirements of the International Regulations, the structure and general contents of the latest edition of the International Regulations, and the roles of various international bodies in the development and implementation of the International Regulations and the current status of regulatory and supportive document development at both the international and domestic level. This review will provide a basis for users and potential users to better understand the source and application of the International Regulations. 1 tab

  5. Prediction of barrier inhomogeneities and carrier transport in Ni-silicided Schottky diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, A.R.; Dimitriu, C.B.; Horsfall, A.B.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Wright, N.G.; O'Neill, A.G.; Maiti, C.K.

    2006-01-01

    Based on Quantum Mechanical (QM) carrier transport and the effects of interface states, a theoretical model has been developed to predict the anomalous current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of a non-ideal Ni-silicided Schottky diode at low temperatures. Physical parameters such as barrier height, ideality factor, series resistance and effective Richardson constant of a silicided Schottky diode were extracted from forward I-V characteristics and are subsequently used for the simulation of both forward and reverse I-V characteristics using a QM transport model in which the effects of interface state and bias dependent barrier reduction are incorporated. The present analysis indicates that the effects of barrier inhomogeneity caused by incomplete silicide formation at the junction and the interface states may change the conventional current transport process, leading to anomalous forward and reverse I-V characteristics for the Ni-silicided Schottky diode

  6. How to manage barriers to formation and implementation of policy packages in transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerman, Jonas; Gudmundsson, Henrik; Sørensen, Claus Hedegaard

    2011-01-01

    for policy formation and implementation. Secondly, we carried out an empirical analysis of barriers and success factors in four cases of policy packaging: Urban Congestion Charging; National Heavy Vehicle Fees; Aviation in the European Emissions Trading System and The EU’s First Railway Package. The third......The aim of this study has been to explore success factors and barriers to the formation and implementation of single policy measures and policy packages in transport, and to identify strategies to manage such barriers. As a first step, we developed a typology of barriers and success factors...... and final task was to identify more general strategies to manage barriers in policy formation and implementation. A main conclusion in this report is that a conscious application of these strategies may contribute significantly to successful formation and implementation of even controversial policies...

  7. Regulation of ABC transporters blood-brain barrier: the good, the bad, and the ugly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David S

    2015-01-01

    The brain capillary endothelial cells that constitute the blood-brain barrier express multiple ABC transport proteins on the luminal, blood-facing, plasma membrane. These transporters function as ATP-driven efflux pumps for xenobiotics and endogenous metabolites. High expression of these ABC transporters at the barrier is a major obstacle to the delivery of therapeutics, including chemotherapeutics, to the CNS. Here, I review the signals that alter ABC transporter expression and transport function with an emphasis on P-glycoprotein, Mrp2, and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), the efflux transporters for which we have the most detailed picture of regulation. Recent work shows that transporter protein expression can be upregulated in response to inflammatory and oxidative stress, therapeutic drugs, diet, and persistent environmental pollutants; as a consequence, drug delivery to the brain is reduced (potentially bad and ugly). In contrast, basal transport activity of P-glycoprotein and BCRP can be reduced through complex signaling pathways that involve events in and on the brain capillary endothelial cells. Targeting these signaling events provides opportunities to rapidly and reversibly increase brain accumulation of drugs that are substrates for the transporters (potentially good). The clinical usefulness of targeting signaling to reduce efflux transporter activity and improve drug delivery to the CNS remains to be established. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis and Control of Carrier Transport in Unipolar Barrier Mid-Infrared (IR) Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-03

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2016-0152 TR-2016-0152 ANALYSIS AND CONTROL OF CARRIER TRANSPORT IN UNIPOLAR BARRIER MID- INFRARED ( IR ) DETECTORS Gary W...SUBTITLE Analysis and Control of Carrier Transport in Unipolar Barrier Mid-Infrared ( IR ) Detectors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9453-15-1-0332 5b. GRANT...components of high performance mid- wave nBn mid-wave Infrared ( IR ) detectors. Material quality and surfaces can have deleterious effects on carrier

  9. International Regulations for Transport of Radioactive Materials, History and Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Shinawy, R.M.K.

    2013-01-01

    International Regulations for the transport of radioactive materials have been published by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) since 1961. These Regulations have been widely adopted into national Regulations. Also adopted into different modal Regulations such as International Air Transport Association (IATA) and International Martime Organization (IMO). These Regulations provide standards for insuring a high level of safety of general public, transport workers, property and environment against radiation, contamination, criticality hazard and thermal effects associated with the transport of radioactive wastes and materials. Several reviews conducted in consultation with Member States (MS) and concerned international organizations, resulted in comprehensive revisions till now. Radioactive materials are generally transported by specialized transport companies and experts. Shippers and carriers have designed their transport operations to comply with these international Regulations. About 20 million consignments of radioactive materials take place around the world each year. These materials were used in different fields such as medicine, industry, agriculture, research, consumer product and electric power generation. After September 11,2001, the IAEA and MS have worked together to develop a new guidance document concerning the security in the transport of radioactive materials. IAEA have initiated activities to assist MS in addressing the need for transport security in a comprehensive manner. The security guidance and measures were mentioned and discussed. The transport security becomes more developed and integrated into national Regulations of many countries beside the safety Regulations. IAEA and other International organizations are working with MS to implement transport security programs such as guidance, training, security assessments and upgrade assistance in these fields.

  10. Reducing Air Pollution from International Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Because of their reliance on petroleum-based fuels and their dramatic growth rates in recent decades, air and sea transport are responsible for significant emissions of both traditional air pollutants and greenhouse gases.

  11. Border Security: Barriers Along the U.S. International Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-16

    Nogales, AZ; Naco , AZ; Douglas, AZ; and El Paso, TX. In 1996, Congress passed the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act... Naco , AZ; Douglas, AZ; and El Paso, TX.80 In a 1999 study which was commissioned by the INS and performed under a Memorandum of Understanding, the...Naturalization Service, Final Environmental Assessment U.S. Border Patrol Temporary Vehicle Barriers Naco and Douglas, Arizona, November 2002. Border Security

  12. Dynamical characterization of transport barriers in nontwist Hamiltonian systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnaine, M.; Mathias, A. C.; Santos, M. S.; Batista, A. M.; Szezech, J. D.; Viana, R. L.

    2018-01-01

    The turnstile provides us a useful tool to describe the flux in twist Hamiltonian systems. Thus, its determination allows us to find the areas where the trajectories flux through barriers. We show that the mechanism of the turnstile can increase the flux in nontwist Hamiltonian systems. A model which captures the essence of these systems is the standard nontwist map, introduced by del Castillo-Negrete and Morrison. For selected parameters of this map, we show that chaotic trajectories entering in resonances zones can be explained by turnstiles formed by a set of homoclinic points. We argue that for nontwist systems, if the heteroclinic points are sufficiently close, they can connect twin-islands chains. This provides us a scenario where the trajectories can cross the resonance zones and increase the flux. For these cases the escape basin boundaries are nontrivial, which demands the use of an appropriate characterization. We applied the uncertainty exponent and the entropies of the escape basin boundary in order to quantify the degree of unpredictability of the asymptotic trajectories.

  13. Globalisation, international transport and the global environment. A scenario approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Veen-Groot, D.B.; Nijkamp, P.

    1999-01-01

    The project 'Globalisation, International Transport and the Global Environment' aims to investigate the consequences of globalisation for international transport for global environmental quality as reflected in greenhouse gases in a very general sense. The policy aim (global/European) is to analyse the influence of international policy (Kyoto/IPCC/changes in carbon taxes) on transport volumes, intermodal substitutions or vehicle size and its implications for the environment. This short-paper aims to give an overview of the state-of-the-art of the title project. Attention will be paid to the assessment of trends, the scenario method, the conceptual framework and four qualitative globalisation scenarios. 16 refs

  14. Demystifying the Barriers to Transport Infrastructure Project Development in Fast Developing Regions: The Case of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyi Nie

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Transport infrastructure (TI has become one of the primary drivers for sustainable economic growth and social progress. However, a wider take-up is currently inhibited in fast developing regions (FDRs by many barriers, which have not been explored explicitly in previous studies. In this study, a three-dimensional framework (i.e., macro environment, local environment, and the construction process is proposed to structure the barriers in a reasonable way. Professionals’ opinions on the importance of the barriers are collected through questionnaire survey. The survey results were analyzed by the ranking analysis technique. It is found that the top five barriers are “difficulty in survey and design during the construction process”, “weak support from economy”, “insufficient funding”, “harsh regional climate”, and “cost overrun”. Further analysis, based on a factor analysis, indicates that these critical barriers could be grouped into three clusters: “administration on transport infrastructure”, “construction technology and cost management”, and “geographical and economic conditions”. The research findings demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed framework, and the implication is that a barriers-based checklist favors stakeholders to improve the efficiency and sustainability of TI development in FDRs. Although the study is situated in China, it sheds light on the subject in other developing countries.

  15. Electronic transport in armchair graphene nanoribbon under double magnetic barrier modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyan; Wu, Chao; Xie, Fang; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Zhou, Guanghui

    2018-03-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the transport properties and the magnetoresistance effect in armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) under modulation by two magnetic barriers. The energy levels are found to be degenerate for a metallic AGNR but are not degenerate for a semiconducting AGNR. However, the conductance characteristics show quantized plateaus in both the metallic and semiconducting cases. When the magnetization directions of the barriers change from parallel to antiparallel, the conductance plateau in the metallic AGNR shows a degenerate feature due to matching between the transport modes in different regions. As the barrier height increases, the conductance shows more oscillatory behavior with sharp peaks and troughs. Specifically, the initial position of nonzero conductance for the metallic AGNR system moves towards a higher energy regime, which indicates that an energy gap has been opened. In addition, the magnetoresistance ratio also shows plateau structures in certain specific energy regions. These results may be useful in the design of electron devices based on AGNR nanostructures.

  16. St. John's Wort constituents modulate P-glycoprotein transport activity at the blood-brain barrier.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ott, M.; Huls, M.; Cornelius, M.G.; Fricker, G.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the short-term signaling effects of St. John's Wort (SJW) extract and selected SJW constituents on the blood-brain barrier transporter P-glycoprotein and to describe the role of PKC in the signaling. METHODS: Cultured porcine brain capillary

  17. The effect of tides and storms on the sediment transport across a Dutch barrier island

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselman, D.A.; de Winter, R.C.; Engelstad, A.C.; McCall, Robert; van Dongeren, Ap; Hoekstra, P.; Oost, Albert; van der Vegt, M.

    2017-01-01

    Under natural conditions, barrier islands might grow vertically and migrate onshore under the influence of long-term sea level rise. Sediment is transported onshore during storm-induced overwash and inundation. However, on many Dutch Wadden Islands, dune openings are closed off by artificial

  18. Liability and insurance aspects of international transport of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Gijn, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Paris and Vienna Conventions do not affect the application of any international transport agreement already in force. However, in certain circumstances both the nuclear operator and the carrier may be held liable for nuclear damage which arises during international transports of nuclear materials. The ensuing cumulation of liabilities under the Nuclear and Transport Conventions may cause serious problems in obtaining adequate insurance cover for such transports. The 1971 Brussels Convention seeks to solve this problem by exonerating any person who might be held liable for nuclear damage under an international maritime convention or national law. Similar difficulties are encountered in the case of transports of nuclear materials between states which have and states which have not ratified the Paris and Vienna Conventions. (NEA) [fr

  19. Regulatory issues in international maritime transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-11

    This report focuses on regulations governing international liner and bulk shipping. The report discusses the web of regulatory measures that surround these two segments of the shipping industry, and which have a considerable impact on its performance...

  20. Transport barrier formation and its maintenance by LHCD on TRIAM-1M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanada, K.; Iyomasa, A.; Zushi, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Sasaki, K.; Hoshika, H.; Nakamura, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Sato, K.N.; Idei, H.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Shiraiwa, S.

    2005-01-01

    Internal transport barrier (ITB) has been obtained in full lower hybrid current driven (LHCD) plasmas on a superconducting tokamak, TRIMA-1M (R=0.84m, a x b=0.12mx0.18m, B T L/R . This indicates that the formation of ITB has the relation to the current density at the foot point of ITB. Self-organized slow sawtooth oscillations (SSSO) of plasma current, density, temperature, and so on with the period comparable to the current diffusion time have been also observed in long duration full LHCD discharges. The oscillation, which has no helical structure, appears only in the high performance plasma with ITB and it seems to be induced by the variation of the transport coefficient which has relation to the current density profile estimated by the radiation from energetic electrons. A crash is sometimes accompanied by the predator prey type instability related with ITB and the decay time of the density is comparable to the energy confinement time. Taking place a crash, particles accumulated inside ITB are released to the peripheral region of the plasma and consequently the plasma is possible to recover the high performance condition with the time constant of τ L/R . The action of particle exhaust caused by SSSO is preferable to maintain the high performance condition, because the transition to the high performance plasma under the high influx of metal impurities can be obtained and it may play an role in the avoidance of the impurity accumulation and the dilution in the future steady state fusion plasma with ITB, as the edge-localized mode in H-mode. (author)

  1. Amyloid-beta transporter expression at the blood-CSF barrier is age-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Crissey L

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age is the major risk factor for many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. There is an accumulation of amyloid-beta peptides (Aβ in both the AD brain and the normal aging brain. Clearance of Aβ from the brain occurs via active transport at the blood-brain barrier (BBB and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB. With increasing age, the expression of the Aβ efflux transporters is decreased and the Aβ influx transporter expression is increased at the BBB, adding to the amyloid burden in the brain. Expression of the Aβ transporters at the choroid plexus (CP epithelium as a function of aging was the subject of this study. Methods This project investigated the changes in expression of the Aβ transporters, the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1, P-glycoprotein (P-gp, LRP-2 (megalin and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE at the BCSFB in Brown-Norway/Fischer rats at ages 3, 6, 9, 12, 20, 30 and 36 months, using real time RT-PCR to measure transporter mRNA expression, and immunohistochemistry (IHC to measure transporter protein in isolated rat CP. Results There was an increase in the transcription of the Aβ efflux transporters, LRP-1 and P-gp, no change in RAGE expression and a decrease in LRP-2, the CP epithelium influx transporter, at the BCSFB with aging. Decreased Aβ42 concentration in the CP, as measured by quantitative IHC, was associated with these Aβ transporter alterations. Conclusions Age-dependent alterations in the CP Aβ transporters are associated with a decrease in Aβ42 accumulation in the CP, and are reciprocal to the changes seen in these transporters at the BBB, suggesting a possible compensatory role for the BCSFB in Aβ clearance in aging.

  2. First International Forum on Management of Air Transport & Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyne Napoli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Paul Sabatier University is the only French University that offers a Master’s Degree in both Air Transport and International Tourism Management and in January 21-23, 2016 launched the first "business-research" Forum to capitalize on the combination of international professional and academic experts and to confirm its role as a major player in two inseparable areas: research and study development within Air Transport and Tourism.

  3. Giving Your Patrons the World: Barriers to, and the Value of, International Interlibrary Loan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Kurt; Thompson, Hilary H.

    2018-01-01

    Using the 2011 and 2015 survey by the Reference and User Services Association Sharing and Transforming Access to Resources Section (RUSA STARS) of international interlibrary loans (ILL), the authors explore barriers to this method of meeting patrons' information needs. They evaluate international ILL in the context of developments in the…

  4. Evolutionarily Conserved Roles for Blood-Brain Barrier Xenobiotic Transporters in Endogenous Steroid Partitioning and Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J. Hindle

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Central nervous system (CNS chemical protection depends upon discrete control of small-molecule access by the blood-brain barrier (BBB. Curiously, some drugs cause CNS side-effects despite negligible transit past the BBB. To investigate this phenomenon, we asked whether the highly BBB-enriched drug efflux transporter MDR1 has dual functions in controlling drug and endogenous molecule CNS homeostasis. If this is true, then brain-impermeable drugs could induce behavioral changes by affecting brain levels of endogenous molecules. Using computational, genetic, and pharmacologic approaches across diverse organisms, we demonstrate that BBB-localized efflux transporters are critical for regulating brain levels of endogenous steroids and steroid-regulated behaviors (sleep in Drosophila and anxiety in mice. Furthermore, we show that MDR1-interacting drugs are associated with anxiety-related behaviors in humans. We propose a general mechanism for common behavioral side effects of prescription drugs: pharmacologically challenging BBB efflux transporters disrupts brain levels of endogenous substrates and implicates the BBB in behavioral regulation. : Hindle et al. shed light on the curious finding that some drugs cause behavioral side-effects despite negligible access into the brain. These authors propose a unifying hypothesis that links blood-brain barrier drug transporter function and brain access of circulating steroids to common CNS adverse drug responses. Keywords: drug side effect mechanisms, central nervous system, blood brain barrier, behavior, toxicology, drug transporters, endobiotics, steroid hormones

  5. GLP-1 analog raises glucose transport capacity of blood-brain barrier in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, M.; Brock, B.; Egefjord, L.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Glucose enters the brain tissue from plasma by facilitated diffusion across the two membranes of the endothelium of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), mediated by the glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). There is evidence in Alzheimer's disease (AD) of reduction of glucose transport across...... the blood-brain barrier, due to diminished GLUT1 translocation and expression at the BBB. Reduced BBB GLUT1 expression is known to aggravate AD pathology and further impair cognitive function, implying that GLUT1 may be a potential target of therapy directed towards AD neurovascular dysfunction...... and degeneration. Hypothesis: The incretin hormone GLP-1 prevents the decline of the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose that signifies cognitive impairment, synaptic dysfunction, and disease evolution in AD, and GLP-1 may directly activate GLUT1 transport in brain capillary endothelium. For this reason, we here...

  6. Blowin' in the wind? Drivers and barriers for the uptake of wind propulsion in international shipping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojon, Isabelle; Dieperink, Carel

    2014-01-01

    International shipping transports around 90% of global commerce and is of major importance for the global economy. Whilst it is the most efficient and environmentally friendly mode of transport, CO 2 emissions from shipping activities still account for an estimated 3% of global emissions. One means of significantly reducing fuel consumption and thereby GHG emissions from shipping are wind propulsion technologies (i.e. towing kites, Flettner rotors and sails) – yet current market uptake is very low. Therefore, the aim of this article is to identify the barriers and drivers for the uptake of wind propulsion technologies. To this end, the theoretical approach of technological innovation systems is adopted. This approach combines structural system components with so-called system functions which represent the dynamics underlying structural changes in the system. The fulfillment of these functions is considered important for the development and diffusion of innovations. Based on newspaper and academic articles, online expert interviews and semi-structured interviews, the level of function fulfillment is evaluated, followed by the identification of structural drivers and barriers influencing function fulfillment. Third, the possibilities to influence these drivers and barriers are discussed. - Highlights: • The overall performance of the technological innovation system for wind propulsion technologies is low. • Experts acknowledge the importance, but also the lack of fulfillment of theoretically relevant innovation functions. • Structural barriers for the development of wind propulsion technologies outweigh drivers. • Drivers for the development of wind propulsion technologies are only emerging while barriers have existed for a long time. • The IMO can stimulate knowledge development and diffusion as well as the development of market-based instruments

  7. Characterization and scaling of the tokamak edge transport barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Philip Adrian

    2012-04-24

    scaling for {tau} {sub E,ped} are nearly identical to the IPB98 global confinement scaling. This strongly suggests a significant pedestal contribution to the global confinement. The extrapolations result in a global confinement time of 3 s for ITER which is at the lower end of the IPB98 scaling. The pedestal real space gradients show a very strong correlation with the pedestal top values. The trend is particularly pronounced for T{sub e} and shows no deviation due to other parameters. The gradients in {Psi}{sub N} coordinates shows no such correlation. The normalized pressure gradient {alpha}, which is important for the pedestal stability, has a strong correlation with the normalized pressure and with the plasma shape. The plasma shape plays an important role for the pedestal which can have significant impact on the extrapolations. The presented study confirms that the pedestal cannot be described by a unifying theory. The different observations favour various mechanisms. The pedestal top values of electron and ion temperature and density can be individually transport limited, but together they can still reach the peeling-ballooning stability limit. At the same time the pedestal widths of temperature and density scale individually.

  8. Barriers to the Utilisation of Counselling Services by International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambouropoulos, Alexa

    2015-01-01

    International students are particularly affected by issues related to physical health, academic studies, and social and psychological matters. Despite sometimes enormous emotional distress, there is evidence to suggest that these students are reticent to use counselling services to address these issues. The purpose of this study is to examine the…

  9. Barriers and opportunities to access international resources for ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Despite some successes when it comes to national and global efforts at tobacco control, little evidence exists of international funding or support in this area for developing countries like Bolivia. Bolivia is one of 173 countries to date that have ratified the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). The FCTC has ...

  10. International antiterrorist conventions concerning the safety of air transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek BARCIK

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the international law regulations are presented concerning the civilian safety of the air transport. The history concerning air terrorism and international antiterrorist conventions was described in detail, involving The Chicago Convention, The Tokyo Convention, The Hague Convention and Montreal Convention.

  11. Quantum transport in GaN/AlN double-barrier heterostructure nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songmuang, R; Katsaros, G; Monroy, E; Spathis, P; Bougerol, C; Mongillo, M; De Franceschi, S

    2010-09-08

    We investigate electronic transport in n-i-n GaN nanowires with and without AlN double barriers. The nanowires are grown by catalyst-free, plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy enabling abrupt GaN/AlN interfaces as well as longitudinal n-type doping modulation. At low temperature, transport in n-i-n GaN nanowires is dominated by the Coulomb blockade effect. Carriers are confined in the undoped middle region, forming single or multiple islands with a characteristic length of approximately 100 nm. The incorporation of two AlN tunnel barriers causes confinement to occur within the GaN dot in between. In the case of a 6 nm thick dot and 2 nm thick barriers, we observe characteristic signatures of Coulomb-blockaded transport in single quantum dots with discrete energy states. For thinner dots and barriers, Coulomb-blockade effects do not play a significant role while the onset of resonant tunneling via the confined quantum levels is accompanied by a negative differential resistance surviving up to approximately 150 K.

  12. Radionuclide transport modeling of diffusion cell experiments specific to a backfill barrier in a salt repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, H.M.; Pietz, J.M.; Smith, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental radionuclide migration diffusion cell data have been collected as part of the WIPP Waste Package Performance Program. This data was collected under conditions approximating geologic isolation of a backfill barrier in a salt repository. The experiments are designed to aid in the evaluation of engineered backfill barriers. This paper describes a radionuclide transport model designed to aid interpreting experimental diffusion cell migration data and eventually to simulate the long-term effectiveness of the backfill barrier in a salt repository. The model is designed to test a variety of expressions representative of potential mechanisms for retardation within the backfill for the best-fit with experimental data. From the comparison, the aim is to select the appropriate mechanism from the host of potential mechanisms for retardation. The model employs a novel integral equation approach to the solution of the transport equation with nonlinear retardation terms. The solution technique used in this model is a semi-analytical, iterative method for the general nonlinear problem. It is felt the technique offers improved computational efficiency over comparable finite difference methods. Comparisons between experimental migration diffusion cell data and the model predictions are presented in this paper. Tentative conclusions concerning the importance of the retardation mechanism to radionuclide transport in the backfill barrier will be drawn. 8 references, 7 figures

  13. Communication Barrier during Clinical Placement: Challenges and Experiences of International Nursing students

    OpenAIRE

    Awe, Omobolape

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Effective communication in a clinical environment is vital. It plays an important role in patient care, just as language proficiency has been noted to be related to satisfactory learning experiences. This study aimed to understand the experiences of the students in respect to communication barriers during clinical practice and to answer three main re-search questions; 1: Do international student experience communication barrier during clinical placement? 2: What kind of language b...

  14. Internal Medicine Hospitalists' Perceived Barriers and Recommendations for Optimizing Secondary Prevention of Osteoporotic Hip Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Eng Keong; Loh, Kah Poh; Goff, Sarah L

    2017-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a major public health concern affecting an estimated 10 million people in the United States. To the best of our knowledge, no qualitative study has explored barriers perceived by medicine hospitalists to secondary prevention of osteoporotic hip fractures. We aimed to describe these perceived barriers and recommendations regarding how to optimize secondary prevention of osteoporotic hip fracture. In-depth, semistructured interviews were performed with 15 internal medicine hospitalists in a tertiary-care referral medical center. The interviews were analyzed with directed content analysis. Internal medicine hospitalists consider secondary osteoporotic hip fracture prevention as the responsibility of outpatient physicians. Identified barriers were stratified based on themes including physicians' perception, patients' characteristics, risks and benefits of osteoporosis treatment, healthcare delivery system, and patient care transition from the inpatient to the outpatient setting. Some of the recommendations include building an integrated system that involves a multidisciplinary team such as the fracture liaison service, initiating a change to the hospital policy to facilitate inpatient care and management of osteoporosis, and creating a smooth patient care transition to the outpatient setting. Our study highlighted how internal medicine hospitalists perceive their role in the secondary prevention of osteoporotic hip fractures and what they perceive as barriers to initiating preventive measures in the hospital. Inconsistency in patient care transition and the fragmented nature of the existing healthcare system were identified as major barriers. A fracture liaison service could remove some of these barriers.

  15. A Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes (MIMIC) model of internal barriers to drug treatment in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Chang; Kelly, Brian C; Liao, Yanhui; He, Haoyu; Luo, Tao; Deng, Huiqiong; Liu, Tieqiao; Hao, Wei; Wang, Jichuan

    2015-03-01

    Although evidence exists for distinct barriers to drug abuse treatment (BDATs), investigations of their inter-relationships and the effect of individual characteristics on the barrier factors have been sparse, especially in China. A Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes (MIMIC) model is applied for this target. A sample of 262 drug users were recruited from three drug rehabilitation centers in Hunan Province, China. We applied a MIMIC approach to investigate the effect of gender, age, marital status, education, primary substance use, duration of primary drug use, and drug treatment experience on the internal barrier factors: absence of problem (AP), negative social support (NSS), fear of treatment (FT), and privacy concerns (PC). Drug users of various characteristics were found to report different internal barrier factors. Younger participants were more likely to report NSS (-0.19, p=0.038) and PC (-0.31, pdrug users, ice users were more likely to report AP (0.44, pDrug treatment experiences related to AP (0.20, p=0.012). In addition, differential item functioning (DIF) occurred in three items when participant from groups with different duration of drug use, ice use, or marital status. Individual characteristics had significant effects on internal barriers to drug treatment. On this basis, BDAT perceived by different individuals could be assessed before tactics were utilized to successfully remove perceived barriers to drug treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Breaking International Barriers: #ColorectalSurgery Is #GlobalSurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayol, Julio; Otero, Jaime

    2017-09-01

    Colorectal surgeons have lagged behind other professionals in the use of social media. Currently, Twitter is the most widely utilized social platform for professional purposes among them. Connection and contagion are the two key actions that, together with immediate feedback and quantifiable impact, favor the use of Twitter over other social networks. In early 2016, a group of colorectal surgeons launched the #colorectalsurgery hashtag and, in less than 1 year, the ecosystem has incorporated over 2,600 users that generated over 24,000 tweets and 100 million impressions. "Live-Tweeting" surgical conferences by attendees including institutional or society accounts have greatly contributed to the success of the initiative. However, there are some barriers to a more wide adoption of social media, such as misrepresentation of non-peer-reviewed data, challenges to intellectual property protection, or even damage to the professional image. Active engagement with the #colorectalsurgery community may result in benefits for the global surgery community through information sharing, social interactions, personal branding, and research.

  17. Asian international students' barriers to joining group counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Yeon

    2014-10-01

    This cross-sectional study examined anticipated reactions to group participation among Asian international students (ISs). Structural equation modeling confirmed that Asian ISs' (n = 180) level of acculturation was associated with their attitude toward joining group counseling, which is partially mediated by their stigma toward help-seeking. The results of multiple regression analyses indicated that ISs who reported higher place dependence, stigma toward help-seeking, and fear of negative evaluation reported more fear about disclosing emotional parts of themselves to other group members in the presence of a group member from the same country of origin. The results showed that ISs' perceived difficulties in providing feedback to a group member in the presence of an IS from the same country of origin were predicted by low place identity, high place dependence, and more stigma. International students' willingness to disclose and provide feedback in a group counseling setting was compared in three different hypothetical situations based on other group members' demographics, and the results showed that ISs are more afraid of self-disclosure in the presence of an international student from the same country.

  18. Physics of turbulence control and transport barrier formation in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, E.J.; Burrell, K.H.; Carlstrom, T.N.

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes the physical mechanisms responsible for turbulence control and transport barrier formation on DIII-D as determined from a synthesis of results from different enhanced confinement regimes, including quantitative and qualitative comparisons to theory. A wide range of DIII-D data support the hypothesis that a single underlying physical mechanism, turbulence suppression via E x B shear flow is playing an essential, though not necessarily unique, role in reducing turbulence and transport in all of the following improved confinement regimes: H-mode, VH-mode, high-ell i modes, improved performance counter-injection L-mode discharges and high performance negative central shear (NCS) discharges. DIII-D data also indicate that synergistic effects are important in some cases, as in NCS discharges where negative magnetic shear also plays a role in transport barrier formation. This work indicates that in order to control turbulence and transport it is important to focus on understanding physical mechanisms, such as E x B shear, which can regulate and control entire classes of turbulent modes, and thus control transport. In the highest performance DIII-D discharges, NCS plasmas with a VH-mode like edge, turbulence is suppressed at all radii, resulting in neoclassical levels of ion transport over most of the plasma volume

  19. Mathematical Modeling and Experimental Validation of Nanoemulsion-Based Drug Transport across Cellular Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadakia, Ekta; Shah, Lipa; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2017-07-01

    Nanoemulsions have shown potential in delivering drug across epithelial and endothelial cell barriers, which express efflux transporters. However, their transport mechanisms are not entirely understood. Our goal was to investigate the cellular permeability of nanoemulsion-encapsulated drugs and apply mathematical modeling to elucidate transport mechanisms and sensitive nanoemulsion attributes. Transport studies were performed in Caco-2 cells, using fish oil nanoemulsions and a model substrate, rhodamine-123. Permeability data was modeled using a semi-mechanistic approach, capturing the following cellular processes: endocytotic uptake of the nanoemulsion, release of rhodamine-123 from the nanoemulsion, efflux and passive permeability of rhodamine-123 in aqueous solution. Nanoemulsions not only improved the permeability of rhodamine-123, but were also less sensitive to efflux transporters. The model captured bidirectional permeability results and identified sensitive processes, such as the release of the nanoemulsion-encapsulated drug and cellular uptake of the nanoemulsion. Mathematical description of cellular processes, improved our understanding of transport mechanisms, such as nanoemulsions don't inhibit efflux to improve drug permeability. Instead, their endocytotic uptake, results in higher intracellular drug concentrations, thereby increasing the concentration gradient and transcellular permeability across biological barriers. Modeling results indicated optimizing nanoemulsion attributes like the droplet size and intracellular drug release rate, may further improve drug permeability.

  20. Functional and cytometric examination of different human lung epithelial cell types as drug transport barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Rosania, Gus R; Kim, Chong-Kook; Shin, Meong Cheol

    2016-03-01

    To develop inhaled medications, various cell culture models have been used to examine the transcellular transport or cellular uptake properties of small molecules. For the reproducible high throughput screening of the inhaled drug candidates, a further verification of cell architectures as drug transport barriers can contribute to establishing appropriate in vitro cell models. In the present study, side-by-side experiments were performed to compare the structure and transport function of three lung epithelial cells (Calu-3, normal human bronchial primary cells (NHBE), and NL-20). The cells were cultured on the nucleopore membranes in the air-liquid interface (ALI) culture conditions, with cell culture medium in the basolateral side only, starting from day 1. In transport assays, paracellular transport across all three types of cells appeared to be markedly different with the NHBE or Calu-3 cells, showing low paracellular permeability and high TEER values, while the NL-20 cells showed high paracellular permeability and low TEER. Quantitative image analysis of the confocal microscope sections further confirmed that the Calu-3 cells formed intact cell monolayers in contrast to the NHBE and NL-20 cells with multilayers. Among three lung epithelial cell types, the Calu-3 cell cultures under the ALI condition showed optimal cytometric features for mimicking the biophysical characteristics of in vivo airway epithelium. Therefore, the Calu-3 cell monolayers could be used as functional cell barriers for the lung-targeted drug transport studies.

  1. Blood-brain barrier in vitro models as tools in drug discovery: assessment of the transport ranking of antihistaminic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, W; Mandikova, J; Pawlowitsch, R; Linz, B; Bennani-Baiti, B; Lauer, R; Lachmann, B; Noe, C R

    2012-05-01

    In the course of our validation program testing blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro models for their usability as tools in drug discovery it was evaluated whether an established Transwell model based on porcine cell line PBMEC/C1-2 was able to differentiate between the transport properties of first and second generation antihistaminic drugs. First generation antihistamines can permeate the BBB and act in the central nervous system (CNS), whereas entry to the CNS of second generation antihistamines is restricted by efflux pumps such as P-glycoprotein (P-gP) located in brain endothelial cells. P-gP functionality of PBMEC/C1-2 cells grown on Transwell filter inserts was proven by transport studies with P-gP substrate rhodamine 123 and P-gP blocker verapamil. Subsequent drug transport studies with the first generation antihistamines promethazine, diphenhydramine and pheniramine and the second generation antihistamines astemizole, ceterizine, fexofenadine and loratadine were accomplished in single substance as well as in group studies. Results were normalised to diazepam, an internal standard for the transcellular transport route. Moreover, effects after addition of P-gP inhibitor verapamil were investigated. First generation antihistamine pheniramine permeated as fastest followed by diphenhydramine, diazepam, promethazine and second generation antihistaminic drugs ceterizine, fexofenadine, astemizole and loratadine reflecting the BBB in vivo permeability ranking well. Verapamil increased the transport rates of all second generation antihistamines, which suggested involvement of P-gP during their permeation across the BBB model. The ranking after addition of verapamil was significantly changed, only fexofenadine and ceterizine penetrated slower than internal standard diazepam in the presence of verapamil. In summary, permeability data showed that the BBB model based on porcine cell line PBMEC/C1-2 was able to reflect the BBB in vivo situation for the transport of

  2. Regulation of Copper Transport Crossing Brain Barrier Systems by Cu-ATPases: Effect of Manganese Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xue; Zhang, Yanshu; Jiang, Wendy; Monnot, Andrew Donald; Bates, Christopher Alexander; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of cellular copper (Cu) homeostasis involves Cu-transporting ATPases (Cu-ATPases), i.e., ATP7A and ATP7B. The question as to how these Cu-ATPases in brain barrier systems transport Cu, i.e., toward brain parenchyma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or blood, remained unanswered. This study was designed to characterize roles of Cu-ATPases in regulating Cu transport at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-CSF barrier (BCB) and to investigate how exposure to toxic manganese (Mn) altered the function of Cu-ATPases, thereby contributing to the etiology of Mn-induced parkinsonian disorder. Studies by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR), Western blot, and immunocytochemistry revealed that both Cu-ATPases expressed abundantly in BBB and BCB. Transport kinetic studies by in situ brain infusion and ventriculo-cisternal (VC) perfusion in Sprague Dawley rat suggested that the BBB was a major site for Cu entry into brain, whereas the BCB was a predominant route for Cu efflux from the CSF to blood. Confocal evidence showed that the presence of excess Cu or Mn in the choroid plexus cells led to ATP7A relocating toward the apical microvilli facing the CSF, but ATP7B toward the basolateral membrane facing blood. Mn exposure inhibited the production of both Cu-ATPases. Collectively, these data suggest that Cu is transported by the BBB from the blood to brain, which is mediated by ATP7A in brain capillary. By diffusion, Cu ions move from the interstitial fluid into the CSF, where they are taken up by the BCB. Within the choroidal epithelial cells, Cu ions are transported by ATP7B back to the blood. Mn exposure alters these processes, leading to Cu dyshomeostasis-associated neuronal injury. PMID:24614235

  3. Brain barriers and functional interfaces with sequential appearance of ABC efflux transporters during human development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllgård, Kjeld; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Holst, Camilla B.

    2017-01-01

    Adult brain is protected from entry of drugs and toxins by specific mechanisms such as ABC (ATP-binding Cassette) efflux transporters. Little is known when these appear in human brain during development. Cellular distribution of three main ABC transporters (ABCC1, ABCG2, ABCB1) was determined...... at blood-brain barriers and interfaces in human embryos and fetuses in first half of gestation. Antibodies against claudin-5 and-11 and antibodies to α-fetoprotein were used to describe morphological and functional aspects of brain barriers. First exchange interfaces to be established, probably at 4......-5 weeks post conception, are between brain and embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (eCSF) and between outer surface of brain anlage and primary meninx. They already exclude α-fetoprotein and are immunopositive for both claudins, ABCC1 and ABCG2. ABCB1 is detectable within a week of blood vessels first...

  4. Application of CFRP with High Hydrogen Gas Barrier Characteristics to Fuel Tanks of Space Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonemoto, Koichi; Yamamoto, Yuta; Okuyama, Keiichi; Ebina, Takeo

    In the future, carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) with high hydrogen gas barrier performance will find wide applications in all industrial hydrogen tanks that aim at weight reduction; the use of such materials will be preferred to the use of conventional metallic materials such as stainless steel or aluminum. The hydrogen gas barrier performance of CFRP will become an important issue with the introduction of hydrogen-fuel aircraft. It will also play an important role in realizing fully reusable space transportation system that will have high specific tensile CFRP structures. Such materials are also required for the manufacture of high-pressure hydrogen gas vessels for use in the fuel cell systems of automobiles. This paper introduces a new composite concept that can be used to realize CFRPs with high hydrogen gas barrier performance for applications in the cryogenic tanks of fully reusable space transportation system by the incorporation of a nonmetallic crystal layer, which is actually a dense and highly oriented clay crystal laminate. The preliminary test results show that the hydrogen gas barrier characteristics of this material after cryogenic heat shocks and cyclic loads are still better than those of other polymer materials by approximately two orders of magnitude.

  5. Globalization of the automobile industry in China. Dynamics and barriers in the greening of road transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Lin

    2001-08-01

    This article describes the state of the automobile industry and urban road transportation management in China. It reviews how the automobile industry is evolving to respond to challenges in economic development, environmental regulations, and technological change. The dynamics and barriers resulting from technological change of the automobile in response to reduction of exhaust emissions and energy-efficiency improvement are analyzed. It is argued that consideration of externality costs should be integrated in automobile industrial policy making and transport management. This paper questions the current government policy of encouraging private car ownership, and suggests that improvement in public transportation systems and stronger emissions control would be relevant to China's drive toward sustainable transportation development. (author)

  6. Globalization of the automobile industry in China: dynamics and barriers in greening of the road transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan Lin

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the state of the automobile industry and urban road transportation management in China. It reviews how the automobile industry is evolving to respond to challenges in economic development, environmental regulations, and technological change. The dynamics and barriers resulting from technological change of automobiles in response to reduction of exhaust emissions and energy-efficiency improvement are analyzed. It is argued that consideration of externality costs should be integrated in automobile industrial policymaking and transportation management. Efforts need to be made to use more economic incentives for emissions reduction, and to promote technological change for cleaner vehicle development. This paper questions the current government policy of encouraging private car ownership, and suggests that improvement in public transportation systems, stronger emissions control, and technology innovation on environmental friendly automobile technologies would be relevant to China's drive toward sustainable transportation development. Social inequities resulted from automobile use is also stressed in the analysis

  7. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Studies of Membrane Transporters Using Total Internal Reflection Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudsmits, Joris M H; van Oijen, Antoine M; Slotboom, Dirk J

    2017-01-01

    Cells are delineated by a lipid bilayer that physically separates the inside from the outer environment. Most polar, charged, or large molecules require proteins to reduce the energetic barrier for passage across the membrane and to achieve transport rates that are relevant for life. Here, we describe techniques to visualize the functioning of membrane transport proteins with fluorescent probes at the single-molecule level. First, we explain how to produce membrane-reconstituted transporters with fluorescent labels. Next, we detail the construction of a microfluidic flow cell to image immobilized proteoliposomes on a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope. We conclude by describing the methods that are needed to analyze fluorescence movies and obtain useful single-molecule data. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Design and validation of a microfluidic device for blood-brain barrier monitoring and transport studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugolini, Giovanni Stefano; Occhetta, Paola; Saccani, Alessandra; Re, Francesca; Krol, Silke; Rasponi, Marco; Redaelli, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    In vitro blood-brain barrier models are highly relevant for drug screening and drug development studies, due to the challenging task of understanding the transport mechanism of drug molecules through the blood-brain barrier towards the brain tissue. In this respect, microfluidics holds potential for providing microsystems that require low amounts of cells and reagent and can be potentially multiplexed for increasing the ease and throughput of the drug screening process. We here describe the design, development and validation of a microfluidic device for endothelial blood-brain barrier cell transport studies. The device comprises of two microstructured layers (top culture chamber and bottom collection chamber) sandwiching a porous membrane for the cell culture. Microstructured layers include two pairs of physical electrodes, embedded into the device layers by geometrically defined guiding channels with computationally optimized positions. These electrodes allow the use of commercial electrical measurement systems for monitoring trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER). We employed the designed device for performing preliminary assessment of endothelial barrier formation with murine brain endothelial cells (Br-bEnd5). Results demonstrate that cellular junctional complexes effectively form in the cultures (expression of VE-Cadherin and ZO-1) and that the TEER monitoring systems effectively detects an increase of resistance of the cultured cell layers indicative of tight junction formation. Finally, we validate the use of the described microsystem for drug transport studies demonstrating that Br-bEnd5 cells significantly hinder the transport of molecules (40 kDa and 4 kDa dextran) from the top culture chamber to the bottom collection chamber.

  9. The recent international situation on the transport of radioactive material and IAEA 2003 transport conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Since the creation of the United Nations, the international community initiated efforts to harmonize international practices for the safe transport of hazardous goods, including radioactive material. And, IAEA is playing a key role in fostering the establishment of transport regulations on radioactive material. This current worldwide system of regulatory control has achieved an excellent safety record. However, some concerns still remain regarding the transport of radioactive material, as the discussion of this topic at IAEA General Conferences in the last few years. IAEA Transport conference planed as a forum in which to better understand these concerns, and to answer relevant underlying questions. At the same time, outside these technical areas, discussions also covered related issues such as liability resulting from an accident during the transport and communication between concerned governments, and between these governments and the public at large. The International Conference on the Safety of Transport of Radioactive Material took place in Vienna, Austria, from 7 to 11 July 2003. There were 534 nominated participants from 82 States, 9 intergovernmental organizations (IGOs), and 5 non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and there were 132 contributed and invited papers. By this report, I report the recent international situation on the transport of radioactive material and result of the IAEA 2003 Transport Conference. (author)

  10. Globalisation, international transport and the global environment. A scenario approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Veen-Groot, D.B.; Nijkamp, P. [Department of Spatial Economics, Free University, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1999-07-01

    The project 'Globalisation, International Transport and the Global Environment' aims to investigate the consequences of globalisation for international transport for global environmental quality as reflected in greenhouse gases in a very general sense. The policy aim (global/European) is to analyse the influence of international policy (Kyoto/IPCC/changes in carbon taxes) on transport volumes, intermodal substitutions or vehicle size and its implications for the environment. This short-paper aims to give an overview of the state-of-the-art of the title project. Attention will be paid to the assessment of trends, the scenario method, the conceptual framework and four qualitative globalisation scenarios. 16 refs.

  11. International medical graduate-patient communication: a qualitative analysis of perceived barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorgan, Kelly A; Lang, Forrest; Floyd, Michael; Kemp, Evelyn

    2009-11-01

    International medical graduates (IMGs) represent a substantial portion of all medical residents in the United States. Yet, IMGs may be disadvantaged in their communications with U.S. patients for a variety of reasons. The authors conducted a qualitative study to examine IMGs' perceptions of the barriers to their communication with patients. A convenience sample of 12 IMGs participated in interviews that lasted 1 to 1.5 hours. Residents from the Caribbean, Colombia, Denmark, India, Iran, Pakistan, and Peru participated in individual interviews conducted on-site at one of three clinics. Interviews were transcribed and then coded independently and jointly. The authors used a qualitative analysis of interview transcripts to identify primary and secondary themes. IMGs' perceptions of the barriers to communication with their Appalachian patients fit into two broad themes: educational barriers and interpersonal barriers. Within each of these themes, the authors identified secondary themes: education-related barriers were science immersion and lack of communication training, and interpersonally related barriers were unfamiliar dialects, new power dynamics, and different rapport-building expectations. The analysis of the interview data yielded several important findings that residency programs should consider when designing orientations, training curricula, and communication interventions. Programs may need to address challenges related to regional dialect and "informal" English use, as well as communication barriers associated with cross-cultural differences in norms, values, and beliefs. Programs also need to draw on multilayered interventions to address the multidimensional challenges of cross-cultural physician-patient communication.

  12. Modification of the Internal Transport in the Tyre Factory

    OpenAIRE

    Matuszak Zbigniew; Sokołowski Damian; Jaśkiewicz Marek; Šarkan Branislav; Stokłosa Józef

    2017-01-01

    The production plant of tyres and rubber goods has been characterized in the article. The production process structure in general as well as the production process of tyres has been presented. The analysis of the internal transport system used in the production process of large tyres (OTR - Off The Road). The modification of the present transport system used in the large tyres production has been proposed. Both systems: the present one and the modified one have been compared using SWOT method...

  13. Barriers to Implementing the International Integrated Reporting Framework: A Contemporary Academic Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Dumay, John; Bernardi, Cristiana; Guthrie, James; La Torre, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper is motivated by the International Integrated Reporting Council’s (IIRC) call for feedback from all stakeholders with knowledge of the International Integrated Reporting Framework , and specifically of the enablers, incentives and barriers to its implementation. The paper synthesises insights from contemporary accounting research into integrated reporting (IR) as a general concept, and integrated reporting as espoused by the IIRC in the (IIRC, 2013). We specifically focus...

  14. CrN-Ag nanocomposite coatings: Control of lubricant transport by diffusion barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papi, P.A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Mulligan, C.P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); U.S. Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center, Benet Laboratories, Watervliet, NY 12189 (United States); Gall, D., E-mail: galld@rpi.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    1-{mu}m-thick self-lubricating CrN-Ag composite coatings containing 16 at.% Ag were deposited on Si substrates by reactive co-sputtering at T{sub s} = 400 Degree-Sign C, and were covered with CrN cap layers with a columnar microstructure and a thickness d = 0-1000 nm. Vacuum annealing at T{sub a} = 500 and 600 Degree-Sign C for 1 h causes Ag transport to the sample surface and the formation of Ag surface grains. Quantitative scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analyses show that increasing d from 0 to 10 to 100 nm for T{sub a} = 500 Degree-Sign C leads to a decrease in the areal density of Ag surface grains from 0.86 to 0.45 to 0.04 {mu}m{sup -2}, while their lateral size remains constant at 360 {+-} 60 nm. However, increasing T{sub a} to 600 Degree-Sign C causes a doubling of the Ag grain size, and a 4-30 times larger overall Ag transport. These results are explained by kinetic barriers for Ag diffusion through the porous cap layer with a porosity that decreases with increasing d, resulting in an effective activation barrier for Ag transport that increases from 0.78 eV in the absence of a cap layer to 0.89 eV for d = 10 nm and 1.07 eV for d = 30 nm. Auger electron spectroscopy depth profile analyses of annealed layers reveal no detectable Ag within the CrN cap layer and a uniform depletion of the Ag reservoir throughout the composite coating thickness, indicating unhindered Ag transport within the composite. The overall results show that a CrN diffusion barrier cap layer is an effective approach to control Ag lubricant transport to the surface of CrN-Ag composite coatings. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CrN-Ag composite coatings are capped with CrN diffusion barriers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag diffuses to the surface during annealing at 500 or 600 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ag transport is controlled by the cap thickness d = 0-1000 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The activation energy for Ag

  15. Anisotropic transport of normal metal-barrier-normal metal junctions in monolayer phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sarkar, Sangita; Agarwal, Amit; Sengupta, K.

    2017-07-01

    We study transport properties of a phosphorene monolayer in the presence of single and multiple potential barriers of height U 0 and width d, using both continuum and microscopic lattice models, and show that the nature of electron transport along its armchair edge (x direction) is qualitatively different from its counterpart in both conventional two-dimensional electron gas with Schrödinger-like quasiparticles and graphene or surfaces of topological insulators hosting massless Dirac quasiparticles. We show that the transport, mediated by massive Dirac electrons, allows one to achieve collimated quasiparticle motion along x and thus makes monolayer phosphorene an ideal experimental platform for studying Klein paradox in the context of gapped Dirac materials. We study the dependence of the tunneling conductance G\\equiv {{G}xx} as a function of d and U 0, and demonstrate that for a given applied voltage V its behavior changes from oscillatory to decaying function of d for a range of U 0 with finite non-zero upper and lower bounds, and provide analytical expression for these bounds within which G decays with d. We contrast such behavior of G with that of massless Dirac electrons in graphene and also with that along the zigzag edge (y direction) in phosphorene where the quasiparticles obey an effective Schrödinger equation at low energy. We also study transport through multiple barriers along x and demonstrate that these properties hold for transport through multiple barriers as well. Finally, we suggest concrete experiments which may verify our theoretical predictions.

  16. 3rd International Symposium for Intelligent Transportation and Smart City

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Xiongyao; Sun, Jian; Ma, Limin; Chen, Yinong; ITASC

    2017-01-01

    This book presents research advances in intelligent transportation and smart cities in detail, mainly focusing on green traffic and urban utility tunnels, presented at the 3rd International Symposium for Intelligent Transportation and Smart City (ITASC) held at Tongji University, Shanghai, on May 19–20, 2017. It discusses a number of hot topics, such as the 2BMW system (Bus, Bike, Metro and Walking), transportation safety and environmental protection, urban utility design and application, as well as the application of BIM (Building Information Modeling) in city design. By connecting the theory and applications of intelligent transportation in smart cities, it enhances traffic efficiency and quality. The book gathers numerous selected papers and lectures, including contributions from respected scholars and the latest engineering advances, to provide guidance to researchers in the field of transportation and urban planning at universities and in related industries. The first conference in the ITASC series sta...

  17. Barriers to Adjustment: Needs of International Students within a Semi-Urban Campus Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyrazli, Senel; Grahame, Kamini Maraj

    2007-01-01

    Following an ecological framework, the primary purpose of this study was to examine the adjustment needs of international students within their academic and social communities. Focus group interviews revealed that students are more in need during their initial transition after arrival to the U.S. and that they experience a number of barriers in…

  18. Blowin' in the wind? Drivers and barriers for the uptake of wind propulsion in international shipping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rojon, I.; Dieperink, C.

    2014-01-01

    International shipping transports around 90% of global commerce and is of major importance for the global economy. Whilst it is the most efficient and environmentally friendly mode of transport, CO2 emissions from shipping activities still account for an estimated 3% of global emissions. One means

  19. Paving the way to nanoionics: atomic origin of barriers for ionic transport through interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frechero, M. A.; Rocci, M.; Sánchez-Santolino, G.; Kumar, Amit; Salafranca, J.; Schmidt, Rainer; Díaz-Guillén, M. R.; Durá, O. J.; Rivera-Calzada, A.; Mishra, R.; Jesse, Stephen; Pantelides, S. T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Varela, M.; Pennycook, S. J.; Santamaria, J.; Leon, C.

    2015-12-01

    The blocking of ion transport at interfaces strongly limits the performance of electrochemical nanodevices for energy applications. The barrier is believed to arise from space-charge regions generated by mobile ions by analogy to semiconductor junctions. Here we show that something different is at play by studying ion transport in a bicrystal of yttria (9% mol) stabilized zirconia (YSZ), an emblematic oxide ion conductor. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) provides structure and composition at atomic resolution, with the sensitivity to directly reveal the oxygen ion profile. We find that Y segregates to the grain boundary at Zr sites, together with a depletion of oxygen that is confined to a small length scale of around 0.5 nm. Contrary to the main thesis of the space-charge model, there exists no evidence of a long-range O vacancy depletion layer. Combining ion transport measurements across a single grain boundary by nanoscale electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM), broadband dielectric spectroscopy measurements, and density functional calculations, we show that grain-boundary-induced electronic states act as acceptors, resulting in a negatively charged core. Besides the possible effect of the modified chemical bonding, this negative charge gives rise to an additional barrier for ion transport at the grain boundary.

  20. Current transport in Zn/p-Si(100) Schottky barrier diodes at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karatas, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Kahramanmaras Suetcue imam University, 46100 Kahramanmaras (Turkey)]. E-mail: skaratas@ksu.edu.tr; Altindal, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Gazi University, 06500, Ankara (Turkey); Cakar, M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Kahramanmaras Suetcue imam University, 46100 Kahramanmaras (Turkey)

    2005-03-15

    In this study, we have performed behavior of the non-ideal forward bias current-voltage (I-V) and the reverse bias capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics of Zn/p-Si (metal-semiconductor) Schottky barrier diode (SBDs) with thin interfacial insulator layer. The forward bias I-V and reverse bias C-V characteristics of SBDs have been studied at the temperatures range of 300-400K. SBD parameters such as ideality factor n, the series resistance (R{sub S}) determined Cheung's functions and Schottky barrier height, {phi}{sub b}, are investigated as functions of temperature. The ideality factor n and R{sub S} were strongly temperature dependent and changed linearly with temperature and inverse temperature, respectively. The zero-bias barrier heights {phi}{sub b0}(I-V) calculated from I-V measurements show an unusual behavior that it was found to increase linearly with the increasing temperature. However, the barrier height {phi}{sub b}(C-V) calculated from C-V measurements at 500kHz frequency decreased linearly with the increasing temperature. The correlation between {phi}{sub b0}(I-V) and {phi}{sub b}(C-V) barrier heights have been explained by taking into account ideality factors n and the tunneling factor ({alpha}{chi}{sup 1/2}{delta}) in the current transport mechanism. Also, the temperature dependence of energy distribution of interface state density (N{sub SS}) was determined from the forward I-V measurements by taking into account the bias dependence of the effective barrier height. The higher values of n and R{sub S} were attributed to the presence of a native insulator on Si surface and to high density of interface states localized at semiconductor-native oxide layer (Si/SiO{sub 2}) interface.

  1. GLUT-1 GLUCOSE TRANSPORTERS IN THE BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER: DIFFERENTIAL PHOSPHORYLATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devraj, Kavi; Klinger, Marianne E.; Myers, Roland L.; Mokashi, Ashwini; Hawkins, Richard A.; Simpson, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    Glucose is the primary metabolic fuel for the mammalian brain and a continuous supply is required to maintain normal CNS function. The transport of glucose across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) into the brain is mediated by the facilitative glucose transporter GLUT-1. Prior studies (Simpson et al. 2001) had revealed that the conformations of the GLUT-1 transporter were different in luminal (blood facing) and abluminal (brain facing) membranes of bovine cerebral endothelial cells, based on differential antibody recognition. In this study we have extended these observations and using a combination of 2D-PAGE/Western blotting and immunogold electron microscopy we determined that these different conformations are exhibited in vivo and arise from differential phosphorylation of GLUT-1 and not from alternative splicing or altered O- or N-linked glycosylation. PMID:21910135

  2. International transport of incandescent gas mantles - an incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Khaidem R.K.

    2004-01-01

    Consumer products, though contain small quantities of radioactive material, are designed and manufactured with reference to prescribed safety standards; and supplied for use in public domain. On the basis of the nature of the exposures associated with such practices, which are quite low, the Regulatory Authority exempts the practices from many of the regulatory requirements. As they are inherently safe for handling, transporting and use, they are exempted from some of the requirements under the provisions of the regulations on the transport of radioactive material. Though the basic meaning and purpose of a radioactivity-based consumer product are similar to other commodities, there is a need to transport the former as per the regulations for safe transport of radioactive material till the product reaches at end user. The strict adherence to the transport regulations during transport of the radioactivity-based consumer product would ensure smooth carriage particularly in international arena. On the basis of an incident that happened during the transport of consumer products, this paper analyzes the provisions relating to radioactivity-based consumer products as envisaged in the basic safety standards of IAEA and their transport, particularly for natural thorium based consumer product gas mantles. (author)

  3. External and Internal Barriers to Studying Can Affect Student Success and Retention in a Diverse Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Clement

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Although a majority of under-represented minority (URM students begin their postsecondary education at community colleges, little is known about barriers to success and retention for transfer-bound science students. This study focuses on some of the barriers that affect these students’ ability to study adequately for a community college “gateway” course. It tests whether instructors’ expectations of study time were realistic for community college students and whether students reported facing external barriers, such as job and family responsibilities, or internal barriers to studying, such as lack of motivational, cognitive, and metacognitive abilities, all of which have been shown to impact academic success and retention. It also tests whether students who faced such barriers were less likely to succeed in and complete the course, as well as whether time spent studying was related to course success. The findings reported here show that community college students do not have enough available time to study and that external and internal barriers are both prevalent among these students. In addition, students who faced such barriers are more likely to fail or drop the class. Results also show that study time is positively correlated with retention, but not performance, as well as with some motivational, cognitive, and metacognitive dimensions of self-regulated learning. These findings lead to new questions, including whether student success in a community college class is associated with the use of cognitive and metacognitive learning strategies for students with no prior degrees, and whether increased course structure may improve success for college students with lower self-regulated abilities.

  4. Challenges and future research needs towards international freight transport modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meersman, H.; Ehrler, C.C.; Bruckmann, D.; Chen, T.M.; Francke, J.; Hill, P.; Jackson, C.; Klauenberg, J.; Kurowski, M.; Seidel, S.; Vierth, I.

    2016-01-01

    The advanced internationalisation of markets and production processes continuously adds to the complexity of supply chains. At the same time improving the sustainability of the related international freight transport processes and optimising their efficiency is becoming a topic of central relevance.

  5. PROBLEMS OF DETERMINING THE FUEL COST FOR INTERNATIONAL ROAD TRANSPORTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bondarev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available When performing international goods transportation the most expensive consumption is the fuel. For planing reliable fuel costs there was conducted analytical and experimental research. According to the research, the method to determine the volume and cost of fuel according to the criterion of its maximum use with minimum cost within the country follow routes is determined.

  6. Improving the Transportability of CBT for Internalizing Disorders in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, R. Meredith; McHugh, R. Kathryn; Santucci, Lauren C.; Barlow, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Research provides strong support for the efficacy and effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of childhood internalizing disorders. Given evidence for limited dissemination and implementation of CBT outside of academic settings, efforts are underway to improve its transportability so that more children with mental…

  7. ESTIMATION OF EFFICIENCY OF INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC RELATIONS IN INTERNATIONAL CARGO TRANSPORTATION BY ROAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kosovsky

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes methodology for estimating efficiency international economic relations in the sphere international cargo transportation by road for the national economy on the basis of relationship between advantages and costs of sub-systems of the unified system for automotive export services.

  8. Internet-marketing v mezhdunarodnoi torgovle i na transporte = Internet marketing in the international trade and transport international transport corridors / Vladimir Zaitsev

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Zaitsev, Vladimir

    2003-01-01

    Ettekanne 3.-4. detsembrini 2003 Tallinnas toimunud rahvusvahelisel konverents-näitusel "Logistics and transport in international trade" käsitleb Interneti rolli ja võimalusi rahvusvaheliste transporditeenuste turunduses

  9. Role of low-order rational surfaces in transport barrier formation on the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, K.; Tanaka, K.; Watanabe, F.

    2010-11-01

    In the Large Helical Device, edge transport barrier (ETB) was formed by H-mode transition near the low-order rational surfaces, that is, at the ι/2π=1 resonant layer (ι/2π: the rotational transform) in outward-shifted plasmas of R ax =3.9m (R ax : the magnetic axis position in the vacuum field), and the ι/2π=2 resonant layer in inward-shifted plasmas of R ax =3.6m. The ι/2π=1 and 2 resonant layers reside in the stochastic field region existing just outside the last closed magnetic surface (LCFS). In the outward-shifted plasmas, H-modes without edge localized modes (ELM-free H-modes) followed by giant ELMs were obtained, while H-modes with high frequency and low amplitude ELMs were obtained in the inward-shifted plasmas. A new type of barrier formation induced by TAE bursts was observed in the plasmas of R ax =3.6m, where the transport barrier is formed near the ι/2π=1 surface locates inside LCFS. (author)

  10. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the expression of plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) at the blood-brain barrier and its implications to the transport of neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kuo-Chen; Lu, Ya-Hsuan; Peng, Yi-Hsuan; Hsu, Lih-Ching; Lin, Chun-Jung

    2015-12-01

    Plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) is a polyspecific organic cation transporter that is highly expressed in the central nervous system. This study aimed to investigate the effect of lipopolysaccharide on PMAT expression at the blood-brain barrier and the interaction between PMAT and neurotoxins. As a result, PMAT mRNA was identified in brain microvessels (BMVs), brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), astrocytes, and pericytes isolated from C57BL/6 mice and/or Wistar rats using RT-qPCR. The immunofluorescence staining confirmed the expression of PMAT protein in BMVs and striatum of C57BL/6 mice. Western blotting demonstrated its localization at the luminal and abluminal sides of BMECs. In C57BL/6 mice, PMAT protein was significantly increased in BMVs 24 h after an intraperitoneal injection of 3 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide. Lipopolysaccharide treatment also significantly increased PMAT expression in cerebral cortex and the striatum in a time-dependent manner, as well as the brain-to-plasma ratio of 1-benzyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (1-benzyl-TIQ). In isolated cells, lipopolysaccharide treatment significantly increased PMAT mRNA in brain astrocytes and the BMECs co-cultured with astrocytes. In addition to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, the kinetic study indicated that both 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and 1-benzyl-TIQ are substrates of human PMAT. These findings suggest that inflammation can change PMAT expression at the blood-brain barrier, which may affect PMAT-mediated transport of neurotoxins. We demonstrated the expression of plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT; mRNA or protein) at several subunits of the blood-brain barrier. Lipopolysaccharide treatment can significantly increase the expression of PMAT in vivo (in brain microvessels, cerebral cortex, and the striatum of C57BL/6 mice) and in vitro (in brain astrocytes and brain microvascular endothelial cells co-cultured with astrocytes). Lipopolysaccharide treatment

  11. The role of ABC transporters of the blood-brain barrier in opioid tolerance development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Środa-Pomianek

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Opioids constitute an important group of drugs used in chronic pain treatment, e.g. cancer pain. Unfortunately, the development of the organism’s tolerance to the analgesic activity of opioids, the tendency to develop addictions and undesirable side effects are the main causes reducing opioid efficiency in chronic pain treatment. Among many mechanisms connected to emerging of opioid resistance the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters present at the blood-brain barrier may play an important role. These transporter proteins, especially P-glycoprotein (ABCB1, MDR1, affect pharmacokinetics of many drugs and xenobiotics that are their substrates. ABC transporters reduce cellular uptake of drugs and/or increase their export from brain tissue to blood. Substrate specificity of P-glycoprotein is extremely wide and comprises many structurally and functionally unrelated compounds. What is interesting, substrate specificity of P-glycoprotein overlaps to a great extent the specificity of the isoforms of cytochrome P450 involved in drug metabolism. In the present review, the ABC proteins-mediated transport of opioids was discussed as well as the mechanisms of transport regulation. Cellular metabolism of various opioid drugs and the role of ABC transporters in their absorption, distribution and elimination were also described.

  12. Technical Work Plan for: Near Field Environment: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2006-01-01

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes work activities to be performed by the Near-Field Environment Team. The objective of the work scope covered by this TWP is to generate Revision 03 of EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction, referred to herein as the radionuclide transport abstraction (RTA) report. The RTA report is being revised primarily to address condition reports (CRs), to address issues identified by the Independent Validation Review Team (IVRT), to address the potential impact of transport, aging, and disposal (TAD) canister design on transport models, and to ensure integration with other models that are closely associated with the RTA report and being developed or revised in other analysis/model reports in response to IVRT comments. The RTA report will be developed in accordance with the most current version of LP-SIII.10Q-BSC and will reflect current administrative procedures (LP-3.15Q-BSC, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''; LP-SIII.2Q-BSC, ''Qualification of Unqualified Data''; etc.), and will develop related Document Input Reference System (DIRS) reports and data qualifications as applicable in accordance with prevailing procedures. The RTA report consists of three models: the engineered barrier system (EBS) flow model, the EBS transport model, and the EBS-unsaturated zone (UZ) interface model. The flux-splitting submodel in the EBS flow model will change, so the EBS flow model will be validated again. The EBS transport model and validation of the model will be substantially revised in Revision 03 of the RTA report, which is the main subject of this TWP. The EBS-UZ interface model may be changed in Revision 03 of the RTA report due to changes in the conceptualization of the UZ transport abstraction model (a particle tracker transport model based on the discrete fracture transfer function will be used instead of the dual-continuum transport model previously used). Validation of the EBS-UZ interface model will be revised to be consistent with

  13. Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in Engineering Barrier Systems (EBS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steefel, Carl; Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Liu, Hui-Hai; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Geological repositories for disposal of high-level nuclear wastes generally rely on a multi-barrier system to isolate radioactive wastes from the biosphere. The multi-barrier system typically consists of a natural barrier system, including repository host rock and its surrounding subsurface environment, and an engineering barrier system (EBS). EBS represents the man-made, engineered materials placed within a repository, including the waste form, waste canisters, buffer materials, backfill and seals (OECD, 2003). EBS plays a significant role in the containment and long-term retardation of radionuclide release. EBS is involved in complex thermal, hydrogeological, mechanical, chemical and biological processes, such as heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow (including gas release due to canister corrosion), swelling of buffer materials, radionuclide diffusive transport, waste dissolution and chemical reactions. All these processes are related to each other. An in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is critical for the performance assessment (PA) for EBS and the entire repository. Within the EBS group of Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign, LBNL is currently focused on (1) thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in buffer materials (bentonite) and (2) diffusive transport in EBS associated with clay host rock, with a long-term goal to develop a full understanding of (and needed modeling capabilities to simulate) impacts of coupled processes on radionuclide transport in different components of EBS, as well as the interaction between near-field host rock (e.g., clay) and EBS and how they effect radionuclide release. This final report documents the progress that LBNL has made in its focus areas. Specifically, Section 2 summarizes progress on literature review for THMC processes and reactive-diffusive radionuclide transport in bentonite. The literature review provides a picture of the state-of-the-art of the relevant research areas

  14. Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in Engineering Barrier Systems (EBS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steefel, Carl; Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Liu, Hui-Hai; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    Geological repositories for disposal of high-level nuclear wastes generally rely on a multi-barrier system to isolate radioactive wastes from the biosphere. The multi-barrier system typically consists of a natural barrier system, including repository host rock and its surrounding subsurface environment, and an engineering barrier system (EBS). EBS represents the man-made, engineered materials placed within a repository, including the waste form, waste canisters, buffer materials, backfill and seals (OECD, 2003). EBS plays a significant role in the containment and long-term retardation of radionuclide release. EBS is involved in complex thermal, hydrogeological, mechanical, chemical and biological processes, such as heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow (including gas release due to canister corrosion), swelling of buffer materials, radionuclide diffusive transport, waste dissolution and chemical reactions. All these processes are related to each other. An in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is critical for the performance assessment (PA) for EBS and the entire repository. Within the EBS group of Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign, LBNL is currently focused on (1) thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in buffer materials (bentonite) and (2) diffusive transport in EBS associated with clay host rock, with a long-term goal to develop a full understanding of (and needed modeling capabilities to simulate) impacts of coupled processes on radionuclide transport in different components of EBS, as well as the interaction between near-field host rock (e.g., clay) and EBS and how they effect radionuclide release. This final report documents the progress that LBNL has made in its focus areas. Specifically, Section 2 summarizes progress on literature review for THMC processes and reactive-diffusive radionuclide transport in bentonite. The literature review provides a picture of the state-of-the-art of the relevant research areas

  15. 2015 International Conference on Information Technology and Intelligent Transportation Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Lakhmi; Zhao, Xiangmo

    2017-01-01

    This volume includes the proceedings of the 2015 International Conference on Information Technology and Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITITS 2015) which was held in Xi’an on December 12-13, 2015. The conference provided a platform for all professionals and researchers from industry and academia to present and discuss recent advances in the field of Information Technology and Intelligent Transportation Systems. The presented information technologies are connected to intelligent transportation systems including wireless communication, computational technologies, floating car data/floating cellular data, sensing technologies, and video vehicle detection. The articles focusing on intelligent transport systems vary in the technologies applied, from basic management systems to more application systems including topics such as emergency vehicle notification systems, automatic road enforcement, collision avoidance systems and some cooperative systems. The conference hosted 12 invited speakers and over 200 part...

  16. Aging alters mRNA expression of amyloid transporter genes at the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osgood, Doreen; Miller, Miles C; Messier, Arthur A; Gonzalez, Liliana; Silverberg, Gerald D

    2017-09-01

    Decreased clearance of potentially toxic metabolites, due to aging changes, likely plays a significant role in the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides and other macromolecules in the brain of the elderly and in the patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aging is the single most important risk factor for AD development. Aβ transport receptor proteins expressed at the blood-brain barrier are significantly altered with age: the efflux transporters lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 and P-glycoprotein are reduced, whereas the influx transporter receptor for advanced glycation end products is increased. These receptors play an important role in maintaining brain biochemical homeostasis. We now report that, in a rat model of aging, gene transcription is altered in aging, as measured by Aβ receptor gene messenger RNA (mRNA) at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 20, 30, and 36 months. Gene mRNA expression from isolated cerebral microvessels was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 and P-glycoprotein mRNA were significantly reduced in aging, and receptor for advanced glycation end products was increased, in parallel with the changes seen in receptor protein expression. Transcriptional changes appear to play a role in aging alterations in blood-brain barrier receptor expression and Aβ accumulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The role of ion transport phenomena in memristive double barrier devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkmann, Sven; Hansen, Mirko; Ziegler, Martin; Kohlstedt, Hermann; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    In this work we report on the role of ion transport for the dynamic behavior of a double barrier quantum mechanical Al/Al2O3/NbxOy/Au memristive device based on numerical simulations in conjunction with experimental measurements. The device consists of an ultra-thin NbxOy solid state electrolyte between an Al2O3 tunnel barrier and a semiconductor metal interface at an Au electrode. It is shown that the device provides a number of interesting features such as an intrinsic current compliance, a relatively long retention time, and no need for an initialization step. Therefore, it is particularly attractive for applications in highly dense random access memories or neuromorphic mixed signal circuits. However, the underlying physical mechanisms of the resistive switching are still not completely understood yet. To investigate the interplay between the current transport mechanisms and the inner atomistic device structure a lumped element circuit model is consistently coupled with 3D kinetic Monte Carlo model for the ion transport. The simulation results indicate that the drift of charged point defects within the NbxOy is the key factor for the resistive switching behavior. It is shown in detail that the diffusion of oxygen modifies the local electronic interface states resulting in a change of the interface properties.

  18. Study of Pellet Injection Effects on Transport Barrier Formation and Pedestal Width Using Bifurcation Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wihakhaphirom, K.; Chatthong, B.; Picha, R.; Poolyarat, N.; Onjun, T.

    2014-01-01

    This work focuses on the effects of pellet injection on the L-H transition phenomenon in tokamak plasmas based on bifurcation concept. Thermal and particle transport equations with both neoclassical and turbulent contributions included are solved simultaneously. In this study, the investigated transport suppression mechanism is flow shear, which is assumed to affect only the turbulent channel. The flow shear, coupling both transport equations via pres- sure and density gradients, can be calculated from the force balance equation. The pedestal formation can be seen when some operation points reach the second branch of bifurcation curve. As a result, the pedestal region can be determined. The pellet injection is modeled as a Gaussian profile of the particle source function. The centroid of the Gaussian shape repre- sents the location of the maximum pellet penetration depth, which is taken to be proportional to the pellet's initial velocity. Moreover, the duration that the pellet has effects on transport barrier formation and pedestal width in the plasma is proportional to its diameter. The two transport equations are solved both analytically and numerically using MATLAB to study the possibility of L-H transition triggering using pellet injection and its effects on pedestal width.

  19. Regulatory mechanisms for iron transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duck, Kari A; Simpson, Ian A; Connor, James R

    2017-12-09

    Many critical metabolic functions in the brain require adequate and timely delivery of iron. However, most studies when considering brain iron uptake have ignored the iron requirements of the endothelial cells that form the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Moreover, current models of BBB iron transport do not address regional regulation of brain iron uptake or how neurons, when adapting to metabolic demands, can acquire more iron. In this study, we demonstrate that both iron-poor transferrin (apo-Tf) and the iron chelator, deferoxamine, stimulate release of iron from iron-loaded endothelial cells in an in vitro BBB model. The role of the endosomal divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) in BBB iron acquisition and transport has been questioned. Here, we show that inhibition of DMT1 alters the transport of iron and Tf across the endothelial cells. These data support an endosome-mediated model of Tf-bound iron uptake into the brain and identifies mechanisms for local regional regulation of brain iron uptake. Moreover, our data provide an explanation for the disparity in the ratio of Tf to iron transport into the brain that has confounded the field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. CITY TRANSPORT IN BARRIER-FREE ARCHITECTURAL PLANNING SPACE FOR PEOPLE WITH LIMITED MOBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pryadko Igor’ Petrovich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current state of transport organization for people with limited mobility. The article evaluates the results of the actions the executive authorities of Moscow and Moscow Region take. Barrier-free space organization for disabled people and parents with prams is given a special attention. The lack of strategy in the sphere leads to considerable difficulties for people with limited ability. This problem should be solved in cooperation with the survey of other peoples' needs. The article gives examples of comfortable urban space in Sochi, Moscow, Chita, Mytishchi and analyses the ways urbanism influences people with limited abilities.

  1. Histamine elimination from the cerebrospinal fluid across the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier: involvement of plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT/SLC29A4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Takuya; Nakazawa, Ayumi; Okura, Takashi; Deguchi, Yoshiharu; Akanuma, Shin-Ichi; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2016-11-01

    The elimination of histamine, an excitatory neurotransmitter, from the brain/CSF across the blood-brain barrier and blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB) was investigated using Wistar rats, which were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium. An in vivo intracerebral microinjection study suggested that there was only partial efflux of [ 3 H]histamine from the rat brain across the blood-brain barrier. The [ 3 H]histamine elimination clearance from the rat CSF was 3.8-fold greater than that of a CSF bulk flow marker, and the elimination of [ 3 H]histamine was significantly inhibited by the co-administration of unlabeled histamine, suggesting the involvement of a carrier-mediated process in histamine elimination from the CSF. The uptake study of [ 3 H]histamine by the isolated rat choroid plexus revealed histamine elimination from the CSF across the BCSFB. The [ 3 H]histamine uptake by TR-CSFB3 cells, a model cell line for the BCSFB, exhibited temperature-dependent and saturable kinetics, suggesting the involvement of carrier-mediated transport of histamine at the BCSFB. In the inhibition study, [ 3 H]histamine uptake by TR-CSFB3 cells was significantly inhibited by substrates and/or inhibitors of plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT/SLC29A4), but not affected by substrates of organic cation transporters. These results suggest the elimination of histamine from the CSF via plasma membrane monoamine transporter at the BCSFB. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  2. Modification of the Internal Transport in the Tyre Factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matuszak Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The production plant of tyres and rubber goods has been characterized in the article. The production process structure in general as well as the production process of tyres has been presented. The analysis of the internal transport system used in the production process of large tyres (OTR - Off The Road. The modification of the present transport system used in the large tyres production has been proposed. Both systems: the present one and the modified one have been compared using SWOT method (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats. Not only the advantages but also the critical remarks concerning the proposed system have been enumerated.

  3. Gas transport in the bentonite barrier of AGP and their interfaces; Transporte de gas en la barrera de bentonita de un AGP y sus interfases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez Rodrigo, V.; Villar Gelicia, M. V.; Martin Martin, P. L.; Romero Alvarez, F. J.

    2014-07-01

    The research of gas transport processes through the barriers is of great relevance in the assessment of the behaviour of the repository. The main objective of this study is to determine the properties of gas transport in saturated bentonite samples and the interfaces between them. (Author)

  4. Globalisation, International Transport and the Global Environment (GITAGE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nijkamp, P. [Department of Spatial Economics, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2001-07-01

    The title project aims to map the transport implications of current world-wide globalisation trends, with a particular view to the consequences of increased transport (of both passengers and goods) for global environmental quality as reflected in Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) (notably, but not exclusively CO2). In this study, environmental and climate consequences of globalisation are assessed in a quantitative sense for various modes of transport - in relation to international trade and person mobility - in a medium- to long-term perspective by using results and knowledge from the CPB World Scan Model and the IVM information base on global emissions. Four globalisation scenarios (quantified with WorldScan) formed the basis for various transport scenarios (on different scale levels) of which the consequences in terms of emissions were shown. Besides, the importance and possibilities of innovations in transport were clarified as this is of major importance in mapping out the future of transport. Also attention was paid to the possible impact of policy intervention. Under high economic growth and little political concern about climate change, CO2 emissions from transport might double to quadruple, depending on the region, in the period 1995-2020. It appears that European and Dutch emission levels can only be limited to around 1995 levels if, simultaneously, economic growth is limited, if under a trend towards sustainability transport intensities of economies decline and if all technical opportunities for reduction Of CO2 emissions are exploited. However, since transport is mainly a derived demand, the conclusion is that the transportation sector in itself has only a limited potential to offer a significant contribution towards a reduction in CO2 emissions. Transportation technology and logistics are mainly driven by competitive behaviour, so that an autonomous role of the transport sector in shaping a world characterised by sustainable development is rather limited. This

  5. Formation of core transport barrier and CH-Mode by ion Bernstein wave heating in PBX-M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Gettelfinger, G.; Hatcher, R.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Manickam, J.

    1995-01-01

    Observation of core transport barrier formation (for particles, ion and electron energies, and toroidal momentum) by ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) in PBX-M plasma is reported. The formation of a transport barrier leads to a strong peaking and significant increase of the core pressure (70%) and toroidal momentum (20%), and has been termed the core-high confinement mode (CH-Mode). This formation of a transport barrier is consistent, in terms of the expected barrier location as well as the required threshold power, with a theoretical model based on the poloidal sheared flow generation by the ion Bernstein wave power. The use of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) induced sheared flow as a tool to control plasma pressure and bootstrap current profiles shows a favorable scaling for the use in future reactor grade tokamak plasmas

  6. The low internal rotation barriers of halogenated toluenes: Rotational spectrum of 2,4-difluorotoluene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, K. P. Rajappan; Herbers, Sven; Obenchain, Daniel A.; Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Lesarri, Alberto

    2018-02-01

    The rotational spectrum of 2,4-difluorotoluene in the region 5-25 GHz has been studied by pulsed supersonic jet using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The tunneling splitting due to the methyl internal rotation in the ground torsional state could be unambiguously identified and the threefold (V3) potential barrier hindering the internal rotation of the methyl top was determined as 2.80144 (82) kJ/mol. The ground-state rotational parameters for the parent and seven 13C isotopic species in natural abundance were determined with high accuracy, including all quartic centrifugal distortion constants. The electric dipole moment μ = 1.805(42) D was obtained from Stark effect measurements. The molecular structure was derived using the substitution (rs) method. Supporting ab initio (MP2) calculations provided comparative values for the potential barrier and molecular parameters.

  7. Performance of intact and partially degraded concrete barriers in limiting mass transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.C.

    1992-06-01

    Mass transport through concrete barriers and release rate from concrete vaults are quantitatively evaluated. The thorny issue of appropriate diffusion coefficients for use in performance assessment calculations is covered, with no ultimate solution found. Release from monolithic concrete vaults composed of concrete waste forms is estimated with a semi-analytical solution. A parametric study illustrates the importance of different parameters on release. A second situation of importance is the role of a concrete shell or vault placed around typical waste forms in limiting mass transport. In both situations, the primary factor controlling concrete performance is cracks. The implications of leaching behavior on likely groundwater concentrations is examined. Frequently, lower groundwater concentrations can be expected in the absence of engineered covers that reduce infiltration

  8. Microstructure of Josephson junctions: Effect on supercurrent transport in YBCO grain boundary and barrier layer junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, K.L.; Huang, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The electric transport of high-temperature superconductors, such as YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO), can be strongly restricted by the presence of high-angle grain boundaries (GB). This weak-link behavior is governed by the macroscopic GB geometry and the microscopic grain boundary structure and composition at the atomic level. Whereas grain boundaries present a considerable impediment to high current applications of high T c materials, there is considerable commercial interest in exploiting the weak-link-nature of grain boundaries for the design of microelectronic devices, such as superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). The Josephson junctions which form the basis of this technology can also be formed by introducing artificial barriers into the superconductor. The authors have examined both types of Josephson junctions by EM techniques in an effort to understand the connection between microstructure/chemistry and electrical transport properties. This knowledge is a valuable resource for the design and production of improved devices

  9. Internalization and Axonal Transport of the HIV Glycoprotein gp120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berth, Sarah; Caicedo, Hector Hugo; Sarma, Tulika; Morfini, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    The HIV glycoprotein gp120, a neurotoxic HIV glycoprotein that is overproduced and shed by HIV-infected macrophages, is associated with neurological complications of HIV such as distal sensory polyneuropathy, but interactions of gp120 in the peripheral nervous system remain to be characterized. Here, we demonstrate internalization of extracellular gp120 in a manner partially independent of binding to its coreceptor CXCR4 by F11 neuroblastoma cells and cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. Immunocytochemical and pharmacological experiments indicate that gp120 does not undergo trafficking through the endolysosomal pathway. Instead, gp120 is mainly internalized through lipid rafts in a cholesterol-dependent manner, with a minor fraction being internalized by fluid phase pinocytosis. Experiments using compartmentalized microfluidic chambers further indicate that, after internalization, endocytosed gp120 selectively undergoes retrograde but not anterograde axonal transport from axons to neuronal cell bodies. Collectively, these studies illuminate mechanisms of gp120 internalization and axonal transport in peripheral nervous system neurons, providing a novel framework for mechanisms for gp120 neurotoxicity. PMID:25636314

  10. The blood-brain barrier fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1/SLC27A1) supplies docosahexaenoic acid to the brain, and insulin facilitates transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Yusuke; Uchida, Yasuo; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Tachikawa, Masanori; Aizawa, Sanshiro; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2017-05-01

    We purposed to clarify the contribution of fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1/SLC 27A1) to the supply of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) to the brain across the blood-brain barrier in this study. Transport experiments showed that the uptake rate of [ 14 C]-DHA in human FATP1-expressing HEK293 cells was significantly greater than that in empty vector-transfected (mock) HEK293 cells. The steady-state intracellular DHA concentration was nearly 2-fold smaller in FATP1-expressing than in mock cells, suggesting that FATP1 works as not only an influx, but also an efflux transporter for DHA. [ 14 C]-DHA uptake by a human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC/D3) increased in a time-dependent manner, and was inhibited by unlabeled DHA and a known FATP1 substrate, oleic acid. Knock-down of FATP1 in hCMEC/D3 cells with specific siRNA showed that FATP1-mediated uptake accounts for 59.2-73.0% of total [ 14 C]-DHA uptake by the cells. Insulin treatment for 30 min induced translocation of FATP1 protein to the plasma membrane in hCMEC/D3 cells and enhanced [ 14 C]-DHA uptake. Immunohistochemical analysis of mouse brain sections showed that FATP1 protein is preferentially localized at the basal membrane of brain microvessel endothelial cells. We found that two neuroprotective substances, taurine and biotin, in addition to DHA, undergo FATP1-mediated efflux. Overall, our results suggest that FATP1 localized at the basal membrane of brain microvessels contributes to the transport of DHA, taurine and biotin into the brain, and insulin rapidly increases DHA supply to the brain by promoting translocation of FATP1 to the membrane. Read the Editorial Comment for this article on page 324. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Sensitivity analysis on retardation effect of natural barriers against radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatanaka, K.

    1994-01-01

    The generic performance assessment of the geological disposal system for high level waste (HLW) in Japan has been carried out by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) in accordance with the overall HLW management program defined by the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan. The Japanese concept of the geological disposal system is based on a multi-barrier system which is composed of vitrified waste, carbon steel overpack, thick bentonite buffer and a variety of realistic geological conditions. The main objectives of the study are the detailed analysis of the performance of engineered barrier system (EBS) and the analysis of the performance of natural barrier system (NBS) and the evaluation of its compliance with the required overall system performance. Sensitivity analysis was carried out for the objectives to investigate the way and extent of the retardation in the release to biosphere by the effect of NBS, and to clarify the conditions which is sufficient to ensure that the overall system meets safety requirement. The radionuclide transport model in geological media, the sensitivity analysis, and the calculated results of the retardation effect of NBS in terms of the sensitivity parameters are reported. (K.I.)

  12. The Fuel Efficiency of Maritime Transport. Potential for improvement and analysis of barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faber, J.; Nelissen, D.; Smit, M. [CE Delft, Delft (Netherlands); Behrends, B. [Marena Ltd., s.l. (United Kingdom); Lee, D.S. [Manchester Metropolitan University, Machester (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    There is significant potential to improve the fuel efficiency of ships and thus contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from maritime transport. It has long been recognised that this potential is not being fully exploited, owing to the existence of non-market barriers. This report analyses the barriers to implementing fuel efficiency improvements, and concludes that the most important of these are the split incentive between ship owners and operators, a lack of trusted data on new technologies, and transaction costs associated with evaluating measures. As a result, in practice about a quarter of the cost-effective abatement potential is unavailable. There are several ways to overcome these barriers. The split incentive can - to some extent - be overcome by providing more detailed information on the fuel efficiency of vessels, making due allowance for operational profiles. This would allow fuel consumption to be more accurately projected and a larger share of efficiency benefits to accrue to ship owners, thus increasing the return on investment in fuel-saving technologies. This would also require changes to standard charter parties. The credibility of information on new technologies can be improved through intensive collaboration between suppliers of new technologies and shipping companies. In order to overcome risk, government subsidies could provide an incentive. This could have the additional benefit that governments could require publication of results.

  13. Multiplication of shearless barriers for chaotic transport in order to improve confined plasmas in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Caroline G.L.; Roberto, M.; Carvalho, R. Egydio de; Caldas, I.L.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: We present a study that deals with meandering curves which arise after the reconnection process (or overlap) of resonances (1), that occurs only in non-twist discrete maps (2). Meandering curves formed by this kind of process play the role of barriers for chaotic transport in phase space, because inside the meandering region there is a special torus, called shearless torus, known as the strongest torus in a dynamical system (1). We introduce an extra perturbation in the Standard Non-twist Map (3), and we call this new map Labyrinthic Standard Non-twist Map (4). The labyrinthic map proposed in this work shows multiple reconnection processes of resonances, presenting multiple barriers for chaotic transport. Having applications in important areas such as the physics of thermonuclear plasmas confined in tokamaks for the extraction of clean energy. (1) D. del-Castillo-Negrete, J. M. Greene, P. J. Morrison, Physica D 91, 1 (1996) (2) A.J. Lichtenberg and M.A. Lieberman, Regular and Chaotic Dynamics (Springer, New York, 1992) (3) D. Del-Castillo-Negrete and P. J. Morrison, Phys. Fluids A 5, 948 (1993) (4) Caroline G. L. Martins; R. Egydio de Carvalho; I. L. Caldas; M. Roberto. Labyrinthic standard non-twist map. Journal of Physics A, Mathematical and Theoretical, v. 44, p. 045102 (2011). (author)

  14. Influence of ion transport on discharge propagation of nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Weizhuo; Koji, Fukagata

    2017-11-01

    A numerical study has been conducted to understand the streamer formation and propagation of nanosecond pulsed surface dielectric barrier discharge of positive polarity. First we compared the result of different grid configuration to investigate the influence of x and y direction grid spacing on the streamer propagation. The streamer propagation is sensitive to y grid spacing especially at the dielectric surface. The streamer propagation velocity can reach 0.2 cm/ns when the voltage magnitude is 12 kV. A narrow gap was found between the streamer and dielectric barrier, where the plasma density is several orders of magnitude smaller than the streamer region. Analyses on the ion transport in the gap and streamer regions show the different ion transport mechanisms in the two different region. In the gap region, the diffusion of electron toward the dielectric layer decreases the seed electron in the beginning of voltage pulse, resulting that ionization avalanche does not occur. The streamer region is not significantly affected by the diffusion flux toward the dielectric layer, so that ionization avalanche takes place and leads to dramatic increase of plasma density.

  15. Spin-polarized transport in a δ-doped magnetic-barrier nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shuai; Lu, Mao-Wang, E-mail: maowanglu@126.com; Jiang, Ya-Qing; Chen, Sai-Yan

    2014-09-05

    We theoretically investigate the electron spin transport properties through a δ-doped magnetic-barrier nanostructure, which can be realized experimentally by depositing two identical ferromagnetic stripes with the opposite in-plane magnetization on the top of a semiconductor heterostructure in parallel configuration and by using atomic layer doping technique. The δ-doping dependent transmission, conductance and spin polarization are calculated exactly by analytically solving Schrödinger equation of the spin electron. It is found that the electronic spin-polarized behavior in this device can be manipulated by changing the weight and/or the position of the δ-doping. Therefore, such a device can be used as a controllable spin filter, which may be helpful for spintronics applications. - Highlights: • Spin-polarized transport in a δ-doped magnetic-barrier nanostructure is explored. • Both magnitude and sign of spin polarization depend on the δ-doping. • A controllable spin filter can be achieved for spintronics applications.

  16. The Role of P-Glycoprotein in Transport of Danshensu across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Fei Yu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Danshensu (3-(3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl lactic acid, a water-soluble active component isolated from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, is widely used for the treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. The present study aims to investigate the role of P-glycoprotein in transport of Danshensu across the blood-brain barrier. Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with verapamil at a dose of 20 mg kg−1 (verapamil group or the same volume of normal saline (control group. Ninety minutes later, the animals were administrated with Danshensu (15 mg kg−1 by intravenous injection. At 15 min, 30 min, and 60 min after Danshensu administration, the levels of Danshensu in the blood and brain were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS. The results showed that Danshensu concentrations in the brain of the rats pretreated with verapamil were significantly increased. In addition, the brain-plasma ratios of the group pretreated with verapamil were much higher than that of the control group. There was no difference in Danshensu level in plasma between the verapamil group and control group. The findings indicated that Danshensu can pass the blood-brain barrier, and P-glycoprotein plays an important role in Danshensu transportation in brain.

  17. Spin transport and Hanle effect in silicon nanowires using graphene tunnel barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van't Erve, O. M. J.; Friedman, A. L.; Li, C. H.; Robinson, J. T.; Connell, J.; Lauhon, L. J.; Jonker, B. T.

    2015-06-01

    Spin-based devices offer non-volatile, scalable, low power and reprogrammable functionality for emerging device technologies. Here we fabricate nanoscale spintronic devices with ferromagnetic metal/single-layer graphene tunnel barriers used to generate spin accumulation and spin currents in a silicon nanowire transport channel. We report the first observation of spin precession via the Hanle effect in both local three-terminal and non-local spin-valve geometries, providing a direct measure of spin lifetimes and confirmation of spin accumulation and pure spin transport. The use of graphene as the tunnel barrier provides a low-resistance area product contact and clean magnetic switching characteristics, because it smoothly bridges the nanowire and minimizes complicated magnetic domains that otherwise compromise the magnetic behaviour. Utilizing intrinsic two-dimensional layers such as graphene or hexagonal boron nitride as tunnel contacts on nanowires offers many advantages over conventional materials deposited by vapour deposition, enabling a path to highly scaled electronic and spintronic devices.

  18. Simultaneous realization of high density edge transport barrier and improved L-mode on CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Takashi; Okamura, Shoichi; Suzuki, Chihiro

    2008-10-01

    An edge transport barrier (ETB) formation and an improved L-mode (IL mode) have been simultaneously realized in high density region (n-bar e - 1.2x10 20 m -3 ) on Compact Helical System (CHS). When the ETB is formed during the IL mode, the density reduction in the edge region is suppressed by the barrier formation. As a result of the continuous increasing of the temperature by the IL mode, the stored energy during the combined mode increased up to the maximum stored energy (W p - 9.4 kJ) recorded in CHS experiments. The plasma pressure in the peripheral region increases up to three times larger than that of the L-mode, and the large edge plasma pressure gradient is formed accompanying the pedestal structure. That is caused by the anomalous transport reduction that is confirmed from the sharp drop of the density fluctuation in the edge region. The neutral particle reduction in the peripheral region and the metallic impurity accumulation in the core plasma are simultaneously observed during the high density ETB formation. (author)

  19. Measurement and modelling of reactive transport in geological barriers for nuclear waste containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qingrong; Joseph, Claudia; Schmeide, Katja; Jivkov, Andrey P

    2015-11-11

    Compacted clays are considered as excellent candidates for barriers to radionuclide transport in future repositories for nuclear waste due to their very low hydraulic permeability. Diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism, controlled by a nano-scale pore system. Assessment of the clays' long-term containment function requires adequate modelling of such pore systems and their evolution. Existing characterisation techniques do not provide complete pore space information for effective modelling, such as pore and throat size distributions and connectivity. Special network models for reactive transport are proposed here using the complimentary character of the pore space and the solid phase. This balances the insufficient characterisation information and provides the means for future mechanical-physical-chemical coupling. The anisotropy and heterogeneity of clays is represented using different length parameters and percentage of pores in different directions. Resulting networks are described as mathematical graphs with efficient discrete calculus formulation of transport. Opalinus Clay (OPA) is chosen as an example. Experimental data for the tritiated water (HTO) and U(vi) diffusion through OPA are presented. Calculated diffusion coefficients of HTO and uranium species are within the ranges of the experimentally determined data in different clay directions. This verifies the proposed pore network model and validates that uranium complexes are diffusing as neutral species in OPA. In the case of U(vi) diffusion the method is extended to account for sorption and convection. Rather than changing pore radii by coarse grained mathematical formula, physical sorption is simulated in each pore, which is more accurate and realistic.

  20. Effects of insulin on hexose transport across blood-brain barrier in normoglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namba, H.; Lucignani, G.; Nehlig, A.; Patlak, C.; Pettigrew, K.; Kennedy, C.; Sokoloff, L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of insulin on 3-O-[ 14 C] methylglucose transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) were studied in conscious rats under steady-state normoglycemic conditions. The [ 14 C]methylglucose was infused intravenously at a constant rate, and animals were killed at various times between 5 and 30 min after the initiation of the infusion. The time course of the arterial plasma concentration of [ 14 C]methylglucose was determined in timed arterial blood samples taken during the infusion. Local cerebral tissue concentrations of [ 14 C]methylglucose at the time of killing were determined by quantitative autoradiography of brain sections. The rate constants for inward and outward transport of [ 14 C]methylglucose across the BBB, K 1 , and k 2 , respectively, were estimated by a least-squares, best-fit of a kinetic equation to the measured time courses of plasma and tissue concentrations. The equilibrium distribution ration, K 1 /k 2 , for [ 14 C]methylglucose in brain increased by ∼ 10-11% in the hyperinsulinemic animals. Because 3-O-[ 14 C]methylglucose shares the same carrier that transports glucose and other hexoses across the BBB, these results suggest that hyperinsulinemia decreases the rate constants for transport but increases the distribution space for hexoses in brain. These effects are, however, quite small and are probably minor or negligible when compared with the major effects of insulin in other tissues

  1. Alpha Adrenergic Induction of Transport of Lysosomal Enzyme across the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Urayama

    Full Text Available The impermeability of the adult blood-brain barrier (BBB to lysosomal enzymes impedes the ability to treat the central nervous system manifestations of lysosomal storage diseases. Here, we found that simultaneous stimulation of the alpha1 and alpha2 adrenoreceptor restores in adult mice the high rate of transport for the lysosomal enzyme P-GUS that is seen in neonates but lost with development. Beta adrenergics, other monoamines, and acetylcholine did not restore this transport. A high dose (500 microg/mouse of clonidine, a strong alpha2 and weak alpha1 agonist, was able to act as monotherapy in the stimulation of P-GUS transport. Neither use of alpha1 plus alpha2 agonists nor the high dose clonidine disrupted the BBB to albumin. In situ brain perfusion and immunohistochemistry studies indicated that adrengerics act on transporters already at the luminal surface of brain endothelial cells. These results show that adrenergic stimulation, including monotherapy with clonidine, could be key for CNS enzyme replacement therapy.

  2. Hierarchical modeling of plasma and transport phenomena in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, N.; Aggelopoulos, C. A.; Skouras, E. D.; Tsakiroglou, C. D.; Burganos, V. N.

    2017-12-01

    A novel dual-time hierarchical approach is developed to link the plasma process to macroscopic transport phenomena in the interior of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor that has been used for soil remediation (Aggelopoulos et al 2016 Chem. Eng. J. 301 353–61). The generation of active species by plasma reactions is simulated at the microseconds (µs) timescale, whereas convection and thermal conduction are simulated at the macroscopic (minutes) timescale. This hierarchical model is implemented in order to investigate the influence of the plasma DBD process on the transport and reaction mechanisms during remediation of polluted soil. In the microscopic model, the variables of interest include the plasma-induced reactive concentrations, while in the macroscopic approach, the temperature distribution, and the velocity field both inside the discharge gap and within the polluted soil material as well. For the latter model, the Navier–Stokes and Darcy Brinkman equations for the transport phenomena in the porous domain are solved numerically using a FEM software. The effective medium theory is employed to provide estimates of the effective time-evolving and three-phase transport properties in the soil sample. Model predictions considering the temporal evolution of the plasma remediation process are presented and compared with corresponding experimental data.

  3. The international school nurse asthma project: barriers related to asthma management in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svavarsdottir, Erla Kolbrun; Garwick, Ann W; Anderson, Lori S; Looman, Wendy S; Seppelt, Ann; Orlygsdottir, Brynja

    2013-05-01

    This article is a report of an international study of barriers to asthma care from the perspectives of school nurses in Reykjavik, Iceland and St. Paul, Minnesota, in the context of their schools, communities and countries. Globally, asthma affects the health and school performance of many adolescents. School nurses play a key role by providing care to adolescents with asthma in school settings. Understanding universal barriers to asthma management in schools is important for developing interventions that are effective in multiple societal contexts. Exploratory, descriptive study. Parallel studies were conducted from September 2008-January 2009, through six focus groups among school nurses (n = 32, in Reykjavik n = 17 and St. Paul n = 15) who were managing asthma in adolescents. Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim in English or Icelandic. The Icelandic transcripts were translated into English. Descriptive content analytic techniques were used to systematically identify and categorize types of barriers to asthma care. School nurses in both countries identified common barriers, such as time constraints, communication challenges and school staff barriers. The primary difference was that St. Paul school nurses identified more socio-economic and health access barriers than school nurses in Reykjavik. Greater cultural and linguistic diversity and socio-economic differences in the student population in St. Paul and lack of universal healthcare coverage in the US contributed to school nurses' need to focus more on asthma management than school nurses in Reykjavik, who were able to focus more on asthma prevention and education. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. The International School Nurse Asthma Project: Barriers Related to Asthma Management in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svavarsdottir, Erla Kolbrun; Garwick, Ann W.; Anderson, Lori S.; Looman, Wendy S.; Seppelt, Ann; Orlygsdottir, Brynja

    2014-01-01

    Aim This paper is a report of an international study of barriers to asthma care from the perspectives of school nurses in Reykjavik, Iceland and St. Paul, Minnesota, in the context of their schools, communities and countries. Background Globally, asthma affects the health and school performance of many adolescents. School nurses play a key role by providing care to adolescents with asthma in school settings. Understanding universal barriers to asthma management in schools is important for developing interventions that are effective in multiple societal contexts. Design Exploratory, descriptive study. Methods Parallel studies were conducted from September 2008 - January 2009, through six focus groups among school nurses (N=32, in Reykjavik n=17 and St. Paul n=15) who were managing asthma in adolescents. Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim in English or Icelandic. The Icelandic transcripts were translated into English. Descriptive content analytic techniques were used to systematically identify and categorize types of barriers to asthma care. Results School nurses in both countries identified common barriers such as time constraints, communication challenges and school staff barriers. The primary difference was that St. Paul school nurses identified more socioeconomic and health access barriers than school nurses in Reykjavik. Conclusion Greater cultural and linguistic diversity and socioeconomic differences in the student population in St. Paul and lack of universal health care coverage in the U.S. contributed to school nurses’ need to focus more on asthma management than school nurses in Reykjavik, who were able to focus more on asthma prevention and education. PMID:22897444

  5. In Vitro and Ex Vivo Model Systems to Measure ABC Transporter Activity at the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Nienke M; Kooij, Gijs; de Vries, Helga E

    2016-01-01

    With the aging population the occurrence of central nervous system diseases such as cancer, mental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases, is expected to increase and hence, the demand for effective drugs. However, the passage of drugs across the blood-brain barrier represents a major challenge in accomplishing efficient brain delivery of therapeutic agents. This highly efficient barrier is composed of a monolayer of capillary endothelial cells supported by pericytes and astrocytic end-feet, that together effectively shield the brain from the blood. The brain microvascular endothelial cells form a physical and metabolic barrier where paracellular and transcellular transport of molecules in and out of the brain is closely regulated, allowing nutrients to pass but preventing the entry of harmful neurotoxic substances, including drugs. For this purpose brain endothelial cells express efficient efflux pumps, such as ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which limit the delivery of drugs into the brain. To treat the above-mentioned chronic central nervous system disorders, it is crucial to design compounds that can pass the blood-brain barrier and thus the ABC transporters. In order to achieve this, representative models of the blood-brain barrier with predictive validity are necessary. This review discusses the current in vitro and ex vivo model systems that are used to measure ABC transporter activity in order to study potential in vivo efficacy of blood-brain barrier-drug passage.

  6. Transport characteristics of guanidino compounds at the blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier: relevance to neural disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tachikawa Masanori

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Guanidino compounds (GCs, such as creatine, phosphocreatine, guanidinoacetic acid, creatinine, methylguanidine, guanidinosuccinic acid, γ-guanidinobutyric acid, β-guanidinopropionic acid, guanidinoethane sulfonic acid and α-guanidinoglutaric acid, are present in the mammalian brain. Although creatine and phosphocreatine play important roles in energy homeostasis in the brain, accumulation of GCs may induce epileptic discharges and convulsions. This review focuses on how physiologically important and/or neurotoxic GCs are distributed in the brain under physiological and pathological conditions. Transporters for GCs at the blood-brain barrier (BBB and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF barrier (BCSFB have emerged as substantial contributors to GCs distribution in the brain. Creatine transporter (CRT/solute carrier (SLC 6A8 expressed at the BBB regulates creatine concentration in the brain, and represents a major pathway for supply of creatine from the circulating blood to the brain. CRT may be a key factor facilitating blood-to-brain guanidinoacetate transport in patients deficient in S-adenosylmethionine:guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase, the creatine biosynthetic enzyme, resulting in cerebral accumulation of guanidinoacetate. CRT, taurine transporter (TauT/SLC6A6 and organic cation transporter (OCT3/SLC22A3 expressed at the BCSFB are involved in guanidinoacetic acid or creatinine efflux transport from CSF. Interestingly, BBB efflux transport of GCs, including guanidinoacetate and creatinine, is negligible, though the BBB has a variety of efflux transport systems for synthetic precursors of GCs, such as amino acids and neurotransmitters. Instead, the BCSFB functions as a major cerebral clearance system for GCs. In conclusion, transport of GCs at the BBB and BCSFB appears to be the key determinant of the cerebral levels of GCs, and changes in the transport characteristics may cause the abnormal distribution of GCs in the brain seen

  7. Directed transport in a ratchet with internal and chemical freedoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrich, T., E-mail: tdittrich@unal.edu.co [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota D.C. (Colombia); CeiBA-Complejidad, Bogota D.C. (Colombia); Naranjo, N.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota D.C. (Colombia); CeiBA-Complejidad, Bogota D.C. (Colombia)

    2010-10-05

    Graphical abstract: Directed currents in a ratchet including a chemical freedom that provides energy input and an internal freedom modeled as a functional mode of a motor molecule show a direct relation to the structure of the underlying attaractor, limit cycle or chaotic, as reflected in their dependence on the coupling between external and chemical degrees of freedom. - Abstract: We consider mechanisms of directed current in a ratchet model comprising, besides the external freedom where transport occurs, a chemical freedom that replaces the familiar external driving by an autonomous dynamics providing energy input, and an internal freedom representing a functional mode of a motor molecule. The dependence of the current on various parameters is studied in numerical simulations of our model. In particular, we point out the role of the internal freedom as a buffer between energy input and output of mechanical work that allows a temporary storage of injected energy and can contribute to the efficiency of current generation.

  8. Merging Transport Data for Choroid Plexus with Blood-Brain Barrier to Model CNS Homeostasis and Disease More Effectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Conrad; Johanson, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Robust modeling of CNS transport integrates molecular fluxes at the microvascular blood-brain barrier and epithelial choroid plexus blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier. Normal activity of solute transporters, channels and aquaporins, in the cerebral endothelium and choroidal epithelium, sets the microenvironment composition for neurons and glia. Conversely, perturbed transport/permeability at the barrier interfaces causes interstitial fluid dyshomeostasis (e.g. edema) arising in neural disorders. Critically-important transependymal solute/water distribution between brain and CSF needs more attention. This treatise encourages procuring transport data simultaneously for blood-brain barrier, blood-CSF barrier and CSF. In situ perfusion and multicompartmental analyses (tracers, microdialysis) provide dynamic assessments of molecular transfer among various CNS regions. Diffusion, active transport and convection are distorted by disease- and age-associated alterations in barrier permeability and CSF turnover (sink action). Clinical complications result from suboptimal conveyance of micronutrients (folate), catabolites (β-amyloid) and therapeutic agents (antibiotics) within the CNS. Neurorestorative therapies for stroke, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis and brain tumors are facilitated by insight on molecular and cellular trafficking through the choroid plexus-CSF nexus. Knowledge is needed about fluxes of growth factors, neurotrophins, hormones and leukocytes from ventricular CSF into the hippocampus, subventricular zone and hypothalamus. CSF and brain removal of potentially toxic catabolites and neuropeptides merits further investigation to manage the degeneration of Alzheimer's disease and normal pressure hydrocephalus. Novel therapies will rely on delineating peptide and drug distributions across the blood-brain barrier and choroid plexus-CSF, and how they modulate the intervening neural-glial networks and neurogenic sites. Multicompartmental transport

  9. Determination of charge transport activation energy and injection barrier in organic semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züfle, S.; Altazin, S.; Hofmann, A.; Jäger, L.; Neukom, M. T.; Brütting, W.; Ruhstaller, B.

    2017-09-01

    Charge carrier transport in organic semiconductor devices is thermally activated with characteristic activation energies in the range of 0.2-0.6 eV, leading to strongly temperature-dependent behaviour. For designing efficient organic semiconductor materials and devices, it is therefore indispensable to understand the origin of these activation energies. We propose that in bilayer organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) employing a polar electron transport layer, as well as in metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) devices, the hole injection barrier Einj and the hole mobility activation energy Eμ can be decoupled from each other if temperature-dependent capacitance-frequency (C-f-T) and MIS-CELIV (charge extraction by linearly increasing voltage) experiments are combined. While the C-f-T signal contains information of both injection and transport, the CELIV current is expected to be insensitive to the electrode injection properties. We employ numerical drift-diffusion simulations to investigate the accuracy of this analytical parameter extraction approach and to develop criteria for its validity. We show that the implicit assumption of constant charge density and field profiles leads to systematic errors in determining the activation energies. Thus, one should be aware of the intrinsic limitations of the analytical Arrhenius fit, and for more accurate parameter determination a full drift-diffusion modelling is advised. Applying the analytical method to a standard bilayer OLED, we find that the total activation energy of 0.5 eV for the hole current can be split into contributions of ≈0.25 eV each for injection barrier and mobility. Finally, we also discuss the broader applicability of this method for other device stacks and material combinations.

  10. Impairment of brain endothelial glucose transporter by methamphetamine causes blood-brain barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murrin L Charles

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methamphetamine (METH, an addictive psycho-stimulant drug with euphoric effect is known to cause neurotoxicity due to oxidative stress, dopamine accumulation and glial cell activation. Here we hypothesized that METH-induced interference of glucose uptake and transport at the endothelium can disrupt the energy requirement of the blood-brain barrier (BBB function and integrity. We undertake this study because there is no report of METH effects on glucose uptake and transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB to date. Results In this study, we demonstrate that METH-induced disruption of glucose uptake by endothelium lead to BBB dysfunction. Our data indicate that a low concentration of METH (20 μM increased the expression of glucose transporter protein-1 (GLUT1 in primary human brain endothelial cell (hBEC, main component of BBB without affecting the glucose uptake. A high concentration of 200 μM of METH decreased both the glucose uptake and GLUT1 protein levels in hBEC culture. Transcription process appeared to regulate the changes in METH-induced GLUT1 expression. METH-induced decrease in GLUT1 protein level was associated with reduction in BBB tight junction protein occludin and zonula occludens-1. Functional assessment of the trans-endothelial electrical resistance of the cell monolayers and permeability of dye tracers in animal model validated the pharmacokinetics and molecular findings that inhibition of glucose uptake by GLUT1 inhibitor cytochalasin B (CB aggravated the METH-induced disruption of the BBB integrity. Application of acetyl-L-carnitine suppressed the effects of METH on glucose uptake and BBB function. Conclusion Our findings suggest that impairment of GLUT1 at the brain endothelium by METH may contribute to energy-associated disruption of tight junction assembly and loss of BBB integrity.

  11. Facilitators and barriers to adjustment of international nurses: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawi, J; Xu, Y

    2009-06-01

    There is a scarcity of research focusing on issues encountered by international nurses (INs) in their adjustment to foreign health-care environments. Increasingly, INs are relied upon to address staffing shortages in many Western countries. As such, it is vital to identify what facilitates and what the barriers are to the successful adjustment in order to assist their integration into new workplace environments. This integrative review identifies facilitators and barriers encountered by INs as they adjust to foreign health-care environments. Based on Cooper's Five Stages of Integrative Research Review, a systematic search of eight electronic databases was conducted, combined with hand and ancestral searches. Two authors independently reviewed each qualified study for relevance and significance. Subsequently, facilitators and barriers were identified and categorized into themes and subthemes. Twenty-nine studies conducted in Australia, Canada, Iceland, UK and the USA were included in this review. Findings indicated that positive work ethic, persistence, psychosocial and logistical support, learning to be assertive and continuous learning facilitated the adjustment of INs to their new workplace environments. In contrast, language and communication difficulties, differences in culture-based lifeways, lack of support, inadequate orientation, differences in nursing practice and inequality were barriers. The review findings provide the basis for the development and testing of an evidence-informed programme to facilitate the successful adjustment of INs to their new work environments.

  12. Internal resistor of multi-functional tunnel barrier for selectivity and switching uniformity in resistive random access memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangheon; Woo, Jiyong; Lee, Daeseok; Cha, Euijun; Hwang, Hyunsang

    2014-01-01

    In this research, we analyzed the multi-functional role of a tunnel barrier that can be integrated in devices. This tunnel barrier, acting as an internal resistor, changes its resistance with applied bias. Therefore, the current flow in the devices can be controlled by a tunneling mechanism that modifies the tunnel barrier thickness for non-linearity and switching uniformity of devices. When a device is in a low-resistance state, the tunnel barrier controls the current behavior of the device because most of the bias is applied to the tunnel barrier owing to its higher resistance. Furthermore, the tunnel barrier induces uniform filament formation during set operation with the tunnel barrier controlling the current flow.

  13. 8th International symposium on transport phenomena in combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The 8th International Symposium on Transport Phenomena in Combustion will be held in San Francisco, California, U.S.A., July 16-20, 1995, under the auspices of the Pacific Center of Thermal-Fluids Engineering. The purpose of the Symposium is to provide a forum for researchers and practitioners from around the world to present new developments and discuss the state of the art and future directions and priorities in the areas of transport phenomena in combustion. The Symposium is the eighth in a series; previous venues were Honolulu 1985, Tokyo 1987, Taipei 1988, Sydney 1991, Beijing 1992, Seoul 1993 and Acapulco 1994, with emphasis on various aspects of transport phenomena. The current Symposium theme is combustion. The Symposium has assembled a balanced program with topics ranging from fundamental research to contemporary applications of combustion theory. Invited keynote lecturers will provide extensive reviews of topics of great interest in combustion. Colloquia will stress recent advances and innovations in fire spread and suppression, and in low NO{sub x} burners, furnaces, boilers, internal combustion engines, and other practical combustion systems. Finally, numerous papers will contribute to the fundamental understanding of complex processes in combustion. This document contains abstracts of papers to be presented at the Symposium.

  14. Transporter-Guided Delivery of Nanoparticles to Improve Drug Permeation across Cellular Barriers and Drug Exposure to Selective Cell Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longfa Kou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted nano-drug delivery systems conjugated with specific ligands to target selective cell-surface receptors or transporters could enhance the efficacy of drug delivery and therapy. Transporters are expressed differentially on the cell-surface of different cell types, and also specific transporters are expressed at higher than normal levels in selective cell types under pathological conditions. They also play a key role in intestinal absorption, delivery via non-oral routes (e.g., pulmonary route and nasal route, and transfer across biological barriers (e.g., blood–brain barrier and blood–retinal barrier. As such, the cell-surface transporters represent ideal targets for nano-drug delivery systems to facilitate drug delivery to selective cell types under normal or pathological conditions and also to avoid off-target adverse side effects of the drugs. There is increasing evidence in recent years supporting the utility of cell-surface transporters in the field of nano-drug delivery to increase oral bioavailability, to improve transfer across the blood–brain barrier, and to enhance delivery of therapeutics in a cell-type selective manner in disease states. Here we provide a comprehensive review of recent advancements in this interesting and important area. We also highlight certain key aspects that need to be taken into account for optimal development of transporter-assisted nano-drug delivery systems.

  15. Evolutionarily Conserved Roles for Blood-Brain Barrier Xenobiotic Transporters in Endogenous Steroid Partitioning and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Samantha J; Munji, Roeben N; Dolghih, Elena; Gaskins, Garrett; Orng, Souvinh; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Soung, Allison; DeSalvo, Michael; Kitamoto, Toshihiro; Keiser, Michael J; Jacobson, Matthew P; Daneman, Richard; Bainton, Roland J

    2017-10-31

    Central nervous system (CNS) chemical protection depends upon discrete control of small-molecule access by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Curiously, some drugs cause CNS side-effects despite negligible transit past the BBB. To investigate this phenomenon, we asked whether the highly BBB-enriched drug efflux transporter MDR1 has dual functions in controlling drug and endogenous molecule CNS homeostasis. If this is true, then brain-impermeable drugs could induce behavioral changes by affecting brain levels of endogenous molecules. Using computational, genetic, and pharmacologic approaches across diverse organisms, we demonstrate that BBB-localized efflux transporters are critical for regulating brain levels of endogenous steroids and steroid-regulated behaviors (sleep in Drosophila and anxiety in mice). Furthermore, we show that MDR1-interacting drugs are associated with anxiety-related behaviors in humans. We propose a general mechanism for common behavioral side effects of prescription drugs: pharmacologically challenging BBB efflux transporters disrupts brain levels of endogenous substrates and implicates the BBB in behavioral regulation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 78 FR 68501 - International Standards on the Transport of Dangerous Goods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ... sessions, can be found on the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Transport Division Web... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration International Standards on the Transport of Dangerous Goods DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health...

  17. 75 FR 19671 - International Standards on the Transport of Dangerous Goods; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    ... Administration International Standards on the Transport of Dangerous Goods; Public Meeting AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice of public... (IAEA). [cir] Global harmonization of transport of dangerous goods regulations with the Model...

  18. 19 CFR 351.515 - Internal transport and freight charges for export shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Internal transport and freight charges for export shipments. (a) Benefit—(1) In general. In the case of internal transport and freight charges on export shipments, a benefit exists to the extent that the charges... receipt of benefit. In the case of internal transport and freight charges for export shipments, the...

  19. Brief communication "Stratospheric winds, transport barriers and the 2011 Arctic ozone hole"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Olascoaga

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic stratosphere throughout the late winter and early spring of 2011 was characterized by an unusually severe ozone loss, resulting in what has been described as an ozone hole. The 2011 ozone loss was made possible by unusually cold temperatures throughout the Arctic stratosphere. Here we consider the issue of what constitutes suitable environmental conditions for the formation and maintenance of a polar ozone hole. Our discussion focuses on the importance of the stratospheric wind field and, in particular, the importance of a high latitude zonal jet, which serves as a meridional transport barrier both prior to ozone hole formation and during the ozone hole maintenance phase. It is argued that stratospheric conditions in the boreal winter/spring of 2011 were highly unusual inasmuch as in that year Antarctic-like Lagrangian dynamics led to the formation of a boreal ozone hole.

  20. Application of the "Behind the Barriers" resilience conceptual model to a flooded rail transport system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzva, Michael; Barroca, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    The vulnerability of guided transport systems facing natural hazards is a burning issue for the urban risks management. Experience feedbacks on guided transport systems show they are particularly vulnerable to natural risks, especially flood risks. Besides, the resilience concept is used as a systemic approach for making an accurate analysis of the effect of these natural risks on rail guided transport systems. In this context, several conceptual models of resilience are elaborated for presenting the various possible resilience strategies applied to urban technical systems. One of this resilience conceptual model is the so-called "Behind The Barriers" model based on the identification of four complementary types of resilience: (i) cognitive resilience, linked to knowledge of the risk and the potential failures; (ii) functional resilience, representing the capacity of a system to protect itself from damage while continuing to provide services; (iii) correlative resilience, that characterises the relationship between service demand and the capacity of the system to respond; (iv) organisational resilience, expressing the capacity to mobilise an area much wider than the one affected. In addition to the work already published during the 7th Resilience Engineering Symposium, the purpose of this paper is to offer an application of a resilience conceptual model, the "Behind the Barriers" model, relating to a specific urban technical system, the public guided transport system, and facing a particular risk, a flood hazard. To do that, the paper is focused on a past incident on a French Intercity railway line as a studied case. Indeed, on June 18th and 19th 2013, the rise of the level of the "Gave de Pau" river, located in the municipality of Coarraze, caused many disorders on the intercity line serving the cities of Tarbes, Pau and Lourdes . Among the disorders caused by the flooding, about 100 meters of railway embankments were collapsed. With a constraint to reopen the

  1. A multi-purpose unit concept to integrate storage, transportation, and the engineered barrier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollaway, W.R.; Rozier, R.; Nitti, D.A.; Williams, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Multi-Purpose Unit (MPU) is a new concept for standardizing and integrating the waste management functions of spent fuel storage, transportation, and geologic disposal. The MPU concept would use one unit, composed of a relatively thick-walled inner canister with a multi-purpose overpack, to meet the requirements for storage in 10 CFR 72, transportation in 10 CFR 71, and the engineered barrier system in 10 CFR 60. The MPU concept differs from the recently proposed Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) concept in that the MPU concept uses a single multi-purpose overpack for storage, transportation, and geologic disposal, while the MPC concept uses separate and unique overpacks for each of these system functions. A design concept for the MPU is presented along with an estimate of unit costs. An initial evaluation of overall system cost showed that the MPU concept could be economically competitive with the current reference system. The MPU concept provides the potential for significant reduction, simplification, and standardization of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWMS) facilities and operations, including those at the utilities, during waste acceptance and transportation, and at the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility and the repository. The primary issues for the MPU concept relate to uncertainties with respect to licensing, and the programmatic risks associated with implementing the MPU concept before the repository design is finalized. The strong potential exhibited by the MPU concept demonstrates that this option merits additional development and should be considered in the next phase of work on multi-purpose concepts for the CRWMS

  2. Upregulation of zinc transporter 2 in the blood-CSF barrier following lead exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xue; Zeng, Andrew; Zheng, Wei; Du, Yansheng

    2014-02-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential element for normal brain function; an abnormal Zn homeostasis in brain and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been implied in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanisms that regulate Zn transport in the blood-brain interface remain unknown. This study was designed to investigate Zn transport by the blood-CSF barrier (BCB) in the choroid plexus, with a particular focus on Zn transporter-2 (ZnT2), and to understand if lead (Pb) accumulation in the choroid plexus disturbed the Zn regulatory function in the BCB. Confocal microscopy, quantitative PCR and western blot demonstrated the presence of ZnT2 in the choroidal epithelia; ZnT2 was primarily in cytosol in freshly isolated plexus tissues but more toward the peripheral membrane in established choroidal Z310 cells. Exposure of rats to Pb (single ip injection of 50 mg Pb acetate/kg) for 24 h increased ZnT2 fluorescent signals in plexus tissues by confocal imaging and protein expression by western blot. Similar results were obtained by in vitro experiments using Z310 cells. Further studies using cultured cells and a two-chamber Transwell device showed that Pb treatment significantly reduced the cellular Zn concentration and led to an increased transport of Zn across the BCB, the effect that may be due to the increased ZnT2 by Pb exposure. Taken together, these results indicate that ZnT2 is present in the BCB; Pb exposure increases the ZnT2 expression in choroidal epithelial cells by a yet unknown mechanism and as a result, more Zn ions may be deposited into the intracellular Zn pool, leading to a relative Zn deficiency state in the cytoplasm at the BCB.

  3. Intercontinental nuclear transport from the private international law perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnus, U.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give a survey on choice of law rules which apply outside the nuclear liability conventions in case of damage caused by international nuclear transports. We found a remarkable variety of solutions. Some of the solutions make it difficult or even impossible to predict in advance which substantive law in a hypothetical case would apply. These difficulties are increased by the fact that more often than not, a victim can choose where to sue and thereby also influence the final outcome of a case. As far as private international law rules apply - and as mentioned the non-ratification of the nuclear liability conventions by many nuclear states forces us to fall back on the choice of law rules in many cases - the applicable law and the hypothetical level of compensation therefore often remain uncertain when judged at the time of organisation of the nuclear transport. However, at this time the question of undertaking risks and of insurability must be decided. (author)

  4. Impaired Amino Acid Transport at the Blood Brain Barrier Is a Cause of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tărlungeanu, Dora C; Deliu, Elena; Dotter, Christoph P; Kara, Majdi; Janiesch, Philipp Christoph; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Galluccio, Michele; Tesulov, Mateja; Morelli, Emanuela; Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Bilguvar, Kaya; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Johansen, Anide; Esharif, Seham; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Topcu, Meral; Schlessinger, Avner; Indiveri, Cesare; Duncan, Kent E; Caglayan, Ahmet Okay; Gunel, Murat; Gleeson, Joseph G; Novarino, Gaia

    2016-12-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of genetic disorders often overlapping with other neurological conditions. We previously described abnormalities in the branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolic pathway as a cause of ASD. Here, we show that the solute carrier transporter 7a5 (SLC7A5), a large neutral amino acid transporter localized at the blood brain barrier (BBB), has an essential role in maintaining normal levels of brain BCAAs. In mice, deletion of Slc7a5 from the endothelial cells of the BBB leads to atypical brain amino acid profile, abnormal mRNA translation, and severe neurological abnormalities. Furthermore, we identified several patients with autistic traits and motor delay carrying deleterious homozygous mutations in the SLC7A5 gene. Finally, we demonstrate that BCAA intracerebroventricular administration ameliorates abnormal behaviors in adult mutant mice. Our data elucidate a neurological syndrome defined by SLC7A5 mutations and support an essential role for the BCAA in human brain function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of the Explosive Internal Impact on the Barriers of Building Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwiński, Jarosław; Stolarski, Adam

    2017-10-01

    Work issues concern the safety of construction in relation to the hazards arising from explosion of the explosive charge located inside the building. The algorithms proposed in the paper for determining the parameters of the overpressure wave resulting from the detonation of clustered explosive charges, determine the basis for numerical simulation analyzes. Determination of the maximum value of peak pressure on the wave forehead of an internal explosion is presented on the basis of reflected wave analysis. Changeability in time of the internal explosion action describes the overpressure phase only. The analysis of the load caused by the internal explosive charge detonation was carried out under conditions of the undisturbed standard atmosphere. A load determination algorithm has been developed, taking into account the geometrical characteristics of the building barriers and the rooms as well as the parameters of environment in which the detonation occurs. The way of taking into account the influence of venting surfaces, i.e. windows, doors, ventilation ducts, on the overpressure wave parameters, was presented. Discloses a method to take into account the effect of the surface relief, i.e. windows, doors, air ducts, pressure wave parameters. Modification of the method for explosive overpressure determination presented by Cormie, Smith, Mays (2009), was proposed in the paper. This modification was developed on the basis of substitute impulse analysis for multiple overpressure pulses. In order to take into account the pressure distribution of explosive gases on the barrier surface, the method of modification the relationship for determination the changeability over time and space of the pressure of explosive gases, was presented. For this purpose, the changeability of the pressure wave angles of incidence to the barrier and the distance of the explosive charge to any point on the surface of the barrier, was taken into account. Based on the developed procedure, the

  6. Theoretical Compartment Modeling of DCE-MRI Data Based on the Transport across Physiological Barriers in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Fanea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders represent major causes of lost years of healthy life and mortality worldwide. Development of their quantitative interdisciplinary in vivo evaluation is required. Compartment modeling (CM of brain data acquired in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging techniques with clinically available contrast agents can be performed to quantitatively assess brain perfusion. Transport of 1H spins in water molecules across physiological compartmental brain barriers in three different pools was mathematically modeled and theoretically evaluated in this paper and the corresponding theoretical compartment modeling of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI data was analyzed. The pools considered were blood, tissue, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. The blood and CSF data were mathematically modeled assuming continuous flow of the 1H spins in these pools. Tissue data was modeled using three CMs. Results in this paper show that transport across physiological brain barriers such as the blood to brain barrier, the extracellular space to the intracellular space barrier, or the blood to CSF barrier can be evaluated quantitatively. Statistical evaluations of this quantitative information may be performed to assess tissue perfusion, barriers' integrity, and CSF flow in vivo in the normal or disease-affected brain or to assess response to therapy.

  7. Mesoscale plasma dynamics, transport barriers and zonal flows: simulations and paradigms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thyagaraja, A.; Knight, P.J. [Euratom/Ukaea Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX (United Kingdom); Loureiro, N. [Plasma Physics Group, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-06-01

    Tokamaks are magnetic confinement fusion devices which seek to produce power from fusion reactions between the isotopes of hydrogen (deuterium and tritium). The understanding of turbulent transport processes which govern the energy, momentum and current distributions in tokamak plasmas is important to optimising the economically viable design of future power plants based on the tokamak concept. With the advent of powerful modern computers it has become possible to model the plasma dynamics on the so-called 'mesoscale' which consists of electromagnetic turbulence with wavelengths intermediate to the ion gyro radius and the system size of typical tokamaks. This paper attempts to describe one such approach which evolves the two-fluid model of a tokamak plasma globally (i.e., both on the macro-scale and the mesoscale), using a nonlinear, electromagnetic, three-dimensional code CUTIE. Recent researches, both theoretical and experimental, on tokamaks indicate the spontaneous (or, externally induced) generation of so-called 'zonal flows', which, under well-defined conditions, can lead to substantial reduction of turbulent transport in localized regions known as transport barriers. This type of confinement enhancement is of great importance in the design and construction of practical fusion power plants and has been the subject of intensive study. In addition to the computational approach based on CUTIE simulations, we also describe some simpler paradigmatic models which are designed to illustrate the genesis of zonal flows by characteristic drift wave fluctuations and the effects of such highly sheared advective flows on the system dynamics. These models help one to understand in a much clearer fashion the rather complex processes simulated by CUTIE. (authors)

  8. Optimization of transport suppression barriers generated by externally driven Alfven waves in D-shaped, low aspect ratio tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruma, C; Cuperman, S; Komoshvili, K

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to optimize the internal transport barriers (ITBs) generated by externally launched mode-converted fast waves (FWs) in pre-heated spherical tokamaks (STs), we have carried out a systematic parametric investigation with respect to the rf waves and antenna characteristics; as a study case, a START-like device has been considered. Within the framework of a plasma model including both kinetic effects (collisionless Landau damping on passing electrons) and collisional damping on both trapped and passing electrons and ions, and starting with the solution of the full wave equation for a ST-plasma, we show that optimized ITBs, suitable for the stabilization of plasma turbulence (e.g. overpassing the maximum growth rate of the ITG-instability, γ ITG ) in STs can be generated by the aid of externally launched FW and mode-converted to kinetic Alfven waves. This result holds in spite of the limiting trapped-particles associated squeezing factor S present in the non-linear equation for E r (via the viscosity coefficient μ θi ∝|S| 3/2 , S = S(dE r /dr))

  9. A reassessment of the blood-brain barrier transport of large neutral amino acids during acute systemic inflammation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Rasmus H; Berg, Ronan M G; Taudorf, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    We reassessed data from a previous study on the transcerebral net exchange of large neutral amino acids (LNAAs) using a novel mathematical model of blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport. The study included twelve healthy volunteers who received a 4-h intravenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion (t...

  10. The enzymatic degradation and transport of leucine-enkephalin and 4-imidazolidinone enkephalin prodrugs at the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, L.; Bak, A.; Friis, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    In this study, the stability in and transport across a cell culture model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is investigated for leucine-enkephalin (Leu-enkephalin) and four 4-imidazolidinone prodrugs of Leu-enkephalin. The results show that Leu-enkephalin is degraded in the cell culture model...

  11. Language barriers and professional identity: A qualitative interview study of newly employed international medical doctors and Norwegian colleagues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjeggestad, Erik; Gerwing, Jennifer; Gulbrandsen, Pål

    2017-08-01

    To explore how language barriers influence communication and collaboration between newly-employed international medical doctors and Norwegian health personnel. Interviews were conducted with 16 doctors who had recently started working in Norway and 12 Norwegian born health personnel who had extensive experience working with international medical doctors. Analyses were consistent with principles of systematic text condensation. All participants experienced that language barriers caused difficulties in their everyday collaboration. Furthermore, the participants' descriptions of "language barriers" encompassed a wide range of topics, including semantics (e.g., specialized professional vocabulary, system knowledge), pragmatics (e.g., using language in doctor-patient and interprofessional interactions), and specific culturally sensitive topics. All participants described that language barriers provoked uncertainty about a doctor's competence. Newly employed international medical doctors and their colleagues are concerned by ineffective communication due to language barriers. Experiences of language barriers threaten professional identity as a competent and effective doctor. Newly employed doctors who are non-native speakers could benefit from support in understanding and handling the array of barriers related to language. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of Transporters in Central Nervous System Drug Delivery and Blood-Brain Barrier Protection: Relevance to Treatment of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje Brzica

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The only approved pharmacologic treatment for ischemic stroke is thrombolysis via recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA. A short therapeutic window and serious adverse events (ie, hemorrhage, excitotoxicity greatly limit r-tPA therapy, which indicates an essential need to develop novel stroke treatment paradigms. Transporters expressed at the blood-brain barrier (BBB provide a significant opportunity to advance stroke therapy via central nervous system delivery of drugs that have neuroprotective properties. Examples of such transporters include organic anion–transporting polypeptides (Oatps and organic cation transporters (Octs. In addition, multidrug resistance proteins (Mrps are transporter targets in brain microvascular endothelial cells that can be exploited to preserve BBB integrity in the setting of stroke. Here, we review current knowledge on stroke pharmacotherapy and demonstrate how endogenous BBB transporters can be targeted for improvement of ischemic stroke treatment.

  13. Zebrafish as a visual and dynamic model to study the transport of nanosized drug delivery systems across the biological barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Miao, Xiaoqing; Chen, Tongkai; Yi, Xiang; Wang, Ruibing; Zhao, Haitao; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen; Wang, Xueqing; Zheng, Ying

    2017-08-01

    With the wide application of nanotechnology to drug delivery systems, a simple, dynamic and visual in vivo model for high-throughput screening of novel formulations with fluorescence markers across biological barriers is desperately needed. In vitro cell culture models have been widely used, although they are far from a complimentary in vivo system. Mammalian animal models are common predictive models to study transport, but they are costly and time consuming. Zebrafish (Danio rerio), a small vertebrate model, have the potential to be developed as an "intermediate" model for quick evaluations. Based on our previously established coumarin 6 nanocrystals (C6-NCs), which have two different sizes, the present study investigates the transportation of C6-NCs across four biological barriers, including the chorion, blood brain barrier (BBB), blood retinal barrier (BRB) and gastrointestinal (GI) barrier, using zebrafish embryos and larvae as in vivo models. The biodistribution and elimination of C6 from different organs were quantified in adult zebrafish. The results showed that compared to 200nm C6-NCs, 70nm C6-NCs showed better permeability across these biological barriers. A FRET study suggested that intact C6-NCs together with the free dissolved form of C6 were absorbed into the larval zebrafish. More C6 was accumulated in different organs after incubation with small sized NCs via lipid raft-mediated endocytosis in adult zebrafish, which is consistent with the findings from in vitro cell monolayers and the zebrafish larvae model. C6-NCs could be gradually eliminated in each organ over time. This study demonstrated the successful application of zebrafish as a simple and dynamic model to simultaneously assess the transport of nanosized drug delivery systems across several biological barriers and biodistribution in different organs, especially in the brain, which could be used for central nervous system (CNS) drug and delivery system screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  14. Visualisation and Quantification of Transport in Barrier Rocks with Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulenkampff, J.; Gajewski, C.; Gründig, M.; Lippmann-Pipke, J.; Mittmann, H.; Richter, M.; Wolf, M.

    2009-04-01

    In tight barrier rocks laboratory observation of radionuclide transport and determination of transport parameters is a demanding and interminable task, because of slow rates, small concentrations, and intricate chemical interactions. The validity of results from common laboratory methods, like flow- and diffusion experiments on small samples, is limited by the heterogeneity of the pathways and adherent upscaling issues, because homogeneous conditions have to be presumed for these input-output investigations. But nano-pores or micro-fractures could be present, which would provide pathways for heterogeneous transport processes. Transport properties of these pathways are most influential boundary conditions for reactions between fluid components and crystal surfaces. We propose Positron Emission Tomography (GEO-PET) as an appropriate method for direct observation of heterogeneous transport of radiotracers in tight material on the laboratory scale. With high-resolution PET scanners, which are common instruments of biomedical research ("small animal PET"), it is possible to determine the spatio-temporal distribution of the tracer activity with a resolution of almost 1 mm during about three periods of the tracer half-life (half-lives of some applicable PET tracers: 18F: 1.8 h, 124I: 4.2 days, 58Co: 70.8 days). The PET tracer is applied as ion in solution or as marker for compounds, like colloids. The most considerable difference between PET applications on geomaterial compared to biological tissue is the stronger attenuation and scattering of radiation because of the higher density of rock material. After travelling the positron attenuation length in dense material (about 1 mm), the positron annihilates in contact with an electron, transmitting two photons with 511 keV, propagating in antiparallel direction. The sample size of geomaterial is limited by the attenuation length of these photons. By applying an appropriate attenuation correction it is possible to investigate

  15. Breaking down the barriers to commercialization of fuel cells in transportation through Government - industry R&D programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalk, S.G. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Venkateswaran, S.R. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    PEM fuel cell technology is rapidly emerging as a viable propulsion alternative to the internal combustion engine. Fuel cells offer the advantages of low emissions, high efficiency, fuel flexibility, quiet and continuous operation, and modularity. Over the last decade, dramatic advances have been achieved in the performance and cost of PEM fuel cell technologies for automotive applications. However, significant technical barriers remain to making fuel cell propulsion systems viable alternatives to the internal combustion engine. This paper focuses on the progress achieved and remaining technical barriers while highlighting Government-industry R&D efforts that are accelerating fuel cell technology toward commercialization.

  16. The Role of Air Transport in the Development of International Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Zajac

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There are close links between air transport and international tourism. The latter, in a significant way has an impact on the development and stimulation of changes in aviation and, in particular, this applies to establishing new routes or increasing competition by the emergence of new air carriers. The essence of aviation is manifested in the aviation business travel and learning about the new States. Therefore, a change that has been made in aviation in the second half of the 20th century is a breakthrough. It is about a liberalization of this sector, which has enabled the development of international tourism. There are plenty of benefits for the development of tourism coming from the liberalization of aviation sector. Thanks to competitive prices and continually increasing offer of air connections to various places in the world, demand for tourism is growing trend. Among the factors hampering the development of aviation tourism, the following should be included: maintaining the visa requirement for many countries, the threat of terrorist attacks, a set of factors in the structure of tourism and safety issue. When it comes to Europe, along with the implementation of the common policy of the European Union, the sector of the tourism industry started to develop. Eliminating internal barriers and the gradual implementation of the freedom of movement of persons, services and capital has led to an increase in the demand for tourism in the EU. Europe is an attractive tourist destination in the world.

  17. Involvement of Carrier-Mediated Transport at the Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier in Spermine Clearance from Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanuma, Shin-Ichi; Shimada, Hirokazu; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    Spermine is the end-product in the polyamine biosynthetic pathway, and its excess accumulation induces neuroexcitatory responses and neurotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the involvement of transport systems at the brain barriers in the clearance of spermine. In vivo rat spermine elimination from brain parenchyma across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCSFB) was assessed by intracerebral and intracerebroventricular administration techniques, respectively. To characterize spermine transport at the BCSFB, a transport study using rat choroid plexus was performed. After the intracerebral microinjection of [ 3 H]spermine, no time-dependent decrease in [ 3 H]spermine in the ipsilateral cerebrum was observed, suggesting the low contribution of the BBB to spermine clearance from the brain. In contrast, the [ 3 H]spermine concentration in the CSF after intracerebroventricular administration was time-dependently decreased with an elimination rate constant of 0.352 min -1 , and the elimination clearance of [ 3 H]spermine was 6.6-fold greater than that of [ 14 C]D-mannitol, reflecting bulk flow of the CSF. This [ 3 H]spermine elimination was attenuated by co-administration of unlabeled excess spermine, indicating carrier-mediated elimination of spermine from the CSF. [ 3 H]Spermine transport into the choroid plexus was strongly inhibited by unlabeled spermine, other polyamines (spermidine and putrescine), and organic cation transporter substrates such as corticosterone and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium. However, other substrates/inhibitors for organic cation transporters (decynium-22 and tetraethylammonium) had little effect. Consequently, our study indicates that transporting molecules at the BCSFB, distinct from typical organic cation transporters, are involved in spermine clearance from the CSF.

  18. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A ampersand M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each use, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document. 22 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  19. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each case, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document.

  20. Scientific English: a program for addressing linguistic barriers of international research trainees in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Carrie; Chang, Shine; Pagel, Walter

    2011-03-01

    Within the international research environment, English is indisputably the lingua franca, and thus, the majority of the world's scientists must adapt to a second language. Linguistic barriers in science affect not only researchers' career paths but institutional productivity and efficiency as well. To address these barriers, we designed and piloted a specialized course, Scientific English. The pedagogical approach is based on English for specific purposes methodology in which curriculum and content are driven by the types of daily language used and interactions which occur in the participants' occupation, in this case, cancer research. The 11-week program was organized into three sections: presentation skill, meeting and discussion skills, and writing skills. Effectiveness of the course was measured by the number of participants able to produce the presentations and written products with a score of at least 75 of 100 possible points. From January to December 2008, participant scores averaged 90.4 for presentation and 86.8 for written products. The authors provide insights and recommendations on the development and delivery of the program.

  1. Facilitators and Barriers to International Collaboration in Spinal Cord Injury: Results from a Survey of Clinicians and Researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, Vanessa K; Chan, Elaine; Bassett-Spiers, Kent; Berlowitz, David J; Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Charlifue, Susan; Graco, Marnie; Hayes, Keith C; Horsewell, Jane; Joshi, Phalgun; Markelis, Debora; Smith, Verna; Waheed, Zeina; Brown, Douglas J

    2018-02-01

    International collaboration in spinal cord injury (SCI) research is necessary to overcome the challenges often encountered by clinicians and researchers, including participant recruitment, high cost, and the need for specialized expertise. However, international collaboration poses its own obstacles. The objective of this study was to conduct an international online survey to assess barriers and facilitators to international SCI clinical research, potential initiatives to facilitate future collaborations, and the use of SCI-specific data sets and standards. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Of 364 total respondents, 213 completed the survey, with the majority of these participants based in North America (38%), Asia (22%), Europe (18%), and Oceania (16%). Over half had more than 10 years of experience in SCI research or clinical practice (57%) and 60% had previous experience with international collaborations. Funding was identified as a top barrier (82%), a facilitator (93%), and a proposed future initiative (97%). Communication and technology were also identified as strong facilitators and proposed future initiatives. The International Standards for Neurological Classification of SCI were used by 69% of participants, the International Standards to document remaining Autonomic Function after SCI by 13% of participants, and the International SCI Data Sets by 45% of participants. As the need for international collaborations in SCI research increases, it is important to identify how clinicians and researchers can be supported by SCI consumer and professional organizations, funders, and networks. Furthermore, unique solutions to overcome modifiable barriers and creation of new facilitators are also needed.

  2. THE ROLE AND THE IMPORTANCE OF THE LOGISTICS PLATFORM IN THE INTERN AND INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LĂPĂDUŞI MIHAELA LOREDANA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The logistics of the company is a challenge and in the same time a necessity for its introduction the management activity, which in our opinion means more than the simple supply with merchandise of the means due to the fact that the manager of the company ,that has logistics problems, must know very well which are the existent internal and external infrastructures and that are organized in logistic platforms that will be introduced in the company strategy, for the saving of the resources and the surface sizing storage. The aim of this paper is to highlight the fact that the creation of an effective logistics system by a company lead to the decrease of the negative effects of the merchandise transportation and also the creation of the conditions for a sustainable development. This is projected so that it allows the usage of an informational system that enables the application of some effective programs for optimal routing of the means of transportation for the accomplishment of the proposed objectives, meaning the transportation of the merchandise to the beneficiary at the established deadlines and in quality conditions. The insurance of the transportation of the merchandise to the clients in safety and quality conditions requires that the logistics manager of the company assures logistics platforms as effective solutions for the saving of the resources; these represent objectives of the logistic system that realizes shipment operations of the merchandise stored, packed, sorted and grouped with the view of shipping them to the beneficiaries (clients.

  3. High density high performance plasma with internal diffusion barrier in Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, R.; Kobayashi, M.; Miyazawa, J.

    2008-10-01

    A attractive high density plasma operational regime, namely an internal diffusion barrier (IDB), has been discovered in the intrinsic helical divertor configuration on the Large Helical Device (LHD). The IDB which enables core plasma to access a high density/high pressure regime has been developed. It is revealed that the IDB is reproducibly formed by pellet fueling in the magnetic configurations shifted outward in major radius. Attainable central plasma density exceeds 1x10 21 m -3 . Central pressure reaches 1.5 times atmospheric pressure and the central β value becomes fairly high even at high magnetic field, i.e. β(0)=5.5% at B t =2.57 T. (author)

  4. Carrier-mediated cocaine transport at the blood-brain barrier as a putative mechanism in addiction liability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapy, Hélène; Smirnova, Maria; André, Pascal; Schlatter, Joël; Chiadmi, Fouad; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Declèves, Xavier; Cisternino, Salvatore

    2014-10-31

    The rate of entry of cocaine into the brain is a critical factor that influences neuronal plasticity and the development of cocaine addiction. Until now, passive diffusion has been considered the unique mechanism known by which cocaine crosses the blood-brain barrier. We reassessed mechanisms of transport of cocaine at the blood-brain barrier using a human cerebral capillary endothelial cell line (hCMEC/D3) and in situ mouse carotid perfusion. Both in vivo and in vitro cocaine transport studies demonstrated the coexistence of a carrier-mediated process with passive diffusion. At pharmacological exposure level, passive diffusion of cocaine accounted for only 22.5% of the total cocaine influx in mice and 5.9% in hCMEC/D3 cells, whereas the carrier-mediated influx rate was 3.4 times greater than its passive diffusion rate in vivo. The functional identification of this carrier-mediated transport demonstrated the involvement of a proton antiporter that shared the properties of the previously characterized clonidine and nicotine transporter. The functionnal characterization suggests that the solute carrier (SLC) transporters Oct (Slc22a1-3), Mate (Slc47a1) and Octn (Slc22a4-5) are not involved in the cocaine transport in vivo and in vitro. Diphenhydramine, heroin, tramadol, cocaethylene, and norcocaine all strongly inhibited cocaine transport, unlike benzoylecgonine. Trans-stimulation studies indicated that diphenhydramine, nicotine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (ecstasy) and the cathinone compound 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) were also substrates of the cocaine transporter. Cocaine transport at the BBB involves a proton-antiporter flux that is quantitatively much more important than its passive diffusion. The molecular identification and characterization of this transporter will provide new tools to understand its role in addictive mechanisms. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e

  5. 76 FR 68829 - International Standards on the Transport of Dangerous Goods; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... Dangerous Goods; Public Meeting AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice is to advise interested... International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Global harmonization of transport of dangerous goods regulations...

  6. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement - 5. International meeting. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this fifth international meeting is to bring again together specialists in the different disciplines related to clays and clay minerals, with scientists from organizations engaged in disposal of radioactive waste in order to evaluate the progress of the research conducted in that field. Multidisciplinary approaches including geology, mineralogy, geochemistry, rheology, physics and chemistry of clay minerals and assemblages are required in order to provide a detailed characterization of the geological host formations considered for the disposal of radioactive waste and to assess the behaviour of engineered and natural barriers when submitted to various types of perturbations induced by such facilities. The evaluation of the performances of the natural barrier as well as of the impact of repository-induced disturbances upon the confinement properties of clay-rich geological formations constitute major objectives for the experimental programs being and/or to be conducted in underground research laboratories, for interpreting the subsequent scientific results, for modelling the long-term behaviour of radioactive waste repositories and carrying out safety assessment exercises. The meeting covers all the aspects of clay characterization and behaviour considered at various times and space scales relevant to confinement of radionuclides in clay from basic phenomenological processes description, to the global understanding of the performance and safety at repository and geological scales. Special emphasis will be put on the modelling of processes occurring at the mineralogical level within the clay barriers. The topics covered by the program of the meeting are also supposed to be coherent with the general objectives proposed within the Strategic Research Agenda elaborated through the Implementing Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste Technology Platform (IGD-TP). In this context, the meeting will also offer a particular opportunity to present the more

  7. Moving beyond the language barrier: the communication strategies used by international medical graduates in intercultural medical encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Parul; Krieger, Janice L

    2011-07-01

    To understand the communication strategies international medical graduates use in medical interactions to overcome language and cultural barriers. In-depth interviews were conducted with 12 international physicians completing their residency training in internal medicine in a large hospital in Midwestern Ohio. The interview explored (a) barriers participants encountered while communicating with their patients regarding language, affect, and culture, and (b) communication convergence strategies used to make the interaction meaningful. International physicians use multiple convergence strategies when interacting with their patients to account for the intercultural and intergroup differences, including repeating information, changing speaking styles, and using non-verbal communication. Understanding barriers to communication faced by international physicians and recognizing accommodation strategies they employ in the interaction could help in training of future international doctors who come to the U.S. to practice medicine. Early intervention could reduce the time international physicians spend navigating through the system and trying to learn by experimenting with different strategies which will allow these physicians to devote more time to patient care. We recommend developing a training manual that is instructive of the socio-cultural practices of the region where international physician will start practicing medicine. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Oil Shocks through International Transport Costs: Evidence from U.S. Business Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Hakan Yilmazkuday

    2011-01-01

    The effects of oil shocks on output volatility through international transport costs are investigated in an open-economy DSGE model. Two versions of the model, with and without international transport costs, are structurally estimated for the U.S. economy by a Bayesian approach for moving windows of ten years. For model selection, the posterior odds ratios of the two versions are compared for each ten-year window. The version with international transport costs is selected during periods of hi...

  9. Transport barriers and edge localized modes-like bursts in a plasma model with turbulent equipartition profiles (Erratum in Phys. Plasmas v. 9, 3804 (2003))

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, V.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Nycander, J.

    2003-01-01

    Self-consistent development of transport barriers is investigated analytically and numerically in flux driven interchange turbulence with highly intermittent turbulent fluxes. Numerical simulations on a bounded domain show turbulence leading to a homogenization of Lagrangian invariants by mixing,......, and constitute transport barriers for the turbulent fluxes, but are intermittently disrupted by strong bursts in the transport, which may be related to the strong edge localized modes observed in toroidal devices. (C) 2003 American Institute of Physics....

  10. [Health risks of residual fumigants in international transport containers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, X; Budnik, L T; Preisser, A M

    2010-03-01

    The increasing transport of goods worldwide is mainly carried in standard containers. These containers are frequently fumigated in order to protect freight from pests and to follow regulations of importing countries. Fumigants as well as toxic industrial chemicals can adsorb to goods and be emitted from them over various periods of time. This review is based on a literature search, analyses of air samples from a randomized selection of import containers at the port of Hamburg and clinical investigations of intoxicated subject. These data indicate that about 70% of imported containers exceed national or international threshold levels, about one sixth exceeding occupational exposure limits of fumigants and/or toxic industrial chemical, 0.5% had concentrations immediately dangerous to life or health. Intoxications by inhalation mainly occur in workers in the logistics area. No information exists on possible fumigation in small and medium-sized companies where the container units are unloaded. Neurological and respiratory ailments dominated in patients from our outpatient clinic and those reported in the literature: symptoms were often misdiagnosed. Our results confirm findings of other investigators that subjects who unload containers or have otherwise intensive contact with imported goods are frequently exposed to toxic or very toxic volatile chemicals. It can be assumed that there are many unrecognized cases and also health risks to the ultimate consumers of transported goods. History taking targeted on potential exposure is of great diagnostic importance in elucidating typical temporal relationship between exposure by inhalation and symptoms such as headache, skin irritation, cough, dyspnea, diarrhoea and neurological deficits. Detailed investigations by medical specialists is necessary to confirm suspected diagnoses. This should be combined with immediate special analyses of air samples and laboratory tests (biological monitoring). Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart

  11. International Collaborations on Engineered Barrier Systems: Brief Overview of SKB-EBS Activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Research collaborations with international partners on the behavior and performance of engineered barrier systems (EBS) are an important aspect of the DOE-NE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign strategy in the evaluation of disposal design concepts. These international partnerships are a cost-effective way of engaging in key R&D activities with common goals resulting in effective scientific knowledge exchanges thus enhancing existing and future research programs in the USA. This report provides a brief description of the activities covered by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) EBS Task Force (TF) (referred hereafter as SKB EBS TF) and potential future directions for engagement of the DOE-NE UFDC program in relevant R&D activities. Emphasis is given to SKB EBS TF activities that are still ongoing and aligned to the UFDC R&D program. This include utilization of data collected in the bentonite rock interaction experiment (BRIE) and data sets from benchmark experiments produced by the chemistry or “C” part of the SKB EBS TF. Potential applications of information generated by this program include comparisons/tests between model and data (e.g., reactive diffusion), development and implementation of coupled-process models (e.g., HM), and code/model benchmarking.

  12. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, T.

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  13. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Thomas [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation. View all reports on the TEF Web page, http://www.eere.energy.gov/analysis/transportationenergyfutures/index.html.

  14. Diffusive Transport of Sulphide through an Engineering Barrier System in a Deep Geological Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, S. A.; Sleep, B. E.; McKelvie, J. R. M.; Krol, M.

    2015-12-01

    Bentonite is a naturally occurring clay-rich sediment containing montmorillonite, a smectitic clay mineral that has a high cation exchange capacity and swells upon contact with water. Owing to these characteristics, highly compacted bentonite (HCB) is an often included component of engineered barrier systems (EBS) designed to protect used fuel containers (UFCs) in deep geological repositories (DGR) for high-level nuclear waste. The low water activity and high swelling pressure of HCB suppresses microbial activity and the related production of sulphide that could cause microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of UFCs The Canadian Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) has chosen a UFC that consists of an inner steel core and outer copper coating which is resistant to corrosion. However, under anaerobic conditions, MIC can still contribute to UFC corrosion if sulphides are present in the groundwater. Therefore the EBS consisting of bentonite blocks and pellets has been designed to impede the movement of sulphides to the UFC. In order to examine the effectiveness of the EBS, a 3D numerical model was developed capable of simulating the diffusive transport of sulphide within the NWMO EBS. The model was developed using COMSOL Multiphysics, a finite element software package and is parametric which allows the impact of different repository layouts to be assessed. The developed model was of the entire NWMO placement room, as well as, a stand-alone UFC and included conservative assumptions such as a fully saturated system and a constant concentration boundary condition. The results showed that the highest sulphide flux occurred at the semi-spherical end caps of the UFC. Further studies examined the effect of sulphide hotspots and fractures, representing possible EBS failure mechanisms. The model results highlight that even with conservative assumptions the chosen EBS will effectively protect the UFC from microbiologically influenced corrosion.

  15. An in vitro transport model for rapid screening and predicting the permeability of candidate compounds at blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Hong; Sun, Xiao; Mei, Chao; Sun, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Xiao-Dong; Chang, Qi

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to design and develop a simple in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeation model for elementarily and rapidly predicting the permeability of candidate compounds at BBB and further evaluating whether P-glycoprotein (P-gp) affects them across BBB. The model was mainly composed of cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (rBMECs), glass contraption, and micropore membrane. First, we evaluated the model by morphological observation. Second, the restriction effects of paracellular transport were verified by measuring marker probes transport, and monitoring transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and leakage. Finally, protein expression and activity of P-gp were confirmed by carrying out Western blot analysis and polarized transport of rhodamine-123 (Rho123) in rBMECs. The rBMECs retained both endothelial cells and BBB features. The rBMECs model reproducibly attained approximately 130 Ω cm² on the steady-state TEER value, and displayed a barrier function to marker probes transport by decreasing the permeability. Protein band of 170 kDa manifested the existence of P-gp in the rBMECs, and the findings of cyclosporin A-sensitive decrease of Rho123 efflux confirmed the presence of P-gp activity. A simple, rapid, and convenient in vitro BBB permeation model was successfully established and applied to evaluate the BBB transport profiles of three natural flavonoids: quercetin, naringenin, and rutin.

  16. Expression of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1c1 and monocarboxylate transporter 8 in the rat placental barrier and the compensatory response to thyroid dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-na Sun

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones (THs must pass from mother to fetus for normal fetal development and require the expression of placental TH transporters. We investigate the compensatory effect of placental organic anion transporting polypeptide 1c1 (Oatp1c1 and monocarboxylate transporter 8 (Mct8 on maternal thyroid dysfunction. We describe the expressions of these two transporters in placental barriers and trophoblastic cell populations in euthyroidism and thyroid dysfunction resulting from differential iodine nutrition at gestation day (GD 16 and 20, that is, before and after the onset of fetal thyroid function. Immunohistochemistry revealed that in the blood-placenta barrier, these two TH transporters were strongly expressed in the villous interstitial substance and were weakly expressed in trophoblast cells. Levels of Oatp1c1 protein obviously increased in the placental fetal portion during maternal thyroid deficiency at GD16. Under maternal thyroid deficiency after the production of endogenous fetal TH, quantitative PCR analysis revealed down-regulation of Oatp1c1 occurred along with up-regulation of Mct8 in trophoblast cell populations isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM; this was consistent with the protein levels in the fetal portion of the placenta. In addition, decreased D3 mRNA at GD16 and increased D2 mRNA on two gestational days were observed in trophoblast cells with thyroid dysfunction. However, levels of Oatp1c1 mRNA at GD16 and D3 mRNA at GD20 were too low to be detectable in trophoblast cells. In conclusion, placental Oatp1c1 plays an essential compensatory role when the transplacental passage of maternal THs is insufficient at the stage before the fetal TH production. In addition, the coordinated effects of Oatp1c1, Mct8, D2 and D3 in the placental barrier may regulate both transplacental TH passage and the development of trophoblast cells during thyroid dysfunction throughout the pregnancy.

  17. Carrier-Mediated Transport of Nicotine Across the Inner Blood-Retinal Barrier: Involvement of a Novel Organic Cation Transporter Driven by an Outward H(+) Gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tega, Yuma; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Yuzurihara, Chihiro; Akanuma, Shin-Ichi; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2015-09-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the blood-to-retina transport of nicotine across the inner blood-retinal barrier (BRB). Using the in vivo vascular injection method, the blood-to-retina influx clearance of nicotine across the BRB was determined as 131 μL/(min?g retina), which is much higher than that of a nonpermeable paracellular marker, and blood-to-retina transport of nicotine was inhibited by organic cations such as pyrilamine and verapamil. The nicotine uptake by a conditionally immortalized rat retinal capillary endothelial cell line (TR-iBRB2 cells), an in vitro model of the inner BRB, exhibited time, temperature, and concentration dependence with a Km of 492 μM. These results suggest the involvement of a carrier-mediated transport process in nicotine transport in the inner BRB. The nicotine uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells was stimulated by an outwardly directed H(+) gradient, and the uptake was significantly inhibited by bulky and hydrophobic cationic drugs, whereas inhibitors of organic cation transporters did not show inhibitory effect. These results suggest that the novel organic cation transport system driven by an outwardly directed H(+) gradient is involved in the blood-to-retina transport of nicotine across the inner BRB. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  18. Barriers to internal rotation from relative intensity measurements as a function of temperature on microwave absorption lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenberg, G.

    A variant is presented of the relative intensity method (RIM) in microwave spectroscopy to determine barriers to internal rotation. In this method torsional energies are determined directly from the slope of the straight line relating the logarithm of the intensity ratio and the reciprocal of the

  19. Placental Drug Transport-on-a-Chip: A Microengineered In Vitro Model of Transporter-Mediated Drug Efflux in the Human Placental Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Cassidy; Yi, Yoon-Suk; Ma, Lin; Tess, Emily R; Farrell, Megan J; Georgescu, Andrei; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Huh, Dongeun

    2018-01-01

    The current lack of knowledge about the effect of maternally administered drugs on the developing fetus is a major public health concern worldwide. The first critical step toward predicting the safety of medications in pregnancy is to screen drug compounds for their ability to cross the placenta. However, this type of preclinical study has been hampered by the limited capacity of existing in vitro and ex vivo models to mimic physiological drug transport across the maternal-fetal interface in the human placenta. Here the proof-of-principle for utilizing a microengineered model of the human placental barrier to simulate and investigate drug transfer from the maternal to the fetal circulation is demonstrated. Using the gestational diabetes drug glyburide as a model compound, it is shown that the microphysiological system is capable of reconstituting efflux transporter-mediated active transport function of the human placental barrier to limit fetal exposure to maternally administered drugs. The data provide evidence that the placenta-on-a-chip may serve as a new screening platform to enable more accurate prediction of drug transport in the human placenta. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Transport, boundary physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanelli, F.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the contributions presented at the 18 th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in the field of transport and boundary physics will be summarised with reference to the following distinct issues: H-mode physics, Internal Transport Barrier formation, transport studies, Radiative Improved modes and impurity seeding, divertor and He exhaust, new configurations. (author)

  1. Detecting the transport barriers in the Pearl River estuary, Southern China with the aid of Lagrangian coherent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xing; Zhan, Haigang; Cai, Shuqun; Zhan, Weikang; Ni, Peitong

    2018-05-01

    Knowledge of horizontal transport pathways is important for the protection of the marine ecosystem in coastal areas. In this paper, we develop a 3D model to simulate hydrodynamics and particle transport in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE), Southern China, to study the barriers to transport in the PRE. Specifically, we use the flow velocity produced by the model to locate Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) hidden in ocean surface currents. Our findings show that a remarkable LCS begins upstream near the Humen inlet, extends to the Wanshan Islands via Neilingding Island, and can act as a transport barrier in the estuary. This LCS appeared 1-2 h after high tide and was persistent for 6-7 h during every ebb tide. Particles released on the west side of the LCS moved downstream, exited the estuary by Daxi Channel, and seldom spread to the east side, especially the Hong Kong Sea area. An analysis of several scenarios suggested that the formation of this LCS was due to topography restrictions and tidal forces.

  2. ROAD TRANSPORT BARRIERS ENCOUNTERED BY PEOPLE WITH TRAVEL DIFFICULTIES IN JAPAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsumi TOKUDA

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This study looks in detail at specific barriers encountered by people with travel difficulties in Japan, and the barriers encountered by the visually impaired and wheelchair users in particular. These barriers include vehicles parked on sidewalks or textured paving blocks for the visually impaired, bicycles ridden on sidewalks, bicycles left on the sidewalk, uneven sidewalks, obstacles on sidewalks, undulating sidewalks, steep slopes, barging pedestrians, textured paving blocks that have been improperly laid, buttons on traffic lights for persons with disabilities that have been set up in inappropriate locations, etc.

  3. PROSPECTS OF INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT TRANSPORT IN THE EAST-WEST DIRECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł DROŹDZIEL

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the assets of building broad-gauge lines in Europe. The delivery time for international transport of goods affects international business in terms of the capital put into goods and subsequently affects its turnover rate. The current disproportion of different line gauges in Europe causes significant problems in the transport of goods especially in commodity streams in the East - West direction. Based on previous research of commodity streams in international trade and a comprehensive analysis of all performed studies for building broad gauge lines, the assets of building these lines included the development of employment, increasing the transport capacity and the building of transshipment stations in Slovakia. The current geopolitical developments have also a significant impact on international transport and important transport links, therefore diversifying these risks is a logical consideration to ensure the smooth delivery of goods and thus the development of international trade.

  4. Beta-endorphin chimeric peptides: Transport through the blood-brain barrier in vivo and cleavage of disulfide linkage by brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardridge, W.M.; Triguero, D.; Buciak, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Water soluble peptides are normally not transported through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Chimeric peptides may be transportable through the BBB and are formed by the covalent coupling of a nontransportable peptide to a transportable peptide vector, e.g. cationized albumin, using disulfide-based coupling reagents such as N-succinimidyl 3-[2-pyridyldithio(propionate)] (SPDP). The transcytosis of peptide into brain parenchyma, as opposed to vascular sequestration of blood-borne peptide, was quantified using an internal carotid artery perfusion/capillary depletion method. It is shown that [125I]beta-endorphin is not transported through the BBB, but is rapidly cleaved to free [125I] tyrosine via capillary peptidase. Therefore, chimeric peptide was prepared using [125I] [D-Ala2]beta-endorphin (DABE), owing to the resistance of this analogue to peptidase degradation. The [125I] DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide is shown to enter brain parenchyma at a rate comparable to that reported previously for unconjugated cationized albumin. When the [125I] DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide was incubated with rat brain homogenate at 37 C, the free [125I] DABE was liberated from the cationized albumin conjugate prior to its subsequent degradation into free [125I] tyrosine. Approximately 50% of the chimeric peptide was cleaved within 60 sec of incubation at 37 C. These studies demonstrate that (1) [125I]beta-endorphin is not transported through the BBB in its unconjugated form, (2) a [125I] DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide is transported through the BBB into brain parenchyma at a rate comparable to the unconjugated cationized albumin, and (3) brain contains the necessary disulfide reductases for rapid cleavage of the chimeric peptide into free beta-endorphin and this cleavage occurs before degradation of the [125I] DABE into [125I] tyrosine

  5. Beta-endorphin chimeric peptides: Transport through the blood-brain barrier in vivo and cleavage of disulfide linkage by brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardridge, W.M.; Triguero, D.; Buciak, J.L. (UCLA School of Medicine (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Water soluble peptides are normally not transported through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Chimeric peptides may be transportable through the BBB and are formed by the covalent coupling of a nontransportable peptide to a transportable peptide vector, e.g. cationized albumin, using disulfide-based coupling reagents such as N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio(propionate)) (SPDP). The transcytosis of peptide into brain parenchyma, as opposed to vascular sequestration of blood-borne peptide, was quantified using an internal carotid artery perfusion/capillary depletion method. It is shown that (125I)beta-endorphin is not transported through the BBB, but is rapidly cleaved to free (125I) tyrosine via capillary peptidase. Therefore, chimeric peptide was prepared using (125I) (D-Ala2)beta-endorphin (DABE), owing to the resistance of this analogue to peptidase degradation. The (125I) DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide is shown to enter brain parenchyma at a rate comparable to that reported previously for unconjugated cationized albumin. When the (125I) DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide was incubated with rat brain homogenate at 37 C, the free (125I) DABE was liberated from the cationized albumin conjugate prior to its subsequent degradation into free (125I) tyrosine. Approximately 50% of the chimeric peptide was cleaved within 60 sec of incubation at 37 C. These studies demonstrate that (1) (125I)beta-endorphin is not transported through the BBB in its unconjugated form, (2) a (125I) DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide is transported through the BBB into brain parenchyma at a rate comparable to the unconjugated cationized albumin, and (3) brain contains the necessary disulfide reductases for rapid cleavage of the chimeric peptide into free beta-endorphin and this cleavage occurs before degradation of the (125I) DABE into (125I) tyrosine.

  6. Characterizing the International Migration Barriers with a Probabilistic Multilateral Migration Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomeng; Xu, Hongzhong; Chen, Jiawei; Chen, Qinghua; Zhang, Jiang; di, Zengru

    2016-09-01

    Human migration is responsible for forming modern civilization and has had an important influence on the development of various countries. There are many issues worth researching, and “the reason to move” is the most basic one. The concept of migration cost in the classical self-selection theory, which was introduced by Roy and Borjas, is useful. However, migration cost cannot address global migration because of the limitations of deterministic and bilateral choice. Following the idea of migration cost, this paper developed a new probabilistic multilateral migration model by introducing the Boltzmann factor from statistical physics. After characterizing the underlying mechanism or driving force of human mobility, we reveal some interesting facts that have provided a deeper understanding of international migration, such as the negative correlation between migration costs for emigrants and immigrants and a global classification with clear regional and economic characteristics, based on clustering of migration cost vectors. In addition, we deconstruct the migration barriers using regression analysis and find that the influencing factors are complicated but can be partly (12.5%) described by several macro indexes, such as the GDP growth of the destination country, the GNI per capita and the HDI of both the source and destination countries.

  7. Barriers to providing school-based health care: international case comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seigart, Denise; Dietsch, Elaine; Parent, Michèle

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on an international collaborative study which compared school-based health care in the United States of America, Canada and Australia. Tri-nation school-based health care was compared and contrasted through the utilisation of a series of interpretive case studies. Grounded theory approaches informed the data analysis and reporting processes. Unlike the US, Canadian and Australian school students rarely have access to school-based health care on site. All three nations face structural, cultural and societal barriers, often related to limited resources which limit the effectiveness of school-based health care. The benefits of school-based health care and providing comprehensive services through schools can include healthier children, better learning, healthier parents, and healthier communities. Unfortunately, based on our research, comprehensive school health services have not been adequately implemented in the US, Canada or Australia. Given the findings of this study, increased comprehensive school-based health services are urgently needed in the US, Canada and Australia.

  8. Metal-organic semiconductor interfacial barrier height determination from internal photoemission signal in spectral response measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Iyer, S. Sundar Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Accurate and convenient evaluation methods of the interfacial barrier ϕb for charge carriers in metal semiconductor (MS) junctions are important for designing and building better opto-electronic devices. This becomes more critical for organic semiconductor devices where a plethora of molecules are in use and standardised models applicable to myriads of material combinations for the different devices may have limited applicability. In this paper, internal photoemission (IPE) from spectral response (SR) in the ultra-violet to near infra-red range of different MS junctions of metal-organic semiconductor-metal (MSM) test structures is used to determine more realistic MS ϕb values. The representative organic semiconductor considered is [6, 6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, and the metals considered are Al and Au. The IPE signals in the SR measurement of the MSM device are identified and separated before it is analysed to estimate ϕb for the MS junction. The analysis of IPE signals under different bias conditions allows the evaluation of ϕb for both the front and back junctions, as well as for symmetric MSM devices.

  9. Fisher information and steric effect: study of the internal rotation barrier of ethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, Rodolfo O; Liu, Shubin; Angulo, Juan Carlos; Dehesa, Jesús S; Antolín, Juan; Molina-Espíritu, Moyocoyani

    2011-05-05

    On the basis of a density-based quantification of the steric effect [Liu, S. B. J. Chem. Phys.2007, 126, 244103], the origin of the internal rotation barrier between the eclipsed and staggered conformers of ethane is systematically investigated in this work from an information-theoretical point of view by using the Fisher information measure in conjugated spaces. Two kinds of computational approaches are considered in this work: adiabatic (with optimal structure) and vertical (with fixed geometry). The analyses are performed systematically by following, in each case, the conformeric path by changing the dihedral angle from 0 to 180° . This is calculated at the HF, MP2, B3LYP, and CCSD(T) levels of theory and with several basis sets. Selected descriptors of the densities are utilized to support the observations. Our results show that in the adiabatic case the eclipsed conformer possesses a larger steric repulsion than the staggered conformer, but in the vertical cases the staggered conformer retains a larger steric repulsion. Our results verify the plausibility for defining and computing the steric effect in the post-Hartree-Fock level of theory according to the scheme proposed by Liu.

  10. Barriers to and enablers for European rail freight transport for integrated door-to-door logistics service. Part 2: Enablers for multimodal rail freight transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewan Md Zahurul ISLAM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to examine and identify barriers to and enablers for the European rail freight transport services as a transport chain partner along the supply chains in the changing market scenario. The changing market scenario includes, among others, requiring 'door-to-door' rather than 'terminal to terminal' and integrated service, competitive ability to attract non-rail cargo type, changes in the customer requirements (e.g. reliable service and changes in the operational requirements and practices. Using a literature review method, the paper is presented in two parts. The part 1 focuses on the identification of barriers to the European rail freight service by reviewing freight logistics services for global supply chains followed by the current performance of European rail freight transport followed by a discussion on the rail freight market liberalisation in Europe. Then rail freight transport in the Unites States (U.S. is discussed. The research notes that although the background, scope and necessity for reform measures in Europe differ from those of the U.S., some lessons can be learned and the main lesson is that an appropriate reform measure can enhance rail sector competitive ability in Europe. The part 2 of the paper is dedicated to recommend some concrete steps and actions as enablers to remove the barriers identified in the part 1 to develop multimodal rail freight transport. The enablers for multimodal rail freight transport include: •\tEuropean rail freight transport market needs full liberalisation so that incumbent and new entrants can compete freely. •\tThe rail operators need to acquire service (e.g. customer tailored services, door to door service quality offered by road freight operators. •\tThey need to conduct a combination of ‘terminal-to-terminal’ and door-to-door operations, as and when needed; •\tThey must build partnership with freight forwarder or 3PLs to include all types of customers

  11. Competitiveness of the Air and the Sea Cargo Transport of Mexico under the International Trade Frame

    OpenAIRE

    America I. Zamora Torres; Jose Cesar Lenin Navarro Chavez; Joel Bonales Valencia

    2015-01-01

    International trade trends have changed the cost structure, pricing, logistics, supply chain and hence comparative advantages. Such trends have similarly defined the trade competitiveness of countries becoming more relevant with the level of integration of global transport networks as a driver of international trade. In this paper we evaluate through Principal Component Analysis methodology the international transport competitiveness considering the most important variables that affect this s...

  12. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE CARGO INSURANCE CONTRACT IN CASE OF INTERNATIONAL LAND TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dănilă Ștefan MATEI

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cargo international transport is an engine for the development of the economic relations between states involving cross-border movement of goods through the crossing of at least one border of a state (international transport or by crossing at least two border crossing points, in which case we are in the presence of an international cargo transit. During the transit the goods transported may be subject to an insurance. The object of the cargo insurance is, thus, represented by the goods, the items expressly listed in the insurance policy, within the territorial limits specified in the insurance policy, both during the transport and during the storage, in the latter case, at the express request of the insured and with the acceptance of the insurer. This paper analyzes the characteristics of the cargo insurance aiming to present the theoretical and practical aspects of interest with regard to the cargo insurance concluded in case of an international land freight transport.

  13. Conservation on international boundaries: the impact of security barriers on selected terrestrial mammals in four protected areas in Arizona, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie W McCallum

    Full Text Available Several thousand terrestrial protected areas (PAs lie on international boundaries. Because international boundaries can be focal points for trade, illegal activity and development, such PAs can be vulnerable to a range of anthropogenic threats. There is an increasing trend towards the erection of international boundary infrastructure (including fences, barriers and ditches in many parts of the world, which may reduce the risk of these anthropogenic threats to some PAs. However this may restrict home range and access to resources for some native species. We sought to understand the impacts of these two different types of threat by using camera traps to measure the activity level of humans, native and invasive mammals in four US PAs on the Mexican international boundary. Comparisons were made between treatment areas with barriers and those without. Results showed that puma and coati were more likely to appear in treatment areas without barriers, whereas humans were not observed more frequently in one treatment area over another. The suggestion is that the intermittent fencing present in this part of the world does affect some native species, but does not necessarily restrict the movement of humans (including illegal migrants, who may negatively impact native species.

  14. An international perspective on electric transportation. Survey on electric road transport 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeda, M; Kroon, P. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands); Appels, D. [Agentschap NL, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    To compare the Dutch governmental efforts and developments in the field of electric road transport, the Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation has asked ECN Policy Studies and NL Agency to conduct an international assessment on electric mobility. The countries that have been considered are: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, UK, China, USA and South Korea. The Netherlands has a high ambition level with regard to the number of electric vehicles and is one of the leaders as for the envisaged number of charging points. In the field of R and D, Germany, South Korea and China take the lead, followed by France, the UK, the USA and Austria. However, the assessment has only looked at specific funds for electric mobility, and has not looked at general R and D and innovation funds. The Netherlands has several electro-mobility field tests, but is not leading in number. Norway and Austria are leading countries when it comes to implementation of public charging infrastructure.

  15. Perceptions of Teachers at the International Institute of Sociology of Law of International Student Diversity: Barriers, Enrichment or Cosmopolitan Learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela L. Melville

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the main activities of the International Institute of Sociology of Law (IISL is its International Master’s program in Sociology of Law. This program is highly innovative, in that rather than having any in-house teachers, the program is delivered by leading scholars from around the world. In 2014, the IISL celebrated its 25th anniversary, which provided an ideal opportunity to reflect upon the Master’s program. Teachers were invited to provide their views on teaching at the IISL, and the strongest theme that emerged was student diversity. This paper considers why student diversity struck teachers so strongly, and how has the IISL achieved such a highly diverse student body.It then explores teachers’ perceptions of diversity, revealing responses ranging from seeing diversity as a barrier to embracing diversity as enriching for students and teachers alike. Teaching was largely conceived as a form of ‘engaged pedagogy’ (hooks 1994, which involved drawing on a genuine dialogue with students, embracing multiple perspectives, challenging that challenge hegemonic understandings of sociology of law, and interaction beyond the classroom walls. We argue that this model of teaching produces a global community of cosmopolitan, reflective, self-aware, critical, culturally sensitive and caring sociology of law scholars. Una de las actividades principales del Instituto Internacional de Sociología Jurídica (IISJ es su programa de Master Internacional en Sociología Jurídica. Este programa es muy innovador, en él, en lugar de tener profesores propios, son destacados académicos de todo el mundo los que imparten el programa. En 2014, el IISJ celebró su 25 aniversario, lo que supuso una oportunidad ideal para reflexionar sobre el programa de Master. Se invitó a los profesores a que ofrecieran su punto de vista sobre la enseñanza en el IISJ, y el tema más importante que surgió fue la diversidad del alumnado. En este trabajo se analiza por

  16. PPAR-α, a lipid-sensing transcription factor, regulates blood-brain barrier efflux transporter expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Vijay R; Campos, Christopher R; Evans, Rebecca A; Oliver, Keith D; Chan, Gary Ny; Miller, David S; Cannon, Ronald E

    2017-04-01

    Lipid sensor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR- α) is the master regulator of lipid metabolism. Dietary release of endogenous free fatty acids, fibrates, and certain persistent environmental pollutants, e.g. perfluoroalkyl fire-fighting foam components, are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha ligands. Here, we define a role for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha in regulating the expression of three ATP-driven drug efflux transporters at the rat and mouse blood-brain barriers: P-glycoprotein (Abcb1), breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp/Abcg2), and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2/Abcc2). Exposing isolated rat brain capillaries to linoleic acid, clofibrate, or PKAs increased the transport activity and protein expression of the three ABC transporters. These effects were blocked by the PPAR- α antagonist, GW6471. Dosing rats with 20 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg of clofibrate decreased the brain accumulation of the P-glycoprotein substrate, verapamil, by 50% (in situ brain perfusion; effects blocked by GW6471) and increased P-glycoprotein expression and activity in capillaries ex vivo. Fasting C57Bl/6 wild-type mice for 24 h increased both serum lipids and brain capillary P-glycoprotein transport activity. Fasting did not alter P-glycoprotein activity in PPAR- α knockout mice. These results indicate that hyperlipidemia, lipid-lowering fibrates and exposure to certain fire-fighting foam components activate blood-brain barrier peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, increase drug efflux transporter expression and reduce drug delivery to the brain.

  17. Stereospecific transport of Tyr-MIF-1 across the blood-brain barrier by peptide transport system-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, W.A.; Kastin, A.J.; Michals, E.A.; Barrera, C.M. (Veterans Affairs Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that peptide transport system-1 (PTS-1), the saturable system that transports Tyr-MIF-1, the enkephalins, and related peptides out of the central nervous system (CNS), exhibits stereospecificity. In the present studies, we showed that {sup 125}I-L-Tyr-MIF-1, but not {sup 131}I-D-Tyr-MIF-1, was cleared from the CNS more rapidly than could be accounted for by nonspecific mechanisms. Such clearance was inhibited by a 1.0 nmol dose of L-Tyr-MIF-1, but not by D-Tyr-MIF-1. Neither L- nor D-Tyr-MIF-1 altered the much lower clearance of I-D-Tyr-MIF-1 from the brain. Radioactivity recovered from the vascular space after the injection of {sup 125}I-Tyr-MIF-1 into the lateral ventricle of the brain eluted by HPLC primarily as intact peptide, demonstrating that most of the Tyr-MIF-1 was not degraded during transport. By contrast, the nonsaturable unidirectional influx of Tyr-MIF-1 into the CNS did not distinguish between the isomers. These studies confirm and extend the observations that Tyr-MIF-1 is transported out of the CNS by a saturable, stereospecific transport system as an intact peptide while the influx into the CNS is by a nonsaturable mechanism that does not distinguish between the isomers.

  18. Transport of nuclear materials as an international project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartejsova, Eva

    2010-01-01

    The following companies are involved in this project: CEZ a.s., ALTA a.s., ALTA 32 s.r.o., DMS s.r.o., TVEL (RF), and NUKLON (RF). Transport containers are TK-S5 (for Temelin) and TK-S55 (for Dukovany) types. Details of fuel supplies for the 2 Czech NPPs are described and the fresh fuel element transport procedure is highlighted. (P.A.)

  19. New Dynamic Approach of a Safety Barrier Wall for a Civil Transport Aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    Merz, Ludger

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges for Airbus preparing a new freighter development process was the design of a solid freighter barrier, which separates the courier area from the cargo compartment. The major task of such a barrier is to protect the passengers against all risks caused due to cargo impact by a justifiable design. These risks may result from all kind of survivable incident and accident scenarios. Real aircraft crashes were analyzed to get away from a static book-case and come to a more reali...

  20. Can new legislation in importing countries represent new barriers to the development of an international ethanol market?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Raquel R. de; Schaeffer, Roberto; Meira, Irineu

    2011-01-01

    The use of ethanol as a fuel has been attracting increasing attention in countries that are interested in reducing their dependence on imported oil and lowering their greenhouse gas emissions. Despite this growing interest, the global ethanol market is still incipient because of the small number of producing countries, the lack of technical standardization and the existence of tariff and non-tariff trade barriers. New laws have taken effect in 2010 in the United States and the European Union imposing domestic requirements for sustainable production of ethanol. Although these are generally positive developments, they can create greater difficulties for the development of an international ethanol market. This work examines the technical barriers posed by these new laws and how they can be resolved under the auspices of the World Trade Organization. In addition, this work analyses the Brazilian and Caribbean cases discussing to what extent these new technical barriers will affect ethanol production and exports arising from these countries. - Research highlights: → We examine the ethanol market and the increase of technical barriers. → Higher production costs will be associated with different environmental standards. → The adoption of international standards is key to develop the ethanol market. → A global agreement on biofuels will foster the development of its market.

  1. High Penetration of Renewable Energy in the Transportation Sector: Scenarios, Barriers, and Enablers; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vimmerstedt, L.; Brown, A.; Heath, G.; Mai, T.; Ruth, M.; Melaina, M.; Simpkins, T.; Steward, D.; Warner, E.; Bertram, K.; Plotkin, S.; Patel, D.; Stephens, T.; Vyas, A.

    2012-06-01

    Transportation accounts for 71% of U.S. petroleum use and 33% of its greenhouse gases emissions. Pathways toward reduced greenhouse gas emissions and petroleum dependence in the transportation sector have been analyzed in considerable detail, but with some limitations. To add to this knowledge, the U.S. Department of Energy has launched a study focused on underexplored greenhouse-gas-abatement and oil-savings opportunities related to transportation. This Transportation Energy Futures study analyzes specific issues and associated key questions to strengthen the existing knowledge base and help cultivate partnerships among federal agencies, state and local governments, and industry.

  2. Relationship of internal macrobioeroder densities in living massive Porites to turbidity and chlorophyll on the Australian Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grand, H. M.; Fabricius, K. E.

    2011-03-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the density of internal macrobioeroders in living massive Porites and nutrient status. The study was conducted along turbidity and chlorophyll gradients towards river mouths on 12 reefs in four regions of the inshore Great Barrier Reef. Mean internal macrobioeroder densities doubled from 2 to 8 m depth, and at the 8 m sites, densities increased 4- to 7-fold towards the river mouths in all regions. Densities also increased 1.6-fold for each additional 1 NTU turbidity and 650-fold per 1 μg L-1 additional chlorophyll a. The study shows that the density of macrobioeroder boreholes in living massive Porites is a simple bioindicator measure for changing turbidity and chlorophyll concentrations on the Great Barrier Reef for sites from which direct water quality measurements are unavailable.

  3. Multiple blood-brain barrier transport mechanisms limit bumetanide accumulation, and therapeutic potential, in the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römermann, Kerstin; Fedrowitz, Maren; Hampel, Philip; Kaczmarek, Edith; Töllner, Kathrin; Erker, Thomas; Sweet, Douglas H; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2017-05-01

    There is accumulating evidence that bumetanide, which has been used over decades as a potent loop diuretic, also exerts effects on brain disorders, including autism, neonatal seizures, and epilepsy, which are not related to its effects on the kidney but rather mediated by inhibition of the neuronal Na-K-Cl cotransporter isoform NKCC1. However, following systemic administration, brain levels of bumetanide are typically below those needed to inhibit NKCC1, which critically limits its clinical use for treating brain disorders. Recently, active efflux transport at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been suggested as a process involved in the low brain:plasma ratio of bumetanide, but it is presently not clear which transporters are involved. Understanding the processes explaining the poor brain penetration of bumetanide is needed for developing strategies to improve the brain delivery of this drug. In the present study, we administered probenecid and more selective inhibitors of active transport carriers at the BBB directly into the brain of mice to minimize the contribution of peripheral effects on the brain penetration of bumetanide. Furthermore, in vitro experiments with mouse organic anion transporter 3 (Oat3)-overexpressing Chinese hamster ovary cells were performed to study the interaction of bumetanide, bumetanide derivatives, and several known inhibitors of Oats on Oat3-mediated transport. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that the uptake and efflux of bumetanide at the BBB is much more complex than previously thought. It seems that both restricted passive diffusion and active efflux transport, mediated by Oat3 but also organic anion-transporting polypeptide (Oatp) Oatp1a4 and multidrug resistance protein 4 explain the extremely low brain concentrations that are achieved after systemic administration of bumetanide, limiting the use of this drug for targeting abnormal expression of neuronal NKCC1 in brain diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  4. Transport of thyroxine across the blood-brain barrier is directed primarily from brain to blood in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, W.A.; Kastin, A.J.; Michals, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    The role of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the transport of thyroxine was examined in mice. Radioiodinated (hot thyroxine (hT 4 ) administered icv had a half-time disappearance from the brain of 30 min. This increased to 60 min (p 4 ). The Km for this inhibition of hT 4 transport out of the brain by cT 4 was 9.66 pmole/brain. Unlabeled 3,3',5 triiodothyronine (cT 3 ) was unable to inhibit transport of hT 4 out of the brain, although both cT 3 (p 4 (p 3 ) to a small degree. Entry of hT 4 into the brain after peripheral administration was negligible and was not affected by either cT 4 nor cT 3 . By contrast, the entry of hT 3 into the brain after peripheral administration was inhibited by cT 3 (p 4 (p < 0.01). The levels of the unlabeled thyroid hormones administered centrally in these studies did not affect bulk flow, as assessed by labeled red blood cells (/sup 99m/Tc-RBC), or the carrier mediated transport of iodide out of the brain. Likewise, the vascular space of the brain and body, as assessed by /sup 99m/Tc-RBC, was unchanged by the levels of peripherally administered unlabeled thyroid hormones. Therefore, the results of these studies are not due to generalized effects of thyroid hormones on BBB transport. The results indicate that in the mouse the major carrier-mediated system for thyroxine in the BBB transports thyroxine out of the brain, while the major system for triiodothyronine transports hormone into the brain. 14 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  5. Permeating disciplines: Overcoming barriers between molecular simulations and classical structure-function approaches in biological ion transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Rebecca J; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Delemotte, Lucie; Hellmich, Ute A; Rothberg, Brad S

    2018-04-01

    Ion translocation across biological barriers is a fundamental requirement for life. In many cases, controlling this process-for example with neuroactive drugs-demands an understanding of rapid and reversible structural changes in membrane-embedded proteins, including ion channels and transporters. Classical approaches to electrophysiology and structural biology have provided valuable insights into several such proteins over macroscopic, often discontinuous scales of space and time. Integrating these observations into meaningful mechanistic models now relies increasingly on computational methods, particularly molecular dynamics simulations, while surfacing important challenges in data management and conceptual alignment. Here, we seek to provide contemporary context, concrete examples, and a look to the future for bridging disciplinary gaps in biological ion transport. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Beyond the Structure-Function Horizon of Membrane Proteins edited by Ute Hellmich, Rupak Doshi and Benjamin McIlwain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. International knowledge gaining : Challenges and barriers among university spin-off firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taheri, M.; Van Geenhuizen, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Industrial competence is increasingly dispersed across the globe, urging young high-technology firms to build knowledge relationships across national and continental boundaries. However, building such relationships is hampered by numerous barriers following from short in experience and education of

  7. PATRAM '83: 7th international symposium on packaging and transportation of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Papers were presented at the following sessions: international regulations; materials, fracture toughness of ferritic steels; risk analysis techniques; storage in packagings; packaging design considerations; monolithic cast iron casks; risk analysis; facility/transportation system interface; research and development programs; UF 6 packagings; national regulations; transportation operations and traffic; containment, seals, and leakage; radiation risk experience; emergency response; structural modeling and testing; transportation system planning; institutional issues and public response; packaging systems; thermal analysis and testing; systems analysis; structural analyses; quality assurance; packaging and transportation systems; physical protection; criticality and shielding; transportation operations and experience; standards; shock absorber technology; and information and training for regulatory compliance. Individual summaries are title listed

  8. PATRAM '83: 7th International Symposium on Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Materials, summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papers were presented at the following sessions: international regulations; materials, fracture toughness of ferritic steels; risk analysis techniques; storage in packagings; packaging design considerations; monolithic cast iron casks; risk analysis; facility/transportation system interface; research and development programs; UF6 packagings; national regulations; transportation operations and traffic; containment, seals, and leakage; radiation risk experience; emergency response; structural modeling and testing; transportation system planning; institutional issues and public response; packaging systems; thermal analysis and testing; systems analysis; structural analyses; quality assurance; packaging and transportation systems; physical protection; criticality and shielding; transportation operations and experience; standards; shock absorber technology; and information and training for regulatory compliance. Individual summaries are title listed.

  9. The problems of international transport corridors development on the territory of the Russian Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustamzade M.N.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available in the transition of the leading countries of the world on an innovative way of development, transport is considered as one of the most important factors of socio-economic growth in Russia. Transport contributes to strengthening the unity of the economic area of the country, improves the interregional and international transport and economic relations, increases the efficient using of natural resources, develops entrepreneurship and international cooperation. However, there is a number of obstacles before implementation of transport and transit potential of Russia. The paper deals with features of international and national transport corridors on the territory of Russia and the key problems of their functioning and possible ways to overcome them.

  10. PATRAM '92: 10th international symposium on the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document provides the papers presented by Sandia Laboratories at PATRAM '92, the tenth International symposium on the Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Materials held September 13--18, 1992 in Yokohama City, Japan. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  11. En route: Transport and embodiment in international medical travel journeys between Indonesia and Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormond, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    International medical travel is increasingly big business. Using Indonesian patient-consumers’transport experiences in the pursuit of private medical care in Malaysia, this paper explores howtransport operators and infrastructure are responding and adjusting to the embodied specificities of the

  12. The role of multidrug resistance protein (MRP-1) as an active efflux transporter on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingineni, Karthik; Belekar, Vilas; Tangadpalliwar, Sujit R; Garg, Prabha

    2017-05-01

    Drugs acting on central nervous system (CNS) may take longer duration to reach the market as these compounds have a higher attrition rate in clinical trials due to the complexity of the brain, side effects, and poor blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability compared to non-CNS-acting compounds. The roles of active efflux transporters with BBB are still unclear. The aim of the present work was to develop a predictive model for BBB permeability that includes the MRP-1 transporter, which is considered as an active efflux transporter. A support vector machine model was developed for the classification of MRP-1 substrates and non-substrates, which was validated with an external data set and Y-randomization method. An artificial neural network model has been developed to evaluate the role of MRP-1 on BBB permeation. A total of nine descriptors were selected, which included molecular weight, topological polar surface area, ClogP, number of hydrogen bond donors, number of hydrogen bond acceptors, number of rotatable bonds, P-gp, BCRP, and MRP-1 substrate probabilities for model development. We identified 5 molecules that fulfilled all criteria required for passive permeation of BBB, but they all have a low logBB value, which suggested that the molecules were effluxed by the MRP-1 transporter.

  13. Interfacial electronic transport phenomena in single crystalline Fe-MgO-Fe thin barrier junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangineni, R. B., E-mail: rameshg.phy@pondiuni.edu.in [Department of Physics, School of Physical, Chemical and Applied Sciences, Pondicherry University, R. V. Nagar, Kalapet, Pondicherry 605 014 (India); SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF-Grenoble 1/Grenoble INP, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex (France); Bellouard, C., E-mail: christine.bellouard@ijl.nancy-universite.fr; Duluard, A. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Negulescu, B. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); UFR de Sciences et Techniques, Matériaux, microélectronique, acoustique, nanotechnologies (GREMAN), University François Rabelais, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); Baraduc, C.; Gaudin, G. [SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF-Grenoble 1/Grenoble INP, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex (France); Tiusan, C., E-mail: coriolan.tiusan@phys.utcluj.ro [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Department of Physics and Chemistry, Center of Superconductivity, Spintronics and Surface Science, Technical University of Cluj Napoca, Str. Memorandumului No. 28, RO-400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2014-05-05

    Spin filtering effects in nano-pillars of Fe-MgO-Fe single crystalline magnetic tunnel junctions are explored with two different sample architectures and thin MgO barriers (thickness: 3–8 monolayers). The two architectures, with different growth and annealing conditions of the bottom electrode, allow tuning the quality of the bottom Fe/MgO interface. As a result, an interfacial resonance states (IRS) is observed or not depending on this interface quality. The IRS contribution, observed by spin polarized tunnel spectroscopy, is analyzed as a function of the MgO barrier thickness. Our experimental findings agree with theoretical predictions concerning the symmetry of the low energy (0.2 eV) interfacial resonance states: a mixture of Δ{sub 1}-like and Δ{sub 5}-like symmetries.

  14. Cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial cells (BBCEC) - a blood-brain barrier model for studying the binding and internalization of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, B.T.; Borchardt, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    Cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial cells (BBCEC) have previously been reported by their laboratory as a working model for studying nutrient and drug transport and metabolism at the blood-brain barrier. In the present study, they have utilized this culture system to investigate the binding and internalization of [ 125 I]-labelled insulin (INS) and insulin-like growth factor 1(IGF-1) by BBCEC. After 2 hrs at 23 0 C, the specific binding of INS and IGF-1 was 1.6% and 13.6%, respectively. At 37 0 C, the maximum specific binding was 0.9% for INS and 5.8% for IGF-1. Using an acid-wash technique to assess peptide internalization, it was observed that, at 37 0 C, approximately 60% of the bound INS rapidly became resistant to acid treatment, a value which was constant over 2 hr. With IGF-1, a similar proportion of the bound material, 62%, became resistant by 30 min, but subsequently decreased to 45% by 2 hr. Scatchard analysis of competitive binding studies indicated the presence of two binding sites for each protein, having K/sub d/'s of 0.82 nM and 19.2 nM for INS and 0.39 nM and 3.66 nM for IGF-1. Little change in the amount of INS binding was observed over a four-day interval as the cultures became a confluent monolayer. The present report of binding and internalization of these proteins suggests that the BBCEC may utilize a receptor-mediated process to internalize and/or transport (transcytosis) INS and IGF-1 from the circulation

  15. International Perspectives and Implementation of Sustainability Criteria in the Development of Biofuels for Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meza, Maria Josefina Figueroa; Gudmundsson, Henrik

    Establishing sustainability criteria for the development of biofuels is an important step for the consolidation of an international market on biofuels for transport for several reasons: Biofuels are expected to play a significant role in a transition to low carbon future in transport in particular...

  16. PATRAM '83: 7th international symposium on packaging and transportation of radioactive materials. Proceedings. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    Volume 1 contains the papers from the following sessions: Plenary session; international regulations; fracture toughness of ferritic steels; monolithic cast iron casks; risk analysis techniques; storage in packagings; packaging design considerations; risk analysis; facility/transportation system interface; research and development programs; UF 6 packagings; national regulations; transportation operations and traffic; containment, seals, and leakage; and radiation risk experiences

  17. 75 FR 38168 - Hazardous Materials: International Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (TS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No. PHMSA-2010-0130 (Notice No.10-2)] Hazardous Materials: International Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (TS-R-1); Draft Revision Available for Comment AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous...

  18. Ultrasound effects on brain-targeting mannosylated liposomes: in vitro and blood–brain barrier transport investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zidan AS

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed S Zidan,1,2 Hibah Aldawsari1 1Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt Abstract: Delivering drugs to intracerebral regions can be accomplished by improving the capacity of transport through blood–brain barrier. Using sertraline as model drug for brain targeting, the current study aimed at modifying its liposomal vesicles with mannopyranoside. Box-Behnken design was employed to statistically optimize the ultrasound parameters, namely ultrasound amplitude, time, and temperature, for maximum mannosylation capacity, sertraline entrapment, and surface charge while minimizing vesicular size. Moreover, in vitro blood–brain barrier transport model was established to assess the transendothelial capacity of the optimized mannosylated vesicles. Results showed a dependence of vesicular size, mannosylation capacity, and sertraline entrapment on cavitation and bubble implosion events that were related to ultrasound power amplitude, temperature. However, short ultrasound duration was required to achieve >90% mannosylation with nanosized vesicles (<200 nm of narrow size distribution. Optimized ultrasound parameters of 65°C, 27%, and 59 seconds for ultrasound temperature, amplitude, and time were elucidated to produce 81.1%, 46.6 nm, and 77.6% sertraline entrapment, vesicular size, and mannosylation capacity, respectively. Moreover, the transendothelial ability was significantly increased by 2.5-fold by mannosylation through binding with glucose transporters. Hence, mannosylated liposomes processed by ultrasound could be a promising approach for manufacturing and scale-up of brain-targeting liposomes. Keywords: CNS delivery, sizing, lipid based formulations, quality by design, sertraline hydrochloride

  19. Edge energy transport barrier and turbulence in the I-mode regime on Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, A. E.; Whyte, D. G.; Churchill, R. M.; Cziegler, I.; Dominguez, A.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Hughes, J. W.; Rice, J. E.; Bespamyatnov, I.; Greenwald, M. J.; Howard, N.; Lipschultz, B.; Marmar, E. S.; Reinke, M. L.; Rowan, W. L.; Terry, J. L.

    2011-05-01

    We report extended studies of the I-mode regime [Whyte et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 105005 (2010)] obtained in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [Marmar et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 51(3), 3261 (2007)]. This regime, usually accessed with unfavorable ion B × ∇B drift, features an edge thermal transport barrier without a strong particle transport barrier. Steady I-modes have now been obtained with favorable B × ∇B drift, by using specific plasma shapes, as well as with unfavorable drift over a wider range of shapes and plasma parameters. With favorable drift, power thresholds are close to the standard scaling for L-H transitions, while with unfavorable drift they are ˜ 1.5-3 times higher, increasing with Ip. Global energy confinement in both drift configurations is comparable to H-mode scalings, while density profiles and impurity confinement are close to those in L-mode. Transport analysis of the edge region shows a decrease in edge χeff, by typically a factor of 3, between L- and I-mode. The decrease correlates with a drop in mid-frequency fluctuations (f ˜ 50-150 kHz) observed on both density and magnetics diagnostics. Edge fluctuations at higher frequencies often increase above L-mode levels, peaking at f ˜ 250 kHz. This weakly coherent mode is clearest and has narrowest width (Δf/f ˜ 0.45) at low q95 and high Tped, up to 1 keV. The Er well in I-mode is intermediate between L- and H-mode and is dominated by the diamagnetic contribution in the impurity radial force balance, without the Vpol shear typical of H-modes.

  20. Applying the International Nuclear Event Scale to radioactive materials transport events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krembel, D.

    2002-01-01

    Expanding the scope of its activities to include controlling the safe transport of radioactive materials, the French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) has decided to apply the INES scale to transport events, following a wide-ranging debate bringing together experts, industry and the Conseil Superieur de la Surete et de l'Information Nucleaire (Higher Council for Nuclear Safety and Information). International interest in French experience has gradually raised the question of harmonised application of the INES scale to transport events by the competent international authorities. (author)

  1. A process and container for transport and storage of irradiated internal equipment from a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubourg, M.

    1996-01-01

    A transfer container is assembled (from at least two components) around the highly irradiated internal equipment, in the reactor pool; the entire internal equipment is then transported, as a whole, in the container to a storage zone. The storage container walls are fitted with biological protection and cooling means

  2. Predicting the impacts of new technology aircraft on international air transportation demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausrotas, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    International air transportation to and from the United States was analyzed. Long term and short term effects and causes of travel are described. The applicability of econometric methods to forecast passenger travel is discussed. A nomograph is developed which shows the interaction of economic growth, airline yields, and quality of service in producing international traffic.

  3. Transport of gases through concrete barriers. Task 3: characterization of radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, A.W.; Atkinson, A.; Claisse, P.A.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of the cementitious materials within a radioactive waste repository as a physical barrier to the migration of radionuclides depends on the maintenance of the integrity of the barrier. Potentially, this can be compromised by physical damage to the barrier caused by pressurization as gas is generated within the repository. The maintenance of chemical homogeneity within the material used for backfilling the repository may also be compromised as a consequence of gas pressurization through the formation of additional cracks and the reaction of cementitious materials with gases such as carbon dioxide. Consequently, the migration of gas within repository construction materials may be a significant parameter in both the design of a repository and the provision of a safety-case for disposal. The migration of hydrogen, helium, methane, argon and carbon dioxide has been studied for materials selected to be typical of repository structural concretes and grouts that are being considered for backfilling and waste encapsulation. The apparent permeability of these materials to gas has been shown to be dependent on gas type and average pressure in the structural concrete due to the effects of Knudsen flow at pressures of the order of 100 kPa. This is not observed in the grouts due to the significantly greater pore size. The permeability coefficients of the grouts are several orders of magnitude greater than those of the concrete. Gas migration is strongly influenced by the degree of water saturation of the materials. The presence of interfaces within the materials results in an increase in permeability at higher degrees of water saturation. A simple model has been developed to simulate the effects of gas pressurization. The tangential hoop stress at the surface of a void is calculated and comparison with the expected tensile strength of the materials is used to assess the potential for cracking. The backfill grouts seem to have sufficient permeability to disperse

  4. Rapid transport of CCL11 across the blood-brain barrier: regional variation and importance of blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Michelle A; Morofuji, Yoichi; Owen, Joshua B; Banks, William A

    2014-06-01

    Increased blood levels of the eotaxin chemokine C-C motif ligand 11 (CCL11) in aging were recently shown to negatively regulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis. How circulating CCL11 could affect the central nervous system (CNS) is not clear, but one possibility is that it can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we show that CCL11 undergoes bidirectional transport across the BBB. Transport of CCL11 from blood into whole brain (influx) showed biphasic kinetics, with a slow phase preceding a rapid phase of uptake. We found that the slow phase was explained by binding of CCL11 to cellular components in blood, whereas the rapid uptake phase was mediated by direct interactions with the BBB. CCL11, even at high doses, did not cause BBB disruption. All brain regions except striatum showed a delayed rapid-uptake phase. Striatum had only an early rapid-uptake phase, which was the fastest of any brain region. We also observed a slow but saturable transport system for CCL11 from brain to blood. C-C motif ligand 3 (CCR3), an important receptor for CCL11, did not facilitate CCL11 transport across the BBB, although high concentrations of a CCR3 inhibitor increased brain uptake without causing BBB disruption. Our results indicate that CCL11 in the circulation can access many regions of the brain outside of the neurogenic niche via transport across the BBB. This suggests that blood-borne CCL11 may have important physiologic functions in the CNS and implicates the BBB as an important regulator of physiologic versus pathologic effects of this chemokine.

  5. [Concrete pain prevention measures regarding hospital internal transport in a cancer center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebbak, Jean-Marie; Vignozzi, Annick; Bussy, Catherine; Charleux, Diane; Laplanche, Agnès; Mathivon, Delphine; Di Palma, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Iatrogenic pain is a common problem for cancer patients, including those due to hospital internal transport. An original prospective study conducted in 2006 allowed risk factor identification, and from 2007, a pluri-annual progress plan was implemented. Its actions were systematically evaluated and all phases of transportation reconsidered: preparation, patient transport to and care in medicotechnical units. Measures applied to anticipate these pains help improve the quality of hospital care. All professionals involved in the patient transportation system need to be made aware of this and not only hospital porters.

  6. Coupled processes of fluid flow, solute transport, and geochemical reactions in reactive barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeongkon; Schwartz, Franklin W.; Xu, Tianfu; Choi, Heechul, and Kim, In S.

    2004-01-02

    A complex pattern of coupling between fluid flow and mass transport develops when heterogeneous reactions occur. For instance, dissolution and precipitation reactions can change a porous medium's physical properties, such as pore geometry and thus permeability. These changes influence fluid flow, which in turn impacts the composition of dissolved constituents and the solid phases, and the rate and direction of advective transport. Two-dimensional modeling studies using TOUGHREACT were conducted to investigate the coupling between flow and transport developed as a consequence of differences in density, dissolution precipitation, and medium heterogeneity. The model includes equilibrium reactions for aqueous species, kinetic reactions between the solid phases and aqueous constituents, and full coupling of porosity and permeability changes resulting from precipitation and dissolution reactions in porous media. In addition, a new permeability relationship is implemented in TOUGHREACT to examine the effects of geochemical reactions and density difference on plume migration in porous media. Generally, the evolutions in the concentrations of the aqueous phase are intimately related to the reaction-front dynamics. Plugging of the medium contributed to significant transients in patterns of flow and mass transport.

  7. The future of transportation in sustainable energy systems: Opportunities and barriers in a clean energy transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominkovic, Dominik Franjo; Bačeković, Ivan; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    2017-01-01

    and energy resources. Especially challenging transition is envisaged for heavy-weight, long-range vehicles and airplanes. A detailed literature review was carried out in order to detect the current state of the research on clean transport sector, as well as to point out the gaps in the research. In order...

  8. Environmental impact assessment in urban transport planning: Exploring process-related barriers in Spanish practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soria-Lara, J.A.; Bertolini, L.; te Brömmelstroet, M.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of EIA for evaluating transport planning projects is increasingly being questioned by practitioners, institutions and scholars. The academic literature has traditionally focused more on solving content-related problems with EIA (i.e. the measurement of environmental effects) than

  9. Modelling of the blood-brain barrier transport of morphine-3-glucuronide studied using microdialysis in the rat: involvement of probenecid-sensitive transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Rujia; Bouw, M René; Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of probenecid on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport of morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G). Two groups of rats received an exponential infusion of M3G over 4 h to reach a target plasma concentration of 65 μM on two consecutive days. Probenecid was co-administered in the treatment group on day 2. Microdialysis was used to estimate unbound M3G concentrations in brain extracellular fluid (ECF) and blood. In vivo recovery of M3G was calculated with retrodialysis by drug, preceding the drug administration. The BBB transport was modelled using NONMEM. In the probenecid group, the ratio of the steady-state concentration of unbound M3G in brain ECF to that in blood was 0.08±0.02 in the absence and 0.16±0.05 in the presence of probenecid (P=0.001). In the control group, no significant difference was found in this ratio between the 2 days (0.11±0.05 and 0.10±0.02, respectively). The process that appears to be mainly influenced by probenecid is influx clearance into the brain (0.11 μl min−1 g-brain−1 vs 0.17 μl min−1 g-brain−1, in the absence vs presence of probenecid, Pprobenecid. In conclusion, a probenecid-sensitive transport system is involved in the transport of M3G across the BBB. PMID:11139459

  10. Single-electron transport driven by surface acoustic waves: Moving quantum dots versus short barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utko, Pawel; Hansen, Jørn Bindslev; Lindelof, Poul Erik

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the response of the acoustoelectric-current driven by a surface-acoustic wave through a quantum point contact in the closed-channel regime. Under proper conditions, the current develops plateaus at integer multiples of ef when the frequency f of the surface-acoustic wave...... or the gate voltage V-g of the point contact is varied. A pronounced 1.1 MHz beat period of the current indicates that the interference of the surface-acoustic wave with reflected waves matters. This is supported by the results obtained after a second independent beam of surface-acoustic wave was added......, though at different current values, as if they were superposed on each other. Their presence could result from two independent quantization mechanisms for the acoustoelectric-current. We point out that short potential barriers determining the properties of our nominally long constrictions could lead...

  11. Self-consistent computation of transport barrier formation by fluid drift turbulence in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.; Jenko, F.; Peeters, A.; Teo, A.C-Y.

    2001-01-01

    (1) Computations of turbulence from the electromagnetic gyrofluid model are performed in a flux surface geometry representing the actual MHD equilibrium of the ASDEX Upgrade edge flux surfaces. The transition to ideal ballooning seen in simple geometries as the plasma beta rises is suppressed, leaving the transport at quantitatively realistic levels. Computations for core parameters at half-radius geometry show significant contribution due to the finite beta electron dynamics, possibly removing the standard ITG threshold. (2) Strong inward vorticity transport in edge turbulence, resulting from ion diamagnetic flows, may lead to a build up of mean ExB vorticity fast enough to cause an H-mode transition. (3) Friction of mean ion flows against neutrals involves both toroidal and poloidal flow components, leading to a finite radial current due to a given ExB profile even with zero poloidal rotation. (author)

  12. Self-consistent computation of transport barrier formation by fluid drift turbulence in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.; Jenko, F.; Peeters, A.G.; Teo, A.C.Y.

    1999-01-01

    (1) Computations of turbulence from the electromagnetic gyro fluid model are performed in a flux surface geometry representing the actual MHD equilibrium of the ASDEX Upgrade edge flux surfaces. The transition to ideal ballooning seen in simple geometries as the plasma beta rises is suppressed, leaving the transport at quantitatively realistic levels. Computations for core parameters at half-radius geometry show significant contribution due to the finite beta electron dynamics, possibly removing the standard ITG threshold. (2) Strong inward vorticity transport in edge turbulence, resulting from ion diamagnetic flows, may lead to a build up of mean ExB vorticity fast enough to cause an H-mode transition. (3) Friction of mean ion flows against neutrals involves both toroidal and poloidal flow components, leading to a finite radial current due to a given ExB profile even with zero poloidal rotation. (author)

  13. Study Regarding the Provision of Security and Safety in the International Maritime Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana POPA

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The security in transport has become a crucial issue internationally, especially after the terrorist attacks of September 2001 and even more recently. Maritime, along with aviation, is considered a sensitive and of high-risk transport sector, in terms of security. Moreover, topics related to safety in maritime transport have become very important over the past decades mostly because of the numerous maritime accidents putting in danger both human lives and the environment. Taking into account the global dimension of maritime transport along with the fact that the participation of Asia in the world trade during the past decade has been substantial, the current maritime safety and security practices apply for all areas. This can only be achieved through the application of high standards and regulations setting the prerequisites for safe and secure navigation. In this direction, a significant number of Directives, Regulations and Initiatives on maritime safety and security have been introduced by international and European organizations, such as the International Maritime Organization, (I.M.O., the International Labour Organization (I.L.O. and the European Union (EU. In the framework of this analysis, the levels of compliance of European and Asian countries, regarding the international legislation, is examined while special emphasis is given on the problems and difficulties encountered during the implementation processes. Furthermore, a number of recommendations aiming to enhance the existing levels of safety and security in maritime transport in both examined area is provided.

  14. Grunt language versus accent: the perceived communication barriers between international medical graduates and patients in Central Wheatbelt catchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Jessica; Macdonald, William; Bulsara, Caroline; Lim, David

    2012-01-01

    Due to the chronic shortages of GPs in Australian rural and remote regions, considerable numbers of international medical graduates (IMG) have been recruited. IMG experience many difficulties when relocating to Australia with one of the most significant being effective GP-patient communication. Given that this is essential for effective consultation it can have a substantial impact on health care. A purposive sample of seven practising GPs (five IMG, two Australian-trained doctors (ATD)) was interviewed using a semistructured face-to-face interviewing technique. GPs from Nigeria, Egypt, United Kingdom, India, Singapore and Australia participated. Interviews were transcribed and then coded. The authors used qualitative thematic analysis of interview transcripts to identify common themes. IMG-patient communication barriers were considered significant in the Wheatbelt region as identified by both IMG and ATD. ATD indicated they were aware of IMG-patient communication issues resulting in subsequent consults with patients to explain results and diagnoses. Significantly, a lack of communication between ATD and IMG also emerged, creating a further barrier to effective communication. Analysis of the data generated several important findings that rural GP networks should consider when integrating new IMG into the community. Addressing the challenges related to cross-cultural differences should be a priority, in order to enable effective communication. More open communication between ATD and IMG about GP-patient communication barriers and education programs around GP-patient communication would help both GP and patient satisfaction.

  15. Air Transport and Operations. Proceedings of the Third International Air Transport and Operations Symposium 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curran, R.; Fischer, L.; Pérez, D.; Klein, K.; Hoekstra, J.; Roling, P.; Verhagen, W.J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Air transport must evolve if it is to optimize its value in the 21st century. The mood in the aerospace industry is positive with regard to economic recovery, but the focus in this transitional time must be on sustaining value, without losing sight of environmental and safety priorities

  16. Water transport through cement-based barriers-A preliminary study using neutron radiography and tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brew, D.R.M. [ANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation), Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)], E-mail: dbr@ansto.gov.au; Beer, F.C. de; Radebe, M.J.; Nshimirimana, R. [Necsa (South African Nuclear Energy Corporation), Pretoria (South Africa); McGlinn, P.J.; Aldridge, L.P.; Payne, T.E. [ANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation), Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2009-06-21

    In this preliminary study we use neutron radiography and tomography to examine differences in water transport through cement pastes and mortars. Bulk residual water contents and sorptivity curves determined using neutron radiography are compared with data obtained gravimetrically. In addition, macro-pore volume distributions of each sample were measured. Furthermore, it was possible to use neutron radiography to monitor the change in the mass of water when samples were dried or when water moved into the samples. The trends and absolute values of weight loss and gain obtained using both approaches are very consistent for mortars, especially when a neutron-scattering correction is applied.

  17. Delivery of dopamine transporter tracer (PE2I) through blood brain barrier with ultrasound and microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrière, Sophie; Escoffre, Jean-Michel; Bodard, Sylvie; Novell, Anthony; Vergote, Jackie; Vercouillie, Johnny; Thiéry, Jean-Claude; Chalon, Sylvie; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2012-10-01

    The blood-brain barrier plays a major role in controlling the delivery of therapeutic and imaging agents to the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of ultrasound and microbubbles to increase its delivery through the BBB and by determining the optimal experimental conditions that achieve a transient and safe BBB disruption. First, we established the ultrasound conditions that achieved a transient BBB disruption in rats using a non-permeant marker, Evans blue. Hence SonoVue® (450 μL/kg) and Evans blue (100 mg/kg) were intravenously administered. BBB leakage was obtained using ultrasound insonation through the rat skull at 1.6 MPa, PRF 1 Hz, duty cycle 12%, burst 10 ms during 120 sec. BBB disruption was observed in all treated animals (N=4) by histological analysis. The same experimental conditions were applied to enhance brain uptake of PE2I. Biological samples were analyzed using a scintillation counter apparatus. The results showed 50% and 20% increase of 125I-PE2I uptake in the striatum and cerebral cortex, respectively, in the treated rats (N=5) versus control (N=4). Similar enhancements were observed using SonoVue® at half concentration. This innovative method provides a great potential for intracerebral delivery of molecular ligands that could be used for the therapy of brain diseases.

  18. Investigating dominant processes in ZVI permeable reactive barriers using reactive transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Anne; Ruhl, Aki S.; Amos, Richard T.

    2013-08-01

    The reactive and hydraulic efficacy of zero valent iron permeable reactive barriers (ZVI PRBs) is strongly affected by geochemical composition of the groundwater treated. An enhanced version of the geochemical simulation code MIN3P was applied to simulate dominating processes in chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) treating ZVI PRBs including geochemical dependency of ZVI reactivity, gas phase formation and a basic formulation of degassing. Results of target oriented column experiments with distinct chemical conditions (carbonate, calcium, sulfate, CHCs) were simulated to parameterize the model. The simulations demonstrate the initial enhancement of anaerobic iron corrosion due to carbonate and long term inhibition by precipitates (chukanovite, siderite, iron sulfide). Calcium was shown to enhance long term corrosion due to competition for carbonate between siderite, chukanovite, and aragonite, with less inhibition of iron corrosion by the needle like aragonite crystals. Application of the parameterized model to a field site (Bernau, Germany) demonstrated that temporarily enhanced groundwater carbonate concentrations caused an increase in gas phase formation due to the acceleration of anaerobic iron corrosion.

  19. Impurity accumulation and performance of ITER and DEMO plasmas in the presence of transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatthong, B; Promping, J; Onjun, T

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the impurity accumulations and their performance in the presence of both ITB and ETB in ITER and DEMO plasmas are investigated using a BALDUR integrated predictive modelling code. In these simulations, a combination of a neoclassical transport model NCLASS and an anomalous transport model Mixed Bohm/gyro-Bohm is used. The boundary condition is described at the top of the pedestal, which is calculated theoretically based on a combination of magnetic and flow shear stabilization pedestal width scaling and an infinite-n ballooning pressure gradient model. The toroidal flow is calculated based on the NTV (neoclassical toroidal viscosity) toroidal velocity model. The time evolution of plasma temperature and density profiles of ITER and DEMO (Korean K-DEMO and Japanese DEMO models A, B and C) plasmas are simulated in H -mode scenario with and without ITB formation. It is found that Japanese DEMO model C yields highest plasma temperature; while Korean DEMO yields the best plasma performance among those designs considered. Impurity accumulation is found to be highest in Japanese DEMO model B. (paper)

  20. Peptide transport through the blood-brain barrier. Final report 1 Jul 87-31 Dec 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partridge, W.M.

    1991-01-15

    Most neuropeptides are incapable of entering the brain from blood owing to the presence of unique anatomical structures in the brain capillary wall, which makes up the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Such neuropeptides could be introduced into the bloodstream by intranasal insufflation and, thus, could have powerful medicinal properties (e.g., Beta-endorphin for the treatment of pain, vasopressin analogues for treatment of memory, ACTH analogues for treatment of post-traumatic epilepsy), should these peptides be capable of traversing the BBB. One such strategy for peptide delivery through the BBB is the development of chimeric peptides, which is the basis of the present contract. The production of chimeric peptides involves the covalent coupling of a nontransportable peptide (e.g., Beta-endorphin, vasopressin) to a transportable vector peptide (e.g., insulin, transferrin, cationized albumin, histone). The transportable peptide is capable of penetrating the BBB via receptor-mediated or absorptive-mediated transcytosis. Therefore, the introduction of chimeric peptides allows the nontransportable peptide to traverse the BBB via a physiologic piggy back mechanism.

  1. A mathematical approach for assessing the transport of large neutral amino acids across the blood-brain barrier in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Rasmus Holmboe; Berg, Ronan M G

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the large neutral amino acid (LNAA) transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is thought to contribute to brain dysfunction in a number of clinical conditions, including phenylketonuria, acute liver failure, and sepsis. Here, we present a novel approach for estimating BBB permeability and the LNAA concentrations in brain extracellular fluid, by demonstrating that they can be mathematically derived on the basis of kinetic constants of the BBB available from the literature, if cerebral blood flow and the arterial and jugular venous LNAA concentrations are known. While it is well known that the permeability surface area product of the BBB to a LNAA from blood to brain (PS1) can be calculated from the arterial LNAA concentrations and kinetic constants of the BBB, we demonstrate that the permeability surface area product from brain to blood (PS2) can be calculated by deriving the substrate activity of the saturable transporter from the kinetic constants and arterial and jugular venous LNAA concentrations, and that the concentration of the LNAA in brain extracellular fluid can then be determined. This approach is methodically simple, and may be useful for assessing the transcerebral exchange kinetics of LNAAs in future human-experimental and clinical studies.

  2. The Serotonin Transporter Undergoes Constitutive Internalization and Is Primarily Sorted to Late Endosomes and Lysosomal Degradation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels; Bay, Tina; Eriksen, Jacob; Gether, Ulrik; Jørgensen, Trine Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) plays a critical role in regulating serotonin signaling by mediating reuptake of serotonin from the extracellular space. The molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling SERT levels in the membrane remain poorly understood. To study trafficking of the surface resident SERT, two functional epitope-tagged variants were generated. Fusion of a FLAG-tagged one-transmembrane segment protein Tac to the SERT N terminus generated a transporter with an extracellular epitope suited for trafficking studies (TacSERT). Likewise, a construct with an extracellular antibody epitope was generated by introducing an HA (hemagglutinin) tag in the extracellular loop 2 of SERT (HA-SERT). By using TacSERT and HA-SERT in antibody-based internalization assays, we show that SERT undergoes constitutive internalization in a dynamin-dependent manner. Confocal images of constitutively internalized SERT demonstrated that SERT primarily co-localized with the late endosomal/lysosomal marker Rab7, whereas little co-localization was observed with the Rab11, a marker of the “long loop” recycling pathway. This sorting pattern was distinct from that of a prototypical recycling membrane protein, the β2-adrenergic receptor. Furthermore, internalized SERT co-localized with the lysosomal marker LysoTracker and not with transferrin. The sorting pattern was further confirmed by visualizing internalization of SERT using the fluorescent cocaine analog JHC1-64 and by reversible and pulse-chase biotinylation assays showing evidence for lysosomal degradation of the internalized transporter. Finally, we found that SERT internalized in response to stimulation with 12-myristate 13-acetate co-localized primarily with Rab7- and LysoTracker-positive compartments. We conclude that SERT is constitutively internalized and that the internalized transporter is sorted mainly to degradation. PMID:24973209

  3. Organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1 is involved in pentamidine transport at the human and mouse blood-brain barrier (BBB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayathri N Sekhar

    Full Text Available Pentamidine is an effective trypanocidal drug used against stage 1 Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT. At the blood-brain barrier (BBB, it accumulates inside the endothelial cells but has limited entry into the brain. This study examined transporters involved in pentamidine transport at the human and mouse BBB using hCMEC/D3 and bEnd.3 cell lines, respectively. Results revealed that both cell lines expressed the organic cation transporters (OCT1, OCT2 and OCT3, however, P-gp was only expressed in hCMEC/D3 cells. Polarised expression of OCT1 was also observed. Functional assays found that ATP depletion significantly increased [3H]pentamidine accumulation in hCMEC/D3 cells (***p<0.001 but not in bEnd.3 cells. Incubation with unlabelled pentamidine significantly decreased accumulation in hCMEC/D3 and bEnd.3 cells after 120 minutes (***p<0.001. Treating both cell lines with haloperidol and amantadine also decreased [3H]pentamidine accumulation significantly (***p<0.001 and **p<0.01 respectively. However, prazosin treatment decreased [3H]pentamidine accumulation only in hCMEC/D3 cells (*p<0.05, and not bEnd.3 cells. Furthermore, the presence of OCTN, MATE, PMAT, ENT or CNT inhibitors/substrates had no significant effect on the accumulation of [3H]pentamidine in both cell lines. From the data, we conclude that pentamidine interacts with multiple transporters, is taken into brain endothelial cells by OCT1 transporter and is extruded into the blood by ATP-dependent mechanisms. These interactions along with the predominant presence of OCT1 in the luminal membrane of the BBB contribute to the limited entry of pentamidine into the brain. This information is of key importance to the development of pentamidine based combination therapies which could be used to treat CNS stage HAT by improving CNS delivery, efficacy against trypanosomes and safety profile of pentamidine.

  4. Transport characteristics of Pd Schottky barrier diodes on epitaxial n-GaSb as determined from temperature dependent current–voltage measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venter, A., E-mail: andre.venter@nmmu.ac.za [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Murape, D.M.; Botha, J.R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Auret, F.D. [Department of Physics, University of the Pretoria, Lynnwood Road, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependent transport characteristics of Pd/n-GaSb:Te Schottky contacts with low and saturating reverse current are investigated by means of current–voltage measurements between 80 K and 320 K. The apparent barrier height and ideality factor increase with a decrease in temperature. Neither thermionic nor thermionic field emission can explain the low temperature characteristics of these diodes. Instead, evidence is presented for barrier inhomogeneity across the metal/semiconductor contact. A plot of the barrier height, ϕ{sub b} vs. 1/2kT revealed a double Gaussian distribution for the barrier height with ϕ{sub b,mean} assuming values of 0.59 eV ± 0.07 (80–140 K) and 0.25 eV ± 0.12 (140–320 K) respectively. - Highlights: • Transport characteristics of Pd/epitaxial n-GaSb:Te SBDs are studied by means of I-V-T measurements. • SBDs have remarkably low and saturating reverse current – of the lowest ever reported for GaSb. • Transport behaviour is explained by considering electronic states present on the GaSb surface. • Evidence is presented for barrier inhomogeneity across the metal-semiconductor contact.

  5. Quality management for the international transportation of non-human primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Elmore

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Safe and humane transportation of live animals requires dedicated, informed personnel who carefully plan and attend to the details of appropriate animal care and handling throughout the shipping process. Specifically, although transportation of non-human primates shares goals common to all live animal transport, it also poses unique challenges stemming from the nature of these animals. Some of these unique challenges of transporting non-human primates, include the impact of public perception of non-human primates as cargo, maintaining biosecurity of non-human primate cargo, safety of both the non-human primate and public contacts, meeting the vital husbandry needs of varying species of non-human primates and compliance with numerous regulatory agencies, which may have overlapping responsibilities. This discussion will focus on these important considerations, as they relate to the legal international transportation of non-human primates for scientific use.

  6. International Oil Price’s Impacts on Carbon Emission in China’s Transportation Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxing Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper analyses the impact mechanism of international oil price on the industrial carbon emission, and uses the partial least squares regression model to study international oil price’s impact on carbon emissions in China’s transportation industry.Design/methodology/approach: This paper chooses five independent variables of GDP, international oil price, private car population, passenger and freight transportation volume as impact factors to investigate industrial carbon emissions, the paper also analyses the impact mechanism of international oil price on the industrial carbon emission, and finally the paper uses the partial least squares regression model to study international oil price’s impact on carbon emissions in China’s transportation industry. With the independent variables’ historical data from 1994 to 2009 as a sample, the fitting of the industry carbon emissions is satisfying. And based on the data of 2011, the paper maintains the private car owning, passenger and freight transportation volume to study international oil prices’ impact on the industry carbon emissions at different levels of GDP.Findings: The results show that: with the same GDP growth, the industry carbon emissions increase with the rise in international oil prices, and vice versa, the industry carbon emissions decrease; and lastly when GDP increases to a certain extent, in both cases of international oil prices’ rise or fall, the industry carbon emissions will go up, and the industry carbon emissions increase even faster while the energy prices are rising.Practical implications: Limit the growth in private-vehicle ownership, change China's transport sector within the next short-term in the structure of energy consumption and put forward China's new energy, alternative energy sources and renewable energy application so as to weaken the dependence on international oil, and indirectly slowdown China's GDP growth rate, which are all possible

  7. On the possibility of high-velocity tidal sterams as dynamic barriers to longshore sediment transport: evidence from the continental shelf off the Gulf of Kutch, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, R.R.; Hashimi, N.H.; Rao, V.P.

    and clay minerals. The distinct differences have resulted because the high-velocity (2 to 2.5 knots) tidal stream at the gulf mouth acts as a dynamic barrier inhibiting sediment transport across the month. Differences in the distribution of sand size...

  8. New insight into the structure, internal rotation barrier and vibrational analysis of 2-fluorostyrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuttolomondo, Maria Eugenia [Instituto de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Bioquimica, Quimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, San Lorenzo 456, 4000 Tucuman (Argentina); Navarro, Amparo, E-mail: anavarro@ujaen.es [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Universidad de Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas, 23071 Jaen (Spain); Pena, Tomas; Fernandez-Liencres, Maria Paz; Granadino-Roldan, Jose Manuel [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Universidad de Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas, 23071 Jaen (Spain); Parker, Stewart F. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Fernandez-Gomez, Manuel [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Universidad de Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas, 23071 Jaen (Spain)

    2009-06-30

    The molecular structure of 2-fluorostyrene has been optimized at ab initio (MP2 and CCSD) and DFT levels (B3LYP, mPW1PW91) with different basis sets (6-31G*, 6-311++G**, cc-pVDZ). B3LYP predicts planar structures for both cis and trans conformers, the latter being more stable than the former. mPW1PW91, MP2 and CCSD calculations yield a quasi-planar conformation in agreement with XRD and microwave data. The vinyl-phenyl torsion barrier of 2-fluorostyrene has been calculated at B3LYP, mPW1PW91, MP2 and CCSD levels with 6-31G{sup *} basis set as well as at MP2/cc-pVDZ level. Results have been compared with experimental data from the vibronic spectrum of the jet-cooled compound through a deconvolution of the total electronic potential energy by a sixfold Fourier-type expansion. As a result, MP2/cc-pVDZ shows the best performance as regards the torsional barrier height for the trans form. The effects governing the torsion barriers and preferred conformations have been analyzed at mPW1PW91/6-31G{sup *} and MP2/cc-pVDZ levels. To achieve this, two different schemes, i.e. the total electron energy and the natural bond orbital, NBO, partition schemes have been used. The Atoms-in-Molecules (AIM) theory has been applied to the cis and trans conformers in order to detect intramolecular contacts. Furthermore, a twofold aimed analysis of the vibrational spectrum has been performed. First, to obtain a complete assignment nonexistent so far and second, to confirm the being of the predicted cis and trans forms in the liquid and solid states. New records of infrared and Raman spectra, and for the first time, the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectrum have been used. Moreover, the mPW1PW91/6-31G* harmonic force field has been scaled using a multiple scaling (SQM) force field procedure. To achieve this, the initial scale factors were refined in order to get the best possible fitting between the calculated and experimental frequencies attaining to a final rms deviation of 5 cm

  9. Attenuation of pyrite oxidation with a fly ash pre-barrier: Reactive transport modelling of column experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Lopez, R.; Cama, J.; Nieto, J.M.; Ayora, C.; Saaltink, M.W. [University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain). Dept. of Geology

    2009-09-15

    Conventional permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for passive treatment of groundwater contaminated by acid mine drainage (AMD) use limestone as reactive material that neutralizes water acidity. However, the limestone-alkalinity potential ceases as inevitable precipitation of secondary metal-phases on grain surfaces occurs, limiting its efficiency. In the present study, fly ash derived from coal combustion is investigated as an alternative alkalinity generating material for the passive treatment of AMD using solution-saturated column experiments. Unlike conventional systems, the utilization of fly ash in a pre-barrier to intercept the non-polluted recharge water before this water reacts with pyrite-rich wastes is proposed. Chemical variation in the columns was interpreted with the reactive transport code RETRASO. In parallel, kinetics of fly ash dissolution at alkaline pH were studied using flow-through experiments and incorporated into the model. In a saturated column filled solely with pyritic sludge-quartz sand (1: 10), oxidation took place at acidic conditions (pH 3.7). According to SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} release and pH, pyrite dissolution occurred favourably in the solution-saturated porous medium until dissolved O{sub 2} was totally consumed. In a second saturated column, pyrite oxidation took place at alkaline conditions (pH 10.45) as acidity was neutralized by fly ash dissolution in a previous level. At this pH Fe release from pyrite dissolution was immediately depleted as Fe-oxy(hydroxide) phases that precipitated on the pyrite grains, forming Fe-coatings (microencapsulation). With time, pyrite microencapsulation inhibited oxidation in practically 97% of the pyritic sludge. Rapid pyrite-surface passivation decreased its reactivity, preventing AMD production in the relatively short term.

  10. Shift of subtropical transport barriers explains observed hemispheric asymmetry of decadal trends of age of air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Stiller

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In response to global warming, the Brewer–Dobson circulation in the stratosphere is expected to accelerate and the mean transport time of air along this circulation to decrease. This would imply a negative stratospheric age of air trend, i.e. an air parcel would need less time to travel from the tropopause to any point in the stratosphere. Age of air as inferred from tracer observations, however, shows zero to positive trends in the northern mid-latitude stratosphere and zonally asymmetric patterns. Using satellite observations and model calculations we show that the observed latitudinal and vertical patterns of the decadal changes of age of air in the lower to middle stratosphere during the period 2002–2012 are predominantly caused by a southward shift of the circulation pattern by about 5°. After correction for this shift, the observations reveal a hemispherically almost symmetric decrease of age of air in the lower to middle stratosphere up to 800 K of up to −0.25 years over the 2002–2012 period with strongest decrease in the northern tropics. This net change is consistent with long-term trends from model predictions.

  11. FAILURE MECHANISMS OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES AND llMPROVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADNAN PARLAK

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available MechanicaJ properties of high performance ceramics have been improved to the point where their use in heat engines is possible. The high temperature strength and low thermal expansion properties of bigh performance ceramics offer an advantage over metals in the development of non-water cooling engine. However, because bard environment in diesel engine combustion chamber, solving the problem of durabiUty of TBC is important. DurabiUty of thermal barrier coatings(TBC is liınited by two main failure mechanisms: Therınal expansion nlİsmatch betwcen bond coat and top coat and bond coat oxidation. Both of these can cause failure of the ceramic top coat. Developments of recent years sholv that bond coats \\Vith higher oxidation resistance tend to have better coating system cyclic lives

  12. Dependence of Streptococcus lactis Phosphate Transport on Internal Phosphate Concentration and Internal pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POOLMAN, B; NIJSSEN, RMJ; KONINGS, WN

    1987-01-01

    Uptake of phosphate by Streptococcus lactis ML3 proceeds in the absence of a proton motive force, but requires the synthesis of ATP by either arginine or lactose metabolism. The appearance of free Pi internally in arginine-metabolizing cells corresponded quantitatively with the disappearance of

  13. Modulation of cytochrome P450 metabolism and transport across intestinal epithelial barrier by ginger biophenolics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Mukkavilli

    Full Text Available Natural and complementary therapies in conjunction with mainstream cancer care are steadily gaining popularity. Ginger extract (GE confers significant health-promoting benefits owing to complex additive and/or synergistic interactions between its bioactive constituents. Recently, we showed that preservation of natural "milieu" confers superior anticancer activity on GE over its constituent phytochemicals, 6-gingerol (6G, 8-gingerol (8 G, 10-gingerol (10 G and 6-shogaol (6S, through enterohepatic recirculation. Here we further evaluate and compare the effects of GE and its major bioactive constituents on cytochrome P450 (CYP enzyme activity in human liver microsomes by monitoring metabolites of CYP-specific substrates using LC/MS/MS detection methods. Our data demonstrate that individual gingerols are potent inhibitors of CYP isozymes, whereas GE exhibits a much higher half-maximal inhibition value, indicating no possible herb-drug interactions. However, GE's inhibition of CYP1A2 and CYP2C8 reflects additive interactions among the constituents. In addition, studies performed to evaluate transporter-mediated intestinal efflux using Caco-2 cells revealed that GE and its phenolics are not substrates of P-glycoprotein (Pgp. Intriguingly, however, 10 G and 6S were not detected in the receiver compartment, indicating possible biotransformation across the Caco-2 monolayer. These data strengthen the notion that an interplay of complex interactions among ginger phytochemicals when fed as whole extract dictates its bioactivity highlighting the importance of consuming whole foods over single agents. Our study substantiates the need for an in-depth analysis of hepatic biotransformation events and distribution profiles of GE and its active phenolics for the design of safe regimens.

  14. Health risks in international container and bulk cargo transport due to volatile toxic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baur, Xaver; Budnik, Lygia T; Zhao, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    To ensure the preservation and quality of the goods, physical (i.e. radiation) or chemical pest control is needed. The dark side of such consents may bear health risks in international transport and production sharing. In fact, between 10% and 20% of all containers arriving European harbors were...

  15. Housing and Transport: Access Issues for Disabled International Students in British Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soorenian, Armineh

    2013-01-01

    This article explores two disabled people's "Seven Needs" to independent living, those of "housing" and "transport" issues, in relation to disabled international students in British universities. Firstly, students' living arrangements, including issues related to the suitability of university accommodation to their…

  16. Real-Time Scheduling Approaches for Vehicle-Based Internal Transport Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Le-Anh (Tuan); M.B.M. de Koster (René)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, we study the problem of scheduling and dispatching vehicles in vehicle-based internal transport systems within warehouses and production facilities. We develop and use two rolling horizon policies to solve real-time vehicle scheduling problems. To solve static instances of

  17. Transport of radioactive material. 1994-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-10-01

    This document lists all sales publications, IAEA-TECDOC Series, Training Course Series and National Competent Authorities Lists of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the transport of radioactive materials during the period 1994-2002. It gives a short abstract and contents of these issues along with their costs in EURO

  18. 75 FR 16808 - BDP International, Inc. v. United Transport Tankcontainers, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Complaint...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION BDP International, Inc. v. United Transport Tankcontainers, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Complaint and Assignment Notice is given that a complaint has been filed with the Federal Maritime Commission (``Commission...

  19. Invisible barriers in international labour migration : The case of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalen, H.P.; Henkens, C.J.I.M.

    2009-01-01

    Why is labour mobility in the European Union so low? To shed light on this issue we focus and examine international labour migration intentions of the Dutch potential labour force. A key characteristic of intended labour migration of the Dutch is that its low level and the fact that it is strongly

  20. Beyond Language Barriers: Teaching Self-Efficacy among East Asian International Teaching Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunha

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined roles that perceived English fluency and sociocultural adaptation difficulty play in predicting self-efficacy beliefs for teaching in a sample of 119 international teaching assistants (ITAs) from East Asian countries of China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan. Results showed that a positive relationship between perceived English…

  1. Linguistic Barriers among Internationally Educated Teachers in Ireland and Canada: A Critical Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Clea; McDaid, Rory

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on qualitative interview and focus group data collected from Internationally Educated Teachers (IETs) in the context of two different research studies conducted in Ireland and Manitoba, Canada, this article critically examines how national/regional linguistic requirements and expectations of a hidden curriculum are experienced as barriers…

  2. Fifth international symposium on the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C. Jr.; Kent, D.C.; Pope, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    This article is a brief review of the Fifth Interantional Symposium on the Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Materials held at Las Vegas, Nev., May 7-12, 1978. This symposium was sponsored by Sandia Laboratories under the auspices of the Department of Energy. Highlighting the meeting were papers on regulations, legal issues, logistics and planning, risk assessment, ad various technology- and systems-related topics. It is apparent that, although transportation of radioactive materials has received much attention in the past, even more attention will be required in the future or transportation may become a limiting factor in the nuclear power option. Areas requiring special attention include: (1) the continued evaluation and updating of regulations and the coordination of this effort on an international level; (2) the use of risk analysis not only to establish, modify, or verify regulations but also to lend credence to the regulations in the public view; (3) the development of technology to provide cost-effective and more easily used packaging and transportation systems; (4) the expansion of effort to provide accurate information to legislative and other rule-making bodies and to the public to aid in making rational decisions relative to transportation; (5) the evaluation of large-scale international transfer of spent fuel; and (6) the commitment to, and fabrication of, the large fleets of shipping systems that will soon be required to transport the growing quantities of spent fuel, nuclear waste, and other radioactive materials

  3. Targeting transferrin receptors at the blood-brain barrier improves the uptake of immunoliposomes and subsequent cargo transport into the brain parenchyma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kasper B.; Burkhart, Annette; Melander, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Drug delivery to the brain is hampered by the presence of the blood-brain barrier, which excludes most molecules from freely diffusing into the brain, and tightly regulates the active transport mechanisms that ensure sufficient delivery of nutrients to the brain parenchyma. Harnessing the possibi......Drug delivery to the brain is hampered by the presence of the blood-brain barrier, which excludes most molecules from freely diffusing into the brain, and tightly regulates the active transport mechanisms that ensure sufficient delivery of nutrients to the brain parenchyma. Harnessing...... cargo uptake in the brain endothelium and subsequent cargo transport into the brain. These findings suggest that transferrin receptor-targeting is a relevant strategy of increasing drug exposure to the brain....

  4. Analyzing internal barriers for automotive parts remanufacturers in China using grey-DEMATEL approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Xiqiang; Govindan, Kannan; Zhu, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Automotive industries have attracted attention from international sectors recently. This attention to the industry results in many innovative technologies being integrated in these manufacturing arenas. In developing countries such as the BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) countries, especia......Automotive industries have attracted attention from international sectors recently. This attention to the industry results in many innovative technologies being integrated in these manufacturing arenas. In developing countries such as the BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) countries......, especially China who is a global leader in automotive sales and production, researchers see substantial attempts to increase economic and societal values in automotive sectors through the use of many sustainable strategies. Among these sustainable strategies, remanufacturing has witnessed much debate...... in recent years. In China, automotive parts remanufacturing is still in a nascent stage, but the country is striving hard to implement a strategy in industries to result in cleaner production. Additionally, remanufacturing yields high financial, societal, and environmental returns, and it provides...

  5. The torsional barriers of two equivalent methyl internal rotations in 2,5-dimethylfuran investigated by microwave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Vinh; Bruckhuisen, Jonas; Stahl, Wolfgang; Ilyushin, Vadim; Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam

    2018-01-01

    The microwave spectrum of 2,5-dimethylfuran was recorded using two pulsed molecular jet Fourier transform microwave spectrometers which cover the frequency range from 2 to 40 GHz. The internal rotations of two equivalent methyl tops with a barrier height of approximately 439.15 cm-1 introduce torsional splittings of all rotational transitions in the spectrum. For the spectral analysis, two different computer programs were applied and compared, the PAM-C2v-2tops code based on the principal axis method which treats several torsional states simultaneously, and the XIAM code based on the combined axis method, yielding accurate molecular parameters. The experimental work was supplemented by quantum chemical calculations. Two-dimensional potential energy surfaces depending on the torsional angles of both methyl groups were calculated and parametrized.

  6. Experimental and ab initio study on structures and internal barriers to rotation in α-stannyl, germanium, and silicon carbamates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadidi, Khosrow; Khaligh, Nader Ghaffari; Islami, Parisa; Aryan, Reza; Arvin-Nezhad, Hamid

    2009-02-01

    A detailed study of structural parameters and internal rotational barriers in α-stannyl, germanium and silicon carbamates 1 [H 3 CX-CH 2-N(Me)CO 2Me X dbnd C, Si, Ge, Sn] were calculated at HF/6-311G, HF/3-21G and B3LYP/3-21G//HF/3-21G levels and compared with DNMR data of synthesized molecules and a literature X-ray data. Two minimum-energy conformers, namely A and B, with almost similar energies were found for these molecules. Effect of heteroatom on structure and relative energies ( Erel) between the participants in the conformational equilibrium (A ↔ B) of these carbamates has been investigated.

  7. Coupled modelling (transport-reaction) of the fluid-clay interactions and their feed back on the physical properties of the bentonite engineered clay barrier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marty, N.

    2006-11-01

    The originality of this work is to process feed back effects of mineralogical and chemical modifications of clays, in storage conditions, on their physical properties and therefore on their transport characteristics (porosity, molecular diffusion, permeability). These feed back effects are modelled using the KIRMAT code (Kinetic of Reaction and MAss Transfer) developed from the kinetic code KINDIS by adding the effect of water renewal in the mineral-solution reactive cells. KIRMAT resolves mass balance equations associated with mass transport together with the geochemical reactions in a 1D approach. After 100 000 years of simulated interaction at 100 C, with the fluid of the Callovo-Oxfordian geological level (COX) and with iron provided by the steel overpack corrosion, the montmorillonite of the clay barrier is only partially transformed (into illite, chlorite, saponite...). Only outer parts of the modelled profile seem to be significantly affected by smectite dissolution processes, mainly at the interface with the geological environment. The modifications of physical properties show a closure of the porosity at the boundaries of the barrier, by creating a decrease of mass transport by molecular diffusion, essentially at the interface with the iron. Permeability laws applied to this system show a decrease of the hydraulic conductivity correlated with the porosity evolution. Near the COX, the swelling pressure of the clays from the barrier decreases. In the major part of the modelled profile, the engineered clay barrier system seems to keep its initial physical properties (porosity, molecular diffusion, permeability, swelling pressure) and functionalities. (author)

  8. Tooth discoloration effects of calcium silicate based barrier materials used in revascularization and treatment with internal bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makbule Bilge Akbulut

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/purpose: Usage of barrier materials is an important step in revascularization procedure. One of the undesired properties of these barrier materials is to cause coronal tooth discoloration. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the tooth discoloration induced by ProRoot MTA (PMTA, Biodentine, and MM-MTA, as well as the efficacy of internal bleaching on this discoloration. Materials and methods: Forty-two maxillary incisor teeth were prepared. Triple antibiotic paste (TAP was placed in the root canals and incubated for 3 weeks. After removing the TAP, blood embedded spongostans were inserted into the root canals, and PMTA, Biodentine, or MM-MTA was placed over them. The teeth were incubated for 4 weeks at 37 °C; then, the internal bleaching agent was sealed for one week. The tooth color was measured throughout the study and the color change values (ΔE of each specimen were calculated, and the data was statistically analyzed using the one-way ANOVA and Tamhane's T2 tests. Results: The TAP significantly decreased the luminosity of the teeth (p  0.05. The teeth in the Biodentine group were more whitened than those of the PMTA and MM-MTA groups (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Although the PMTA, Biodentine, and MM-MTA caused similar color alterations in the teeth, more bleaching was observed on those teeth discolored using TAP + blood + Biodentine. Keywords: dental materials, endodontics, revascularization, tooth bleaching

  9. Formation of edge transport barrier in the ergodic field layer of helical divertor configuration on the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, K; Ohdachi, S; Watanabe, F; Narihara, K; Morisaki, T; Sakakibara, S; Morita, S; Goto, M; Ida, K; Masuzaki, S; Miyazawa, K; Tanaka, K; Tokuzawa, T; Watanabe, K W; Yoshinuma, M

    2006-01-01

    On the Large Helical Device (LHD), low to high confinement (L-H) transition and edge transport barrier (ETB) formation were observed in the low beta regime ((β dia ) dia ): volume-averaged beta derived from diamagnetic measurement) as well as in relatively high beta regime (>1.5%). In most of ETB plasmas electron density preferentially increases in the edge region without a substantial rise of the edge electron temperature. The ETB zone develops inside the ergodic field layer calculated in the vacuum field. The ETB formation strongly destabilizes edge coherent modes such as m/n = 2/3 or 1/2 (m, n: poloidal and toroidal mode numbers), because the plasma edge region is in the magnetic hill. The ETB is partially destroyed by the combination of these edge MHD modes and ELM-like activities. For a particular experimental condition, the forced generation of a sizable m/n = 1/1 magnetic island near the edge by application of external field perturbations facilitates the L-H transition at a lower electron density and suppresses edge MHD modes and ELM-like activities to lower levels

  10. Monolayers of IEC-18 cells as an in vitro model for screening the passive transcellular and paracellular transport across the intestinal barrier: Comparison of active and passive transport with the human colon carcinoma Caco-2 cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versantvoort, C.H.M.; Ondrewater, R.C.A.; Duizer, E.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Gilde, A.J.; Groten, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: previous studies have shown that the rat small intestinal cell line IEC-18 provides a size-selective barrier for paracellularly transported hydrophilic macromolecules. In order to determine the utility of IEC-18 cells as an in vitro model to screen the passive paracellular and transcellular

  11. International comparisons of energy and environmental efficiency in the road transport sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Abdallah, Khaled; Belloumi, Mounir; De Wolf, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The present work provides an international comparison of the energy intensity and the carbon dioxide intensity in road transport for a group of 90 countries over the period 1980–2012. This paper attempts to perform a comparative analysis to find the most appropriate mapping of the energy performance in road transport taking into account the three dimensions of sustainable energy development, namely road transport-related energy consumption, economic growth and carbon dioxide emissions. An important result of the study is the inverse relationship between energy efficiency and environmental efficiency. Through the calculated Theil coefficient, our empirical findings highlight the existence of spatial and temporal disparities between countries. In 2012, Tunisia occupies the 48th and the 38th rank respectively in terms of energy and environmental efficiency. Based on a general index of energy performance in the road transport sector, it is deemed to have a medium–high energy performance by occupying the 34th rank. The study shows the importance of enhancing a number of policies for the road transport system through the joint improvement of the fuel price policy, of the road infrastructure policy and of the fuel-efficient road vehicles policy, in order to maintain sustainable energy road transport. - Highlights: • The paper presents an international comparative analysis of the energy performance. • The road transport is analyzed for a group of 90 countries over the period 1980–2012. • There is no convergence between energy and environmental efficiencies. • Tunisia has a medium-high energy performance by occupying the 34th rank in 2012. • The findings show the importance of enhancing some policies for the road transport.

  12. International Conference on the Safe and Secure Transport of Radioactive Material: The Next Fifty Years of Transport - Creating a Safe, Secure and Sustainable Framework. Papers and Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the conference is to encourage application of appropriate levels of safety and security during transport by: Promoting international discussion on the safety and security of radioactive material transport; Identifying and sharing best practices; Identifying issues and problems; Identifying opportunities, such as providing assistance, to support national adoption of comprehensive transport safety and security frameworks; Developing ideas for coordinating and enhancing transport safety and security. Scope of the Conference: Nuclear and other radioactive material in legal regulated transport (not illicit trafficking, smuggling, etc.); All modes of transport; Safety; Security; Domestic and international movements, including transit; Response to accidents and security events; Legislative and regulatory requirements and approaches; Practical issues such as transport logistics; Regional networks; and Information security and the need for transparency. The conference is not intended to cover the technical topics covered in the PATRAM conference (package design and analysis).

  13. Nature-based care opportunities and barriers in oncology contexts: a modified international e-Delphi survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschke, Sarah; O'Callaghan, Clare C; Schofield, Penelope

    2017-10-16

    To develop recommendations regarding opportunities and barriers for nature-based care in oncology contexts using a structured knowledge generation process involving relevant healthcare and design experts. Four-round modified electronic Delphi study. Oncology patients' nature-based recommendations, uncovered in preceding qualitative investigation, were included in the first round for the expert participants' consideration. Key items (opportunities and barriers) were developed using data aggregation and synthesis, followed by item prioritisation and 10-point Likert scale ranking (1=not important, 10=very important). Descriptive statistics were calculated to assess items of highest importance representing expert recommendations. Online Delphi process constituting an electronic international survey. A purposive sample of 200 potential panellists (recruitment target n=40) comprising healthcare practitioners, managers, designers, architects and researchers were invited to participate; experts were identified via research networks, snowballing and systematic literature review. 38 experts across seven countries (Australia, USA, UK, New Zealand, Canada, Denmark and Sweden) returned questionnaire 1, which determined consent and acceptance for participation. Initial response rate was 19%, and subsequent response rates were 84%, 82% and 84% for rounds 2, 3 and 4, respectively. The Delphi panel developed recommendations consisting of 10 opportunities and 10 barriers. The following opportunities were rated to be of highest importance: window views from clinical areas onto nature; outdoor settings, gardens and courtyards with easy and effortless access; and nature-based physical exercise adapted to patient requirements. Highest-rated barriers for nature-based oncology care included lack of knowledge and awareness about benefits of nature engagement and inaccessibility, not considering access requirements for the very sick and frail. Experts suggested and agreed on a set of

  14. Barriers to the universal adoption of bilateral internal mammary artery grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umakanthan, Jeremiah; Jeyakumar, Panch; Umakanthan, Branavan; Jeyakumar, Nikeshan; Senthilkumar, Nadarajah; Saraswathy, Mathioli R; Umakanthan, Padminidevi; Umakanthan, Janani; Sial, Tamoor; Abrina, Sofia; Buendia, Frances M; Pan, Irene; Kamath, Ramadas K; Pathmarajah, Canagaratnam; Sivalingam, Kanagaratnam; Nathan, Shan A; Sunder, Shun K; Mahendra, Tom; Umakanthan, Ramanan

    2015-04-01

    The left internal mammary artery (LIMA) graft is considered the "gold standard" of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). This conduit provides increased survival, symptomatic relief, increased freedom from myocardial infarction, and increased freedom from re-intervention when compared to saphenous venous grafting. It has a remarkable long term patency rate with clinical and angiographic outcomes that are unmatched by other conduits. Given the fact that patients often require more than one graft during a coronary revascularization procedure, the prospect of bilateral internal mammary artery (BIMA) grafting has been very appealing to some surgeons. BIMA grafting has been extensively studied via multiple retrospective and prospective cohort studies and findings have indicated that BIMA grafting can have an increased survival benefit when compared to LIMA grafting alone. As a result, this technique has accrued increasing popularity over the course of the last decade. Yet, questions still remain on whether BIMA grafting is the optimal treatment modality for patients in terms of long-term prognosis. There is limited data at the present time from randomized controlled trials and only 4-12% of CABGs performed today utilize BIMA grafting. Concerns regarding perioperative complications, which patient subsets are at higher risks for complications from the technique, and the technical challenges involved in utilizing and teaching the technique have limited its widespread use. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Raising Climate Finance from International Transport Sectors. Identification and Analysis of Governance Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faber, J. [CE Delft, Delft (Netherlands); Pahuja, N.; Garg, A. [The Energy and Resources Institute TERI, New Delhi (India)

    2012-03-15

    Market based instruments (MBIs) for maritime transport have the potential to reduce emissions while at the same time raising funds for climate policies in developing countries. GHG emissions from international aviation and maritime transport accounted for approximately 5% of global anthropogenic emissions in 2005 and are rising rapidly. There is a clear need to address these emissions in order not to undermine policies for mitigating land based emissions. Developing countries need financial support to carry out climate policies, both adaptation and mitigation. The UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) makes policies by developing countries conditional on climate finance. In the current economic and financial circumstances, there is a need for new sources of finance. The governance of such MBIs should ensure that they are neither an international tax nor require hypothecation of fiscal revenues, while they should provide new and additional finance. MBIs which are in fact an international tax would not be politically feasible, and likewise hypothecation would be opposed by many states. This report finds that an emissions trading scheme (ETS) can satisfy these criteria, provided that: (1) it transfers a share of allowances directly to developing countries in order to ensure there is no net incidence on them; developing countries could auction these allowances in order to raise revenue; (2) it transfers allowances to the Green Climate Fund to support climate policies; auctioning these allowances would provide revenues for the Fund; (3) it transfers allowances to IMO or another organisation in order to finance fuel-efficiency improvements in international transport.

  16. 2013 International Conference on Electrical and Information Technologies for Rail Transportation

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Zhigang; Qin, Yong; Zhao, Minghua; Diao, Lijun

    2014-01-01

    Proceedings of the 2013 International Conference on Electrical and Information Technologies for Rail Transportation (EITRT2013) collects the latest research in this field, including a wealth of state-of-the-art research theories and applications in intelligent computing, information processing, communication technology, automatic control, etc. The objective of the proceedings is to provide a major interdisciplinary forum for researchers, engineers, academics and industrial professionals to present the most innovative research on and developments in the field of rail transportation electrical and information technologies. Contributing authors from academia, industry and the government also offer inside views of new, interdisciplinary solutions.

  17. Monitoring for Radioactive Material in International Mail Transported by Public Postal Operators. Reference Manual (Chinese Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The illegal transport of conventional explosives and biological material has been observed in public mail and could lead to serious health hazards. In response to Member States' requests to establish guidance for detecting the movement of radioactive material in international mail, the IAEA and the Universal Postal Union (UPU) undertook a joint effort to prepare this publication. It considers how radioactive materials in international mail might be detected, how best to monitor for these materials in mail facilities and how to respond appropriately. This publication brings together a concise but comprehensive description of the various techniques and equipment used to detect and control radioactive material during mail processing.

  18. Internal hydration of a metal-transporting ATPase is controlled by membrane lateral pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahmy, Karim [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biophysics; Fischermeier, E. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Pospisil, P. [A.S.C. R., Prague (Czech Republic). J. Heyrovsky Inst. Physical Chemistry; Solioz, M. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland); Sayed, A.; Hof, M.

    2017-07-01

    The active transport of ions across biological mem branes requires their hydration shell to interact with the interior of membrane proteins. However, the influence of the external lipid phase on internal dielectric dynamics is hard to access by experiment. Using the octahelical transmembrane architecture of the copper-transporting P{sub 1B}-type ATPase from Legionella pneumophila (LpCopA) as a model structure, we have established the site-specific labeling of internal cysteines with a polarity-sensitive fluorophore. This enabled dipolar relaxation studies in a solubilized form of the protein and in its lipid-embedded state in nano-discs (NDs). Time-dependent fluorescence shifts revealed the site-specific hydration and dipole mobility around the conserved ion-binding motif. The spatial distribution of both features is shaped significantly and independently of each other by membrane lateral pressure.

  19. Internal hydration of a metal-transporting ATPase is controlled by membrane lateral pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahmy, Karim; Pospisil, P.; Sayed, A.; Hof, M.

    2017-01-01

    The active transport of ions across biological mem branes requires their hydration shell to interact with the interior of membrane proteins. However, the influence of the external lipid phase on internal dielectric dynamics is hard to access by experiment. Using the octahelical transmembrane architecture of the copper-transporting P 1B -type ATPase from Legionella pneumophila (LpCopA) as a model structure, we have established the site-specific labeling of internal cysteines with a polarity-sensitive fluorophore. This enabled dipolar relaxation studies in a solubilized form of the protein and in its lipid-embedded state in nano-discs (NDs). Time-dependent fluorescence shifts revealed the site-specific hydration and dipole mobility around the conserved ion-binding motif. The spatial distribution of both features is shaped significantly and independently of each other by membrane lateral pressure.

  20. Plasma rotation evolution near the peripheral transport barrier in the presence of low-frequency MHD bursts in TUMAN-3M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulanin, V V; Askinazi, L G; Lebedev, S V; Gorohov, M V; Kornev, V A; Petrov, A V; Tukachinsky, A S; Vildjunas, M I

    2006-01-01

    The experiments described in the paper are aimed at investigating the possible influence of the low frequency magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity burst on the Ohmic H-mode in the TUMAN-3M tokamak. During the MHD burst a transient deterioration of improved confinement was observed. The study has been focused on the measurements of plasma fluctuation poloidal velocity performed by microwave Doppler reflectometry. The plasma fluctuation rotation observed before the MHD burst in the vicinity of the edge transport barrier was in the direction of plasma drift in the negative radial electric field. During the MHD activity the measured poloidal velocity was drastically decreased and even changed its sign. Radial profiles of the poloidal velocity measured in a set of reproducible tokamak shots exhibited the plasma fluctuation rotation in the ion diamagnetic drift direction at the location of the peripheral transport barrier. The possible reasons for this phenomenon are discussed

  1. Physics of transport in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Asp, E.; Bourdelle, C.; Hoang, T.; Imbeaux, F.; Joffrin, E.; Litaudon, X.; Angioni, C.; Manini, A.; Peeter, A.; Ryter, F.; Baranov, Y.; Cordey, G.; McDonald, D.C.; Parail, V.; Valovic, M.; Thyagaraja, A.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Budny, R.; Kirneva, N.; Hogeweij, D.; Nordman, H.; Weilland, J.; Tala, T.; Weisen, H.; Zabolotsky, A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper is an overview of recent results related to turbulent particle and heat transport, and triggering of Internal Transport Barriers. Particle transport is characterised by a pinch velocity that is found to be larger than the value predicted by theory of collisional transport (Ware pinch) in L-mode plasmas. Also it increases with magnetic shear. In H-mode, density peaking decreases with collisionality. Pinch velocity reaches the Ware value for large collision frequencies. Heat transport has made progress along two directions: dimensionless scaling laws and analysis of modulation experiments. Dimensionless scaling law of thermal confinement agrees with the prediction for electrostatic turbulence. Dependence with collisionality remains to be understood. Heat modulation experiments have been investigated in several devices using a critical gradient model, micro-stability analysis and predictive modelling. Thresholds and stiffness are correctly reproduced by stability analysis and modelling with Weiland model. Analysis with a critical gradient model leads to a large variability of stiffness. Finally the question of triggering Internal Transport Barriers has been addressed by analysing electron transport barriers. It is confirmed that negative magnetic shear combined with Shafranov shift is a robust stabilizing mechanism. However, some well established features of internal barriers are hardly explained by theory, in particular the role of low order rational values of the minimum safety factor, and the existence of multiple barriers. (authors)

  2. Physics of transport in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbet, X.; Asp, E.; Bourdelle, C.; Hoang, T.; Imbeaux, F.; Joffrin, E.; Litaudon, X. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache (DSM/DRFC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Mantica, P.; Sozzi, C. [Euratom-ENEA/CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Milano (Italy); Angioni, C.; Manini, A.; Peeter, A.; Ryter, F. [Euratom Association, MPI fur Plasmaphysik, Garchin bei Munchen (Germany); Baranov, Y.; Cordey, G.; McDonald, D.C.; Parail, V.; Valovic, M.; Thyagaraja, A.; Voitsekhovitch, I. [Euratom-UKAEA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX (United Kingdom); Budny, R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab; Crisati, F. [Association Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy); Kirneva, N. [Kurchatov Institute, RRC, Moscow (Russian Federation); Hogeweij, D. [Association Euratom-FOM Institute voor Plasmafysica, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Nordman, H.; Weilland, J. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology and Euratom-VR Association, Goeteborg (Sweden); Tala, T. [Association Euratom-Tekes, VTT Processes (Finland); Weisen, H.; Zabolotsky, A. [Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, CRPP, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    This paper is an overview of recent results related to turbulent particle and heat transport, and triggering of Internal Transport Barriers. Particle transport is characterised by a pinch velocity that is found to be larger than the value predicted by theory of collisional transport (Ware pinch) in L-mode plasmas. Also it increases with magnetic shear. In H-mode, density peaking decreases with collisionality. Pinch velocity reaches the Ware value for large collision frequencies. Heat transport has made progress along two directions: dimensionless scaling laws and analysis of modulation experiments. Dimensionless scaling law of thermal confinement agrees with the prediction for electrostatic turbulence. Dependence with collisionality remains to be understood. Heat modulation experiments have been investigated in several devices using a critical gradient model, micro-stability analysis and predictive modelling. Thresholds and stiffness are correctly reproduced by stability analysis and modelling with Weiland model. Analysis with a critical gradient model leads to a large variability of stiffness. Finally the question of triggering Internal Transport Barriers has been addressed by analysing electron transport barriers. It is confirmed that negative magnetic shear combined with Shafranov shift is a robust stabilizing mechanism. However, some well established features of internal barriers are hardly explained by theory, in particular the role of low order rational values of the minimum safety factor, and the existence of multiple barriers. (au0011tho.

  3. Vertical transport through AlGaN barriers in heterostructures grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, David A.; Fireman, Micha N.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Kuritzky, Leah Y.; Wu, Yuh-Renn; Speck, James S.

    2017-02-01

    The results of vertical transport through AlGaN heterobarriers are presented for ammonia molecular beam epitaxy (NH3-MBE) on c-plane GaN on sapphire templates and on m-plane bulk GaN substrates, as well as by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on m-plane bulk GaN substrates. Experiments were performed to determine the role of the AlGaN alloy as an effective barrier to vertical transport, which is an essential component of both optoelectronic and power electronic devices. The alloy composition, thickness, and doping levels of the AlGaN layers, as well as substrate orientation, were systematically varied to examine their influence on electron transport. Atom probe tomography (APT) was used to directly determine the alloy composition at the atomic scale to reveal the presence of random alloy fluctuations which provides insight into the nature of the observed transport.

  4. Communications issues for international radioactive materials transport, Post 9/11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, A.A.; Hartenstein, M.; Nawano, M.

    2004-01-01

    The terrorist attacks of September 11 th 2001 in New York and Washington (9/11) have increased government, public and media concern over terrorist attacks in general and attack on transport systems in particular. Antinuclear groups have increasingly made unsubstantiated claims about the terrorist threat to Radioactive Materials Transport and the consequences of such a threat being realised. At the same time, the international and national security regulations relating to Nuclear Materials Transport have been reviewed and tightened since 9/11. These changes have in some cases restricted the information that can be made publicly available. It is against this background that the Industry must operate and seek to inform the public through its communications activities whilst remaining within the new security framework of security regulations. These activities must necessarily provide sufficient information to counter the incorrect claims made by opponents, allay fears of the public as far as possible and provide factual and scientifically rigorous data without compromising security

  5. Communications issues for international radioactive materials transport, Post 9/11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, A.A. [International Transport, BNFL, Warrington, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Hartenstein, M. [Transport External Affairs, Marketing, Sales and Projects Div., Cogema Logistics, Saint Quentin en Yvelines (France); Nawano, M. [Transport Headquarters, Overseas Reprocessing Committee, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    The terrorist attacks of September 11{sup th} 2001 in New York and Washington (9/11) have increased government, public and media concern over terrorist attacks in general and attack on transport systems in particular. Antinuclear groups have increasingly made unsubstantiated claims about the terrorist threat to Radioactive Materials Transport and the consequences of such a threat being realised. At the same time, the international and national security regulations relating to Nuclear Materials Transport have been reviewed and tightened since 9/11. These changes have in some cases restricted the information that can be made publicly available. It is against this background that the Industry must operate and seek to inform the public through its communications activities whilst remaining within the new security framework of security regulations. These activities must necessarily provide sufficient information to counter the incorrect claims made by opponents, allay fears of the public as far as possible and provide factual and scientifically rigorous data without compromising security.

  6. Transboundary health impacts of transported global air pollution and international trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, D.; Zhang, Q.; Jiang, X.

    2017-12-01

    Millions of people die every year from diseases caused by exposure to outdoor air pollution. Some studies have estimated premature mortality related to local sources of air pollution, but local air quality can also be affected by atmospheric transport of pollution from distant sources. International trade is contributing to the globalization of emission and pollution as a result of the production of goods (and their associated emissions) in one region for consumption in another region. The effects of international trade on air pollutant emissions, air quality and health have been investigated regionally, but a combined, global assessment of the health impacts related to international trade and the transport of atmospheric air pollution is lacking. Here we combine four global models to estimate premature mortality caused by fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution as a result of atmospheric transport and the production and consumption of goods and services in different world regions. We find that, of the 3.45 million premature deaths related to PM2.5 pollution in 2007 worldwide, about 12 per cent (411,100 deaths) were related to air pollutants emitted in a region of the world other than that in which the death occurred, and about 22 per cent (762,400 deaths) were associated with goods and services produced in one region for consumption in another. For example, PM2.5 pollution produced in China in 2007 is linked to more than 64,800 premature deaths in regions other than China, including more than 3,100 premature deaths in western Europe and the USA; on the other hand, consumption in western Europe and the USA is linked to more than 108,600 premature deaths in China. Our results reveal that the transboundary health impacts of PM2.5 pollution associated with international trade are greater than those associated with long-distance atmospheric pollutant transport.

  7. Transboundary health impacts of transported global air pollution and international trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Jiang, Xujia; Tong, Dan; Davis, Steven J; Zhao, Hongyan; Geng, Guannan; Feng, Tong; Zheng, Bo; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G; Ni, Ruijing; Brauer, Michael; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Martin, Randall V; Huo, Hong; Liu, Zhu; Pan, Da; Kan, Haidong; Yan, Yingying; Lin, Jintai; He, Kebin; Guan, Dabo

    2017-03-29

    Millions of people die every year from diseases caused by exposure to outdoor air pollution. Some studies have estimated premature mortality related to local sources of air pollution, but local air quality can also be affected by atmospheric transport of pollution from distant sources. International trade is contributing to the globalization of emission and pollution as a result of the production of goods (and their associated emissions) in one region for consumption in another region. The effects of international trade on air pollutant emissions, air quality and health have been investigated regionally, but a combined, global assessment of the health impacts related to international trade and the transport of atmospheric air pollution is lacking. Here we combine four global models to estimate premature mortality caused by fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) pollution as a result of atmospheric transport and the production and consumption of goods and services in different world regions. We find that, of the 3.45 million premature deaths related to PM 2.5 pollution in 2007 worldwide, about 12 per cent (411,100 deaths) were related to air pollutants emitted in a region of the world other than that in which the death occurred, and about 22 per cent (762,400 deaths) were associated with goods and services produced in one region for consumption in another. For example, PM 2.5 pollution produced in China in 2007 is linked to more than 64,800 premature deaths in regions other than China, including more than 3,100 premature deaths in western Europe and the USA; on the other hand, consumption in western Europe and the USA is linked to more than 108,600 premature deaths in China. Our results reveal that the transboundary health impacts of PM 2.5 pollution associated with international trade are greater than those associated with long-distance atmospheric pollutant transport.

  8. First observation of a new zonal-flow cycle state in the H-mode transport barrier of the experimental advanced superconducting Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.S.; Wang, H. Q.; Wan, B. N.

    2012-01-01

    A new turbulence-flow cycle state has been discovered after the formation of a transport barrier in the H-mode plasma edge during a quiescent phase on the EAST superconducting tokamak. Zonal-flow modulation of high-frequency-broadband (0.05-1MHz) turbulence was observed in the steep-gradient regi...... reproduced this state well. © 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4769852]...

  9. Hypothetical Case and Scenario Description for International Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Adam David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Osborn, Douglas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Katherine A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cohn, Brian [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thomas, Maikael A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Parks, Mancel Jordan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Parks, Ethan Rutledge [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mohagheghi, Amir H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    To support more rigorous analysis on global security issues at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), there is a need to develop realistic data sets without using "real" data or identifying "real" vulnerabilities, hazards or geopolitically embarrassing shortcomings. In response, an interdisciplinary team led by subject matter experts in SNL's Center for Global Security and Cooperation (CGSC) developed a hypothetical case description. This hypothetical case description assigns various attributes related to international SNF transportation that are representative, illustrative and indicative of "real" characteristics of "real" countries. There is no intent to identify any particular country and any similarity with specific real-world events is purely coincidental. To support the goal of this report to provide a case description (and set of scenarios of concern) for international SNF transportation inclusive of as much "real-world" complexity as possible -- without crossing over into politically sensitive or classified information -- this SAND report provides a subject matter expert-validated (and detailed) description of both technical and political influences on the international transportation of spent nuclear fuel. [PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

  10. International cooperation for the development of consistent and stable transportation regulations to promote and enhance safety and security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strosnider, J.

    2004-01-01

    International commerce of radioactive materials crosses national boundaries, linking separate regulatory institutions with a common purpose and making it necessary for these institutions to work together in order to achieve common safety goals in a manner that does not place an undue burden on industry and commerce. Widespread and increasing use of radioactive materials across the world has led to increases in the transport of radioactive materials. The demand for consistency in the oversight of international transport has also increased to prevent unnecessary delays and costs associated with incongruent or redundant regulatory requirements by the various countries through which radioactive material is transported. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is the authority for international regulation of transportation of radioactive materials responsible for promulgation of regulations and guidance for the establishment of acceptable methods of transportation for the international community. As such, the IAEA is seen as the focal point for consensus building between its Member States to develop consistency in transportation regulations and reviews and to ensure the safe and secure transport of radioactive material. International cooperation is also needed to ensure stability in our regulatory processes. Changes to transportation regulations should be based on an anticipated safety benefit supported by risk information and insights gained from continuing experience, evaluation, and research studies. If we keep safety as the principle basis for regulatory changes, regulatory stability will be enhanced. Finally, as we endeavour to maintain consistency and stability in our international regulations, we must be mindful of the new security challenges that lay before the international community as a result of a changing terrorist environment. Terrorism is a problem of global concern that also requires international cooperation and support, as we look for ways to

  11. Regional, national and international security requirements for the transport of nuclear cargo by sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booker, P.A.; Barnwell, I. [Marine Operations, BNFL International Transport and British Nuclear Group Security (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Since the beginning of the nuclear age in the 1940's, the world has focused on the immense possibilities of nuclear power with both its destructive and productive capabilities. The civil nuclear industry in the UK, as in most nuclear weapons states, grew from the military facilities built in the post war years under the political climate of the Cold War. In the early years of the industry, civil and defence nuclear facilities were inextricably linked both in public perceptions and the regulatory infrastructure under which they operated. The nuclear arms race and the spread of communism overshadowed people's perceptions of there being two separate uses of nuclear material. This was a double edged sword which initially allowed the industry to develop largely unhindered by public concerns but latterly meant the industry could not break away from its roots and to many is still perceived as a dangerous and destructive force. Regulatory frameworks governing all aspects of the industry have developed both nationally and internationally driven by valid public concerns, political agendas and an international consensus that the unregulated use of nuclear material has catastrophic possibilities on an international scale. With the internationalisation of the civil nuclear industry and the costs associated with developing facilities to fully support each stage of the fuel cycle, from enrichment, fuel manufacturing, reprocessing and waste remediation, it became inevitable that a transport infrastructure would develop to make best use of the facilities. Regulations, both national and international are implicit in ensuring the security of nuclear material in transit. Due to the physical size of many of the irradiated fuel packages and implications of the changes to transport safety regulations, international transports of nuclear material, other than within mainland Europe, is predominantly carried out by sea.

  12. Regional, national and international security requirements for the transport of nuclear cargo by sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, P.A.; Barnwell, I.

    2004-01-01

    Since the beginning of the nuclear age in the 1940's, the world has focused on the immense possibilities of nuclear power with both its destructive and productive capabilities. The civil nuclear industry in the UK, as in most nuclear weapons states, grew from the military facilities built in the post war years under the political climate of the Cold War. In the early years of the industry, civil and defence nuclear facilities were inextricably linked both in public perceptions and the regulatory infrastructure under which they operated. The nuclear arms race and the spread of communism overshadowed people's perceptions of there being two separate uses of nuclear material. This was a double edged sword which initially allowed the industry to develop largely unhindered by public concerns but latterly meant the industry could not break away from its roots and to many is still perceived as a dangerous and destructive force. Regulatory frameworks governing all aspects of the industry have developed both nationally and internationally driven by valid public concerns, political agendas and an international consensus that the unregulated use of nuclear material has catastrophic possibilities on an international scale. With the internationalisation of the civil nuclear industry and the costs associated with developing facilities to fully support each stage of the fuel cycle, from enrichment, fuel manufacturing, reprocessing and waste remediation, it became inevitable that a transport infrastructure would develop to make best use of the facilities. Regulations, both national and international are implicit in ensuring the security of nuclear material in transit. Due to the physical size of many of the irradiated fuel packages and implications of the changes to transport safety regulations, international transports of nuclear material, other than within mainland Europe, is predominantly carried out by sea

  13. International Road Freight Transport in France: Experiences from Germany, the Netherlands and Driver Costs Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Guihery

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available These last few years, French international road freight transport has been undergoing a loss of influence within Europe while traffic has increased and great manoeuvres are taking place since the opening of the European Union towards East. Some of the French transporters are then focusing back on the French market showing a worrying loss in competitiveness. On the contrary, German and Dutch companies are increasing their shares in the French market and have reorganized themselves within Europe to face Eastern Europe competition: follow-up on customers delocalizing in the East, networking, hyperproductivity, markets segmentation between high quality transport in the West, specific markets and low cost segment in Eastern Germany and East Europe (Poland, Romania, ..., intensive geographical closeness to a great harbour (Rotterdam... What should France learn from German and Dutch experiences? On the basis of a comparison of our neighbours' driving costs and road freight transport structure, our contribution - a synthesis of two recent studies ordered by the Comite National Routier (CNR, studies free to be downloaded by www.cnr.fr - will first propose a cooperation with German or Dutch companies in order to propose a winner-winner model based on exchange of competencies: North Africa (Morocco for instance and Southern Europe for French partners (specialization Storage - Logistics and transport business model and opening towards the East for the German and Dutch partners.

  14. Brain-to-Blood Transporters for Endogenous Substrates and Xenobiotics at the Blood-Brain Barrier: An Overview of Biology and Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaki, Tetsuya; Ohtsuki, Sumio

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In the past decade, research into P-glycoprotein involving the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has seen a shift in the concept of the BBB as a structural barrier to that of a functional barrier for xenobiotics and changed simultaneously the strategy for the discovery and development of drugs acting in the CNS. As far as making advances in neurotherapeutics are concerned, the brain-to-blood transport function at the BBB will be one of the most important issues. Knowing the limitations of the in vivo and in vitro methods for BBB efflux research, it is essential to adopt a multidisciplinary approach in investigating the true physiological role of the BBB. Among several methods, the Brain Efflux Index method and the use of conditionally immortalized brain capillary endothelial cell lines, established from transgenic rats harboring temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 large T-antigen gene, are likely to be very useful tools for the BBB efflux transport research. According to our recent findings using these methods, several transporters in the brain capillary endothelial cells appear to play an important role in reducing the brain level of hydrophilic endogenous substrates produced either in the brain or peripheral organs, e.g., neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, metabolites of neurotransmitters, and uremic toxins. It has been reported also that large hydrophilic molecules, such as IgG, apo-transferrin, and amyloid-β peptide, are susceptible to brain-to-blood efflux transport. In the light of the latest findings, we have formed the hypothesis that the BBB acts as a CNS detoxifying system for both endogenous substrates and xenobiotics in the brain. A fuller understanding of the physiological role of BBB efflux transporters will provide rational insights to assist in the development of safer neurotherapeutics. PMID:15717058

  15. A Comprehensive Biophysical Model of Ion and Water Transport in Plant Roots. I. Clarifying the Roles of Endodermal Barriers in the Salt Stress Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kylie J; Miklavcic, Stanley J

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed and comprehensive mathematical model of active and passive ion and water transport in plant roots. Two key features are the explicit consideration of the separate, but interconnected, apoplastic, and symplastic transport pathways for ions and water, and the inclusion of both active and passive ion transport mechanisms. The model is used to investigate the respective roles of the endodermal Casparian strip and suberin lamellae in the salt stress response of plant roots. While it is thought that these barriers influence different transport pathways, it has proven difficult to distinguish their separate functions experimentally. In particular, the specific role of the suberin lamellae has been unclear. A key finding based on our simulations was that the Casparian strip is essential in preventing excessive uptake of Na + into the plant via apoplastic bypass, with a barrier efficiency that is reflected by a sharp gradient in the steady-state radial distribution of apoplastic Na + across the barrier. Even more significantly, this function cannot be replaced by the action of membrane transporters. The simulations also demonstrated that the positive effect of the Casparian strip of controlling Na + uptake, was somewhat offset by its contribution to the osmotic stress component: a more effective barrier increased the detrimental osmotic stress effect. In contrast, the suberin lamellae were found to play a relatively minor, even non-essential, role in the overall response to salt stress, with the presence of the suberin lamellae resulting in only a slight reduction in Na + uptake. However, perhaps more significantly, the simulations identified a possible role of suberin lamellae in reducing plant energy requirements by acting as a physical barrier to preventing the passive leakage of Na + into endodermal cells. The model results suggest that more and particular experimental attention should be paid to the properties of the Casparian strip

  16. An extreme breaching of a barrier spit: insights on large breach formation and its impact on barrier dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iulian Zăinescu, Florin; Vespremeanu-Stroe, Alfred; Tătui, Florin

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we document a case of exceptionally large natural breaching of a sandy spit (Sacalin barrier, Danube delta) using Lidar data and satellite imagery, annual (and seasonal) surveys of topography and bathymetry on successive cross-barrier profiles, and hourly datasets of wind and waves. The breach morphology and dynamics was monitored and described from its inception to closure, together with its impact on the adjoining features (upper shoreface, back-barrier lagoon, downdrift coast) and on the local sediment budgets. Breaching is first observed to occur on a beach-length of 0.5 km in April 2012 and two years later reached 3.5 km (May 2014). The barrier translates to a recovery stage dominated by continuous back-barrier deposition through subaqueous cross-breach sediment transport. Soon, the barrier widening triggers a negative feedback which limits the back-barrier sediment transfer. As a result, back-barrier deposition decreases whilst the barrier aggradation through overwash becomes more frequent. The event was found to be a natural experiment which switched the barrier's decadal evolution from low cross-shore transport to high cross-shore transport over the barrier. Although previously considered as constant, the cross-shore transport recorded during the large breach lifespan is an order of magnitude larger than in the non-breach period. 3 x 106 m3 of sediment were deposited in three years which is equivalent to the modelled longshore transport in the region. Nevertheless, the sediment circuits are more complex involving exchanges with the upper shoreface, as indicated by the extensive erosion down to -4m. In the absence of tides, the Sacalin breach closed naturally in 3 years and brings a valuable contribution on how breaches may evolve, as only limited data has been internationally reported until now. The very high deposition rate of sediment in the breach is a testimony of the high sediment volumes supplied by the longshore transport and the high

  17. Multiple zonal jets and convective heat transport barriers in a quasi-geostrophic model of planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guervilly, C.; Cardin, P.

    2017-10-01

    We study rapidly rotating Boussinesq convection driven by internal heating in a full sphere. We use a numerical model based on the quasi-geostrophic approximation for the velocity field, whereas the temperature field is 3-D. This approximation allows us to perform simulations for Ekman numbers down to 10-8, Prandtl numbers relevant for liquid metals (˜10-1) and Reynolds numbers up to 3 × 104. Persistent zonal flows composed of multiple jets form as a result of the mixing of potential vorticity. For the largest Rayleigh numbers computed, the zonal velocity is larger than the convective velocity despite the presence of boundary friction. The convective structures and the zonal jets widen when the thermal forcing increases. Prograde and retrograde zonal jets are dynamically different: in the prograde jets (which correspond to weak potential vorticity gradients) the convection transports heat efficiently and the mean temperature tends to be homogenized; by contrast, in the cores of the retrograde jets (which correspond to steep gradients of potential vorticity) the dynamics is dominated by the propagation of Rossby waves, resulting in the formation of steep mean temperature gradients and the dominance of conduction in the heat transfer process. Consequently, in quasi-geostrophic systems, the width of the retrograde zonal jets controls the efficiency of the heat transfer.

  18. Electrical transport across nanometric SrTiO3 and BaTiO3 barriers in conducting/insulator/conducting junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, H.; Sirena, M.; González Sutter, J.; Troiani, H. E.; del Corro, P. G.; Granell, P.; Golmar, F.; Haberkorn, N.

    2018-01-01

    We report the electrical transport properties of conducting/insulator/conducting heterostructures by studying current-voltage IV curves at room temperature. The measurements were obtained on tunnel junctions with different areas (900, 400 and 100 μm2) using a conducting atomic force microscope. Trilayers with GdBa2Cu3O7 (GBCO) as the bottom electrode, SrTiO3 or BaTiO3 (thicknesses between 1.6 and 4 nm) as the insulator barrier, and GBCO or Nb as the top electrode were grown by DC sputtering on (100) SrTiO3 substrates For SrTiO3 and BaTiO3 barriers, asymmetric IV curves at positive and negative polarization can be obtained using electrodes with different work function. In addition, hysteretic IV curves are obtained for BaTiO3 barriers, which can be ascribed to a combined effect of the FE reversal switching polarization and an oxygen vacancy migration. For GBCO/BaTiO3/GBCO heterostructures, the IV curves correspond to that expected for asymmetric interfaces, which indicates that the disorder affects differently the properties at the bottom and top interfaces. Our results show the role of the interface disorder on the electrical transport of conducting/insulator/conduction heterostructures, which is relevant for different applications, going from resistive switching memories (at room temperature) to Josephson junctions (at low temperatures).

  19. 6th International Workshop on Computer-Aided Scheduling of Public Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Branco, Isabel; Paixão, José

    1995-01-01

    This proceedings volume consists of papers presented at the Sixth International Workshop on Computer-Aided Scheduling of Public Transpon, which was held at the Fund~lio Calouste Gulbenkian in Lisbon from July 6th to 9th, 1993. In the tradition of alternating Workshops between North America and Europe - Chicago (1975), Leeds (1980), Montreal (1983), Hamburg (1987) and again Montreal (1990), the European city of Lisbon was selected as the venue for the Workshop in 1993. As in earlier Workshops, the central theme dealt with vehicle and duty scheduling problems and the employment of operations-research-based software systems for operational planning in public transport. However, as was initiated in Hamburg in 1987, the scope of this Workshop was broadened to include topics in related fields. This fundamental alteration was an inevitable consequence of the growing demand over the last decade for solutions to the complete planning process in public transport through integrated systems. Therefore, the program of thi...

  20. Coupled modelling (transport-reaction) of the fluid-clay interactions and their feed back on the physical properties of the bentonite engineered clay barrier system; Modelisation couplee (transport - reaction) des interactions fluides - argiles et de leurs effets en retour sur les proprietes physiques de barrieres ouvragees en bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marty, N

    2006-11-15

    The originality of this work is to process feed back effects of mineralogical and chemical modifications of clays, in storage conditions, on their physical properties and therefore on their transport characteristics (porosity, molecular diffusion, permeability). These feed back effects are modelled using the KIRMAT code (Kinetic of Reaction and MAss Transfer) developed from the kinetic code KINDIS by adding the effect of water renewal in the mineral-solution reactive cells. KIRMAT resolves mass balance equations associated with mass transport together with the geochemical reactions in a 1D approach. After 100 000 years of simulated interaction at 100 C, with the fluid of the Callovo-Oxfordian geological level (COX) and with iron provided by the steel overpack corrosion, the montmorillonite of the clay barrier is only partially transformed (into illite, chlorite, saponite...). Only outer parts of the modelled profile seem to be significantly affected by smectite dissolution processes, mainly at the interface with the geological environment. The modifications of physical properties show a closure of the porosity at the boundaries of the barrier, by creating a decrease of mass transport by molecular diffusion, essentially at the interface with the iron. Permeability laws applied to this system show a decrease of the hydraulic conductivity correlated with the porosity evolution. Near the COX, the swelling pressure of the clays from the barrier decreases. In the major part of the modelled profile, the engineered clay barrier system seems to keep its initial physical properties (porosity, molecular diffusion, permeability, swelling pressure) and functionalities. (author)

  1. Fluid Physical and Transport Phenomena Studies aboard the International Space Station: Planned Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhim S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the microgravity fluid physics and transport phenomena experiments planned for the International Spare Station. NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Science and Applications has established a world-class research program in fluid physics and transport phenomena. This program combines the vast expertise of the world research community with NASA's unique microgravity facilities with the objectives of gaining new insight into fluid phenomena by removing the confounding effect of gravity. Due to its criticality to many terrestrial and space-based processes and phenomena, fluid physics and transport phenomena play a central role in the NASA's Microgravity Program. Through widely publicized research announcement and well established peer-reviews, the program has been able to attract a number of world-class researchers and acquired a critical mass of investigations that is now adding rapidly to this field. Currently there arc a total of 106 ground-based and 20 candidate flight principal investigators conducting research in four major thrust areas in the program: complex flows, multiphase flow and phase change, interfacial phenomena, and dynamics and instabilities. The International Space Station (ISS) to be launched in 1998, provides the microgravity research community with a unprecedented opportunity to conduct long-duration microgravity experiments which can be controlled and operated from the Principal Investigators' own laboratory. Frequent planned shuttle flights to the Station will provide opportunities to conduct many more experiments than were previously possible. NASA Lewis Research Center is in the process of designing a Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) to be located in the Laboratory Module of the ISS that will not only accommodate multiple users but, allow a broad range of fluid physics and transport phenomena experiments to be conducted in a cost effective manner.

  2. Transboundary health impacts of transported global air pollution and international trade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qiang; Jiang, Xujia; Tong, Dan; Davis, Steven J.; Zhao, Hongyan; Geng, Guannan; Feng, Tong; Zheng, Bo; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G.; Ni, Ruijing; Brauer, Michael; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Martin, Randall V.; Huo, Hong; Liu, Zhu; Pan, Da; Kan, Haidong; Yan, Yingying; Lin, Jintai; He, Kebin; Guan, Dabo

    2017-03-29

    Millions of people die every year from diseases caused by exposure to outdoor air pollution1, 2, 3, 4, 5. Some studies have estimated premature mortality related to local sources of air pollution6, 7, but local air quality can also be affected by atmospheric transport of pollution from distant sources8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18. International trade is contributing to the globalization of emission and pollution as a result of the production of goods (and their associated emissions) in one region for consumption in another region14, 19, 20, 21, 22. The effects of international trade on air pollutant emissions23, air quality14 and health24 have been investigated regionally, but a combined, global assessment of the health impacts related to international trade and the transport of atmospheric air pollution is lacking. Here we combine four global models to estimate premature mortality caused by fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution as a result of atmospheric transport and the production and consumption of goods and services in different world regions. We find that, of the 3.45 million premature deaths related to PM2.5 pollution in 2007 worldwide, about 12 per cent (411,100 deaths) were related to air pollutants emitted in a region of the world other than that in which the death occurred, and about 22 per cent (762,400 deaths) were associated with goods and services produced in one region for consumption in another. For example, PM2.5 pollution produced in China in 2007 is linked to more than 64,800 premature deaths in regions other than China, including more than 3,100 premature deaths in western Europe and the USA; on the other hand, consumption in western Europe and the USA is linked to more than 108,600 premature deaths in China. Our results reveal that the transboundary health impacts of PM2.5 pollution associated with international trade are greater than those associated with long-distance atmospheric pollutant transport.

  3. PATRAM '83: 7th international symposium on packaging and transportation of radioactive materials. Proceedings. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1983-12-01

    Volume 1 contains the papers from the following sessions: Plenary session; international regulations; fracture toughness of ferritic steels; monolithic cast iron casks; risk analysis techniques; storage in packagings; packaging design considerations; risk analysis; facility/transportation system interface; research and development programs; UF/sub 6/ packagings; national regulations; transportation operations and traffic; containment, seals, and leakage; and radiation risk experiences.

  4. IAEA'S International Working Group on Integrated Transport and Storage Safety case for Dual Purpose Casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumano, Yumiko; Varley, Kasturi; ); Droste, Bernhard; Wolff, Dietmar; Hirose, Makoto; Harvey, John; Reiche, Ingo; McConnell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel is generated from the operation of nuclear reactors and it is imperative that it is safely managed following its removal from reactor cores. Reactor pools are usually designed based on the assumption that the fuel will be removed after a short period of time either for reprocessing, disposal, or further storage. As a result of storing higher burn-up fuel, significantly increased time-frame till disposal solutions are prepared, and delays in decisions on strategies for spent fuel management, the volume of spent fuel discharged from reactors which needs to be managed and stored is on the increase. Consequently, additional storage capacity is needed following the initial storage in reactor pools. Options for additional storage include wet storage or dry storage in a dedicated facility or in storage casks. One of these options is the use of a Dual Purpose Cask (DPC), which is a specially designed cask for both storage and transport. The management of spent fuel using a DPC generally involves on-site and off-site transportation before and after storage. Most countries require package design approval for the DPC to be transported. In addition, it is required in many countries to have a licence for storage of the spent fuel in the DPC or a licence for a storage facility that contains DPCs. Therefore, demonstration of compliance of the DPC with national and international transport regulations as well as with the storage requirements is necessary. In order to address this increasing need among Member States, the IAEA established an international working group in 2010 to develop a guidance for integrating safety cases for both storage and transport in a holistic manner. The working group consists of experts from regulatory bodies, Technical Support Organizations, operators for both transportation and storage, and research institutes. This activity is planned to be completed by 2013. Currently, a technical report has been drafted and is expected to be

  5. International deployment of cooperative intelligent transportation systems : bilateral efforts of the European Commission and United States Department of Transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-18

    This task report concerning alternative models of public and private sector involvement is the third in a series comprising the overall study, Overcoming Barriers to ITS - Lessons from Other Technologies: This report examines different ways the publi...

  6. Internal photoemission for photovoltaic using p-type Schottky barrier: Band structure dependence and theoretical efficiency limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ko-Han; Chang, Yin-Jung

    2018-01-01

    Solar energy conversion via internal photoemission (IPE) across a planar p-type Schottky junction is quantified for aluminum (Al) and copper (Cu) in the framework of direct transitions with non-constant matrix elements. Transition probabilities and k-resolved group velocities are obtained based on pseudo-wavefunction expansions and realistic band structures using the pseudopotential method. The k-resolved number of direct transitions, hole photocurrent density, quantum yield (QY), and the power conversion efficiency (PCE) under AM1.5G solar irradiance are subsequently calculated and analyzed. For Al, the parabolic and "parallel-band" effect along the U-W-K path significantly enhances the transition rate with final energies of holes mainly within 1.41 eV below the Fermi energy. For Cu, d-state hot holes mostly generated near the upper edge of 3d bands dominate the hole photocurrent and are weekly (strongly) dependent on the barrier height (metal film thickness). Hot holes produced in the 4s band behave just oppositely to their d-state counterparts. Non-constant matrix elements are shown to be necessary for calculations of transitions due to time-harmonic perturbation in Cu. Compared with Cu, Al-based IPE in p-type Schottky shows the highest PCE (QY) up to about 0.2673% (5.2410%) at ΦB = 0.95 eV (0.5 eV) and a film thickness of 11 nm (20 nm). It is predicted that metals with relatively dispersionless d bands (such as Cu) in most cases do not outperform metals with photon-accessible parallel bands (such as Al) in photon energy conversion using a planar p-type Schottky junction.

  7. Assessing drug transport across the human placental barrier: from in vivo and in vitro measurements to the ex vivo perfusion method and in silico techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaginis, Constantinos; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2011-05-01

    Assessing drug transport across the human placental barrier is of vital importance in order to guarantee drug safety during pregnancy. However, due to ethical reasons, in vivo fetal development risk assessment studies related to maternal drugs and chemicals exposure remain extremely limited. To overcome any ethical issues, several in vitro models applying primary trophoblastic cells, immortal cell lines and tissue explants of placental origin have recently been advanced. Alternatively, ex vivo human placental perfusion seems to be a more representative and highly informative method, which offers better insights into the different drug transporters, xenobiotic metabolism and tissue binding. Recently, in silico techniques have further been advanced as complementary tools to validate experimental placental transfer data, offering an attractive alternative for high throughput screening of potential fetotoxicity at the early stages of drug design. The present review scrutinizes, from a critical point of view, the current trends and perspectives in the emerging topic of drug transport across the human placental barrier. The special characteristics of the recently developed biopharmaceuticals on the transplacental transfer process are also discussed.

  8. Transport properties of Josephson contacts with ferromagnetic tunnel barriers; Transporteigenschaften von Josephson-Kontakten mit ferromagnetischer Tunnelbarriere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprungmann, Dirk

    2010-01-28

    The combination of the Josephson and the proximity effect is possible by the introduction of a ferromagnetic barrier into a Josephson contact resulting in a so called π coupling. The supra current through these contacts is flowing in the reverse direction. Specific new electronic circuits such as phase shifting devices are possible, for instance for high-speed analog-digital transducers. In the frame of this thesis SIFS Josephson contacts were studied, with a barrier consisting of a thin insulating Al2Ox barrier layer and a ferromagnetic thin film. For the ferromagnetic material weak ferromagnetic Ni(0.6)Cu(0.4), the strong ferromagnetic Fe(0.25)Co(0.75) and the ternary Heusler alloys Co2MnSn and Cu2MnAl were used. Josephson contacts with π coupling were realized with the NiCu alloy, triplet superconductivity seems to appear with the Heusler systems.

  9. The International Experience of the State Support for Creating the Transport and Logistics Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zharska Iryna O.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at analysis and synthesis of the international experience as to the State support for creating the transport and logistics centers (TLCs. The causes for emergence of the first TLCs in Europe (60-80-ies of XX century were considered. Values of the LPI index for the countries occupying the first 40 positions of the ranking as of 2014 and of 2016 have been provided, and the major changes during this time have been analyzed. The ranking position of Ukraine is displayed separately. Features of the logistics infrastructure of nine countries with a high value of the LPI index have been considered, degree of the State involvement in the formation of the TLC network has been analyzed. It has been substantiated that creation of the transport and logistics centers allows to reduce the logistics costs of individual producers and contributes to enhancing the efficiency of operation of the national economy in general by attracting investments in the infrastructure development, increasing the number of jobs and tax revenues. The basic motifs that determine the interest of the State authorities in providing support for creating the transportation and logistics centers have been defined. Prospect for further research in this direction will be determining the efficiency of using the different models of the State support for creation and development of TLCs

  10. Internal Domains of Natural Porous Media Revealed: Critical Locations for Transport, Storage, and Chemical Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachara, John M.; Brantley, Susan L.; Chorover, Jon D.; Ewing, Robert P.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan; Perfect, E.; Rother, Gernot; Stack, Andrew G.

    2016-03-16

    Internal pore domains exist within rocks, lithic fragments, subsurface sediments and soil aggregates. These domains, which we term internal domains in porous media (IDPM), contain a significant fraction of their porosity as nanopores, dominate the reactive surface area of diverse porous media types, and are important locations for chemical reactivity and hydrocarbon storage. Traditionally difficult to interrogate, advances in instrumentation and imaging methods are providing new insights on the physical structures and chemical attributes of IDPM. In this review we: discuss analytical methods to characterize IDPM, evaluate what has been learned about their size distributions, connectivity, and extended structures; determine whether they exhibit unique chemical reactivity; and assess potential for their inclusion in reactive transport models. Three key findings are noteworthy. 1) A combination of methods now allows complete characterization of the porosity spectrum of natural materials and its connectivity; while imaging microscopies are providing three dimensional representations of the interconnected pore network. 2) Chemical reactivity in pores <10 nm is expected to be different from micro and macropores, yet research performed to date is inconclusive on the nature, direction, and magnitude of effect. 3) Existing continuum reactive transport models treat IDPM as a sub-grid feature with average, empirical, scale-dependent parameters; and are not formulated to include detailed information on pore networks. Overall we find that IDPM are key features controlling hydrocarbon release from shales in hydrofracking systems, organic matter stabilization and recalcitrance in soil, weathering and soil formation, and long term inorganic and organic contaminant behavior in the vadose zone and groundwater. We conclude with an assessment of impactful research opportunities to advance understanding of IDPM, and to incorporate their important effects in reactive transport models

  11. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Transport in Interacting Disordered Systems (TIDS-14)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydman, Aviad

    2012-07-01

    The '14th Transport in interacting disordered systems - TIDS14' conference took place during 5-8 September 2011 in Acre Israel. The conference was a continuation of the biennial meeting traditionally called HRP (hopping and related phenomena) and later named TIDS (transport in interacting disordered systems). Previous conferences took place in Trieste (1985), Bratislava (1987), Chapel Hill (1989), Marburg (1991), Glasgow (1993), Jerusalem (1995), Rackeve (1997), Murcia (1999), Shefayim (2001), Trieste (2003), Egmond, aan Zee (2005), Marburg (2007) and Rackeve (2009). Central to these conferences are systems that are characterized by a large degree of disorder and hence they lack translational symmetry. In such systems interactions are usually very important. Dramatic differences in the behavior of crystalline solids and the 'disordered' systems are possible. Some examples of the latter are amorphous materials, polymer aggregates, materials whose properties are governed by impurities, granular systems and biological systems. This conference series is notable for the pleasant atmosphere and fruitful exchange of ideas between theoreticians and experimentalists in these areas. This tradition was also maintained in the conference in Israel. Specific topics of TIDS14 included: hopping, electron and Coulomb glasses, Anderson localization and many body localization, noise, magneto-transport, metal-insulator and superconductor-insulator transition, transport through low dimensional and nanostructures, quantum coherence, interference and dephasing and other related topics. Over sixty scientists from fourteen countries participated in the conference and presented papers either as oral presentations or as posters in two sessions that took place during the conference. Many of these papers are included in these proceedings. I would like to thank all the conference participants for the interesting presentations, debates and discussions that created a stimulating but pleasant

  12. Close binary evolution. II. Impact of tides, wind magnetic braking, and internal angular momentum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H. F.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A.; Ekström, S.; Eggenberger, P.; Georgy, C.; Qin, Y.; Fragos, T.; Soerensen, M.; Barblan, F.; Wade, G. A.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Massive stars with solar metallicity lose important amounts of rotational angular momentum through their winds. When a magnetic field is present at the surface of a star, efficient angular momentum losses can still be achieved even when the mass-loss rate is very modest, at lower metallicities, or for lower-initial-mass stars. In a close binary system, the effect of wind magnetic braking also interacts with the influence of tides, resulting in a complex evolution of rotation. Aims: We study the interactions between the process of wind magnetic braking and tides in close binary systems. Methods: We discuss the evolution of a 10 M⊙ star in a close binary system with a 7 M⊙ companion using the Geneva stellar evolution code. The initial orbital period is 1.2 days. The 10 M⊙ star has a surface magnetic field of 1 kG. Various initial rotations are considered. We use two different approaches for the internal angular momentum transport. In one of them, angular momentum is transported by shear and meridional currents. In the other, a strong internal magnetic field imposes nearly perfect solid-body rotation. The evolution of the primary is computed until the first mass-transfer episode occurs. The cases of different values for the magnetic fields and for various orbital periods and mass ratios are briefly discussed. Results: We show that, independently of the initial rotation rate of the primary and the efficiency of the internal angular momentum transport, the surface rotation of the primary will converge, in a time that is short with respect to the main-sequence lifetime, towards a slowly evolving velocity that is different from the synchronization velocity. This "equilibrium angular velocity" is always inferior to the angular orbital velocity. In a given close binary system at this equilibrium stage, the difference between the spin and the orbital angular velocities becomes larger when the mass losses and/or the surface magnetic field increase. The

  13. N-terminal truncation of the dopamine transporter abolishes phorbol ester- and substance P receptor-stimulated phosphorylation without impairing transporter internalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granas, Charlotta; Ferrer, Jasmine; Loland, Claus Juul

    2003-01-01

    The structural basis of phosphorylation and its putative role in internalization were investigated in the human dopamine transporter (hDAT). Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) was achieved either directly by treatment with 4-alpha-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or by activating the Galpha...

  14. Communications and Positioning by Satelhte in the International Road Transport System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draško Marin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the basic technology of satellite .I'Stemsrelated to the geostationary satellites particular(v with regardto the .\\'Stem of satellites in the European network ofEUTELSAT (European Telecommunications Satellite Organizationcovering Europe, North Africa and part of the MiddleEast.This enables positioning of vehicles in the internationalroad transport system in the territory which has been covered bythe satellite signal.The EUTELTRACS system within the EUTELSAT organizationenables not only positioning with preciseness ofabout 300 m, but also two-way communications between vehiclesand company headquarters, which is an advantage comparedto the other positioning systems.EUTELTRACS service belongs to the land mobile satelliteservices with secondary status (it must not impose any interferenceto other radio-communication services and cannot claimprotection from other services.The use of frequency bands is for the up-links 14.0-14.25GHz, and for the down-links 10.25-11.20 GHz, 11.45-11.70GHz and 12.50-12.75 GHz.The EUTELTRACS system provides services by means ofOmniTRACS terminals and CEPT (European Conference ofPostal and Telecommunications Administrations administrationsissue type approvals, designating the terminal markingand make decisions regarding free circulation of terminals inconformity with their national regulations.The OmniTRACS terminal.l'stem has been specially presentedas well as the fixed part of EUTELTRACS .\\'Stem withthe satellite segment.Every transport company has been considered as a subscriberto an authorised EUTELTRACS service provider.The service for tracing trucks in the international trafficthroughout Europe and Middle East can be fully expressed byincluding the stronger transport companies (more than 10trucks which can establish the transport more rationallythrough EUTELTRACS service.The implementation of the EUTELTRACS service hasbeen imposed on the Croatian companies, whose internationaltransport could

  15. Blood-brain barrier transport and protein binding of flumazenil and iomazenil in the rat: implications for neuroreceptor studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbaek, C; Ott, P; Paulson, O B

    1999-01-01

    of blood-brain barrier permeability for two benzodiazepine antagonists were performed in 44 rats by the double-indicator technique. Cerebral blood flow was measured by intracarotid Xe-injection. The apparent permeability-surface product (PSapp) was measured while CBF or bolus composition was changed......The calculated fraction of receptor ligands available for blood-brain barrier passage in vivo (f(avail)) may differ from in vitro (f(eq)) measurements. This study evaluates the protein-ligand interaction for iomazenil and flumazenil in rats by comparing f(eq) and f(avail). Repeated measurements......(avail) and f(eq) as well as the effect of CBF on PSapp can be caused by capillary heterogeneity....

  16. Amphetamine activates Rho GTPase signaling to mediate dopamine transporter internalization and acute behavioral effects of amphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, David S.; Underhill, Suzanne M.; Stolz, Donna B.; Murdoch, Geoffrey H.; Thiels, Edda; Romero, Guillermo; Amara, Susan G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute amphetamine (AMPH) exposure elevates extracellular dopamine through a variety of mechanisms that include inhibition of dopamine reuptake, depletion of vesicular stores, and facilitation of dopamine efflux across the plasma membrane. Recent work has shown that the DAT substrate AMPH, unlike cocaine and other nontransported blockers, can also stimulate endocytosis of the plasma membrane dopamine transporter (DAT). Here, we show that when AMPH enters the cytoplasm it rapidly stimulates DAT internalization through a dynamin-dependent, clathrin-independent process. This effect, which can be observed in transfected cells, cultured dopamine neurons, and midbrain slices, is mediated by activation of the small GTPase RhoA. Inhibition of RhoA activity with C3 exotoxin or a dominant-negative RhoA blocks AMPH-induced DAT internalization. These actions depend on AMPH entry into the cell and are blocked by the DAT inhibitor cocaine. AMPH also stimulates cAMP accumulation and PKA-dependent inactivation of RhoA, thus providing a mechanism whereby PKA- and RhoA-dependent signaling pathways can interact to regulate the timing and robustness of AMPH’s effects on DAT internalization. Consistent with this model, the activation of D1/D5 receptors that couple to PKA in dopamine neurons antagonizes RhoA activation, DAT internalization, and hyperlocomotion observed in mice after AMPH treatment. These observations support the existence of an unanticipated intracellular target that mediates the effects of AMPH on RhoA and cAMP signaling and suggest new pathways to target to disrupt AMPH action. PMID:26553986

  17. IMS (International Magnetospheric Study) contributions to the understanding of auroral precipitation, transport, and particle sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fennell, J.F.

    1985-03-01

    The progress in our understanding of plasma processes throughout the magnetosphere has increased dramatically during the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS) period. In this report the auroral ionosphere as a source of particles for the magnetosphere and the auroral particle acceleration and precipitation are emphasized. Some of the processes involved in the transport of particles from the ionosphere out into the magnetosphere are treated as well as the precipitation of magnetospheric particles into the auroral and subauroral ionosphere. Some of the effects auroral ionospheric ions have on the magnetospheric plasma composition are described. A brief overview of pre-IMS results is also given to set the stage for a description of IMS contributions in these areas.

  18. Study of carbon dioxide emission inventory from transportation sector at Kualanamu International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryati, I.; Indrawan, I.; Alihta, K. N.

    2018-02-01

    Transportation includes sources of greenhouse gas emission contributor in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2). CO2 is one of the air pollutant gases that cause climate change. The source of CO2 emissions at airports comes from road and air transportation. Kualanamu International Airport is one of the public service airports in North Sumatera Province. The purpose of this study is to inventory the emission loads generated by motor vehicles and aircraft and to forecast contributions of CO2 emissions from motor vehicles and aircraft. The research method used is quantitative and qualitative methods. The quantitative method used is to estimate emission loads of motor vehicles based on vehicle volume and emission factors derived from the literature and using the Tier-2 method to calculate the aircraft emission loads. The results for the maximum CO2 concentration were 6,206,789.37 μg/m3 and the minimal CO2 concentration was 4,070,674.84 μg/Nm3. The highest aircraft CO2 emission load is 200,164,424.5 kg/hr (1.75 x 109 ton/year) and the lowest is 38,884,064.5 kg/hr (3.40 x 108 ton/year). Meanwhile, the highest CO2 emission load from motor vehicles was 51,299.25 gr/hr (449,38 ton/year) and the lowest was 38,990.42 gr/hr (341,55 ton/year). CO2 contribution from a motor vehicle is 65% and 5% from aircraft in Kualanamu International Airport.

  19. Influence of geochemical processes on transport in porous medium; application to the clogging of confinement barriers in a geological waste disposal; Influence des processus geochimiques sur le transport en milieu poreux; application au colmatage en barrieres de confinement potentielles dans un stockage en formation geologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagneau, V

    2002-07-01

    Three research orientations are currently followed for the future of radioactive wastes. Disposal in deep geological formations is one of these options. The package and the successive barriers are attacked by the in-situ water and start interacting. These reactions lead to modifications of the mineralogical composition of the materials and of their macroscopic properties. While the coupling between transport and geochemistry is widely studied, the feedback of porosity changes is usually neglected. Yet, studying different possible interfaces of a repository reveals that large modifications of porosity are likely to occur. This work, performed at the Ecole des Mines de Paris and Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, aimed at investigating the effective consequences of taking porosity changes into account in coupled geochemistry-transport models. A simplified theoretic problem was addressed. It highlighted the difficulties of introducing porosity changes. In particular, it pointed out the effect of the several macroscopic relations binding porosity to transport and chemistry. Separately, two series of experiments, on very simple geochemical systems, gave concrete information on clogging systems. Following these results, porosity changes and their feedback on chemistry and transport were inserted in the coupled code HYTEC at the Ecole des Mines de Paris. Complex issues, related to the engineered barrier, were then addressed (concrete-clay interaction). New effects were found, including a decrease in the flux of dissolved species, due to the partial clogging at the interface, a slow down of reacting fronts; some reactions were even found to change directions. (author)

  20. Constitutively internalized dopamine transporter is targeted to late endosomes and lysosomal degradation in heterologous cell lines and dopaminergic neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jacob; Madsen, Kenneth; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard

    of the single-membrane spanning protein Tac, thereby creating an extracellular antibody epitope. Upon expression in HEK293 cells this Tac-DAT fusion protein displayed uptake properties similar to the wild type (WT) transporter. Additionally, Tac-DAT was, like the WT, internalized both in response to PMA......The dopamine transporter (DAT) belongs to SLC6 family of Na+/Cl- coupled transporters and mediates clearance of released dopamine (DA) from the synaptic cleft. To investigate the constitutive trafficking of heterologously expressed DAT we fused the N-terminus of DAT to the intracellular tail...... and amphetamine, a substrate of the DAT. In antibody feeding experiments we observed that Tac-DAT was constitutively internalized faster than Tac alone and using an ELISA based assay we could quantify time-dependent intracellular accumulation of the transporter. Incubation with inhibitors of lysosomal degradation...

  1. Vertical Transport of Momentum by the Inertial-Gravity Internal Waves in a Baroclinic Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Slepyshev

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available When the internal waves break, they are one of the sources of small-scale turbulence. Small-scale turbulence causes the vertical exchange in the ocean. However, internal waves with regard to the Earth rotation in the presence of vertically inhomogeneous two-dimensional current are able to contribute to the vertical transport. Free inertial-gravity internal waves in a baroclinic current in a boundless basin of a constant depth are considered in the Bussinesq approximation. Boundary value problem of linear approximation for the vertical velocity amplitude of internal waves has complex coefficients when current velocity component, which is transversal to the wave propagation direction, depends on the vertical coordinate (taking into account the rotation of the Earth. Eigenfunction and wave frequency are complex, and it is shown that a weak wave damping takes place. Dispersive relation and wave damping decrement are calculated in the linear approximation. At a fixed wave number damping decrement of the second mode is larger (in the absolute value than the one of the first mode. The equation for vertical velocity amplitude for real profiles of the Brunt – Vaisala frequency and current velocity are numerically solved according to implicit Adams scheme of the third order of accuracy. The dispersive curves of the first two modes do not reach inertial frequency in the low-frequency area due to the effect of critical layers in which wave frequency of the Doppler shift is equal to the inertial one. Termination of the second mode dispersive curves takes place at higher frequency than the one of the first mode. In the second order of the wave amplitude the Stokes drift speed is determined. It is shown that the Stokes drift speed, which is transversal to the wave propagation direction, differs from zero if the transversal component of current velocity depends on the vertical coordinate. In this case, the Stokes drift speed in the second mode is lower than

  2. Statement to the International Conference on the Safety of Transport of Radioactive Material. Vienna, 7 July 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2003-01-01

    The transport of radioactive material has been subject to regulation for many decades, and the International Atomic Energy Agency, working with its Member States and all relevant international governmental organizations, has played a key role in fostering the establishment of those regulations and providing for their application. First published in 1961, the IAEA's Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material are periodically revised to incorporate technical advances, operational experience and the latest radiation protection principles. These Transport Regulations address all categories of radioactive material. Although recommendatory in nature, they constitute the basis for national regulations in many Member States, and generally become mandatory through the legally binding instruments of the relevant modal bodies, such as the International Maritime Organization or the International Civil Aviation Organization. In some cases, these instruments take the form of universal conventions, such as the Convention on International Civil Aviation or the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea; in other cases, they take the form of regional agreements, such as the European Agreement Concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road. Overall, there are 21 universal instruments and 22 regional instruments in force that apply, directly or indirectly, to the safe transport of radioactive material. This current worldwide system of regulatory control, while not without shortcomings, has achieved an excellent safety record. Over several decades of transporting radioactive material, there has not been an in-transit accident with serious human health, economic or environmental consequences attributable to the radioactive nature of the transported goods. In recognition of this fact, the United Nations Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation has noted these transport activities as having no radiological impact. This excellent record

  3. Turkish Seaborne Trade and the Effects of the Strategic Developments in the International Energy and Transport Corridors: A Qualitative Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barış KULEYİN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The facts that strong economies require more energy production which in turn requires further energy resources increase the importance of the energy and transport corridors for energy policies. This increase makes it clear that sea transport has a strategic role in terms of transit passage and the port/terminal links of pipelines. Concerning all these interrelations, this exploratory research aims to explore and reveal the effects of the strategic developments focused on the international energy and transport corridors on the Turkish seaborne trade. To reach this particular aim, a through literature review was carried out concerning the international energy and transport corridors and international energy sector. This literature review was followed by certain content analysis regarding the effects of the developments in the above mentioned areas on Turkey in general and a Delphi research involving the effects of such developments on the Turkish seaborne trade in particular. The research was concluded with a discussion on the statements agreed during Delphi research process. The discussion created certain recommendations and revealed that Turkey can maintain and sustain her effectiveness on the international energy and transport corridors only and only through having a powerful and effective seaborne trade structure.

  4. Electronic Transport in Single Molecule Junctions: Control of the Molecule-Electrode Coupling Through Intramolecular Tunneling Barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danilov, Andrey; Kubatkin, Sergey; Kafanov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    We report on single molecule electron transport measurements of two oligophenylenevinylene (OPV3) derivatives placed in a nanogap between gold (Au) or lead (Pb) electrodes in a field effect transistor device. Both derivatives contain thiol end groups that allow chemical binding to the electrodes....... One derivative has additional methylene groups separating the thiols from the delocalized -electron system. The insertion of methylene groups changes the open state conductance by 3-4 orders of magnitude and changes the transport mechanism from a coherent regime with finite zero-bias conductance...

  5. Phosphorylation of the norepinephrine transporter at threonine 258 and serine 259 is linked to protein kinase C-mediated transporter internalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jayanthi, Lankupalle D; Annamalai, Balasubramaniam; Samuvel, Devadoss J

    2006-01-01

    ester (beta-PMA)-induced phosphorylation of NET occurs on serine and threonine residues. Beta-PMA treatment inhibited NE transport, reduced plasma membrane hNET levels, and stimulated hNET phosphorylation in human placental trophoblast cells expressing the WT-hNET. Substance P-mediated activation......Recently, we have demonstrated the phosphorylation- and lipid raft-mediated internalization of the native norepinephrine transporter (NET) following protein kinase C (PKC) activation (Jayanthi, L. D., Samuvel, D. J., and Ramamoorthy, S. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 19315-19326). Here we tested...

  6. Impact of sea-level rise on cross-shore sediment transport on fetch-limited barrier reef island beaches under modal and cyclonic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, T E; Golshani, A; Atkinson, A; Shimamoto, T; Wu, S; Callaghan, D P; Mumby, P J

    2015-08-15

    A one-dimensional wave model is combined with an analytical sediment transport model to investigate the likely influence of sea-level rise on net cross-shore sediment transport on fetch-limited barrier reef and lagoon island beaches. The modelling considers if changes in the nearshore wave height and wave period in the lagoon induced by different water levels over the reef flat are likely to lead to net offshore or onshore movement of sediment. The results indicate that the effects of SLR on net sediment movement are highly variable and controlled by the bathymetry of the reef and lagoon. A significant range of reef-lagoon bathymetry, and notably shallow and narrow reefs, appears to lead hydrodynamic conditions and beaches that are likely to be stable or even accrete under SLR. Loss of reef structural complexity, particularly on the reef flat, increases the chance of sediment transport away from beaches and offshore. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A new in vivo method to study P-glycoprotein transport in tumors and the blood-brain barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrikse, NH; de Vries, EGE; Eriks-Fluks, L; van der Graaf, WTA; Hospers, GAP; Willemsen, ATM; Vaalburg, W; Franssen, EJF

    1999-01-01

    Drug resistance is a major cause of chemotherapy failure in cancer treatment, One reason is the overexpression of the drug efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp), involved in multidrug resistance (MDR), In vivo pharmacokinetic analysis of P-gp transport might identify the capacity of modulation by P-gp

  8. Electronic Transport in Single Molecule Junctions: Control of the Molecule-Electrode Coupling Through Intramolecular Tunneling Barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danilov, Andrey; Kubatkin, Sergey; Kafanov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    We report on single molecule electron transport measurements of two oligophenylenevinylene (OPV3) derivatives placed in a nanogap between gold (Au) or lead (Pb) electrodes in a field effect transistor device. Both derivatives contain thiol end groups that allow chemical binding to the electrodes...... to sequential tunneling and Coulomb blockade behavior....

  9. The role of legal regulation and place of international organisations in transport companies’ development at foreign market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleh Lyashuk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the analysis of the market of international trucking transport companies. The study is based on statistics and works of domestic and foreign scholars on the issue of current state and prospects of market development. Dedicated dynamics and structure of international trucking market, features of export, import and transit trucking. Identified the main priorities for the development and growth of the market.

  10. Spin transport at the international linear collider and its impact on the measurement of polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, Moritz

    2013-12-15

    At the planned International Linear Collider (ILC), the longitudinal beam polarization needs to be determined with an unprecedented precision. For that purpose, the beam delivery systems (BDS) are equipped with two laser Compton polarimeters each, which are foreseen to achieve a systematic uncertainty of {<=} 0.25 %. The polarimeters are located 1.6 km upstream and 150 m downstream of the e{sup +}e{sup -} interaction point (IP). The average luminosity-weighted longitudinal polarization P{sup lumi}{sub z}, which is the decisive quantity for the experiments, has to be determined from these measurements with the best possible precision. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the spin transport in the BDS is mandatory to estimate how precise the longitudinal polarization at the IP is known from the polarimeter measurements. The envisaged precision for the propagation of the measurement value is {<=} 0.1 %. This thesis scrutinizes the spin transport in view of the achievable precision. A detailed beamline simulation for the BDS has been developed, including the simulation of the beam-beam collisions at the IP. The following factors which might limit the achievable precision is investigated: a variation of the beam parameters, the beam alignment precision at the polarimeters and the IP, the bunch rotation at the IP, the detector magnets, the beam-beam collisions, the emission of synchrotron radiation and misalignments of the beamline elements. In absence of collisions, a precision of 0.085% on the propagation of the measured longitudinal polarization has been found achievable. This result however depends mainly on the presumed precisions for the parallel alignment of the beam at the polarimeters and for the alignment of polarization vector. In presence of collisions, the measurement at the downstream polarimeter depends strongly on the intensity of the collision and the size of the polarimeter laser spot. Therefore, a more detailed study of the laser-bunch interaction is

  11. Relative contribution of CTR1 and DMT1 in copper transport by the blood–CSF barrier: Implication in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Gang; Chen, Jingyuan; Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The homeostasis of copper (Cu) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is partially regulated by the Cu transporter-1 (CTR1) and divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) at the blood–CSF barrier (BCB) in the choroid plexus. Data from human and animal studies suggest an increased Cu concentration in blood, CSF, and brains following in vivo manganese (Mn) exposure. This study was designed to investigate the relative role of CTR1 and DMT1 in Cu transport under normal or Mn-exposed conditions using an immortalized choroidal Z310 cell line. Mn exposure in vitro resulted in an increased cellular 64 Cu uptake and the up-regulation of both CTR1 and DMT1. Knocking down CTR1 by siRNA counteracted the Mn-induced increase of 64 Cu uptake, while knocking down DMT1 siRNA resulted in an increased cellular 64 Cu uptake in Mn-exposed cells. To distinguish the roles of CTR1 and DMT1 in Cu transport, the Z310 cell-based tetracycline (Tet)-inducible CTR1 and DMT1 expression cell lines were developed, namely iZCTR1 and iZDMT1 cells, respectively. In iZCTR1 cells, Tet induction led to a robust increase (25 fold) of 64 Cu uptake with the time course corresponding to the increased CTR1. Induction of DMT1 by Tet in iZDMT1 cells, however, resulted in only a slight increase of 64 Cu uptake in contrast to a substantial increase in DMT1 mRNA and protein expression. These data indicate that CTR1, but not DMT1, plays an essential role in transporting Cu by the BCB in the choroid plexus. Mn-induced cellular overload of Cu at the BCB is due, primarily, to Mn-induced over-expression of CTR1. -- Highlights: ► This study compares the relative role of CTR1 and DMT1 in Cu transport by the BCB. ► Two novel tetracycline-inducible CTR1 and DMT1 expression cell lines are created. ► CTR1, but not DMT1, plays an essential role in transporting Cu by the BCB. ► Mn-induced cellular Cu overload is due to its induction of CTR1 rather than DMT1. ► Induction of CTR1 by Mn in the BCB contributes to an elevated Cu

  12. Relative contribution of CTR1 and DMT1 in copper transport by the blood–CSF barrier: Implication in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Gang [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shanxi 710032 (China); Chen, Jingyuan [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shanxi 710032 (China); Zheng, Wei, E-mail: wzheng@purdue.edu [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    The homeostasis of copper (Cu) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is partially regulated by the Cu transporter-1 (CTR1) and divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) at the blood–CSF barrier (BCB) in the choroid plexus. Data from human and animal studies suggest an increased Cu concentration in blood, CSF, and brains following in vivo manganese (Mn) exposure. This study was designed to investigate the relative role of CTR1 and DMT1 in Cu transport under normal or Mn-exposed conditions using an immortalized choroidal Z310 cell line. Mn exposure in vitro resulted in an increased cellular {sup 64}Cu uptake and the up-regulation of both CTR1 and DMT1. Knocking down CTR1 by siRNA counteracted the Mn-induced increase of {sup 64}Cu uptake, while knocking down DMT1 siRNA resulted in an increased cellular {sup 64}Cu uptake in Mn-exposed cells. To distinguish the roles of CTR1 and DMT1 in Cu transport, the Z310 cell-based tetracycline (Tet)-inducible CTR1 and DMT1 expression cell lines were developed, namely iZCTR1 and iZDMT1 cells, respectively. In iZCTR1 cells, Tet induction led to a robust increase (25 fold) of {sup 64}Cu uptake with the time course corresponding to the increased CTR1. Induction of DMT1 by Tet in iZDMT1 cells, however, resulted in only a slight increase of {sup 64}Cu uptake in contrast to a substantial increase in DMT1 mRNA and protein expression. These data indicate that CTR1, but not DMT1, plays an essential role in transporting Cu by the BCB in the choroid plexus. Mn-induced cellular overload of Cu at the BCB is due, primarily, to Mn-induced over-expression of CTR1. -- Highlights: ► This study compares the relative role of CTR1 and DMT1 in Cu transport by the BCB. ► Two novel tetracycline-inducible CTR1 and DMT1 expression cell lines are created. ► CTR1, but not DMT1, plays an essential role in transporting Cu by the BCB. ► Mn-induced cellular Cu overload is due to its induction of CTR1 rather than DMT1. ► Induction of CTR1 by Mn in the BCB

  13. [18F]FDG is not transported by P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein at the rodent blood–brain barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanek, Thomas; Traxl, Alexander; Bankstahl, Jens P.; Bankstahl, Marion; Sauberer, Michael; Langer, Oliver; Kuntner, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Transport of 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) by the multidrug efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) at the blood–brain barrier (BBB) may confound the interpretation of [ 18 F]FDG brain PET data. Aim of this study was to assess the influence of ABCB1 and ABCG2 at the BBB on brain distribution of [ 18 F]FDG in vivo by performing [ 18 F]FDG PET scans in wild-type and transporter knockout mice and by evaluating changes in [ 18 F]FDG brain distribution after transporter inhibition. Methods: Dynamic small-animal PET experiments (60 min) were performed with [ 18 F]FDG in groups of wild-type and transporter knockout mice (Abcb1a/b (−/−) , Abcg2 (−/−) and Abcb1a/b (−/−) Abcg2 (−/−) ) and in wild-type rats without and with i.v. pretreatment with the known ABCB1 inhibitor tariquidar (15 mg/kg, given at 2 h before PET). Blood was sampled from animals from the orbital sinus vein at the end of the PET scans and measured in a gamma counter. Brain uptake of [ 18 F]FDG was expressed as the brain-to-blood radioactivity concentration ratio in the last PET time frame (K b,brain ). Results: K b,brain values of [ 18 F]FDG were not significantly different between different mouse types both without and with tariquidar pretreatment. The blood-to-brain transfer rate constant of [ 18 F]FDG was significantly lower in tariquidar-treated as compared with vehicle-treated rats (0.350 ± 0.025 mL/min/g versus 0.416 ± 0.024 mL/min/g, p = 0.026, paired t-test) but K b,brain values were not significantly different between both rat groups. Conclusion: Our results show that [ 18 F]FDG is not transported by Abcb1 at the mouse and rat BBB in vivo. In addition we found no evidence for Abcg2 transport of [ 18 F]FDG at the mouse BBB. Advances in knowledge and implications for patient care: Our findings imply that functional activity of ABCB1 and ABCG2 at the BBB does not need to be taken into account when

  14. Elucidation of Transport Mechanism of Paeoniflorin and the Influence of Ligustilide, Senkyunolide I and Senkyunolide A on Paeoniflorin Transport through Mdck-Mdr1 Cells as Blood-Brain Barrier in Vitro Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peng-Yi; Liu, Dan; Zheng, Qin; Wu, Qing; Tang, Yu; Yang, Ming

    2016-03-02

    The objectives of the present investigation were to: (1) elucidate the transport mechanism of paeoniflorin (PF) across MDCK-MDR1 monolayers; and (2) evaluate the effect of ligustilide (LIG), senkyunolide I (SENI) and senkyunolide A (SENA) on the transport of PF through blood-brain barrier so as to explore the enhancement mechanism. Transport studies of PF were performed in both directions, from apical to basolateral side (A→B) and from basolateral to apical sides (B→A). Drug concentrations were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. PF showed relatively poor absorption in MDCK-MDR1 cells, apparent permeability coefficients (Papp) ranging from 0.587 × 10(-6) to 0.705 × 10(-6) cm/s. In vitro experiments showed that the transport of PF in both directions was concentration dependent and not saturable. The B→A/A→B permeability ER of PF was more than 2 in the MDCK-MDR1 cells, which indicated that the transport mechanism of PF might be passive diffusion as the dominating process with the active transportation mediated mechanism involved. The increased Papp of PF in A→B direction by EDTA-Na₂ suggested that PF was absorbed via the paracellular route. The P-gp inhibitor verapamil could significantly increase the transport of PF in A→B direction, and ER decreased from 2.210 to 0.690, which indicated that PF was P-gp substance. The transport of PF in A→B direction significantly increased when co-administrated with increasing concentrations of LIG, SENI and SENA. An increased cellular accumulation of Rho 123 and Western blot analysis indicated that LIG, SENI and SENA had increased the transport of PF in the BBB models attribute to down-regulate P-gp expression. A decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) during the permeation experiment can be explained by the modulation and opening of the tight junctions caused by the permeation enhancer LIG, SENI and SENA.

  15. Assessment of P-Glycoprotein Transport Activity at the Human Blood-Retina Barrier with (R)-11C-Verapamil PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Martin; Karch, Rudolf; Tournier, Nicolas; Cisternino, Salvatore; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Hacker, Marcus; Marhofer, Peter; Zeitlinger, Markus; Langer, Oliver

    2017-04-01

    P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) is expressed at the blood-retina barrier (BRB), where it may control distribution of drugs from blood to the retina and thereby influence drug efficacy and toxicity. Methods: We performed PET scans with the ABCB1 substrate ( R )- 11 C-verapamil on 5 healthy male volunteers without and with concurrent infusion of the ABCB1 inhibitor tariquidar. We estimated the rate constants for radiotracer transfer across the BRB ( K 1 , k 2 ) and total retinal distribution volume V T Results: During ABCB1 inhibition, retinal V T and influx rate constant K 1 were significantly, by 1.4 ± 0.5-fold and 1.5 ± 0.3-fold, increased compared with baseline. Retinal efflux rate constant k 2 was significantly decreased by 2.8 ± 1.0-fold. Conclusion: We found a significant increase in ( R )- 11 C-verapamil distribution to the retina during ABCB1 inhibition, which provides first in vivo evidence for ABCB1 transport activity at the human BRB. The increase in retinal distribution was approximately 2.5-fold less pronounced than previously reported for the blood-brain barrier. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  16. Considerations on legislation, transportation and international trade of mineral commodities containing NORM; Consideracoes sobre legislacao, transporte e comercio internacional de commodities minerais contendo NORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauria, Dejanira da Costa; Borges, Flavia Luiza Soares; Villegas, Raul Alberto Sodre

    2016-07-01

    The radiation protection and transport procedures of the main importing countries of the Brazilian minerals, which are related to radioactive minerals are presented. The references and an overview about the safety procedures and guides, norms and regulations about NORM related to radiation limits for the public and personnel are also commented. The exemption values in the International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA recommendations and the legislation of the main importers of Brazilian mineral goods: China, Europe and Community and United States are introduced.

  17. Evidence for altered transport of insulin across the blood-brain barrier in insulin-resistant humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heni, Martin; Schöpfer, Patricia; Peter, Andreas; Sartorius, Tina; Fritsche, Andreas; Synofzik, Matthis; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Maetzler, Walter; Hennige, Anita M

    2014-08-01

    Eating behavior, body weight regulation, peripheral glucose metabolism, and cognitive function depend on adequate insulin action in the brain, and recent studies in humans suggested that impaired insulin action in the brain emerges upon fat intake, obesity, and genetic variants. As insulin enters into the brain in a receptor-mediated fashion, we hypothesized that whole-body insulin sensitivity might affect the transport of insulin into the brain and contribute to the aversive effect of insulin resistance in the central nervous system. In this study, we aimed to determine the ratio of insulin in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum to whole-body insulin sensitivity. Healthy human subjects participated in an oral glucose tolerance test to determine whole-body insulin sensitivity and underwent lumbar puncture. Blood and CSF concentrations of insulin were significantly correlated. The CSF/serum ratio for insulin was significantly associated with whole body insulin sensitivity with reduced insulin transported into the CSF in insulin-resistant subjects. Together, our data suggest that transport of insulin into the CSF relates to peripheral insulin sensitivity and impairs insulin action in the brain. This underlines the need for sensitizing measures in insulin-resistant subjects.

  18. Electric transport in the Netherlands in an international perspective. Benchmark electric driving 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, P.; Weeda, M.; Appels, D.

    2012-07-01

    This international benchmark on electric mobility has been conducted to compare the Dutch governmental efforts and developments in the field of electric road transport. The countries that have been considered in this benchmark are: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, UK, China, USA and South Korea. The Netherlands has a high ambition level with regard to the number of electric vehicles compared to other countries without a large car industry. As for the envisaged number of charging points, the Netherlands is one of the prominent leaders. In the field of R and D, Germany, South Korea and China take the lead, followed by France, the UK, the USA and Austria. However, the benchmark has only looked at specific funds for electric mobility, and has not looked at general R and D and innovation funds. The Netherlands has several electro-mobility field tests, but is not leading in number. However, regarding general market penetration, the Netherlands is one of the leading countries, next to Norway, based on the relative number of passenger cars and commercial vehicles on the road. Norway and Austria are leading countries when it comes to implementation of public charging infrastructure, but also in this field the Netherlands has a prominent position in the group of countries that follow. In the current pre-commercial phase, the introduction of electric transportation in the Netherlands is supported by a high-level advisory group, the so-called Formula E-Team. This group consists of representatives and experts from industry and (scientific) society, and acts as a figurehead for electric transport. The group advises on coordination of actions to stimulate not only electro- mobility, but also innovation which should lead to new economic activities. Currently, about two hundred companies are already active in the field of electro-mobility in the Netherlands, including some top players and many SMEs (Small Medium Enterprises). The

  19. Y2K and International Agricultural Transportation: Analysis of Export Markets, Import Suppliers, and Major Food Aid Recipient Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    USDA Y2K information assessment of international food transportation modes in : selected foreign countries. The assessment targeted 9 of the top 10 markets for : U.S. Agricultural exports and 7 of the top 8 suppliers of imported food products : to th...

  20. An Examination of Pre-Service Agricultural Science Teachers' Interest and Participation in International Experiences: Motivations and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphrey, Theresa Pesl; Lane, Katy; Harlin, Julie; Cherry, Audie

    2016-01-01

    The importance of creating global mindedness within pre-service agricultural science teachers through international experiences cannot be overstated. However, providing opportunities for international experiences and college students selecting to participate in these opportunities are two very different actions. Mechanisms must be put in place…

  1. Transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Here is the decree of the thirtieth of July 1998 relative to road transportation, to trade and brokerage of wastes. It requires to firms which carry out a road transportation as well as to traders and to brokers of wastes to declare their operations to the prefect. The declaration has to be renewed every five years. (O.M.)

  2. Absorptive-mediated endocytosis of cationized albumin and a beta-endorphin-cationized albumin chimeric peptide by isolated brain capillaries. Model system of blood-brain barrier transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, A.K.; Eisenberg, J.B.; Pardridge, W.M.

    1987-11-05

    Cationized albumin (pI greater than 8), unlike native albumin (pI approximately 4), enters cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rapidly from blood. This suggests that a specific uptake mechanism for cationized albumin may exist at the brain capillary wall, i.e. the blood-brain barrier. Isolated bovine brain capillaries rapidly bound cationized (/sup 3/H)albumin and approximately 70% of the bound radioactivity was resistant to mild acid wash, which is assumed to represent internalized peptide. Binding was saturable and a Scatchard plot gave a maximal binding capacity (Ro) = 5.5 +/- 0.7 micrograms/mgp (79 +/- 10 pmol/mgp), and a half-saturation constant (KD) = 55 +/- 8 micrograms/ml (0.8 +/- 0.1 microM). The binding of cationized (/sup 3/H)albumin (pI = 8.5-9) was inhibited by protamine, protamine sulfate, and polylysine (molecular weight = 70,000) with a Ki of approximately 3 micrograms/ml for all three proteins. The use of cationized albumin in directed delivery of peptides through the blood-brain barrier was examined by coupling (/sup 3/H)beta-endorphin to unlabeled cationized albumin (pI = 8.5-9) using the bifunctional reagent, N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)proprionate. The (/sup 3/H)beta-endorphin-cationized albumin chimeric peptide was rapidly bound and endocytosed by isolated bovine brain capillaries, and this was inhibited by unlabeled cationized albumin but not by unconjugated beta-endorphin or native bovine albumin. Cationized albumin provides a new tool for studying absorptive-mediated endocytosis at the brain capillary and may also provide a vehicle for directed drug delivery through the blood-brain barrier.

  3. Internally shunted Josephson junctions with barriers tuned near the metal-insulator transition for RSFQ logic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Lei [Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-6006 (United States); Gandikota, Raghuram [Chemical and Materials Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-6006 (United States); Singh, Rakesh K [Chemical and Materials Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-6006 (United States); Gu Lin [Center for Solid State Science, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Smith, David J [Center for Solid State Science, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Meng Xiaofan [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Zeng Xianghui [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Duzer, Theodore van [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rowell, John M [Chemical and Materials Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-6006 (United States); Newman, N [Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-6006 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    The fabrication of self-shunted SNS (superconductor/normal conductor/superconductor) Josephson junctions for rapid single flux quantum (RSFQ) logic could potentially facilitate increased circuit density, as well as reduced parasitic capacitance and inductance over the currently used externally shunted SIS (superconductor/insulator/superconductor) trilayer junction process. We report the deposition, fabrication, and device characterization of Josephson junctions prepared with Nb{sub 1-y}Ti{sub y}N electrodes and Ta{sub x}N barriers tuned near the metal-insulator transition, deposited on practical large-area oxide-buffered silicon wafers. When scaled to practical device dimensions, this type of junction is found to have an I{sub c}R{sub n} product of over 0.5 mV and a critical current (I{sub c}) and normal resistance (R{sub n}) of magnitudes suitable for single flux quantum digital circuits. A longer than expected normal-metal coherence length ({xi}{sub n}) of 5.8 nm is inferred from the thickness dependence of J{sub c} at 4.2 K for junctions fabricated using a barrier resistivity of 13 m{omega} cm. Although not well understood and not quantitatively predicted by conventional theories, this results in a sufficiently high I{sub c} and I{sub c}R{sub n} to make the junctions suitable for practical applications. Similar observations of unexpectedly large Josephson coupling currents in SNS junctions have been documented in other systems, particularly in cases when the barrier is near the M-I transition, and have become known as the giant proximity effect. The temperature dependence of {xi}{sub n}, I{sub c}R{sub n}, and J{sub c} are also reported. For this technology to be used in practical applications, significant improvements in our fabrication process are needed as we observe large variations in I{sub c} and R{sub n} values across a 100 mm wafer, presumably as a result of variations in the Ta:N stoichiometry and the resulting changes in the Ta{sub x}N barrier

  4. Species differences in blood-brain barrier transport of three positron emission tomography radioligands with emphasis on P-glycoprotein transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvänen, Stina; Lindhe, Orjan; Palner, Mikael; Kornum, Birgitte R; Rahman, Obaidur; Långström, Bengt; Knudsen, Gitte M; Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta

    2009-03-01

    Species differences occur in the brain concentrations of drugs, but the reasons for these differences are not yet apparent. This study was designed to compare brain uptake of three radiolabeled P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrates across species using positron emission tomography. Brain concentrations and brain-to-plasma ratios were compared; [(11)C]verapamil in rats, guinea pigs, and monkeys; [(11)C](S)-(2-methoxy-5-(5-trifluoromethyltetrazol-1-yl)-phenylmethylamino)-2(S)-phenylpiperidine (GR205171) in rats, guinea pigs, monkeys, and humans; and [(18)F]altanserin in rats, minipigs, and humans. The fraction of the unbound radioligand in plasma was studied along with its metabolism. The effect of P-gp inhibition was investigated by administering cyclosporin A (CsA). Pronounced species differences were found in the brain and brain-to-plasma concentrations of [(11)C]verapamil, [(11)C]GR205171, and [(18)F]altanserin with higher brain distribution in humans, monkeys, and minipigs than in rats and guinea pigs. For example, the brain-to-plasma ratio of [(11)C]GR205171 was almost 9-fold higher in humans compared with rats. The species differences were still present after P-gp inhibition, although the increase in brain concentrations after P-gp inhibition was somewhat greater in rats than in the other species. Differences in plasma protein binding and metabolism did not explain the species-related differences. The findings are important for interpretation of brain drug delivery when extrapolating preclinical data to humans. Compounds found to be P-gp substrates in rodents are likely to also be substrates in higher species, but sufficient blood-brain barrier permeability may be retained in humans to allow the compound to act at intracerebral targets.

  5. Developing effective mass transit systems : proceedings of the 5th International Workshop on Public Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    The Federal Transit Administration (FTA), in conjunction with the U.S. Embassy, the Russian Ministry of Transportation, the City of Moscow, and the Ministry of Transport of the Moscow Oblast (Regional) Government, hosted a bilateral conference to dis...

  6. 75 FR 63534 - International Standards on the Transport of Dangerous Goods; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... Dangerous Goods; Public Meeting AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice is to advise interested... Agency (IAEA). Global harmonization of transport of dangerous goods regulations. Guiding principles for...

  7. 76 FR 25774 - International Standards on the Transport of Dangerous Goods; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-05

    ... Dangerous Goods; Public Meeting AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice is to advise interested...). Global harmonization of transport of dangerous goods regulations. Guiding principles for the Model...

  8. Climate change adaptation and mitigation : state transportation, regional, and international strategies: synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    This synthesis and literature review requested by Seth Start, Sustainable Transportation Manager, Washington State Department of Transportation, provides information on strategies other state DOTs countries, and local agencies are using to prepare...

  9. Self-regulation of turbulence in low rotation DIII-D QH-mode with an oscillating transport barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barada, Kshitish; Rhodes, T. L.; Burrell, K. H.; Zeng, L.; Chen, Xi

    2016-10-01

    We present observations of turbulence and flow shear limit cycle oscillations (LCOs) in wide pedestal QH-mode DIII-D tokamak plasmas that are consistent with turbulence self-regulation. In this low input torque regime, both edge harmonic oscillations (EHOs) and ELMs are absent. LCOs of ExB velocity shear and ñ present predator-prey like behavior in these fully developed QH-mode plasmas. During these limit cycle oscillations, the ExB poloidal flows possess a long-range toroidal correlation consistent with turbulence generated zonal flow activity. Further, these limit cycle oscillations are observed in a broad range of edge parameters including ne, Te, floor Langmuir probe ion saturation current, and radial electric field Er. TRANSP calculations of transport indicate little change between the EHO and LCO wide pedestal phases. These observations are consistent with LCO driven transport that may play a role in maintaining the profiles below ELM threshold in the EHO-free steady state wide pedestal QH-mode regime. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-08ER54984 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  10. Physical signatures of drug transport through an artificial skin barrier--a proposed model and its validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochowski, Pawel; Szurkowski, Janusz

    2014-05-01

    The objective of the present study is to better characterize the system acting as a model for the penetration of a pharmaceutical drug into the skin. With a new mathematical formalism, the transport of the drug (dithranol) from a semisolid vaseline suspension into an artificial membrane was described. In our novel approach, we have taken into account not only diffusion but also other effects dependent on chemical reactivity of drug, medium structure, and drug-matrix interactions. The transport equation was solved with two methods: the Laplace transform and the reflection-and-superposition. Despite the applied method, the three-dimensional calculations were found to be, in major parts, in good agreement with the experimental data resulting from the photoacoustic depth profiling. For the first time, from the depth profiling we were capable of estimating not only the diffusion coefficient but also other parameters of the permeation phenomenon as the pore velocity, the first and the zero order reaction rate coefficients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Reduced cognitive function, increased blood-brain-barrier transport and inflammatory responses, and altered brain metabolites in LDLr -/-and C57BL/6 mice fed a western diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowsky, Jennifer M; Lee, Linda L; Puchowicz, Michelle; Golub, Mari S; Befroy, Douglas E; Wilson, Dennis W; Anderson, Steven; Cline, Gary; Bini, Jason; Borkowski, Kamil; Knotts, Trina A; Rutledge, John C

    2018-01-01

    Recent work suggests that diet affects brain metabolism thereby impacting cognitive function. Our objective was to determine if a western diet altered brain metabolism, increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport and inflammation, and induced cognitive impairment in C57BL/6 (WT) mice and low-density lipoprotein receptor null (LDLr -/-) mice, a model of hyperlipidemia and cognitive decline. We show that a western diet and LDLr -/- moderately influence cognitive processes as assessed by Y-maze and radial arm water maze. Also, western diet significantly increased BBB transport, as well as microvessel factor VIII in LDLr -/- and microglia IBA1 staining in WT, both indicators of activation and neuroinflammation. Interestingly, LDLr -/- mice had a significant increase in 18F- fluorodeoxyglucose uptake irrespective of diet and brain 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed increased lactate and lipid moieties. Metabolic assessments of whole mouse brain by GC/MS and LC/MS/MS showed that a western diet altered brain TCA cycle and β-oxidation intermediates, levels of amino acids, and complex lipid levels and elevated proinflammatory lipid mediators. Our study reveals that the western diet has multiple impacts on brain metabolism, physiology, and altered cognitive function that likely manifest via multiple cellular pathways.

  12. HIV/AIDS, health and wellbeing study among International Transport Workers' Federation (ITF) seafarer affiliates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaf Chowdhury, Syed Asif; Smith, Jacqueline; Trowsdale, Steve; Leather, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Transport workers generally face a higher-than-average risk of HIV as well as other health challenges. In order to improve understanding of health issues in the maritime sector, including but not limited to HIV/AIDS, and to prepare appropriate responses the International Transport Workers' Federation (ITF) conducted a study of the views and needs of those affiliates. The ITF carried out two surveys. The first consisted of a questionnaire sent to all ITF seafarer affiliates to establish their concerns about health issues, including the impact of HIV/AIDS, and to assess the extent and nature of existing trade union programmes. The second consisted of a knowledge, attitude and behaviour survey on health, wellbeing and AIDS among a cross-section of individual members administered through anonymous and confidential questionnaires by maritime affiliates in four countries in different regions and an identical online questionnaire through Survey Monkey. For the first survey, replies were received from 35 unions in 30 countries, including major seafarer supplying countries - India, Indonesia, Myanmar, Philippines, Turkey, Ukraine - and major beneficial ownership countries such as Germany, Italy, Norway, and South Korea. Health issues of concern included HIV and other sexually transmitted infections for over three-quarters of them, and then alcohol use, weight control, and mental health. All said they would welcome ITF support in starting or strengthening a programme on general health and/or HIV. Replies were received to the second survey from 615 individual seafarers. Half to three-quarters said they worried about their weight, lack of exercise and drinking; over half felt depressed sometimes or often. There were serious knowledge gaps in a number of areas, especially HIV transmission and prevention, as well as high levels of stigma towards workmates with HIV. A number of health issues and information gaps remain unaddressed on board and pre-departure. Mental health is

  13. Revisiting nanoparticle technology for blood-brain barrier transport: Unfolding at the endothelial gate improves the fate of transferrin receptor-targeted liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Moos, Torben

    2016-01-28

    An unmet need exists for therapeutic compounds to traverse the brain capillary endothelial cells that denote the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to deliver effective treatment to the diseased brain. The use of nanoparticle technology for targeted delivery to the brain implies that targeted liposomes encapsulating a drug of interest will undergo receptor-mediated uptake and transport through the BBB with a subsequent unfolding of the liposomal content inside the brain, hence revealing drug release to adjacent drug-demanding neurons. As transferrin receptors (TfRs) are present on brain capillary endothelial, but not on endothelial cells elsewhere in the body, the use of TfR-targeted liposomes - colloidal particulates with a phospholipid bilayer membrane - remains the most relevant strategy to obtain efficient drug delivery to the brain. However, many studies have failed to provide sufficient quantitative data to proof passage of the BBB and significant appearance of drugs inside the brain parenchyma. Here, we critically evaluate the current evidence on the use of TfR-targeted liposomes for brain drug delivery based on a thorough investigation of all available studies within this research field. We focus on issues with respect to experimental design and data analysis that may provide an explanation to conflicting reports, and we discuss possible explanations for the current lack of sufficient transcytosis across the BBB for implementation in the design of TfR-targeted liposomes. We finally provide a list of suggestions for strategies to obtain substantial uptake and transport of drug carriers at the BBB with a concomitant transport of therapeutics into the brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Transport of Australian Continental Dust to Australia's Great Barrier Reef Region: First Results From Sampling, Remote Sensing, Synoptic and Trajectory Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapper, N.; O'Loingsigh, T.; de Deckker, P.; Cohen, D.

    2009-04-01

    As part of a large multi-disciplinary project funded by the Australian Research Council and in collaboration with the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, we established in mid-2008 three PM 2.5 samplers in eastern Australia to determine possible transport of continental dust from the major dust source region of the Lake Eyre Basin (LEB). These samplers were located at Fowlers Gap, New South Wales [NSW] (31.09S, 141.70E), Mount Stromlo, NSW (35.30S, 149.00E) and Heron Island, Queensland (23.44S, 151.83E). The latter location is of particular significance because of its proximity to the World Heritage Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and to the tropical rainforest of coastal North Queensland. In previous studies, dust and associated organic material of African origin has been associated with rainforest fertilisation in Amazonia and coral bleaching in the Carribean. In this presentation three case studies of continental dust transport to Heron Island that occurred in the first four months of sampling are examined. In each case transport of soil material from the LEB region and/or western NSW is confirmed by the nature of material sampled, by remote sensing of the dust, by forward and backward air parcel trajectory analysis and by synoptic analysis. In each case the dust arrived over Heron Island 3-7 days after passing over the southern samplers, generally having followed an anti-clockwise curved path to approach Heron Island from the southeast. The potential significance of this finding for the GBR is briefly discussed.

  15. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allshouse, Michael; Armstrong, Frederick Henry; Burns, Stephen; Courts, Michael; Denn, Douglas; Fortunato, Paul; Gettings, Daniel; Hansen, David; Hoffman, Douglas; Jones, Robert

    2007-01-01

    .... The ability of the global transportation industry to rapidly move passengers and products from one corner of the globe to another continues to amaze even those wise to the dynamics of such operations...

  16. Amphetamine-induced loss of human dopamine transporter activity: An internalization-dependent and cocaine-sensitive mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Christine; Ferrer, Jasmine V.; Shi, Lei; Chen, Jiayun; Merrill, Gerald; Lamb, Maria E.; Leeb-Lundberg, L. M. Fredrik; Carvelli, Lucia; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Galli, Aurelio

    2000-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a target of amphetamine (AMPH) and cocaine. These psychostimulants attenuate DAT clearance efficiency, thereby increasing synaptic dopamine (DA) levels. Re-uptake rate is determined by the number of functional transporters at the cell surface as well as by their turnover rate. Here, we present evidence that DAT substrates, including AMPH and DA, cause internalization of human DAT, thereby reducing transport capacity. Acute treatment with AMPH reduced the maximal rate of [3H]DA uptake, decreased AMPH-induced currents, and significantly redistributed the immunofluorescence of an epitope-tagged DAT from the plasma membrane to the cytosol in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Conversely, DAT inhibitors, such as cocaine, mazindol, and nomifensine, when administered with AMPH, blocked the reduction in [3H]DA uptake and the redistribution of DAT immunofluorescence to the cytosol. The reductions of [3H]DA uptake and AMPH-induced DAT internalization also were inhibited by coexpression of a dominant negative mutant of dynamin I (K44A), indicating that endocytosis modulates transport capacity, likely through a clathrin-mediated pathway. With this mechanism of regulation, acute application of AMPH would reduce DA uptake not only by direct competition for uptake, but also by reducing the available cell-surface DAT. Moreover, AMPH-induced internalization might diminish the amount of DAT available for DA efflux, thereby modulating the cytotoxic effects of elevated extracellular DA. PMID:10823899

  17. Core transport properties in JT-60U and JET identity plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litaudon, X.; Sakamoto, Y.; de Vries, P. C.; Salmi, A.; Tala, T.; Angioni, C.; Benkadda, S.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Bourdelle, C.; Brix, M.; Crombe, K.; Fujita, T.; Futatani, S.; Garbet, X.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N. C.; Hayashi, N.; Hoang, G. T.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Matsunaga, G.; Nakano, T.; Oyama, N.; Parail, V.; Shinohara, K.; Suzuki, T.; Takechi, M.; Takenaga, H.; Takizuka, T.; Urano, H.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Yoshida, M.

    2011-01-01

    The paper compares the transport properties of a set of dimensionless identity experiments performed between JET and JT-60U in the advanced tokamak regime with internal transport barrier, ITB. These International Tokamak Physics Activity, ITPA, joint experiments were carried out with the same plasma

  18. Problems and Barriers in Ensuring Effective Acute and Post-Operative Pain Management--an International Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mędrzycka-Dąbrowska, Wioletta; Dąbrowski, Sebastian; Basiński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Pain management originated at the turn of the 1960s and 70s in the United States, and spread to Western Europe almost a decade later. It is estimated today that a lack of adequate pain management affects 80% of the global population, and is a serious problem in over 150 countries. At the national level, the greatest burden of inadequate pain management is borne by the elderly, pregnant and breastfeeding women, children, people coping with addictions to harmful substances, and the mentally ill. In spite of enormous progress, there are still significant barriers to comprehensive pain management. Pain management should be considered a priority. It is an interdisciplinary task requiring the cooperation of the whole medical staff. The current review of literature revealed a number of factors limiting the possibility of achieving effective pain management, related to healthcare systems, medical staff and patients.

  19. PATRAM '83: 7th international symposium on packaging and transportation of radioactive materials. Proceedings. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    Volume 2 contains papers from the following sessions: emergency response; structural modeling and testing; transportation system planning; institutional issues and public response; packaging systems; thermal analysis and testing; systems analysis; structural analyses; quality assurance; packaging and transportation systems; physical protection; criticality and shielding; transportation operations and experience; standards; shock absorber technology; and information and training for compliance. Seventy-eight papers were indexed separately; thirty-eight were already in the Energy Data Base

  20. Japanese Language as an Organizational Barrier for International Students to Access to University Services: A Case of Aoyama Gakuin University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Hiroyoshi

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, Aoyama Gakuin University (AGU) started a government-funded degree program (taught in English) to accept international students with limited or no Japanese language proficiency. However, the students faced obstacles in accessing all of the university resources provided. In this article, I investigated Japanese language as an organizational…

  1. Noise and Vibration Mitigation for Rail Transportation Systems : Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on RailwayNoise

    CERN Document Server

    Gautier, Pierre-Etienne; Hanson, Carl; Hemsworth, Brian; Nelson, James; Schulte-Werning, Burkhard; Thompson, David; Vos, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This volume contains the contributions to the 10th International Workshop on Railway Noise, held October 18–22, 2010, in Nagahama, Japan, organized by the Railway Technical Research Institute (RTRI), Japan. With 11 sessions and 3 poster sessions, the workshop featured presentations by international leaders in the field of railway noise and vibration. All subjects relating to 1. prospects, legal regulation, and perception; 2. wheel and rail noise; 3. structure-borne noise and squeal noise; 4. ground-borne vibration; 5. aerodynamic noise and micro-pressure waves from tunnel portals; 6. interior noise and sound barriers; and 7. prediction, measurements, and monitoring are addressed here. This book is a useful “state-of-the-art” reference for scientists and engineers involved in solving environmental problems of railways.

  2. Internationally Recommended Best Practices in Transportation Financing Public-Private Partnerships (P3s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Lawrence; Lawther, Wendell; Hodge, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    sector partner designs-builds-finances-operates- maintains (DBFOM) a transportation infrastructure asset (road, highway, bridge, tunnel, etc.) with an emphasis on financing. Under this type of arrangement, the private sector partner is primarily responsible for securing all or substantially all......Transportation financing public-private partnerships (P3s) are a common practice in many countries. However, they represent a relatively new approach to transportation infrastructure financing for state and local governments in the United States. In a transportation financing P3 project, a private...

  3. Transportation risk management : international practices for program development and project delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Managing transportation networks, including agency : management, program development, and project : delivery, is extremely complex and fraught with : uncertainty. Administrators, planners, and engineers : coordinate a multitude of organizational and ...

  4. A Study on International Multimodal Transport Networks from Korea to Central Asia: Focus on Secondhand Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, high-income countries use multimodal transportation to export large quantities of secondhand vehicles to low-income countries. Secondhand vehicle export has shown its highest growth in recent years, especially in Korea. The problem of transporting secondhand vehicles from Korea to Central Asia is becoming an important issue, but few researchers are interested in it. The objective of this research is to determine the optimal transport network for exporting secondhand vehicles from Korea to Central Asian countries by combining experts’ opinions and real data from existing transport networks. The fuzzy Delphi method was applied to obtain factors to evaluate alternative multimodal transport networks for moving secondhand vehicles from Korea to Central Asian countries by judgment from experts. The analysis shows that among the five factors (total cost, total time, reliability, security, and transportation capability, total cost is the most considerable factor, followed by reliability, transportation capability, total time, and security. Additionally, in the mainly three multimodal transport networks, the sea+Trans-China Railway route is ranked first, followed by the sea+Trans-Siberian Railway and sea+truck routes.

  5. DELINEATING THE MOLECULAR BASIS FOR CONSTITUTIVE INTERNALIZATION AND DEGRADATION OF THE DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Jacob; (Vægter), Christian Bjerggaard; Gether, Ulrik

    The human dopamine transporter (hDAT) was transiently expressed in N2A neuroblastoma cells. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed efficient surface targeting of the transporter in undifferentiated cells as well as in differentiated cells. In the differentiated cells the hDAT displayed...

  6. 77 FR 69927 - International Standards on the Transport of Dangerous Goods; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ... Dangerous Goods; Public Meeting AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA... Sub-Committee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (UNSCOE TDG) to be held December 3 to 11... 18th Revised Edition of the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods Model...

  7. Potential artifacts in interpretation of differential breakthrough of colloids and dissolved tracers in the context of transport in a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.; Johnson, W.P.; Piana, M.J.; Fuller, C.C.; Naftz, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Many published studies have used visual comparison of the timing of peak breakthrough of colloids versus conservative dissolved tracers (hereafter referred to as dissolved tracers or tracers) in subsurface media to determine whether they are advected differently, and to elucidate the mechanisms of differential advection. This purely visual approach of determining differential advection may have artifacts, however, due to the attachment of colloids to subsurface media. The attachment of colloids to subsurface media may shift the colloidal peak breakthrough to earlier times, causing an apparent "faster" peak breakthrough of colloids relative to dissolve tracers even though the transport velocities for the colloids and the dissolved tracers may actually be equivalent. In this paper, a peak shift analysis was presented to illustrate the artifacts associated with the purely visual approach in determining differential advection, and to quantify the peak shift due to colloid attachment. This peak shift analysis was described within the context of microsphere and bromide transport within a zero-valent iron (ZVI) permeable reactive barrier (PRB) located in Fry Canyon, Utah. Application of the peak shift analysis to the field microsphere and bromide breakthrough data indicated that differential advection of the microspheres relative to the bromide occurred in the monitoring wells closest to the injection well in the PRB. It was hypothesized that the physical heterogeneity at the grain scale, presumably arising from differences in inter- versus intra-particle porosity, contributed to the differential advection of the microspheres versus the bromide in the PRB. The relative breakthrough (RB) of microspheres at different wells was inversely related to the ionic strength of ground water at these wells, in agreement with numerous studies showing that colloid attachment is directly related to solution ionic strength.

  8. Degradation of concrete-based barriers by Mg-containing brines: From laboratory experiments via reactive transport modelling to overall safety analysis in repository scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, Matthias; Wilhelm, Stefan; Hagemann, Sven; Xie, Mingliang; Wollrath, Jürgen; Preuss, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    . Corrosion in radial direction towards the axis of the seal would quickly create an expanding preferred flowpath if it occurred over the whole length of the seal simultaneously and would thus destroy the building in a rather short time. The model results show, however, that the diffusion process from the EDZ into the seal is fast compared to the transport velocity along the EDZ. Thus the corroding agent is extracted from the EDZ within a transport distance of a few meters what means that the reaction zone is almost vertically planar and that along the remaining length the barrier keeps intact for a sufficiently long time. This justifies the use of a 1D-approximation of the corrosion process in the complex transport model for the safety analysis for the whole repository system which comprises all relevant processes taking place in the salt structure and the surrounding geosphere.

  9. Systematic barriers to the effective delivery of home dialysis in the United States: a report from the Public Policy/Advocacy Committee of the North American Chapter of the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golper, Thomas A; Saxena, Anjali B; Piraino, Beth; Teitelbaum, Isaac; Burkart, John; Finkelstein, Fredric O; Abu-Alfa, Ali

    2011-12-01

    Home dialysis, currently underused in the United States compared with other industrialized countries, likely will benefit from the newly implemented US prospective payment system. Not only is home dialysis less expensive from the standpoint of pure dialysis costs, but overall health system costs may be decreased by more subtle benefits, such as reduced transportation. However, many systematic barriers exist to the successful delivery of home dialysis. We organized these barriers into the categories of educational barriers (patient and providers), governmental/regulatory barriers (state and federal), and barriers specifically related to the philosophies and business practices of dialysis providers (eg, staffing, pharmacies, supplies, space, continuous quality improvement practices, and independence). All stakeholders share the goal of delivering home dialysis therapies in the most cost- and clinically effective and least problematic manner. Identification and recognition of such barriers is the first step. In addition, we have suggested action plans to stimulate the kidney community to find even better solutions so that collectively we may overcome these barriers. Copyright © 2011 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Inflammation Modulates RLIP76/RALBP1 Electrophile-Glutathione Conjugate Transporter and Housekeeping Genes in Human Blood-Brain Barrier Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Bennani-Baiti

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells are often present at inflammation sites. This is the case of endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB of patients afflicted with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, or multiple sclerosis, as well as in cases of bacterial meningitis, trauma, or tumor-associated ischemia. Inflammation is a known modulator of gene expression through the activation of transcription factors, mostly NF-κB. RLIP76 (a.k.a. RALBP1, an ATP-dependent transporter of electrophile-glutathione conjugates, modulates BBB permeability through the regulation of tight junction function, cell adhesion, and exocytosis. Genes and pathways regulated by RLIP76 are transcriptional targets of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α pro-inflammatory molecule, suggesting that RLIP76 may also be an inflammation target. To assess the effects of TNF-α on RLIP76, we faced the problem of choosing reference genes impervious to TNF-α. Since such genes were not known in human BBB endothelial cells, we subjected these to TNF-α, and measured by quantitative RT-PCR the expression of housekeeping genes commonly used as reference genes. We find most to be modulated, and analysis of several inflammation datasets as well as a metaanalysis of more than 5000 human tissue samples encompassing more than 300 cell types and diseases show that no single housekeeping gene may be used as a reference gene. Using three different algorithms, however, we uncovered a reference geneset impervious to TNF-α, and show for the first time that RLIP76 expression is induced by TNF-α and follows the induction kinetics of inflammation markers, suggesting that inflammation can influence RLIP76 expression at the BBB. We also show that MRP1 (a.k.a. ABCC1, another electrophile-glutathione transporter, is not modulated in the same cells and conditions, indicating that RLIP76 regulation by TNF-α is not a general property of glutathione transporters. The reference geneset

  11. Effect of rotational speed modulation on heat transport in a fluid layer with temperature dependent viscosity and internal heat source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S. Bhadauria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a theoretical investigation has been carried out to study the combined effect of rotation speed modulation and internal heating on thermal instability in a temperature dependent viscous horizontal fluid layer. Rayleigh–Bénard momentum equation with Coriolis term has been considered to describe the convective flow. The system is rotating about it is own axis with non-uniform rotational speed. In particular, a time-periodic and sinusoidally varying rotational speed has been considered. A weak nonlinear stability analysis is performed to find the effect of modulation on heat transport. Nusselt number is obtained in terms of amplitude of convection and internal Rayleigh number, and depicted graphically for showing the effects of various parameters of the system. The effect of modulated rotation speed is found to have a stabilizing effect for different values of modulation frequency. Further, internal heating and thermo-rheological parameters are found to destabilize the system.

  12. Engaging the international community : research on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) applications to improve environmental performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    This report seeks to build on the exposure that the authors have had during the past two years to : the thinking of the Japanese and European thought leaders about how Intelligent Transportation : System (ITS) can contribute toward meeting environmen...

  13. Time as a trade barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    International trade occurs in physical space and moving goods requires time. This paper examines the importance of time as a trade barrier, estimates the magnitude of time costs, and relates these to patterns of trade and the international organizati...

  14. Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-06-01

    The ''International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers'' was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries

  15. The serotonin transporter undergoes constitutive internalization and is primarily sorted to late endosomes and lysosomal degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels; Bay, Tina; Eriksen, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    . Furthermore, internalized SERT co-localized with the lysosomal marker LysoTracker and not with transferrin. The sorting pattern was further confirmed by visualizing internalization of SERT using the fluorescent cocaine analogue JHC1-64, and by reversible and pulse chase biotinylation assays showing evidence...

  16. Trends in transportation energy use, 1970--1988: An international perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schipper, L.; Steiner, R.; Meyers, S.

    1992-05-01

    Personal mobility and timely movement of goods have become increasingly important around the world, and energy use for transportation has grown rapidly as a consequence. Energy is used in transportation for two rather different activities: moving people, which we refer to as passenger travel, and moving freight. While freight transport is closely connected to economic activity, much of travel is conducted for personal reasons. In the OECD countries, travel accounts for around 70% of total transportation energy use. In contrast, freight transport accounts for the larger share in the Former East Bloc and the developing countries (LDCs). In our analysis, we focus on three elements that shape transportation energy use: activity, which we measure in passenger-km (p-km) or tonne-km (t-km), modal structure (the share of total activity accounted for by various modes), and modal energy intensities (energy use per p-km or t-km). The modal structure of travel and freight transport is important because there are often considerable differences in energy intensity among modes. The average 1988 average energy use per p-km of different travel modes in the United States (US), West Germany, and Japan are illustrated. With the exception of rail in the US, bus and rail travel had much lower intensity than automobile and air travel. What is perhaps surprising is that the intensity of air travel is only slightly higher than that of automobile travel. This reflects the much higher utilization of vehicle capacity in air travel and the large share of automobile travel that takes place in urban traffic (automobile energy intensity in long-distance driving is much lower than the average over types of driving).

  17. Transport phenomena in a steam-methanol reforming microreactor with internal heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jeong-Se; Lee, Ming-Tsang; Greif, Ralph; Grigoropoulos, Costas P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1740 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    An experimental and theoretical study of steam reforming of methanol is carried out in a packed-bed microreactor with internal heating. Experimental results of the methanol conversion and carbon monoxide concentration in an internally heated reformer are compared with those of an externally heated reformer. Higher methanol conversion and carbon monoxide concentration are obtained for internal heating at the same conditions. The results show the conversion efficiency of methanol and CO concentration increase with increasing internal heating rate over the range of operating conditions. A correlation for the conversion efficiency of methanol has been obtained as a function of the internal heating rate and a dimensionless time parameter which represents the ratio of the characteristic time of the methanol flow to the time for chemical reaction. (author)

  18. PATRAM 2004 - The 14th international symposium on the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The 14th International Symposium on the Packaging and Transport of Radioactive Materials, PATRAM 2004, was held at the Estrel Convention Center in Berlin, Germany, from 20-24 September 2004. PATRAM '04 was held under the auspices of the German Federal Ministry for Transport, Building and Housing (BMNBW), and was hosted by the German Bundesanstalt fur Materialforschung und -Prufung (BAM). Further, the conference was held in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the US Institute for Nuclear Materials Management. As with past PATRAM conferences, this one covered a wide range of topics that are of concern to the nuclear materials transport industry; regulations, operations, technical analyses and testing, design, institutional issues, security, risk assessment and emergency response. Presentation of these topics was provided through a number of fora, plenary presentations, panel presentations, oral presentations, posters and technical tours. Coupled with the opening reception on Monday evening and the coffee breaks, a forum was provided at this PATRAM that allowed all participants ample opportunities to increase their technical knowledge, to learn about compelling issues around the world and to network with colleagues. (orig.)

  19. PATRAM 2004 - The 14th international symposium on the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The 14th International Symposium on the Packaging and Transport of Radioactive Materials, PATRAM 2004, was held at the Estrel Convention Center in Berlin, Germany, from 20-24 September 2004. PATRAM '04 was held under the auspices of the German Federal Ministry for Transport, Building and Housing (BMNBW), and was hosted by the German Bundesanstalt fur Materialforschung und -Prufung (BAM). Further, the conference was held in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the US Institute for Nuclear Materials Management. As with past PATRAM conferences, this one covered a wide range of topics that are of concern to the nuclear materials transport industry; regulations, operations, technical analyses and testing, design, institutional issues, security, risk assessment and emergency response. Presentation of these topics was provided through a number of fora, plenary presentations, panel presentations, oral presentations, posters and technical tours. Coupled with the opening reception on Monday evening and the coffee breaks, a forum was provided at this PATRAM that allowed all participants ample opportunities to increase their technical knowledge, to learn about compelling issues around the world and to network with colleagues. (orig.)

  20. The international transportation of zoo animals: conserving biological diversity and protecting animal welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhart, Peter; Adams, David B; Voracek, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Issues pertaining to the long distance transportation of animals are examined according to the aspirations of the world's zoo community. Guidance comes from the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA), the civil society organisation that provides 'leadership and support for zoos, aquariums and partner organisations of the world in animal care and welfare, conservation of biodiversity, environmental education and global sustainability'. The authors describe why it is necessary to transport zoo animals over long distances and how animal welfare can be protected during the process. Transportation of animals among zoos is essential for the cooperative breeding programmes undertaken for the ex situ conservation of wildlife with the help of WAZA studbooks. The challenge is to satisfy the entwined ethical imperatives of safeguarding animal welfare and protecting biodiversity.

  1. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system with directed internal gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Michael Jerome; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2010-02-09

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an inlet adapted to introduce gas into the interior of the vessel, an outlet adapted to withdraw gas from the interior of the vessel, and an axis; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region; and (c) one or more gas flow control partitions disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and adapted to change a direction of gas flow within the vessel.

  2. NATO Advanced Study Institute on International Summer School on Chaotic Dynamics and Transport in Classical and Quantum Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Collet, P; Métens, S; Neishtadt, A; Zaslavsky, G; Chaotic Dynamics and Transport in Classical and Quantum Systems

    2005-01-01

    This book offers a modern updated review on the most important activities in today dynamical systems and statistical mechanics by some of the best experts in the domain. It gives a contemporary and pedagogical view on theories of classical and quantum chaos and complexity in hamiltonian and ergodic systems and their applications to anomalous transport in fluids, plasmas, oceans and atom-optic devices and to control of chaotic transport. The book is issued from lecture notes of the International Summer School on "Chaotic Dynamics and Transport in Classical and Quantum Systems" held in Cargèse (Corsica) 18th to the 30th August 2003. It reflects the spirit of the School to provide lectures at the post-doctoral level on basic concepts and tools. The first part concerns ergodicity and mixing, complexity and entropy functions, SRB measures, fractal dimensions and bifurcations in hamiltonian systems. Then, models of dynamical evolutions of transport processes in classical and quantum systems have been largely expla...

  3. Using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to address facilitators and barriers to participation at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Anabela Correia

    2015-01-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) was approved by the World Health Assembly in 2001. Ten years later, strong arguments have arisen regarding the added value of ICF to the policies on employment and the outcomes at the workplace. As a conceptual framework, ICF has universality because of its inclusive and comprehensive view of human functioning. At a practical level ICF can be used to quantify the impact of impairment on an individual's ability to act in his/her environment and to assess interventions to minimize the impact of disability and maximize functioning. To explore key indicators of social participation (life habits) of persons with disabilities, particularly related to work, among environmental and personal factors. Data were collected by self-administered questionnaires from a convenience sample of 149 working-age persons with disabilities. Social participation is a construct composed by multiple components and employment domain is the strongest indicator of participation. Correlations between social participation and personal factors, such as self-efficacy and attitudes towards disability were moderate. Those who are employed scored higher quality of life in terms of satisfaction with life, more positive attitudes toward disabilities and higher self-efficacy than the ones who are retired or unemployed. Persons using adapted wheelchair and those who were involved in wheelchair selection scored higher in social participation in general, performance at work, and quality of life. Age and disability duration were not associated with participants' employment status. These findings suggest that rehabilitation and vocational agents, like physiotherapists and other professionals, should have knowledge and understanding of the multiple factors that influence persons with disabilities' participation at work. Programs should provide appropriate wheelchairs, skills training, empowerment and problem-solving strategies in

  4. Imidazole-4-acetic acid, a new lead structure for interaction with the taurine transporter in outer blood-retinal barrier cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valembois, Sophie; Krall, Jacob; Frølund, Bente; Steffansen, Bente

    2017-05-30

    Retinal diseases leading to impaired vision and ultimately blindness are mainly characterized by ischemic and hypoxic stress. Targeting the retinal ρ-containing γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (ρ GABA A Rs) and thereby decreasing the retinal neuronal activity has been proposed as a novel therapeutic approach. The taurine transporter (TAUT) plays a key role in the retinal transport of GABA and has been previously suggested to display a higher functional activity in the retina compared to the brain. TAUT would therefore stand as a suitable target for the selective delivery of ρ GABA A R ligands into the retina. Consequently, an in vitro model of TAUT at the outer blood-retinal barrier (BRB) was developed and characterized using the ARPE-19 cell line. Furthermore, the structural requirements of GABA A R ligands for interacting with TAUT at the BRB were investigated for a series of standard GABA A R ligands by testing their ability to inhibit the TAUT-mediated influx of taurine in ARPE-19 cells. Results showed that taurine influx was seven-fold higher when the ARPE-19 cells were cultured under hyperosmotic conditions and was demonstrated to display saturable kinetics (K m =27.7±2.2μM and J max =24.2±0.6pmol/cm 2 ·min). Furthermore, the taurine influx was significantly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by GABA and imidazole-4-acetic acid (IAA), which is a naturally occurring metabolite of histamine. These compounds display similar K i values of 644.2μM and 658.6μM, respectively. Moreover, IAA demonstrated higher inhibitory properties than the other tested GABA analogs: 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP), 4,5,6,7-tetrahydropyrazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (Aza-THIP), muscimol, and thiomuscimol. These studies demonstrated that IAA interacts with TAUT, which makes IAA a new lead structure in the development of new compounds, which are not only interacting with TAUT but also potent ρ GABA A R ligands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  5. Supplementary Report on Audit of Internal Control Systems Related to the Office of the Secretary of Transportation's Financial Statements for Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-24

    The internal controlrelated objectives for our audits of the Office of the Secretary of Transportation's (OST) Financial Statements for Fiscal Years (FY) 1994 and 1995 were to determine whether OST and the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) (i) had...

  6. Influence of internal waves on the dispersion and transport of inclined gravity currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, C. A. R.; Pietrasz, V. B.; Ouellette, N. T.; Koseff, J. R.

    2016-02-01

    Brine discharge from desalination facilities presents environmental risks, particularly to benthic organisms. High concentrations of salt and chemical additives, which can be toxic to local ecosystems, are typically mitigated by dilution close to the source. Our laboratory experiments investigate how breaking internal tides can help to dilute gravity currents caused by desalination effluents and direct them away from the benthic layer. In laboratory experiments, internal waves at the pycnocline of an ambient stratification were directed towards a sloping shelf, down which ran a gravity current. The breaking internal waves were seen to increase the proportion of the fluid from the gravity current diverted away from the slope into an intrusion along the pycnocline. In a parametric study, increasing the amplitude of the internal wave was seen to increase the amount of dense fluid in the pycnocline intrusion. The amplitude required to divert the gravity current into the intrusion compares well with an analytical theory that equates the incident energy in the internal wave to the potential energy required to dilute the gravity current. These experimental results suggest that sites of breaking internal waves may be good sites for effluent disposal. Effluent diverted into the intrusion avoids the ecologically sensitive benthic layer.

  7. 78 FR 36723 - Federal Management Regulation (FMR); Restrictions on International Transportation of Freight and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... posted without change to http://www.regulations.gov , including any personal and/or business confidential... Australia, Switzerland, and Japan, which allow carriers from those countries to transport cargo subject to... points outside the United States. The provisions in the agreements with Australia and Switzerland became...

  8. 77 FR 33019 - International Standards on the Transport of Dangerous Goods; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... Dangerous Goods; Public Meeting AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA... Sub-Committee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (UNSCOE TDG) to be held June 25 to July 4... Dangerous Goods Model Regulations which will be implemented within relevant domestic, regional, and...

  9. Heat transfer analysis of a volumetric solar receiver by coupling the solar radiation transport and internal heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xue; Xia, Xin-Lin; Liu, Hua; Li, Yang; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A model coupling solar radiation transport and internal heat transfer is developed. • Two other treatment approaches for the concentrated solar radiation are compared. • Porous parameters significantly affect the distribution of absorbed solar radiation. • The TBC approach overestimates the solid temperature with a deviation up to 76.4%. • The CIR approach provides acceptable temperature field with deviation less than 3.4%. - Abstract: Volumetric receivers have become a promising technology for the solar thermal conversion. The absorption of concentrated solar radiation and the heat transfer to the working fluid are the two dominant processes. To effectively investigate the thermal performance of receiver, a numerical model coupling the solar radiation transport and the internal heat transfer is presented. Solar radiation transport from the dish concentrator to the interior of receiver is simulated with the Monte Carlo ray tracing method. Combining the distribution of absorbed solar energy in the receiver, the local thermal non-equilibrium model with P1 approximation is used to solve the internal heat transfer. Two other treatment approaches for the concentrated solar radiation are compared. One considers the solar radiation on the front surface of receiver as thermal boundary condition (TBC) and the other as a collimated incident radiation (CIR) beam. The results show that the porosity and mean cell size have a great effect on the distribution of absorbed solar radiation. Compared with the coupling approach, the TBC approach overestimates the solid temperature near the front surface with a deviation up to 76.4%, while the CIR approach provides acceptable temperature field with a deviation less than 3.4%. In addition, the fluid and solid temperatures both decrease as the slope error of concentrator increases.

  10. Building barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turksen, Kursad

    2017-10-02

    Formation of tissue barriers starts in early development where it is critical for normal cell fate selection, differentiation and organogenesis. Barrier maintenance is critical to the ongoing function of organs during adulthood and aging. Dysfunctional tissue barrier formation and function at any stage of the organismal life cycle underlies many disease states.

  11. Who gains? allocation of freight transport user benefits from international infrastructure projects in multicountry cost-benefit analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosgerau, Mogens; Kristensen, Niels Buus

    2005-01-01

    A public decision by several countries on whether to cofinance an international infrastructure project is the subject of a cost-benefit analysis (CBA). The CBA elements are broken out and analyzed for each country. The issue of freight user benefits is discussed, and results are derived from...... a partial equilibrium model and point toward practical applicability. A recent analysis of the Fehmarn Belt Bridge, which will connect Denmark and Germany in a link in the Trans-European Network for Transport, is used for illustrative purposes....

  12. The international intraval project to study validation of geosphere transport models for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    INTRAVAL is an international project concerned with the use of mathematical models for predicting the potential transport of radioactive substances in the geosphere. Such models are used to help assess the longterm safety of radioactive waste disposal systems. The INTRAVAL project was established to evaluate the validity of these models. Results from a set of selected laboratory and field experiments as well as studies of occurrences of radioactive substances in nature (natural analogues) are compared in a systematic way with model predictions. Discrepancies between observations and predictions are discussed and analyzed

  13. The Transportation Logistics of Manufactured Products in the Colombian Internal Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edisson Castro Escobar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper tracks the transport logistics of the Colombian manufacturing industry in the domestic market, analyzing the direction and the volume of the cargo moved by road. The study is intended to identify some sectorial and regional enclaves of the industry that could be strategic for market diversification and to facilitate production chains. Estimates of land freight movements are made based on the origin-destination survey carried out by the Ministry of Transportation in 2008. The different regional and sectorial flows are projected through a geodetic network model. The results indicate that regional differences in product specialization explain the movement of cargo from specific industries, while in other cases there are no significant flows because the industries largely serve local markets.

  14. Three-dimensional transport theory: An analytical solution of an internal beam searchlight problem-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a number of methods for obtaining analytical solutions and numerical results for three-dimensional one-speed neutron transport problems in a half-space containing a variety of source shapes which emit neutrons mono-directionally. For example, we consider an off-centre point source, a ring source and a disk source, or any combination of these, and calculate the surface scalar flux as a function of the radial and angular co-ordinates. Fourier transforms in the transverse directions are used and a Laplace transform in the axial direction. This enables the Wiener-Hopf method to be employed, followed by an inverse Fourier-Hankel transform. Some additional transformations are introduced which enable the inverse Hankel transforms involving Bessel functions to be evaluated numerically more efficiently. A hybrid diffusion theory method is also described which is shown to be a useful guide to the general behaviour of the solutions of the transport equation.

  15. International regulations on labour health and safety applied to fishing and maritime transport sectors. Are maritime workers under-protected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Julio Louro; Portela, Rosa Mary de la Campa; Pardo, Guadalupe Martín

    2012-01-01

    The work activity developed on board is of great importance in our nearby environment, and it has a series of peculiarities that determine the service rendering of sea workers. On the other hand, work at sea is developed on an international basis. Nowadays such work becomes a completely globalised industrial sector in relation to the elements that make up the ship's operation, including manpower. For that reason several relevant international organisations have paid attention to this industrial sector and have adopted a broad regulation on this matter. In the case of the European Union, the Community procedure emphasises enormous interest in providing specific and comprehensive training to seafarers, as well as in regulating working time on board with the aim of minimising the safety problems caused by fatigue. In the present article a schematic presentation of regulations on workers' health and occupational safety protection derived from the European Union, the International Maritime Organisation, and the International Labour Organisation has been done. Also it shows what parts of these regulations are not applicable to the work on board, and it reveals how the workers of fishing and maritime transport sectors are under-protected with regard to the guarantee of their health and occupational safety compared to workers in other sectors.

  16. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolch, W.E.

    1994-11-01

    The goal of this particular task is to consider, for the first time, the explicit transport of beta particles and photon-generated electrons in the series of six phantoms developed by Cristy and Eckerman (1987) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In their report, ORNL/TM-8381, specific absorbed fractions of energy are reported for phantoms representing the newborn (3.4 kg), the one-year-old (9.8 kg), the five-year-old (19 kg), the ten-year-old (32 kg), the fifteen-year-old/adult female (55-58 kg), and the adult male (70 kg). Radiation transport calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo code ALGAMP which allows photon transport only. In subsequent calculations of radionuclide S values as is done in the MIRDOSE2 computer program, electron absorbed fractions are thus considered to be either unity or zero depending upon whether the source region does or does not equal the target region, respectively.