WorldWideScience

Sample records for interfaced computer control

  1. Control by personal computer and Interface 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eung Mug; Park, Sun Ho

    1989-03-01

    This book consists of three chapters. The first chapter deals with basic knowledge of micro computer control which are computer system, micro computer system, control of the micro computer and control system for calculator. The second chapter describes Interface about basic knowledge such as 8255 parallel interface, 6821 parallel interface, parallel interface of personal computer, reading BCD code in parallel interface, IEEE-488 interface, RS-232C interface and transmit data in personal computer and a measuring instrument. The third chapter includes control experiment by micro computer, experiment by eight bit computer and control experiment by machine code and BASIC.

  2. Experiencing Brain-Computer Interface Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Laar, B.L.A.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) are systems that extract information from the user’s brain activity and employ it in some way in an interactive system. While historically BCIs were mainly catered towards paralyzed or otherwise physically handicapped users, the last couple of years applications with

  3. Interface control scheme for computer high-speed interface unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, B. K.

    1975-01-01

    Control scheme is general and performs for multiplexed and dedicated channels as well as for data-bus interfaces. Control comprises two 64-pin, dual in-line packages, each of which holds custom large-scale integrated array built with silicon-on-sapphire complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology.

  4. Digital quality control of the camera computer interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd-Pokropek, A.

    1983-01-01

    A brief description is given of how the gamma camera-computer interface works and what kind of errors can occur. Quality control tests of the interface are then described which include 1) tests of static performance e.g. uniformity, linearity, 2) tests of dynamic performance e.g. basic timing, interface count-rate, system count-rate, 3) tests of special functions e.g. gated acquisition, 4) tests of the gamma camera head, and 5) tests of the computer software. The tests described are mainly acceptance and routine tests. Many of the tests discussed are those recommended by an IAEA Advisory Group for inclusion in the IAEA control schedules for nuclear medicine instrumentation. (U.K.)

  5. Control of a mobile robot through brain computer interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Jimenez Moreno

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper poses a control interface to command the movement of a mobile robot according to signals captured from the user's brain. These signals are acquired and interpreted by Emotiv EPOC device, a 14-electrode type sensor which captures electroencephalographic (EEG signals with high resolution, which, in turn, are sent to a computer for processing. One brain-computer interface (BCI was developed based on the Emotiv software and SDK in order to command the mobile robot from a distance. Functionality tests are performed with the sensor to discriminate shift intentions of a user group, as well as with a fuzzy controller to hold the direction in case of concentration loss. As conclusion, it was possible to obtain an efficient system for robot movements by brain commands.

  6. A brain-computer interface controlled mail client.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tianyou; Li, Yuanqing; Long, Jinyi; Wang, Cong

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a brain-computer interface (BCI) based mail client. This system is controlled by hybrid features extracted from scalp-recorded electroencephalographic (EEG). We emulate the computer mouse by the motor imagery-based mu rhythm and the P300 potential. Furthermore, an adaptive P300 speller is included to provide text input function. With this BCI mail client, users can receive, read, write mails, as well as attach files in mail writing. The system has been tested on 3 subjects. Experimental results show that mail communication with this system is feasible.

  7. Region based Brain Computer Interface for a home control application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman Aydin, Eda; Bay, Omer Faruk; Guler, Inan

    2015-08-01

    Environment control is one of the important challenges for disabled people who suffer from neuromuscular diseases. Brain Computer Interface (BCI) provides a communication channel between the human brain and the environment without requiring any muscular activation. The most important expectation for a home control application is high accuracy and reliable control. Region-based paradigm is a stimulus paradigm based on oddball principle and requires selection of a target at two levels. This paper presents an application of region based paradigm for a smart home control application for people with neuromuscular diseases. In this study, a region based stimulus interface containing 49 commands was designed. Five non-disabled subjects were attended to the experiments. Offline analysis results of the experiments yielded 95% accuracy for five flashes. This result showed that region based paradigm can be used to select commands of a smart home control application with high accuracy in the low number of repetitions successfully. Furthermore, a statistically significant difference was not observed between the level accuracies.

  8. Quality control of the gamma camera/computer interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busemann-Sokole, E.

    1983-01-01

    Reporting on the conference mentioned, the author indicates that technical inspection of the gamma camera and the attached computer each by themselves is not sufficient. The parts of the interface and the hardware or software can contain sources of error. In order to obtain the best diagnostic image a number of control measurements are recommended dealing with image intensifying, intensifier offset, linearity of transformation, exclusion of 'data drop' or 'bit drop', 2-pulse timing, correct response with different counting rates, and response to triggers (electrocardiogram). The last and most important recommendation is to record in writing particulars of each inspection and control measurement, particulars and solutions of problems and modifications in hardware and software. (Auth.)

  9. An optical brain computer interface for environmental control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaz, Hasan; Shewokis, Patricia A; Bunce, Scott; Onaral, Banu

    2011-01-01

    A brain computer interface (BCI) is a system that translates neurophysiological signals detected from the brain to supply input to a computer or to control a device. Volitional control of neural activity and its real-time detection through neuroimaging modalities are key constituents of BCI systems. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a new BCI design that utilizes intention-related cognitive activity within the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex using functional near infrared (fNIR) spectroscopy. fNIR is a noninvasive, safe, portable and affordable optical technique with which to monitor hemodynamic changes, in the brain's cerebral cortex. Because of its portability and ease of use, fNIR is amenable to deployment in ecologically valid natural working environments. We integrated a control paradigm in a computerized 3D virtual environment to augment interactivity. Ten healthy participants volunteered for a two day study in which they navigated a virtual environment with keyboard inputs, but were required to use the fNIR-BCI for interaction with virtual objects. Results showed that participants consistently utilized the fNIR-BCI with an overall success rate of 84% and volitionally increased their cerebral oxygenation level to trigger actions within the virtual environment.

  10. Computer interfacing

    CERN Document Server

    Dixey, Graham

    1994-01-01

    This book explains how computers interact with the world around them and therefore how to make them a useful tool. Topics covered include descriptions of all the components that make up a computer, principles of data exchange, interaction with peripherals, serial communication, input devices, recording methods, computer-controlled motors, and printers.In an informative and straightforward manner, Graham Dixey describes how to turn what might seem an incomprehensible 'black box' PC into a powerful and enjoyable tool that can help you in all areas of your work and leisure. With plenty of handy

  11. Brain-Computer Interface application: auditory serial interface to control a two-class motor-imagery-based wheelchair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron-Angevin, Ricardo; Velasco-Álvarez, Francisco; Fernández-Rodríguez, Álvaro; Díaz-Estrella, Antonio; Blanca-Mena, María José; Vizcaíno-Martín, Francisco Javier

    2017-05-30

    Certain diseases affect brain areas that control the movements of the patients' body, thereby limiting their autonomy and communication capacity. Research in the field of Brain-Computer Interfaces aims to provide patients with an alternative communication channel not based on muscular activity, but on the processing of brain signals. Through these systems, subjects can control external devices such as spellers to communicate, robotic prostheses to restore limb movements, or domotic systems. The present work focus on the non-muscular control of a robotic wheelchair. A proposal to control a wheelchair through a Brain-Computer Interface based on the discrimination of only two mental tasks is presented in this study. The wheelchair displacement is performed with discrete movements. The control signals used are sensorimotor rhythms modulated through a right-hand motor imagery task or mental idle state. The peculiarity of the control system is that it is based on a serial auditory interface that provides the user with four navigation commands. The use of two mental tasks to select commands may facilitate control and reduce error rates compared to other endogenous control systems for wheelchairs. Seventeen subjects initially participated in the study; nine of them completed the three sessions of the proposed protocol. After the first calibration session, seven subjects were discarded due to a low control of their electroencephalographic signals; nine out of ten subjects controlled a virtual wheelchair during the second session; these same nine subjects achieved a medium accuracy level above 0.83 on the real wheelchair control session. The results suggest that more extensive training with the proposed control system can be an effective and safe option that will allow the displacement of a wheelchair in a controlled environment for potential users suffering from some types of motor neuron diseases.

  12. The computer-controlled GPIB-RS232 interface for data transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Xiaowei

    1993-01-01

    A kind of RS232-GPIB interface circuit is introduced, which provides communication between the serial system and the instrument with GPIB. Port P 1 of 8031 is used to select function mode as listener, talker or others. Under the control of a personal computer, the data communication is completed both in serial and the parallel modes

  13. Brain Computer Interface for Micro-controller Driven Robot Based on Emotiv Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Parth Gargava; Krishna Asawa

    2017-01-01

    A Brain Computer Interface (BCI) is developed to navigate a micro-controller based robot using Emotiv sensors. The BCI system has a pipeline of 5 stages- signal acquisition, pre-processing, feature extraction, classification and CUDA inter- facing. It shall aid in serving a prototype for physical movement of neurological patients who are unable to control or operate on their muscular movements. All stages of the pipeline are designed to process bodily actions like eye blinks to command naviga...

  14. Flexusi Interface Builder For Computer Based Accelerator Monitoring And Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Kurakin, V G; Kurakin, P V

    2004-01-01

    We have developed computer code for any desired graphics user interface designing for monitoring and control system at the executable level. This means that operator can build up measurement console consisting of virtual devices before or even during real experiment without recompiling source file. Such functionality results in number of advantages comparing with traditional programming. First of all any risk disappears to introduce bug into source code. Another important thing is the fact the both program developers and operator staff do not interface in developing ultimate product (measurement console). Thus, small team without detailed project can design even very complicated monitoring and control system. For the reason mentioned below, approach suggested is especially helpful for large complexes to be monitored and control, accelerator being among them. The program code consists of several modules, responsible for data acquisition, control and representation. Borland C++ Builder technologies based on VCL...

  15. Multidimensional control using a mobile-phone based brain-muscle-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Scott; Joshi, Sanjay S

    2011-01-01

    Many well-known brain-computer interfaces measure signals at the brain, and then rely on the brain's ability to learn via operant conditioning in order to control objects in the environment. In our lab, we have been developing brain-muscle-computer interfaces, which measure signals at a single muscle and then rely on the brain's ability to learn neuromuscular skills via operant conditioning. Here, we report a new mobile-phone based brain-muscle-computer interface prototype for severely paralyzed persons, based on previous results from our group showing that humans may actively create specified power levels in two separate frequency bands of a single sEMG signal. Electromyographic activity on the surface of a single face muscle (Auricularis superior) is recorded with a standard electrode. This analog electrical signal is imported into an Android-based mobile phone. User-modulated power in two separate frequency band serves as two separate and simultaneous control channels for machine control. After signal processing, the Android phone sends commands to external devices via Bluetooth. Users are trained to use the device via biofeedback, with simple cursor-to-target activities on the phone screen.

  16. Universal computer interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dheere, RFBM

    1988-01-01

    Presents a survey of the latest developments in the field of the universal computer interface, resulting from a study of the world patent literature. Illustrating the state of the art today, the book ranges from basic interface structure, through parameters and common characteristics, to the most important industrial bus realizations. Recent technical enhancements are also included, with special emphasis devoted to the universal interface adapter circuit. Comprehensively indexed.

  17. [Research of controlling of smart home system based on P300 brain-computer interface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinjia; Yang, Chengjie

    2014-08-01

    Using electroencephalogram (EEG) signal to control external devices has always been the research focus in the field of brain-computer interface (BCI). This is especially significant for those disabilities who have lost capacity of movements. In this paper, the P300-based BCI and the microcontroller-based wireless radio frequency (RF) technology are utilized to design a smart home control system, which can be used to control household appliances, lighting system, and security devices directly. Experiment results showed that the system was simple, reliable and easy to be populirised.

  18. Parietal neural prosthetic control of a computer cursor in a graphical-user-interface task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revechkis, Boris; Aflalo, Tyson NS; Kellis, Spencer; Pouratian, Nader; Andersen, Richard A.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. To date, the majority of Brain-Machine Interfaces have been used to perform simple tasks with sequences of individual targets in otherwise blank environments. In this study we developed a more practical and clinically relevant task that approximated modern computers and graphical user interfaces (GUIs). This task could be problematic given the known sensitivity of areas typically used for BMIs to visual stimuli, eye movements, decision-making, and attentional control. Consequently, we sought to assess the effect of a complex, GUI-like task on the quality of neural decoding. Approach. A male rhesus macaque monkey was implanted with two 96-channel electrode arrays in area 5d of the superior parietal lobule. The animal was trained to perform a GUI-like ‘Face in a Crowd’ task on a computer screen that required selecting one cued, icon-like, face image from a group of alternatives (the ‘Crowd’) using a neurally controlled cursor. We assessed whether the crowd affected decodes of intended cursor movements by comparing it to a ‘Crowd Off’ condition in which only the matching target appeared without alternatives. We also examined if training a neural decoder with the Crowd On rather than Off had any effect on subsequent decode quality. Main results. Despite the additional demands of working with the Crowd On, the animal was able to robustly perform the task under Brain Control. The presence of the crowd did not itself affect decode quality. Training the decoder with the Crowd On relative to Off had no negative influence on subsequent decoding performance. Additionally, the subject was able to gaze around freely without influencing cursor position. Significance. Our results demonstrate that area 5d recordings can be used for decoding in a complex, GUI-like task with free gaze. Thus, this area is a promising source of signals for neural prosthetics that utilize computing devices with GUI interfaces, e.g. personal computers, mobile devices, and tablet

  19. Parietal neural prosthetic control of a computer cursor in a graphical-user-interface task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revechkis, Boris; Aflalo, Tyson N S; Kellis, Spencer; Pouratian, Nader; Andersen, Richard A

    2014-12-01

    To date, the majority of Brain-Machine Interfaces have been used to perform simple tasks with sequences of individual targets in otherwise blank environments. In this study we developed a more practical and clinically relevant task that approximated modern computers and graphical user interfaces (GUIs). This task could be problematic given the known sensitivity of areas typically used for BMIs to visual stimuli, eye movements, decision-making, and attentional control. Consequently, we sought to assess the effect of a complex, GUI-like task on the quality of neural decoding. A male rhesus macaque monkey was implanted with two 96-channel electrode arrays in area 5d of the superior parietal lobule. The animal was trained to perform a GUI-like 'Face in a Crowd' task on a computer screen that required selecting one cued, icon-like, face image from a group of alternatives (the 'Crowd') using a neurally controlled cursor. We assessed whether the crowd affected decodes of intended cursor movements by comparing it to a 'Crowd Off' condition in which only the matching target appeared without alternatives. We also examined if training a neural decoder with the Crowd On rather than Off had any effect on subsequent decode quality. Despite the additional demands of working with the Crowd On, the animal was able to robustly perform the task under Brain Control. The presence of the crowd did not itself affect decode quality. Training the decoder with the Crowd On relative to Off had no negative influence on subsequent decoding performance. Additionally, the subject was able to gaze around freely without influencing cursor position. Our results demonstrate that area 5d recordings can be used for decoding in a complex, GUI-like task with free gaze. Thus, this area is a promising source of signals for neural prosthetics that utilize computing devices with GUI interfaces, e.g. personal computers, mobile devices, and tablet computers.

  20. The computer graphics interface

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbrugge Chauveau, Karla; Niles Reed, Theodore; Shepherd, B

    2014-01-01

    The Computer Graphics Interface provides a concise discussion of computer graphics interface (CGI) standards. The title is comprised of seven chapters that cover the concepts of the CGI standard. Figures and examples are also included. The first chapter provides a general overview of CGI; this chapter covers graphics standards, functional specifications, and syntactic interfaces. Next, the book discusses the basic concepts of CGI, such as inquiry, profiles, and registration. The third chapter covers the CGI concepts and functions, while the fourth chapter deals with the concept of graphic obje

  1. A distributed, graphical user interface based, computer control system for atomic physics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshet, Aviv; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic physics experiments often require a complex sequence of precisely timed computer controlled events. This paper describes a distributed graphical user interface-based control system designed with such experiments in mind, which makes use of off-the-shelf output hardware from National Instruments. The software makes use of a client-server separation between a user interface for sequence design and a set of output hardware servers. Output hardware servers are designed to use standard National Instruments output cards, but the client-server nature should allow this to be extended to other output hardware. Output sequences running on multiple servers and output cards can be synchronized using a shared clock. By using a field programmable gate array-generated variable frequency clock, redundant buffers can be dramatically shortened, and a time resolution of 100 ns achieved over effectively arbitrary sequence lengths.

  2. A distributed, graphical user interface based, computer control system for atomic physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshet, Aviv; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic physics experiments often require a complex sequence of precisely timed computer controlled events. This paper describes a distributed graphical user interface-based control system designed with such experiments in mind, which makes use of off-the-shelf output hardware from National Instruments. The software makes use of a client-server separation between a user interface for sequence design and a set of output hardware servers. Output hardware servers are designed to use standard National Instruments output cards, but the client-server nature should allow this to be extended to other output hardware. Output sequences running on multiple servers and output cards can be synchronized using a shared clock. By using a field programmable gate array-generated variable frequency clock, redundant buffers can be dramatically shortened, and a time resolution of 100 ns achieved over effectively arbitrary sequence lengths.

  3. Goal selection versus process control in a brain-computer interface based on sensorimotor rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Audrey S; He, Bin

    2009-02-01

    In a brain-computer interface (BCI) utilizing a process control strategy, the signal from the cortex is used to control the fine motor details normally handled by other parts of the brain. In a BCI utilizing a goal selection strategy, the signal from the cortex is used to determine the overall end goal of the user, and the BCI controls the fine motor details. A BCI based on goal selection may be an easier and more natural system than one based on process control. Although goal selection in theory may surpass process control, the two have never been directly compared, as we are reporting here. Eight young healthy human subjects participated in the present study, three trained and five naïve in BCI usage. Scalp-recorded electroencephalograms (EEG) were used to control a computer cursor during five different paradigms. The paradigms were similar in their underlying signal processing and used the same control signal. However, three were based on goal selection, and two on process control. For both the trained and naïve populations, goal selection had more hits per run, was faster, more accurate (for seven out of eight subjects) and had a higher information transfer rate than process control. Goal selection outperformed process control in every measure studied in the present investigation.

  4. Control of a visual keyboard using an electrocorticographic brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusienski, Dean J; Shih, Jerry J

    2011-05-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are devices that enable severely disabled people to communicate and interact with their environments using their brain waves. Most studies investigating BCI in humans have used scalp EEG as the source of electrical signals and focused on motor control of prostheses or computer cursors on a screen. The authors hypothesize that the use of brain signals obtained directly from the cortical surface will more effectively control a communication/spelling task compared to scalp EEG. A total of 6 patients with medically intractable epilepsy were tested for the ability to control a visual keyboard using electrocorticographic (ECOG) signals. ECOG data collected during a P300 visual task paradigm were preprocessed and used to train a linear classifier to subsequently predict the intended target letters. The classifier was able to predict the intended target character at or near 100% accuracy using fewer than 15 stimulation sequences in 5 of the 6 people tested. ECOG data from electrodes outside the language cortex contributed to the classifier and enabled participants to write words on a visual keyboard. This is a novel finding because previous invasive BCI research in humans used signals exclusively from the motor cortex to control a computer cursor or prosthetic device. These results demonstrate that ECOG signals from electrodes both overlying and outside the language cortex can reliably control a visual keyboard to generate language output without voice or limb movements.

  5. Brain Computer Interface for Micro-controller Driven Robot Based on Emotiv Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parth Gargava

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A Brain Computer Interface (BCI is developed to navigate a micro-controller based robot using Emotiv sensors. The BCI system has a pipeline of 5 stages- signal acquisition, pre-processing, feature extraction, classification and CUDA inter- facing. It shall aid in serving a prototype for physical movement of neurological patients who are unable to control or operate on their muscular movements. All stages of the pipeline are designed to process bodily actions like eye blinks to command navigation of the robot. This prototype works on features learning and classification centric techniques using support vector machine. The suggested pipeline, ensures successful navigation of a robot in four directions in real time with accuracy of 93 percent.

  6. Goal selection versus process control while learning to use a brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Audrey S.; Rose, Minn L.; He, Bin

    2011-06-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) can be used to accomplish a task without requiring motor output. Two major control strategies used by BCIs during task completion are process control and goal selection. In process control, the user exerts continuous control and independently executes the given task. In goal selection, the user communicates their goal to the BCI and then receives assistance executing the task. A previous study has shown that goal selection is more accurate and faster in use. An unanswered question is, which control strategy is easier to learn? This study directly compares goal selection and process control while learning to use a sensorimotor rhythm-based BCI. Twenty young healthy human subjects were randomly assigned either to a goal selection or a process control-based paradigm for eight sessions. At the end of the study, the best user from each paradigm completed two additional sessions using all paradigms randomly mixed. The results of this study were that goal selection required a shorter training period for increased speed, accuracy, and information transfer over process control. These results held for the best subjects as well as in the general subject population. The demonstrated characteristics of goal selection make it a promising option to increase the utility of BCIs intended for both disabled and able-bodied users.

  7. Beyond intuitive anthropomorphic control: recent achievements using brain computer interface technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmeyer, Eric A.; Fifer, Matthew; Rich, Matthew; Pino, Johnathan; Wester, Brock; Johannes, Matthew; Dohopolski, Chris; Helder, John; D'Angelo, Denise; Beaty, James; Bensmaia, Sliman; McLoughlin, Michael; Tenore, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) research has progressed rapidly, with BCIs shifting from animal tests to human demonstrations of controlling computer cursors and even advanced prosthetic limbs, the latter having been the goal of the Revolutionizing Prosthetics (RP) program. These achievements now include direct electrical intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) of the brain to provide human BCI users feedback information from the sensors of prosthetic limbs. These successes raise the question of how well people would be able to use BCIs to interact with systems that are not based directly on the body (e.g., prosthetic arms), and how well BCI users could interpret ICMS information from such devices. If paralyzed individuals could use BCIs to effectively interact with such non-anthropomorphic systems, it would offer them numerous new opportunities to control novel assistive devices. Here we explore how well a participant with tetraplegia can detect infrared (IR) sources in the environment using a prosthetic arm mounted camera that encodes IR information via ICMS. We also investigate how well a BCI user could transition from controlling a BCI based on prosthetic arm movements to controlling a flight simulator, a system with different physical dynamics than the arm. In that test, the BCI participant used environmental information encoded via ICMS to identify which of several upcoming flight routes was the best option. For both tasks, the BCI user was able to quickly learn how to interpret the ICMSprovided information to achieve the task goals.

  8. Using the Electrocorticographic Speech Network to Control a Brain-Computer Interface in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuthardt, Eric C.; Gaona, Charles; Sharma, Mohit; Szrama, Nicholas; Roland, Jarod; Freudenberg, Zac; Solis, Jamie; Breshears, Jonathan; Schalk, Gerwin

    2013-01-01

    Electrocorticography (ECoG) has emerged as a new signal platform for brain-computer interface (BCI) systems. Classically, the cortical physiology that has been commonly investigated and utilized for device control in humans has been brain signals from sensorimotor cortex. Hence, it was unknown whether other neurophysiological substrates, such as the speech network, could be used to further improve on or complement existing motor-based control paradigms. We demonstrate here for the first time that ECoG signals associated with different overt and imagined phoneme articulation can enable invasively monitored human patients to control a one-dimensional computer cursor rapidly and accurately. This phonetic content was distinguishable within higher gamma frequency oscillations and enabled users to achieve final target accuracies between 68 and 91% within 15 minutes. Additionally, one of the patients achieved robust control using recordings from a microarray consisting of 1 mm spaced microwires. These findings suggest that the cortical network associated with speech could provide an additional cognitive and physiologic substrate for BCI operation and that these signals can be acquired from a cortical array that is small and minimally invasive. PMID:21471638

  9. Control of a nursing bed based on a hybrid brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nengneng Peng; Rui Zhang; Haihua Zeng; Fei Wang; Kai Li; Yuanqing Li; Xiaobin Zhuang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose an intelligent nursing bed system which is controlled by a hybrid brain-computer interface (BCI) involving steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) and P300. Specifically, the hybrid BCI includes an asynchronous brain switch based on SSVEP and P300, and a P300-based BCI. The brain switch is used to turn on/off the control system of the electric nursing bed through idle/control state detection, whereas the P300-based BCI is for operating the nursing bed. At the beginning, the user may focus on one group of flashing buttons in the graphic user interface (GUI) of the brain switch, which can simultaneously evoke SSVEP and P300, to switch on the control system. Here, the combination of SSVEP and P300 is used for improving the performance of the brain switch. Next, the user can control the nursing bed using the P300-based BCI. The GUI of the P300-based BCI includes 10 flashing buttons, which correspond to 10 functional operations, namely, left-side up, left-side down, back up, back down, bedpan open, bedpan close, legs up, legs down, right-side up, and right-side down. For instance, he/she can focus on the flashing button "back up" in the GUI of the P300-based BCI to activate the corresponding control such that the nursing bed is adjusted up. Eight healthy subjects participated in our experiment, and obtained an average accuracy of 93.75% and an average false positive rate (FPR) of 0.15 event/min. The effectiveness of our system was thus demonstrated.

  10. A binary motor imagery tasks based brain-computer interface for two-dimensional movement control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bin; Cao, Lei; Maysam, Oladazimi; Li, Jie; Xie, Hong; Su, Caixia; Birbaumer, Niels

    2017-12-01

    Objective. Two-dimensional movement control is a popular issue in brain-computer interface (BCI) research and has many applications in the real world. In this paper, we introduce a combined control strategy to a binary class-based BCI system that allows the user to move a cursor in a two-dimensional (2D) plane. Users focus on a single moving vector to control 2D movement instead of controlling vertical and horizontal movement separately. Approach. Five participants took part in a fixed-target experiment and random-target experiment to verify the effectiveness of the combination control strategy under the fixed and random routine conditions. Both experiments were performed in a virtual 2D dimensional environment and visual feedback was provided on the screen. Main results. The five participants achieved an average hit rate of 98.9% and 99.4% for the fixed-target experiment and the random-target experiment, respectively. Significance. The results demonstrate that participants could move the cursor in the 2D plane effectively. The proposed control strategy is based only on a basic two-motor imagery BCI, which enables more people to use it in real-life applications.

  11. Gaze-and-brain-controlled interfaces for human-computer and human-robot interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishkin S. L.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Human-machine interaction technology has greatly evolved during the last decades, but manual and speech modalities remain single output channels with their typical constraints imposed by the motor system’s information transfer limits. Will brain-computer interfaces (BCIs and gaze-based control be able to convey human commands or even intentions to machines in the near future? We provide an overview of basic approaches in this new area of applied cognitive research. Objective. We test the hypothesis that the use of communication paradigms and a combination of eye tracking with unobtrusive forms of registering brain activity can improve human-machine interaction. Methods and Results. Three groups of ongoing experiments at the Kurchatov Institute are reported. First, we discuss the communicative nature of human-robot interaction, and approaches to building a more e cient technology. Specifically, “communicative” patterns of interaction can be based on joint attention paradigms from developmental psychology, including a mutual “eye-to-eye” exchange of looks between human and robot. Further, we provide an example of “eye mouse” superiority over the computer mouse, here in emulating the task of selecting a moving robot from a swarm. Finally, we demonstrate a passive, noninvasive BCI that uses EEG correlates of expectation. This may become an important lter to separate intentional gaze dwells from non-intentional ones. Conclusion. The current noninvasive BCIs are not well suited for human-robot interaction, and their performance, when they are employed by healthy users, is critically dependent on the impact of the gaze on selection of spatial locations. The new approaches discussed show a high potential for creating alternative output pathways for the human brain. When support from passive BCIs becomes mature, the hybrid technology of the eye-brain-computer (EBCI interface will have a chance to enable natural, fluent, and the

  12. Toward brain-computer interface based wheelchair control utilizing tactually-evoked event-related potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background People with severe disabilities, e.g. due to neurodegenerative disease, depend on technology that allows for accurate wheelchair control. For those who cannot operate a wheelchair with a joystick, brain-computer interfaces (BCI) may offer a valuable option. Technology depending on visual or auditory input may not be feasible as these modalities are dedicated to processing of environmental stimuli (e.g. recognition of obstacles, ambient noise). Herein we thus validated the feasibility of a BCI based on tactually-evoked event-related potentials (ERP) for wheelchair control. Furthermore, we investigated use of a dynamic stopping method to improve speed of the tactile BCI system. Methods Positions of four tactile stimulators represented navigation directions (left thigh: move left; right thigh: move right; abdomen: move forward; lower neck: move backward) and N = 15 participants delivered navigation commands by focusing their attention on the desired tactile stimulus in an oddball-paradigm. Results Participants navigated a virtual wheelchair through a building and eleven participants successfully completed the task of reaching 4 checkpoints in the building. The virtual wheelchair was equipped with simulated shared-control sensors (collision avoidance), yet these sensors were rarely needed. Conclusion We conclude that most participants achieved tactile ERP-BCI control sufficient to reliably operate a wheelchair and dynamic stopping was of high value for tactile ERP classification. Finally, this paper discusses feasibility of tactile ERPs for BCI based wheelchair control. PMID:24428900

  13. Electrophysiological Brain Activity during the Control of a Motor Imagery-Based Brain–Computer Interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frolov, A. A.; Aziatskaya, G.A.; Bobrov, P.D.; Luykmanov, R. Kh.; Fedotova, I.R.; Húsek, Dušan; Snášel, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 5 (2017), s. 501-511 ISSN 0362-1197 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : brain–computer interface * neurointerface * EEG * motor imagery * EEG rhythm synchronization and desynchronization * independent component analysis * EEG inverse problem * neurorehabilitation Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8)

  14. Design and Implementation of a Brain Computer Interface System for Controlling a Robotic Claw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelakis, D.; Zoumis, S.; Asvestas, P.

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the design and implementation of a brain-computer interface (BCI) system that can control a robotic claw. The system is based on the Emotiv Epoc headset, which provides the capability of simultaneous recording of 14 EEG channels, as well as wireless connectivity by means of the Bluetooth protocol. The system is initially trained to decode what user thinks to properly formatted data. The headset communicates with a personal computer, which runs a dedicated software application, implemented under the Processing integrated development environment. The application acquires the data from the headset and invokes suitable commands to an Arduino Uno board. The board decodes the received commands and produces corresponding signals to a servo motor that controls the position of the robotic claw. The system was tested successfully on a healthy, male subject, aged 28 years. The results are promising, taking into account that no specialized hardware was used. However, tests on a larger number of users is necessary in order to draw solid conclusions regarding the performance of the proposed system.

  15. Brain-computer interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A computer-implemented method of providing an interface between a user and a processing unit, the method comprising : presenting one or more stimuli to a user, each stimulus varying at a respective stimulation frequency, each stimulation frequency being associated with a respective user......-selectable input; receiving at least one signal indicative of brain activity of the user; and determining, from the received signal, which of the one or more stimuli the user attends to and selecting the user-selectable input associated with the stimulation frequency of the determined stimuli as being a user...

  16. Transferring brain-computer interfaces beyond the laboratory: successful application control for motor-disabled users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeb, Robert; Perdikis, Serafeim; Tonin, Luca; Biasiucci, Andrea; Tavella, Michele; Creatura, Marco; Molina, Alberto; Al-Khodairy, Abdul; Carlson, Tom; Millán, José D R

    2013-10-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are no longer only used by healthy participants under controlled conditions in laboratory environments, but also by patients and end-users, controlling applications in their homes or clinics, without the BCI experts around. But are the technology and the field mature enough for this? Especially the successful operation of applications - like text entry systems or assistive mobility devices such as tele-presence robots - requires a good level of BCI control. How much training is needed to achieve such a level? Is it possible to train naïve end-users in 10 days to successfully control such applications? In this work, we report our experiences of training 24 motor-disabled participants at rehabilitation clinics or at the end-users' homes, without BCI experts present. We also share the lessons that we have learned through transferring BCI technologies from the lab to the user's home or clinics. The most important outcome is that 50% of the participants achieved good BCI performance and could successfully control the applications (tele-presence robot and text-entry system). In the case of the tele-presence robot the participants achieved an average performance ratio of 0.87 (max. 0.97) and for the text entry application a mean of 0.93 (max. 1.0). The lessons learned and the gathered user feedback range from pure BCI problems (technical and handling), to common communication issues among the different people involved, and issues encountered while controlling the applications. The points raised in this paper are very widely applicable and we anticipate that they might be faced similarly by other groups, if they move on to bringing the BCI technology to the end-user, to home environments and towards application prototype control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cortical excitability correlates with the event-related desynchronization during brain-computer interface control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Ian; Blanchard, Caroline; Holmes, Nicholas P.

    2018-04-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) based on motor control have been suggested as tools for stroke rehabilitation. Some initial successes have been achieved with this approach, however the mechanism by which they work is not yet fully understood. One possible part of this mechanism is a, previously suggested, relationship between the strength of the event-related desynchronization (ERD), a neural correlate of motor imagination and execution, and corticospinal excitability. Additionally, a key component of BCIs used in neurorehabilitation is the provision of visual feedback to positively reinforce attempts at motor control. However, the ability of visual feedback of the ERD to modulate the activity in the motor system has not been fully explored. Approach. We investigate these relationships via transcranial magnetic stimulation delivered at different moments in the ongoing ERD related to hand contraction and relaxation during BCI control of a visual feedback bar. Main results. We identify a significant relationship between ERD strength and corticospinal excitability, and find that our visual feedback does not affect corticospinal excitability. Significance. Our results imply that efforts to promote functional recovery in stroke by targeting increases in corticospinal excitability may be aided by accounting for the time course of the ERD.

  18. Visual perception affected by motivation and alertness controlled by a noninvasive brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimenko, Vladimir A; Runnova, Anastasia E; Zhuravlev, Maksim O; Makarov, Vladimir V; Nedayvozov, Vladimir; Grubov, Vadim V; Pchelintceva, Svetlana V; Hramov, Alexander E; Pisarchik, Alexander N

    2017-01-01

    The influence of motivation and alertness on brain activity associated with visual perception was studied experimentally using the Necker cube, which ambiguity was controlled by the contrast of its ribs. The wavelet analysis of recorded multichannel electroencephalograms (EEG) allowed us to distinguish two different scenarios while the brain processed the ambiguous stimulus. The first scenario is characterized by a particular destruction of alpha rhythm (8-12 Hz) with a simultaneous increase in beta-wave activity (20-30 Hz), whereas in the second scenario, the beta rhythm is not well pronounced while the alpha-wave energy remains unchanged. The experiments were carried out with a group of financially motivated subjects and another group of unpaid volunteers. It was found that the first scenario occurred mainly in the motivated group. This can be explained by the increased alertness of the motivated subjects. The prevalence of the first scenario was also observed in a group of subjects to whom images with higher ambiguity were presented. We believe that the revealed scenarios can occur not only during the perception of bistable images, but also in other perceptual tasks requiring decision making. The obtained results may have important applications for monitoring and controlling human alertness in situations which need substantial attention. On the base of the obtained results we built a brain-computer interface to estimate and control the degree of alertness in real time.

  19. Design of a Mobile Brain Computer Interface-Based Smart Multimedia Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Kevin C.; Lin, Bor-Shing; Wong, Alice May-Kuen; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2015-01-01

    Music is a way of expressing our feelings and emotions. Suitable music can positively affect people. However, current multimedia control methods, such as manual selection or automatic random mechanisms, which are now applied broadly in MP3 and CD players, cannot adaptively select suitable music according to the user’s physiological state. In this study, a brain computer interface-based smart multimedia controller was proposed to select music in different situations according to the user’s physiological state. Here, a commercial mobile tablet was used as the multimedia platform, and a wireless multi-channel electroencephalograph (EEG) acquisition module was designed for real-time EEG monitoring. A smart multimedia control program built in the multimedia platform was developed to analyze the user’s EEG feature and select music according his/her state. The relationship between the user’s state and music sorted by listener’s preference was also examined in this study. The experimental results show that real-time music biofeedback according a user’s EEG feature may positively improve the user’s attention state. PMID:25756862

  20. Visual perception affected by motivation and alertness controlled by a noninvasive brain-computer interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A Maksimenko

    Full Text Available The influence of motivation and alertness on brain activity associated with visual perception was studied experimentally using the Necker cube, which ambiguity was controlled by the contrast of its ribs. The wavelet analysis of recorded multichannel electroencephalograms (EEG allowed us to distinguish two different scenarios while the brain processed the ambiguous stimulus. The first scenario is characterized by a particular destruction of alpha rhythm (8-12 Hz with a simultaneous increase in beta-wave activity (20-30 Hz, whereas in the second scenario, the beta rhythm is not well pronounced while the alpha-wave energy remains unchanged. The experiments were carried out with a group of financially motivated subjects and another group of unpaid volunteers. It was found that the first scenario occurred mainly in the motivated group. This can be explained by the increased alertness of the motivated subjects. The prevalence of the first scenario was also observed in a group of subjects to whom images with higher ambiguity were presented. We believe that the revealed scenarios can occur not only during the perception of bistable images, but also in other perceptual tasks requiring decision making. The obtained results may have important applications for monitoring and controlling human alertness in situations which need substantial attention. On the base of the obtained results we built a brain-computer interface to estimate and control the degree of alertness in real time.

  1. Eye-gaze control of the computer interface: Discrimination of zoom intent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis methodology and associated experiment were developed to assess whether definable and repeatable signatures of eye-gaze characteristics are evident, preceding a decision to zoom-in, zoom-out, or not to zoom at a computer interface. This user intent discrimination procedure can have broad application in disability aids and telerobotic control. Eye-gaze was collected from 10 subjects in a controlled experiment, requiring zoom decisions. The eye-gaze data were clustered, then fed into a multiple discriminant analysis (MDA) for optimal definition of heuristics separating the zoom-in, zoom-out, and no-zoom conditions. Confusion matrix analyses showed that a number of variable combinations classified at a statistically significant level, but practical significance was more difficult to establish. Composite contour plots demonstrated the regions in parameter space consistently assigned by the MDA to unique zoom conditions. Peak classification occurred at about 1200--1600 msec. Improvements in the methodology to achieve practical real-time zoom control are considered

  2. Self-paced brain-computer interface control of ambulation in a virtual reality environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Po T.; King, Christine E.; Chui, Luis A.; Do, An H.; Nenadic, Zoran

    2012-10-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) often leaves affected individuals unable to ambulate. Electroencephalogram (EEG) based brain-computer interface (BCI) controlled lower extremity prostheses may restore intuitive and able-body-like ambulation after SCI. To test its feasibility, the authors developed and tested a novel EEG-based, data-driven BCI system for intuitive and self-paced control of the ambulation of an avatar within a virtual reality environment (VRE). Approach. Eight able-bodied subjects and one with SCI underwent the following 10-min training session: subjects alternated between idling and walking kinaesthetic motor imageries (KMI) while their EEG were recorded and analysed to generate subject-specific decoding models. Subjects then performed a goal-oriented online task, repeated over five sessions, in which they utilized the KMI to control the linear ambulation of an avatar and make ten sequential stops at designated points within the VRE. Main results. The average offline training performance across subjects was 77.2±11.0%, ranging from 64.3% (p = 0.001 76) to 94.5% (p = 6.26×10-23), with chance performance being 50%. The average online performance was 8.5±1.1 (out of 10) successful stops and 303±53 s completion time (perfect = 211 s). All subjects achieved performances significantly different than those of random walk (p prosthesis systems may be feasible.

  3. Design of a Mobile Brain Computer Interface-Based Smart Multimedia Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin C. Tseng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Music is a way of expressing our feelings and emotions. Suitable music can positively affect people. However, current multimedia control methods, such as manual selection or automatic random mechanisms, which are now applied broadly in MP3 and CD players, cannot adaptively select suitable music according to the user’s physiological state. In this study, a brain computer interface-based smart multimedia controller was proposed to select music in different situations according to the user’s physiological state. Here, a commercial mobile tablet was used as the multimedia platform, and a wireless multi-channel electroencephalograph (EEG acquisition module was designed for real-time EEG monitoring. A smart multimedia control program built in the multimedia platform was developed to analyze the user’s EEG feature and select music according his/her state. The relationship between the user’s state and music sorted by listener’s preference was also examined in this study. The experimental results show that real-time music biofeedback according a user’s EEG feature may positively improve the user’s attention state.

  4. On the control of brain-computer interfaces by users with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Ian; Billinger, Martin; Laparra-Hernández, José; Aloise, Fabio; García, Mariano Lloria; Faller, Josef; Scherer, Reinhold; Müller-Putz, Gernot

    2013-09-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have been proposed as a potential assistive device for individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) to assist with their communication needs. However, it is unclear how well-suited BCIs are to individuals with CP. Therefore, this study aims to investigate to what extent these users are able to gain control of BCIs. This study is conducted with 14 individuals with CP attempting to control two standard online BCIs (1) based upon sensorimotor rhythm modulations, and (2) based upon steady state visual evoked potentials. Of the 14 users, 8 are able to use one or other of the BCIs, online, with a statistically significant level of accuracy, without prior training. Classification results are driven by neurophysiological activity and not seen to correlate with occurrences of artifacts. However, many of these users' accuracies, while statistically significant, would require either more training or more advanced methods before practical BCI control would be possible. The results indicate that BCIs may be controlled by individuals with CP but that many issues need to be overcome before practical application use may be achieved. This is the first study to assess the ability of a large group of different individuals with CP to gain control of an online BCI system. The results indicate that six users could control a sensorimotor rhythm BCI and three a steady state visual evoked potential BCI at statistically significant levels of accuracy (SMR accuracies; mean ± STD, 0.821 ± 0.116, SSVEP accuracies; 0.422 ± 0.069). Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Using a cVEP-Based Brain-Computer Interface to Control a Virtual Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechmann, Hannes; Finke, Andrea; Ritter, Helge

    2016-06-01

    Brain-computer interfaces provide a means for controlling a device by brain activity alone. One major drawback of noninvasive BCIs is their low information transfer rate, obstructing a wider deployment outside the lab. BCIs based on codebook visually evoked potentials (cVEP) outperform all other state-of-the-art systems in that regard. Previous work investigated cVEPs for spelling applications. We present the first cVEP-based BCI for use in real-world settings to accomplish everyday tasks such as navigation or action selection. To this end, we developed and evaluated a cVEP-based on-line BCI that controls a virtual agent in a simulated, but realistic, 3-D kitchen scenario. We show that cVEPs can be reliably triggered with stimuli in less restricted presentation schemes, such as on dynamic, changing backgrounds. We introduce a novel, dynamic repetition algorithm that allows for optimizing the balance between accuracy and speed individually for each user. Using these novel mechanisms in a 12-command cVEP-BCI in the 3-D simulation results in ITRs of 50 bits/min on average and 68 bits/min maximum. Thus, this work supports the notion of cVEP-BCIs as a particular fast and robust approach suitable for real-world use.

  6. Affective Aspects of Perceived Loss of Control and Potential Implications for Brain-Computer Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissmann, Sebastian; Zander, Thorsten O; Faller, Josef; Brönstrup, Jonas; Kelava, Augustin; Gramann, Klaus; Gerjets, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Most brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) focus on detecting single aspects of user states (e.g., motor imagery) in the electroencephalogram (EEG) in order to use these aspects as control input for external systems. This communication can be effective, but unaccounted mental processes can interfere with signals used for classification and thereby introduce changes in the signal properties which could potentially impede BCI classification performance. To improve BCI performance, we propose deploying an approach that potentially allows to describe different mental states that could influence BCI performance. To test this approach, we analyzed neural signatures of potential affective states in data collected in a paradigm where the complex user state of perceived loss of control (LOC) was induced. In this article, source localization methods were used to identify brain dynamics with source located outside but affecting the signal of interest originating from the primary motor areas, pointing to interfering processes in the brain during natural human-machine interaction. In particular, we found affective correlates which were related to perceived LOC. We conclude that additional context information about the ongoing user state might help to improve the applicability of BCIs to real-world scenarios.

  7. Affective Aspects of Perceived Loss of Control and Potential Implications for Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Grissmann

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Most brain-computer interfaces (BCIs focus on detecting single aspects of user states (e.g., motor imagery in the electroencephalogram (EEG in order to use these aspects as control input for external systems. This communication can be effective, but unaccounted mental processes can interfere with signals used for classification and thereby introduce changes in the signal properties which could potentially impede BCI classification performance. To improve BCI performance, we propose deploying an approach that potentially allows to describe different mental states that could influence BCI performance. To test this approach, we analyzed neural signatures of potential affective states in data collected in a paradigm where the complex user state of perceived loss of control (LOC was induced. In this article, source localization methods were used to identify brain dynamics with source located outside but affecting the signal of interest originating from the primary motor areas, pointing to interfering processes in the brain during natural human-machine interaction. In particular, we found affective correlates which were related to perceived LOC. We conclude that additional context information about the ongoing user state might help to improve the applicability of BCIs to real-world scenarios.

  8. Final Report: MaRSPlus Sensor System Electrical Cable Management and Distributed Motor Control Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reil, Robin

    2011-01-01

    The success of JPL's Next Generation Imaging Spectrometer (NGIS) in Earth remote sensing has inspired a follow-on instrument project, the MaRSPlus Sensor System (MSS). One of JPL's responsibilities in the MSS project involves updating the documentation from the previous JPL airborne imagers to provide all the information necessary for an outside customer to operate the instrument independently. As part of this documentation update, I created detailed electrical cabling diagrams to provide JPL technicians with clear and concise build instructions and a database to track the status of cables from order to build to delivery. Simultaneously, a distributed motor control system is being developed for potential use on the proposed 2018 Mars rover mission. This system would significantly reduce the mass necessary for rover motor control, making more mass space available to other important spacecraft systems. The current stage of the project consists of a desktop computer talking to a single "cold box" unit containing the electronics to drive a motor. In order to test the electronics, I developed a graphical user interface (GUI) using MATLAB to allow a user to send simple commands to the cold box and display the responses received in a user-friendly format.

  9. Electroencephalogram-Based Brain–Computer Interface and Lower-Limb Prosthesis Control: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas P. Murphy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to establish the feasibility of manipulating a prosthetic knee directly by using a brain–computer interface (BCI system in a transfemoral amputee. Although the other forms of control could be more reliable and quick (e.g., electromyography control, the electroencephalography (EEG-based BCI may provide amputees an alternative way to control a prosthesis directly from brain.MethodsA transfemoral amputee subject was trained to activate a knee-unlocking switch through motor imagery of the movement of his lower extremity. Surface scalp electrodes transmitted brain wave data to a software program that was keyed to activate the switch when the event-related desynchronization in EEG reached a certain threshold. After achieving more than 90% reliability for switch activation by EEG rhythm-feedback training, the subject then progressed to activating the knee-unlocking switch on a prosthesis that turned on a motor and unlocked a prosthetic knee. The project took place in the prosthetic department of a Veterans Administration medical center. The subject walked back and forth in the parallel bars and unlocked the knee for swing phase and for sitting down. The success of knee unlocking through this system was measured. Additionally, the subject filled out a questionnaire on his experiences.ResultsThe success of unlocking the prosthetic knee mechanism ranged from 50 to 100% in eight test segments.ConclusionThe performance of the subject supports the feasibility for BCI control of a lower extremity prosthesis using surface scalp EEG electrodes. Investigating direct brain control in different types of patients is important to promote real-world BCI applications.

  10. Real-Time Control of an Articulatory-Based Speech Synthesizer for Brain Computer Interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Bocquelet

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Restoring natural speech in paralyzed and aphasic people could be achieved using a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI controlling a speech synthesizer in real-time. To reach this goal, a prerequisite is to develop a speech synthesizer producing intelligible speech in real-time with a reasonable number of control parameters. We present here an articulatory-based speech synthesizer that can be controlled in real-time for future BCI applications. This synthesizer converts movements of the main speech articulators (tongue, jaw, velum, and lips into intelligible speech. The articulatory-to-acoustic mapping is performed using a deep neural network (DNN trained on electromagnetic articulography (EMA data recorded on a reference speaker synchronously with the produced speech signal. This DNN is then used in both offline and online modes to map the position of sensors glued on different speech articulators into acoustic parameters that are further converted into an audio signal using a vocoder. In offline mode, highly intelligible speech could be obtained as assessed by perceptual evaluation performed by 12 listeners. Then, to anticipate future BCI applications, we further assessed the real-time control of the synthesizer by both the reference speaker and new speakers, in a closed-loop paradigm using EMA data recorded in real time. A short calibration period was used to compensate for differences in sensor positions and articulatory differences between new speakers and the reference speaker. We found that real-time synthesis of vowels and consonants was possible with good intelligibility. In conclusion, these results open to future speech BCI applications using such articulatory-based speech synthesizer.

  11. Historical Overview, Current Status, and Future Trends in Human-Computer Interfaces for Process Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owre, Fridtjov

    2003-01-01

    Approximately 25 yr ago, the first computer-based process control systems, including computer-generated displays, appeared. It is remarkable how slowly the human-computer interfaces (HCI's) of such systems have developed over the years. The display design approach in those early days had its roots in the topology of the process. Usually, the information came from the piping and instrumentation diagrams. Later, some important additional functions were added to the basic system, such as alarm and trend displays. Today, these functions are still the basic ones, and the end-user displays have not changed much except for improved display quality in terms of colors, font types and sizes, resolution, and object shapes, resulting from improved display hardware.Today, there are two schools of display design competing for supremacy in the process control segment of the HCI community. One can be characterized by extension and integration of current practice, while the other is more revolutionary.The extension of the current practice approach can be described in terms of added system functionality and integration. This means that important functions for the plant operator - such as signal validation, plant overview information, safety parameter displays, procedures, prediction of future states, and plant performance optimization - are added to the basic functions and integrated in a total unified HCI for the plant operator.The revolutionary approach, however, takes as its starting point the design process itself. The functioning of the plant is described in terms of the plant goals and subgoals, as well as the means available to reach these goals. Then, displays are designed representing this functional structure - in clear contrast to the earlier plant topology representation. Depending on the design approach used, the corresponding displays have various designations, e.g., function-oriented, task-oriented, or ecological displays.This paper gives a historical overview of past

  12. Modulation of Posterior Alpha Activity by Spatial Attention Allows for Controlling A Continuous Brain-Computer Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horschig, J.M.; Oosterheert, W.; Oostenveld, R.; Jensen, O.

    2015-01-01

    Here we report that the modulation of alpha activity by covert attention can be used as a control signal in an online brain-computer interface, that it is reliable, and that it is robust. Subjects were instructed to orient covert visual attention to the left or right hemifield. We decoded the

  13. A Brain Computer Interface for Robust Wheelchair Control Application Based on Pseudorandom Code Modulated Visual Evoked Potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohebbi, Ali; Engelsholm, Signe K.D.; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2015-01-01

    In this pilot study, a novel and minimalistic Brain Computer Interface (BCI) based wheelchair control application was developed. The system was based on pseudorandom code modulated Visual Evoked Potentials (c-VEPs). The visual stimuli in the scheme were generated based on the Gold code...

  14. Controlling a human-computer interface system with a novel classification method that uses electrooculography signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shang-Lin; Liao, Lun-De; Lu, Shao-Wei; Jiang, Wei-Ling; Chen, Shi-An; Lin, Chin-Teng

    2013-08-01

    Electrooculography (EOG) signals can be used to control human-computer interface (HCI) systems, if properly classified. The ability to measure and process these signals may help HCI users to overcome many of the physical limitations and inconveniences in daily life. However, there are currently no effective multidirectional classification methods for monitoring eye movements. Here, we describe a classification method used in a wireless EOG-based HCI device for detecting eye movements in eight directions. This device includes wireless EOG signal acquisition components, wet electrodes and an EOG signal classification algorithm. The EOG classification algorithm is based on extracting features from the electrical signals corresponding to eight directions of eye movement (up, down, left, right, up-left, down-left, up-right, and down-right) and blinking. The recognition and processing of these eight different features were achieved in real-life conditions, demonstrating that this device can reliably measure the features of EOG signals. This system and its classification procedure provide an effective method for identifying eye movements. Additionally, it may be applied to study eye functions in real-life conditions in the near future.

  15. Brain Computer Interfaces, a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Nicolas-Alonso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A brain-computer interface (BCI is a hardware and software communications system that permits cerebral activity alone to control computers or external devices. The immediate goal of BCI research is to provide communications capabilities to severely disabled people who are totally paralyzed or ‘locked in’ by neurological neuromuscular disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brain stem stroke, or spinal cord injury. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of BCIs, looking at the different steps that form a standard BCI: signal acquisition, preprocessing or signal enhancement, feature extraction, classification and the control interface. We discuss their advantages, drawbacks, and latest advances, and we survey the numerous technologies reported in the scientific literature to design each step of a BCI. First, the review examines the neuroimaging modalities used in the signal acquisition step, each of which monitors a different functional brain activity such as electrical, magnetic or metabolic activity. Second, the review discusses different electrophysiological control signals that determine user intentions, which can be detected in brain activity. Third, the review includes some techniques used in the signal enhancement step to deal with the artifacts in the control signals and improve the performance. Fourth, the review studies some mathematic algorithms used in the feature extraction and classification steps which translate the information in the control signals into commands that operate a computer or other device. Finally, the review provides an overview of various BCI applications that control a range of devices.

  16. Brain Computer Interfaces, a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Alonso, Luis Fernando; Gomez-Gil, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a hardware and software communications system that permits cerebral activity alone to control computers or external devices. The immediate goal of BCI research is to provide communications capabilities to severely disabled people who are totally paralyzed or ‘locked in’ by neurological neuromuscular disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brain stem stroke, or spinal cord injury. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of BCIs, looking at the different steps that form a standard BCI: signal acquisition, preprocessing or signal enhancement, feature extraction, classification and the control interface. We discuss their advantages, drawbacks, and latest advances, and we survey the numerous technologies reported in the scientific literature to design each step of a BCI. First, the review examines the neuroimaging modalities used in the signal acquisition step, each of which monitors a different functional brain activity such as electrical, magnetic or metabolic activity. Second, the review discusses different electrophysiological control signals that determine user intentions, which can be detected in brain activity. Third, the review includes some techniques used in the signal enhancement step to deal with the artifacts in the control signals and improve the performance. Fourth, the review studies some mathematic algorithms used in the feature extraction and classification steps which translate the information in the control signals into commands that operate a computer or other device. Finally, the review provides an overview of various BCI applications that control a range of devices. PMID:22438708

  17. Brain-computer interface controlled gaming: evaluation of usability by severely motor restricted end-users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Elisa Mira; Höhne, Johannes; Staiger-Sälzer, Pit; Tangermann, Michael; Kübler, Andrea

    2013-10-01

    Connect-Four, a new sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) based brain-computer interface (BCI) gaming application, was evaluated by four severely motor restricted end-users; two were in the locked-in state and had unreliable eye-movement. Following the user-centred approach, usability of the BCI prototype was evaluated in terms of effectiveness (accuracy), efficiency (information transfer rate (ITR) and subjective workload) and users' satisfaction. Online performance varied strongly across users and sessions (median accuracy (%) of end-users: A=.65; B=.60; C=.47; D=.77). Our results thus yielded low to medium effectiveness in three end-users and high effectiveness in one end-user. Consequently, ITR was low (0.05-1.44bits/min). Only two end-users were able to play the game in free-mode. Total workload was moderate but varied strongly across sessions. Main sources of workload were mental and temporal demand. Furthermore, frustration contributed to the subjective workload of two end-users. Nevertheless, most end-users accepted the BCI application well and rated satisfaction medium to high. Sources for dissatisfaction were (1) electrode gel and cap, (2) low effectiveness, (3) time-consuming adjustment and (4) not easy-to-use BCI equipment. All four end-users indicated ease of use as being one of the most important aspect of BCI. Effectiveness and efficiency are lower as compared to applications using the event-related potential as input channel. Nevertheless, the SMR-BCI application was satisfactorily accepted by the end-users and two of four could imagine using the BCI application in their daily life. Thus, despite moderate effectiveness and efficiency BCIs might be an option when controlling an application for entertainment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Brain-Computer Interface Controlled Functional Electrical Stimulation System for Ankle Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Christine E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many neurological conditions, such as stroke, spinal cord injury, and traumatic brain injury, can cause chronic gait function impairment due to foot-drop. Current physiotherapy techniques provide only a limited degree of motor function recovery in these individuals, and therefore novel therapies are needed. Brain-computer interface (BCI is a relatively novel technology with a potential to restore, substitute, or augment lost motor behaviors in patients with neurological injuries. Here, we describe the first successful integration of a noninvasive electroencephalogram (EEG-based BCI with a noninvasive functional electrical stimulation (FES system that enables the direct brain control of foot dorsiflexion in able-bodied individuals. Methods A noninvasive EEG-based BCI system was integrated with a noninvasive FES system for foot dorsiflexion. Subjects underwent computer-cued epochs of repetitive foot dorsiflexion and idling while their EEG signals were recorded and stored for offline analysis. The analysis generated a prediction model that allowed EEG data to be analyzed and classified in real time during online BCI operation. The real-time online performance of the integrated BCI-FES system was tested in a group of five able-bodied subjects who used repetitive foot dorsiflexion to elicit BCI-FES mediated dorsiflexion of the contralateral foot. Results Five able-bodied subjects performed 10 alternations of idling and repetitive foot dorsifiexion to trigger BCI-FES mediated dorsifiexion of the contralateral foot. The epochs of BCI-FES mediated foot dorsifiexion were highly correlated with the epochs of voluntary foot dorsifiexion (correlation coefficient ranged between 0.59 and 0.77 with latencies ranging from 1.4 sec to 3.1 sec. In addition, all subjects achieved a 100% BCI-FES response (no omissions, and one subject had a single false alarm. Conclusions This study suggests that the integration of a noninvasive BCI with a lower

  19. Brain-computer interface controlled functional electrical stimulation system for ankle movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, An H; Wang, Po T; King, Christine E; Abiri, Ahmad; Nenadic, Zoran

    2011-08-26

    Many neurological conditions, such as stroke, spinal cord injury, and traumatic brain injury, can cause chronic gait function impairment due to foot-drop. Current physiotherapy techniques provide only a limited degree of motor function recovery in these individuals, and therefore novel therapies are needed. Brain-computer interface (BCI) is a relatively novel technology with a potential to restore, substitute, or augment lost motor behaviors in patients with neurological injuries. Here, we describe the first successful integration of a noninvasive electroencephalogram (EEG)-based BCI with a noninvasive functional electrical stimulation (FES) system that enables the direct brain control of foot dorsiflexion in able-bodied individuals. A noninvasive EEG-based BCI system was integrated with a noninvasive FES system for foot dorsiflexion. Subjects underwent computer-cued epochs of repetitive foot dorsiflexion and idling while their EEG signals were recorded and stored for offline analysis. The analysis generated a prediction model that allowed EEG data to be analyzed and classified in real time during online BCI operation. The real-time online performance of the integrated BCI-FES system was tested in a group of five able-bodied subjects who used repetitive foot dorsiflexion to elicit BCI-FES mediated dorsiflexion of the contralateral foot. Five able-bodied subjects performed 10 alternations of idling and repetitive foot dorsifiexion to trigger BCI-FES mediated dorsifiexion of the contralateral foot. The epochs of BCI-FES mediated foot dorsifiexion were highly correlated with the epochs of voluntary foot dorsifiexion (correlation coefficient ranged between 0.59 and 0.77) with latencies ranging from 1.4 sec to 3.1 sec. In addition, all subjects achieved a 100% BCI-FES response (no omissions), and one subject had a single false alarm. This study suggests that the integration of a noninvasive BCI with a lower-extremity FES system is feasible. With additional modifications

  20. Modulation of Posterior Alpha Activity by Spatial Attention Allows for Controlling A Continuous Brain-Computer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horschig, Jörn M; Oosterheert, Wouter; Oostenveld, Robert; Jensen, Ole

    2015-11-01

    Here we report that the modulation of alpha activity by covert attention can be used as a control signal in an online brain-computer interface, that it is reliable, and that it is robust. Subjects were instructed to orient covert visual attention to the left or right hemifield. We decoded the direction of attention from the magnetoencephalogram by a template matching classifier and provided the classification outcome to the subject in real-time using a novel graphical user interface. Training data for the templates were obtained from a Posner-cueing task conducted just before the BCI task. Eleven subjects participated in four sessions each. Eight of the subjects achieved classification rates significantly above chance level. Subjects were able to significantly increase their performance from the first to the second session. Individual patterns of posterior alpha power remained stable throughout the four sessions and did not change with increased performance. We conclude that posterior alpha power can successfully be used as a control signal in brain-computer interfaces. We also discuss several ideas for further improving the setup and propose future research based on solid hypotheses about behavioral consequences of modulating neuronal oscillations by brain computer interfacing.

  1. Brain Computer Interface-Controlling Devices Utilizing The Alpha Brain Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Hundia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper describes the development and testing of an interface system whereby one can control external devices by voluntarily controlling alpha waves that is through eye movement. Such a system may be used for the control of prosthetics robotic arms and external devices like wheelchairs using the alpha brain waves and the Mu rhythm. The response generated through the movement of the eye detecting and controlling the amplitude of the alpha brain waves is interfaced and processed to control Robotic systems and smart home control. In order to measure the response of alpha waves over different lobes of the brain initially I measured these signals over 32 regions using silver chloride plated electrodes. By the opening and the closure of the eyes and the movement in the up-down left-right directions and processing these movements measuring them over the occipital region I was able to differentiate the amplitude of the alpha waves generated due to these several movements. In the First session testing period subjects were asked to close and open their eyes and they were able to control limited movements of a Robot and a prosthetic arm. In the Second 2session the movement of the eyes was also considered left-right up-down along with the opening and closure during this time span they were able to control more dimensions of the robot several devices at the same time using different eye movements.

  2. The Berlin Brain-Computer Interface: Progress Beyond Communication and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankertz, Benjamin; Acqualagna, Laura; Dähne, Sven; Haufe, Stefan; Schultze-Kraft, Matthias; Sturm, Irene; Ušćumlic, Marija; Wenzel, Markus A; Curio, Gabriel; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2016-01-01

    The combined effect of fundamental results about neurocognitive processes and advancements in decoding mental states from ongoing brain signals has brought forth a whole range of potential neurotechnological applications. In this article, we review our developments in this area and put them into perspective. These examples cover a wide range of maturity levels with respect to their applicability. While we assume we are still a long way away from integrating Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) technology in general interaction with computers, or from implementing neurotechnological measures in safety-critical workplaces, results have already now been obtained involving a BCI as research tool. In this article, we discuss the reasons why, in some of the prospective application domains, considerable effort is still required to make the systems ready to deal with the full complexity of the real world.

  3. The Berlin Brain-Computer Interface: Progress Beyond Communication and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Blankertz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The combined effect of fundamental results about neurocognitive processes and advancements in decoding mental states from ongoing brain signals has brought forth a whole range of potential neurotechnological applications. In this article, we review our developments in this area and put them into perspective. These examples cover a wide range of maturity levels with respect to their applicability. While we assume we are still a long way away from integrating Brain-Computer Interface (BCI technology in general interaction with computers, or from implementing neurotechnological measures in safety-critical workplaces, results have already now been obtained involving a BCI as research tool. In this article, we discuss the reasons why, in some of the prospective application domains, considerable effort is still required to make the systems ready to deal with the full complexity of the real world.

  4. Quadcopter control in three-dimensional space using a noninvasive motor imagery based brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFleur, Karl; Cassady, Kaitlin; Doud, Alexander; Shades, Kaleb; Rogin, Eitan; He, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Objective At the balanced intersection of human and machine adaptation is found the optimally functioning brain-computer interface (BCI). In this study, we report a novel experiment of BCI controlling a robotic quadcopter in three-dimensional physical space using noninvasive scalp EEG in human subjects. We then quantify the performance of this system using metrics suitable for asynchronous BCI. Lastly, we examine the impact that operation of a real world device has on subjects’ control with comparison to a two-dimensional virtual cursor task. Approach Five human subjects were trained to modulate their sensorimotor rhythms to control an AR Drone navigating a three-dimensional physical space. Visual feedback was provided via a forward facing camera on the hull of the drone. Individual subjects were able to accurately acquire up to 90.5% of all valid targets presented while travelling at an average straight-line speed of 0.69 m/s. Significance Freely exploring and interacting with the world around us is a crucial element of autonomy that is lost in the context of neurodegenerative disease. Brain-computer interfaces are systems that aim to restore or enhance a user’s ability to interact with the environment via a computer and through the use of only thought. We demonstrate for the first time the ability to control a flying robot in the three-dimensional physical space using noninvasive scalp recorded EEG in humans. Our work indicates the potential of noninvasive EEG based BCI systems to accomplish complex control in three-dimensional physical space. The present study may serve as a framework for the investigation of multidimensional non-invasive brain-computer interface control in a physical environment using telepresence robotics. PMID:23735712

  5. Implementation of an Embedded Web Server Application for Wireless Control of Brain Computer Interface Based Home Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Eda Akman; Bay, Ömer Faruk; Güler, İnan

    2016-01-01

    Brain Computer Interface (BCI) based environment control systems could facilitate life of people with neuromuscular diseases, reduces dependence on their caregivers, and improves their quality of life. As well as easy usage, low-cost, and robust system performance, mobility is an important functionality expected from a practical BCI system in real life. In this study, in order to enhance users' mobility, we propose internet based wireless communication between BCI system and home environment. We designed and implemented a prototype of an embedded low-cost, low power, easy to use web server which is employed in internet based wireless control of a BCI based home environment. The embedded web server provides remote access to the environmental control module through BCI and web interfaces. While the proposed system offers to BCI users enhanced mobility, it also provides remote control of the home environment by caregivers as well as the individuals in initial stages of neuromuscular disease. The input of BCI system is P300 potentials. We used Region Based Paradigm (RBP) as stimulus interface. Performance of the BCI system is evaluated on data recorded from 8 non-disabled subjects. The experimental results indicate that the proposed web server enables internet based wireless control of electrical home appliances successfully through BCIs.

  6. Control system oriented human interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barale, P.; Jacobson, V.; Kilgore, R.; Rondeau, D.

    1976-11-01

    The on-line control system interface for magnet beam steering and focusing in the Bevalac is described. An Aydin model 5205B display generator was chosen. This display generator will allow the computer to completely rewrite a monitor screen in less than 50 ms and is also capable of controlling a color monitor

  7. Computer-to-process interface in JET's control and diagnostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullard, K.; Dorling, S.E.; Montfoort, J.E. van

    1986-01-01

    The JET Control and Data Acquisition System, CODAS, uses some 40,000 electrical signals to control and monitor JET's various systems. This paper describes the electronic equipment and the data transmission techniques which are used to route these signals to and from the centrally-located computers is described. Special emphasis has been placed on the practical aspects of building and maintaining such a large system of approaching 8,000 modules. Quantities and costs of the various classes of modules and cables are given together with an outline of the quality assurance and organisational techniques adopted. (author)

  8. Computer-to-process interface in JET's control and diagnostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullard, K.; Dorling, S.; Van Montfoort, J.

    1987-01-01

    The JET Control and Data Acquisition System, CODAS, uses some 40,000 electrical signals to control and monitor JET's various systems. This paper describes the electronic equipment and the data transmission techniques which are used to route these signals to and from the centrally-located computers. Special emphasis has been placed on the practical aspects of building and maintaining such a large system of approaching 8,000 modules. Quantities and costs of the various classes of modules and cables are given together with an outline of the quality assurance and organisational techniques adopted

  9. Design of a Computer-Controlled, Random-Access Slide Projector Interface. Final Report (April 1974 - November 1974).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Paul J.; And Others

    The design, development, test, and evaluation of an electronic hardware device interfacing a commercially available slide projector with a plasma panel computer terminal is reported. The interface device allows an instructional computer program to select slides for viewing based upon the lesson student situation parameters of the instructional…

  10. Quadcopter control in three-dimensional space using a noninvasive motor imagery-based brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFleur, Karl; Cassady, Kaitlin; Doud, Alexander; Shades, Kaleb; Rogin, Eitan; He, Bin

    2013-08-01

    Objective. At the balanced intersection of human and machine adaptation is found the optimally functioning brain-computer interface (BCI). In this study, we report a novel experiment of BCI controlling a robotic quadcopter in three-dimensional (3D) physical space using noninvasive scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) in human subjects. We then quantify the performance of this system using metrics suitable for asynchronous BCI. Lastly, we examine the impact that the operation of a real world device has on subjects' control in comparison to a 2D virtual cursor task. Approach. Five human subjects were trained to modulate their sensorimotor rhythms to control an AR Drone navigating a 3D physical space. Visual feedback was provided via a forward facing camera on the hull of the drone. Main results. Individual subjects were able to accurately acquire up to 90.5% of all valid targets presented while travelling at an average straight-line speed of 0.69 m s-1. Significance. Freely exploring and interacting with the world around us is a crucial element of autonomy that is lost in the context of neurodegenerative disease. Brain-computer interfaces are systems that aim to restore or enhance a user's ability to interact with the environment via a computer and through the use of only thought. We demonstrate for the first time the ability to control a flying robot in 3D physical space using noninvasive scalp recorded EEG in humans. Our work indicates the potential of noninvasive EEG-based BCI systems for accomplish complex control in 3D physical space. The present study may serve as a framework for the investigation of multidimensional noninvasive BCI control in a physical environment using telepresence robotics.

  11. A Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) system to use arbitrary Windows applications by directly controlling mouse and keyboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuler, Martin

    2015-08-01

    A Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) allows to control a computer by brain activity only, without the need for muscle control. In this paper, we present an EEG-based BCI system based on code-modulated visual evoked potentials (c-VEPs) that enables the user to work with arbitrary Windows applications. Other BCI systems, like the P300 speller or BCI-based browsers, allow control of one dedicated application designed for use with a BCI. In contrast, the system presented in this paper does not consist of one dedicated application, but enables the user to control mouse cursor and keyboard input on the level of the operating system, thereby making it possible to use arbitrary applications. As the c-VEP BCI method was shown to enable very fast communication speeds (writing more than 20 error-free characters per minute), the presented system is the next step in replacing the traditional mouse and keyboard and enabling complete brain-based control of a computer.

  12. Brain-computer interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treder, Matthias S.; Miklody, Daniel; Blankertz, Benjamin

    quality measure'. We were able to show that for stimuli close to the perceptual threshold, there was sometimes a discrepancy between overt responses and brain responses, shedding light on subjects using different response criteria (e.g., more liberal or more conservative). To conclude, brain-computer...... of perceptual and cognitive biases. Furthermore, subjects can only report on stimuli if they have a clear percept of them. On the other hand, the electroencephalogram (EEG), the electrical brain activity measured with electrodes on the scalp, is a more direct measure. It allows us to tap into the ongoing neural...... auditory processing stream. In particular, it can tap brain processes that are pre-conscious or even unconscious, such as the earliest brain responses to sounds stimuli in primary auditory cortex. In a series of studies, we used a machine learning approach to show that the EEG can accurately reflect...

  13. Steady-State VEP-Based Brain-Computer Interface Control in an Immersive 3D Gaming Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke R

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of an effective EEG-based brain-computer interface design for binary control in a visually elaborate immersive 3D game. The BCI uses the steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP generated in response to phase-reversing checkerboard patterns. Two power-spectrum estimation methods were employed for feature extraction in a series of offline classification tests. Both methods were also implemented during real-time game play. The performance of the BCI was found to be robust to distracting visual stimulation in the game and relatively consistent across six subjects, with 41 of 48 games successfully completed. For the best performing feature extraction method, the average real-time control accuracy across subjects was 89%. The feasibility of obtaining reliable control in such a visually rich environment using SSVEPs is thus demonstrated and the impact of this result is discussed.

  14. Control of a brain-computer interface using stereotactic depth electrodes in and adjacent to the hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusienski, D. J.; Shih, J. J.

    2011-04-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a device that enables severely disabled people to communicate and interact with their environments using their brain waves. Most research investigating BCI in humans has used scalp-recorded electroencephalography or intracranial electrocorticography. The use of brain signals obtained directly from stereotactic depth electrodes to control a BCI has not previously been explored. In this study, event-related potentials (ERPs) recorded from bilateral stereotactic depth electrodes implanted in and adjacent to the hippocampus were used to control a P300 Speller paradigm. The ERPs were preprocessed and used to train a linear classifier to subsequently predict the intended target letters. The classifier was able to predict the intended target character at or near 100% accuracy using fewer than 15 stimulation sequences in the two subjects tested. Our results demonstrate that ERPs from hippocampal and hippocampal adjacent depth electrodes can be used to reliably control the P300 Speller BCI paradigm.

  15. Installation and test of new human machine interface of the HANARO control computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Jin; Kim, Y. K.; Choi, Y. S.; Jung, H. S.; Kim, H. K.; Wu, J. S.

    2002-06-01

    As a first step of the long-term replace plan, we upgraded BCS, the HMI of HANARO control computer. ProcessSuite system that was imported this time consists of a workstation class PC and application program that is compatible with MLC and operates on Windows NT 4.0. Operation data storage function that was disabled due to disk drive failure of BCS is now enabled and log scale display and a secure means to enter demand power are made available. Mostly the configuration of ProcessSuite system was found correct although we found some discrepancy and corrected them. The further works to be done are the addition of graphic display screens based on flow diagram, selection and procurement of alarm printer, provision for chart recorders, transmission of important operating parameters and so on. After that, we will produce some documents to prove the performance of new system and prepare user manual for operator

  16. Robust Brain-Computer Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuderink, B.

    2011-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) enables direct communication from the brain to devices, bypassing the traditional pathway of peripheral nerves and muscles. Current BCIs aimed at patients require that the user invests weeks, or even months, to learn the skill to intentionally modify their brain

  17. On the need to better specify the concept of control in brain-computer-interfaces/neurofeedback research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme eWood

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at a better specification of the concept of control in brain-computer-interfaces (BCI and neurofeedback research, we propose to distinguish self-control of brain activity from the broader concept of BCI control, since the first describes a neurocognitive phenomenon and is only one of the many components of BCI control. Based on this distinction, we developed a framework based on dual-processes theory that describes the cognitive determinants of self-control of brain activity as the interplay of automatic vs. controlled information processing. Further, we distinguish between cognitive processes that are necessary and sufficient to achieve a given level of self-control of brain activity and those which are not. We discuss that those cognitive processes which are not necessary for the learning process can hamper self-control because they cannot be completely turned-off at any time. This framework aims at a comprehensive description of the cognitive determinants of the acquisition of self-control of brain activity underlying those classes of BCI which require the user to achieve regulation of brain activity as well as neurofeedback learning.

  18. Inkjet color-printer control interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, R.; Kriegler, F. J.; Marshall, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Special purpose interface permits computer-driven control of inkjet printers. Inkjet printers are answer to problem of high-speed peripheral output devices for computer systems. Control interface was developed to provide high-resolution color-classification maps quickly and economically from multispectral data.

  19. Toward brain-actuated car applications: Self-paced control with a motor imagery-based brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Zhou, Zongtan; Yin, Erwei; Jiang, Jun; Tang, Jingsheng; Liu, Yadong; Hu, Dewen

    2016-10-01

    This study presented a paradigm for controlling a car using an asynchronous electroencephalogram (EEG)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) and presented the experimental results of a simulation performed in an experimental environment outside the laboratory. This paradigm uses two distinct MI tasks, imaginary left- and right-hand movements, to generate a multi-task car control strategy consisting of starting the engine, moving forward, turning left, turning right, moving backward, and stopping the engine. Five healthy subjects participated in the online car control experiment, and all successfully controlled the car by following a previously outlined route. Subject S1 exhibited the most satisfactory BCI-based performance, which was comparable to the manual control-based performance. We hypothesize that the proposed self-paced car control paradigm based on EEG signals could potentially be used in car control applications, and we provide a complementary or alternative way for individuals with locked-in disorders to achieve more mobility in the future, as well as providing a supplementary car-driving strategy to assist healthy people in driving a car. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Communication and control by listening: towards optimal design of a two-class auditory streaming brain-computer interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jeremy Hill

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Most brain-computer interface (BCI systems require users to modulate brain signals in response to visual stimuli. Thus, they may not be useful to people with limited vision, such as those with severe paralysis. One important approach for overcoming this issue is auditory streaming, an approach whereby a BCI system is driven by shifts of attention between two dichotically presented auditory stimulus streams. Motivated by the long-term goal of translating such a system into a reliable, simple yes-no interface for clinical usage, we aim to answer two main questions. First, we asked which of two previously-published variants provides superior performance: a fixed-phase (FP design in which the streams have equal period and opposite phase, or a drifting-phase (DP design where the periods are unequal. We found FP to be superior to DP (p = 0.002: average performance levels were 80% and 72% correct, respectively. We were also able to show, in a pilot with one subject, that auditory streaming can support continuous control and neurofeedback applications: by shifting attention between ongoing left and right auditory streams, the subject was able to control the position of a paddle in a computer game. Second, we examined whether the system is dependent on eye movements, since it is known that eye movements and auditory attention may influence each other, and any dependence on the ability to move one’s eyes would be a barrier to translation to paralyzed users. We discovered that, despite instructions, some subjects did make eye movements that were indicative of the direction of attention. However, there was no correlation, across subjects, between the reliability of the eye movement signal and the reliability of the BCI system, indicating that our system was configured to work independently of eye movement. Together, these findings are an encouraging step forward toward BCIs that provide practical communication and control options for the most severely

  1. Communication and control by listening: toward optimal design of a two-class auditory streaming brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, N Jeremy; Moinuddin, Aisha; Häuser, Ann-Katrin; Kienzle, Stephan; Schalk, Gerwin

    2012-01-01

    Most brain-computer interface (BCI) systems require users to modulate brain signals in response to visual stimuli. Thus, they may not be useful to people with limited vision, such as those with severe paralysis. One important approach for overcoming this issue is auditory streaming, an approach whereby a BCI system is driven by shifts of attention between two simultaneously presented auditory stimulus streams. Motivated by the long-term goal of translating such a system into a reliable, simple yes-no interface for clinical usage, we aim to answer two main questions. First, we asked which of two previously published variants provides superior performance: a fixed-phase (FP) design in which the streams have equal period and opposite phase, or a drifting-phase (DP) design where the periods are unequal. We found FP to be superior to DP (p = 0.002): average performance levels were 80 and 72% correct, respectively. We were also able to show, in a pilot with one subject, that auditory streaming can support continuous control and neurofeedback applications: by shifting attention between ongoing left and right auditory streams, the subject was able to control the position of a paddle in a computer game. Second, we examined whether the system is dependent on eye movements, since it is known that eye movements and auditory attention may influence each other, and any dependence on the ability to move one's eyes would be a barrier to translation to paralyzed users. We discovered that, despite instructions, some subjects did make eye movements that were indicative of the direction of attention. However, there was no correlation, across subjects, between the reliability of the eye movement signal and the reliability of the BCI system, indicating that our system was configured to work independently of eye movement. Together, these findings are an encouraging step forward toward BCIs that provide practical communication and control options for the most severely paralyzed users.

  2. Asynchronous P300-based brain-computer interface to control a virtual environment: initial tests on end users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloise, Fabio; Schettini, Francesca; Aricò, Pietro; Salinari, Serenella; Guger, Christoph; Rinsma, Johanna; Aiello, Marco; Mattia, Donatella; Cincotti, Febo

    2011-10-01

    Motor disability and/or ageing can prevent individuals from fully enjoying home facilities, thus worsening their quality of life. Advances in the field of accessible user interfaces for domotic appliances can represent a valuable way to improve the independence of these persons. An asynchronous P300-based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) system was recently validated with the participation of healthy young volunteers for environmental control. In this study, the asynchronous P300-based BCI for the interaction with a virtual home environment was tested with the participation of potential end-users (clients of a Frisian home care organization) with limited autonomy due to ageing and/or motor disabilities. System testing revealed that the minimum number of stimulation sequences needed to achieve correct classification had a higher intra-subject variability in potential end-users with respect to what was previously observed in young controls. Here we show that the asynchronous modality performed significantly better as compared to the synchronous mode in continuously adapting its speed to the users' state. Furthermore, the asynchronous system modality confirmed its reliability in avoiding misclassifications and false positives, as previously shown in young healthy subjects. The asynchronous modality may contribute to filling the usability gap between BCI systems and traditional input devices, representing an important step towards their use in the activities of daily living.

  3. Usability and Performance Measure of a Consumer-grade Brain Computer Interface System for Environmental Control by Neurological Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Deravi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing incidence and prevalence of chronic brain injury patients and the current financial constraints in healthcare budgets, there is a need for a more intelligent way to realise the current practice of neuro-rehabilitation service provision. Brain-computer Interface (BCI systems have the potential to address this issue to a certain extent only if carefully designed research can demonstrate that these systems are accurate, safe, cost-effective, are able to increase patient/carer satisfaction and enhance their quality of life. Therefore, one of the objectives of the proposed study was to examine whether participants (patients with brain injury and a sample of reference population were able to use a low cost BCI system (Emotiv EPOC to interact with a computer and to communicate via spelling words. Patients participated in the study did not have prior experience in using BCI headsets so as to measure the user experience in the first-exposure to BCI training. To measure emotional arousal of participants we used an ElectroDermal Activity Sensor (Qsensor by Affectiva. For the signal processing and feature extraction of imagery controls the Cognitive Suite of Emotiv's Control Panel was used. Our study reports the key findings based on data obtained from a group of patients and a sample reference population and presents the implications for the design and development of a BCI system for communication and control. The study also evaluates the performance of the system when used practically in context of an acute clinical environment

  4. Artistic Brain-Computer Interfaces: State-of-the-Art of Control Mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wadeson, Amy; Nijholt, Antinus; Nam, Chang S.

    2015-01-01

    Artistic BCI applications offer a new modality for humans to express themselves creatively. In this survey we reviewed the available literature on artistic BCIs by classifying four types of user control afforded by the available applications: selective control, passive control, direct control and

  5. The impact of goal-oriented task design on neurofeedback learning for brain-computer interface control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhinney, S R; Tremblay, A; Boe, S G; Bardouille, T

    2018-02-01

    Neurofeedback training teaches individuals to modulate brain activity by providing real-time feedback and can be used for brain-computer interface control. The present study aimed to optimize training by maximizing engagement through goal-oriented task design. Participants were shown either a visual display or a robot, where each was manipulated using motor imagery (MI)-related electroencephalography signals. Those with the robot were instructed to quickly navigate grid spaces, as the potential for goal-oriented design to strengthen learning was central to our investigation. Both groups were hypothesized to show increased magnitude of these signals across 10 sessions, with the greatest gains being seen in those navigating the robot due to increased engagement. Participants demonstrated the predicted increase in magnitude, with no differentiation between hemispheres. Participants navigating the robot showed stronger left-hand MI increases than those with the computer display. This is likely due to success being reliant on maintaining strong MI-related signals. While older participants showed stronger signals in early sessions, this trend later reversed, suggesting greater natural proficiency but reduced flexibility. These results demonstrate capacity for modulating neurofeedback using MI over a series of training sessions, using tasks of varied design. Importantly, the more goal-oriented robot control task resulted in greater improvements.

  6. Design and simulation of virtual telephone keypad control based on brain computer interface (BCI with very high transfer rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehab B. Ashari

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain Computer Interface (BCI is a communication and control mechanism, which does not rely on any kind of muscular response to send a message to the external world. This technique is used to help the paralyzed people with spinal cord injury to have the ability to communicate with the external world. In this paper we emphasize to increase the BCI System bit rate for controlling a virtual telephone keypad. To achieve the proposed algorithm, a simulated virtual telephone keypad based on Steady State Visual Evoked Potential (SSVEP BCI system is developed. Dynamic programming technique with specifically modified Longest Common Subsequence (LCS algorithm is used. By comparing the paralyzed user selection with the recent, and then the rest, of the stored records in the file of the telephone, the user can save the rest of his choices for controlling the keypad and thence improving the overall performance of the BCI system. This axiomatic approach, which is used in searching the web pages for increasing the performance of the searching, is urgent to be used for the paralyzed people rather than the normal user.

  7. Feedback control policies employed by people using intracortical brain-computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Francis R.; Pandarinath, Chethan; Jarosiewicz, Beata; Murphy, Brian A.; Memberg, William D.; Blabe, Christine H.; Saab, Jad; Walter, Benjamin L.; Sweet, Jennifer A.; Miller, Jonathan P.; Henderson, Jaimie M.; Shenoy, Krishna V.; Simeral, John D.; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Kirsch, Robert F.; Bolu Ajiboye, A.

    2017-02-01

    Objective. When using an intracortical BCI (iBCI), users modulate their neural population activity to move an effector towards a target, stop accurately, and correct for movement errors. We call the rules that govern this modulation a ‘feedback control policy’. A better understanding of these policies may inform the design of higher-performing neural decoders. Approach. We studied how three participants in the BrainGate2 pilot clinical trial used an iBCI to control a cursor in a 2D target acquisition task. Participants used a velocity decoder with exponential smoothing dynamics. Through offline analyses, we characterized the users’ feedback control policies by modeling their neural activity as a function of cursor state and target position. We also tested whether users could adapt their policy to different decoder dynamics by varying the gain (speed scaling) and temporal smoothing parameters of the iBCI. Main results. We demonstrate that control policy assumptions made in previous studies do not fully describe the policies of our participants. To account for these discrepancies, we propose a new model that captures (1) how the user’s neural population activity gradually declines as the cursor approaches the target from afar, then decreases more sharply as the cursor comes into contact with the target, (2) how the user makes constant feedback corrections even when the cursor is on top of the target, and (3) how the user actively accounts for the cursor’s current velocity to avoid overshooting the target. Further, we show that users can adapt their control policy to decoder dynamics by attenuating neural modulation when the cursor gain is high and by damping the cursor velocity more strongly when the smoothing dynamics are high. Significance. Our control policy model may help to build better decoders, understand how neural activity varies during active iBCI control, and produce better simulations of closed-loop iBCI movements.

  8. Shaping bacterial population behavior through computer-interfaced control of individual cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chait, Remy; Ruess, Jakob; Bergmiller, Tobias; Tkačik, Gašper; Guet, Călin C

    2017-11-16

    Bacteria in groups vary individually, and interact with other bacteria and the environment to produce population-level patterns of gene expression. Investigating such behavior in detail requires measuring and controlling populations at the single-cell level alongside precisely specified interactions and environmental characteristics. Here we present an automated, programmable platform that combines image-based gene expression and growth measurements with on-line optogenetic expression control for hundreds of individual Escherichia coli cells over days, in a dynamically adjustable environment. This integrated platform broadly enables experiments that bridge individual and population behaviors. We demonstrate: (i) population structuring by independent closed-loop control of gene expression in many individual cells, (ii) cell-cell variation control during antibiotic perturbation, (iii) hybrid bio-digital circuits in single cells, and freely specifiable digital communication between individual bacteria. These examples showcase the potential for real-time integration of theoretical models with measurement and control of many individual cells to investigate and engineer microbial population behavior.

  9. Visuo-motor coordination ability predicts performance with brain-computer interfaces controlled by modulation of sensorimotor rhythms (SMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Hammer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of sensorimotor rhythms (SMR was suggested as a control signal for brain-computer interfaces (BCI. Yet, there is a population of users estimated between 10 to 50% not able to achieve reliable control and only about 20% of users achieve high (80-100% performance. Predicting performance prior to BCI use would facilitate selection of the most feasible system for an individual, thus constitute a practical benefit for the user, and increase our knowledge about the correlates of BCI control. In a recent study, we predicted SMR-BCI performance from psychological variables that were assessed prior to the BCI sessions and BCI control was supported with machine-learning techniques. We described two significant psychological predictors, namely the visuo-motor coordination ability and the ability to concentrate on the task. The purpose of the current study was to replicate these results thereby validating these predictors within a neurofeedback based SMR-BCI that involved no machine learning. Thirty-three healthy BCI novices participated in a calibration session and three further neurofeedback training sessions. Two variables were related with mean SMR-BCI performance: (1 A measure for the accuracy of fine motor skills, i.e. a trade for a person’s visuo-motor control ability and (2 subject’s attentional impulsivity. In a linear regression they accounted for almost 20% in variance of SMR-BCI performance, but predictor (1 failed significance. Nevertheless, on the basis of our prior regression model for sensorimotor control ability we could predict current SMR-BCI performance with an average prediction error of M = 12.07%. In more than 50% of the participants, the prediction error was smaller than 10%. Hence, psychological variables played a moderate role in predicting SMR-BCI performance in a neurofeedback approach that involved no machine learning. Future studies are needed to further consolidate (or reject the present predictors.

  10. Brain-Computer Interfaces in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Jerry J.; Krusienski, Dean J.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) acquire brain signals, analyze them, and translate them into commands that are relayed to output devices that carry out desired actions. BCIs do not use normal neuromuscular output pathways. The main goal of BCI is to replace or restore useful function to people disabled by neuromuscular disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cerebral palsy, stroke, or spinal cord injury. From initial demonstrations of electroencephalography-based spelling and single-neuron-based device control, researchers have gone on to use electroencephalographic, intracortical, electrocorticographic, and other brain signals for increasingly complex control of cursors, robotic arms, prostheses, wheelchairs, and other devices. Brain-computer interfaces may also prove useful for rehabilitation after stroke and for other disorders. In the future, they might augment the performance of surgeons or other medical professionals. Brain-computer interface technology is the focus of a rapidly growing research and development enterprise that is greatly exciting scientists, engineers, clinicians, and the public in general. Its future achievements will depend on advances in 3 crucial areas. Brain-computer interfaces need signal-acquisition hardware that is convenient, portable, safe, and able to function in all environments. Brain-computer interface systems need to be validated in long-term studies of real-world use by people with severe disabilities, and effective and viable models for their widespread dissemination must be implemented. Finally, the day-to-day and moment-to-moment reliability of BCI performance must be improved so that it approaches the reliability of natural muscle-based function. PMID:22325364

  11. Interfaces para control cerebral

    OpenAIRE

    Spinelli, Enrique Mario

    2000-01-01

    La función de una interfaz para control cerebral basada en señales de electroencefalograma (EEG), en forma general denominada BCI (Brain control Interface), es establecer un enlace directo entre el cerebro y una máquina, sin utilizar acciones motoras directas. Una BCI permite realizar operaciones simples a partir de la interpretación de las señales de EEG. Su desarrollo está principalmente orientado hacia la ayuda a personas con discapacidades motoras severas, que poseen deterioros en el sist...

  12. Principles of interfacing computers to medical equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, J L; Martin, T R

    1990-12-01

    Table 3 shows a comparison of the interface standards considered. RS232 has the advantages of availability, flexibility and low cost. Variants on the standard overcome its limitations in data-rate and distance. The Centronics parallel standard is available on most personal computers and is particularly suitable for high data-rates over short distances. Other PC standards such as SCSI are special-purpose interfaces and therefore more difficult to use. GPIB is a robust and well-specified standard often used for the control of laboratory instruments.

  13. Control of epileptic seizures in WAG/Rij rats by means of brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Vladimir V.; Maksimenko, Vladimir A.; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; Lüttjohann, Annika; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2018-02-01

    The main issue of epileptology is the elimination of epileptic events. This can be achieved by a system that predicts the emergence of seizures in conjunction with a system that interferes with the process that leads to the onset of seizure. The prediction of seizures remains, for the present, unresolved in the absence epilepsy, due to the sudden onset of seizures. We developed an algorithm for predicting seizures in real time, evaluated it and implemented it into an online closed-loop brain stimulation system designed to prevent typical for the absence of epilepsy of spike waves (SWD) in the genetic rat model. The algorithm correctly predicts more than 85% of the seizures and the rest were successfully detected. Unlike the old beliefs that SWDs are unpredictable, current results show that they can be predicted and that the development of systems for predicting and preventing closed-loop capture is a feasible step on the way to intervention to achieve control and freedom from epileptic seizures.

  14. Brain-Computer Interface Controlled Cyborg: Establishing a Functional Information Transfer Pathway from Human Brain to Cockroach Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangye; Zhang, Dingguo

    2016-01-01

    An all-chain-wireless brain-to-brain system (BTBS), which enabled motion control of a cyborg cockroach via human brain, was developed in this work. Steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) based brain-computer interface (BCI) was used in this system for recognizing human motion intention and an optimization algorithm was proposed in SSVEP to improve online performance of the BCI. The cyborg cockroach was developed by surgically integrating a portable microstimulator that could generate invasive electrical nerve stimulation. Through Bluetooth communication, specific electrical pulse trains could be triggered from the microstimulator by BCI commands and were sent through the antenna nerve to stimulate the brain of cockroach. Serial experiments were designed and conducted to test overall performance of the BTBS with six human subjects and three cockroaches. The experimental results showed that the online classification accuracy of three-mode BCI increased from 72.86% to 78.56% by 5.70% using the optimization algorithm and the mean response accuracy of the cyborgs using this system reached 89.5%. Moreover, the results also showed that the cyborg could be navigated by the human brain to complete walking along an S-shape track with the success rate of about 20%, suggesting the proposed BTBS established a feasible functional information transfer pathway from the human brain to the cockroach brain.

  15. An optimal range of information quantity on computer-based procedure interface design in the advanced main control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh Minchih; Chiu Mingchuan; Hwang Sheueling

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of information in the interface design is a critical issue. Too much information on an interface can confuse a user while executing a task, and too little information may result in poor user performance. This study focused on the quantification of visible information on computer-based procedures (CBPs). Levels of information quantity and task complexity were considered in this experiment. Simulated CBPs were developed to consist of three levels: high (at least 10 events, i.e. 3.32 bits), medium (4–8 events, i.e. 2–3 bits), and low information quantity (1 or 2 events, i.e. 0 or 1 bits). Task complexity comprised two levels: complex tasks and simple tasks. The dependent variables include operation time, secondary task performance, and mental workload. Results suggested that medium information quantity of five to eight events has a remarkable advantage in supporting operator performance under both simple and complex tasks. This research not only suggested the appropriate range of information quantity on the CBP interface, but also complemented certain deficient results of previous CBP interface design studies. Additionally, based on results obtained by this study, the quantification of information on the CBP interface should be considered to ensure safe operation of nuclear power plants. (author)

  16. Ecological Interface Design for Computer Network Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kevin B; Bryant, Adam; Sushereba, Christen

    2018-05-01

    A prototype ecological interface for computer network defense (CND) was developed. Concerns about CND run high. Although there is a vast literature on CND, there is some indication that this research is not being translated into operational contexts. Part of the reason may be that CND has historically been treated as a strictly technical problem, rather than as a socio-technical problem. The cognitive systems engineering (CSE)/ecological interface design (EID) framework was used in the analysis and design of the prototype interface. A brief overview of CSE/EID is provided. EID principles of design (i.e., direct perception, direct manipulation and visual momentum) are described and illustrated through concrete examples from the ecological interface. Key features of the ecological interface include (a) a wide variety of alternative visual displays, (b) controls that allow easy, dynamic reconfiguration of these displays, (c) visual highlighting of functionally related information across displays, (d) control mechanisms to selectively filter massive data sets, and (e) the capability for easy expansion. Cyber attacks from a well-known data set are illustrated through screen shots. CND support needs to be developed with a triadic focus (i.e., humans interacting with technology to accomplish work) if it is to be effective. Iterative design and formal evaluation is also required. The discipline of human factors has a long tradition of success on both counts; it is time that HF became fully involved in CND. Direct application in supporting cyber analysts.

  17. Brain computer interface for operating a robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Humaira; Balasubramaniam, Hari Chand; Malik, Aamir Saeed

    2013-10-01

    A Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) is a hardware/software based system that translates the Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals produced by the brain activity to control computers and other external devices. In this paper, we will present a non-invasive BCI system that reads the EEG signals from a trained brain activity using a neuro-signal acquisition headset and translates it into computer readable form; to control the motion of a robot. The robot performs the actions that are instructed to it in real time. We have used the cognitive states like Push, Pull to control the motion of the robot. The sensitivity and specificity of the system is above 90 percent. Subjective results show a mixed trend of the difficulty level of the training activities. The quantitative EEG data analysis complements the subjective results. This technology may become very useful for the rehabilitation of disabled and elderly people.

  18. Spatial co-adaptation of cortical control columns in a micro-ECoG brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, A. G.; Williams, J. J.; Wheeler, J. J.; Moran, D. W.

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Electrocorticography (ECoG) has been used for a range of applications including electrophysiological mapping, epilepsy monitoring, and more recently as a recording modality for brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Studies that examine ECoG electrodes designed and implanted chronically solely for BCI applications remain limited. The present study explored how two key factors influence chronic, closed-loop ECoG BCI: (i) the effect of inter-electrode distance on BCI performance and (ii) the differences in neural adaptation and performance when fixed versus adaptive BCI decoding weights are used. Approach. The amplitudes of epidural micro-ECoG signals between 75 and 105 Hz with 300 μm diameter electrodes were used for one-dimensional and two-dimensional BCI tasks. The effect of inter-electrode distance on BCI control was tested between 3 and 15 mm. Additionally, the performance and cortical modulation differences between constant, fixed decoding using a small subset of channels versus adaptive decoding weights using the entire array were explored. Main results. Successful BCI control was possible with two electrodes separated by 9 and 15 mm. Performance decreased and the signals became more correlated when the electrodes were only 3 mm apart. BCI performance in a 2D BCI task improved significantly when using adaptive decoding weights (80%-90%) compared to using constant, fixed weights (50%-60%). Additionally, modulation increased for channels previously unavailable for BCI control under the fixed decoding scheme upon switching to the adaptive, all-channel scheme. Significance. Our results clearly show that neural activity under a BCI recording electrode (which we define as a ‘cortical control column’) readily adapts to generate an appropriate control signal. These results show that the practical minimal spatial resolution of these control columns with micro-ECoG BCI is likely on the order of 3 mm. Additionally, they show that the combination and

  19. On the Relationship Between Attention Processing and P300-Based Brain Computer Interface Control in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Riccio

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to investigate the capacity to control a P3-based brain-computer interface (BCI device for communication and its related (temporal attention processing in a sample of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS patients with respect to healthy subjects. The ultimate goal was to corroborate the role of cognitive mechanisms in event-related potential (ERP-based BCI control in ALS patients. Furthermore, the possible differences in such attentional mechanisms between the two groups were investigated in order to unveil possible alterations associated with the ALS condition. Thirteen ALS patients and 13 healthy volunteers matched for age and years of education underwent a P3-speller BCI task and a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP task. The RSVP task was performed by participants in order to screen their temporal pattern of attentional resource allocation, namely: (i the temporal attentional filtering capacity (scored as T1%; and (ii the capability to adequately update the attentive filter in the temporal dynamics of the attentional selection (scored as T2%. For the P3-speller BCI task, the online accuracy and information transfer rate (ITR were obtained. Centroid Latency and Mean Amplitude of N200 and P300 were also obtained. No significant differences emerged between ALS patients and Controls with regards to online accuracy (p = 0.13. Differently, the performance in controlling the P3-speller expressed as ITR values (calculated offline were compromised in ALS patients (p < 0.05, with a delay in the latency of P3 when processing BCI stimuli as compared with Control group (p < 0.01. Furthermore, the temporal aspect of attentional filtering which was related to BCI control (r = 0.51; p < 0.05 and to the P3 wave amplitude (r = 0.63; p < 0.05 was also altered in ALS patients (p = 0.01. These findings ground the knowledge required to develop sensible classes of BCI specifically designed by taking into account the influence of the cognitive

  20. Computational design of patterned interfaces using reduced order models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vattre, A.J.; Abdolrahim, N.; Kolluri, K.; Demkowicz, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Patterning is a familiar approach for imparting novel functionalities to free surfaces. We extend the patterning paradigm to interfaces between crystalline solids. Many interfaces have non-uniform internal structures comprised of misfit dislocations, which in turn govern interface properties. We develop and validate a computational strategy for designing interfaces with controlled misfit dislocation patterns by tailoring interface crystallography and composition. Our approach relies on a novel method for predicting the internal structure of interfaces: rather than obtaining it from resource-intensive atomistic simulations, we compute it using an efficient reduced order model based on anisotropic elasticity theory. Moreover, our strategy incorporates interface synthesis as a constraint on the design process. As an illustration, we apply our approach to the design of interfaces with rapid, 1-D point defect diffusion. Patterned interfaces may be integrated into the microstructure of composite materials, markedly improving performance. (authors)

  1. Are we there yet? Evaluating commercial grade brain-computer interface for control of computer applications by individuals with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherian, Sarvnaz; Selitskiy, Dmitry; Pau, James; Claire Davies, T

    2017-02-01

    Using a commercial electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain-computer interface (BCI), the training and testing protocol for six individuals with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy (GMFCS and MACS IV and V) was evaluated. A customised, gamified training paradigm was employed. Over three weeks, the participants spent two sessions exploring the system, and up to six sessions playing the game which focussed on EEG feedback of left and right arm motor imagery. The participants showed variable inconclusive results in the ability to produce two distinct EEG patterns. Participant performance was influenced by physical illness, motivation, fatigue and concentration. The results from this case study highlight the infancy of BCIs as a form of assistive technology for people with cerebral palsy. Existing commercial BCIs are not designed according to the needs of end-users. Implications for Rehabilitation Mood, fatigue, physical illness and motivation influence the usability of a brain-computer interface. Commercial brain-computer interfaces are not designed for practical assistive technology use for people with cerebral palsy. Practical brain-computer interface assistive technologies may need to be flexible to suit individual needs.

  2. Principles of Motor Recovery in Post-Stroke Patients using Hand Exoskeleton Controlled by the Brain-Computer Interface Based on Motor Imagery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frolov, A. A.; Húsek, Dušan; Biryukova, E. V.; Bobrov, P.; Mokienko, O.; Alexandrov, A.V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 1 (2017), s. 107-137 ISSN 1210-0552 Grant - others:Russian Ministry of Education and Science(RU) RFMEFI60715X0128 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : brain computer interface * motor imagery * post-stroke and post-traumatic patients * arm and hand exoskeleton * proportional derivative controller * motor synergy * clinical application Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 0.394, year: 2016

  3. Brain-Computer Interfaces for 1-D and 2-D Cursor Control: Designs Using Volitional Control of the EEG Spectrum or Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo, Leonard J.; Matthews, Bryan; Rosipal, Roman

    2005-01-01

    We have developed and tested two EEG-based brain-computer interfaces (BCI) for users to control a cursor on a computer display. Our system uses an adaptive algorithm, based on kernel partial least squares classification (KPLS), to associate patterns in multichannel EEG frequency spectra with cursor controls. Our first BCI, Target Practice, is a system for one-dimensional device control, in which participants use biofeedback to learn voluntary control of their EEG spectra. Target Practice uses a KF LS classifier to map power spectra of 30-electrode EEG signals to rightward or leftward position of a moving cursor on a computer display. Three subjects learned to control motion of a cursor on a video display in multiple blocks of 60 trials over periods of up to six weeks. The best subject s average skill in correct selection of the cursor direction grew from 58% to 88% after 13 training sessions. Target Practice also implements online control of two artifact sources: a) removal of ocular artifact by linear subtraction of wavelet-smoothed vertical and horizontal EOG signals, b) control of muscle artifact by inhibition of BCI training during periods of relatively high power in the 40-64 Hz band. The second BCI, Think Pointer, is a system for two-dimensional cursor control. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) are triggered by four flickering checkerboard stimuli located in narrow strips at each edge of the display. The user attends to one of the four beacons to initiate motion in the desired direction. The SSVEP signals are recorded from eight electrodes located over the occipital region. A KPLS classifier is individually calibrated to map multichannel frequency bands of the SSVEP signals to right-left or up-down motion of a cursor on a computer display. The display stops moving when the user attends to a central fixation point. As for Target Practice, Think Pointer also implements wavelet-based online removal of ocular artifact; however, in Think Pointer muscle

  4. Brain-computer interfaces in neurological rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Janis J; Wolpaw, Jonathan R

    2008-11-01

    Recent advances in analysis of brain signals, training patients to control these signals, and improved computing capabilities have enabled people with severe motor disabilities to use their brain signals for communication and control of objects in their environment, thereby bypassing their impaired neuromuscular system. Non-invasive, electroencephalogram (EEG)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies can be used to control a computer cursor or a limb orthosis, for word processing and accessing the internet, and for other functions such as environmental control or entertainment. By re-establishing some independence, BCI technologies can substantially improve the lives of people with devastating neurological disorders such as advanced amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. BCI technology might also restore more effective motor control to people after stroke or other traumatic brain disorders by helping to guide activity-dependent brain plasticity by use of EEG brain signals to indicate to the patient the current state of brain activity and to enable the user to subsequently lower abnormal activity. Alternatively, by use of brain signals to supplement impaired muscle control, BCIs might increase the efficacy of a rehabilitation protocol and thus improve muscle control for the patient.

  5. Brain-Computer Interfacing Embedded in Intelligent and Affective Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus

    In this talk we survey recent research views on non-traditional brain-computer interfaces (BCI). That is, interfaces that can process brain activity input, but that are designed for the ‘general population’, rather than for clinical purposes. Control of applications can be made more robust by fusing

  6. Legal Aspects of Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krausová, Alžběta

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2014) ISSN 1802-5951 Institutional support: RVO:68378122 Keywords : brain-computer interface * human rights * right to privacy, Subject RIV: AG - Legal Sciences http://mujlt.law.muni.cz/index.php

  7. Human-machine interface aspects and use of computer-based operator support systems in control room upgrades and new control room designs for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, O.

    1997-01-01

    At the Halden Project efforts are made to explore the possibilities through design, development and validation of Computer-based Operator Support Systems (COSSes) which can assist the operators in different operational situations, ranging from normal operation to disturbance and accident conditions. The programme comprises four main activities: 1) verification and validation of safety critical software systems; 2) man-machine interaction research emphasizing improvements in man-machine interfaces on the basis of human factors studies; 3) computerized operator support systems assisting the operator in fault detection/diagnosis and planning of control actions; and 4) control room development providing a basis for retrofitting of existing control rooms and for the design of advanced concepts. The paper presents the status of this development programme, including descriptions of specific operator support functions implemented in the simulator-based, experimental control room at Halden (HAMMLAB, HAlden Man-Machine LABoratory). These operator aids comprise advanced alarms systems, diagnostic support functions, electronic procedures, critical safety functions surveillance and accident management support systems. The different operator support systems development at the Halden Project are tested and evaluated in HAMMLAB with operators from the Halden Reactor, and occasionally from commercial NPPs, as test subjects. These evaluations provide data on the merits of different operator support systems in an advanced control room setting, as well as on how such systems should be integrated to enhance operator performance. The paper discusses these aspects and the role of computerized operator support systems in plant operation based on the experience from this work at the Halden Project. 15 refs, 5 figs

  8. Human-machine interface aspects and use of computer-based operator support systems in control room upgrades and new control room designs for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, O [Institutt for Energiteknikk, OECD Halden Reactor Project (Netherlands)

    1997-07-01

    At the Halden Project efforts are made to explore the possibilities through design, development and validation of Computer-based Operator Support Systems (COSSes) which can assist the operators in different operational situations, ranging from normal operation to disturbance and accident conditions. The programme comprises four main activities: 1) verification and validation of safety critical software systems; 2) man-machine interaction research emphasizing improvements in man-machine interfaces on the basis of human factors studies; 3) computerized operator support systems assisting the operator in fault detection/diagnosis and planning of control actions; and 4) control room development providing a basis for retrofitting of existing control rooms and for the design of advanced concepts. The paper presents the status of this development programme, including descriptions of specific operator support functions implemented in the simulator-based, experimental control room at Halden (HAMMLAB, HAlden Man-Machine LABoratory). These operator aids comprise advanced alarms systems, diagnostic support functions, electronic procedures, critical safety functions surveillance and accident management support systems. The different operator support systems development at the Halden Project are tested and evaluated in HAMMLAB with operators from the Halden Reactor, and occasionally from commercial NPPs, as test subjects. These evaluations provide data on the merits of different operator support systems in an advanced control room setting, as well as on how such systems should be integrated to enhance operator performance. The paper discusses these aspects and the role of computerized operator support systems in plant operation based on the experience from this work at the Halden Project. 15 refs, 5 figs.

  9. A passive brain-computer interface application for the mental workload assessment on professional air traffic controllers during realistic air traffic control tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aricò, P; Borghini, G; Di Flumeri, G; Colosimo, A; Pozzi, S; Babiloni, F

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, it has been a fast-growing concept in the neuroscience field. The passive brain-computer interface (p-BCI) systems allow to improve the human-machine interaction (HMI) in operational environments, by using the covert brain activity (eg, mental workload) of the operator. However, p-BCI technology could suffer from some practical issues when used outside the laboratories. In particular, one of the most important limitations is the necessity to recalibrate the p-BCI system each time before its use, to avoid a significant reduction of its reliability in the detection of the considered mental states. The objective of the proposed study was to provide an example of p-BCIs used to evaluate the users' mental workload in a real operational environment. For this purpose, through the facilities provided by the École Nationale de l'Aviation Civile of Toulouse (France), the cerebral activity of 12 professional air traffic control officers (ATCOs) has been recorded while performing high realistic air traffic management scenarios. By the analysis of the ATCOs' brain activity (electroencephalographic signal-EEG) and the subjective workload perception (instantaneous self-assessment) provided by both the examined ATCOs and external air traffic control experts, it has been possible to estimate and evaluate the variation of the mental workload under which the controllers were operating. The results showed (i) a high significant correlation between the neurophysiological and the subjective workload assessment, and (ii) a high reliability over time (up to a month) of the proposed algorithm that was also able to maintain high discrimination accuracies by using a low number of EEG electrodes (~3 EEG channels). In conclusion, the proposed methodology demonstrated the suitability of p-BCI systems in operational environments and the advantages of the neurophysiological measures with respect to the subjective ones. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Man-machine interfaces analysis system based on computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoming; Gao Zuying; Zhou Zhiwei; Zhao Bingquan

    2004-01-01

    The paper depicts a software assessment system, Dynamic Interaction Analysis Support (DIAS), based on computer simulation technology for man-machine interfaces (MMI) of a control room. It employs a computer to simulate the operation procedures of operations on man-machine interfaces in a control room, provides quantified assessment, and at the same time carries out analysis on operational error rate of operators by means of techniques for human error rate prediction. The problems of placing man-machine interfaces in a control room and of arranging instruments can be detected from simulation results. DIAS system can provide good technical supports to the design and improvement of man-machine interfaces of the main control room of a nuclear power plant

  11. Post-stroke Rehabilitation Training with a Motor-Imagery-Based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI)-Controlled Hand Exoskeleton: A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Alexander A; Mokienko, Olesya; Lyukmanov, Roman; Biryukova, Elena; Kotov, Sergey; Turbina, Lydia; Nadareyshvily, Georgy; Bushkova, Yulia

    2017-01-01

    Repeated use of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) providing contingent sensory feedback of brain activity was recently proposed as a rehabilitation approach to restore motor function after stroke or spinal cord lesions. However, there are only a few clinical studies that investigate feasibility and effectiveness of such an approach. Here we report on a placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial that investigated whether stroke survivors with severe upper limb (UL) paralysis benefit from 10 BCI training sessions each lasting up to 40 min. A total of 74 patients participated: median time since stroke is 8 months, 25 and 75% quartiles [3.0; 13.0]; median severity of UL paralysis is 4.5 points [0.0; 30.0] as measured by the Action Research Arm Test, ARAT, and 19.5 points [11.0; 40.0] as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment, FMMA. Patients in the BCI group ( n = 55) performed motor imagery of opening their affected hand. Motor imagery-related brain electroencephalographic activity was translated into contingent hand exoskeleton-driven opening movements of the affected hand. In a control group ( n = 19), hand exoskeleton-driven opening movements of the affected hand were independent of brain electroencephalographic activity. Evaluation of the UL clinical assessments indicated that both groups improved, but only the BCI group showed an improvement in the ARAT's grasp score from 0 [0.0; 14.0] to 3.0 [0.0; 15.0] points ( p exoskeleton-assisted physical therapy can improve post-stroke rehabilitation outcomes. Both maximum and mean values of the percentage of successfully decoded imagery-related EEG activity, were higher than chance level. A correlation between the classification accuracy and the improvement in the upper extremity function was found. An improvement of motor function was found for patients with different duration, severity and location of the stroke.

  12. Touch-based Brain Computer Interfaces: State of the art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Brouwer, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) rely on the user's brain activity to control equipment or computer devices. Many BCIs are based on imagined movement (called active BCIs) or the fact that brain patterns differ in reaction to relevant or attended stimuli in comparison to irrelevant or unattended

  13. TMS communications software. Volume 1: Computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. S.; Lenker, M. D.

    1979-01-01

    A prototype bus communications system, which is being used to support the Trend Monitoring System (TMS) as well as for evaluation of the bus concept is considered. Hardware and software interfaces to the MODCOMP and NOVA minicomputers are included. The system software required to drive the interfaces in each TMS computer is described. Documentation of other software for bus statistics monitoring and for transferring files across the bus is also included.

  14. Post-stroke Rehabilitation Training with a Motor-Imagery-Based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI-Controlled Hand Exoskeleton: A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Frolov

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Repeated use of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs providing contingent sensory feedback of brain activity was recently proposed as a rehabilitation approach to restore motor function after stroke or spinal cord lesions. However, there are only a few clinical studies that investigate feasibility and effectiveness of such an approach. Here we report on a placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial that investigated whether stroke survivors with severe upper limb (UL paralysis benefit from 10 BCI training sessions each lasting up to 40 min. A total of 74 patients participated: median time since stroke is 8 months, 25 and 75% quartiles [3.0; 13.0]; median severity of UL paralysis is 4.5 points [0.0; 30.0] as measured by the Action Research Arm Test, ARAT, and 19.5 points [11.0; 40.0] as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment, FMMA. Patients in the BCI group (n = 55 performed motor imagery of opening their affected hand. Motor imagery-related brain electroencephalographic activity was translated into contingent hand exoskeleton-driven opening movements of the affected hand. In a control group (n = 19, hand exoskeleton-driven opening movements of the affected hand were independent of brain electroencephalographic activity. Evaluation of the UL clinical assessments indicated that both groups improved, but only the BCI group showed an improvement in the ARAT's grasp score from 0 [0.0; 14.0] to 3.0 [0.0; 15.0] points (p < 0.01 and pinch scores from 0.0 [0.0; 7.0] to 1.0 [0.0; 12.0] points (p < 0.01. Upon training completion, 21.8% and 36.4% of the patients in the BCI group improved their ARAT and FMMA scores respectively. The corresponding numbers for the control group were 5.1% (ARAT and 15.8% (FMMA. These results suggests that adding BCI control to exoskeleton-assisted physical therapy can improve post-stroke rehabilitation outcomes. Both maximum and mean values of the percentage of successfully decoded imagery-related EEG activity, were higher

  15. Guest editorial: Brain/neuronal computer games interfaces and interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Coyle, D.; Principe, J.; Lotte, F.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays brainwave or electroencephalogram (EEG) controlled games controllers are adding new options to satisfy the continual demand for new ways to interact with games, following trends such as the Nintendo® Wii, Microsoft® Kinect and Playstation® Move which are based on accelerometers and motion capture. EEG-based brain-computer games interaction are controlled through brain-computer interface (BCI) technology which requires sophisticated signal processing to produce a low communication ban...

  16. [Arm Motor Function Recovery during Rehabilitation with the Use of Hand Exoskeleton Controlled by Brain-Computer Interface: a Patient with Severe Brain Damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biryukova, E V; Pavlova, O G; Kurganskaya, M E; Bobrov, P D; Turbina, L G; Frolov, A A; Davydov, V I; Sil'tchenko, A V; Mokienko, O A

    2016-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of motor function recovery in a patient with severe brain damage in the course of neurorehabilitation using hand exoskeleton controlled by brain-computer interface. For estimating the motor function of paretic arm, we used the biomechanical analysis of movements registered during the course of rehabilitation. After 15 weekly sessions of hand exoskeleton control, the following results were obtained: a) the velocity profile of goal-directed movements of paretic hand became bell-shaped, b) the patient began to extend and abduct the hand which was flexed and adducted in the beginning of rehabilitation, and c) the patient began to supinate the forearm which was pronated in the beginning of rehabilitation. The first result is an evidence of the general improvement of the quality of motor control, while the second and third results prove that the spasticity of paretic arm has decreased.

  17. Multi-robot control interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Walton, Miles C [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-06

    Methods and systems for controlling a plurality of robots through a single user interface include at least one robot display window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot display window illustrating one or more conditions of a respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes at least one robot control window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot control window configured to receive one or more commands for sending to the respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes a multi-robot common window comprised of information received from each of the plurality of robots.

  18. Interfacing computers and the internet with your allergy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2004-10-01

    Computers and the internet have begun to play a prominent role in the medical profession and, in particular, the allergy specialty. Computer technology is being used more frequently for patient and physician education, asthma management in children and adults, including environmental control, generating patient databases for research and clinical practice and in marketing and e-commerce. This article will review how computers and the internet have begun to interface with the allergy subspecialty practice in these various areas.

  19. CIT diagnostic computer interface studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauch, W.; Hayes, S.; Lowrance, J.; Oliaro, G.; Sauthoff, N.; Sichta, P.; Stark, W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the on-going work performed in proposing instrumentation equipment and communications networks for the Diagnostic Data Acquisition and Diagnostic Instrumentation and Control System for the Compact Ignition Torus (CIT), which will begin operation in 1993. Consideration is given to the system criteria and requirements and their influence on the appropriate application of instrumentation and communication technologies to the system. This paper concentrates on the investigation of the bus communication technologies as they apply to the CIT data acquisition system. It compares CAMAC, VME, and FASTBUS as standards for data acquisition. The paper describes the connectivity between VAX equipment and CAMAC and VME instrumentation systems. Instrumentation and communication functionality and performance levels are presented as factors important to the overall data acquisition system performance

  20. RC Circuits: Some Computer-Interfaced Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Pratibha; Verma, Mallika

    1994-01-01

    Describes a simple computer-interface experiment for recording the response of an RC network to an arbitrary input excitation. The setup is used to pose a variety of open-ended investigations in network modeling by varying the initial conditions, input signal waveform, and the circuit topology. (DDR)

  1. A computational method for sharp interface advection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roenby, Johan; Bredmose, Henrik; Jasak, Hrvoje

    2016-01-01

    We devise a numerical method for passive advection of a surface, such as the interface between two incompressible fluids, across a computational mesh. The method is called isoAdvector, and is developed for general meshes consisting of arbitrary polyhedral cells. The algorithm is based on the volu...

  2. The Brain-Computer Interface Cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerven, Marcel; Farquhar, Jason; Schaefer, Rebecca; Vlek, Rutger; Geuze, Jeroen; Nijholt, Antinus; Ramsay, Nick; Haselager, Pim; Vuurpijl, Louis; Gielen, Stan; Desain, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) have attracted much attention recently, triggered by new scientific progress in understanding brain function and by impressive applications. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the various steps in the BCI cycle, i.e., the loop from the measurement of

  3. Brain-computer interfaces for arts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gürkök, Hayrettin; Nijholt, Antinus; D' Mello, S.; Pantic, Maja

    2013-01-01

    We experience positive emotions when our hedonic needs, such as virtuosity or relatedness, are satisfied. Creating art is one way of satisfying these needs, so artistic computer applications can be considered as ‘affective’. Artistic braincomputer interfaces (BCIs), which allow people to create art

  4. Electrostatics with Computer-Interfaced Charge Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Computer interfaced electrostatic charge sensors allow both qualitative and quantitative measurements of electrostatic charge but are quite sensitive to charges accumulating on modern synthetic materials. They need to be used with care so that students can correctly interpret their measurements. This paper describes the operation of the sensors,…

  5. Asynchronous P300-Based Brain-Computer Interface to Control a Virtual Environment : Initial Tests on End Users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aloise, Fabio; Schettini, Francesca; Arico, Pietro; Salinari, Serenella; Guger, Christoph; Rinsma, Johanna; Aiello, Marco; Mattia, Donatella; Cincotti, Febo

    2011-01-01

    Motor disability and/or ageing can prevent individuals from fully enjoying home facilities, thus worsening their quality of life. Advances in the field of accessible user interfaces for domotic appliances can represent a valuable way to improve the independence of these persons. An asynchronous

  6. Brain-Computer Interfaces Revolutionizing Human-Computer Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Graimann, Bernhard; Allison, Brendan

    2010-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) establishes a direct output channel between the human brain and external devices. BCIs infer user intent via direct measures of brain activity and thus enable communication and control without movement. This book, authored by experts in the field, provides an accessible introduction to the neurophysiological and signal-processing background required for BCI, presents state-of-the-art non-invasive and invasive approaches, gives an overview of current hardware and software solutions, and reviews the most interesting as well as new, emerging BCI applications. The book is intended not only for students and young researchers, but also for newcomers and other readers from diverse backgrounds keen to learn about this vital scientific endeavour.

  7. Light Duty Utility Arm interface control document plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engstrom, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    This document describes the interface control documents that will be used to identify and control interface features throughout all phases of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) development and design. After the system is built, delivered and installed in the Cold Test Facility and later at the tank farm, the Interface Control Documents can be used in maintaining the configuration control process. The Interface Control Document will consist of Interface Control Drawings and a data base directly tied to the Interface Control Drawings. The data base can be used as an index to conveniently find interface information. Design drawings and other text documents that contain interface information will appear in the database. The Interface Control Drawings will be used to document and control the data and information that define the interface boundaries between systems, subsystems and equipment. Also, the interface boundaries will define the areas of responsibility for systems and subsystems. The drawing will delineate and identify all the physical and functional interfaces that required coordination to establish and maintain compatibility between the co-functioning equipment, computer software, and the tank farm facilities. An appendix contains the Engineering interface control database system riser manual

  8. Light Duty Utility Arm interface control document plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engstrom, J.W.

    1994-12-27

    This document describes the interface control documents that will be used to identify and control interface features throughout all phases of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) development and design. After the system is built, delivered and installed in the Cold Test Facility and later at the tank farm, the Interface Control Documents can be used in maintaining the configuration control process. The Interface Control Document will consist of Interface Control Drawings and a data base directly tied to the Interface Control Drawings. The data base can be used as an index to conveniently find interface information. Design drawings and other text documents that contain interface information will appear in the database. The Interface Control Drawings will be used to document and control the data and information that define the interface boundaries between systems, subsystems and equipment. Also, the interface boundaries will define the areas of responsibility for systems and subsystems. The drawing will delineate and identify all the physical and functional interfaces that required coordination to establish and maintain compatibility between the co-functioning equipment, computer software, and the tank farm facilities. An appendix contains the Engineering interface control database system riser manual.

  9. Interface language for diagnostic control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matone, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    The neutron multichannel collimator diagnostic on TFTR is run with the help of a keyboard-entered interface language. The language allows the user to interact with the real-time control and data analysis systems in a consistent and efficient manner. It uses a vocabulary that can be abbreviated into one character commands which the proficient user may concatenate into command words. This allows the user to progress quickly from a novice to an expert operating mode. A similar type interface language could be applied to many interactive applications accepting keyboard inputs

  10. Spectrometer user interface to computer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, L.; Davies, M.; Fry, F.A.; Venn, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    A computer system for use in radiation spectrometry should be designed around the needs and comprehension of the user and his operating environment. To this end, the functions of the system should be built in a modular and independent fashion such that they can be joined to the back end of an appropriate user interface. The point that this interface should be designed rather than just allowed to evolve is illustrated by reference to four related computer systems of differing complexity and function. The physical user interfaces in all cases are keyboard terminals, and the virtues and otherwise of these devices are discussed and compared with others. The language interface needs to satisfy a number of requirements, often conflicting. Among these, simplicity and speed of operation compete with flexibility and scope. Both experienced and novice users need to be considered, and any individual's needs may vary from naive to complex. To be efficient and resilient, the implementation must use an operating system, but the user needs to be protected from its complex and unfamiliar syntax. At the same time the interface must allow the user access to all services appropriate to his needs. The user must also receive an image of privacy in a multi-user system. The interface itself must be stable and exhibit continuity between implementations. Some of these conflicting needs have been overcome by the SABRE interface with languages operating at several levels. The foundation is a simple semimnemonic command language that activates indididual and independent functions. The commands can be used with positional parameters or in an interactive dialogue the precise nature of which depends upon the operating environment and the user's experience. A command procedure or macrolanguage allows combinations of commands with conditional branching and arithmetic features. Thus complex but repetitive operations are easily performed

  11. Computer control applied to accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Crowley-Milling, Michael C

    1974-01-01

    The differences that exist between control systems for accelerators and other types of control systems are outlined. It is further indicated that earlier accelerators had manual control systems to which computers were added, but that it is essential for the new, large accelerators to include computers in the control systems right from the beginning. Details of the computer control designed for the Super Proton Synchrotron are presented. The method of choosing the computers is described, as well as the reasons for CERN having to design the message transfer system. The items discussed include: CAMAC interface systems, a new multiplex system, operator-to-computer interaction (such as touch screen, computer-controlled knob, and non- linear track-ball), and high-level control languages. Brief mention is made of the contributions of other high-energy research laboratories as well as of some other computer control applications at CERN. (0 refs).

  12. Human-computer interface incorporating personal and application domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Thomas G [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-03-29

    The present invention provides a human-computer interface. The interface includes provision of an application domain, for example corresponding to a three-dimensional application. The user is allowed to navigate and interact with the application domain. The interface also includes a personal domain, offering the user controls and interaction distinct from the application domain. The separation into two domains allows the most suitable interface methods in each: for example, three-dimensional navigation in the application domain, and two- or three-dimensional controls in the personal domain. Transitions between the application domain and the personal domain are under control of the user, and the transition method is substantially independent of the navigation in the application domain. For example, the user can fly through a three-dimensional application domain, and always move to the personal domain by moving a cursor near one extreme of the display.

  13. The kinematic portrait of a patient as an objective indicator of motor function in the process of neurorehabilitation with hand exoskeleton controlled by the brain – computer interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. А. Kondur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of biomechanical analysis of the motor function of the arm of poststroke patient in the process of neuroreha bilitation with exoskeleton of the hand controlled by brain – computer interface are presented in this paper. At the beginning and end of the course it was registered the kinematic portrait of the patient– isolated random movements for each of the seven degrees of freedom as the paretic and intact arms.Angular accelerations were taken as an assessment of muscle forces, the number of reverse movements was taken as an assessment of joint spasticity, and the kinematic content of the movement as a description of pathological synergy arising after stroke. These parameters give an objective numerical asses sment of motor function as well as of rehabilitation technology effectiveness.

  14. Multimodal 2D Brain Computer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almajidy, Rand K; Boudria, Yacine; Hofmann, Ulrich G; Besio, Walter; Mankodiya, Kunal

    2015-08-01

    In this work we used multimodal, non-invasive brain signal recording systems, namely Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS), disc electrode electroencephalography (EEG) and tripolar concentric ring electrodes (TCRE) electroencephalography (tEEG). 7 healthy subjects participated in our experiments to control a 2-D Brain Computer Interface (BCI). Four motor imagery task were performed, imagery motion of the left hand, the right hand, both hands and both feet. The signal slope (SS) of the change in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration measured by NIRS was used for feature extraction while the power spectrum density (PSD) of both EEG and tEEG in the frequency band 8-30Hz was used for feature extraction. Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) was used to classify different combinations of the aforementioned features. The highest classification accuracy (85.2%) was achieved by using features from all the three brain signals recording modules. The improvement in classification accuracy was highly significant (p = 0.0033) when using the multimodal signals features as compared to pure EEG features.

  15. Brain Computer Interface on Track to Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Felip; Vargiu, Eloisa; Dauwalder, Stefan; Solà, Marc; Müller-Putz, Gernot; Wriessnegger, Selina C; Pinegger, Andreas; Kübler, Andrea; Halder, Sebastian; Käthner, Ivo; Martin, Suzanne; Daly, Jean; Armstrong, Elaine; Guger, Christoph; Hintermüller, Christoph; Lowish, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    The novel BackHome system offers individuals with disabilities a range of useful services available via brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), to help restore their independence. This is the time such technology is ready to be deployed in the real world, that is, at the target end users' home. This has been achieved by the development of practical electrodes, easy to use software, and delivering telemonitoring and home support capabilities which have been conceived, implemented, and tested within a user-centred design approach. The final BackHome system is the result of a 3-year long process involving extensive user engagement to maximize effectiveness, reliability, robustness, and ease of use of a home based BCI system. The system is comprised of ergonomic and hassle-free BCI equipment; one-click software services for Smart Home control, cognitive stimulation, and web browsing; and remote telemonitoring and home support tools to enable independent home use for nonexpert caregivers and users. BackHome aims to successfully bring BCIs to the home of people with limited mobility to restore their independence and ultimately improve their quality of life.

  16. Brain Computer Interface on Track to Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felip Miralles

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The novel BackHome system offers individuals with disabilities a range of useful services available via brain-computer interfaces (BCIs, to help restore their independence. This is the time such technology is ready to be deployed in the real world, that is, at the target end users’ home. This has been achieved by the development of practical electrodes, easy to use software, and delivering telemonitoring and home support capabilities which have been conceived, implemented, and tested within a user-centred design approach. The final BackHome system is the result of a 3-year long process involving extensive user engagement to maximize effectiveness, reliability, robustness, and ease of use of a home based BCI system. The system is comprised of ergonomic and hassle-free BCI equipment; one-click software services for Smart Home control, cognitive stimulation, and web browsing; and remote telemonitoring and home support tools to enable independent home use for nonexpert caregivers and users. BackHome aims to successfully bring BCIs to the home of people with limited mobility to restore their independence and ultimately improve their quality of life.

  17. EEG Negativity in Fixations Used for Gaze-Based Control: Toward Converting Intentions into Actions with an Eye-Brain-Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkin, Sergei L.; Nuzhdin, Yuri O.; Svirin, Evgeny P.; Trofimov, Alexander G.; Fedorova, Anastasia A.; Kozyrskiy, Bogdan L.; Velichkovsky, Boris M.

    2016-01-01

    We usually look at an object when we are going to manipulate it. Thus, eye tracking can be used to communicate intended actions. An effective human-machine interface, however, should be able to differentiate intentional and spontaneous eye movements. We report an electroencephalogram (EEG) marker that differentiates gaze fixations used for control from spontaneous fixations involved in visual exploration. Eight healthy participants played a game with their eye movements only. Their gaze-synchronized EEG data (fixation-related potentials, FRPs) were collected during game's control-on and control-off conditions. A slow negative wave with a maximum in the parietooccipital region was present in each participant's averaged FRPs in the control-on conditions and was absent or had much lower amplitude in the control-off condition. This wave was similar but not identical to stimulus-preceding negativity, a slow negative wave that can be observed during feedback expectation. Classification of intentional vs. spontaneous fixations was based on amplitude features from 13 EEG channels using 300 ms length segments free from electrooculogram contamination (200–500 ms relative to the fixation onset). For the first fixations in the fixation triplets required to make moves in the game, classified against control-off data, a committee of greedy classifiers provided 0.90 ± 0.07 specificity and 0.38 ± 0.14 sensitivity. Similar (slightly lower) results were obtained for the shrinkage Linear Discriminate Analysis (LDA) classifier. The second and third fixations in the triplets were classified at lower rate. We expect that, with improved feature sets and classifiers, a hybrid dwell-based Eye-Brain-Computer Interface (EBCI) can be built using the FRP difference between the intended and spontaneous fixations. If this direction of BCI development will be successful, such a multimodal interface may improve the fluency of interaction and can possibly become the basis for a new input device

  18. EEG Negativity in Fixations Used for Gaze-Based Control: Toward Converting Intentions into Actions with an Eye-Brain-Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei L. Shishkin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We usually look at an object when we are going to manipulate it. Thus, eye tracking can be used to communicate intended actions. An effective human-machine interface, however, should be able to differentiate intentional and spontaneous eye movements. We report an electroencephalogram (EEG marker that differentiates gaze fixations used for control from spontaneous fixations involved in visual exploration. Eight healthy participants played a game with their eye movements only. Their gaze-synchronized EEG data (fixation-related potentials, FRPs were collected during game’s control-on and control-off conditions. A slow negative wave with a maximum in the parietooccipital region was present in each participant’s averaged FRPs in the control-on conditions and was absent or had much lower amplitude in the control-off condition. This wave was similar but not identical to stimulus-preceding negativity, a slow negative wave that can be observed during feedback expectation. Classification of intentional vs. spontaneous fixations was based on amplitude features from 13 EEG channels using 300 ms length segments free from electrooculogram contamination (200..500 ms relative to the fixation onset. For the first fixations in the fixation triplets required to make moves in the game, classified against control-off data, a committee of greedy classifiers provided 0.90 ± 0.07 specificity and 0.38 ± 0.14 sensitivity. Similar (slightly lower results were obtained for the shrinkage LDA classifier. The second and third fixations in the triplets were classified at lower rate. We expect that, with improved feature sets and classifiers, a hybrid dwell-based Eye-Brain-Computer Interface (EBCI can be built using the FRP difference between the intended and spontaneous fixations. If this direction of BCI development will be successful, such a multimodal interface may improve the fluency of interaction and can possibly become the basis for a new input device for

  19. An associative Brain-Computer-Interface for acute stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Aliakbaryhosseinabadi, Susan

    2016-01-01

    An efficient innovative Brain-Computer-Interface system that empowers chronic stroke patients to control an artificial activation of their lower limb muscle through task specific motor intent has been tested in the past. In the current study it was applied to acute stroke patients. The system...

  20. Brain-Computer Interface Games: Towards a Framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gürkök, Hayrettin; Nijholt, Antinus; Poel, Mannes; Nakatsu, Ryohei; Rauterberg, Matthias; Ciancarini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The brain-computer interface (BCI) community has started to consider games as potential applications, while the game community has started to consider BCI as a game controller. However, there is a discrepancy between the BCI games developed by the two communities. This not only adds to the workload

  1. Brain-computer interfacing under distraction: an evaluation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Stephanie; Frølich, Laura; Höhne, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Objective. While motor-imagery based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have been studied over many years by now, most of these studies have taken place in controlled lab settings. Bringing BCI technology into everyday life is still one of the main challenges in this field of research. Approach...

  2. Brain-Computer Interface Games: Towards a Framework.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gürkök, Hayrettin; Nijholt, Antinus; Poel, Mannes; Herrlich, Marc; Malaka, Rainer; Masuch, Maic

    2012-01-01

    The brain-computer interface (BCI) community started to consider games as potential applications while the games community started to consider BCI as a game controller. However, there is a discrepancy between the BCI games developed by the two communities. In this paper, we propose a preliminary BCI

  3. Light on! Real world evaluation of a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI) for environment control in a smart home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabalona, Roberta; Grossi, Ferdinando; Tessadri, Adam; Castiglioni, Paolo; Caracciolo, Antonio; de Munari, Ilaria

    2012-01-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems aim to enable interaction with other people and the environment without muscular activation by the exploitation of changes in brain signals due to the execution of cognitive tasks. In this context, the visual P300 potential appears suited to control smart homes through BCI spellers. The aim of this work is to evaluate whether the widely used character-speller is more sustainable than an icon-based one, designed to operate smart home environment or to communicate moods and needs. Nine subjects with neurodegenerative diseases and no BCI experience used both speller types in a real smart home environment. User experience during BCI tasks was evaluated recording concurrent physiological signals. Usability was assessed for each speller type immediately after use. Classification accuracy was lower for the icon-speller, which was also more attention demanding. However, in subjective evaluations, the effect of a real feedback partially counterbalanced the difficulty in BCI use. Since inclusive BCIs require to consider interface sustainability, we evaluated different ergonomic aspects of the interaction of disabled users with a character-speller (goal: word spelling) and an icon-speller (goal: operating a real smart home). We found the first one as more sustainable in terms of accuracy and cognitive effort.

  4. Brain Computer Interface on Track to Home

    OpenAIRE

    Miralles, Felip; Vargiu, Eloisa; Dauwalder, Stefan; Solà, Marc; Müller-Putz, Gernot; Wriessnegger, Selina C.; Pinegger, Andreas; Kübler, Andrea; Halder, Sebastian; Käthner, Ivo; Martin, Suzanne; Daly, Jean; Armstrong, Elaine; Guger, Christoph; Hintermüller, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The novel BackHome system offers individuals with disabilities a range of useful services available via brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), to help restore their independence. This is the time such technology is ready to be deployed in the real world, that is, at the target end users' home. This has been achieved by the development of practical electrodes, easy to use software, and delivering telemonitoring and home support capabilities which have been conceived, implemented, and tested within ...

  5. A brain computer interface-based explorer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lijuan; Yu, Tianyou; Li, Yuanqing

    2015-04-15

    In recent years, various applications of brain computer interfaces (BCIs) have been studied. In this paper, we present a hybrid BCI combining P300 and motor imagery to operate an explorer. Our system is mainly composed of a BCI mouse, a BCI speller and an explorer. Through this system, the user can access his computer and manipulate (open, close, copy, paste, and delete) files such as documents, pictures, music, movies and so on. The system has been tested with five subjects, and the experimental results show that the explorer can be successfully operated according to subjects' intentions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. High Performance Computing - Power Application Programming Interface Specification.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laros, James H.,; Kelly, Suzanne M.; Pedretti, Kevin; Grant, Ryan; Olivier, Stephen Lecler; Levenhagen, Michael J.; DeBonis, David

    2014-08-01

    Measuring and controlling the power and energy consumption of high performance computing systems by various components in the software stack is an active research area [13, 3, 5, 10, 4, 21, 19, 16, 7, 17, 20, 18, 11, 1, 6, 14, 12]. Implementations in lower level software layers are beginning to emerge in some production systems, which is very welcome. To be most effective, a portable interface to measurement and control features would significantly facilitate participation by all levels of the software stack. We present a proposal for a standard power Application Programming Interface (API) that endeavors to cover the entire software space, from generic hardware interfaces to the input from the computer facility manager.

  7. Java interface for asserting interactive telerobotic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePasquale, Peter; Lewis, John; Stein, Matthew R.

    1997-12-01

    Many current web-based telerobotic interfaces use HyperText Markup Language (HTML) forms to assert user control on a robot. While acceptable for some tasks, a Java interface can provide better client-server interaction. The Puma Paint project is a joint effort between the Department of Computing Sciences at Villanova University and the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Wilkes University. THe project utilizes a Java applet to control a Unimation Puma 1760 robot during the task of painting on a canvas. The interface allows the user to control the paint strokes as well as the pressure of a brush on the canvas and how deep the brush is dipped into a paint jar. To provide immediate feedback, a virtual canvas models the effects of the controls as the artist paints. Live color video feedback is provided, allowing the user to view the actual results of the robot's motions. Unlike the step-at-a-time model of many web forms, the application permits the user to assert interactive control. The greater the complexity of the interaction between the robot and its environment, the greater the need for high quality information presentation to the user. The use of Java allows the sophistication of the user interface to be raised to the level required for satisfactory control. This paper describes the Puma Paint project, including the interface and communications model. It also examines the challenges of using the Internet as the medium of communications and the challenges of encoding free ranging motions for transmission from the client to the robot.

  8. A computational method for sharp interface advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredmose, Henrik; Jasak, Hrvoje

    2016-01-01

    We devise a numerical method for passive advection of a surface, such as the interface between two incompressible fluids, across a computational mesh. The method is called isoAdvector, and is developed for general meshes consisting of arbitrary polyhedral cells. The algorithm is based on the volume of fluid (VOF) idea of calculating the volume of one of the fluids transported across the mesh faces during a time step. The novelty of the isoAdvector concept consists of two parts. First, we exploit an isosurface concept for modelling the interface inside cells in a geometric surface reconstruction step. Second, from the reconstructed surface, we model the motion of the face–interface intersection line for a general polygonal face to obtain the time evolution within a time step of the submerged face area. Integrating this submerged area over the time step leads to an accurate estimate for the total volume of fluid transported across the face. The method was tested on simple two-dimensional and three-dimensional interface advection problems on both structured and unstructured meshes. The results are very satisfactory in terms of volume conservation, boundedness, surface sharpness and efficiency. The isoAdvector method was implemented as an OpenFOAM® extension and is published as open source. PMID:28018619

  9. A computational method for sharp interface advection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roenby, Johan; Bredmose, Henrik; Jasak, Hrvoje

    2016-11-01

    We devise a numerical method for passive advection of a surface, such as the interface between two incompressible fluids, across a computational mesh. The method is called isoAdvector, and is developed for general meshes consisting of arbitrary polyhedral cells. The algorithm is based on the volume of fluid (VOF) idea of calculating the volume of one of the fluids transported across the mesh faces during a time step. The novelty of the isoAdvector concept consists of two parts. First, we exploit an isosurface concept for modelling the interface inside cells in a geometric surface reconstruction step. Second, from the reconstructed surface, we model the motion of the face-interface intersection line for a general polygonal face to obtain the time evolution within a time step of the submerged face area. Integrating this submerged area over the time step leads to an accurate estimate for the total volume of fluid transported across the face. The method was tested on simple two-dimensional and three-dimensional interface advection problems on both structured and unstructured meshes. The results are very satisfactory in terms of volume conservation, boundedness, surface sharpness and efficiency. The isoAdvector method was implemented as an OpenFOAM ® extension and is published as open source.

  10. Design on the Control System of a Gait Rehabilitation Training Robot Based on Brain-Computer Interface and Virtual Reality Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a control system of a gait rehabilitation training robot based on Brain-Computer Interface (BCI and virtual reality technology is proposed, which makes the patients' rehabilitation training process more interesting. A technique for measuring the mental states of the human and associated applications based on normal brain signals are examined and evaluated firstly. Secondly, the virtual game starts with the information from the BCI and then it runs in the form of a thread, with the singleton design pattern as the main mode. Thirdly, through the synergistic cooperation with the main software, the virtual game can achieve quick and effective access to blood oxygen, heart rate and other physiological information of the patients. At the same time, by means of the hardware control system, the start-up of the gait rehabilitation training robot could be controlled accurately and effectively. Therefore, the plantar pressure information and the velocity information, together with the physiological information of the patients, would be properly reflected in the game lastly and the physical condition of the patients participating in rehabilitation training would also be reflected to a great extent.

  11. Gaming control using a wearable and wireless EEG-based brain-computer interface device with novel dry foam-based sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication system that can help users interact with the outside environment by translating brain signals into machine commands. The use of electroencephalographic (EEG) signals has become the most common approach for a BCI because of their usability and strong reliability. Many EEG-based BCI devices have been developed with traditional wet- or micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS)-type EEG sensors. However, those traditional sensors have uncomfortable disadvantage and require conductive gel and skin preparation on the part of the user. Therefore, acquiring the EEG signals in a comfortable and convenient manner is an important factor that should be incorporated into a novel BCI device. In the present study, a wearable, wireless and portable EEG-based BCI device with dry foam-based EEG sensors was developed and was demonstrated using a gaming control application. The dry EEG sensors operated without conductive gel; however, they were able to provide good conductivity and were able to acquire EEG signals effectively by adapting to irregular skin surfaces and by maintaining proper skin-sensor impedance on the forehead site. We have also demonstrated a real-time cognitive stage detection application of gaming control using the proposed portable device. The results of the present study indicate that using this portable EEG-based BCI device to conveniently and effectively control the outside world provides an approach for researching rehabilitation engineering. PMID:22284235

  12. A multi-purpose brain-computer interface output device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David E; Huggins, Jane E

    2011-10-01

    While brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are a promising alternative access pathway for individuals with severe motor impairments, many BCI systems are designed as stand-alone communication and control systems, rather than as interfaces to existing systems built for these purposes. An individual communication and control system may be powerful or flexible, but no single system can compete with the variety of options available in the commercial assistive technology (AT) market. BCls could instead be used as an interface to these existing AT devices and products, which are designed for improving access and agency of people with disabilities and are highly configurable to individual user needs. However, interfacing with each AT device and program requires significant time and effort on the part of researchers and clinicians. This work presents the Multi-Purpose BCI Output Device (MBOD), a tool to help researchers and clinicians provide BCI control of many forms of AT in a plug-and-play fashion, i.e., without the installation of drivers or software on the AT device, and a proof-of-concept of the practicality of such an approach. The MBOD was designed to meet the goals of target device compatibility, BCI input device compatibility, convenience, and intuitive command structure. The MBOD was successfully used to interface a BCI with multiple AT devices (including two wheelchair seating systems), as well as computers running Windows (XP and 7), Mac and Ubuntu Linux operating systems.

  13. A Multi-purpose Brain-Computer Interface Output Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David E; Huggins, Jane E

    2012-01-01

    While brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are a promising alternative access pathway for individuals with severe motor impairments, many BCI systems are designed as standalone communication and control systems, rather than as interfaces to existing systems built for these purposes. While an individual communication and control system may be powerful or flexible, no single system can compete with the variety of options available in the commercial assistive technology (AT) market. BCIs could instead be used as an interface to these existing AT devices and products, which are designed for improving access and agency of people with disabilities and are highly configurable to individual user needs. However, interfacing with each AT device and program requires significant time and effort on the part of researchers and clinicians. This work presents the Multi-Purpose BCI Output Device (MBOD), a tool to help researchers and clinicians provide BCI control of many forms of AT in a plug-and-play fashion, i.e. without the installation of drivers or software on the AT device, and a proof-of-concept of the practicality of such an approach. The MBOD was designed to meet the goals of target device compatibility, BCI input device compatibility, convenience, and intuitive command structure. The MBOD was successfully used to interface a BCI with multiple AT devices (including two wheelchair seating systems), as well as computers running Windows (XP and 7), Mac and Ubuntu Linux operating systems. PMID:22208120

  14. CAMAPPLE: CAMAC interface to the Apple computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxoby, G.J.; Trang, Q.H.; Williams, S.H.

    1981-04-01

    The advent of the personal microcomputer provides a new tool for the debugging, calibration and monitoring of small scale physics apparatus, e.g., a single detector being developed for a larger physics apparatus. With an appropriate interface these microcomputer systems provide a low cost (1/3 the cost of a comparable minicomputer system), convenient, dedicated, portable system which can be used in a fashion similar to that of portable oscilloscopes. Here, an interface between the Apple computer and CAMAC which is now being used to study the detector for a Cerenkov ring-imaging device is described. The Apple is particularly well-suited to this application because of its ease of use, hi-resolution graphics, peripheral bus and documentation support

  15. Camapple: CAMAC interface to the Apple computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxoby, G.J.; Trang, Q.H.; Williams, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    The advent of the 'personal' microcomputer provides a new tool for the debugging, calibration and monitoring of small scale physics apparatus, e.g., a single detector being developed for a larger physics apparatus. With an appropriate interface these microcomputer systems provide a low cost (1/3 the cost of a comparable minicomputer system), convenient, dedicated, portable system which can be used in a fashion similar to that of portable oscilliscopes. Here we describe an interface between the Apple computer and CAMAC which is now being used to study the detector for a Cerenkov ring-imaging device. The Apple is particularly well-suited to this application because of its ease of use, hi-resolution graphics, peripheral bus and documentation support. (orig.)

  16. A database for TMT interface control documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Kim; Roberts, Scott; Brighton, Allan; Rogers, John

    2016-08-01

    The TMT Software System consists of software components that interact with one another through a software infrastructure called TMT Common Software (CSW). CSW consists of software services and library code that is used by developers to create the subsystems and components that participate in the software system. CSW also defines the types of components that can be constructed and their roles. The use of common component types and shared middleware services allows standardized software interfaces for the components. A software system called the TMT Interface Database System was constructed to support the documentation of the interfaces for components based on CSW. The programmer describes a subsystem and each of its components using JSON-style text files. A command interface file describes each command a component can receive and any commands a component sends. The event interface files describe status, alarms, and events a component publishes and status and events subscribed to by a component. A web application was created to provide a user interface for the required features. Files are ingested into the software system's database. The user interface allows browsing subsystem interfaces, publishing versions of subsystem interfaces, and constructing and publishing interface control documents that consist of the intersection of two subsystem interfaces. All published subsystem interfaces and interface control documents are versioned for configuration control and follow the standard TMT change control processes. Subsystem interfaces and interface control documents can be visualized in the browser or exported as PDF files.

  17. Interfacing Sensors To Micro Controllers

    KAUST Repository

    Norain, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    This lecture will cover the most common interface and interface techniques between sensors and microcontrollers. The presentation will introduce the pros and cons of each interface type including analogue, digital and serial output sensors. It will also cover the basic required electronics knowledge to help you in selecting and designing your next sensor to microcontroller interface.

  18. Interfacing Sensors To Micro Controllers

    KAUST Repository

    Norain, Mohamed

    2018-01-15

    This lecture will cover the most common interface and interface techniques between sensors and microcontrollers. The presentation will introduce the pros and cons of each interface type including analogue, digital and serial output sensors. It will also cover the basic required electronics knowledge to help you in selecting and designing your next sensor to microcontroller interface.

  19. Computer aided control engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymkat, Maciej; Ravn, Ole

    1997-01-01

    Current developments in the field of Computer Aided Control Engineering (CACE) have a visible impact on the design methodologies and the structure of the software tools supporting them. Today control engineers has at their disposal libraries, packages or programming environments that may...... in CACE enhancing efficient flow of information between the tools supporting the following phases of the design process. In principle, this flow has to be two-way, and more or less automated, in order to enable the engineer to observe the propagation of the particular design decisions taken at various...... levels.The major conclusions of the paper are related with identifying the factors affecting the software tool integration in a way needed to facilitate design "inter-phase" communication. These are: standard application interfaces, dynamic data exchange mechanisms, code generation techniques and general...

  20. Optimizing the Usability of Brain-Computer Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; Chase, Steve M

    2018-03-22

    Brain-computer interfaces are in the process of moving from the laboratory to the clinic. These devices act by reading neural activity and using it to directly control a device, such as a cursor on a computer screen. An open question in the field is how to map neural activity to device movement in order to achieve the most proficient control. This question is complicated by the fact that learning, especially the long-term skill learning that accompanies weeks of practice, can allow subjects to improve performance over time. Typical approaches to this problem attempt to maximize the biomimetic properties of the device in order to limit the need for extensive training. However, it is unclear if this approach would ultimately be superior to performance that might be achieved with a nonbiomimetic device once the subject has engaged in extended practice and learned how to use it. Here we approach this problem using ideas from optimal control theory. Under the assumption that the brain acts as an optimal controller, we present a formal definition of the usability of a device and show that the optimal postlearning mapping can be written as the solution of a constrained optimization problem. We then derive the optimal mappings for particular cases common to most brain-computer interfaces. Our results suggest that the common approach of creating biomimetic interfaces may not be optimal when learning is taken into account. More broadly, our method provides a blueprint for optimal device design in general control-theoretic contexts.

  1. User Experience May be Producing Greater Heart Rate Variability than Motor Imagery Related Control Tasks during the User-System Adaptation in Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Valerdi, Luz M.; Gutiérrez-Begovich, David A.; Argüello-García, Janet; Sepulveda, Francisco; Ramírez-Mendoza, Ricardo A.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) is technology that is developing fast, but it remains inaccurate, unreliable and slow due to the difficulty to obtain precise information from the brain. Consequently, the involvement of other biosignals to decode the user control tasks has risen in importance. A traditional way to operate a BCI system is via motor imagery (MI) tasks. As imaginary movements activate similar cortical structures and vegetative mechanisms as a voluntary movement does, heart rate variability (HRV) has been proposed as a parameter to improve the detection of MI related control tasks. However, HR is very susceptible to body needs and environmental demands, and as BCI systems require high levels of attention, perceptual processing and mental workload, it is important to assess the practical effectiveness of HRV. The present study aimed to determine if brain and heart electrical signals (HRV) are modulated by MI activity used to control a BCI system, or if HRV is modulated by the user perceptions and responses that result from the operation of a BCI system (i.e., user experience). For this purpose, a database of 11 participants who were exposed to eight different situations was used. The sensory-cognitive load (intake and rejection tasks) was controlled in those situations. Two electrophysiological signals were utilized: electroencephalography and electrocardiography. From those biosignals, event-related (de-)synchronization maps and event-related HR changes were respectively estimated. The maps and the HR changes were cross-correlated in order to verify if both biosignals were modulated due to MI activity. The results suggest that HR varies according to the experience undergone by the user in a BCI working environment, and not because of the MI activity used to operate the system. PMID:27458384

  2. Graphical User Interface Programming in Introductory Computer Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolnick, Michael M.; Spooner, David L.

    Modern computing systems exploit graphical user interfaces for interaction with users; as a result, introductory computer science courses must begin to teach the principles underlying such interfaces. This paper presents an approach to graphical user interface (GUI) implementation that is simple enough for beginning students to understand, yet…

  3. Brain Computer Interfaces for Enhanced Interaction with Mobile Robot Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-27

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) show great potential in allowing humans to interact with computational environments in a...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 27-07-2016 17-Sep-2013 16-Sep-2014 Final Report: Brain Computer Interfaces for Enhanced Interactions with Mobile Robot...published in peer-reviewed journals: Number of Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Brain Computer Interfaces for Enhanced

  4. Vibrotactile Feedback for Brain-Computer Interface Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Cincotti, Febo; Kauhanen, Laura; Aloise, Fabio; Palomäki, Tapio; Caporusso, Nicholas; Jylänki, Pasi; Mattia, Donatella; Babiloni, Fabio; Vanacker, Gerolf; Nuttin, Marnix; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Millán, José del R.

    2007-01-01

    To be correctly mastered, brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) need an uninterrupted flow of feedback to the user. This feedback is usually delivered through the visual channel. Our aim was to explore the benefits of vibrotactile feedback during users' training and control of EEG-based BCI applications. A protocol for delivering vibrotactile feedback, including specific hardware and software arrangements, was specified. In three studies with 33 subjects (i...

  5. Brain-Computer Interface Spellers: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezeika, Aya; Benda, Mihaly; Stawicki, Piotr; Gembler, Felix; Saboor, Abdul; Volosyak, Ivan

    2018-03-30

    A Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) provides a novel non-muscular communication method via brain signals. A BCI-speller can be considered as one of the first published BCI applications and has opened the gate for many advances in the field. Although many BCI-spellers have been developed during the last few decades, to our knowledge, no reviews have described the different spellers proposed and studied in this vital field. The presented speller systems are categorized according to major BCI paradigms: P300, steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP), and motor imagery (MI). Different BCI paradigms require specific electroencephalogram (EEG) signal features and lead to the development of appropriate Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs). The purpose of this review is to consolidate the most successful BCI-spellers published since 2010, while mentioning some other older systems which were built explicitly for spelling purposes. We aim to assist researchers and concerned individuals in the field by illustrating the highlights of different spellers and presenting them in one review. It is almost impossible to carry out an objective comparison between different spellers, as each has its variables, parameters, and conditions. However, the gathered information and the provided taxonomy about different BCI-spellers can be helpful, as it could identify suitable systems for first-hand users, as well as opportunities of development and learning from previous studies for BCI researchers.

  6. Brain–Computer Interface Spellers: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gembler, Felix; Saboor, Abdul

    2018-01-01

    A Brain–Computer Interface (BCI) provides a novel non-muscular communication method via brain signals. A BCI-speller can be considered as one of the first published BCI applications and has opened the gate for many advances in the field. Although many BCI-spellers have been developed during the last few decades, to our knowledge, no reviews have described the different spellers proposed and studied in this vital field. The presented speller systems are categorized according to major BCI paradigms: P300, steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP), and motor imagery (MI). Different BCI paradigms require specific electroencephalogram (EEG) signal features and lead to the development of appropriate Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs). The purpose of this review is to consolidate the most successful BCI-spellers published since 2010, while mentioning some other older systems which were built explicitly for spelling purposes. We aim to assist researchers and concerned individuals in the field by illustrating the highlights of different spellers and presenting them in one review. It is almost impossible to carry out an objective comparison between different spellers, as each has its variables, parameters, and conditions. However, the gathered information and the provided taxonomy about different BCI-spellers can be helpful, as it could identify suitable systems for first-hand users, as well as opportunities of development and learning from previous studies for BCI researchers. PMID:29601538

  7. TFTR centralized torus interface valve control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, G.G.; Olsen, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    A system developed especially for the TFTR to monitor and control the interface between the vacuum vessel and associated diagnostics will be described in this paper. Diagnostics which must be connected to the machine vacuum are required to do so through a Torus Interface Valve (TIV). Two types of TIV's are used on TFTR. The first type is a non-latching valve which must be held in the opened position by a sustained OPEN command, returning automatically to the closed position when the OPEN command is removed. This type of TIV is used on all systems which never insert a probe into the vacuum vessel through the TIV. The second type of TIV is a latching valve which requires a momentary OPEN command to open and a momentary CLOSE command to close. Each TIV is linked to its own dedicated logic controller. Each logic controller is hardwired to the appropriate TIV OPEN/CLOSED limit switches, probe IN/OUT limit switches, TFTR vacuum vessel pressure setpoint switches, and diagnostic pressure setpoint switches. The logic controller can be configured for local (push-button) or remote (computer) control. Each controller has a uniquely coded keyswitch to determine the configuration. Whether under local or remote control, all OPEN and CLOSE commands must be approved by the TIV controller (TIVC). In the case of systems with probes, the controller must receive a positive indication that the probe is completely backed out before a CLOSE command will be transmitted from the TIVC to the TIV. Before a valve will be opened by a controller, the differential pressure across the valve must be within certain limits

  8. COMPUTER CONTROL OF BEHAVIORAL EXPERIMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SIEGEL, LOUIS

    THE LINC COMPUTER PROVIDES A PARTICULAR SCHEDULE OF REINFORCEMENT FOR BEHAVIORAL EXPERIMENTS BY EXECUTING A SEQUENCE OF COMPUTER OPERATIONS IN CONJUNCTION WITH A SPECIALLY DESIGNED INTERFACE. THE INTERFACE IS THE MEANS OF COMMUNICATION BETWEEN THE EXPERIMENTAL CHAMBER AND THE COMPUTER. THE PROGRAM AND INTERFACE OF AN EXPERIMENT INVOLVING A PIGEON…

  9. Adaptive Automation Triggered by EEG-Based Mental Workload Index: A Passive Brain-Computer Interface Application in Realistic Air Traffic Control Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aricò, Pietro; Borghini, Gianluca; Di Flumeri, Gianluca; Colosimo, Alfredo; Bonelli, Stefano; Golfetti, Alessia; Pozzi, Simone; Imbert, Jean-Paul; Granger, Géraud; Benhacene, Raïlane; Babiloni, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive Automation (AA) is a promising approach to keep the task workload demand within appropriate levels in order to avoid both the under - and over-load conditions, hence enhancing the overall performance and safety of the human-machine system. The main issue on the use of AA is how to trigger the AA solutions without affecting the operative task. In this regard, passive Brain-Computer Interface (pBCI) systems are a good candidate to activate automation, since they are able to gather information about the covert behavior (e.g., mental workload) of a subject by analyzing its neurophysiological signals (i.e., brain activity), and without interfering with the ongoing operational activity. We proposed a pBCI system able to trigger AA solutions integrated in a realistic Air Traffic Management (ATM) research simulator developed and hosted at ENAC (É cole Nationale de l'Aviation Civile of Toulouse, France). Twelve Air Traffic Controller (ATCO) students have been involved in the experiment and they have been asked to perform ATM scenarios with and without the support of the AA solutions. Results demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed pBCI system, since it enabled the AA mostly during the high-demanding conditions (i.e., overload situations) inducing a reduction of the mental workload under which the ATCOs were operating. On the contrary, as desired, the AA was not activated when workload level was under the threshold, to prevent too low demanding conditions that could bring the operator's workload level toward potentially dangerous conditions of underload.

  10. A brain-computer interface based cognitive training system for healthy elderly: a randomized control pilot study for usability and preliminary efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tih-Shih; Goh, Siau Juinn Alexa; Quek, Shin Yi; Phillips, Rachel; Guan, Cuntai; Cheung, Yin Bun; Feng, Lei; Teng, Stephanie Sze Wei; Wang, Chuan Chu; Chin, Zheng Yang; Zhang, Haihong; Ng, Tze Pin; Lee, Jimmy; Keefe, Richard; Krishnan, K Ranga Rama

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive decline in aging is a pressing issue associated with significant healthcare costs and deterioration in quality of life. Previously, we reported the successful use of a novel brain-computer interface (BCI) training system in improving symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Here, we examine the feasibility of the BCI system with a new game that incorporates memory training in improving memory and attention in a pilot sample of healthy elderly. This study investigates the safety, usability and acceptability of our BCI system to elderly, and obtains an efficacy estimate to warrant a phase III trial. Thirty-one healthy elderly were randomized into intervention (n = 15) and waitlist control arms (n = 16). Intervention consisted of an 8-week training comprising 24 half-hour sessions. A usability and acceptability questionnaire was administered at the end of training. Safety was investigated by querying users about adverse events after every session. Efficacy of the system was measured by the change of total score from the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) before and after training. Feedback on the usability and acceptability questionnaire was positive. No adverse events were reported for all participants across all sessions. Though the median difference in the RBANS change scores between arms was not statistically significant, an effect size of 0.6SD was obtained, which reflects potential clinical utility according to Simon's randomized phase II trial design. Pooled data from both arms also showed that the median change in total scores pre and post-training was statistically significant (Mdn = 4.0; pattention (p = 0.039), and delayed memory (pattention in healthy elderly, and appears to be safe, user-friendly and acceptable to senior users. Given the efficacy signal, a phase III trial is warranted. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01661894.

  11. A pilot randomized controlled trial using EEG-based brain-computer interface training for a Chinese-speaking group of healthy elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tih-Shih; Quek, Shin Yi; Goh, Siau Juinn Alexa; Phillips, Rachel; Guan, Cuntai; Cheung, Yin Bun; Feng, Lei; Wang, Chuan Chu; Chin, Zheng Yang; Zhang, Haihong; Lee, Jimmy; Ng, Tze Pin; Krishnan, K Ranga Rama

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that cognitive training (CT) can improve the cognitive functioning of the elderly. CT may be influenced by cultural and linguistic factors, but research examining CT programs has mostly been conducted on Western populations. We have developed an innovative electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) CT program that has shown preliminary efficacy in improving cognition in 32 healthy English-speaking elderly adults in Singapore. In this second pilot trial, we examine the acceptability, safety, and preliminary efficacy of our BCI CT program in healthy Chinese-speaking Singaporean elderly. Thirty-nine elderly participants were randomized into intervention (n=21) and wait-list control (n=18) arms. Intervention consisted of 24 half-hour sessions with our BCI-based CT training system to be completed in 8 weeks; the control arm received the same intervention after an initial 8-week waiting period. At the end of the training, a usability and acceptability questionnaire was administered. Efficacy was measured using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), which was translated and culturally adapted for the Chinese-speaking local population. Users were asked about any adverse events experienced after each session as a safety measure. The training was deemed easily usable and acceptable by senior users. The median difference in the change scores pre- and post-training of the modified RBANS total score was 8.0 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.0-16.0, P=0.042) higher in the intervention arm than waitlist control, while the mean difference was 9.0 (95% CI: 1.7-16.2, P=0.017). Ten (30.3%) participants reported a total of 16 adverse events - all of which were graded "mild" except for one graded "moderate". Our BCI training system shows potential in improving cognition in both English- and Chinese-speaking elderly, and deserves further evaluation in a Phase III trial. Overall, participants

  12. A brain-computer interface to support functional recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Troels W; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) register changes in brain activity and utilize this to control computers. The most widely used method is based on registration of electrical signals from the cerebral cortex using extracranially placed electrodes also called electroencephalography (EEG). The features...... extracted from the EEG may, besides controlling the computer, also be fed back to the patient for instance as visual input. This facilitates a learning process. BCI allow us to utilize brain activity in the rehabilitation of patients after stroke. The activity of the cerebral cortex varies with the type...... of movement we imagine, and by letting the patient know the type of brain activity best associated with the intended movement the rehabilitation process may be faster and more efficient. The focus of BCI utilization in medicine has changed in recent years. While we previously focused on devices facilitating...

  13. Concepts of analytical user interface evaluation method for continuous work in NPP main control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. J.; Heo, G. Y.; Jang, S. H.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a conceptual study of analytical evaluation method for computer-based user interface in the main control room of advanced nuclear power plant. User interfaces can classify them into two groups as static interface and dynamic interface. Existing evaluation and design methods of user interface have been mainly performed for the static user interface. But, it is useful for the dynamic user interface to control the complex system, and proper evaluation method for this is seldom. Therefore an evaluation method for dynamic user interface is proper for continuous works by standards of the load of cognition and the similarity of an interface

  14. Brain-Computer Interface-based robotic end effector system for wrist and hand rehabilitation: results of a three-armed randomized controlled trial for chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Keng eAng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of an Electroencephalography (EEG-based Motor Imagery (MI Brain-Computer Interface (BCI coupled with a Haptic Knob (HK robot for arm rehabilitation in stroke patients. In this three-arm, single-blind, randomized controlled trial; 21 chronic hemiplegic stroke patients (Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment (FMMA score 10-50, recruited after pre-screening for MI BCI ability, were randomly allocated to BCI-HK, HK or Standard Arm Therapy (SAT groups. All groups received 18 sessions of intervention over 6 weeks, 3 sessions per week, 90 minutes per session. The BCI-HK group received 1 hour of BCI coupled with HK intervention, and the HK group received 1 hour of HK intervention per session. Both BCI-HK and HK groups received 120 trials of robot-assisted hand grasping and knob manipulation followed by 30 minutes of therapist-assisted arm mobilization. The SAT group received 1.5 hours of therapist-assisted arm mobilization and forearm pronation-supination movements incorporating wrist control and grasp-release functions. In all, 14 males, 7 females, mean age 54.2 years, mean stroke duration 385.1 days, with baseline FMMA score 27.0 were recruited. The primary outcome measure was upper-extremity FMMA scores measured mid-intervention at week 3, end-intervention at week 6, and follow-up at weeks 12 and 24. Seven, 8 and 7 subjects underwent BCI-HK, HK and SAT interventions respectively. FMMA score improved in all groups, but no intergroup differences were found at any time points. Significantly larger motor gains were observed in the BCI-HK group compared to the SAT group at weeks 3, 12 and 24, but motor gains in the HK group did not differ from the SAT group at any time point. In conclusion, BCI-HK is effective, safe, and may have the potential for enhancing motor recovery in chronic stroke when combined with therapist-assisted arm mobilization.

  15. Brain-computer interface-based robotic end effector system for wrist and hand rehabilitation: results of a three-armed randomized controlled trial for chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Kai Keng; Guan, Cuntai; Phua, Kok Soon; Wang, Chuanchu; Zhou, Longjiang; Tang, Ka Yin; Ephraim Joseph, Gopal J; Kuah, Christopher Wee Keong; Chua, Karen Sui Geok

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of an Electroencephalography (EEG)-based Motor Imagery (MI) Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) coupled with a Haptic Knob (HK) robot for arm rehabilitation in stroke patients. In this three-arm, single-blind, randomized controlled trial; 21 chronic hemiplegic stroke patients (Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment (FMMA) score 10-50), recruited after pre-screening for MI BCI ability, were randomly allocated to BCI-HK, HK or Standard Arm Therapy (SAT) groups. All groups received 18 sessions of intervention over 6 weeks, 3 sessions per week, 90 min per session. The BCI-HK group received 1 h of BCI coupled with HK intervention, and the HK group received 1 h of HK intervention per session. Both BCI-HK and HK groups received 120 trials of robot-assisted hand grasping and knob manipulation followed by 30 min of therapist-assisted arm mobilization. The SAT group received 1.5 h of therapist-assisted arm mobilization and forearm pronation-supination movements incorporating wrist control and grasp-release functions. In all, 14 males, 7 females, mean age 54.2 years, mean stroke duration 385.1 days, with baseline FMMA score 27.0 were recruited. The primary outcome measure was upper extremity FMMA scores measured mid-intervention at week 3, end-intervention at week 6, and follow-up at weeks 12 and 24. Seven, 8 and 7 subjects underwent BCI-HK, HK and SAT interventions respectively. FMMA score improved in all groups, but no intergroup differences were found at any time points. Significantly larger motor gains were observed in the BCI-HK group compared to the SAT group at weeks 3, 12, and 24, but motor gains in the HK group did not differ from the SAT group at any time point. In conclusion, BCI-HK is effective, safe, and may have the potential for enhancing motor recovery in chronic stroke when combined with therapist-assisted arm mobilization.

  16. Spent Nuclear Fuel project interface control plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    This implementation process philosophy is in keeping with the ongoing reengineering of the WHC Controlled Manuals to achieve interface control within the SNF Project. This plan applies to all SNF Project sub-project to sub-project, and sub-project to exteranl (both on and off the Hanford Site) interfaces

  17. The brain-computer interface cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gerven, Marcel; Farquhar, Jason; Schaefer, Rebecca; Vlek, Rutger; Geuze, Jeroen; Nijholt, Anton; Ramsey, Nick; Haselager, Pim; Vuurpijl, Louis; Gielen, Stan; Desain, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have attracted much attention recently, triggered by new scientific progress in understanding brain function and by impressive applications. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the various steps in the BCI cycle, i.e., the loop from the measurement of brain activity, classification of data, feedback to the subject and the effect of feedback on brain activity. In this article we will review the critical steps of the BCI cycle, the present issues and state-of-the-art results. Moreover, we will develop a vision on how recently obtained results may contribute to new insights in neurocognition and, in particular, in the neural representation of perceived stimuli, intended actions and emotions. Now is the right time to explore what can be gained by embracing real-time, online BCI and by adding it to the set of experimental tools already available to the cognitive neuroscientist. We close by pointing out some unresolved issues and present our view on how BCI could become an important new tool for probing human cognition.

  18. Towards psychologically adaptive brain-computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrden, A.; Chau, T.

    2016-12-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interface (BCI) performance is sensitive to short-term changes in psychological states such as fatigue, frustration, and attention. This paper explores the design of a BCI that can adapt to these short-term changes. Approach. Eleven able-bodied individuals participated in a study during which they used a mental task-based EEG-BCI to play a simple maze navigation game while self-reporting their perceived levels of fatigue, frustration, and attention. In an offline analysis, a regression algorithm was trained to predict changes in these states, yielding Pearson correlation coefficients in excess of 0.45 between the self-reported and predicted states. Two means of fusing the resultant mental state predictions with mental task classification were investigated. First, single-trial mental state predictions were used to predict correct classification by the BCI during each trial. Second, an adaptive BCI was designed that retrained a new classifier for each testing sample using only those training samples for which predicted mental state was similar to that predicted for the current testing sample. Main results. Mental state-based prediction of BCI reliability exceeded chance levels. The adaptive BCI exhibited significant, but practically modest, increases in classification accuracy for five of 11 participants and no significant difference for the remaining six despite a smaller average training set size. Significance. Collectively, these findings indicate that adaptation to psychological state may allow the design of more accurate BCIs.

  19. Near infrared spectroscopy based brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganatha, Sitaram; Hoshi, Yoko; Guan, Cuntai

    2005-04-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) provides users with an alternative output channel other than the normal output path of the brain. BCI is being given much attention recently as an alternate mode of communication and control for the disabled, such as patients suffering from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) or "locked-in". BCI may also find applications in military, education and entertainment. Most of the existing BCI systems which rely on the brain's electrical activity use scalp EEG signals. The scalp EEG is an inherently noisy and non-linear signal. The signal is detrimentally affected by various artifacts such as the EOG, EMG, ECG and so forth. EEG is cumbersome to use in practice, because of the need for applying conductive gel, and the need for the subject to be immobile. There is an urgent need for a more accessible interface that uses a more direct measure of cognitive function to control an output device. The optical response of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) denoting brain activation can be used as an alternative to electrical signals, with the intention of developing a more practical and user-friendly BCI. In this paper, a new method of brain-computer interface (BCI) based on NIRS is proposed. Preliminary results of our experiments towards developing this system are reported.

  20. Encoder-decoder optimization for brain-computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merel, Josh; Pianto, Donald M; Cunningham, John P; Paninski, Liam

    2015-06-01

    Neuroprosthetic brain-computer interfaces are systems that decode neural activity into useful control signals for effectors, such as a cursor on a computer screen. It has long been recognized that both the user and decoding system can adapt to increase the accuracy of the end effector. Co-adaptation is the process whereby a user learns to control the system in conjunction with the decoder adapting to learn the user's neural patterns. We provide a mathematical framework for co-adaptation and relate co-adaptation to the joint optimization of the user's control scheme ("encoding model") and the decoding algorithm's parameters. When the assumptions of that framework are respected, co-adaptation cannot yield better performance than that obtainable by an optimal initial choice of fixed decoder, coupled with optimal user learning. For a specific case, we provide numerical methods to obtain such an optimized decoder. We demonstrate our approach in a model brain-computer interface system using an online prosthesis simulator, a simple human-in-the-loop pyschophysics setup which provides a non-invasive simulation of the BCI setting. These experiments support two claims: that users can learn encoders matched to fixed, optimal decoders and that, once learned, our approach yields expected performance advantages.

  1. Encoder-decoder optimization for brain-computer interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Merel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprosthetic brain-computer interfaces are systems that decode neural activity into useful control signals for effectors, such as a cursor on a computer screen. It has long been recognized that both the user and decoding system can adapt to increase the accuracy of the end effector. Co-adaptation is the process whereby a user learns to control the system in conjunction with the decoder adapting to learn the user's neural patterns. We provide a mathematical framework for co-adaptation and relate co-adaptation to the joint optimization of the user's control scheme ("encoding model" and the decoding algorithm's parameters. When the assumptions of that framework are respected, co-adaptation cannot yield better performance than that obtainable by an optimal initial choice of fixed decoder, coupled with optimal user learning. For a specific case, we provide numerical methods to obtain such an optimized decoder. We demonstrate our approach in a model brain-computer interface system using an online prosthesis simulator, a simple human-in-the-loop pyschophysics setup which provides a non-invasive simulation of the BCI setting. These experiments support two claims: that users can learn encoders matched to fixed, optimal decoders and that, once learned, our approach yields expected performance advantages.

  2. Integrated computer network high-speed parallel interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, R.B.

    1979-03-01

    As the number and variety of computers within Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Central Computer Facility grows, the need for a standard, high-speed intercomputer interface has become more apparent. This report details the development of a High-Speed Parallel Interface from conceptual through implementation stages to meet current and future needs for large-scle network computing within the Integrated Computer Network. 4 figures

  3. P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI) event-related potentials (ERPs): People with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) vs. age-matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCane, Lynn M; Heckman, Susan M; McFarland, Dennis J; Townsend, George; Mak, Joseph N; Sellers, Eric W; Zeitlin, Debra; Tenteromano, Laura M; Wolpaw, Jonathan R; Vaughan, Theresa M

    2015-11-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) aimed at restoring communication to people with severe neuromuscular disabilities often use event-related potentials (ERPs) in scalp-recorded EEG activity. Up to the present, most research and development in this area has been done in the laboratory with young healthy control subjects. In order to facilitate the development of BCI most useful to people with disabilities, the present study set out to: (1) determine whether people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and healthy, age-matched volunteers (HVs) differ in the speed and accuracy of their ERP-based BCI use; (2) compare the ERP characteristics of these two groups; and (3) identify ERP-related factors that might enable improvement in BCI performance for people with disabilities. Sixteen EEG channels were recorded while people with ALS or healthy age-matched volunteers (HVs) used a P300-based BCI. The subjects with ALS had little or no remaining useful motor control (mean ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised 9.4 (±9.5SD) (range 0-25)). Each subject attended to a target item as the items in a 6×6 visual matrix flashed. The BCI used a stepwise linear discriminant function (SWLDA) to determine the item the user wished to select (i.e., the target item). Offline analyses assessed the latencies, amplitudes, and locations of ERPs to the target and non-target items for people with ALS and age-matched control subjects. BCI accuracy and communication rate did not differ significantly between ALS users and HVs. Although ERP morphology was similar for the two groups, their target ERPs differed significantly in the location and amplitude of the late positivity (P300), the amplitude of the early negativity (N200), and the latency of the late negativity (LN). The differences in target ERP components between people with ALS and age-matched HVs are consistent with the growing recognition that ALS may affect cortical function. The development of BCIs for use by this population may begin

  4. A brain-computer interface based cognitive training system for healthy elderly: a randomized control pilot study for usability and preliminary efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tih-Shih Lee

    Full Text Available Cognitive decline in aging is a pressing issue associated with significant healthcare costs and deterioration in quality of life. Previously, we reported the successful use of a novel brain-computer interface (BCI training system in improving symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Here, we examine the feasibility of the BCI system with a new game that incorporates memory training in improving memory and attention in a pilot sample of healthy elderly. This study investigates the safety, usability and acceptability of our BCI system to elderly, and obtains an efficacy estimate to warrant a phase III trial. Thirty-one healthy elderly were randomized into intervention (n = 15 and waitlist control arms (n = 16. Intervention consisted of an 8-week training comprising 24 half-hour sessions. A usability and acceptability questionnaire was administered at the end of training. Safety was investigated by querying users about adverse events after every session. Efficacy of the system was measured by the change of total score from the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS before and after training. Feedback on the usability and acceptability questionnaire was positive. No adverse events were reported for all participants across all sessions. Though the median difference in the RBANS change scores between arms was not statistically significant, an effect size of 0.6SD was obtained, which reflects potential clinical utility according to Simon's randomized phase II trial design. Pooled data from both arms also showed that the median change in total scores pre and post-training was statistically significant (Mdn = 4.0; p<0.001. Specifically, there were significant improvements in immediate memory (p = 0.038, visuospatial/constructional (p = 0.014, attention (p = 0.039, and delayed memory (p<0.001 scores. Our BCI-based system shows promise in improving memory and attention in healthy

  5. Human-computer interface glove using flexible piezoelectric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Youngsu; Seo, Jeonggyu; Kim, Jun-Sik; Park, Jung-Min

    2017-05-01

    In this note, we propose a human-computer interface glove based on flexible piezoelectric sensors. We select polyvinylidene fluoride as the piezoelectric material for the sensors because of advantages such as a steady piezoelectric characteristic and good flexibility. The sensors are installed in a fabric glove by means of pockets and Velcro bands. We detect changes in the angles of the finger joints from the outputs of the sensors, and use them for controlling a virtual hand that is utilized in virtual object manipulation. To assess the sensing ability of the piezoelectric sensors, we compare the processed angles from the sensor outputs with the real angles from a camera recoding. With good agreement between the processed and real angles, we successfully demonstrate the user interaction system with the virtual hand and interface glove based on the flexible piezoelectric sensors, for four hand motions: fist clenching, pinching, touching, and grasping.

  6. BRAIN-COMPUTER-INTERFACE – SUPPORTED MOTOR IMAGERY TRAININTG FOR PATIENTS WITH HEMIPARESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Mokienko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to assess the feasibility of motor imagery supported brain-computer interface in patients with hemiparesis. 13 patients with central paresis of the hand and 15 healthy volunteers were learning to control EEG-based interface with feedback. No differences on interface control quality were found between patients and healthy subjects. The trainings were accompanied by the desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythm. In patients with cortical damage the source of EEG-activity was dislocated.

  7. A pilot randomized controlled trial using EEG-based brain–computer interface training for a Chinese-speaking group of healthy elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee TS

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tih-Shih Lee,1 Shin Yi Quek,1 Siau Juinn Alexa Goh,1 Rachel Phillips,2 Cuntai Guan,3 Yin Bun Cheung,4 Lei Feng,5 Chuan Chu Wang,3 Zheng Yang Chin,3 Haihong Zhang,3 Jimmy Lee,6 Tze Pin Ng,5 K Ranga Rama Krishnan1 1Department of Neuroscience and Behavioral Disorders, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore; 2Singapore Clinical Research Institute, Singapore; 3Institute for Infocomm Research, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore; 4Centre for Quantitative Medicine, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore; 5Department of Psychological Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 6Department of General Psychiatry/Department of Research, Institute of Mental Health, Singapore Background: There is growing evidence that cognitive training (CT can improve the cognitive functioning of the elderly. CT may be influenced by cultural and linguistic factors, but research examining CT programs has mostly been conducted on Western populations. We have developed an innovative electroencephalography (EEG-based brain–computer interface (BCI CT program that has shown preliminary efficacy in improving cognition in 32 healthy English-speaking elderly adults in Singapore. In this second pilot trial, we examine the acceptability, safety, and preliminary efficacy of our BCI CT program in healthy Chinese-speaking Singaporean elderly.Methods: Thirty-nine elderly participants were randomized into intervention (n=21 and waitlist control (n=18 arms. Intervention consisted of 24 half-hour sessions with our BCI-based CT training system to be completed in 8 weeks; the control arm received the same intervention after an initial 8-week waiting period. At the end of the training, a usability and acceptability questionnaire was administered. Efficacy was measured using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS, which was translated and culturally adapted for the Chinese-speaking local population. Users were asked

  8. Computer control system of TRISTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurokawa, Shin-ichi; Shinomoto, Manabu; Kurihara, Michio; Sakai, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    For the operation of a large accelerator, it is necessary to connect an enormous quantity of electro-magnets, power sources, vacuum equipment, high frequency accelerator and so on and to control them harmoniously. For the purpose, a number of computers are adopted, and connected with a network, in this way, a large computer system for laboratory automation which integrates and controls the whole system is constructed. As a distributed system of large scale, the functions such as electro-magnet control, file processing and operation control are assigned to respective computers, and the total control is made feasible by network connection, at the same time, as the interface with controlled equipment, the CAMAC (computer-aided measurement and control) is adopted to ensure the flexibility and the possibility of expansion of the system. Moreover, the language ''NODAL'' having network support function was developed so as to easily make software without considering the composition of more complex distributed system. The accelerator in the TRISTAN project is composed of an electron linear accelerator, an accumulation ring of 6 GeV and a main ring of 30 GeV. Two ring type accelerators must be synchronously operated as one body, and are controlled with one computer system. The hardware and software are outlined. (Kako, I.)

  9. 200 Area TEDF interface control document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.J.; Hildebrand, R.A.

    1994-11-15

    Because the TEDF does not have any treatment or retention capacity, strict control at the generator interface is essential to operate the TEDF in compliance with good engineering practices, Hanford site requirements, and the 216 Discharge Permit. The information in the Interface Control Document (ICD) forms the basis of understanding between all parties involved in the TEDF; DOE, WHC, and the generating facilities. The ICD defines the controlling document hierarchy; LEF, and generator responsibilities; monitoring and sampling requirements; and specifies the TEDF/Generator Interface points.

  10. 200 Area TEDF interface control document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.J.; Hildebrand, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Because the TEDF does not have any treatment or retention capacity, strict control at the generator interface is essential to operate the TEDF in compliance with good engineering practices, Hanford site requirements, and the 216 Discharge Permit. The information in the Interface Control Document (ICD) forms the basis of understanding between all parties involved in the TEDF; DOE, WHC, and the generating facilities. The ICD defines the controlling document hierarchy; LEF, and generator responsibilities; monitoring and sampling requirements; and specifies the TEDF/Generator Interface points

  11. Human performance interfaces in air traffic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Hern; Yeh, Chung-Hsing

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines how human performance factors in air traffic control (ATC) affect each other through their mutual interactions. The paper extends the conceptual SHEL model of ergonomics to describe the ATC system as human performance interfaces in which the air traffic controllers interact with other human performance factors including other controllers, software, hardware, environment, and organisation. New research hypotheses about the relationships between human performance interfaces of the system are developed and tested on data collected from air traffic controllers, using structural equation modelling. The research result suggests that organisation influences play a more significant role than individual differences or peer influences on how the controllers interact with the software, hardware, and environment of the ATC system. There are mutual influences between the controller-software, controller-hardware, controller-environment, and controller-organisation interfaces of the ATC system, with the exception of the controller-controller interface. Research findings of this study provide practical insights in managing human performance interfaces of the ATC system in the face of internal or external change, particularly in understanding its possible consequences in relation to the interactions between human performance factors.

  12. Mental workload during brain-computer interface training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, Elizabeth A; Williams, Justin C; Vanderheiden, Gregg C; Radwin, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    It is not well understood how people perceive the difficulty of performing brain-computer interface (BCI) tasks, which specific aspects of mental workload contribute the most, and whether there is a difference in perceived workload between participants who are able-bodied and disabled. This study evaluated mental workload using the NASA Task Load Index (TLX), a multi-dimensional rating procedure with six subscales: Mental Demands, Physical Demands, Temporal Demands, Performance, Effort, and Frustration. Able-bodied and motor disabled participants completed the survey after performing EEG-based BCI Fitts' law target acquisition and phrase spelling tasks. The NASA-TLX scores were similar for able-bodied and disabled participants. For example, overall workload scores (range 0-100) for 1D horizontal tasks were 48.5 (SD = 17.7) and 46.6 (SD 10.3), respectively. The TLX can be used to inform the design of BCIs that will have greater usability by evaluating subjective workload between BCI tasks, participant groups, and control modalities. Mental workload of brain-computer interfaces (BCI) can be evaluated with the NASA Task Load Index (TLX). The TLX is an effective tool for comparing subjective workload between BCI tasks, participant groups (able-bodied and disabled), and control modalities. The data can inform the design of BCIs that will have greater usability.

  13. A graphical user-interface control system at SRRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.S.; Wang, C.J.; Chen, S.J.; Jan, G.J.

    1993-01-01

    A graphical user interface control system of 1.3 GeV synchrotron radiation light source was designed and implemented for the beam transport line (BTL) and storage ring (SR). A modern control technique has been used to implement and control the third generation synchrotron light source. Two level computer hardware configuration, that includes process and console computers as a top level and VME based intelligent local controller as a bottom level, was setup and tested. Both level computers are linked by high speed Ethernet data communication network. A database includes static and dynamic databases as well as access routines were developed. In order to commission and operate the machine friendly, the graphical man machine interface was designed and coded. The graphical user interface (GUI) software was installed on VAX workstations for the BTL and SR at the Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (SRRC). The over all performance has been evaluated at 10Hz update rate. The results showed that the graphical operator interface control system is versatile system and can be implemented into the control system of the accelerator. It will provide the tool to control and monitor the equipments of the radiation light source especially for machine commissioning and operation

  14. Towards SSVEP-based, portable, responsive Brain-Computer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Piotr; Salomon, Pawel

    2015-08-01

    A Brain-Computer Interface in motion control application requires high system responsiveness and accuracy. SSVEP interface consisted of 2-8 stimuli and 2 channel EEG amplifier was presented in this paper. The observed stimulus is recognized based on a canonical correlation calculated in 1 second window, ensuring high interface responsiveness. A threshold classifier with hysteresis (T-H) was proposed for recognition purposes. Obtained results suggest that T-H classifier enables to significantly increase classifier performance (resulting in accuracy of 76%, while maintaining average false positive detection rate of stimulus different then observed one between 2-13%, depending on stimulus frequency). It was shown that the parameters of T-H classifier, maximizing true positive rate, can be estimated by gradient-based search since the single maximum was observed. Moreover the preliminary results, performed on a test group (N=4), suggest that for T-H classifier exists a certain set of parameters for which the system accuracy is similar to accuracy obtained for user-trained classifier.

  15. HCIDL: Human-computer interface description language for multi-target, multimodal, plastic user interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamia Gaouar

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available From the human-computer interface perspectives, the challenges to be faced are related to the consideration of new, multiple interactions, and the diversity of devices. The large panel of interactions (touching, shaking, voice dictation, positioning … and the diversification of interaction devices can be seen as a factor of flexibility albeit introducing incidental complexity. Our work is part of the field of user interface description languages. After an analysis of the scientific context of our work, this paper introduces HCIDL, a modelling language staged in a model-driven engineering approach. Among the properties related to human-computer interface, our proposition is intended for modelling multi-target, multimodal, plastic interaction interfaces using user interface description languages. By combining plasticity and multimodality, HCIDL improves usability of user interfaces through adaptive behaviour by providing end-users with an interaction-set adapted to input/output of terminals and, an optimum layout. Keywords: Model driven engineering, Human-computer interface, User interface description languages, Multimodal applications, Plastic user interfaces

  16. A tactile P300 brain-computer interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.M.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2010-01-01

    De werking van de eerste Brain-Computer-Interface gebaseerd op tactiele EEG response wordt gedemonstreerd en het effect van het aantal gebruikte vibro-tactiele tactoren en stimulus-timing parameters wordt onderzocht

  17. From assistance towards restoration with epidural brain-computer interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharabaghi, Alireza; Naros, Georgios; Walter, Armin; Grimm, Florian; Schuermeyer, Marc; Roth, Alexander; Bogdan, Martin; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Birbaumer, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Today's implanted brain-computer interfaces make direct contact with the brain or even penetrate the tissue, bearing additional risks with regard to safety and stability. What is more, these approaches aim to control prosthetic devices as assistive tools and do not yet strive to become rehabilitative tools for restoring lost motor function. We introduced a less invasive, implantable interface by applying epidural electrocorticography in a chronic stroke survivor with a persistent motor deficit. He was trained to modulate his natural motor-related oscillatory brain activity by receiving online feedback. Epidural recordings of field potentials in the beta-frequency band projecting onto the anatomical hand knob proved most successful in discriminating between the attempt to move the paralyzed hand and to rest. These spectral features allowed for fast and reliable control of the feedback device in an online closed-loop paradigm. Only seven training sessions were required to significantly improve maximum wrist extension. For patients suffering from severe motor deficits, epidural implants may decode and train the brain activity generated during attempts to move with high spatial resolution, thus facilitating specific and high-intensity practice even in the absence of motor control. This would thus transform them from pure assistive devices to restorative tools in the context of reinforcement learning and neurorehabilitation.

  18. High Performance Computing - Power Application Programming Interface Specification Version 2.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laros, James H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grant, Ryan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Levenhagen, Michael J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Olivier, Stephen Lecler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pedretti, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ward, H. Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Younge, Andrew J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Measuring and controlling the power and energy consumption of high performance computing systems by various components in the software stack is an active research area. Implementations in lower level software layers are beginning to emerge in some production systems, which is very welcome. To be most effective, a portable interface to measurement and control features would significantly facilitate participation by all levels of the software stack. We present a proposal for a standard power Application Programming Interface (API) that endeavors to cover the entire software space, from generic hardware interfaces to the input from the computer facility manager.

  19. Workshops of the Sixth International Brain–Computer Interface Meeting : brain–computer interfaces past, present, and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huggins, Jane E.; Guger, Christoph; Ziat, Mounia; Zander, Thorsten O.; Taylor, Denise; Tangermann, Michael; Soria-Frisch, Aureli; Simeral, John; Scherer, Reinhold; Rupp, Rüdiger; Ruffini, Giulio; Robinson, Douglas K.R.; Ramsey, Nick F.; Nijholt, Anton; Müller-Putz, Gernot R.; McFarland, Dennis J.; Mattia, Donatella; Lance, Brent J.; Kindermans, Pieter-Jan; Iturrate, Iñaki; Herff, Christian; Gupta, Disha; Do, An H.; Collinger, Jennifer L.; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Chasey, Steven M.; Bleichner, Martin G.; Batista, Aaron; Anderson, Charles W.; Aarnoutse, Erik J.

    2017-01-01

    The Sixth International Brain–Computer Interface (BCI) Meeting was held 30 May–3 June 2016 at the Asilomar Conference Grounds, Pacific Grove, California, USA. The conference included 28 workshops covering topics in BCI and brain–machine interface research. Topics included BCI for specific

  20. A USB 2.0 computer interface for the UCO/Lick CCD cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Mingzhi; Stover, Richard J.

    2004-09-01

    The new UCO/Lick Observatory CCD camera uses a 200 MHz fiber optic cable to transmit image data and an RS232 serial line for low speed bidirectional command and control. Increasingly RS232 is a legacy interface supported on fewer computers. The fiber optic cable requires either a custom interface board that is plugged into the mainboard of the image acquisition computer to accept the fiber directly or an interface converter that translates the fiber data onto a widely used standard interface. We present here a simple USB 2.0 interface for the UCO/Lick camera. A single USB cable connects to the image acquisition computer and the camera's RS232 serial and fiber optic cables plug into the USB interface. Since most computers now support USB 2.0 the Lick interface makes it possible to use the camera on essentially any modern computer that has the supporting software. No hardware modifications or additions to the computer are needed. The necessary device driver software has been written for the Linux operating system which is now widely used at Lick Observatory. The complete data acquisition software for the Lick CCD camera is running on a variety of PC style computers as well as an HP laptop.

  1. Manufacturing and application of micro computer for control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung Man; Heo, Gyeong; Yun, Jun Young

    1990-05-01

    This book deals with machine code and assembly program for micro computer. It composed of 20 chapters, which are micro computer system, practice of a storage cell, manufacturing 1 of micro computer, manufacturing 2 of micro computer, manufacturing of micro computer AID-80A, making of machine language, interface like Z80-PIO and 8255A(PPI), counter and timer interface, exercise of basic command, arithmetic operation, arrangement operation, an indicator control, music playing, detection of input of PIO. control of LED of PIO, PIO mode, CTC control by micro computer, SIO control by micro computer and application by micro computer.

  2. A brain-computer interface to support functional recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaer, Troels W; Sørensen, Helge B

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) register changes in brain activity and utilize this to control computers. The most widely used method is based on registration of electrical signals from the cerebral cortex using extracranially placed electrodes also called electroencephalography (EEG). The features extracted from the EEG may, besides controlling the computer, also be fed back to the patient for instance as visual input. This facilitates a learning process. BCI allow us to utilize brain activity in the rehabilitation of patients after stroke. The activity of the cerebral cortex varies with the type of movement we imagine, and by letting the patient know the type of brain activity best associated with the intended movement the rehabilitation process may be faster and more efficient. The focus of BCI utilization in medicine has changed in recent years. While we previously focused on devices facilitating communication in the rather few patients with locked-in syndrome, much interest is now devoted to the therapeutic use of BCI in rehabilitation. For this latter group of patients, the device is not intended to be a lifelong assistive companion but rather a 'teacher' during the rehabilitation period. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. DIII-D Neutral Beam control system operator interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.J.; Campbell, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    A centralized graphical user interface has been added to the DIII-D Neutral Beam (NB) control systems for status monitoring and remote control applications. This user interface provides for automatic data acquisition, alarm detection and supervisory control of the four NB programmable logic controllers (PLC) as well as the Mode Control PLC. These PLCs are used for interlocking, control and status of the NB vacuum pumping, gas delivery, and water cooling systems as well as beam mode status and control. The system allows for both a friendly user interface as well as a safe and convenient method of communicating with remote hardware that formerly required interns to access. In the future, to enable high level of control of PLC subsystems, complete procedures is written and executed at the touch of a screen control panel button. The system consists of an IBM compatible 486 computer running the FIX DMACS trademark for Windows trademark data acquisition and control interface software, a Texas Instruments/Siemens communication card and Phoenix Digital optical communications modules. Communication is achieved via the TIWAY (Texas Instruments protocol link utilizing both fiber optic communications and a copper local area network (LAN). Hardware and software capabilities will be reviewed. Data and alarm reporting, extended monitoring and control capabilities will also be discussed

  4. Engineering brain-computer interfaces: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, M A

    2014-06-01

    Electricity governs the function of both nervous systems and computers. Whilst ions move in polar fluids to depolarize neuronal membranes, electrons move in the solid-state lattices of microelectronic semiconductors. Joining these two systems together, to create an iono-electric brain-computer interface, is an immense challenge. However, such interfaces offer (and in select clinical contexts have already delivered) a method of overcoming disability caused by neurological or musculoskeletal pathology. To fulfill their theoretical promise, several specific challenges demand consideration. Rate-limiting steps cover a diverse range of disciplines including microelectronics, neuro-informatics, engineering, and materials science. As those who work at the tangible interface between brain and outside world, neurosurgeons are well placed to contribute to, and inform, this cutting edge area of translational research. This article explores the historical background, status quo, and future of brain-computer interfaces; and outlines the challenges to progress and opportunities available to the clinical neurosciences community.

  5. Brain-Computer Interfaces : Beyond Medical Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Lotte, F.; Tangermann, M.

    2012-01-01

    Brain-computer interaction has already moved from assistive care to applications such as gaming. Improvements in usability, hardware, signal processing, and system integration should yield applications in other nonmedical areas.

  6. Development and functional demonstration of a wireless intraoral inductive tongue computer interface for severely disabled persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N S Andreasen Struijk, Lotte; Lontis, Eugen R; Gaihede, Michael; Caltenco, Hector A; Lund, Morten Enemark; Schioeler, Henrik; Bentsen, Bo

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with tetraplegia depend on alternative interfaces in order to control computers and other electronic equipment. Current interfaces are often limited in the number of available control commands, and may compromise the social identity of an individual due to their undesirable appearance. The purpose of this study was to implement an alternative computer interface, which was fully embedded into the oral cavity and which provided multiple control commands. The development of a wireless, intraoral, inductive tongue computer was described. The interface encompassed a 10-key keypad area and a mouse pad area. This system was embedded wirelessly into the oral cavity of the user. The functionality of the system was demonstrated in two tetraplegic individuals and two able-bodied individuals Results: The system was invisible during use and allowed the user to type on a computer using either the keypad area or the mouse pad. The maximal typing rate was 1.8 s for repetitively typing a correct character with the keypad area and 1.4 s for repetitively typing a correct character with the mouse pad area. The results suggest that this inductive tongue computer interface provides an esthetically acceptable and functionally efficient environmental control for a severely disabled user. Implications for Rehabilitation New Design, Implementation and detection methods for intra oral assistive devices. Demonstration of wireless, powering and encapsulation techniques suitable for intra oral embedment of assistive devices. Demonstration of the functionality of a rechargeable and fully embedded intra oral tongue controlled computer input device.

  7. Personal computers in accelerator control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderssen, P.S.

    1988-01-01

    The advent of the personal computer has created a popular movement which has also made a strong impact on science and engineering. Flexible software environments combined with good computational performance and large storage capacities are becoming available at steadily decreasing costs. Of equal importance, however, is the quality of the user interface offered on many of these products. Graphics and screen interaction is available in ways that were only possible on specialized systems before. Accelerator engineers were quick to pick up the new technology. The first applications were probably for controllers and data gatherers for beam measurement equipment. Others followed, and today it is conceivable to make personal computer a standard component of an accelerator control system. This paper reviews the experience gained at CERN so far and describes the approach taken in the design of the common control center for the SPS and the future LEP accelerators. The design goal has been to be able to integrate personal computers into the accelerator control system and to build the operator's workplace around it. (orig.)

  8. The Impact of User Interface on Young Children's Computational Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugnali, Alex; Sullivan, Amanda; Bers, Marina Umaschi

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: Over the past few years, new approaches to introducing young children to computational thinking have grown in popularity. This paper examines the role that user interfaces have on children's mastery of computational thinking concepts and positive interpersonal behaviors. Background: There is a growing pressure to begin teaching…

  9. Development and evaluation of a head-controlled human-computer interface with mouse-like functions for physically disabled users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Martins Pereira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to develop a pointing device controlled by head movement that had the same functions as a conventional mouse and to evaluate the performance of the proposed device when operated by quadriplegic users. METHODS: Ten individuals with cervical spinal cord injury participated in functional evaluations of the developed pointing device. The device consisted of a video camera, computer software, and a target attached to the front part of a cap, which was placed on the user's head. The software captured images of the target coming from the video camera and processed them with the aim of determining the displacement from the center of the target and correlating this with the movement of the computer cursor. Evaluation of the interaction between each user and the proposed device was carried out using 24 multidirectional tests with two degrees of difficulty. RESULTS: According to the parameters of mean throughput and movement time, no statistically significant differences were observed between the repetitions of the tests for either of the studied levels of difficulty. CONCLUSIONS: The developed pointing device adequately emulates the movement functions of the computer cursor. It is easy to use and can be learned quickly when operated by quadriplegic individuals.

  10. Distributed user interfaces for clinical ubiquitous computing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bång, Magnus; Larsson, Anders; Berglund, Erik; Eriksson, Henrik

    2005-08-01

    Ubiquitous computing with multiple interaction devices requires new interface models that support user-specific modifications to applications and facilitate the fast development of active workspaces. We have developed NOSTOS, a computer-augmented work environment for clinical personnel to explore new user interface paradigms for ubiquitous computing. NOSTOS uses several devices such as digital pens, an active desk, and walk-up displays that allow the system to track documents and activities in the workplace. We present the distributed user interface (DUI) model that allows standalone applications to distribute their user interface components to several devices dynamically at run-time. This mechanism permit clinicians to develop their own user interfaces and forms to clinical information systems to match their specific needs. We discuss the underlying technical concepts of DUIs and show how service discovery, component distribution, events and layout management are dealt with in the NOSTOS system. Our results suggest that DUIs--and similar network-based user interfaces--will be a prerequisite of future mobile user interfaces and essential to develop clinical multi-device environments.

  11. Brain-machine and brain-computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friehs, Gerhard M; Zerris, Vasilios A; Ojakangas, Catherine L; Fellows, Mathew R; Donoghue, John P

    2004-11-01

    The idea of connecting the human brain to a computer or machine directly is not novel and its potential has been explored in science fiction. With the rapid advances in the areas of information technology, miniaturization and neurosciences there has been a surge of interest in turning fiction into reality. In this paper the authors review the current state-of-the-art of brain-computer and brain-machine interfaces including neuroprostheses. The general principles and requirements to produce a successful connection between human and artificial intelligence are outlined and the authors' preliminary experience with a prototype brain-computer interface is reported.

  12. Brain-computer interface for alertness estimation and improving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hramov, Alexander; Maksimenko, Vladimir; Hramova, Marina

    2018-02-01

    Using wavelet analysis of the signals of electrical brain activity (EEG), we study the processes of neural activity, associated with perception of visual stimuli. We demonstrate that the brain can process visual stimuli in two scenarios: (i) perception is characterized by destruction of the alpha-waves and increase in the high-frequency (beta) activity, (ii) the beta-rhythm is not well pronounced, while the alpha-wave energy remains unchanged. The special experiments show that the motivation factor initiates the first scenario, explained by the increasing alertness. Based on the obtained results we build the brain-computer interface and demonstrate how the degree of the alertness can be estimated and controlled in real experiment.

  13. Interfacing the Paramesh Computational Libraries to the Cactus Computational Framework, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We will design and implement an interface between the Paramesh computational libraries, developed and used by groups at NASA GSFC, and the Cactus computational...

  14. Evaluating a multi-player brain-computer interface game: challenge versus co-experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gürkök, Hayrettin; Volpe, G; Reidsma, Dennis; Poel, Mannes; Camurri, A.; Obbink, Michel; Nijholt, Antinus

    2013-01-01

    Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) have started to be considered as game controllers. The low level of control they provide prevents them from providing perfect control but allows the design of challenging games which can be enjoyed by players. Evaluation of enjoyment, or user experience (UX), is

  15. Human-Computer Interfaces for Wearable Computers: A Systematic Approach to Development and Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Witt, Hendrik

    2007-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis examines user interfaces for wearable computers.Wearable computers are a special kind of mobile computers that can be worn on the body. Furthermore, they integrate themselves even more seamlessly into different activities than a mobile phone or a personal digital assistant can.The thesis investigates the development and evaluation of user interfaces for wearable computers. In particular, it presents fundamental research results as well as supporting softw...

  16. Computer-Based Tools for Evaluating Graphical User Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Loretta A.

    1997-01-01

    The user interface is the component of a software system that connects two very complex system: humans and computers. Each of these two systems impose certain requirements on the final product. The user is the judge of the usability and utility of the system; the computer software and hardware are the tools with which the interface is constructed. Mistakes are sometimes made in designing and developing user interfaces because the designers and developers have limited knowledge about human performance (e.g., problem solving, decision making, planning, and reasoning). Even those trained in user interface design make mistakes because they are unable to address all of the known requirements and constraints on design. Evaluation of the user inter-face is therefore a critical phase of the user interface development process. Evaluation should not be considered the final phase of design; but it should be part of an iterative design cycle with the output of evaluation being feed back into design. The goal of this research was to develop a set of computer-based tools for objectively evaluating graphical user interfaces. The research was organized into three phases. The first phase resulted in the development of an embedded evaluation tool which evaluates the usability of a graphical user interface based on a user's performance. An expert system to assist in the design and evaluation of user interfaces based upon rules and guidelines was developed during the second phase. During the final phase of the research an automatic layout tool to be used in the initial design of graphical inter- faces was developed. The research was coordinated with NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Mission Operations Laboratory's efforts in developing onboard payload display specifications for the Space Station.

  17. New generation of 3D desktop computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerjanc, Robert; Pastoor, Siegmund

    1997-05-01

    Today's computer interfaces use 2-D displays showing windows, icons and menus and support mouse interactions for handling programs and data files. The interface metaphor is that of a writing desk with (partly) overlapping sheets of documents placed on its top. Recent advances in the development of 3-D display technology give the opportunity to take the interface concept a radical stage further by breaking the design limits of the desktop metaphor. The major advantage of the envisioned 'application space' is, that it offers an additional, immediately perceptible dimension to clearly and constantly visualize the structure and current state of interrelations between documents, videos, application programs and networked systems. In this context, we describe the development of a visual operating system (VOS). Under VOS, applications appear as objects in 3-D space. Users can (graphically connect selected objects to enable communication between the respective applications. VOS includes a general concept of visual and object oriented programming for tasks ranging from, e.g., low-level programming up to high-level application configuration. In order to enable practical operation in an office or at home for many hours, the system should be very comfortable to use. Since typical 3-D equipment used, e.g., in virtual-reality applications (head-mounted displays, data gloves) is rather cumbersome and straining, we suggest to use off-head displays and contact-free interaction techniques. In this article, we introduce an autostereoscopic 3-D display and connected video based interaction techniques which allow viewpoint-depending imaging (by head tracking) and visually controlled modification of data objects and links (by gaze tracking, e.g., to pick, 3-D objects just by looking at them).

  18. Neuroanatomical correlates of brain-computer interface performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kazumi; DaSalla, Charles Sayo; Honda, Manabu; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2015-04-15

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) offer a potential means to replace or restore lost motor function. However, BCI performance varies considerably between users, the reasons for which are poorly understood. Here we investigated the relationship between sensorimotor rhythm (SMR)-based BCI performance and brain structure. Participants were instructed to control a computer cursor using right- and left-hand motor imagery, which primarily modulated their left- and right-hemispheric SMR powers, respectively. Although most participants were able to control the BCI with success rates significantly above chance level even at the first encounter, they also showed substantial inter-individual variability in BCI success rate. Participants also underwent T1-weighted three-dimensional structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI data were subjected to voxel-based morphometry using BCI success rate as an independent variable. We found that BCI performance correlated with gray matter volume of the supplementary motor area, supplementary somatosensory area, and dorsal premotor cortex. We suggest that SMR-based BCI performance is associated with development of non-primary somatosensory and motor areas. Advancing our understanding of BCI performance in relation to its neuroanatomical correlates may lead to better customization of BCIs based on individual brain structure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Computer organization and design the hardware/software interface

    CERN Document Server

    Hennessy, John L

    1994-01-01

    Computer Organization and Design: The Hardware/Software Interface presents the interaction between hardware and software at a variety of levels, which offers a framework for understanding the fundamentals of computing. This book focuses on the concepts that are the basis for computers.Organized into nine chapters, this book begins with an overview of the computer revolution. This text then explains the concepts and algorithms used in modern computer arithmetic. Other chapters consider the abstractions and concepts in memory hierarchies by starting with the simplest possible cache. This book di

  20. Nimrod 4080 computer - Nixie data system interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.V.

    1977-02-01

    The Injector Control System employs an ADC/multiplexer system to convert analogue data from the various beamline elements and supply this to the Controls CAMAC for numeric (Nixie) display. Facilities were incorporated to allow this data to be sent via a line driver to the Diagnostics CAMAC. This report describes the system developed to acquire and log the Nixie data. (author)

  1. Object oriented programming interfaces for accelerator control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, L.T.

    1997-01-01

    Several years ago, the AGS controls group was given the task of developing software for the RHIC accelerator. Like the AGS, the RHIC control system needs to control and monitor equipment distributed around a relatively large geographic area. A local area network connects this equipment to a collection of UNIX workstations in a central control room. Similar software had been developed for the AGS about a decade earlier, but isn't well suited for RHIC use for a number of reasons. Rather than adapt the AGS software for RHIC use, the controls group opted to start with a clean slate. To develop software that would address the shortcomings of the AGS software, while preserving the useful features that evolved through years of use. A current trend in control system design is to provide an object oriented programming interface for application developers. This talk will discuss important aspects and features of object oriented application programming interfaces (APIs) for accelerator control systems, and explore why such interfaces are becoming the norm

  2. Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface Controls Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josh A. Salmond

    2009-08-07

    The modernization of the Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface (MHC PP OI) consisted of upgrading the antiquated single board computer with a proprietary operating system to off-the-shelf hardware and off-the-shelf software with customizable software options. The pump package is the machine interface between a central heating and cooling system that pumps heat transfer fluid through an injection or compression mold base on a local plastic molding machine. The operator interface provides the intelligent means of controlling this pumping process. Strict temperature control of a mold allows the production of high quality parts with tight tolerances and low residual stresses. The products fabricated are used on multiple programs.

  3. Computer-controlled attenuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitov, D; Grozev, Z

    1991-01-01

    Various possibilities for applying electronic computer-controlled attenuators for the automation of physiological experiments are considered. A detailed description is given of the design of a 4-channel computer-controlled attenuator, in two of the channels of which the output signal can change by a linear step, in the other two channels--by a logarithmic step. This, together with the existence of additional programmable timers, allows to automate a wide range of studies in different spheres of physiology and psychophysics, including vision and hearing.

  4. Frontiers of controlling energy levels at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Norbert

    The alignment of electron energy levels at interfaces between semiconductors, dielectrics, and electrodes determines the function and efficiency of all electronic and optoelectronic devices. Reliable guidelines for predicting the level alignment for a given material combination and methods to adjust the intrinsic energy landscape are needed to enable efficient engineering approaches. These are sufficiently understood for established electronic materials, e.g., Si, but for the increasing number of emerging materials, e.g., organic and 2D semiconductors, perovskites, this is work in progress. The intrinsic level alignment and the underlying mechanisms at interfaces between organic and inorganic semiconductors are discussed first. Next, methods to alter the level alignment are introduced, which all base on proper charge density rearrangement at a heterojunction. As interface modification agents we use molecular electron acceptors and donors, as well as molecular photochromic switches that add a dynamic aspect and allow device multifunctionality. For 2D semiconductors surface transfer doping with molecular acceptors/donors transpires as viable method to locally tune the Fermi-level position in the energy gap. The fundamental electronic properties of a prototypical 1D interface between intrinsic and p-doped 2D semiconductor regions are derived from local (scanning probe) and area-averaged (photoemission) spectroscopy experiments. Future research opportunities for attaining unsurpassed interface control through charge density management are discussed.

  5. An Object-Oriented Graphical User Interface for a Reusable Rocket Engine Intelligent Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Musgrave, Jeffrey L.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Paxson, Daniel E.; Wong, Edmond; Saus, Joseph R.; Merrill, Walter C.

    1994-01-01

    An intelligent control system for reusable rocket engines under development at NASA Lewis Research Center requires a graphical user interface to allow observation of the closed-loop system in operation. The simulation testbed consists of a real-time engine simulation computer, a controls computer, and several auxiliary computers for diagnostics and coordination. The system is set up so that the simulation computer could be replaced by the real engine and the change would be transparent to the control system. Because of the hard real-time requirement of the control computer, putting a graphical user interface on it was not an option. Thus, a separate computer used strictly for the graphical user interface was warranted. An object-oriented LISP-based graphical user interface has been developed on a Texas Instruments Explorer 2+ to indicate the condition of the engine to the observer through plots, animation, interactive graphics, and text.

  6. [Brain-Computer Interface: the First Clinical Experience in Russia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokienko, O A; Lyukmanov, R Kh; Chernikova, L A; Suponeva, N A; Piradov, M A; Frolov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Motor imagery is suggested to stimulate the same plastic mechanisms in the brain as a real movement. The brain-computer interface (BCI) controls motor imagery by converting EEG during this process into the commands for an external device. This article presents the results of two-stage study of the clinical use of non-invasive BCI in the rehabilitation of patients with severe hemiparesis caused by focal brain damage. It was found that the ability to control BCI did not depend on the duration of a disease, brain lesion localization and the degree of neurological deficit. The first step of the study involved 36 patients; it showed that the efficacy of rehabilitation was higher in the group with the use of BCI (the score on the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) improved from 1 [0; 2] to 5 [0; 16] points, p = 0.012; no significant improvement was observed in control group). The second step of the study involved 19 patients; the complex BCI-exoskeleton (i.e. with the kinesthetic feedback) was used for motor imagery trainings. The improvement of the motor function of hands was proved by ARAT (the score improved from 2 [0; 37] to 4 [1; 45:5] points, p = 0.005) and Fugl-Meyer scale (from 72 [63; 110 ] to 79 [68; 115] points, p = 0.005).

  7. Performance monitoring for brain-computer-interface actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurger, Aaron; Gale, Steven; Gozel, Olivia; Blanke, Olaf

    2017-02-01

    When presented with a difficult perceptual decision, human observers are able to make metacognitive judgements of subjective certainty. Such judgements can be made independently of and prior to any overt response to a sensory stimulus, presumably via internal monitoring. Retrospective judgements about one's own task performance, on the other hand, require first that the subject perform a task and thus could potentially be made based on motor processes, proprioceptive, and other sensory feedback rather than internal monitoring. With this dichotomy in mind, we set out to study performance monitoring using a brain-computer interface (BCI), with which subjects could voluntarily perform an action - moving a cursor on a computer screen - without any movement of the body, and thus without somatosensory feedback. Real-time visual feedback was available to subjects during training, but not during the experiment where the true final position of the cursor was only revealed after the subject had estimated where s/he thought it had ended up after 6s of BCI-based cursor control. During the first half of the experiment subjects based their assessments primarily on the prior probability of the end position of the cursor on previous trials. However, during the second half of the experiment subjects' judgements moved significantly closer to the true end position of the cursor, and away from the prior. This suggests that subjects can monitor task performance when the task is performed without overt movement of the body. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Interfacing of home-made photoacoustic spectrometer to computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhobale, A.R.; Chaturvedi, T.P.; Venkiteswaran, S.; Sastry, M.D.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the interfacing of Photo Acoustic Spectrometer (PAS) fabricated in-house to a personal computer. This work was carried out to make a state of the art computer based spectrometer with provision for automatic background correction and also which gives hard copy of the spectrum. This report includes the development of software necessary to acquire data and for further processing of the signal. The monochromator used was modified for obtaining a +5 V pulse for each wavelength position. This pulse was further used for controlling the data acquisition and automatic increment of wavelength. Software program was developed in Quick Basic ver. 4.5 environment for acquisition, storage, display and analysis of the spectrum. The program displays on-line spectrum building up on the monitor. Another program converts the acquired spectrum into a normalized spectrum comparing with carbon spectrum stored already in addition to the S/N ratio improvement. The photo acoustic cell and chopper unit were also modified for improving the performance of the PAS unit. (author). 11 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Papers from the Fifth International Brain-Computer Interface Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Jane E.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2014-06-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), also known as brain-machine interfaces (BMIs), translate brain activity into new outputs that replace, restore, enhance, supplement or improve natural brain outputs. BCI research and development has grown rapidly for the past two decades. It is beginning to provide useful communication and control capacities to people with severe neuromuscular disabilities; and it is expanding into new areas such as neurorehabilitation that may greatly increase its clinical impact. At the same time, significant challenges remain, particularly in regard to translating laboratory advances into clinical use. The papers in this special section report some of the work presented at the Fifth International BCI Meeting held on 3-7 June 2013 at the Asilomar Conference Center in Pacific Grove, California, USA. Like its predecessors over the past 15 years, this meeting was supported by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and a variety of other governmental and private sponsors [1]. This fifth meeting was organized and managed by a program committee of BCI researchers from throughout the world [2]. It retained the distinctive retreat-style format developed by the Wadsworth Center researchers who organized and managed the first four meetings. The 301 attendees came from 165 research groups in 29 countries; 37% were students or postdoctoral fellows. Of more than 200 extended abstracts submitted for peer review, 25 were selected for oral presentation [3], and 181 were presented as posters [4] and published in the open-access conference proceedings [5]. The meeting featured 19 highly interactive workshops [6] covering the broad spectrum of BCI research and development, as well as many demonstrations of BCI systems and associated technology. Like the first four meetings, this one included attendees and embraced topics from across the broad spectrum of disciplines essential to effective BCI research and development, including

  10. The CESR computer control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmke, R.G.; Rice, D.H.; Strohman, C.

    1986-01-01

    The control system for the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has functioned satisfactorily since its implementation in 1979. Key characteristics are fast tuning response, almost exclusive use of FORTRAN as a programming language, and efficient coordinated ramping of CESR guide field elements. This original system has not, however, been able to keep pace with the increasing complexity of operation of CESR associated with performance upgrades. Limitations in address space, expandability, access to data system-wide, and program development impediments have prompted the undertaking of a major upgrade. The system under development accomodates up to 8 VAX computers for all applications programs. The database and communications semaphores reside in a shared multi-ported memory, and each hardware interface bus is controlled by a dedicated 32 bit micro-processor in a VME based system. (orig.)

  11. The Emotiv EPOC interface paradigm in Human-Computer Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Ancău Dorina; Roman Nicolae-Marius; Ancău Mircea

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested the use of decoded error potentials in the brain to improve human-computer communication. Together with state-of-the-art scientific equipment, experiments have also tested instruments with more limited performance for the time being, such as Emotiv EPOC. This study presents a review of these trials and a summary of the results obtained. However, the level of these results indicates a promising prospect for using this headset as a human-computer interface for er...

  12. Competing and collaborating brains: multi-brain computer interfacing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Hassanieu, Aboul Ella; Azar, Ahmad Taher

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we survey the possibilities of brain-computer interface applications that assume two or more users, where at least one of the users’ brain activity is used as input to the application. Such ‘applications’ were already explored by artists who introduced artistic EEG applications in

  13. The Future of Brain-Computer Interfacing (keynote paper)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus

    In this paper we survey some early applications and research on brain-computer interfacing. We emphasize and revalue the role the views on artistic and playful applications have played. In previous years various road maps for BCI research appeared. The interest in medical applications has guided BCI

  14. Preface (to: Towards Practical Brain-Computer Interfaces)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allison, Brendan Z.; Dunne, Stephen; Leeb, Robert; Millán, Jose del R.; Allison, Brendan Z.; Dunne, Stephen; Leeb, Robert; Millán, Jose del R.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2012-01-01

    Brain–computer interface (BCI) research is advancing rapidly. The last few years have seen a dramatic rise in journal publications, academic workshops and conferences, books, new products aimed at both healthy and disabled users, research funding from different sources, and media attention. This

  15. Real-time brain computer interface using imaginary movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Madani, Ahmad; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing; Kjær, Troels W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain Computer Interface (BCI) is the method of transforming mental thoughts and imagination into actions. A real-time BCI system can improve the quality of life of patients with severe neuromuscular disorders by enabling them to communicate with the outside world. In this paper...

  16. Social Interaction in a Cooperative Brain-computer Interface Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obbink, Michel; Gürkök, Hayrettin; Plass - Oude Bos, D.; Hakvoort, Gido; Poel, Mannes; Nijholt, Antinus; Camurri, Antonio; Costa, Cristina

    Does using a brain-computer interface (BCI) influence the social interaction between people when playing a cooperative game? By measuring the amount of speech, utterances, instrumental gestures and empathic gestures during a cooperative game where two participants had to reach a certain goal, and

  17. Tutorial: Signal Processing in Brain-Computer Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Molina, G.

    2010-01-01

    Research in Electroencephalogram (EEG) based Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) has been considerably expanding during the last few years. Such an expansion owes to a large extent to the multidisciplinary and challenging nature of BCI research. Signal processing undoubtedly constitutes an essential

  18. Measuring Emotion Regulation with Single Dry Electrode Brain Computer Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, C.N.; Irrmischer, M.; Guo, Y.; Friston, K.; Faisal, A.; Hill, S.; Peng, H.

    2015-01-01

    Wireless brain computer interfaces (BCI’s) are promising for new intelligent applications in which emotions are detected by measuring brain activity. Applications, such as serious games and video game therapy, are measuring and using the user’s emotional state in order to determine the intensity

  19. Third Workshop on Affective Brain-Computer Interfaces: introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mühl, C.; Chanel, G.; Allison, B.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2013-01-01

    Following the first and second workshop on affective brain-computer interfaces, held in conjunction with ACII in Amsterdam (2009) and Memphis (2011), the third workshop explores the advantages and limitations of using neurophysiological signals for the automatic recognition of affective and

  20. Towards passive brain-computer interfaces: applying brain-computer interface technology to human-machine systems in general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Thorsten O; Kothe, Christian

    2011-04-01

    Cognitive monitoring is an approach utilizing realtime brain signal decoding (RBSD) for gaining information on the ongoing cognitive user state. In recent decades this approach has brought valuable insight into the cognition of an interacting human. Automated RBSD can be used to set up a brain-computer interface (BCI) providing a novel input modality for technical systems solely based on brain activity. In BCIs the user usually sends voluntary and directed commands to control the connected computer system or to communicate through it. In this paper we propose an extension of this approach by fusing BCI technology with cognitive monitoring, providing valuable information about the users' intentions, situational interpretations and emotional states to the technical system. We call this approach passive BCI. In the following we give an overview of studies which utilize passive BCI, as well as other novel types of applications resulting from BCI technology. We especially focus on applications for healthy users, and the specific requirements and demands of this user group. Since the presented approach of combining cognitive monitoring with BCI technology is very similar to the concept of BCIs itself we propose a unifying categorization of BCI-based applications, including the novel approach of passive BCI.

  1. Vibrotactile Feedback for Brain-Computer Interface Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febo Cincotti

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To be correctly mastered, brain-computer interfaces (BCIs need an uninterrupted flow of feedback to the user. This feedback is usually delivered through the visual channel. Our aim was to explore the benefits of vibrotactile feedback during users' training and control of EEG-based BCI applications. A protocol for delivering vibrotactile feedback, including specific hardware and software arrangements, was specified. In three studies with 33 subjects (including 3 with spinal cord injury, we compared vibrotactile and visual feedback, addressing: (I the feasibility of subjects' training to master their EEG rhythms using tactile feedback; (II the compatibility of this form of feedback in presence of a visual distracter; (III the performance in presence of a complex visual task on the same (visual or different (tactile sensory channel. The stimulation protocol we developed supports a general usage of the tactors; preliminary experimentations. All studies indicated that the vibrotactile channel can function as a valuable feedback modality with reliability comparable to the classical visual feedback. Advantages of using a vibrotactile feedback emerged when the visual channel was highly loaded by a complex task. In all experiments, vibrotactile feedback felt, after some training, more natural for both controls and SCI users.

  2. Personal computer interface for temmperature measuring in the cutting process with turning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trajchevski, Neven; Filipovski, Velimir; Kuzinonovski, Mikolaj

    2004-01-01

    The computer development aided reserch systems in the investigations of the characteristics of the surface layar forms conditions for decreasing of the measuring uncertainty. Especially important is the fact that the usage of open and self made measuring systems accomplishes the demands for a total control of the research process. This paper describes an original personal computer interface which is used in the newly built computer aided reserrch system for temperatute measuring in the machining with turning. This interface consists of optically-coupled linear isolation amplifier and an analog to digital (A/D) converter. It is designed for measuring of the themo- voltage that is a generated from the natural thermocouple workpiece-cutting tool. That is achived by digitalizing the value of the thermo-voltage in data which is transmitted to the personal computer. The interface realization is a result of the research activity of the faculty of Mechanical Engineering and the Faculty of Electrical Engineering in Skopje.

  3. BCILAB: a platform for brain-computer interface development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothe, Christian Andreas; Makeig, Scott

    2013-10-01

    Objective. The past two decades have seen dramatic progress in our ability to model brain signals recorded by electroencephalography, functional near-infrared spectroscopy, etc., and to derive real-time estimates of user cognitive state, response, or intent for a variety of purposes: to restore communication by the severely disabled, to effect brain-actuated control and, more recently, to augment human-computer interaction. Continuing these advances, largely achieved through increases in computational power and methods, requires software tools to streamline the creation, testing, evaluation and deployment of new data analysis methods. Approach. Here we present BCILAB, an open-source MATLAB-based toolbox built to address the need for the development and testing of brain-computer interface (BCI) methods by providing an organized collection of over 100 pre-implemented methods and method variants, an easily extensible framework for the rapid prototyping of new methods, and a highly automated framework for systematic testing and evaluation of new implementations. Main results. To validate and illustrate the use of the framework, we present two sample analyses of publicly available data sets from recent BCI competitions and from a rapid serial visual presentation task. We demonstrate the straightforward use of BCILAB to obtain results compatible with the current BCI literature. Significance. The aim of the BCILAB toolbox is to provide the BCI community a powerful toolkit for methods research and evaluation, thereby helping to accelerate the pace of innovation in the field, while complementing the existing spectrum of tools for real-time BCI experimentation, deployment and use.

  4. General man-machine interface used in accelerators controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutheon, M.; Di Maio, F.; Pace, A.

    1992-01-01

    A large community is now using Workstations as Accelerators Computer Controls Interface, through the concepts of windows - menus - synoptics - icons. Some standards were established for the CERN-PS control systems rejuvenation. The Booster-to-PS transfer and injection process is now entirely operated with these tools. This application constitutes a global environment providing the users with the controls, analysis, visualization of a part of an accelerator. Individual commands, measurements, and specialized programs including complex treatments are available in a homogeneous frame. Some months of experience in current operation have shown that this model can be extended to the whole project. (author)

  5. Wireless infrared computer control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, George C.; He, Xiaofei

    2004-04-01

    Wireless mouse is not restricted by cable"s length and has advantage over its wired counterpart. However, all the mice available in the market have detection range less than 2 meters and angular coverage less than 180 degrees. Furthermore, commercial infrared mice are based on track ball and rollers to detect movements. This restricts them to be used in those occasions where users want to have dynamic movement, such as presentations and meetings etc. This paper presents our newly developed infrared wireless mouse, which has a detection range of 6 meters and angular coverage of 180 degrees. This new mouse uses buttons instead of traditional track ball and is developed to be a hand-held device like remote controller. It enables users to control cursor with a distance closed to computer and the mouse to be free from computer operation.

  6. Ownership and Agency of an Independent Supernumerary Hand Induced by an Imitation Brain-Computer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashford, Luke; Mehring, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    To study body ownership and control, illusions that elicit these feelings in non-body objects are widely used. Classically introduced with the Rubber Hand Illusion, these illusions have been replicated more recently in virtual reality and by using brain-computer interfaces. Traditionally these illusions investigate the replacement of a body part by an artificial counterpart, however as brain-computer interface research develops it offers us the possibility to explore the case where non-body objects are controlled in addition to movements of our own limbs. Therefore we propose a new illusion designed to test the feeling of ownership and control of an independent supernumerary hand. Subjects are under the impression they control a virtual reality hand via a brain-computer interface, but in reality there is no causal connection between brain activity and virtual hand movement but correct movements are observed with 80% probability. These imitation brain-computer interface trials are interspersed with movements in both the subjects' real hands, which are in view throughout the experiment. We show that subjects develop strong feelings of ownership and control over the third hand, despite only receiving visual feedback with no causal link to the actual brain signals. Our illusion is crucially different from previously reported studies as we demonstrate independent ownership and control of the third hand without loss of ownership in the real hands.

  7. Propulsion controlled aircraft computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, easily retrofit Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) system for use on a wide range of commercial and military aircraft consists of an propulsion controlled aircraft computer that reads in aircraft data including aircraft state, pilot commands and other related data, calculates aircraft throttle position for a given maneuver commanded by the pilot, and then displays both current and calculated throttle position on a cockpit display to show the pilot where to move throttles to achieve the commanded maneuver, or is automatically sent digitally to command the engines directly.

  8. A visual interface to computer programs for linkage analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, C J

    1990-06-01

    This paper describes a visual approach to the input of information about human families into computer data bases, making use of the GEM graphic interface on the Atari ST. Similar approaches could be used on the Apple Macintosh or on the IBM PC AT (to which it has been transferred). For occasional users of pedigree analysis programs, this approach has considerable advantages in ease of use and accessibility. An example of such use might be the analysis of risk in families with Huntington disease using linked RFLPs. However, graphic interfaces do make much greater demands on the programmers of these systems.

  9. APPLYING ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE TECHNIQUES TO HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERFACES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of UIMS (User Interface Management System), a system using a variety of artificial intelligence techniques to build knowledge-based user interfaces combining functionality and information from a variety of computer systems that maintain, test, and configure customer telephone...... and data networks. Three artificial intelligence (AI) techniques used in UIMS are discussed, namely, frame representation, object-oriented programming languages, and rule-based systems. The UIMS architecture is presented, and the structure of the UIMS is explained in terms of the AI techniques....

  10. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System upgrade distributed control and front end computer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) control system was upgraded in 1991 to improve control and provide a graphical operator interface. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper briefly describes the Cover Gas Cleanup System and the overall control system; gives reasons behind the computer system structure; and then gives a detailed description of the distributed control computer, the front end computer, and how these computers interact with the main control computer. The descriptions cover both hardware and software

  11. [The current state of the brain-computer interface problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurkhay, V A; Aleksandrova, E V; Potapov, A A; Goryainov, S A

    2015-01-01

    It was only 40 years ago that the first PC appeared. Over this period, rather short in historical terms, we have witnessed the revolutionary changes in lives of individuals and the entire society. Computer technologies are tightly connected with any field, either directly or indirectly. We can currently claim that computers are manifold superior to a human mind in terms of a number of parameters; however, machines lack the key feature: they are incapable of independent thinking (like a human). However, the key to successful development of humankind is collaboration between the brain and the computer rather than competition. Such collaboration when a computer broadens, supplements, or replaces some brain functions is known as the brain-computer interface. Our review focuses on real-life implementation of this collaboration.

  12. Sequenced subjective accents for brain-computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlek, R. J.; Schaefer, R. S.; Gielen, C. C. A. M.; Farquhar, J. D. R.; Desain, P.

    2011-06-01

    Subjective accenting is a cognitive process in which identical auditory pulses at an isochronous rate turn into the percept of an accenting pattern. This process can be voluntarily controlled, making it a candidate for communication from human user to machine in a brain-computer interface (BCI) system. In this study we investigated whether subjective accenting is a feasible paradigm for BCI and how its time-structured nature can be exploited for optimal decoding from non-invasive EEG data. Ten subjects perceived and imagined different metric patterns (two-, three- and four-beat) superimposed on a steady metronome. With an offline classification paradigm, we classified imagined accented from non-accented beats on a single trial (0.5 s) level with an average accuracy of 60.4% over all subjects. We show that decoding of imagined accents is also possible with a classifier trained on perception data. Cyclic patterns of accents and non-accents were successfully decoded with a sequence classification algorithm. Classification performances were compared by means of bit rate. Performance in the best scenario translates into an average bit rate of 4.4 bits min-1 over subjects, which makes subjective accenting a promising paradigm for an online auditory BCI.

  13. Brain-computer interfacing under distraction: an evaluation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Stephanie; Frølich, Laura; Höhne, Johannes; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Samek, Wojciech

    2016-10-01

    Objective. While motor-imagery based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have been studied over many years by now, most of these studies have taken place in controlled lab settings. Bringing BCI technology into everyday life is still one of the main challenges in this field of research. Approach. This paper systematically investigates BCI performance under 6 types of distractions that mimic out-of-lab environments. Main results. We report results of 16 participants and show that the performance of the standard common spatial patterns (CSP) + regularized linear discriminant analysis classification pipeline drops significantly in this ‘simulated’ out-of-lab setting. We then investigate three methods for improving the performance: (1) artifact removal, (2) ensemble classification, and (3) a 2-step classification approach. While artifact removal does not enhance the BCI performance significantly, both ensemble classification and the 2-step classification combined with CSP significantly improve the performance compared to the standard procedure. Significance. Systematically analyzing out-of-lab scenarios is crucial when bringing BCI into everyday life. Algorithms must be adapted to overcome nonstationary environments in order to tackle real-world challenges.

  14. Quantitative analysis of task selection for brain-computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llera, Alberto; Gómez, Vicenç; Kappen, Hilbert J.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. To assess quantitatively the impact of task selection in the performance of brain-computer interfaces (BCI). Approach. We consider the task-pairs derived from multi-class BCI imagery movement tasks in three different datasets. We analyze for the first time the benefits of task selection on a large-scale basis (109 users) and evaluate the possibility of transferring task-pair information across days for a given subject. Main results. Selecting the subject-dependent optimal task-pair among three different imagery movement tasks results in approximately 20% potential increase in the number of users that can be expected to control a binary BCI. The improvement is observed with respect to the best task-pair fixed across subjects. The best task-pair selected for each subject individually during a first day of recordings is generally a good task-pair in subsequent days. In general, task learning from the user side has a positive influence in the generalization of the optimal task-pair, but special attention should be given to inexperienced subjects. Significance. These results add significant evidence to existing literature that advocates task selection as a necessary step towards usable BCIs. This contribution motivates further research focused on deriving adaptive methods for task selection on larger sets of mental tasks in practical online scenarios.

  15. fNIRS-based brain-computer interfaces: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noman eNaseer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A brain-computer interface (BCI is a communication system that allows the use of brain activity to control computers or other external devices. It can, by bypassing the peripheral nervous system, provide a means of communication for people suffering from severe motor disabilities or in a persistent vegetative state. In this paper, brain-signal generation tasks, noise removal methods, feature extraction/selection schemes, and classification techniques for fNIRS-based BCI are reviewed. The most common brain areas for fNIRS BCI are the primary motor cortex and the prefrontal cortex. In relation to the motor cortex, motor imagery tasks were preferred to motor execution tasks since possible proprioceptive feedback could be avoided. In relation to the prefrontal cortex, fNIRS showed a significant advantage due to no hair in detecting the cognitive tasks like mental arithmetic, music imagery, emotion induction, etc. In removing physiological noise in fNIRS data, band-pass filtering was mostly used. However, more advanced techniques like adaptive filtering, independent component analysis, multi optodes arrangement, etc. are being pursued to overcome the problem that a band-pass filter cannot be used when both brain and physiological signals occur within a close band. In extracting features related to the desired brain signal, the mean, variance, peak value, slope, skewness, and kurtosis of the noised-removed hemodynamic response were used. For classification, the linear discriminant analysis method provided simple but good performance among others: support vector machine, hidden Markov model, artificial neural network, etc. fNIRS will be more widely used to monitor the occurrence of neuro-plasticity after neuro-rehabilitation and neuro-stimulation. Technical breakthroughs in the future are expected via bundled-type probes, hybrid EEG-fNIRS BCI, and through the detection of initial dips.

  16. Interface tracking computations of bubble dynamics in nucleate flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giustini, G.

    2015-01-01

    The boiling process is of utter importance for the design and operation of water-cooled nuclear reactors. Despite continuous effort over the past decades, a fully mechanistic model of boiling in the presence of a solid surface has not yet been achieved. Uncertainties exist at fundamental level, since the microscopic phenomena governing nucleate boiling are still not understood, and as regards 'component scale' modelling, which relies heavily on empirical representations of wall boiling. Accurate models of these phenomena at sub-milli-metric scale are capable of elucidating the various processes and to produce quantitative data needed for up-scaling. Within this context, Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) represents a powerful tool for CFD analysis of boiling flows. In this contribution, DNS coupled with an Interface Tracking method (Y. Sato, B. Niceno, Journal of Computational Physics, Volume 249, 15 September 2013, Pages 127-161) are used to analyse the hydrodynamics and heat transfer associated with heat diffusion controlled bubble growth at a solid substrate during nucleate flow boiling. The growth of successive bubbles from a single nucleation site is simulated with a computational model that includes heat conduction in the solid substrate and evaporation from the liquid film (micro-layer) present beneath the bubble. Bubble evolution is investigated and the additional (with respect to single phase convection) heat transfer mechanisms due to the ebullition cycle are quantified. The simulations show that latent heat exchange due to evaporation in the micro-layer and sensible heat exchange during the waiting time after bubble departure are the main heat transfer mechanisms. It is found that the presence of an imposed flow normal to the bubble rising path determines a complex velocity and temperature distribution near the nucleation site. This conditions can result in bubble sliding, and influence bubble shape, departure diameter and departure frequency

  17. New kind of user interface for controlling MFTF diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preckshot, G.G.; Saroyan, R.A.; Mead, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is faced with the problem of controlling a multitude of plasma diagnostics instruments from a central, multiprocessor computer facility. A 16-bit microprocessor-based workstation allows each physicist entree into the central multiprocessor, which consists of nine Perkin-Elmer 32-bit minicomputers. The workstation provides the user interface to the larger system, with display graphics, windowing, and a physics notebook. Controlling a diagnostic is now equivalent to making entries into a traditional physics notebook

  18. A new kind of user interface for controlling MFTF diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preckshot, G.; Mead, J.; Saroyan, R.

    1983-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is faced with the problem of controlling a multitude of plasma diagnostics instruments from a central, multiprocessor computer facility. A 16-bit microprocessor-based workstation allows each physicist entree into the central multiprocessor, which consists of nine Perkin-Elmer 32-bit minicomputers. The workstation provides the user interface to the larger system, with display graphics, windowing, and a physics notebook. Controlling a diagnostic is now equivalent to making entries into a traditional physics notebook

  19. Efficacy of brain-computer interface-driven neuromuscular electrical stimulation for chronic paresis after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaino, Masahiko; Ono, Takashi; Shindo, Keiichiro; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Ota, Tetsuo; Kimura, Akio; Liu, Meigen; Ushiba, Junichi

    2014-04-01

    Brain computer interface technology is of great interest to researchers as a potential therapeutic measure for people with severe neurological disorders. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of brain computer interface, by comparing conventional neuromuscular electrical stimulation and brain computer interface-driven neuromuscular electrical stimulation, using an A-B-A-B withdrawal single-subject design. A 38-year-old male with severe hemiplegia due to a putaminal haemorrhage participated in this study. The design involved 2 epochs. In epoch A, the patient attempted to open his fingers during the application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation, irrespective of his actual brain activity. In epoch B, neuromuscular electrical stimulation was applied only when a significant motor-related cortical potential was observed in the electroencephalogram. The subject initially showed diffuse functional magnetic resonance imaging activation and small electro-encephalogram responses while attempting finger movement. Epoch A was associated with few neurological or clinical signs of improvement. Epoch B, with a brain computer interface, was associated with marked lateralization of electroencephalogram (EEG) and blood oxygenation level dependent responses. Voluntary electromyogram (EMG) activity, with significant EEG-EMG coherence, was also prompted. Clinical improvement in upper-extremity function and muscle tone was observed. These results indicate that self-directed training with a brain computer interface may induce activity- dependent cortical plasticity and promote functional recovery. This preliminary clinical investigation encourages further research using a controlled design.

  20. PEP computer control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of the computer system that will be used to control and monitor the PEP storage ring. Since the design is essentially complete and much of the system is operational, the system is described as it is expected to 1979. Section 1 of the paper describes the system hardware which includes the computer network, the CAMAC data I/O system, and the operator control consoles. Section 2 describes a collection of routines that provide general services to applications programs. These services include a graphics package, data base and data I/O programs, and a director programm for use in operator communication. Section 3 describes a collection of automatic and semi-automatic control programs, known as SCORE, that contain mathematical models of the ring lattice and are used to determine in real-time stable paths for changing beam configuration and energy and for orbit correction. Section 4 describes a collection of programs, known as CALI, that are used for calibration of ring elements

  1. Hacking the brain: Brain-computer interfacing technology and the ethics of neurosecurity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ienca, M.; Haselager, W.F.G.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-computer interfacing technologies are used as assistive technologies for patients as well as healthy subjects to control devices solely by brain activity. Yet the risks associated with the misuse of these technologies remain largely unexplored. Recent findings have shown that BCIs are

  2. Using brain-computer interfaces and brain-state dependent stimulation as tools in cognitive neuroscience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, O.; Bahramisharif, A.; Oostenveld, R.; Klanke, S.; Hadjipapas, A.; Okazaki, Y.O.; Gerven, M.A.J. van

    2011-01-01

    Large efforts are currently being made to develop and improve online analysis of brain activity which can be used, e.g., for brain-computer interfacing (BCI). A BCI allows a subject to control a device by willfully changing his/her own brain activity. BCI therefore holds the promise as a tool for

  3. Using brain-computer interfaces and brain-state dependent stimulation as tools in cognitive neuroscience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, O.; Bahramisharif, A.; Oostenveld, R.; Klanke, S.; Hadjipapas, A.; Okazaki, Y.O.; Gerven, M.A.J. van

    2011-01-01

    Large efforts are currently being made to develop and improve online analysis of brain activity which can be used, e.g., for brain–computer interfacing (BCI). A BCI allows a subject to control a device by willfully changing his/her own brain activity. BCI therefore holds the promise as a tool for

  4. Training Manual for Elements of Interface Definition and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalli, Vincent R. (Editor); Kastner, Robert E. (Editor); Hartt, Henry N. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The primary thrust of this manual is to ensure that the format and information needed to control interfaces between equipment are clear and understandable. The emphasis is on controlling the engineering design of the interface and not on the functional performance requirements of the system or the internal workings of the interfacing equipment. Interface control should take place, with rare exception, at the interfacing elements and no further. There are two essential sections of the manual. Chapter 2, Principles of Interface Control, discusses how interfaces are defined. It describes different types of interfaces to be considered and recommends a format for the documentation necessary for adequate interface control. Chapter 3, The Process: Through the Design Phases, provides tailored guidance for interface definition and control. This manual can be used to improve planned or existing interface control processes during system design and development. It can also be used to refresh and update the corporate knowledge base. The information presented herein will reduce the amount of paper and data required in interface definition and control processes by as much as 50 percent and will shorten the time required to prepare an interface control document. It also highlights the essential technical parameters that ensure that flight subsystems will indeed fit together and function as intended after assembly and checkout.

  5. Ethical aspects of brain computer interfaces: a scoping review

    OpenAIRE

    Burwell, Sasha; Sample, Matthew; Racine, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Background Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) is a set of technologies that are of increasing interest to researchers. BCI has been proposed as assistive technology for individuals who are non-communicative or paralyzed, such as those with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or spinal cord injury. The technology has also been suggested for enhancement and entertainment uses, and there are companies currently marketing BCI devices for those purposes (e.g., gaming) as well as health-related purposes (e.g...

  6. Shaping of neuronal activity through a Brain Computer Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Valero-Aguayo, Luis; Silva-Sauer, Leandro; Velasco-Alvarez, Ricardo; Ron-Angevin, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal responses are human actions which can be measured by an EEG, and which imply changes in waves when neurons are synchronized. This activity could be changed by principles of behaviour analysis. This research tests the efficacy of the behaviour shaping procedure to progressively change neuronal activity, so that those brain responses are adapted according to the differential reinforcement of visual feedback. The Brain Computer Interface (BCI) enables us to record the EEG in real ti...

  7. Playing with your Brain : Brain-Computer Interfaces and Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton; Tan, Desney; Bernhaupt, Regina; Tscheligi, Manfred

    2007-01-01

    In this workshop we investigate a possible role of brain-computer interaction in computer games and entertainment computing. The assumption is that brain activity, whether it is consciously controlled and directed by the user or just recorded in order to obtain information about the user’s affective

  8. Playing with your Brain: Brain-Computer Interfaces and Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Tan, Desney; Bernhaupt, R.; Tscheligi, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this workshop we investigate a possible role of brain-computer interaction in computer games and entertainment computing. The assumption is that brain activity, whether it is consciously controlled and directed by the user or just recorded in order to obtain information about the user’s affective

  9. The Emotiv EPOC interface paradigm in Human-Computer Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancău Dorina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have suggested the use of decoded error potentials in the brain to improve human-computer communication. Together with state-of-the-art scientific equipment, experiments have also tested instruments with more limited performance for the time being, such as Emotiv EPOC. This study presents a review of these trials and a summary of the results obtained. However, the level of these results indicates a promising prospect for using this headset as a human-computer interface for error decoding.

  10. Comparison of four classification methods for brain-computer interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frolov, A.; Húsek, Dušan; Bobrov, P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 2 (2011), s. 101-115 ISSN 1210-0552 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0567; GA ČR GA201/05/0079; GA ČR GAP202/10/0262 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : brain computer interface * motor imagery * visual imagery * EEG pattern classification * Bayesian classification * Common Spatial Patterns * Common Tensor Discriminant Analysis Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 0.646, year: 2011

  11. High Performance Computing - Power Application Programming Interface Specification Version 1.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laros III, James H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); DeBonis, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grant, Ryan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kelly, Suzanne M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Levenhagen, Michael J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Olivier, Stephen Lecler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pedretti, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Measuring and controlling the power and energy consumption of high performance computing systems by various components in the software stack is an active research area [13, 3, 5, 10, 4, 21, 19, 16, 7, 17, 20, 18, 11, 1, 6, 14, 12]. Implementations in lower level software layers are beginning to emerge in some production systems, which is very welcome. To be most effective, a portable interface to measurement and control features would significantly facilitate participation by all levels of the software stack. We present a proposal for a standard power Application Programming Interface (API) that endeavors to cover the entire software space, from generic hardware interfaces to the input from the computer facility manager.

  12. Controlling Laboratory Processes From A Personal Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, H.; Mackin, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program provides natural-language process control from IBM PC or compatible computer. Sets up process-control system that either runs without operator or run by workers who have limited programming skills. Includes three smaller programs. Two of them, written in FORTRAN 77, record data and control research processes. Third program, written in Pascal, generates FORTRAN subroutines used by other two programs to identify user commands with device-driving routines written by user. Also includes set of input data allowing user to define user commands to be executed by computer. Requires personal computer operating under MS-DOS with suitable hardware interfaces to all controlled devices. Also requires FORTRAN 77 compiler and device drivers written by user.

  13. The Brain Computer Interface Future: Time for a Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    neural processing software developer Mind Technologies, Geger Technologies in Austria and the Sony Corporation in Japan. The WTEC report in 2007...managing photos, video, web surfing, and music , and although in their infancy, researchers have used a web browser interface to control Google...society as a whole. The prospect of BCI entertainment , neuroprostheses, online neuroresearching and marketing, and cognitive performance enhancement

  14. Interface between computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and plant analysis computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffield, R.D.; Dunckhorst, F.F.; Tomlinson, E.T.; Welch, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can provide valuable input to the development of advanced plant analysis computer codes. The types of interfacing discussed in this paper will directly contribute to modeling and accuracy improvements throughout the plant system and should result in significant reduction of design conservatisms that have been applied to such analyses in the past

  15. Interface design of VSOP'94 computer code for safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natsir, Khairina; Andiwijayakusuma, D.; Wahanani, Nursinta Adi; Yazid, Putranto Ilham

    2014-01-01

    Today, most software applications, also in the nuclear field, come with a graphical user interface. VSOP'94 (Very Superior Old Program), was designed to simplify the process of performing reactor simulation. VSOP is a integrated code system to simulate the life history of a nuclear reactor that is devoted in education and research. One advantage of VSOP program is its ability to calculate the neutron spectrum estimation, fuel cycle, 2-D diffusion, resonance integral, estimation of reactors fuel costs, and integrated thermal hydraulics. VSOP also can be used to comparative studies and simulation of reactor safety. However, existing VSOP is a conventional program, which was developed using Fortran 65 and have several problems in using it, for example, it is only operated on Dec Alpha mainframe platforms and provide text-based output, difficult to use, especially in data preparation and interpretation of results. We develop a GUI-VSOP, which is an interface program to facilitate the preparation of data, run the VSOP code and read the results in a more user friendly way and useable on the Personal 'Computer (PC). Modifications include the development of interfaces on preprocessing, processing and postprocessing. GUI-based interface for preprocessing aims to provide a convenience way in preparing data. Processing interface is intended to provide convenience in configuring input files and libraries and do compiling VSOP code. Postprocessing interface designed to visualized the VSOP output in table and graphic forms. GUI-VSOP expected to be useful to simplify and speed up the process and analysis of safety aspects

  16. Interface design of VSOP'94 computer code for safety analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsir, Khairina; Yazid, Putranto Ilham; Andiwijayakusuma, D.; Wahanani, Nursinta Adi

    2014-09-01

    Today, most software applications, also in the nuclear field, come with a graphical user interface. VSOP'94 (Very Superior Old Program), was designed to simplify the process of performing reactor simulation. VSOP is a integrated code system to simulate the life history of a nuclear reactor that is devoted in education and research. One advantage of VSOP program is its ability to calculate the neutron spectrum estimation, fuel cycle, 2-D diffusion, resonance integral, estimation of reactors fuel costs, and integrated thermal hydraulics. VSOP also can be used to comparative studies and simulation of reactor safety. However, existing VSOP is a conventional program, which was developed using Fortran 65 and have several problems in using it, for example, it is only operated on Dec Alpha mainframe platforms and provide text-based output, difficult to use, especially in data preparation and interpretation of results. We develop a GUI-VSOP, which is an interface program to facilitate the preparation of data, run the VSOP code and read the results in a more user friendly way and useable on the Personal 'Computer (PC). Modifications include the development of interfaces on preprocessing, processing and postprocessing. GUI-based interface for preprocessing aims to provide a convenience way in preparing data. Processing interface is intended to provide convenience in configuring input files and libraries and do compiling VSOP code. Postprocessing interface designed to visualized the VSOP output in table and graphic forms. GUI-VSOP expected to be useful to simplify and speed up the process and analysis of safety aspects.

  17. Operator interface to the ORIC control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludemann, C.A.; Casstevens, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) was built in the early 1960s with a hard-wired manual control system. Presently, it serves as a variable-energy heavy-ion cyclotron with an internal ion source, or as an energy booster for the new 25 MV tandem electrostatic accelerator of the Holifield Heavy Ion Facility. One factor which has kept the cyclotron the productive research tool it is today is the gradual transfer of its control functions to a computer-based system beginning in the 1970s. This particular placement of a computer between an accelerator and its operators afforded some unique challenges and opportunities that would not be encountered today. Historically, the transformation began at a time when computers were just beginning to gain acceptance as reliable operational tools. Veteran operators with tens of years of accelerator experience justifiably expressed skepticism that this improvement would aid them, particularly if they had to re-learn how to operate the machine. The confidence of the operators was gained when they realized that one of the primary principles of ergonomics was being upheld. The computer software and hardware was being designed to serve them and not the computer

  18. Interfacing a fieldable multichannel analyzer to a MicroVAX computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litherland, K.R.; Johnson, M.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on software written for interfacing the D.S. Davidson Model 2056 portable multichannel analyzer to a MicroVAX computer running the VMS operating system. The operational objective of the software is to give the user a nearly transparent mechanism for controlling the analyzer with functions equivalent to those on the analyzer's own keyboard, thus minimizing the training requirement for the user. The software is written in VMS enhanced Fortran and consists of a main control program, several subprocesses, and libraries containing graphics commands and other information. Interfaces to other commercially available software packages for data storage and manipulation are provided. Problems encountered and their programming solutions are discussed

  19. Control of peripheral units by satellite computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, K.T.

    1974-01-01

    A computer system was developed allowing the control of nuclear physics experiments, and use of the results by means of graphical and conversational assemblies. This system which is made of two computers, one IBM-370/135 and one Telemecanique Electrique T1600, controls the conventional IBM peripherals and also the special ones made in the laboratory, such as data acquisition display and graphics units. The visual display is implemented by a scanning-type television, equipped with a light-pen. These units in themselves are universal, but their specifications were established to meet the requirements of nuclear physics experiments. The input-output channels of the two computers have been connected together by an interface, designed and implemented in the Laboratory. This interface allows the exchange of control signals and data (the data are changed from bytes into word and vice-versa). The T1600 controls the peripherals mentionned above according to the commands of the IBM370. Hence the T1600 has here the part of a satellite computer which allows conversation with the main computer and also insures the control of its special peripheral units [fr

  20. On the tip of the tongue: learning typing and pointing with an intra-oral computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caltenco, Héctor A; Breidegard, Björn; Struijk, Lotte N S Andreasen

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate typing and pointing performance and improvement over time of four able-bodied participants using an intra-oral tongue-computer interface for computer control. A physically disabled individual may lack the ability to efficiently control standard computer input devices. There have been several efforts to produce and evaluate interfaces that provide individuals with physical disabilities the possibility to control personal computers. Training with the intra-oral tongue-computer interface was performed by playing games over 18 sessions. Skill improvement was measured through typing and pointing exercises at the end of each training session. Typing throughput improved from averages of 2.36 to 5.43 correct words per minute. Pointing throughput improved from averages of 0.47 to 0.85 bits/s. Target tracking performance, measured as relative time on target, improved from averages of 36% to 47%. Path following throughput improved from averages of 0.31 to 0.83 bits/s and decreased to 0.53 bits/s with more difficult tasks. Learning curves support the notion that the tongue can rapidly learn novel motor tasks. Typing and pointing performance of the tongue-computer interface is comparable to performances of other proficient assistive devices, which makes the tongue a feasible input organ for computer control. Intra-oral computer interfaces could provide individuals with severe upper-limb mobility impairments the opportunity to control computers and automatic equipment. Typing and pointing performance of the tongue-computer interface is comparable to performances of other proficient assistive devices, but does not cause fatigue easily and might be invisible to other people, which is highly prioritized by assistive device users. Combination of visual and auditory feedback is vital for a good performance of an intra-oral computer interface and helps to reduce involuntary or erroneous activations.

  1. Proprioceptive feedback and brain computer interface (BCI based neuroprostheses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ander Ramos-Murguialday

    Full Text Available Brain computer interface (BCI technology has been proposed for motor neurorehabilitation, motor replacement and assistive technologies. It is an open question whether proprioceptive feedback affects the regulation of brain oscillations and therefore BCI control. We developed a BCI coupled on-line with a robotic hand exoskeleton for flexing and extending the fingers. 24 healthy participants performed five different tasks of closing and opening the hand: (1 motor imagery of the hand movement without any overt movement and without feedback, (2 motor imagery with movement as online feedback (participants see and feel their hand, with the exoskeleton moving according to their brain signals, (3 passive (the orthosis passively opens and closes the hand without imagery and (4 active (overt movement of the hand and rest. Performance was defined as the difference in power of the sensorimotor rhythm during motor task and rest and calculated offline for different tasks. Participants were divided in three groups depending on the feedback receiving during task 2 (the other tasks were the same for all participants. Group 1 (n = 9 received contingent positive feedback (participants' sensorimotor rhythm (SMR desynchronization was directly linked to hand orthosis movements, group 2 (n = 8 contingent "negative" feedback (participants' sensorimotor rhythm synchronization was directly linked to hand orthosis movements and group 3 (n = 7 sham feedback (no link between brain oscillations and orthosis movements. We observed that proprioceptive feedback (feeling and seeing hand movements improved BCI performance significantly. Furthermore, in the contingent positive group only a significant motor learning effect was observed enhancing SMR desynchronization during motor imagery without feedback in time. Furthermore, we observed a significantly stronger SMR desynchronization in the contingent positive group compared to the other groups during active and

  2. Proprioceptive feedback and brain computer interface (BCI) based neuroprostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Schürholz, Markus; Caggiano, Vittorio; Wildgruber, Moritz; Caria, Andrea; Hammer, Eva Maria; Halder, Sebastian; Birbaumer, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Brain computer interface (BCI) technology has been proposed for motor neurorehabilitation, motor replacement and assistive technologies. It is an open question whether proprioceptive feedback affects the regulation of brain oscillations and therefore BCI control. We developed a BCI coupled on-line with a robotic hand exoskeleton for flexing and extending the fingers. 24 healthy participants performed five different tasks of closing and opening the hand: (1) motor imagery of the hand movement without any overt movement and without feedback, (2) motor imagery with movement as online feedback (participants see and feel their hand, with the exoskeleton moving according to their brain signals, (3) passive (the orthosis passively opens and closes the hand without imagery) and (4) active (overt) movement of the hand and rest. Performance was defined as the difference in power of the sensorimotor rhythm during motor task and rest and calculated offline for different tasks. Participants were divided in three groups depending on the feedback receiving during task 2 (the other tasks were the same for all participants). Group 1 (n = 9) received contingent positive feedback (participants' sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) desynchronization was directly linked to hand orthosis movements), group 2 (n = 8) contingent "negative" feedback (participants' sensorimotor rhythm synchronization was directly linked to hand orthosis movements) and group 3 (n = 7) sham feedback (no link between brain oscillations and orthosis movements). We observed that proprioceptive feedback (feeling and seeing hand movements) improved BCI performance significantly. Furthermore, in the contingent positive group only a significant motor learning effect was observed enhancing SMR desynchronization during motor imagery without feedback in time. Furthermore, we observed a significantly stronger SMR desynchronization in the contingent positive group compared to the other groups during active and passive

  3. Connections that Count: Brain-Computer Interface Enables the Profoundly Paralyzed to Communicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Connections that Count: Brain-Computer Interface Enables the Profoundly Paralyzed to Communicate Past Issues / ... of this page please turn Javascript on. A brain-computer interface (BCI) system This brain-computer interface (BCI) system ...

  4. Mechatronics Interface for Computer Assisted Prostate Surgery Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano del Monte, Felipe; Padilla Castañeda, Miguel A.; Arámbula Cosío, Fernando

    2006-09-01

    In this work is presented the development of a mechatronics device to simulate the interaction of the surgeon with the surgical instrument (resectoscope) used during a Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP). Our mechatronics interface is part of a computer assisted system for training in TURP, which is based on a 3D graphics model of the prostate which can be deformed and resected interactively by the user. The mechatronics interface, is the device that the urology residents will manipulate to simulate the movements performed during surgery. Our current prototype has five degrees of freedom, which are enough to have a realistic simulation of the surgery movements. Two of these degrees of freedom are linear, to determinate the linear displacement of the resecting loop and the other three are rotational to determinate three directions and amounts of rotation.

  5. Enrichment of Human-Computer Interaction in Brain-Computer Interfaces via Virtual Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso-Valerdi Luz María

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tridimensional representations stimulate cognitive processes that are the core and foundation of human-computer interaction (HCI. Those cognitive processes take place while a user navigates and explores a virtual environment (VE and are mainly related to spatial memory storage, attention, and perception. VEs have many distinctive features (e.g., involvement, immersion, and presence that can significantly improve HCI in highly demanding and interactive systems such as brain-computer interfaces (BCI. BCI is as a nonmuscular communication channel that attempts to reestablish the interaction between an individual and his/her environment. Although BCI research started in the sixties, this technology is not efficient or reliable yet for everyone at any time. Over the past few years, researchers have argued that main BCI flaws could be associated with HCI issues. The evidence presented thus far shows that VEs can (1 set out working environmental conditions, (2 maximize the efficiency of BCI control panels, (3 implement navigation systems based not only on user intentions but also on user emotions, and (4 regulate user mental state to increase the differentiation between control and noncontrol modalities.

  6. User Interface Developed for Controls/CFD Interdisciplinary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, in conjunction with the University of Akron, is developing analytical methods and software tools to create a cross-discipline "bridge" between controls and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technologies. Traditionally, the controls analyst has used simulations based on large lumping techniques to generate low-order linear models convenient for designing propulsion system controls. For complex, high-speed vehicles such as the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), simulations based on CFD methods are required to capture the relevant flow physics. The use of CFD should also help reduce the development time and costs associated with experimentally tuning the control system. The initial application for this research is the High Speed Civil Transport inlet control problem. A major aspect of this research is the development of a controls/CFD interface for non-CFD experts, to facilitate the interactive operation of CFD simulations and the extraction of reduced-order, time-accurate models from CFD results. A distributed computing approach for implementing the interface is being explored. Software being developed as part of the Integrated CFD and Experiments (ICE) project provides the basis for the operating environment, including run-time displays and information (data base) management. Message-passing software is used to communicate between the ICE system and the CFD simulation, which can reside on distributed, parallel computing systems. Initially, the one-dimensional Large-Perturbation Inlet (LAPIN) code is being used to simulate a High Speed Civil Transport type inlet. LAPIN can model real supersonic inlet features, including bleeds, bypasses, and variable geometry, such as translating or variable-ramp-angle centerbodies. Work is in progress to use parallel versions of the multidimensional NPARC code.

  7. Simulation Control Graphical User Interface Logging Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewling, Karl B., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    One of the many tasks of my project was to revise the code of the Simulation Control Graphical User Interface (SIM GUI) to enable logging functionality to a file. I was also tasked with developing a script that directed the startup and initialization flow of the various LCS software components. This makes sure that a software component will not spin up until all the appropriate dependencies have been configured properly. Also I was able to assist hardware modelers in verifying the configuration of models after they have been upgraded to a new software version. I developed some code that analyzes the MDL files to determine if any error were generated due to the upgrade process. Another one of the projects assigned to me was supporting the End-to-End Hardware/Software Daily Tag-up meeting.

  8. Challenges in clinical applications of brain computer interfaces in individuals with spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Rupp, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) are devices that measure brain activities and translate them into control signals used for a variety of applications. Among them are systems for communication, environmental control, neuroprostheses, exoskeletons, or restorative therapies. Over the last years the technology of BCIs has reached a level of matureness allowing them to be used not only in research experiments supervised by scientists, but also in clinical routine with patients with neurological im...

  9. Tools for remote computing in accelerator control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderssen, P.S.; Frammery, V.; Wilcke, R.

    1990-01-01

    In modern accelerator control systems, the intelligence of the equipment is distributed in the geographical and the logical sense. Control processes for a large variety of tasks reside in both the equipment and the control computers. Hence successful operation hinges on the availability and reliability of the communication infrastructure. The computers are interconnected by a communication system and use remote procedure calls and message passing for information exchange. These communication mechanisms need a well-defined convention, i.e. a protocol. They also require flexibility in both the setup and changes to the protocol specification. The network compiler is a tool which provides the programmer with a means of establishing such a protocol for his application. Input to the network compiler is a single interface description file provided by the programmer. This file is written according to a grammar, and completely specifies the interprocess communication interfaces. Passed through the network compiler, the interface description file automatically produces the additional source code needed for the protocol. Hence the programmer does not have to be concerned about the details of the communication calls. Any further additions and modifications are made easy, because all the information about the interface is kept in a single file. (orig.)

  10. Catalyzing Inquiry at the Interface of Computing and Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Wooley; Herbert S. Lin

    2005-10-30

    This study is the first comprehensive NRC study that suggests a high-level intellectual structure for Federal agencies for supporting work at the biology/computing interface. The report seeks to establish the intellectual legitimacy of a fundamentally cross-disciplinary collaboration between biologists and computer scientists. That is, while some universities are increasingly favorable to research at the intersection, life science researchers at other universities are strongly impeded in their efforts to collaborate. This report addresses these impediments and describes proven strategies for overcoming them. An important feature of the report is the use of well-documented examples that describe clearly to individuals not trained in computer science the value and usage of computing across the biological sciences, from genes and proteins to networks and pathways, from organelles to cells, and from individual organisms to populations and ecosystems. It is hoped that these examples will be useful to students in the life sciences to motivate (continued) study in computer science that will enable them to be more facile users of computing in their future biological studies.

  11. Passive wireless tags for tongue controlled assistive technology interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakibet, Osman O.; Horne, Robert J.; Kelly, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    Tongue control with low profile, passive mouth tags is demonstrated as a human–device interface by communicating values of tongue-tag separation over a wireless link. Confusion matrices are provided to demonstrate user accuracy in targeting by tongue position. Accuracy is found to increase dramatically after short training sequences with errors falling close to 1% in magnitude with zero missed targets. The rate at which users are able to learn accurate targeting with high accuracy indicates that this is an intuitive device to operate. The significance of the work is that innovative very unobtrusive, wireless tags can be used to provide intuitive human–computer interfaces based on low cost and disposable mouth mounted technology. With the development of an appropriate reading system, control of assistive devices such as computer mice or wheelchairs could be possible for tetraplegics and others who retain fine motor control capability of their tongues. The tags contain no battery and are intended to fit directly on the hard palate, detecting tongue position in the mouth with no need for tongue piercings. PMID:27222736

  12. Some computer graphical user interfaces in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, James C L

    2016-03-28

    In this review, five graphical user interfaces (GUIs) used in radiation therapy practices and researches are introduced. They are: (1) the treatment time calculator, superficial X-ray treatment time calculator (SUPCALC) used in the superficial X-ray radiation therapy; (2) the monitor unit calculator, electron monitor unit calculator (EMUC) used in the electron radiation therapy; (3) the multileaf collimator machine file creator, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy (SWIMRT) used in generating fluence map for research and quality assurance in intensity modulated radiation therapy; (4) the treatment planning system, DOSCTP used in the calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo simulation; and (5) the monitor unit calculator, photon beam monitor unit calculator (PMUC) used in photon beam radiation therapy. One common issue of these GUIs is that all user-friendly interfaces are linked to complex formulas and algorithms based on various theories, which do not have to be understood and noted by the user. In that case, user only needs to input the required information with help from graphical elements in order to produce desired results. SUPCALC is a superficial radiation treatment time calculator using the GUI technique to provide a convenient way for radiation therapist to calculate the treatment time, and keep a record for the skin cancer patient. EMUC is an electron monitor unit calculator for electron radiation therapy. Instead of doing hand calculation according to pre-determined dosimetric tables, clinical user needs only to input the required drawing of electron field in computer graphical file format, prescription dose, and beam parameters to EMUC to calculate the required monitor unit for the electron beam treatment. EMUC is based on a semi-experimental theory of sector-integration algorithm. SWIMRT is a multileaf collimator machine file creator to generate a fluence map produced by a medical linear accelerator. This machine file controls

  13. Integrated Computer Controlled Glow Discharge Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Erik; Post-Zwicker, Andrew

    2002-11-01

    An "Interactive Plasma Display" was created for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to demonstrate the characteristics of plasma to various science education outreach programs. From high school students and teachers, to undergraduate students and visitors to the lab, the plasma device will be a key component in advancing the public's basic knowledge of plasma physics. The device is fully computer controlled using LabVIEW, a touchscreen Graphical User Interface [GUI], and a GPIB interface. Utilizing a feedback loop, the display is fully autonomous in controlling pressure, as well as in monitoring the safety aspects of the apparatus. With a digital convectron gauge continuously monitoring pressure, the computer interface analyzes the input signals, while making changes to a digital flow controller. This function works independently of the GUI, allowing the user to simply input and receive a desired pressure; quickly, easily, and intuitively. The discharge tube is a 36" x 4"id glass cylinder with 3" side port. A 3000 volt, 10mA power supply, is used to breakdown the plasma. A 300 turn solenoid was created to demonstrate the magnetic pinching of a plasma. All primary functions of the device are controlled through the GUI digital controllers. This configuration allows for operators to safely control the pressure (100mTorr-1Torr), magnetic field (0-90Gauss, 7amps, 10volts), and finally, the voltage applied across the electrodes (0-3000v, 10mA).

  14. Brain-computer interface after nervous system injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Alexis; Adeli, Hojjat; Buford, John A

    2014-12-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) has proven to be a useful tool for providing alternative communication and mobility to patients suffering from nervous system injury. BCI has been and will continue to be implemented into rehabilitation practices for more interactive and speedy neurological recovery. The most exciting BCI technology is evolving to provide therapeutic benefits by inducing cortical reorganization via neuronal plasticity. This article presents a state-of-the-art review of BCI technology used after nervous system injuries, specifically: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injury, stroke, and disorders of consciousness. Also presented is transcending, innovative research involving new treatment of neurological disorders. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Archaeologies of touch interfacing with haptics from electricity to computing

    CERN Document Server

    Parisi, David

    2018-01-01

    David Parisi offers the first full history of new computing technologies known as haptic interfaces--which use electricity, vibration, and force feedback to stimulate the sense of touch--showing how the efforts of scientists and engineers over the past 300 years have gradually remade and redefined our sense of touch. Archaeologies of Touch offers a timely and provocative engagement with the long history of touch technology that helps us confront and question the power relations underpinning the project of giving touch its own set of technical media.

  16. Workshops of the Sixth International Brain–Computer Interface Meeting: brain–computer interfaces past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Jane E.; Guger, Christoph; Ziat, Mounia; Zander, Thorsten O.; Taylor, Denise; Tangermann, Michael; Soria-Frisch, Aureli; Simeral, John; Scherer, Reinhold; Rupp, Rüdiger; Ruffini, Giulio; Robinson, Douglas K. R.; Ramsey, Nick F.; Nijholt, Anton; Müller-Putz, Gernot; McFarland, Dennis J.; Mattia, Donatella; Lance, Brent J.; Kindermans, Pieter-Jan; Iturrate, Iñaki; Herff, Christian; Gupta, Disha; Do, An H.; Collinger, Jennifer L.; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Chase, Steven M.; Bleichner, Martin G.; Batista, Aaron; Anderson, Charles W.; Aarnoutse, Erik J.

    2017-01-01

    The Sixth International Brain–Computer Interface (BCI) Meeting was held 30 May–3 June 2016 at the Asilomar Conference Grounds, Pacific Grove, California, USA. The conference included 28 workshops covering topics in BCI and brain–machine interface research. Topics included BCI for specific populations or applications, advancing BCI research through use of specific signals or technological advances, and translational and commercial issues to bring both implanted and non-invasive BCIs to market. BCI research is growing and expanding in the breadth of its applications, the depth of knowledge it can produce, and the practical benefit it can provide both for those with physical impairments and the general public. Here we provide summaries of each workshop, illustrating the breadth and depth of BCI research and highlighting important issues and calls for action to support future research and development. PMID:29152523

  17. Workshops of the Sixth International Brain-Computer Interface Meeting: brain-computer interfaces past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Jane E; Guger, Christoph; Ziat, Mounia; Zander, Thorsten O; Taylor, Denise; Tangermann, Michael; Soria-Frisch, Aureli; Simeral, John; Scherer, Reinhold; Rupp, Rüdiger; Ruffini, Giulio; Robinson, Douglas K R; Ramsey, Nick F; Nijholt, Anton; Müller-Putz, Gernot; McFarland, Dennis J; Mattia, Donatella; Lance, Brent J; Kindermans, Pieter-Jan; Iturrate, Iñaki; Herff, Christian; Gupta, Disha; Do, An H; Collinger, Jennifer L; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Chase, Steven M; Bleichner, Martin G; Batista, Aaron; Anderson, Charles W; Aarnoutse, Erik J

    2017-01-01

    The Sixth International Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) Meeting was held 30 May-3 June 2016 at the Asilomar Conference Grounds, Pacific Grove, California, USA. The conference included 28 workshops covering topics in BCI and brain-machine interface research. Topics included BCI for specific populations or applications, advancing BCI research through use of specific signals or technological advances, and translational and commercial issues to bring both implanted and non-invasive BCIs to market. BCI research is growing and expanding in the breadth of its applications, the depth of knowledge it can produce, and the practical benefit it can provide both for those with physical impairments and the general public. Here we provide summaries of each workshop, illustrating the breadth and depth of BCI research and highlighting important issues and calls for action to support future research and development.

  18. Wearable wireless User Interface Cursor-Controller (UIC-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Nicholas; Kerr, Kevin; Aranda, Ricardo; Hickey, Richard; Esmailbeigi, Hananeh

    2017-07-01

    Controlling a computer or a smartphone's cursor allows the user to access a world full of information. For millions of people with limited upper extremities motor function, controlling the cursor becomes profoundly difficult. Our team has developed the User Interface Cursor-Controller (UIC-C) to assist the impaired individuals in regaining control over the cursor. The UIC-C is a hands-free device that utilizes the tongue muscle to control the cursor movements. The entire device is housed inside a subject specific retainer. The user maneuvers the cursor by manipulating a joystick imbedded inside the retainer via their tongue. The joystick movement commands are sent to an electronic device via a Bluetooth connection. The device is readily recognizable as a cursor controller by any Bluetooth enabled electronic device. The device testing results have shown that the time it takes the user to control the cursor accurately via the UIC-C is about three times longer than a standard computer mouse controlled via the hand. The device does not require any permanent modifications to the body; therefore, it could be used during the period of acute rehabilitation of the hands. With the development of modern smart homes, and enhancement electronics controlled by the computer, UIC-C could be integrated into a system that enables individuals with permanent impairment, the ability to control the cursor. In conclusion, the UIC-C device is designed with the goal of allowing the user to accurately control a cursor during the periods of either acute or permanent upper extremities impairment.

  19. Evaluation of LDA Ensembles Classifiers for Brain Computer Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjona, Cristian; Pentácolo, José; Gareis, Iván; Atum, Yanina; Gentiletti, Gerardo; Acevedo, Rubén; Rufiner, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    The Brain Computer Interface (BCI) translates brain activity into computer commands. To increase the performance of the BCI, to decode the user intentions it is necessary to get better the feature extraction and classification techniques. In this article the performance of a three linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifiers ensemble is studied. The system based on ensemble can theoretically achieved better classification results than the individual counterpart, regarding individual classifier generation algorithm and the procedures for combine their outputs. Classic algorithms based on ensembles such as bagging and boosting are discussed here. For the application on BCI, it was concluded that the generated results using ER and AUC as performance index do not give enough information to establish which configuration is better.

  20. Designing a hands-on brain computer interface laboratory course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalighinejad, Bahar; Long, Laura Kathleen; Mesgarani, Nima

    2016-08-01

    Devices and systems that interact with the brain have become a growing field of research and development in recent years. Engineering students are well positioned to contribute to both hardware development and signal analysis techniques in this field. However, this area has been left out of most engineering curricula. We developed an electroencephalography (EEG) based brain computer interface (BCI) laboratory course to educate students through hands-on experiments. The course is offered jointly by the Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Computer Science Departments of Columbia University in the City of New York and is open to senior undergraduate and graduate students. The course provides an effective introduction to the experimental design, neuroscience concepts, data analysis techniques, and technical skills required in the field of BCI.

  1. ASTEC: Controls analysis for personal computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, John P.; Bauer, Frank H.; Thorpe, Christopher J.

    1989-01-01

    The ASTEC (Analysis and Simulation Tools for Engineering Controls) software is under development at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The design goal is to provide a wide selection of controls analysis tools at the personal computer level, as well as the capability to upload compute-intensive jobs to a mainframe or supercomputer. The project is a follow-on to the INCA (INteractive Controls Analysis) program that has been developed at GSFC over the past five years. While ASTEC makes use of the algorithms and expertise developed for the INCA program, the user interface was redesigned to take advantage of the capabilities of the personal computer. The design philosophy and the current capabilities of the ASTEC software are described.

  2. Fully Implanted Brain-Computer Interface in a Locked-In Patient with ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansteensel, Mariska J; Pels, Elmar G M; Bleichner, Martin G; Branco, Mariana P; Denison, Timothy; Freudenburg, Zachary V; Gosselaar, Peter; Leinders, Sacha; Ottens, Thomas H; Van Den Boom, Max A; Van Rijen, Peter C; Aarnoutse, Erik J; Ramsey, Nick F

    2016-11-24

    Options for people with severe paralysis who have lost the ability to communicate orally are limited. We describe a method for communication in a patient with late-stage amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), involving a fully implanted brain-computer interface that consists of subdural electrodes placed over the motor cortex and a transmitter placed subcutaneously in the left side of the thorax. By attempting to move the hand on the side opposite the implanted electrodes, the patient accurately and independently controlled a computer typing program 28 weeks after electrode placement, at the equivalent of two letters per minute. The brain-computer interface offered autonomous communication that supplemented and at times supplanted the patient's eye-tracking device. (Funded by the Government of the Netherlands and the European Union; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02224469 .).

  3. Man-system interface based on automatic speech recognition: integration to a virtual control desk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Aghina, Mauricio Alves C., E-mail: calexandre@ien.gov.b, E-mail: mol@ien.gov.b, E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.b, E-mail: mag@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Nomiya, Diogo V., E-mail: diogonomiya@gmail.co [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work reports the implementation of a man-system interface based on automatic speech recognition, and its integration to a virtual nuclear power plant control desk. The later is aimed to reproduce a real control desk using virtual reality technology, for operator training and ergonomic evaluation purpose. An automatic speech recognition system was developed to serve as a new interface with users, substituting computer keyboard and mouse. They can operate this virtual control desk in front of a computer monitor or a projection screen through spoken commands. The automatic speech recognition interface developed is based on a well-known signal processing technique named cepstral analysis, and on artificial neural networks. The speech recognition interface is described, along with its integration with the virtual control desk, and results are presented. (author)

  4. Man-system interface based on automatic speech recognition: integration to a virtual control desk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Aghina, Mauricio Alves C.; Nomiya, Diogo V.

    2009-01-01

    This work reports the implementation of a man-system interface based on automatic speech recognition, and its integration to a virtual nuclear power plant control desk. The later is aimed to reproduce a real control desk using virtual reality technology, for operator training and ergonomic evaluation purpose. An automatic speech recognition system was developed to serve as a new interface with users, substituting computer keyboard and mouse. They can operate this virtual control desk in front of a computer monitor or a projection screen through spoken commands. The automatic speech recognition interface developed is based on a well-known signal processing technique named cepstral analysis, and on artificial neural networks. The speech recognition interface is described, along with its integration with the virtual control desk, and results are presented. (author)

  5. The Self-Paced Graz Brain-Computer Interface: Methods and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhold Scherer

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the self-paced 3-class Graz brain-computer interface (BCI which is based on the detection of sensorimotor electroencephalogram (EEG rhythms induced by motor imagery. Self-paced operation means that the BCI is able to determine whether the ongoing brain activity is intended as control signal (intentional control or not (non-control state. The presented system is able to automatically reduce electrooculogram (EOG artifacts, to detect electromyographic (EMG activity, and uses only three bipolar EEG channels. Two applications are presented: the freeSpace virtual environment (VE and the Brainloop interface. The freeSpace is a computer-game-like application where subjects have to navigate through the environment and collect coins by autonomously selecting navigation commands. Three subjects participated in these feedback experiments and each learned to navigate through the VE and collect coins. Two out of the three succeeded in collecting all three coins. The Brainloop interface provides an interface between the Graz-BCI and Google Earth.

  6. Brain-muscle-computer interface: mobile-phone prototype development and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Scott; Joshi, Sanjay S

    2011-07-01

    We report prototype development and testing of a new mobile-phone-based brain-muscle-computer interface for severely paralyzed persons, based on previous results from our group showing that humans may actively create specified power levels in two separate frequency bands of a single surface electromyography (sEMG) signal. EMG activity on the surface of a single face muscle site (auricularis superior) is recorded with a standard electrode. This analog electrical signal is imported into an Android-based mobile phone and digitized via an internal A/D converter. The digital signal is split, and then simultaneously filtered with two band-pass filters to extract total power within two separate frequency bands. The user-modulated power in each frequency band serves as two separate control channels for machine control. After signal processing, the Android phone sends commands to external devices via a Bluetooth interface. Users are trained to use the device via visually based operant conditioning, with simple cursor-to-target activities on the phone screen. The mobile-phone prototype interface is formally evaluated on a single advanced Spinal Muscle Atrophy subject, who has successfully used the interface in his home in evaluation trials and for remote control of a television. Development of this new device will not only guide future interface design for community use, but will also serve as an information technology bridge for in situ data collection to quantify human sEMG manipulation abilities for a relevant population.

  7. Development the Controller Input Power of Peripheral Interfacing Controller Using Other Micro controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syirrazie Che Soh; Harzawardi Hashim; Nor Arymaswati Abdullah; Nur Aira Abdul Rahman; Mohd Ashhar Khalid

    2011-01-01

    This Controller Input Power of a Peripheral Interfacing Controller was developed using the other micro controller. This paper discuss the switching technique are practiced using proper electronic device to develop the controller, thus enable to control the input power of a PIC in order to expand their interfacing capacity and control. This may allow the PIC could be used to acquire input and control output signal from electronic and electromechanical device and instrument as well as software in wide scale and application. (author)

  8. Mining multi-channel EEG for its information content: An ANN-based method for a brain-computer interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, B.O.; Pfurtscheller, G.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    1998-01-01

    . This high recognition rate makes the classifier suitable for a so-called 'Brain-Computer Interface', a system that allows one to control a computer, or another device, with ones brain waves. Our classifier Laplace filters the EEG spatially, but makes use of its entire frequency range, and automatically...

  9. Overview Electrotactile Feedback for Enhancing Human Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamungkas, Daniel S.; Caesarendra, Wahyu

    2018-04-01

    To achieve effective interaction between a human and a computing device or machine, adequate feedback from the computing device or machine is required. Recently, haptic feedback is increasingly being utilised to improve the interactivity of the Human Computer Interface (HCI). Most existing haptic feedback enhancements aim at producing forces or vibrations to enrich the user’s interactive experience. However, these force and/or vibration actuated haptic feedback systems can be bulky and uncomfortable to wear and only capable of delivering a limited amount of information to the user which can limit both their effectiveness and the applications they can be applied to. To address this deficiency, electrotactile feedback is used. This involves delivering haptic sensations to the user by electrically stimulating nerves in the skin via electrodes placed on the surface of the skin. This paper presents a review and explores the capability of electrotactile feedback for HCI applications. In addition, a description of the sensory receptors within the skin for sensing tactile stimulus and electric currents alsoseveral factors which influenced electric signal to transmit to the brain via human skinare explained.

  10. Nanostructured interfaces for enhancing mechanical properties of composites: Computational micromechanical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Computational micromechanical studies of the effect of nanostructuring and nanoengineering of interfaces, phase and grain boundaries of materials on the mechanical properties and strength of materials and the potential of interface nanostructuring to enhance the materials properties are reviewed....

  11. Ethics in published brain-computer interface research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specker Sullivan, L.; Illes, J.

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Sophisticated signal processing has opened the doors to more research with human subjects than ever before. The increase in the use of human subjects in research comes with a need for increased human subjects protections. Approach. We quantified the presence or absence of ethics language in published reports of brain-computer interface (BCI) studies that involved human subjects and qualitatively characterized ethics statements. Main results. Reports of BCI studies with human subjects that are published in neural engineering and engineering journals are anchored in the rationale of technological improvement. Ethics language is markedly absent, omitted from 31% of studies published in neural engineering journals and 59% of studies in biomedical engineering journals. Significance. As the integration of technological tools with the capacities of the mind deepens, explicit attention to ethical issues will ensure that broad human benefit is embraced and not eclipsed by technological exclusiveness.

  12. Brain-computer interfaces current trends and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Azar, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The success of a BCI system depends as much on the system itself as on the user’s ability to produce distinctive EEG activity. BCI systems can be divided into two groups according to the placement of the electrodes used to detect and measure neurons firing in the brain. These groups are: invasive systems, electrodes are inserted directly into the cortex are used for single cell or multi unit recording, and electrocorticography (EcoG), electrodes are placed on the surface of the cortex (or dura); noninvasive systems, they are placed on the scalp and use electroencephalography (EEG) or magnetoencephalography (MEG) to detect neuron activity. The book is basically divided into three parts. The first part of the book covers the basic concepts and overviews of Brain Computer Interface. The second part describes new theoretical developments of BCI systems. The third part covers views on real applications of BCI systems.

  13. Brain-computer interfaces for EEG neurofeedback: peculiarities and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huster, René J; Mokom, Zacharais N; Enriquez-Geppert, Stefanie; Herrmann, Christoph S

    2014-01-01

    Neurofeedback training procedures designed to alter a person's brain activity have been in use for nearly four decades now and represent one of the earliest applications of brain-computer interfaces (BCI). The majority of studies using neurofeedback technology relies on recordings of the electroencephalogram (EEG) and applies neurofeedback in clinical contexts, exploring its potential as treatment for psychopathological syndromes. This clinical focus significantly affects the technology behind neurofeedback BCIs. For example, in contrast to other BCI applications, neurofeedback BCIs usually rely on EEG-derived features with only a minimum of additional processing steps being employed. Here, we highlight the peculiarities of EEG-based neurofeedback BCIs and consider their relevance for software implementations. Having reviewed already existing packages for the implementation of BCIs, we introduce our own solution which specifically considers the relevance of multi-subject handling for experimental and clinical trials, for example by implementing ready-to-use solutions for pseudo-/sham-neurofeedback. © 2013.

  14. Brain computer interfaces as intelligent sensors for enhancing human-computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, M.; Nijboer, F.; Broek, E.L. van den; Fairclough, S.; Nijholt, A.

    2012-01-01

    BCIs are traditionally conceived as a way to control apparatus, an interface that allows you to act on" external devices as a form of input control. We propose an alternative use of BCIs, that of monitoring users as an additional intelligent sensor to enrich traditional means of interaction. This

  15. Brain computer interfaces as intelligent sensors for enhancing human-computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, Mannes; Nijboer, Femke; van den Broek, Egon; Fairclough, Stephen; Morency, Louis-Philippe; Bohus, Dan; Aghajan, Hamid; Nijholt, Antinus; Cassell, Justine; Epps, Julien

    2012-01-01

    BCIs are traditionally conceived as a way to control apparatus, an interface that allows you to "act on" external devices as a form of input control. We propose an alternative use of BCIs, that of monitoring users as an additional intelligent sensor to enrich traditional means of interaction. This

  16. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A communications system and method are provided for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is converted into digital signals and transmitted to the controller. Network device interfaces associated with different data channels can coordinate communications with the other interfaces based on either a transition in a command message sent by the bus controller or a synchronous clock signal.

  17. Neuroengineering tools/applications for bidirectional interfaces, brain computer interfaces, and neuroprosthetic implants - a review of recent progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M Rothschild

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The main focus of this review is to provide a holistic amalgamated overview of the most recent human in vivo techniques for implementing brain-computer interfaces (BCIs, bidirectional interfaces and neuroprosthetics. Neuroengineering is providing new methods for tackling current difficulties; however neuroprosthetics have been studied for decades. Recent progresses are permitting the design of better systems with higher accuracies, repeatability and system robustness. Bidirectional interfaces integrate recording and the relaying of information from and to the brain for the development of BCIs. The concepts of non-invasive and invasive recording of brain activity are introduced. This includes classical and innovative techniques like electroencephalography (EEG and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS. Then the problem of gliosis and solutions for (semi- permanent implant biocompatibility such as innovative implant coatings, materials and shapes are discussed. Implant power and the transmission of their data through implanted pulse generators (IPGs and wireless telemetry are taken into account. How sensation can be relayed back to the brain to increase integration of the neuroengineered systems with the body by methods such as micro-stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS are then addressed. The neuroprosthetic section discusses some of the various types and how they operate. Visual prosthetics are discussed and the three types, dependant on implant location, are examined. Auditory prosthetics, being cochlear or cortical, are then addressed. Replacement hand and limb prosthetics are then considered. These are followed by sections concentrating on the control of wheelchairs, computers and robotics directly from brain activity as recorded by non-invasive and invasive techniques.

  18. Multi parametric card to personal computers interface based in ispLSI1016 circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio Deliz, J.F.; Toledo Acosta, R.B.; Arista Romeu, E.

    1997-01-01

    It is described the design and principal characteristic of the interface circuit for a 16 bit multi parametric add on card for IBM or compatible microcomputer which content two communication channels of direct memory access and bidirectional between the card and the computer, an interrupt controller, a programmable address register, a default add res register of the card, a four channels multiplexer, as well as the decoder logic of the 80C186 and computer. The circuit was designed with two programmable logic devices ispL1016, which allowed drastically to diminish the quantity of utilized components and get a more flexible design in less time better characteristics

  19. Soft drink effects on sensorimotor rhythm brain computer interface performance and resting-state spectral power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundahl, John; Jianjun Meng; He, Jeffrey; Bin He

    2016-08-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems allow users to directly control computers and other machines by modulating their brain waves. In the present study, we investigated the effect of soft drinks on resting state (RS) EEG signals and BCI control. Eight healthy human volunteers each participated in three sessions of BCI cursor tasks and resting state EEG. During each session, the subjects drank an unlabeled soft drink with either sugar, caffeine, or neither ingredient. A comparison of resting state spectral power shows a substantial decrease in alpha and beta power after caffeine consumption relative to control. Despite attenuation of the frequency range used for the control signal, caffeine average BCI performance was the same as control. Our work provides a useful characterization of caffeine, the world's most popular stimulant, on brain signal frequencies and their effect on BCI performance.

  20. Design of a microprocessor-based Control, Interface and Monitoring (CIM unit for turbine engine controls research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaat, J. C.; Soeder, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    High speed minicomputers were used in the past to implement advanced digital control algorithms for turbine engines. These minicomputers are typically large and expensive. It is desirable for a number of reasons to use microprocessor-based systems for future controls research. They are relatively compact, inexpensive, and are representative of the hardware that would be used for actual engine-mounted controls. The Control, Interface, and Monitoring Unit (CIM) contains a microprocessor-based controls computer, necessary interface hardware and a system to monitor while it is running an engine. It is presently being used to evaluate an advanced turbofan engine control algorithm.

  1. Brain-computer interfaces increase whole-brain signal to noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, T Dorina; Lisinski, Jonathan M; McHenry, Monica A; White, Jason P; LaConte, Stephen M

    2013-08-13

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can convert mental states into signals to drive real-world devices, but it is not known if a given covert task is the same when performed with and without BCI-based control. Using a BCI likely involves additional cognitive processes, such as multitasking, attention, and conflict monitoring. In addition, it is challenging to measure the quality of covert task performance. We used whole-brain classifier-based real-time functional MRI to address these issues, because the method provides both classifier-based maps to examine the neural requirements of BCI and classification accuracy to quantify the quality of task performance. Subjects performed a covert counting task at fast and slow rates to control a visual interface. Compared with the same task when viewing but not controlling the interface, we observed that being in control of a BCI improved task classification of fast and slow counting states. Additional BCI control increased subjects' whole-brain signal-to-noise ratio compared with the absence of control. The neural pattern for control consisted of a positive network comprised of dorsal parietal and frontal regions and the anterior insula of the right hemisphere as well as an expansive negative network of regions. These findings suggest that real-time functional MRI can serve as a platform for exploring information processing and frontoparietal and insula network-based regulation of whole-brain task signal-to-noise ratio.

  2. Virtual microscopy: merging of computer mediated communication and intuitive interfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ridder, Huib; de Ridder-Sluiter, Johanna G.; Kluin, Philip M.; Christiaans, Henri H. C. M.

    2009-02-01

    Ubiquitous computing (or Ambient Intelligence) is an upcoming technology that is usually associated with futuristic smart environments in which information is available anytime anywhere and with which humans can interact in a natural, multimodal way. However spectacular the corresponding scenarios may be, it is equally challenging to consider how this technology may enhance existing situations. This is illustrated by a case study from the Dutch medical field: central quality reviewing for pathology in child oncology. The main goal of the review is to assess the quality of the diagnosis based on patient material. The sharing of knowledge in social face-to-face interaction during such meeting is an important advantage. At the same time there is the disadvantage that the experts from the seven Dutch academic medical centers have to travel to the review meeting and that the required logistics to collect and bring patient material and data to the meeting is cumbersome and time-consuming. This paper focuses on how this time-consuming, nonefficient way of reviewing can be replaced by a virtual collaboration system by merging technology supporting Computer Mediated Collaboration and intuitive interfacing. This requires insight in the preferred way of communication and collaboration as well as knowledge about preferred interaction style with a virtual shared workspace.

  3. Ethical aspects of brain computer interfaces: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwell, Sasha; Sample, Matthew; Racine, Eric

    2017-11-09

    Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) is a set of technologies that are of increasing interest to researchers. BCI has been proposed as assistive technology for individuals who are non-communicative or paralyzed, such as those with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or spinal cord injury. The technology has also been suggested for enhancement and entertainment uses, and there are companies currently marketing BCI devices for those purposes (e.g., gaming) as well as health-related purposes (e.g., communication). The unprecedented direct connection created by BCI between human brains and computer hardware raises various ethical, social, and legal challenges that merit further examination and discussion. To identify and characterize the key issues associated with BCI use, we performed a scoping review of biomedical ethics literature, analyzing the ethics concerns cited across multiple disciplines, including philosophy and medicine. Based on this investigation, we report that BCI research and its potential translation to therapeutic intervention generate significant ethical, legal, and social concerns, notably with regards to personhood, stigma, autonomy, privacy, research ethics, safety, responsibility, and justice. Our review of the literature determined, furthermore, that while these issues have been enumerated extensively, few concrete recommendations have been expressed. We conclude that future research should focus on remedying a lack of practical solutions to the ethical challenges of BCI, alongside the collection of empirical data on the perspectives of the public, BCI users, and BCI researchers.

  4. Computer control system of TARN-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, S.

    1989-01-01

    The CAMAC interface system is employed in order to regulate the power supply, beam diagnostic and so on. Five CAMAC stations are located in the TARN-2 area and are linked with a serial highway system. The CAMAC serial highway is driven by a serial highway driver, Kinetic 3992, which is housed in the CAMAC powered crate and regulated by two successive methods. One is regulated by the mini computer through the standard branch-highway crate controller, named Type-A2, and the other is regulated with the microcomputer through the auxiliary crate controller. The CAMAC serial highway comprises the two-way optical cables with a total length of 300 m. Each CAMAC station has the serial and auxiliary crate controllers so as to realize alternative control with the local computer system. Interpreter, INSBASIC, is used in the main control computer. There are many kinds of the 'device control function' of the INSBASIC. Because the 'device control function' implies physical operating procedure of such a device, only knowledge of the logical operating procedure is required. A touch panel system is employed to regulate the complicated control flow without any knowledge of the usage of the device. A rotary encoder system, which is analogous to the potentiometer operation, is also available for smooth adjustment of the setting parameter. (author)

  5. Possibilities and expectations for improved man-machine interface in power system control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asal, H; Burrow, R K; Lindstrom, K; Mocenigo, M; Schellstede, G; Schaffer, G; Serrani, A

    1992-05-01

    The paper describes the hardware, equipment and functions provided to operators for supervising and controlling HVAC power systems. It analyzes the main elements of the man-machine interface (MMI) with particular attention to the recent possibilities afforded by computer technology and full graphic screens. Alarm management and remote control operation are briefly described.

  6. [The P300-based brain-computer interface: presentation of the complex "flash + movement" stimuli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganin, I P; Kaplan, A Ia

    2014-01-01

    The P300 based brain-computer interface requires the detection of P300 wave of brain event-related potentials. Most of its users learn the BCI control in several minutes and after the short classifier training they can type a text on the computer screen or assemble an image of separate fragments in simple BCI-based video games. Nevertheless, insufficient attractiveness for users and conservative stimuli organization in this BCI may restrict its integration into real information processes control. At the same time initial movement of object (motion-onset stimuli) may be an independent factor that induces P300 wave. In current work we checked the hypothesis that complex "flash + movement" stimuli together with drastic and compact stimuli organization on the computer screen may be much more attractive for user while operating in P300 BCI. In 20 subjects research we showed the effectiveness of our interface. Both accuracy and P300 amplitude were higher for flashing stimuli and complex "flash + movement" stimuli compared to motion-onset stimuli. N200 amplitude was maximal for flashing stimuli, while for "flash + movement" stimuli and motion-onset stimuli it was only a half of it. Similar BCI with complex stimuli may be embedded into compact control systems requiring high level of user attention under impact of negative external effects obstructing the BCI control.

  7. Human machine interface for research reactor instrumentation and control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Sabri Minhat; Mohd Idris Taib; Izhar Abu Hussin; Zareen Khan Abdul Jalil Khan; Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha

    2010-01-01

    Most present design of Human Machine Interface for Research Reactor Instrumentation and Control System is modular-based, comprise of several cabinets such as Reactor Protection System, Control Console, Information Console as well as Communication Console. The safety, engineering and human factor will be concerned for the design. Redundancy and separation of signal and power supply are the main factor for safety consideration. The design of Operator Interface absolutely takes consideration of human and environmental factors. Physical parameters, experiences, trainability and long-established habit patterns are very important for user interface, instead of the Aesthetic and Operator-Interface Geometry. Physical design for New Instrumentation and Control System of RTP are proposed base on the state-of- the-art Human Machine Interface design. (author)

  8. Block diagrams of the radar interface and control unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The Interface and Control Unit is the heart of the radar module, which occupies one complex channel of the High-Speed Data Acquisition System of the Goldstone Solar System Radar. Block diagrams of the interface unit are presented as an aid to understanding its operation and interconnections to the rest of the radar module.

  9. Evolution of the Brain Computing Interface (BCI and Proposed Electroencephalography (EEG Signals Based Authentication Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramzan Qaseem

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With current advancements in the field of Brain Computer interface it is required to study how it will affect the other technologies currently in use. In this paper, the authors motivate the need of Brain Computing Interface in the era of IoT (Internet of Things, and analyze how BCI in the presence of IoT could have serious privacy breach if not protected by new kind of more secure protocols. Security breach and hacking has been around for a long time but now we are sensitive towards data as our lives depend on it. When everything is interconnected through IoT and considering that we control all interconnected things by means of our brain using BCI (Brain Computer Interface, the meaning of security breach becomes much more sensitive than in the past. This paper describes the old security methods being used for authentication and how they can be compromised. Considering the sensitivity of data in the era of IoT, a new form of authentication is required, which should incorporate BCI rather than usual authentication techniques.

  10. Training to use a commercial brain-computer interface as access technology: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherian, Sarvnaz; Selitskiy, Dmitry; Pau, James; Davies, T Claire; Owens, R Glynn

    2016-01-01

    This case study describes how an individual with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy was trained over a period of four weeks to use a commercial electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain-computer interface (BCI). The participant spent three sessions exploring the system, and seven sessions playing a game focused on EEG feedback training of left and right arm motor imagery and a customised, training game paradigm was employed. The participant showed improvement in the production of two distinct EEG patterns. The participant's performance was influenced by motivation, fatigue and concentration. Six weeks post-training the participant could still control the BCI and used this to type a sentence using an augmentative and alternative communication application on a wirelessly linked device. The results from this case study highlight the importance of creating a dynamic, relevant and engaging training environment for BCIs. Implications for Rehabilitation Customising a training paradigm to suit the users' interests can influence adherence to assistive technology training. Mood, fatigue, physical illness and motivation influence the usability of a brain-computer interface. Commercial brain-computer interfaces, which require little set up time, may be used as access technology for individuals with severe disabilities.

  11. US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) style guide, Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.

    1996-09-30

    A stated goal of the U.S. Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIS) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of style guides. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide. This document, the U.S. Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide, represents the first version of that style guide. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for RT/NRT Army systems across the weapon systems domains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each domain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their domains.

  12. Controlling Kuka Industrial Robots : Flexible Communication Interface JOpenShowVar.

    OpenAIRE

    Sanfilippo, Filippo; Hatledal, Lars Ivar; Zhang, Houxiang; Fago, Massimiliano; Pettersen, Kristin Ytterstad

    2015-01-01

    JOpenShowVar is a Java open-source cross-platform communication interface to Kuka industrial robots. This novel interface allows for read-write use of the controlled manipulator variables and data structures. JOpenShowVar, which is compatible with all the Kuka industrial robots that use KUKA Robot Controller version 4 (KR C4) and KUKA Robot Controller version 2 (KR C2), runs as a client on a remote computer connected with the Kuka controller via TCP/IP. Even though only soft real-time applica...

  13. User-customized brain computer interfaces using Bayesian optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashashati, Hossein; Ward, Rabab K.; Bashashati, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Objective. The brain characteristics of different people are not the same. Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) should thus be customized for each individual person. In motor-imagery based synchronous BCIs, a number of parameters (referred to as hyper-parameters) including the EEG frequency bands, the channels and the time intervals from which the features are extracted should be pre-determined based on each subject’s brain characteristics. Approach. To determine the hyper-parameter values, previous work has relied on manual or semi-automatic methods that are not applicable to high-dimensional search spaces. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic, scalable and computationally inexpensive algorithm that uses Bayesian optimization to tune these hyper-parameters. We then build different classifiers trained on the sets of hyper-parameter values proposed by the Bayesian optimization. A final classifier aggregates the results of the different classifiers. Main Results. We have applied our method to 21 subjects from three BCI competition datasets. We have conducted rigorous statistical tests, and have shown the positive impact of hyper-parameter optimization in improving the accuracy of BCIs. Furthermore, We have compared our results to those reported in the literature. Significance. Unlike the best reported results in the literature, which are based on more sophisticated feature extraction and classification methods, and rely on prestudies to determine the hyper-parameter values, our method has the advantage of being fully automated, uses less sophisticated feature extraction and classification methods, and yields similar or superior results compared to the best performing designs in the literature.

  14. User-customized brain computer interfaces using Bayesian optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashashati, Hossein; Ward, Rabab K; Bashashati, Ali

    2016-04-01

    The brain characteristics of different people are not the same. Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) should thus be customized for each individual person. In motor-imagery based synchronous BCIs, a number of parameters (referred to as hyper-parameters) including the EEG frequency bands, the channels and the time intervals from which the features are extracted should be pre-determined based on each subject's brain characteristics. To determine the hyper-parameter values, previous work has relied on manual or semi-automatic methods that are not applicable to high-dimensional search spaces. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic, scalable and computationally inexpensive algorithm that uses Bayesian optimization to tune these hyper-parameters. We then build different classifiers trained on the sets of hyper-parameter values proposed by the Bayesian optimization. A final classifier aggregates the results of the different classifiers. We have applied our method to 21 subjects from three BCI competition datasets. We have conducted rigorous statistical tests, and have shown the positive impact of hyper-parameter optimization in improving the accuracy of BCIs. Furthermore, We have compared our results to those reported in the literature. Unlike the best reported results in the literature, which are based on more sophisticated feature extraction and classification methods, and rely on prestudies to determine the hyper-parameter values, our method has the advantage of being fully automated, uses less sophisticated feature extraction and classification methods, and yields similar or superior results compared to the best performing designs in the literature.

  15. An auditory oddball brain-computer interface for binary choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, S; Rea, M; Andreoni, R; Nijboer, F; Hammer, E M; Kleih, S C; Birbaumer, N; Kübler, A

    2010-04-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) provide non-muscular communication for individuals diagnosed with late-stage motoneuron disease (e.g., amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)). In the final stages of the disease, a BCI cannot rely on the visual modality. This study examined a method to achieve high accuracies using auditory stimuli only. We propose an auditory BCI based on a three-stimulus paradigm. This paradigm is similar to the standard oddball but includes an additional target (i.e. two target stimuli, one frequent stimulus). Three versions of the task were evaluated in which the target stimuli differed in loudness, pitch or direction. Twenty healthy participants achieved an average information transfer rate (ITR) of up to 2.46 bits/min and accuracies of 78.5%. Most subjects (14 of 20) achieved their best performance with targets differing in pitch. With this study, the viability of the paradigm was shown for healthy participants and will next be evaluated with individuals diagnosed with ALS or locked-in syndrome (LIS) after stroke. The here presented BCI offers communication with binary choices (yes/no) independent of vision. As it requires only little time per selection, it may constitute a reliable means of communication for patients who lost all motor function and have a short attention span. 2009 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. P300 brain computer interface: current challenges and emerging trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel-Rezai, Reza; Allison, Brendan Z.; Guger, Christoph; Sellers, Eric W.; Kleih, Sonja C.; Kübler, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) enables communication without movement based on brain signals measured with electroencephalography (EEG). BCIs usually rely on one of three types of signals: the P300 and other components of the event-related potential (ERP), steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP), or event related desynchronization (ERD). Although P300 BCIs were introduced over twenty years ago, the past few years have seen a strong increase in P300 BCI research. This closed-loop BCI approach relies on the P300 and other components of the ERP, based on an oddball paradigm presented to the subject. In this paper, we overview the current status of P300 BCI technology, and then discuss new directions: paradigms for eliciting P300s; signal processing methods; applications; and hybrid BCIs. We conclude that P300 BCIs are quite promising, as several emerging directions have not yet been fully explored and could lead to improvements in bit rate, reliability, usability, and flexibility. PMID:22822397

  17. Evaluation of a Compact Hybrid Brain-Computer Interface System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeyoung Shin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We realized a compact hybrid brain-computer interface (BCI system by integrating a portable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS device with an economical electroencephalography (EEG system. The NIRS array was located on the subjects’ forehead, covering the prefrontal area. The EEG electrodes were distributed over the frontal, motor/temporal, and parietal areas. The experimental paradigm involved a Stroop word-picture matching test in combination with mental arithmetic (MA and baseline (BL tasks, in which the subjects were asked to perform either MA or BL in response to congruent or incongruent conditions, respectively. We compared the classification accuracies of each of the modalities (NIRS or EEG with that of the hybrid system. We showed that the hybrid system outperforms the unimodal EEG and NIRS systems by 6.2% and 2.5%, respectively. Since the proposed hybrid system is based on portable platforms, it is not confined to a laboratory environment and has the potential to be used in real-life situations, such as in neurorehabilitation.

  18. On robust parameter estimation in brain-computer interfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samek, Wojciech; Nakajima, Shinichi; Kawanabe, Motoaki; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2017-12-01

    Objective. The reliable estimation of parameters such as mean or covariance matrix from noisy and high-dimensional observations is a prerequisite for successful application of signal processing and machine learning algorithms in brain-computer interfacing (BCI). This challenging task becomes significantly more difficult if the data set contains outliers, e.g. due to subject movements, eye blinks or loose electrodes, as they may heavily bias the estimation and the subsequent statistical analysis. Although various robust estimators have been developed to tackle the outlier problem, they ignore important structural information in the data and thus may not be optimal. Typical structural elements in BCI data are the trials consisting of a few hundred EEG samples and indicating the start and end of a task. Approach. This work discusses the parameter estimation problem in BCI and introduces a novel hierarchical view on robustness which naturally comprises different types of outlierness occurring in structured data. Furthermore, the class of minimum divergence estimators is reviewed and a robust mean and covariance estimator for structured data is derived and evaluated with simulations and on a benchmark data set. Main results. The results show that state-of-the-art BCI algorithms benefit from robustly estimated parameters. Significance. Since parameter estimation is an integral part of various machine learning algorithms, the presented techniques are applicable to many problems beyond BCI.

  19. A Review of Hybrid Brain-Computer Interface Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setare Amiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing number of research activities and different types of studies in brain-computer interface (BCI systems show potential in this young research area. Research teams have studied features of different data acquisition techniques, brain activity patterns, feature extraction techniques, methods of classifications, and many other aspects of a BCI system. However, conventional BCIs have not become totally applicable, due to the lack of high accuracy, reliability, low information transfer rate, and user acceptability. A new approach to create a more reliable BCI that takes advantage of each system is to combine two or more BCI systems with different brain activity patterns or different input signal sources. This type of BCI, called hybrid BCI, may reduce disadvantages of each conventional BCI system. In addition, hybrid BCIs may create more applications and possibly increase the accuracy and the information transfer rate. However, the type of BCIs and their combinations should be considered carefully. In this paper, after introducing several types of BCIs and their combinations, we review and discuss hybrid BCIs, different possibilities to combine them, and their advantages and disadvantages.

  20. ASC-PROBA Interface Control Document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Jørgensen, Finn E

    1999-01-01

    of Automation of the Technical University of Denmark. The document is structured as follows. First we present the ASC - heritage, system description, performance - then we address more specifically the environmental properties, like the EMC compatibility and thermal characteristics, and the design...... and reliability issues. Section 6 deals with the testing and the calibration procedures and in section 7 the mechanical and electrical interfaces are given. In section 8 and 9 we address issues like manufacturing, transportation and storage and to conclude we review the ASC specifications against the PROBA...

  1. Brain-computer interface: changes in performance using virtual reality techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron-Angevin, Ricardo; Díaz-Estrella, Antonio

    2009-01-09

    The ability to control electroencephalographic (EEG) signals when different mental tasks are carried out would provide a method of communication for people with serious motor function problems. This system is known as a brain-computer interface (BCI). Due to the difficulty of controlling one's own EEG signals, a suitable training protocol is required to motivate subjects, as it is necessary to provide some type of visual feedback allowing subjects to see their progress. Conventional systems of feedback are based on simple visual presentations, such as a horizontal bar extension. However, virtual reality is a powerful tool with graphical possibilities to improve BCI-feedback presentation. The objective of the study is to explore the advantages of the use of feedback based on virtual reality techniques compared to conventional systems of feedback. Sixteen untrained subjects, divided into two groups, participated in the experiment. A group of subjects was trained using a BCI system, which uses conventional feedback (bar extension), and another group was trained using a BCI system, which submits subjects to a more familiar environment, such as controlling a car to avoid obstacles. The obtained results suggest that EEG behaviour can be modified via feedback presentation. Significant differences in classification error rates between both interfaces were obtained during the feedback period, confirming that an interface based on virtual reality techniques can improve the feedback control, specifically for untrained subjects.

  2. National Ignition Facility integrated computer control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Arsdall, P.J. LLNL

    1998-01-01

    The NIF design team is developing the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), which is based on an object-oriented software framework applicable to event-driven control systems. The framework provides an open, extensible architecture that is sufficiently abstract to construct future mission-critical control systems. The ICCS will become operational when the first 8 out of 192 beams are activated in mid 2000. The ICCS consists of 300 front-end processors attached to 60,000 control points coordinated by a supervisory system. Computers running either Solaris or VxWorks are networked over a hybrid configuration of switched fast Ethernet and asynchronous transfer mode (ATM). ATM carries digital motion video from sensors to operator consoles. Supervisory software is constructed by extending the reusable framework components for each specific application. The framework incorporates services for database persistence, system configuration, graphical user interface, status monitoring, event logging, scripting language, alert management, and access control. More than twenty collaborating software applications are derived from the common framework. The framework is interoperable among different kinds of computers and functions as a plug-in software bus by leveraging a common object request brokering architecture (CORBA). CORBA transparently distributes the software objects across the network. Because of the pivotal role played, CORBA was tested to ensure adequate performance

  3. CAMAC system for computer control of microwave spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zizka, G.; Turko, B.; Kolbe, B.

    1979-01-01

    An interface between a microwave spectrometer and a computer is described. It consists of three CAMAC modules and uses a standard CAMAC crate and controller. The hardware, in conjunction with appropriate software routines was designed to synchronize measurements, to collect data, and to control the microwave frequency and other experimental parameters

  4. Usability of Three Electroencephalogram Headsets for Brain-Computer Interfaces: A Within Subject Comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gamboa, H.; Nijboer, Femke; van de Laar, B.L.A.; Plácido da Silva, H.; Gilleade, K.; Gerritsen, Steven; Nijholt, Antinus; Bermúdez i Badia, S.; Poel, Mannes; Fairclough, S.

    Currently the field of brain–computer interfacing is increasingly focused on developing usable brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) to better ensure technology transfer and acceptance. Many studies have investigated the usability of BCI applications as a whole. Here we aim to investigate one specific

  5. Distributed computer control system for reactor optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    At the Oldbury power station a prototype distributed computer control system has been installed. This system is designed to support research and development into improved reactor temperature control methods. This work will lead to the development and demonstration of new optimal control systems for improvement of plant efficiency and increase of generated output. The system can collect plant data from special test instrumentation connected to dedicated scanners and from the station's existing data processing system. The system can also, via distributed microprocessor-based interface units, make adjustments to the desired reactor channel gas exit temperatures. The existing control equipment will then adjust the height of control rods to maintain operation at these temperatures. The design of the distributed system is based on extensive experience with distributed systems for direct digital control, operator display and plant monitoring. The paper describes various aspects of this system, with particular emphasis on: (1) the hierarchal system structure; (2) the modular construction of the system to facilitate installation, commissioning and testing, and to reduce maintenance to module replacement; (3) the integration of the system into the station's existing data processing system; (4) distributed microprocessor-based interfaces to the reactor controls, with extensive security facilities implemented by hardware and software; (5) data transfer using point-to-point and bussed data links; (6) man-machine communication based on VDUs with computer input push-buttons and touch-sensitive screens; and (7) the use of a software system supporting a high-level engineer-orientated programming language, at all levels in the system, together with comprehensive data link management

  6. Cognitive assessment of executive functions using brain computer interface and eye-tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cipresso

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available New technologies to enable augmentative and alternative communication in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS have been recently used in several studies. However, a comprehensive battery for cognitive assessment has not been implemented yet. Brain computer interfaces are innovative systems able to generate a control signal from brain responses conveying messages directly to a computer. Another available technology for communication purposes is the Eye-tracker system, that conveys messages from eye-movement to a computer. In this study we explored the use of these two technologies for the cognitive assessment of executive functions in a healthy population and in a ALS patient, also verifying usability, pleasantness, fatigue, and emotional aspects related to the setting. Our preliminary results may have interesting implications for both clinical practice (the availability of an effective tool for neuropsychological evaluation of ALS patients and ethical issues.

  7. The web-based user interface for EAST plasma control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R.R., E-mail: rrzhang@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Anhui (China); Xiao, B.J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Anhui (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui (China); Yuan, Q.P. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Anhui (China); Yang, F. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Anhui (China); Department of Computer Science, Anhui Medical University, Anhui (China); Zhang, Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Anhui (China); Johnson, R.D.; Penaflor, B.G. [General Atomics, DIII-D National Fusion Facility, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The plasma control system (PCS) plays a vital role at EAST for fusion science experiments. Its software application consists of two main parts: an IDL graphical user interface for setting a large number of plasma parameters to specify each discharge, several programs for performing the real-time feedback control and managing the whole control system. The PCS user interface can be used from any X11 Windows client with privileged access to the PCS computer system. However, remote access to the PCS system via the IDL user interface becomes an extreme inconvenience due to the high network latency to draw or operate the interfaces. In order to realize lower latency for remote access to the PCS system, a web-based system has been developed for EAST recently. The setup data are retrieved from the PCS system and client-side JavaScript draws the interfaces into the user's browser. The user settings are also sent back to the PCS system for controlling discharges. These technologies allow the web-based user interface to be viewed by authorized users with a web browser and have it communicate with PCS server processes directly. It works together with the IDL interface and provides a new way to aid remote participation.

  8. The web-based user interface for EAST plasma control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.R.; Xiao, B.J.; Yuan, Q.P.; Yang, F.; Zhang, Y.; Johnson, R.D.; Penaflor, B.G.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma control system (PCS) plays a vital role at EAST for fusion science experiments. Its software application consists of two main parts: an IDL graphical user interface for setting a large number of plasma parameters to specify each discharge, several programs for performing the real-time feedback control and managing the whole control system. The PCS user interface can be used from any X11 Windows client with privileged access to the PCS computer system. However, remote access to the PCS system via the IDL user interface becomes an extreme inconvenience due to the high network latency to draw or operate the interfaces. In order to realize lower latency for remote access to the PCS system, a web-based system has been developed for EAST recently. The setup data are retrieved from the PCS system and client-side JavaScript draws the interfaces into the user's browser. The user settings are also sent back to the PCS system for controlling discharges. These technologies allow the web-based user interface to be viewed by authorized users with a web browser and have it communicate with PCS server processes directly. It works together with the IDL interface and provides a new way to aid remote participation

  9. User interface issues in supporting human-computer integrated scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.; Biefeld, Eric W.

    1991-01-01

    The topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: characteristics of Operations Mission Planner (OMP) schedule domain; OMP architecture; definition of a schedule; user interface dimensions; functional distribution; types of users; interpreting user interaction; dynamic overlays; reactive scheduling; and transitioning the interface.

  10. Towards Effective Non-Invasive Brain-Computer Interfaces Dedicated to Gait Rehabilitation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Castermans

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, significant progress has been made in the field of walk rehabilitation. Motor cortex signals in bipedal monkeys have been interpreted to predict walk kinematics. Epidural electrical stimulation in rats and in one young paraplegic has been realized to partially restore motor control after spinal cord injury. However, these experimental trials are far from being applicable to all patients suffering from motor impairments. Therefore, it is thought that more simple rehabilitation systems are desirable in the meanwhile. The goal of this review is to describe and summarize the progress made in the development of non-invasive brain-computer interfaces dedicated to motor rehabilitation systems. In the first part, the main principles of human locomotion control are presented. The paper then focuses on the mechanisms of supra-spinal centers active during gait, including results from electroencephalography, functional brain imaging technologies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, positron-emission tomography (PET, single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT] and invasive studies. The first brain-computer interface (BCI applications to gait rehabilitation are then presented, with a discussion about the different strategies developed in the field. The challenges to raise for future systems are identified and discussed. Finally, we present some proposals to address these challenges, in order to contribute to the improvement of BCI for gait rehabilitation.

  11. Knowledge-based control of an adaptive interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachman, Roy

    1989-01-01

    The analysis, development strategy, and preliminary design for an intelligent, adaptive interface is reported. The design philosophy couples knowledge-based system technology with standard human factors approaches to interface development for computer workstations. An expert system has been designed to drive the interface for application software. The intelligent interface will be linked to application packages, one at a time, that are planned for multiple-application workstations aboard Space Station Freedom. Current requirements call for most Space Station activities to be conducted at the workstation consoles. One set of activities will consist of standard data management services (DMS). DMS software includes text processing, spreadsheets, data base management, etc. Text processing was selected for the first intelligent interface prototype because text-processing software can be developed initially as fully functional but limited with a small set of commands. The program's complexity then can be increased incrementally. The intelligent interface includes the operator's behavior and three types of instructions to the underlying application software are included in the rule base. A conventional expert-system inference engine searches the data base for antecedents to rules and sends the consequents of fired rules as commands to the underlying software. Plans for putting the expert system on top of a second application, a database management system, will be carried out following behavioral research on the first application. The intelligent interface design is suitable for use with ground-based workstations now common in government, industrial, and educational organizations.

  12. EEG datasets for motor imagery brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hohyun; Ahn, Minkyu; Ahn, Sangtae; Kwon, Moonyoung; Jun, Sung Chan

    2017-07-01

    Most investigators of brain-computer interface (BCI) research believe that BCI can be achieved through induced neuronal activity from the cortex, but not by evoked neuronal activity. Motor imagery (MI)-based BCI is one of the standard concepts of BCI, in that the user can generate induced activity by imagining motor movements. However, variations in performance over sessions and subjects are too severe to overcome easily; therefore, a basic understanding and investigation of BCI performance variation is necessary to find critical evidence of performance variation. Here we present not only EEG datasets for MI BCI from 52 subjects, but also the results of a psychological and physiological questionnaire, EMG datasets, the locations of 3D EEG electrodes, and EEGs for non-task-related states. We validated our EEG datasets by using the percentage of bad trials, event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) analysis, and classification analysis. After conventional rejection of bad trials, we showed contralateral ERD and ipsilateral ERS in the somatosensory area, which are well-known patterns of MI. Finally, we showed that 73.08% of datasets (38 subjects) included reasonably discriminative information. Our EEG datasets included the information necessary to determine statistical significance; they consisted of well-discriminated datasets (38 subjects) and less-discriminative datasets. These may provide researchers with opportunities to investigate human factors related to MI BCI performance variation, and may also achieve subject-to-subject transfer by using metadata, including a questionnaire, EEG coordinates, and EEGs for non-task-related states. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. A collaborative brain-computer interface for improving human performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Wang

    Full Text Available Electroencephalogram (EEG based brain-computer interfaces (BCI have been studied since the 1970s. Currently, the main focus of BCI research lies on the clinical use, which aims to provide a new communication channel to patients with motor disabilities to improve their quality of life. However, the BCI technology can also be used to improve human performance for normal healthy users. Although this application has been proposed for a long time, little progress has been made in real-world practices due to technical limits of EEG. To overcome the bottleneck of low single-user BCI performance, this study proposes a collaborative paradigm to improve overall BCI performance by integrating information from multiple users. To test the feasibility of a collaborative BCI, this study quantitatively compares the classification accuracies of collaborative and single-user BCI applied to the EEG data collected from 20 subjects in a movement-planning experiment. This study also explores three different methods for fusing and analyzing EEG data from multiple subjects: (1 Event-related potentials (ERP averaging, (2 Feature concatenating, and (3 Voting. In a demonstration system using the Voting method, the classification accuracy of predicting movement directions (reaching left vs. reaching right was enhanced substantially from 66% to 80%, 88%, 93%, and 95% as the numbers of subjects increased from 1 to 5, 10, 15, and 20, respectively. Furthermore, the decision of reaching direction could be made around 100-250 ms earlier than the subject's actual motor response by decoding the ERP activities arising mainly from the posterior parietal cortex (PPC, which are related to the processing of visuomotor transmission. Taken together, these results suggest that a collaborative BCI can effectively fuse brain activities of a group of people to improve the overall performance of natural human behavior.

  14. Brain-computer interface based on intermodulation frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaogang; Chen, Zhikai; Gao, Shangkai; Gao, Xiaorong

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Most recent steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) systems have used a single frequency for each target, so that a large number of targets require a large number of stimulus frequencies and therefore a wider frequency band. However, human beings show good SSVEP responses only in a limited range of frequencies. Furthermore, this issue is especially problematic if the SSVEP-based BCI takes a PC monitor as a stimulator, which is only capable of generating a limited range of frequencies. To mitigate this issue, this study presents an innovative coding method for SSVEP-based BCI by means of intermodulation frequencies. Approach. Simultaneous modulations of stimulus luminance and color at different frequencies were utilized to induce intermodulation frequencies. Luminance flickered at relatively large frequency (10, 12, 15 Hz), while color alternated at low frequency (0.5, 1 Hz). An attractive feature of the proposed method was that it would substantially increase the number of targets at a single flickering frequency by altering color modulated frequencies. Based on this method, the BCI system presented in this study realized eight targets merely using three flickering frequencies. Main results. The online results obtained from 15 subjects (14 healthy and 1 with stroke) revealed that an average classification accuracy of 93.83% and information transfer rate (ITR) of 33.80 bit min-1 were achieved using our proposed SSVEP-based BCI system. Specifically, 5 out of the 15 subjects exhibited an ITR of 40.00 bit min-1 with a classification accuracy of 100%. Significance. These results suggested that intermodulation frequencies could be adopted as steady responses in BCI, for which our system could be used as a practical BCI system.

  15. Computational aspects of linear control

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Many devices (we say dynamical systems or simply systems) behave like black boxes: they receive an input, this input is transformed following some laws (usually a differential equation) and an output is observed. The problem is to regulate the input in order to control the output, that is for obtaining a desired output. Such a mechanism, where the input is modified according to the output measured, is called feedback. The study and design of such automatic processes is called control theory. As we will see, the term system embraces any device and control theory has a wide variety of applications in the real world. Control theory is an interdisci­ plinary domain at the junction of differential and difference equations, system theory and statistics. Moreover, the solution of a control problem involves many topics of numerical analysis and leads to many interesting computational problems: linear algebra (QR, SVD, projections, Schur complement, structured matrices, localization of eigenvalues, computation of the...

  16. Brain-computer interface training combined with transcranial direct current stimulation in patients with chronic severe hemiparesis: Proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasashima-Shindo, Yuko; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Ushiba, Junichi; Matsushika, Yayoi; Kamatani, Daiki; Oto, Misa; Ono, Takashi; Nishimoto, Atsuko; Shindo, Keiichiro; Kawakami, Michiyuki; Tsuji, Tetsuya; Liu, Meigen

    2015-04-01

    Brain-computer interface technology has been applied to stroke patients to improve their motor function. Event-related desynchronization during motor imagery, which is used as a brain-computer interface trigger, is sometimes difficult to detect in stroke patients. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is known to increase event-related desynchronization. This study investigated the adjunctive effect of anodal tDCS for brain-computer interface training in patients with severe hemiparesis. Eighteen patients with chronic stroke. A non-randomized controlled study. Subjects were divided between a brain-computer interface group and a tDCS- brain-computer interface group and participated in a 10-day brain-computer interface training. Event-related desynchronization was detected in the affected hemisphere during motor imagery of the affected fingers. The tDCS-brain-computer interface group received anodal tDCS before brain-computer interface training. Event-related desynchronization was evaluated before and after the intervention. The Fugl-Meyer Assessment upper extremity motor score (FM-U) was assessed before, immediately after, and 3 months after, the intervention. Event-related desynchronization was significantly increased in the tDCS- brain-computer interface group. The FM-U was significantly increased in both groups. The FM-U improvement was maintained at 3 months in the tDCS-brain-computer interface group. Anodal tDCS can be a conditioning tool for brain-computer interface training in patients with severe hemiparetic stroke.

  17. A comparative study: use of a Brain-computer Interface (BCI) device by people with cerebral palsy in interaction with computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich, Regina O; Jensen, Emely; Rebelo, Francisco; Oliveira, Tiago

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a comparative study among people with cerebral palsy and healthy controls, of various ages, using a Brain-computer Interface (BCI) device. The research is qualitative in its approach. Researchers worked with Observational Case Studies. People with cerebral palsy and healthy controls were evaluated in Portugal and in Brazil. The study aimed to develop a study for product evaluation in order to perceive whether people with cerebral palsy could interact with the computer and compare whether their performance is similar to that of healthy controls when using the Brain-computer Interface. Ultimately, it was found that there are no significant differences between people with cerebral palsy in the two countries, as well as between populations without cerebral palsy (healthy controls).

  18. Effects of muscle fatigue on the usability of a myoelectric human-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barszap, Alexander G; Skavhaug, Ida-Maria; Joshi, Sanjay S

    2016-10-01

    Electromyography-based human-computer interface development is an active field of research. However, knowledge on the effects of muscle fatigue for specific devices is limited. We have developed a novel myoelectric human-computer interface in which subjects continuously navigate a cursor to targets by manipulating a single surface electromyography (sEMG) signal. Two-dimensional control is achieved through simultaneous adjustments of power in two frequency bands through a series of dynamic low-level muscle contractions. Here, we investigate the potential effects of muscle fatigue during the use of our interface. In the first session, eight subjects completed 300 cursor-to-target trials without breaks; four using a wrist muscle and four using a head muscle. The wrist subjects returned for a second session in which a static fatiguing exercise took place at regular intervals in-between cursor-to-target trials. In the first session we observed no declines in performance as a function of use, even after the long period of use. In the second session, we observed clear changes in cursor trajectories, paired with a target-specific decrease in hit rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS AND PRACTICAL IMPLEMENTATION OF TECHNOLOGY BRAIN-COMPUTER INTERFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ya. Kaplan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Technology brain-computer interface (BCI allow saperson to learn how to control external devices via thevoluntary regulation of own EEG directly from the brain without the involvement in the process of nerves and muscles. At the beginning the main goal of BCI was to replace or restore motor function to people disabled by neuromuscular disorders. Currently, the task of designing the BCI increased significantly, more capturing different aspects of life a healthy person. This article discusses the theoretical, experimental and technological base of BCI development and systematized critical fields of real implementation of these technologies.

  20. Efficient neuroplasticity induction in chronic stroke patients by an associative brain-computer interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Jiang, Ning; Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have the potential to improve functionality in chronic stoke patients when applied over a large number of sessions. Here, we evaluate the effect and the underlying mechanisms of three BCI training sessions in a double-blind-sham-controlled design. The applied BCI......-associative group. Fugl-Meyer motor scores (0.8±0.46 point difference p=0.01), foot (but not finger) tapping frequency, and 10-m walking speed improved significantly for the BCIassociative group, indicating clinically relevant improvements. For the BCI as applied here, the precise coupling between the brain command...

  1. Guidelines for the integration of audio cues into computer user interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumikawa, D.A.

    1985-06-01

    Throughout the history of computers, vision has been the main channel through which information is conveyed to the computer user. As the complexities of man-machine interactions increase, more and more information must be transferred from the computer to the user and then successfully interpreted by the user. A logical next step in the evolution of the computer-user interface is the incorporation of sound and thereby using the sense of ''hearing'' in the computer experience. This allows our visual and auditory capabilities to work naturally together in unison leading to more effective and efficient interpretation of all information received by the user from the computer. This thesis presents an initial set of guidelines to assist interface developers in designing an effective sight and sound user interface. This study is a synthesis of various aspects of sound, human communication, computer-user interfaces, and psychoacoustics. We introduce the notion of an earcon. Earcons are audio cues used in the computer-user interface to provide information and feedback to the user about some computer object, operation, or interaction. A possible construction technique for earcons, the use of earcons in the interface, how earcons are learned and remembered, and the affects of earcons on their users are investigated. This study takes the point of view that earcons are a language and human/computer communication issue and are therefore analyzed according to the three dimensions of linguistics; syntactics, semantics, and pragmatics.

  2. LAMI: A gesturally controlled three-dimensional stage Leap (Motion-based) Audio Mixing Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Wakefield, Jonathan P.; Dewey, Christopher; Gale, William

    2017-01-01

    Interface designers are increasingly exploring alternative approaches to user input/control. LAMI is a Leap (Motion-based) AMI which takes user’s hand gestures and maps these to a three-dimensional stage displayed on a computer monitor. Audio channels are visualised as spheres whose Y coordinate is spectral centroid and X and Z coordinates are controlled by hand position and represent pan and level respectively. Auxiliary send levels are controlled via wrist rotation and vertical hand positio...

  3. Customizing graphical user interface technology for spacecraft control centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Edward; Giancola, Peter; Gibson, Steven; Mahmot, Ronald

    1993-01-01

    The Transportable Payload Operations Control Center (TPOCC) project is applying the latest in graphical user interface technology to the spacecraft control center environment. This project of the Mission Operations Division's (MOD) Control Center Systems Branch (CCSB) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed an architecture for control centers which makes use of a distributed processing approach and the latest in Unix workstation technology. The TPOCC project is committed to following industry standards and using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware and software components wherever possible to reduce development costs and to improve operational support. TPOCC's most successful use of commercial software products and standards has been in the development of its graphical user interface. This paper describes TPOCC's successful use and customization of four separate layers of commercial software products to create a flexible and powerful user interface that is uniquely suited to spacecraft monitoring and control.

  4. Role of optical computers in aeronautical control applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The role that optical computers play in aircraft control is determined. The optical computer has the potential high speed capability required, especially for matrix/matrix operations. The optical computer also has the potential for handling nonlinear simulations in real time. They are also more compatible with fiber optic signal transmission. Optics also permit the use of passive sensors to measure process variables. No electrical energy need be supplied to the sensor. Complex interfacing between optical sensors and the optical computer is avoided if the optical sensor outputs can be directly processed by the optical computer.

  5. Computer controlled high voltage system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunov, B; Georgiev, G; Dimitrov, L [and others

    1996-12-31

    A multichannel computer controlled high-voltage power supply system is developed. The basic technical parameters of the system are: output voltage -100-3000 V, output current - 0-3 mA, maximum number of channels in one crate - 78. 3 refs.

  6. Computer controlled testing of batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, A.C.J.; Einerhand, R.E.F.; Visscher, W.

    1989-01-01

    A computerized testing device for batteries consists of a power supply, a multiplexer circuit connected to the batteries, a protection circuit, and an IBM Data Aquisition and Control Adapter card, connected to a personal computer. The software is written in Turbo-Pascal and can be easily adapted to

  7. Human-computer interfaces applied to numerical solution of the Plateau problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias Fabris, Antonio; Soares Bandeira, Ivana; Ramos Batista, Valério

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present a code in Matlab to solve the Problem of Plateau numerically, and the code will include human-computer interface. The Problem of Plateau has applications in areas of knowledge like, for instance, Computer Graphics. The solution method will be the same one of the Surface Evolver, but the difference will be a complete graphical interface with the user. This will enable us to implement other kinds of interface like ocular mouse, voice, touch, etc. To date, Evolver does not include any graphical interface, which restricts its use by the scientific community. Specially, its use is practically impossible for most of the Physically Challenged People.

  8. Computational analysis of acoustic transmission through periodically perforated interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan E.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to demonstrate the homogenization approach applied to modelling the acoustic transmission on perforated interfaces embedded in the acoustic fluid. We assume a layer, with periodically perforated obstacles, separating two half-spaces filled with the fluid. The homogenization method provides limit transmission conditions which can be prescribed at the homogenized surface representing the "limit" interface. The conditions describe relationship between jump of the acoustic pressures and the transversal acoustic velocity, on introducing the "in-layer pressure" which describes wave propagation in the tangent directions with respect to the interface.This approach may serve as a relevant tool for optimal design of devices aimed at attenuation of the acoustic waves, such as the engine exhaust mufflers or other structures fitted with sieves and grillages. We present numerical examples of wave propagation in a muffler-like structure illustrating viability of the approach when complex 3D geometries of the interface perforation are considered.

  9. ConductHome: Gesture Interface Control of Home Automation Boxes

    OpenAIRE

    J. Branstett; V. Gagneux; A. Leleu; B. Levadoux; J. Pascale

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the interface ConductHome which controls home automation systems with a Leap Motion using "invariant gesture protocols". This interface is meant to simplify the interaction of the user with its environment. A hardware part allows the Leap Motion to be carried around the house. A software part interacts with the home automation box and displays the useful information for the user. An objective of this work is the development of a natural/invariant/simpl...

  10. Improvement of computer complex and interface system for compact nuclear simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D. Y.; Park, W. M.; Cha, K. H.; Jung, C. H.; Park, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    CNS(Compact Nuclear Simulator) was developed at the end of 1980s, and have been used as training simulator for staffs of KAERI during 10 years. The operator panel interface cards and the graphic interface cards were designed with special purpose only for CNS. As these interface cards were worn out for 10 years, it was very difficult to get spare parts and to repair them. And the interface cards were damaged by over current happened by shortage of lamp in the operator panel. To solve these problem, the project 'Improvement of Compact Nuclear Simulator' was started from 1997. This paper only introduces about the improvement of computer complex and interface system

  11. Internet remote control interface for a multipurpose robotic arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Dunnigan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an Internet remote control interface for a MITSUBISHI PA10-6CE manipulator established for the purpose of the ROBOT museum exhibition during spring and summer 2004. The robotic manipulator is a part of the Intelligent Robotic Systems Laboratory at Heriot ? Watt University, which has been established to work on dynamic and kinematic aspects of manipulator control in the presence of environmental disturbances. The laboratory has been enriched by a simple vision system consisting of three web-cameras to broadcast the live images of the robots over the Internet. The Interface comprises of the TCP/IP server providing command parsing and execution using the open controller architecture of the manipulator and a client Java applet web-site providing a simple robot control interface.

  12. Digital interface for bi-directional communication between a computer and a peripheral device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, H. H., Jr. (Inventor); Franklin, C. R.

    1984-01-01

    For transmission of data from the computer to the peripheral, the computer initially clears a flipflop which provides a select signal to a multiplexer. A data available signal or data strobe signal is produced while tht data is being provided to the interface. Setting of the flipflop causes a gate to provide to the peripherial a signal indicating that the interface has data available for transmission. The peripheral provides an acknowledge or strobe signal to transfer the data to the peripheral. For transmission of data from the peripheral to the computer, the computer presents the initially cleared flipflop. A data request signal from the peripheral indicates that the peripheral has data available for transmission to the computer. An acknowledge signal indicates that the interface is ready to receive data from the peripheral and to strobe that data into the interface.

  13. Speech control interface for Eurocontrol’s LINK2000+ system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Cristian ION

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper continues recent research of the authors, considering the use of speech recognition in air traffic control. It proposes the use of a voice control interface for Eurocontrol’s LINK2000+ system, offering an alternative means to improve air transport safety and efficiency.

  14. Tangible interfaces for virtual nuclear power plant control desk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghina, Mauricio Alves C.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Lapa, Celso M.F. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Nomiya, Diogo [Engenharia Eletrica (UFRJ), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cunha, Gerson G.; Landau, Luiz [Programa de Engenharia Civil (PEC/COPPE/UFRJ), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Due to the high safety requirements for nuclear power plant operation, control desks must be designed in such a way operators can take all the procedures safely, with a good overview of all variable indicators and easy access to actuator controls. Also, operators must see alarms indication in a way they can easily identify any abnormal conditions and bring the NPP back to normal operation. The ergonomics and human factors fields have helped evaluations to improve the design of nuclear power plant control systems. Lately, the use of virtual control desks have helped even more such evaluations, by integrating in one platform both nuclear power plant dynamics simulator with a high visual fidelity control desk proto typing. Operators can interact with these virtual control desks in a similar way as with real ones. Such a virtual control desk has been under development at Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, IEN/CNEN. This paper reports the latest improvements, with the use of more interaction modes, to turn operation a friendlier task. An automatic speech recognition interface has been implemented as a self-contained system, by accessing directly MS Windows Application Interface, and with online neural network training for spoken commend recognition. Thus, operators can switch among different desk views. Besides this, head tracking interfaces have been integrated with the virtual control desk, to move within desk views according to users head movements. Both marker and markerless-based head tracking interfaces have been implemented. Results are shown and commented. (author)

  15. Tangible interfaces for virtual nuclear power plant control desk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghina, Mauricio Alves C.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Lapa, Celso M.F.; Nomiya, Diogo; Cunha, Gerson G.; Landau, Luiz

    2011-01-01

    Due to the high safety requirements for nuclear power plant operation, control desks must be designed in such a way operators can take all the procedures safely, with a good overview of all variable indicators and easy access to actuator controls. Also, operators must see alarms indication in a way they can easily identify any abnormal conditions and bring the NPP back to normal operation. The ergonomics and human factors fields have helped evaluations to improve the design of nuclear power plant control systems. Lately, the use of virtual control desks have helped even more such evaluations, by integrating in one platform both nuclear power plant dynamics simulator with a high visual fidelity control desk proto typing. Operators can interact with these virtual control desks in a similar way as with real ones. Such a virtual control desk has been under development at Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, IEN/CNEN. This paper reports the latest improvements, with the use of more interaction modes, to turn operation a friendlier task. An automatic speech recognition interface has been implemented as a self-contained system, by accessing directly MS Windows Application Interface, and with online neural network training for spoken commend recognition. Thus, operators can switch among different desk views. Besides this, head tracking interfaces have been integrated with the virtual control desk, to move within desk views according to users head movements. Both marker and markerless-based head tracking interfaces have been implemented. Results are shown and commented. (author)

  16. Frequency Adaptability of Harmonics Controllers for Grid-Interfaced Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Zhou, Keliang; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    sensitivity of the most popular harmonic controllers for grid-interfaced converters. The frequency adaptability of these harmonic controllers is evaluated in the presence of a variable grid frequency within a specified reasonable range, e.g., +-1% of the nominal grid frequency (50 Hz). Solutions...

  17. Fencing direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2013-09-03

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to segments of shared random access memory through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  18. Neural correlates of learning in an electrocorticographic motor-imagery brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Tim M.; Miller, Kai J.; Rao, Rajesh P. N.; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.

    2014-01-01

    Human subjects can learn to control a one-dimensional electrocorticographic (ECoG) brain-computer interface (BCI) using modulation of primary motor (M1) high-gamma activity (signal power in the 75–200 Hz range). However, the stability and dynamics of the signals over the course of new BCI skill acquisition have not been investigated. In this study, we report 3 characteristic periods in evolution of the high-gamma control signal during BCI training: initial, low task accuracy with corresponding low power modulation in the gamma spectrum, followed by a second period of improved task accuracy with increasing average power separation between activity and rest, and a final period of high task accuracy with stable (or decreasing) power separation and decreasing trial-to-trial variance. These findings may have implications in the design and implementation of BCI control algorithms. PMID:25599079

  19. Integrated multimodal human-computer interface and augmented reality for interactive display applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, Marius S.; Sundareswaran, Venkataraman; Chen, S.; Behringer, Reinhold; Tam, Clement K.; Chan, M.; Bangayan, Phil T.; McGee, Joshua H.

    2000-08-01

    We describe new systems for improved integrated multimodal human-computer interaction and augmented reality for a diverse array of applications, including future advanced cockpits, tactical operations centers, and others. We have developed an integrated display system featuring: speech recognition of multiple concurrent users equipped with both standard air- coupled microphones and novel throat-coupled sensors (developed at Army Research Labs for increased noise immunity); lip reading for improving speech recognition accuracy in noisy environments, three-dimensional spatialized audio for improved display of warnings, alerts, and other information; wireless, coordinated handheld-PC control of a large display; real-time display of data and inferences from wireless integrated networked sensors with on-board signal processing and discrimination; gesture control with disambiguated point-and-speak capability; head- and eye- tracking coupled with speech recognition for 'look-and-speak' interaction; and integrated tetherless augmented reality on a wearable computer. The various interaction modalities (speech recognition, 3D audio, eyetracking, etc.) are implemented a 'modality servers' in an Internet-based client-server architecture. Each modality server encapsulates and exposes commercial and research software packages, presenting a socket network interface that is abstracted to a high-level interface, minimizing both vendor dependencies and required changes on the client side as the server's technology improves.

  20. Mobile Interfaces for Building Control Surveyors

    OpenAIRE

    Chmielewski , Jacek; Walczak , Krzysztof; Wiza , Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    International audience; The problem of integrating heterogeneous back-end platforms used in public administration has been widely addressed in a number of research and development projects. In such a complex and heterogeneous environment, application of the SOA paradigm can be particularly beneficial. However, in some application domains - such as the Building Control Administration - there is an additional requirement: integration of heterogeneous front-end platforms - including access throu...

  1. Joint Time-Frequency-Space Classification of EEG in a Brain-Computer Interface Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molina Gary N Garcia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interface is a growing field of interest in human-computer interaction with diverse applications ranging from medicine to entertainment. In this paper, we present a system which allows for classification of mental tasks based on a joint time-frequency-space decorrelation, in which mental tasks are measured via electroencephalogram (EEG signals. The efficiency of this approach was evaluated by means of real-time experimentations on two subjects performing three different mental tasks. To do so, a number of protocols for visualization, as well as training with and without feedback, were also developed. Obtained results show that it is possible to obtain good classification of simple mental tasks, in view of command and control, after a relatively small amount of training, with accuracies around 80%, and in real time.

  2. Interfacing external quantum devices to a universal quantum computer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio A Lagana

    Full Text Available We present a scheme to use external quantum devices using the universal quantum computer previously constructed. We thereby show how the universal quantum computer can utilize networked quantum information resources to carry out local computations. Such information may come from specialized quantum devices or even from remote universal quantum computers. We show how to accomplish this by devising universal quantum computer programs that implement well known oracle based quantum algorithms, namely the Deutsch, Deutsch-Jozsa, and the Grover algorithms using external black-box quantum oracle devices. In the process, we demonstrate a method to map existing quantum algorithms onto the universal quantum computer.

  3. Brain-computer interface based on generation of visual images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Bobrov

    Full Text Available This paper examines the task of recognizing EEG patterns that correspond to performing three mental tasks: relaxation and imagining of two types of pictures: faces and houses. The experiments were performed using two EEG headsets: BrainProducts ActiCap and Emotiv EPOC. The Emotiv headset becomes widely used in consumer BCI application allowing for conducting large-scale EEG experiments in the future. Since classification accuracy significantly exceeded the level of random classification during the first three days of the experiment with EPOC headset, a control experiment was performed on the fourth day using ActiCap. The control experiment has shown that utilization of high-quality research equipment can enhance classification accuracy (up to 68% in some subjects and that the accuracy is independent of the presence of EEG artifacts related to blinking and eye movement. This study also shows that computationally-inexpensive bayesian classifier based on covariance matrix analysis yields similar classification accuracy in this problem as a more sophisticated Multi-class Common Spatial Patterns (MCSP classifier.

  4. Biomechatronics in medical rehabilitation biomodelling, interface, and control

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Shane (S Q )

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the key technologies in developing biomechatronic systems for medical rehabilitation purposes. It includes a detailed analysis of biosignal processing, biomechanics modelling, neural and muscular interfaces, artificial actuators, robot-assisted training, clinical setup/implementation and rehabilitation robot control. Encompassing highly multidisciplinary themes in the engineering and medical fields, it presents researchers’ insights into the emerging technologies and developments that are being utilized in biomechatronics for medical purposes. Presenting a detailed analysis of five key areas in rehabilitation robotics: (i) biosignal processing; (ii) biomechanics modelling; (iii) neural and muscular interfaces; (iv) artificial actuators and devices; and (v) the use of neurological and muscular interfaces in rehabilitation robots control, the book describes the design of biomechatronic systems, the methods and control systems used and the implementation and testing in order to show how th...

  5. U.S. Army weapon systems human-computer interface style guide. Version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.; Donohoo, D.T.

    1997-12-31

    A stated goal of the US Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIs) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of HCI design guidance documents. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA), now termed the Joint Technical Architecture-Army (JTA-A). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide, which resulted in the US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide Version 1. Based on feedback from the user community, DISC4 further tasked PNNL to revise Version 1 and publish Version 2. The intent was to update some of the research and incorporate some enhancements. This document provides that revision. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for the RT/NRT Army system domain across the weapon systems subdomains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each subdomain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their subdomains.

  6. Experiment on a novel user input for computer interface utilizing tongue input for the severely disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kencana, Andy Prima; Heng, John

    2008-11-01

    This paper introduces a novel passive tongue control and tracking device. The device is intended to be used by the severely disabled or quadriplegic person. The main focus of this device when compared to the other existing tongue tracking devices is that the sensor employed is passive which means it requires no powered electrical sensor to be inserted into the user's mouth and hence no trailing wires. This haptic interface device employs the use of inductive sensors to track the position of the user's tongue. The device is able perform two main PC functions that of the keyboard and mouse function. The results show that this device allows the severely disabled person to have some control in his environment, such as to turn on and off or control daily electrical devices or appliances; or to be used as a viable PC Human Computer Interface (HCI) by tongue control. The operating principle and set-up of such a novel passive tongue HCI has been established with successful laboratory trials and experiments. Further clinical trials will be required to test out the device on disabled persons before it is ready for future commercial development.

  7. Computer organization and design the hardware/software interface

    CERN Document Server

    Patterson, David A

    2013-01-01

    The 5th edition of Computer Organization and Design moves forward into the post-PC era with new examples, exercises, and material highlighting the emergence of mobile computing and the cloud. This generational change is emphasized and explored with updated content featuring tablet computers, cloud infrastructure, and the ARM (mobile computing devices) and x86 (cloud computing) architectures. Because an understanding of modern hardware is essential to achieving good performance and energy efficiency, this edition adds a new concrete example, "Going Faster," used throughout the text to demonstrate extremely effective optimization techniques. Also new to this edition is discussion of the "Eight Great Ideas" of computer architecture. As with previous editions, a MIPS processor is the core used to present the fundamentals of hardware technologies, assembly language, computer arithmetic, pipelining, memory hierarchies and I/O. Optimization techniques featured throughout the text. It covers parallelism in depth with...

  8. Experimental evaluation of multimodal human computer interface for tactical audio applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obrenovic, Z.; Starcevic, D.; Jovanov, E.; Oy, S.

    2002-01-01

    Mission critical and information overwhelming applications require careful design of the human computer interface. Typical applications include night vision or low visibility mission navigation, guidance through a hostile territory, and flight navigation and orientation. Additional channels of

  9. Online LDA BASED brain-computer interface system to aid disabled people

    OpenAIRE

    Apdullah Yayık; Yakup Kutlu

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to develop brain-computer interface system based on electroencephalography that can aid disabled people in daily life. The system relies on one of the most effective event-related potential wave, P300, which can be elicited by oddball paradigm. Developed application has a basic interaction tool that enables disabled people to convey their needs to other people selecting related objects. These objects pseudo-randomly flash in a visual interface on computer screen. The user must...

  10. Soft brain-machine interfaces for assistive robotics: A novel control approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiatti, Lucia; Tessadori, Jacopo; Barresi, Giacinto; Mattos, Leonardo S; Ajoudani, Arash

    2017-07-01

    Robotic systems offer the possibility of improving the life quality of people with severe motor disabilities, enhancing the individual's degree of independence and interaction with the external environment. In this direction, the operator's residual functions must be exploited for the control of the robot movements and the underlying dynamic interaction through intuitive and effective human-robot interfaces. Towards this end, this work aims at exploring the potential of a novel Soft Brain-Machine Interface (BMI), suitable for dynamic execution of remote manipulation tasks for a wide range of patients. The interface is composed of an eye-tracking system, for an intuitive and reliable control of a robotic arm system's trajectories, and a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) unit, for the control of the robot Cartesian stiffness, which determines the interaction forces between the robot and environment. The latter control is achieved by estimating in real-time a unidimensional index from user's electroencephalographic (EEG) signals, which provides the probability of a neutral or active state. This estimated state is then translated into a stiffness value for the robotic arm, allowing a reliable modulation of the robot's impedance. A preliminary evaluation of this hybrid interface concept provided evidence on the effective execution of tasks with dynamic uncertainties, demonstrating the great potential of this control method in BMI applications for self-service and clinical care.

  11. Open-Box Muscle-Computer Interface: Introduction to Human-Computer Interactions in Bioengineering, Physiology, and Neuroscience Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa-Jiménez, M. A.; González-Gaspar, P.; Pérez-Estudillo, C.; López-Meraz, M. L.; Morgado-Valle, C.; Beltran-Parrazal, L.

    2016-01-01

    A Muscle-Computer Interface (muCI) is a human-machine system that uses electromyographic (EMG) signals to communicate with a computer. Surface EMG (sEMG) signals are currently used to command robotic devices, such as robotic arms and hands, and mobile robots, such as wheelchairs. These signals reflect the motor intention of a user before the…

  12. Glove-Enabled Computer Operations (GECO): Design and Testing of an Extravehicular Activity Glove Adapted for Human-Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Richard J.; Olowin, Aaron; Krepkovich, Eileen; Hannaford, Blake; Lindsay, Jack I. C.; Homer, Peter; Patrie, James T.; Sands, O. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The Glove-Enabled Computer Operations (GECO) system enables an extravehicular activity (EVA) glove to be dual-purposed as a human-computer interface device. This paper describes the design and human participant testing of a right-handed GECO glove in a pressurized glove box. As part of an investigation into the usability of the GECO system for EVA data entry, twenty participants were asked to complete activities including (1) a Simon Says Games in which they attempted to duplicate random sequences of targeted finger strikes and (2) a Text Entry activity in which they used the GECO glove to enter target phrases in two different virtual keyboard modes. In a within-subjects design, both activities were performed both with and without vibrotactile feedback. Participants mean accuracies in correctly generating finger strikes with the pressurized glove were surprisingly high, both with and without the benefit of tactile feedback. Five of the subjects achieved mean accuracies exceeding 99 in both conditions. In Text Entry, tactile feedback provided a statistically significant performance benefit, quantified by characters entered per minute, as well as reduction in error rate. Secondary analyses of responses to a NASA Task Loader Index (TLX) subjective workload assessments reveal a benefit for tactile feedback in GECO glove use for data entry. This first-ever investigation of employment of a pressurized EVA glove for human-computer interface opens up a wide range of future applications, including text chat communications, manipulation of procedureschecklists, cataloguingannotating images, scientific note taking, human-robot interaction, and control of suit andor other EVA systems.

  13. Tactile event-related potentials in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): Implications for brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvoni, S; Konicar, L; Prats-Sedano, M A; Garcia-Cossio, E; Genna, C; Volpato, C; Cavinato, M; Paggiaro, A; Veser, S; De Massari, D; Birbaumer, N

    2016-01-01

    We investigated neurophysiological brain responses elicited by a tactile event-related potential paradigm in a sample of ALS patients. Underlying cognitive processes and neurophysiological signatures for brain-computer interface (BCI) are addressed. We stimulated the palm of the hand in a group of fourteen ALS patients and a control group of ten healthy participants and recorded electroencephalographic signals in eyes-closed condition. Target and non-target brain responses were analyzed and classified offline. Classification errors served as the basis for neurophysiological brain response sub-grouping. A combined behavioral and quantitative neurophysiological analysis of sub-grouped data showed neither significant between-group differences, nor significant correlations between classification performance and the ALS patients' clinical state. Taking sequential effects of stimuli presentation into account, analyses revealed mean classification errors of 19.4% and 24.3% in healthy participants and ALS patients respectively. Neurophysiological correlates of tactile stimuli presentation are not altered by ALS. Tactile event-related potentials can be used to monitor attention level and task performance in ALS and may constitute a viable basis for future BCIs. Implications for brain-computer interface implementation of the proposed method for patients in critical conditions, such as the late stage of ALS and the (completely) locked-in state, are discussed. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Applications of Computed Tomography to Evaluate Cellular Solid Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisano, Josephine; Marse, Daryl J.; Schilling, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    The major morphological features - foam cells, voids, knit lines, and the bondline interface were evaluated. The features identified by micro-CT correlate well to those observed by SEM. 3D reconstructions yielded volumetric dimensions for large voids (max 30 mm). Internal voids and groupings of smaller cells at the bondline are concluded to be the cause of the indications noted during the NDE prescreening process.

  15. Microprocessor controlled dual parameter ADC system with a CAMAC interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, D G; Nickell, Jr, J D [Los Alamos Scientific Lab., NM (USA)

    1978-09-01

    Presented here is the design of a dual parameter ADC system which is controlled by a microprocessor and also interfaced to CAMAC. The system was designed to be mobile in that it may work wherever there is a CAMAC crate. In such cases where the CAMAC system is inoperative, the system may operate in a stand-alone mode.

  16. PHREEQCI; a graphical user interface for the geochemical computer program PHREEQC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Scott R.; Macklin, Clifford L.; Parkhurst, David L.

    1997-01-01

    PhreeqcI is a Windows-based graphical user interface for the geochemical computer program PHREEQC. PhreeqcI provides the capability to generate and edit input data files, run simulations, and view text files containing simulation results, all within the framework of a single interface. PHREEQC is a multipurpose geochemical program that can perform speciation, inverse, reaction-path, and 1D advective reaction-transport modeling. Interactive access to all of the capabilities of PHREEQC is available with PhreeqcI. The interface is written in Visual Basic and will run on personal computers under the Windows(3.1), Windows95, and WindowsNT operating systems.

  17. The Challenge '88 Project: Interfacing of Chemical Instruments to Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jim; Verghese, Manoj

    The main part of this project involved using a computer, either an Apple or an IBM, as a chart recorder for the infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrophotometers. The computer "reads" these machines and displays spectra on its monitor. The graphs can then be stored for future reference and manipulation. The program to…

  18. Development of a Control and Vision Interface for an AR.Drone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheema Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The AR.Drone is a remote controlled quadcopter which is low cost, and readily available for consumers. Therefore it represents a simple test-bed on which control and vision research may be conducted. However, interfacing with the AR.Drone can be a challenge for new researchers as the AR.Drone's application programming interface (API is built on low-level, bit-wise, C instructions. Therefore, this paper will demonstrate the use of an additional layer of abstraction on the AR.Drone’s API via the Robot Operating System (ROS. Using ROS, the construction of a high-level graphical user interface (GUI will be demonstrated, with the explicit aim of assisting new researchers in developing simple control and vision algorithms to interface with the AR.Drone. The GUI, formally known as the Control and Vision Interface (CVI is currently used to research and develop computer vision, simultaneous localisation and mapping (SLAM, and path planning algorithms by a number of postgraduate and undergraduate students at the school of Aeronautical, Mechanical, and Mechatronics Engineering (AMME in The University of Sydney.

  19. Affective Interaction with a Virtual Character through an fNIRS Brain-Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Aranyi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Affective Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI harness Neuroscience knowledge to develop affective interaction from first principles. In this paper, we explore affective engagement with a virtual agent through Neurofeedback (NF. We report an experiment where subjects engage with a virtual agent by expressing positive attitudes towards her under a NF paradigm. We use for affective input the asymmetric activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DL-PFC, which has been previously found to be related to the high-level affective-motivational dimension of approach/avoidance. The magnitude of left-asymmetric DL-PFC activity, measured using fNIRS and treated as a proxy for approach, is mapped onto a control mechanism for the virtual agent’s facial expressions, in which Action Units are activated through a neural network. We carried out an experiment with 18 subjects, which demonstrated that subjects are able to successfully engage with the virtual agent by controlling their mental disposition through NF, and that they perceived the agent’s responses as realistic and consistent with their projected mental disposition. This interaction paradigm is particularly relevant in the case of affective BCI as it facilitates the volitional activation of specific areas normally not under conscious control. Overall, our contribution reconciles a model of affect derived from brain metabolic data with an ecologically valid, yet computationally controllable, virtual affective communication environment.

  20. Neurobionics and the brain-computer interface: current applications and future horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Wong, Yan Tat

    2017-05-01

    The brain-computer interface (BCI) is an exciting advance in neuroscience and engineering. In a motor BCI, electrical recordings from the motor cortex of paralysed humans are decoded by a computer and used to drive robotic arms or to restore movement in a paralysed hand by stimulating the muscles in the forearm. Simultaneously integrating a BCI with the sensory cortex will further enhance dexterity and fine control. BCIs are also being developed to: provide ambulation for paraplegic patients through controlling robotic exoskeletons; restore vision in people with acquired blindness; detect and control epileptic seizures; and improve control of movement disorders and memory enhancement. High-fidelity connectivity with small groups of neurons requires microelectrode placement in the cerebral cortex. Electrodes placed on the cortical surface are less invasive but produce inferior fidelity. Scalp surface recording using electroencephalography is much less precise. BCI technology is still in an early phase of development and awaits further technical improvements and larger multicentre clinical trials before wider clinical application and impact on the care of people with disabilities. There are also many ethical challenges to explore as this technology evolves.

  1. Method for Reading Sensors and Controlling Actuators Using Audio Interfaces of Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroca, Rafael V.; Burlamaqui, Aquiles F.; Gonçalves, Luiz M. G.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a novel closed loop control architecture based on audio channels of several types of computing devices, such as mobile phones and tablet computers, but not restricted to them. The communication is based on an audio interface that relies on the exchange of audio tones, allowing sensors to be read and actuators to be controlled. As an application example, the presented technique is used to build a low cost mobile robot, but the system can also be used in a variety of mechatronics applications and sensor networks, where smartphones are the basic building blocks. PMID:22438726

  2. Method for reading sensors and controlling actuators using audio interfaces of mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroca, Rafael V; Burlamaqui, Aquiles F; Gonçalves, Luiz M G

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a novel closed loop control architecture based on audio channels of several types of computing devices, such as mobile phones and tablet computers, but not restricted to them. The communication is based on an audio interface that relies on the exchange of audio tones, allowing sensors to be read and actuators to be controlled. As an application example, the presented technique is used to build a low cost mobile robot, but the system can also be used in a variety of mechatronics applications and sensor networks, where smartphones are the basic building blocks.

  3. Accident sequence analysis of human-computer interface design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, C.-F.; Chen, W.-H.

    2000-01-01

    It is important to predict potential accident sequences of human-computer interaction in a safety-critical computing system so that vulnerable points can be disclosed and removed. We address this issue by proposing a Multi-Context human-computer interaction Model along with its analysis techniques, an Augmented Fault Tree Analysis, and a Concurrent Event Tree Analysis. The proposed augmented fault tree can identify the potential weak points in software design that may induce unintended software functions or erroneous human procedures. The concurrent event tree can enumerate possible accident sequences due to these weak points

  4. Non invasive Brain-Computer Interface system: towards its application as assistive technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincotti, Febo; Mattia, Donatella; Aloise, Fabio; Bufalari, Simona; Schalk, Gerwin; Oriolo, Giuseppe; Cherubini, Andrea; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Babiloni, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    The quality of life of people suffering from severe motor disabilities can benefit from the use of current assistive technology capable of ameliorating communication, house-environment management and mobility, according to the user's residual motor abilities. Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) are systems that can translate brain activity into signals that control external devices. Thus they can represent the only technology for severely paralyzed patients to increase or maintain their communication and control options. Here we report on a pilot study in which a system was implemented and validated to allow disabled persons to improve or recover their mobility (directly or by emulation) and communication within the surrounding environment. The system is based on a software controller that offers to the user a communication interface that is matched with the individual's residual motor abilities. Patients (n=14) with severe motor disabilities due to progressive neurodegenerative disorders were trained to use the system prototype under a rehabilitation program carried out in a house-like furnished space. All users utilized regular assistive control options (e.g., microswitches or head trackers). In addition, four subjects learned to operate the system by means of a non-invasive EEG-based BCI. This system was controlled by the subjects' voluntary modulations of EEG sensorimotor rhythms recorded on the scalp; this skill was learnt even though the subjects have not had control over their limbs for a long time. We conclude that such a prototype system, which integrates several different assistive technologies including a BCI system, can potentially facilitate the translation from pre-clinical demonstrations to a clinical useful BCI. PMID:18394526

  5. Non-invasive brain-computer interface system: towards its application as assistive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincotti, Febo; Mattia, Donatella; Aloise, Fabio; Bufalari, Simona; Schalk, Gerwin; Oriolo, Giuseppe; Cherubini, Andrea; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Babiloni, Fabio

    2008-04-15

    The quality of life of people suffering from severe motor disabilities can benefit from the use of current assistive technology capable of ameliorating communication, house-environment management and mobility, according to the user's residual motor abilities. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are systems that can translate brain activity into signals that control external devices. Thus they can represent the only technology for severely paralyzed patients to increase or maintain their communication and control options. Here we report on a pilot study in which a system was implemented and validated to allow disabled persons to improve or recover their mobility (directly or by emulation) and communication within the surrounding environment. The system is based on a software controller that offers to the user a communication interface that is matched with the individual's residual motor abilities. Patients (n=14) with severe motor disabilities due to progressive neurodegenerative disorders were trained to use the system prototype under a rehabilitation program carried out in a house-like furnished space. All users utilized regular assistive control options (e.g., microswitches or head trackers). In addition, four subjects learned to operate the system by means of a non-invasive EEG-based BCI. This system was controlled by the subjects' voluntary modulations of EEG sensorimotor rhythms recorded on the scalp; this skill was learnt even though the subjects have not had control over their limbs for a long time. We conclude that such a prototype system, which integrates several different assistive technologies including a BCI system, can potentially facilitate the translation from pre-clinical demonstrations to a clinical useful BCI.

  6. Virtual microscopy : Merging of computer mediated collaboration and intuitive interfacing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Ridder, H.; De Ridder-Sluiter, J.G.; Kluin, P.M.; Christiaans, H.H.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing (or Ambient Intelligence) is an upcoming technology that is usually associated with futuristic smart environments in which information is available anytime anywhere and with which humans can interact in a natural, multimodal way. However spectacular the corresponding scenarios

  7. EPICS-QT based graphical user interface for accelerator control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, A.; Singh, S.K.; Rosily, Sherry; Bhagwat, P.V.

    2016-01-01

    Particle accelerators and many industrial complex systems, require a robust and efficient control for its proper operation to achieve required beam quality, safety of its sub component and all working personnel. This control is executed via a graphical user interface through which an operator interacts with the accelerator to achieve the desired state of the machine and its output. Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) is a widely used control system framework in the field of accelerator control. It acts as a middle layer between field devices and graphic user interface used by the operator. Field devices can also be made EPICS compliant by using EPICS based software in that. On the other hand Qt is a C++ framework which is widely used for creating very professional looking and user friendly graphical component. In Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA), which is the first stage of the three stage Accelerator Driven System (ADS) program taken by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), it is decided that EPICS will be used for controlling the accelerator and Qt will be used for developing the various Graphic User Interface (GUI) for operation and diagnostics. This paper discuss the work carried out to achieve this goal in LEHIPA

  8. Computer Program Development Specification for Tactical Interface System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-31

    CNTL CNTL TO ONE VT~i.AE CR1 & TWELVE VT100 LCARD READER VIDEO TERMINALS, SIX LA12O) HARD- COPY TERMINALS, & VECTOR GRAPHICS RPO % TERMINAL 17%M DISK...this data into the TIS para - .. meter tables in the TISGBL common area. ICEHANDL will send test interface ICE to PSS in one of two modes: perio- dically...STOPCauss te TI sotwar toexit ,9.*9~ .r .~ * ~%.’h .9~ .. a .~ .. a. 1 , , p * % .’.-:. .m 7 P : SDSS-MMP-BI ." 31 July 1981 TCL commands authorized

  9. An online three-class Transcranial Doppler ultrasound brain computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Anuja; Samadani, Ali-Akbar; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie; Chau, Tom

    2016-06-01

    Brain computer interfaces (BCI) can provide communication opportunities for individuals with severe motor disabilities. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) measures cerebral blood flow velocities and can be used to develop a BCI. A previously implemented TCD BCI system used verbal and spatial tasks as control signals; however, the spatial task involved a visual cue that awkwardly diverted the user's attention away from the communication interface. Therefore, vision-independent right-lateralized tasks were investigated. Using a bilateral TCD BCI, ten participants controlled online, an on-screen keyboard using a left-lateralized task (verbal fluency), a right-lateralized task (fist motor imagery or 3D-shape tracing), and unconstrained rest. 3D-shape tracing was generally more discernible from other tasks than was fist motor imagery. Verbal fluency, 3D-shape tracing and unconstrained rest were distinguished from each other using a linear discriminant classifier, achieving a mean agreement of κ=0.43±0.17. These rates are comparable to the best offline three-class TCD BCI accuracies reported thus far. The online communication system achieved a mean information transfer rate (ITR) of 1.08±0.69bits/min with values reaching up to 2.46bits/min, thereby exceeding the ITR of previous online TCD BCIs. These findings demonstrate the potential of a three-class online TCD BCI that does not require visual task cues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Computer control of the ISX-B neutral injection beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, P.C.

    1982-09-01

    A system of controls for the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) neutral injection beamlines at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is presented. The system uses standard CAMAC equipment interfaced to the actual beamline controls and driven by a PDP-11/34 mini-computer. It is designed to relieve the operator of most of the mundane tasks of beam injection and also to reduce the number of operators needed to monitor multiple beamlines

  11. Computer systems for nuclear installation data control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    The computer programs developed by Divisao de Instalacoes Nucleares (DIN) from Brazilian CNEN for data control on nuclear installations in Brazil are presented. The following computer programs are described: control of registered companies, control of industrial sources, irradiators and monitors; control of liable person; control of industry irregularities; for elaborating credence tests; for shielding analysis; control of waste refuge [pt

  12. Training leads to increased auditory brain-computer interface performance of end-users with motor impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, S; Käthner, I; Kübler, A

    2016-02-01

    Auditory brain-computer interfaces are an assistive technology that can restore communication for motor impaired end-users. Such non-visual brain-computer interface paradigms are of particular importance for end-users that may lose or have lost gaze control. We attempted to show that motor impaired end-users can learn to control an auditory speller on the basis of event-related potentials. Five end-users with motor impairments, two of whom with additional visual impairments, participated in five sessions. We applied a newly developed auditory brain-computer interface paradigm with natural sounds and directional cues. Three of five end-users learned to select symbols using this method. Averaged over all five end-users the information transfer rate increased by more than 1800% from the first session (0.17 bits/min) to the last session (3.08 bits/min). The two best end-users achieved information transfer rates of 5.78 bits/min and accuracies of 92%. Our results show that an auditory BCI with a combination of natural sounds and directional cues, can be controlled by end-users with motor impairment. Training improves the performance of end-users to the level of healthy controls. To our knowledge, this is the first time end-users with motor impairments controlled an auditory brain-computer interface speller with such high accuracy and information transfer rates. Further, our results demonstrate that operating a BCI with event-related potentials benefits from training and specifically end-users may require more than one session to develop their full potential. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A python based interface for the tandem-linac control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajith Kumar, B.P.

    2011-01-01

    The control system for the Tandem-LINAC accelerator system at IUAC is a client-server design running on a network of PCs under the GNU/Linux operating system. The computers connected to the devices in the accelerator run a server program. The computers providing the user interface runs different kinds of client programs that communicates to the servers over a TCT/IP network to control/monitor the accelerator parameters. Both the programs were written in C language and some programming expertise was required to write the client programs. The addition of a Python language interface has enabled the users to write programs for specific tasks like data logging and partial automation of the operation with minimal effort. (author)

  14. Semi-supervised adaptation in ssvep-based brain-computer interface using tri-training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bender, Thomas; Kjaer, Troels W.; Thomsen, Carsten E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel and computationally simple tri-training based semi-supervised steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interface (BCI). It is implemented with autocorrelation-based features and a Naïve-Bayes classifier (NBC). The system uses nine characters...

  15. MULTI - multifunctional interface of the IBM XT and AT type personal computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, T.; Kalavski, D.; Rubin, D.; Tulaev, A.B.; Tumanov, A.V.

    1988-01-01

    MULTI multifunctional interface which enables to solve problems of personal computer connestion with physical equipment without application of intermediate buses is described. Parallel 32-digit bidirectional 1/10 register and buffered bus of personal computer represent MULTI base. Ways of MULTI application are described

  16. Mind the Sheep! User Experience Evaluation & Brain-Computer Interface Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gürkök, Hayrettin

    2012-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) infers our actions (e.g. a movement), intentions (e.g. preparation for a movement) and psychological states (e.g. emotion, attention) by interpreting our brain signals. It uses the inferences it makes to manipulate a computer. Although BCIs have long been used

  17. Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool (FACET) Interface Control Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabbe, Shon R.

    2017-01-01

    This Interface Control Document (ICD) documents the airspace adaptation and air traffic inputs of NASA's Future ATM Concepts and Evaluation Tool (FACET). Its intended audience is the project manager, project team, development team, and stakeholders interested in interfacing with the system. FACET equips Air Traffic Management (ATM) researchers and service providers with a way to explore, develop and evaluate advanced air transportation concepts before they are field-tested and eventually deployed. FACET is a flexible software tool that is capable of quickly generating and analyzing thousands of aircraft trajectories. It provides researchers with a simulation environment for preliminary testing of advanced ATM concepts. Using aircraft performance profiles, airspace models, weather data, and flight schedules, the tool models trajectories for the climb, cruise, and descent phases of flight for each type of aircraft. An advanced graphical interface displays traffic patterns in two and three dimensions, under various current and projected conditions for specific airspace regions or over the entire continental United States. The system is able to simulate a full day's dynamic national airspace system (NAS) operations, model system uncertainty, measure the impact of different decision-makers in the NAS, and provide analysis of the results in graphical form, including sector, airport, fix, and airway usage statistics. NASA researchers test and analyze the system-wide impact of new traffic flow management algorithms under anticipated air traffic growth projections on the nation's air traffic system. In addition to modeling the airspace system for NASA research, FACET has also successfully transitioned into a valuable tool for operational use. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) traffic flow managers and commercial airline dispatchers have used FACET technology for real-time operations planning. FACET integrates live air traffic data from FAA radar systems and weather data

  18. USING OLFACTORY DISPLAYS AS A NONTRADITIONAL INTERFACE IN HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Efe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Smell has its limitations and disadvantages as a display medium, but it also has its strengths and many have recognized its potential. At present, in communications and virtual technologies, smell is either forgotten or improperly stimulated, because non controlled odorants present in the physical space surrounding the user. Nonetheless a controlled presentation of olfactory information can give advantages in various application fields. Therefore, two enabling technologies, electronic noses and especially olfactory displays are reviewed. Scenarios of usage are discussed together with relevant psycho-physiological issues. End-to-end systems including olfactory interfaces are quantitatively characterised under many respects. Recent works done by the authors on field are reported. The article will touch briefly on the control of scent emissions; an important factor to consider when building scented computer systems. As a sample application SUBSMELL system investigated. A look at areas of human computer interaction where olfaction output may prove useful will be presented. The article will finish with some brief conclusions and discuss some shortcomings and gaps of the topic. In particular, the addition of olfactory cues to a virtual environment increased the user's sense of presence and memory of the environment. Also, this article discusses the educational aspect of the subsmell systems.

  19. Evolution of brain-computer interfaces: going beyond classic motor physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuthardt, Eric C.; Schalk, Gerwin; Roland, Jarod; Rouse, Adam; Moran, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    The notion that a computer can decode brain signals to infer the intentions of a human and then enact those intentions directly through a machine is becoming a realistic technical possibility. These types of devices are known as brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). The evolution of these neuroprosthetic technologies could have significant implications for patients with motor disabilities by enhancing their ability to interact and communicate with their environment. The cortical physiology most investigated and used for device control has been brain signals from the primary motor cortex. To date, this classic motor physiology has been an effective substrate for demonstrating the potential efficacy of BCI-based control. However, emerging research now stands to further enhance our understanding of the cortical physiology underpinning human intent and provide further signals for more complex brain-derived control. In this review, the authors report the current status of BCIs and detail the emerging research trends that stand to augment clinical applications in the future. PMID:19569892

  20. Brain-computer interface with language model-electroencephalography fusion for locked-in syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oken, Barry S; Orhan, Umut; Roark, Brian; Erdogmus, Deniz; Fowler, Andrew; Mooney, Aimee; Peters, Betts; Miller, Meghan; Fried-Oken, Melanie B

    2014-05-01

    Some noninvasive brain-computer interface (BCI) systems are currently available for locked-in syndrome (LIS) but none have incorporated a statistical language model during text generation. To begin to address the communication needs of individuals with LIS using a noninvasive BCI that involves rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) of symbols and a unique classifier with electroencephalography (EEG) and language model fusion. The RSVP Keyboard was developed with several unique features. Individual letters are presented at 2.5 per second. Computer classification of letters as targets or nontargets based on EEG is performed using machine learning that incorporates a language model for letter prediction via Bayesian fusion enabling targets to be presented only 1 to 4 times. Nine participants with LIS and 9 healthy controls were enrolled. After screening, subjects first calibrated the system, and then completed a series of balanced word generation mastery tasks that were designed with 5 incremental levels of difficulty, which increased by selecting phrases for which the utility of the language model decreased naturally. Six participants with LIS and 9 controls completed the experiment. All LIS participants successfully mastered spelling at level 1 and one subject achieved level 5. Six of 9 control participants achieved level 5. Individuals who have incomplete LIS may benefit from an EEG-based BCI system, which relies on EEG classification and a statistical language model. Steps to further improve the system are discussed.

  1. Effects of Soft Drinks on Resting State EEG and Brain-Computer Interface Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jianjun; Mundahl, John; Streitz, Taylor; Maile, Kaitlin; Gulachek, Nicholas; He, Jeffrey; He, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Motor imagery-based (MI based) brain-computer interface (BCI) using electroencephalography (EEG) allows users to directly control a computer or external device by modulating and decoding the brain waves. A variety of factors could potentially affect the performance of BCI such as the health status of subjects or the environment. In this study, we investigated the effects of soft drinks and regular coffee on EEG signals under resting state and on the performance of MI based BCI. Twenty-six healthy human subjects participated in three or four BCI sessions with a resting period in each session. During each session, the subjects drank an unlabeled soft drink with either sugar (Caffeine Free Coca-Cola), caffeine (Diet Coke), neither ingredient (Caffeine Free Diet Coke), or a regular coffee if there was a fourth session. The resting state spectral power in each condition was compared; the analysis showed that power in alpha and beta band after caffeine consumption were decreased substantially compared to control and sugar condition. Although the attenuation of powers in the frequency range used for the online BCI control signal was shown, group averaged BCI online performance after consuming caffeine was similar to those of other conditions. This work, for the first time, shows the effect of caffeine, sugar intake on the online BCI performance and resting state brain signal.

  2. Brain-computer interface signal processing at the Wadsworth Center: mu and sensorimotor beta rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Dennis J; Krusienski, Dean J; Wolpaw, Jonathan R

    2006-01-01

    The Wadsworth brain-computer interface (BCI), based on mu and beta sensorimotor rhythms, uses one- and two-dimensional cursor movement tasks and relies on user training. This is a real-time closed-loop system. Signal processing consists of channel selection, spatial filtering, and spectral analysis. Feature translation uses a regression approach and normalization. Adaptation occurs at several points in this process on the basis of different criteria and methods. It can use either feedforward (e.g., estimating the signal mean for normalization) or feedback control (e.g., estimating feature weights for the prediction equation). We view this process as the interaction between a dynamic user and a dynamic system that coadapt over time. Understanding the dynamics of this interaction and optimizing its performance represent a major challenge for BCI research.

  3. Steady State Visual Evoked Potential Based Brain-Computer Interface for Cognitive Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergren, Nicolai; Bendtsen, Rasmus L.; Kjær, Troels W.

    2016-01-01

    decline is important. Cognitive decline may be detected using fullyautomated computerized assessment. Such systems will provide inexpensive and widely available screenings of cognitive ability. The aim of this pilot study is to develop a real time steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) based brain-computer...... interface (BCI) for neurological cognitive assessment. It is intended for use by patients who suffer from diseases impairing their motor skills, but are still able to control their gaze. Results are based on 11 healthy test subjects. The system performance have an average accuracy of 100% ± 0%. The test...... subjects achieved an information transfer rate (ITR) of 14:64 bits/min ± 7:63 bits=min and a subject test performance of 47:22% ± 34:10%. This study suggests that BCI may be applicable in practice as a computerized cognitive assessment tool. However, many improvements are required for the system...

  4. Towards a truly mobile auditory brain-computer interface: exploring the P300 to take away.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Maarten; Gandras, Katharina; Debener, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study we presented a low-cost, small, and wireless 14-channel EEG system suitable for field recordings (Debener et al., 2012, psychophysiology). In the present follow-up study we investigated whether a single-trial P300 response can be reliably measured with this system, while subjects freely walk outdoors. Twenty healthy participants performed a three-class auditory oddball task, which included rare target and non-target distractor stimuli presented with equal probabilities of 16%. Data were recorded in a seated (control condition) and in a walking condition, both of which were realized outdoors. A significantly larger P300 event-related potential amplitude was evident for targets compared to distractors (pbrain-computer interface (BCI) study. This leads us to conclude that a truly mobile auditory BCI system is feasible. © 2013.

  5. The Asilomar Survey: Stakeholders' Opinions on Ethical Issues Related to Brain-Computer Interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijboer, Femke; Clausen, Jens; Allison, Brendan Z; Haselager, Pim

    2013-01-01

    Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) research and (future) applications raise important ethical issues that need to be addressed to promote societal acceptance and adequate policies. Here we report on a survey we conducted among 145 BCI researchers at the 4 th International BCI conference, which took place in May-June 2010 in Asilomar, California. We assessed respondents' opinions about a number of topics. First, we investigated preferences for terminology and definitions relating to BCIs. Second, we assessed respondents' expectations on the marketability of different BCI applications (BCIs for healthy people, BCIs for assistive technology, BCIs-controlled neuroprostheses and BCIs as therapy tools). Third, we investigated opinions about ethical issues related to BCI research for the development of assistive technology: informed consent process with locked-in patients, risk-benefit analyses, team responsibility, consequences of BCI on patients' and families' lives, liability and personal identity and interaction with the media. Finally, we asked respondents which issues are urgent in BCI research.

  6. A brain-computer interface as input channel for a standard assistive technology software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickler, Claudia; Riccio, Angela; Leotta, Francesco; Hillian-Tress, Sandra; Halder, Sebastian; Holz, Elisa; Staiger-Sälzer, Pit; Hoogerwerf, Evert-Jan; Desideri, Lorenzo; Mattia, Donatella; Kübler, Andrea

    2011-10-01

    Recently brain-computer interface (BCI) control was integrated into the commercial assistive technology product QualiWORLD (QualiLife Inc., Paradiso-Lugano, CH). Usability of the first prototype was evaluated in terms of effectiveness (accuracy), efficiency (information transfer rate and subjective workload/NASA Task Load Index) and user satisfaction (Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology, QUEST 2.0) by four end-users with severe disabilities. Three assistive technology experts evaluated the device from a third person perspective. The results revealed high performance levels in communication and internet tasks. Users and assistive technology experts were quite satisfied with the device. However, none could imagine using the device in daily life without improvements. Main obstacles were the EEG-cap and low speed.

  7. Computer organization and design the hardware/software interface

    CERN Document Server

    Patterson, David A

    2009-01-01

    The classic textbook for computer systems analysis and design, Computer Organization and Design, has been thoroughly updated to provide a new focus on the revolutionary change taking place in industry today: the switch from uniprocessor to multicore microprocessors. This new emphasis on parallelism is supported by updates reflecting the newest technologies with examples highlighting the latest processor designs, benchmarking standards, languages and tools. As with previous editions, a MIPS processor is the core used to present the fundamentals of hardware technologies, assembly language, compu

  8. x-y-recording in transmission electron microscopy. A versatile and inexpensive interface to personal computers with application to stereology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickmann, M; Siklós, L; Joó, F; Wolff, J R

    1990-09-01

    An interface for IBM XT/AT-compatible computers is described which has been designed to read the actual specimen stage position of electron microscopes. The complete system consists of (i) optical incremental encoders attached to the x- and y-stage drivers of the microscope, (ii) two keypads for operator input, (iii) an interface card fitted to the bus of the personal computer, (iv) a standard configuration IBM XT (or compatible) personal computer optionally equipped with a (v) HP Graphic Language controllable colour plotter. The small size of the encoders and their connection to the stage drivers by simple ribbed belts allows an easy adaptation of the system to most electron microscopes. Operation of the interface card itself is supported by any high-level language available for personal computers. By the modular concept of these languages, the system can be customized to various applications, and no computer expertise is needed for actual operation. The present configuration offers an inexpensive attachment, which covers a wide range of applications from a simple notebook to high-resolution (200-nm) mapping of tissue. Since section coordinates can be processed in real-time, stereological estimations can be derived directly "on microscope". This is exemplified by an application in which particle numbers were determined by the disector method.

  9. Flight simulation using a Brain-Computer Interface: A pilot, pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryger, Michael; Wester, Brock; Pohlmeyer, Eric A; Rich, Matthew; John, Brendan; Beaty, James; McLoughlin, Michael; Boninger, Michael; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C

    2017-01-01

    As Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) systems advance for uses such as robotic arm control it is postulated that the control paradigms could apply to other scenarios, such as control of video games, wheelchair movement or even flight. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether our BCI system, which involves decoding the signals of two 96-microelectrode arrays implanted into the motor cortex of a subject, could also be used to control an aircraft in a flight simulator environment. The study involved six sessions in which various parameters were modified in order to achieve the best flight control, including plane type, view, control paradigm, gains, and limits. Successful flight was determined qualitatively by evaluating the subject's ability to perform requested maneuvers, maintain flight paths, and avoid control losses such as dives, spins and crashes. By the end of the study, it was found that the subject could successfully control an aircraft. The subject could use both the jet and propeller plane with different views, adopting an intuitive control paradigm. From the subject's perspective, this was one of the most exciting and entertaining experiments she had performed in two years of research. In conclusion, this study provides a proof-of-concept that traditional motor cortex signals combined with a decoding paradigm can be used to control systems besides a robotic arm for which the decoder was developed. Aside from possible functional benefits, it also shows the potential for a new recreational activity for individuals with disabilities who are able to master BCI control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Voice as Computer Interface: A Look at Tomorrow's Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Holley R.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of voice as the communications device for computer-human interaction focuses on voice recognition systems for use within a library environment. Voice technologies are described, including voice response and voice recognition; examples of voice systems in use in libraries are examined; and further possibilities, including use with…

  11. Hybrid Brain–Computer Interface Techniques for Improved Classification Accuracy and Increased Number of Commands: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Keum-Shik; Khan, Muhammad Jawad

    2017-01-01

    In this article, non-invasive hybrid brain–computer interface (hBCI) technologies for improving classification accuracy and increasing the number of commands are reviewed. Hybridization combining more than two modalities is a new trend in brain imaging and prosthesis control. Electroencephalography (EEG), due to its easy use and fast temporal resolution, is most widely utilized in combination with other brain/non-brain signal acquisition modalities, for instance, functional near infrared spec...

  12. ISLAM PROJECT: Interface between the signals from various experiments of a Van Graaff accelerator and PDP 11/44 computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Piquer, T. A.; Yuste Santos, C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describe an interface between the signals from an in-beam experiment of a Van de Graaff accelerator and a PDP 11/44 computer. The information corresponding to one spectrum is taken from one digital voltammeter and is processed by mean of an equipment controlled by a M6809 microprocessor. The software package has been developed in assembly language and has a size of 1/2 K. (Author) 12 refs

  13. Computer interfacing of the unified systems for personnel supervising in nuclear units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staicu, M.

    1997-01-01

    The dosimetric supervising of the personnel working in nuclear units is based on the information supplied by: 1) the dosimetric data obtained by the method of thermoluminescence; 2) the dosimetric data obtained by the method of photo dosimetry: 3) the records from medical periodic control. To create a unified system of supervising the following elements were combined: a) an Automatic System of TLD Reading and Data Processing (SACDTL). The data from this system are transmitted 'on line' to the computer; b) the measuring line of the optical density of exposed dosimetric films. The interface achieved within the general ensemble SACDTL could be adapted to this line of measurement. The transmission of the data from the measurement line to the computer is made 'on line'; c) the medical surveillance data for each person transmitted 'off line' to the database computer. The unified system resulting from the unification of the three supervising systems will achieve the following general functions: - registering of the personnel working in the nuclear field; - recording the dosimetric data; - processing and presentation of the data; - issuing of measurement bulletins. Thus, by means of unified database, dosimetric intercomparison and correlative studies can be undertaken. (author)

  14. Combining Brain–Computer Interfaces and Assistive Technologies: State-of-the-Art and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, J. d. R.; Rupp, R.; Müller-Putz, G. R.; Murray-Smith, R.; Giugliemma, C.; Tangermann, M.; Vidaurre, C.; Cincotti, F.; Kübler, A.; Leeb, R.; Neuper, C.; Müller, K.-R.; Mattia, D.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, new research has brought the field of electroencephalogram (EEG)-based brain–computer interfacing (BCI) out of its infancy and into a phase of relative maturity through many demonstrated prototypes such as brain-controlled wheelchairs, keyboards, and computer games. With this proof-of-concept phase in the past, the time is now ripe to focus on the development of practical BCI technologies that can be brought out of the lab and into real-world applications. In particular, we focus on the prospect of improving the lives of countless disabled individuals through a combination of BCI technology with existing assistive technologies (AT). In pursuit of more practical BCIs for use outside of the lab, in this paper, we identify four application areas where disabled individuals could greatly benefit from advancements in BCI technology, namely, “Communication and Control”, “Motor Substitution”, “Entertainment”, and “Motor Recovery”. We review the current state of the art and possible future developments, while discussing the main research issues in these four areas. In particular, we expect the most progress in the development of technologies such as hybrid BCI architectures, user–machine adaptation algorithms, the exploitation of users’ mental states for BCI reliability and confidence measures, the incorporation of principles in human–computer interaction (HCI) to improve BCI usability, and the development of novel BCI technology including better EEG devices. PMID:20877434

  15. Error-Free Text Typing Performance of an Inductive Intra-Oral Tongue Computer Interface for Severely Disabled Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen Struijk, Lotte N S; Bentsen, Bo; Gaihede, Michael; Lontis, Eugen R

    2017-11-01

    For severely paralyzed individuals, alternative computer interfaces are becoming increasingly essential for everyday life as social and vocational activities are facilitated by information technology and as the environment becomes more automatic and remotely controllable. Tongue computer interfaces have proven to be desirable by the users partly due to their high degree of aesthetic acceptability, but so far the mature systems have shown a relatively low error-free text typing efficiency. This paper evaluated the intra-oral inductive tongue computer interface (ITCI) in its intended use: Error-free text typing in a generally available text editing system, Word. Individuals with tetraplegia and able bodied individuals used the ITCI for typing using a MATLAB interface and for Word typing for 4 to 5 experimental days, and the results showed an average error-free text typing rate in Word of 11.6 correct characters/min across all participants and of 15.5 correct characters/min for participants familiar with tongue piercings. Improvements in typing rates between the sessions suggest that typing ratescan be improved further through long-term use of the ITCI.

  16. An Asynchronous P300-Based Brain-Computer Interface Web Browser for Severely Disabled People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Cagigal, Victor; Gomez-Pilar, Javier; Alvarez, Daniel; Hornero, Roberto

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an electroencephalographic (EEG) P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI) Internet browser. The system uses the "odd-ball" row-col paradigm for generating the P300 evoked potentials on the scalp of the user, which are immediately processed and translated into web browser commands. There were previous approaches for controlling a BCI web browser. However, to the best of our knowledge, none of them was focused on an assistive context, failing to test their applications with a suitable number of end users. In addition, all of them were synchronous applications, where it was necessary to introduce a "read-mode" command in order to avoid a continuous command selection. Thus, the aim of this study is twofold: 1) to test our web browser with a population of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in order to assess the usefulness of our proposal to meet their daily communication needs; and 2) to overcome the aforementioned limitation by adding a threshold that discerns between control and non-control states, allowing the user to calmly read the web page without undesirable selections. The browser was tested with sixteen MS patients and five healthy volunteers. Both quantitative and qualitative metrics were obtained. MS participants reached an average accuracy of 84.14%, whereas 95.75% was achieved by control subjects. Results show that MS patients can successfully control the BCI web browser, improving their personal autonomy.

  17. Optimized controllers for enhancing dynamic performance of PV interface system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud A. Attia

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic performance of PV interface system can be improved by optimizing the gains of the Proportional–Integral (PI controller. In this work, gravitational search algorithm and harmony search algorithm are utilized to optimal tuning of PI controller gains. Performance comparison between the PV system with optimized PI gains utilizing different techniques are carried out. Finally, the dynamic behavior of the system is studied under hypothetical sudden variations in irradiance. The examination of the proposed techniques for optimal tuning of PI gains is conducted using MATLAB/SIMULINK software package. The main contribution of this work is investigating the dynamic performance of PV interfacing system with application of gravitational search algorithm and harmony search algorithm for optimal PI parameters tuning. Keywords: Photovoltaic power systems, Gravitational search algorithm, Harmony search algorithm, Genetic algorithm, Artificial intelligence

  18. A hybrid three-class brain-computer interface system utilizing SSSEPs and transient ERPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitwieser, Christian; Pokorny, Christoph; Müller-Putz, Gernot R.

    2016-12-01

    Objective. This paper investigates the fusion of steady-state somatosensory evoked potentials (SSSEPs) and transient event-related potentials (tERPs), evoked through tactile simulation on the left and right-hand fingertips, in a three-class EEG based hybrid brain-computer interface. It was hypothesized, that fusing the input signals leads to higher classification rates than classifying tERP and SSSEP individually. Approach. Fourteen subjects participated in the studies, consisting of a screening paradigm to determine person dependent resonance-like frequencies and a subsequent online paradigm. The whole setup of the BCI system was based on open interfaces, following suggestions for a common implementation platform. During the online experiment, subjects were instructed to focus their attention on the stimulated fingertips as indicated by a visual cue. The recorded data were classified during runtime using a multi-class shrinkage LDA classifier and the outputs were fused together applying a posterior probability based fusion. Data were further analyzed offline, involving a combined classification of SSSEP and tERP features as a second fusion principle. The final results were tested for statistical significance applying a repeated measures ANOVA. Main results. A significant classification increase was achieved when fusing the results with a combined classification compared to performing an individual classification. Furthermore, the SSSEP classifier was significantly better in detecting a non-control state, whereas the tERP classifier was significantly better in detecting control states. Subjects who had a higher relative band power increase during the screening session also achieved significantly higher classification results than subjects with lower relative band power increase. Significance. It could be shown that utilizing SSSEP and tERP for hBCIs increases the classification accuracy and also that tERP and SSSEP are not classifying control- and non-control

  19. Microcomputer interfacing and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafa, M A

    1990-01-01

    This is the applications guide to interfacing microcomputers. It offers practical non-mathematical solutions to interfacing problems in many applications including data acquisition and control. Emphasis is given to the definition of the objectives of the interface, then comparing possible solutions and producing the best interface for every situation. Dr Mustafa A Mustafa is a senior designer of control equipment and has written many technical articles and papers on the subject of computers and their application to control engineering.

  20. sBCI-Headset—Wearable and Modular Device for Hybrid Brain-Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsiana Malechka

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Severely disabled people, like completely paralyzed persons either with tetraplegia or similar disabilities who cannot use their arms and hands, are often considered as a user group of Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI. In order to achieve high acceptance of the BCI by this user group and their supporters, the BCI system has to be integrated into their support infrastructure. Critical disadvantages of a BCI are the time consuming preparation of the user for the electroencephalography (EEG measurements and the low information transfer rate of EEG based BCI. These disadvantages become apparent if a BCI is used to control complex devices. In this paper, a hybrid BCI is described that enables research for a Human Machine Interface (HMI that is optimally adapted to requirements of the user and the tasks to be carried out. The solution is based on the integration of a Steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP-BCI, an Event-related (de-synchronization (ERD/ERS-BCI, an eye tracker, an environmental observation camera, and a new EEG head cap for wearing comfort and easy preparation. The design of the new fast multimodal BCI (called sBCI system is described and first test results, obtained in experiments with six healthy subjects, are presented. The sBCI concept may also become useful for healthy people in cases where a “hands-free” handling of devices is necessary.

  1. Virtual microscopy: Merging of computer mediated collaboration and intuitive interfacing

    OpenAIRE

    De Ridder, H.; De Ridder-Sluiter, J.G.; Kluin, P.M.; Christiaans, H.H.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing (or Ambient Intelligence) is an upcoming technology that is usually associated with futuristic smart environments in which information is available anytime anywhere and with which humans can interact in a natural, multimodal way. However spectacular the corresponding scenarios may be, it is equally challenging to consider how this technology may enhance existing situations. This is illustrated by a case study from the Dutch medical field: central quality reviewing for pat...

  2. Computer simulation study of the nematic-vapour interface in the Gay-Berne model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rull, Luis F.; Romero-Enrique, José Manuel

    2017-06-01

    We present computer simulations of the vapour-nematic interface of the Gay-Berne model. We considered situations which correspond to either prolate or oblate molecules. We determine the anchoring of the nematic phase and correlate it with the intermolecular potential parameters. On the other hand, we evaluate the surface tension associated to this interface. We find a corresponding states law for the surface tension dependence on the temperature, valid for both prolate and oblate molecules.

  3. Visibility Aspects Importance of User Interface Reception in Cloud Computing Applications with Increased Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Haxhixhemajli, Denis

    2012-01-01

    Visibility aspects of User Interfaces are important; they deal with the crucial phase of human-computer interaction. They allow users to perform and at the same time hide the complexity of the system. Acceptance of new systems depends on how visibility aspects of the User Interfaces are presented. Human eyes make the first contact with the appearance of any system by so it generates the very beginning of the human – application interaction. In this study it is enforced that visibility aspects...

  4. User Control Interface for W7-X Plasma Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spring, A.; Laqua, H.; Schacht, J.

    2006-01-01

    The WENDELSTEIN 7-X fusion experiment will be a highly complex device operated by a likewise complex control system. The fundamental configuration of the W7-X control system follows two major design principles: It reflects the strict hierarchy of the machine set-up with a set of subordinated components, which in turn can be run autonomously during commissioning and testing. Secondly, it links the basic machine operation (mainly given by the infrastructure status and the components readiness) and the physics program execution (i.e. plasma operation) on each hierarchy level and on different time scales. The complexity of the control system implies great demands on appropriate user interfaces: specialized tools for specific control tasks allowing a dedicated view on the subject to be controlled, hiding complexity wherever possible and reasonable, providing similar operation methods on each hierarchy level and both manual interaction possibilities and a high degree of intelligent automation. The contribution will describe the operation interface for experiment control including the necessary links to the machine operation. The users of ' Xcontrol ' will be both the W7-X session leaders during plasma discharge experiments and the components' or diagnostics' operators during autonomous mode or even laboratory experiments. The main ' Xcontrol ' features, such as program composition and validation, manual and automatic control instruments, resource survey, and process monitoring, will be presented. The implementation principles and the underlying communication will be discussed. (author)

  5. Brain Computer Interface Learning for Systems Based on Electrocorticography and Intracortical Microelectrode Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivayogi V Hiremath

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A brain-computer interface (BCI system transforms neural activity into control signals for external devices in real time. A BCI user needs to learn to generate specific cortical activity patterns to control external devices effectively. We call this process BCI learning, and it often requires significant effort and time. Therefore, it is important to study this process and develop novel and efficient approaches to accelerate BCI learning. This article reviews major approaches that have been used for BCI learning, including computer-assisted learning, co-adaptive learning, operant conditioning, and sensory feedback. We focus on BCIs based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays for restoring motor function. This article also explores the possibility of brain modulation techniques in promoting BCI learning, such as electrical cortical stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and optogenetics. Furthermore, as proposed by recent BCI studies, we suggest that BCI learning is in many ways analogous to motor and cognitive skill learning, and therefore skill learning should be a useful metaphor to model BCI learning.

  6. Brain computer interface learning for systems based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiremath, Shivayogi V; Chen, Weidong; Wang, Wei; Foldes, Stephen; Yang, Ying; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Collinger, Jennifer L; Boninger, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) system transforms neural activity into control signals for external devices in real time. A BCI user needs to learn to generate specific cortical activity patterns to control external devices effectively. We call this process BCI learning, and it often requires significant effort and time. Therefore, it is important to study this process and develop novel and efficient approaches to accelerate BCI learning. This article reviews major approaches that have been used for BCI learning, including computer-assisted learning, co-adaptive learning, operant conditioning, and sensory feedback. We focus on BCIs based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays for restoring motor function. This article also explores the possibility of brain modulation techniques in promoting BCI learning, such as electrical cortical stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and optogenetics. Furthermore, as proposed by recent BCI studies, we suggest that BCI learning is in many ways analogous to motor and cognitive skill learning, and therefore skill learning should be a useful metaphor to model BCI learning.

  7. Guest editorial: Brain/neuronal computer games interfaces and interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coyle, D.; Principe, J.; Lotte, F.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays brainwave or electroencephalogram (EEG) controlled games controllers are adding new options to satisfy the continual demand for new ways to interact with games, following trends such as the Nintendo® Wii, Microsoft® Kinect and Playstation® Move which are based on accelerometers and motion

  8. A Graphical User Interface for the Computational Fluid Dynamics Software OpenFOAM

    OpenAIRE

    Melbø, Henrik Kaald

    2014-01-01

    A graphical user interface for the computational fluid dynamics software OpenFOAM has been constructed. OpenFOAM is a open source and powerful numerical software, but has much to be wanted in the field of user friendliness. In this thesis the basic operation of OpenFOAM will be introduced and the thesis will emerge in a graphical user interface written in PyQt. The graphical user interface will make the use of OpenFOAM simpler, and hopefully make this powerful tool more available for the gene...

  9. A covert attention P300-based brain-computer interface: Geospell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloise, Fabio; Aricò, Pietro; Schettini, Francesca; Riccio, Angela; Salinari, Serenella; Mattia, Donatella; Babiloni, Fabio; Cincotti, Febo

    2012-01-01

    The Farwell and Donchin P300 speller interface is one of the most widely used brain-computer interface (BCI) paradigms for writing text. Recent studies have shown that the recognition accuracy of the P300 speller decreases significantly when eye movement is impaired. This report introduces the GeoSpell interface (Geometric Speller), which implements a stimulation framework for a P300-based BCI that has been optimised for operation in covert visual attention. We compared the Geospell with the P300 speller interface under overt attention conditions with regard to effectiveness, efficiency and user satisfaction. Ten healthy subjects participated in the study. The performance of the GeoSpell interface in covert attention was comparable with that of the P300 speller in overt attention. As expected, the effectiveness of the spelling decreased with the new interface in covert attention. The NASA task load index (TLX) for workload assessment did not differ significantly between the two modalities. This study introduces and evaluates a gaze-independent, P300-based brain-computer interface, the efficacy and user satisfaction of which were comparable with those off the classical P300 speller. Despite a decrease in effectiveness due to the use of covert attention, the performance of the GeoSpell far exceeded the threshold of accuracy with regard to effective spelling.

  10. Development of a software interface for optical disk archival storage for a new life sciences flight experiments computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, Peter N.

    1989-01-01

    The current Life Sciences Laboratory Equipment (LSLE) microcomputer for life sciences experiment data acquisition is now obsolete. Among the weaknesses of the current microcomputer are small memory size, relatively slow analog data sampling rates, and the lack of a bulk data storage device. While life science investigators normally prefer data to be transmitted to Earth as it is taken, this is not always possible. No down-link exists for experiments performed in the Shuttle middeck region. One important aspect of a replacement microcomputer is provision for in-flight storage of experimental data. The Write Once, Read Many (WORM) optical disk was studied because of its high storage density, data integrity, and the availability of a space-qualified unit. In keeping with the goals for a replacement microcomputer based upon commercially available components and standard interfaces, the system studied includes a Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) for interfacing the WORM drive. The system itself is designed around the STD bus, using readily available boards. Configurations examined were: (1) master processor board and slave processor board with the SCSI interface; (2) master processor with SCSI interface; (3) master processor with SCSI and Direct Memory Access (DMA); (4) master processor controlling a separate STD bus SCSI board; and (5) master processor controlling a separate STD bus SCSI board with DMA.

  11. Computation of the Distribution of the Fiber-Matrix Interface Cracks in the Edge Trimming of CFRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu-ji; Zhang, Bo-yu; Ma, Jian-wei; Bi, Guang-jian; Hu, Hai-bo

    2018-04-01

    Edge trimming is commonly used to bring the CFRP components to right dimension and shape in aerospace industries. However, various forms of undesirable machining damage occur frequently which will significantly decrease the material performance of CFRP. The damage is difficult to predict and control due to the complicated changing laws, causing unsatisfactory machining quality of CFRP components. Since the most of damage has the same essence: the fiber-matrix interface cracks, this study aims to calculate the distribution of them in edge trimming of CFRP, thereby to obtain the effects of the machining parameters, which could be helpful to guide the optimal selection of the machining parameters in engineering. Through the orthogonal cutting experiments, the quantitative relation between the fiber-matrix interface crack depth and the fiber cutting angle, cutting depth as well as cutting speed is established. According to the analysis on material removal process on any location of the workpiece in edge trimming, the instantaneous cutting parameters are calculated, and the formation process of the fiber-matrix interface crack is revealed. Finally, the computational method for the fiber-matrix interface cracks in edge trimming of CFRP is proposed. Upon the computational results, it is found that the fiber orientations of CFRP workpieces is the most significant factor on the fiber-matrix interface cracks, which can not only change the depth of them from micrometers to millimeters, but control the distribution image of them. Other machining parameters, only influence the fiber-matrix interface cracks depth but have little effect on the distribution image.

  12. Computer organization and design the hardware/software interface

    CERN Document Server

    Patterson, David A

    2011-01-01

    This Fourth Revised Edition of Computer Organization and Design includes a complete set of updated and new exercises, along with improvements and changes suggested by instructors and students. Focusing on the revolutionary change taking place in industry today--the switch from uniprocessor to multicore microprocessors--this classic textbook has a modern and up-to-date focus on parallelism in all its forms. Examples highlighting multicore and GPU processor designs are supported with performance and benchmarking data. As with previous editions, a MIPS processor is the core used to pres

  13. Automatic pitch detection for a computer game interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca Solis, Juan M.

    2015-01-01

    A software able to recognize notes played by musical instruments is created through automatic pitch recognition. A pitch recognition algorithm is embedded into a software project, using the C implementation of SWIPEP. A memory game is chosen for project. A sequence of notes is listened and played by user to the computer, using a soprano recorder flute. The basic concepts to understand the acoustic phenomena involved are explained. The paper is aimed for all students with basic programming knowledge and want to incorporate sound processing to their projects. (author) [es

  14. Computer organization and design the hardware/software interface

    CERN Document Server

    Patterson, David A

    2007-01-01

    What's New in the Third Edition, Revised Printing. The same great book gets better! This revised printing features all of the original content along with these additional features:. • Appendix A (Assemblers, Linkers, and the SPIM Simulator) has been moved from the CD-ROM into the printed book. • Corrections and bug fixes. Third Edition features. New pedagogical features. • Understanding Program Performance. - Analyzes key performance issues from the programmer's perspective. • Check Yourself Questions. - Helps students assess their understanding of key points of a section. • Computers In the R

  15. Investigation and evaluation into the usability of human-computer interfaces using a typical CAD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickett, J D

    1987-01-01

    This research program covers three topics relating to the human-computer interface namely, voice recognition, tools and techniques for evaluation, and user and interface modeling. An investigation into the implementation of voice-recognition technologies examines how voice recognizers may be evaluated in commercial software. A prototype system was developed with the collaboration of FEMVIEW Ltd. (marketing a CAD package). A theoretical approach to evaluation leads to the hypothesis that human-computer interaction is affected by personality, influencing types of dialogue, preferred methods for providing helps, etc. A user model based on personality traits, or habitual-behavior patterns (HBP) is presented. Finally, a practical framework is provided for the evaluation of human-computer interfaces. It suggests that evaluation is an integral part of design and that the iterative use of evaluation techniques throughout the conceptualization, design, implementation and post-implementation stages will ensure systems that satisfy the needs of the users and fulfill the goal of usability.

  16. NQR spectrometer controlled by a computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoican, Ovidiu

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is one of the sensitive methods for studying physical and chemical properties of a substance, such as chemical composition, molecular structure, molecular motion and electronic environment. The specifications of the research project require the use of a nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer. Design and performances of a pulsed nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer prototype covering the range 1-10 MHz are presented. The pulsed NQR method offers considerably higher sensitivity than either the marginal oscillator or super-regenerative methods. Strong echoes are often observed directly with an oscilloscope or a simple receiver. The method allows us to observe two signal categories: free induction decay (fid) and echoes. The block diagram of the pulsed nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer is shown. All operations performed by the spectrometer are controlled by a computer. The scanning frequency range, amplitude and width of the RF pulse, additional magnetic field and sample temperature can be controlled by the software. Also it is possible to improve the signal-to-noise ratio using digital filtering applied to the data stored. Automatic operation eliminates operator skill and uncertainty of manual operation. The NQR spectrometer control software is a stand alone executable file, runs on Windows 95/98 platform and does not require the existence of another software package. A graphical interface allows to user an easy control over the spectrometer operations. All measured parameters by the control system interface are saved in the standard data files and can be processed further. The design is readily adaptable for other applications. The sample is contained within an aluminum cylindrical case. The upper end cap of the case can be removed and it allows introducing the sample. On the upper end cap RF and main temperature sensor connector are placed. On the internal side of the bottom end cap a thermoelectric cooler (MELCOR

  17. A Conceptual Architecture for Adaptive Human-Computer Interface of a PT Operation Platform Based on Context-Awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Xue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a conceptual architecture for adaptive human-computer interface of a PT operation platform based on context-awareness. This architecture will form the basis of design for such an interface. This paper describes components, key technologies, and working principles of the architecture. The critical contents covered context information modeling, processing, relationship establishing between contexts and interface design knowledge by use of adaptive knowledge reasoning, and visualization implementing of adaptive interface with the aid of interface tools technology.

  18. PointCom: semi-autonomous UGV control with intuitive interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Mitchell M.; Perlin, Victor E.; Iagnemma, Karl D.; Lupa, Robert M.; Rohde, Steven M.; Overholt, James; Fiorani, Graham

    2008-04-01

    Unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) will play an important role in the nation's next-generation ground force. Advances in sensing, control, and computing have enabled a new generation of technologies that bridge the gap between manual UGV teleoperation and full autonomy. In this paper, we present current research on a unique command and control system for UGVs named PointCom (Point-and-Go Command). PointCom is a semi-autonomous command system for one or multiple UGVs. The system, when complete, will be easy to operate and will enable significant reduction in operator workload by utilizing an intuitive image-based control framework for UGV navigation and allowing a single operator to command multiple UGVs. The project leverages new image processing algorithms for monocular visual servoing and odometry to yield a unique, high-performance fused navigation system. Human Computer Interface (HCI) techniques from the entertainment software industry are being used to develop video-game style interfaces that require little training and build upon the navigation capabilities. By combining an advanced navigation system with an intuitive interface, a semi-autonomous control and navigation system is being created that is robust, user friendly, and less burdensome than many current generation systems. mand).

  19. The advantages of the surface Laplacian in brain-computer interface research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Dennis J

    2015-09-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems frequently use signal processing methods, such as spatial filtering, to enhance performance. The surface Laplacian can reduce spatial noise and aid in identification of sources. In BCI research, these two functions of the surface Laplacian correspond to prediction accuracy and signal orthogonality. In the present study, an off-line analysis of data from a sensorimotor rhythm-based BCI task dissociated these functions of the surface Laplacian by comparing nearest-neighbor and next-nearest neighbor Laplacian algorithms. The nearest-neighbor Laplacian produced signals that were more orthogonal while the next-nearest Laplacian produced signals that resulted in better accuracy. Both prediction and signal identification are important for BCI research. Better prediction of user's intent produces increased speed and accuracy of communication and control. Signal identification is important for ruling out the possibility of control by artifacts. Identifying the nature of the control signal is relevant both to understanding exactly what is being studied and in terms of usability for individuals with limited motor control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Impact of User Interface on Young Children’s Computational Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Sullivan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: Over the past few years, new approaches to introducing young children to computational thinking have grown in popularity. This paper examines the role that user interfaces have on children’s mastery of computational thinking concepts and positive interpersonal behaviors. Background: There is a growing pressure to begin teaching computational thinking at a young age. This study explores the affordances of two very different programming interfaces for teaching computational thinking: a graphical coding application on the iPad (ScratchJr and tangible programmable robotics kit (KIBO. Methodology\t: This study used a mixed-method approach to explore the learning experiences that young children have with tangible and graphical coding interfaces. A sample of children ages four to seven (N = 28 participated. Findings: Results suggest that type of user interface does have an impact on children’s learning, but is only one of many factors that affect positive academic and socio-emotional experiences. Tangible and graphical interfaces each have qualities that foster different types of learning

  1. Hardware interface unit for control of shuttle RMS vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Thomas S.; Hansen, Joseph M.; Manouchehri, Davoud; Forouhar, Kamran

    1994-01-01

    Vibration of the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) increases the time for task completion and reduces task safety for manipulator-assisted operations. If the dynamics of the manipulator and the payload can be physically isolated, performance should improve. Rockwell has developed a self contained hardware unit which interfaces between a manipulator arm and payload. The End Point Control Unit (EPCU) is built and is being tested at Rockwell and at the Langley/Marshall Coupled, Multibody Spacecraft Control Research Facility in NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

  2. Control Strategies for the DAB Based PV Interface System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi M El-Helw

    Full Text Available This paper presents an interface system based on the Dual Active Bridge (DAB converter for Photovoltaic (PV arrays. Two control strategies are proposed for the DAB converter to harvest the maximum power from the PV array. The first strategy is based on a simple PI controller to regulate the terminal PV voltage through the phase shift angle of the DAB converter. The Perturb and Observe (P&O Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT technique is utilized to set the reference of the PV terminal voltage. The second strategy presented in this paper employs the Artificial Neural Network (ANN to directly set the phase shift angle of the DAB converter that results in harvesting maximum power. This feed-forward strategy overcomes the stability issues of the feedback strategy. The proposed PV interface systems are modeled and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK and the EMTDC/PSCAD software packages. The simulation results reveal accurate and fast response of the proposed systems. The dynamic performance of the proposed feed-forward strategy outdoes that of the feedback strategy in terms of accuracy and response time. Moreover, an experimental prototype is built to test and validate the proposed PV interface system.

  3. Towards a user-friendly brain-computer interface: initial tests in ALS and PLS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ou; Lin, Peter; Huang, Dandan; Fei, Ding-Yu; Floeter, Mary Kay

    2010-08-01

    Patients usually require long-term training for effective EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI) control due to fatigue caused by the demands for focused attention during prolonged BCI operation. We intended to develop a user-friendly BCI requiring minimal training and less mental load. Testing of BCI performance was investigated in three patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and three patients with primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), who had no previous BCI experience. All patients performed binary control of cursor movement. One ALS patient and one PLS patient performed four-directional cursor control in a two-dimensional domain under a BCI paradigm associated with human natural motor behavior using motor execution and motor imagery. Subjects practiced for 5-10min and then participated in a multi-session study of either binary control or four-directional control including online BCI game over 1.5-2h in a single visit. Event-related desynchronization and event-related synchronization in the beta band were observed in all patients during the production of voluntary movement either by motor execution or motor imagery. The online binary control of cursor movement was achieved with an average accuracy about 82.1+/-8.2% with motor execution and about 80% with motor imagery, whereas offline accuracy was achieved with 91.4+/-3.4% with motor execution and 83.3+/-8.9% with motor imagery after optimization. In addition, four-directional cursor control was achieved with an accuracy of 50-60% with motor execution and motor imagery. Patients with ALS or PLS may achieve BCI control without extended training, and fatigue might be reduced during operation of a BCI associated with human natural motor behavior. The development of a user-friendly BCI will promote practical BCI applications in paralyzed patients. Copyright 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. All rights reserved.

  4. A high speed, selective multi-ADC to computer data transfer interface, for nuclear physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arctaedius, T.; Ekstroem, R.E.

    1986-08-01

    A link connecting up to fifteen Analog to Digital Converters with a computer, through a Direct Memory Access interface, is described. The interface decides which of the connected ADC:s that participate in an event, and transfers the output-data from these to the computer, accompanied with a 2-byte word identifying the participating ADC:s. This data format can be recorded on tape without further transformations, and is easy to unfold at the off-line analysis. Data transfer is accomplished in less than a few microseconds, which is made possible by the use of high speed TTL circuits. (authors)

  5. Overlapped flowers yield detection using computer-based interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Sharma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Precision agriculture has always dealt with the accuracy and timely information about agricultural products. With the help of computer hardware and software technology designing a decision support system that could generate flower yield information and serve as base for management and planning of flower marketing is made so easy. Despite such technologies, some problem still arise, for example, a colour homogeneity of a specimen which cannot be obtained similar to actual colour of image and overlapping of image. In this paper implementing a new ‘counting algorithm’ for overlapped flower is being discussed. For implementing this algorithm, some techniques and operations such as colour image segmentation technique, image segmentation, using HSV colour space and morphological operations have been used. In this paper used two most popular colour space; those are RGB and HSV. HSV colour space decouples brightness from a chromatic component in the image, by which it provides better result in case for occlusion and overlapping.

  6. Computer-supported quality control in X-ray diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, W.; Klotz, E.

    1989-01-01

    Quality control of X-ray facilities in radiological departments of large hospitals is possible only if the instrumentation used for measurements is interfaced to a computer. The central computer helps to organize the measurements as well as analyse and record the results. It can also be connected to a densitometer and camera for evaluating radiographs of test devices. Other quality control tests are supported by a mobile station with equipment for non-invasive dosimetry measurements. Experience with a computer-supported system in quality control of film and film processing is described and the evaluation methods of ANSI and the German industrial standard DIN are compared. The disadvantage of these methods is the exclusion of film quality parameters, which can make processing control almost worthless. (author)

  7. The CERN PS/SL Controls Java Application Programming Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I. Deloose; J. Cuperus; P. Charrue; F. DiMaio; K. Kostro; M. Vanden Eynden; W. Watson

    1999-01-01

    The PS/SL Convergence Project was launched in March 1998. Its objective is to deliver a common control as infrastructure for the CERN accelerators by year 2001. In the framework of this convergence activity, a project was launched to develop a Java Application Programming Interface (API) between programs written in the Java language and the PS and SL accelerator equipment. This Java API was specified and developed in collaboration with TJNAF. It is based on the Java CDEV [1] package that has been extended in order to end up with a CERN/TJNAF common product. It implements a detailed model composed of devices organized in named classes that provide a property-based interface. It supports data subscription and introspection facilities. The device model is presented and the capabilities of the API are described with syntax examples. The software architecture is also described

  8. Optical label-controlled transparent metro-access network interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osadchiy, Alexey Vladimirovich

    This thesis presents results obtained during the course of my PhD research on optical signal routing and interfacing between the metropolitan and access segments of optical networks. Due to both increasing capacity demands and variety of emerging services types, new technological challenges...... control. Highlights of my research include my proposal and experimental proof of principle of an optical coherent detection based optical access network architecture providing support for a large number of users over a single distribution fiber; a spectral amplitude encoded label detection technique...... are arising for seamlessly interfacing metropolitan and access networks. Therefore, in this PhD project, I have analyzed those technological challenges and identified the key aspects to be addressed. I have also proposed and experimentally verified a number of solutions to metropolitan and access networks...

  9. Computer-controlled neutron time-of-flight spectrometer. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriman, S.H.

    1979-12-01

    A time-of-flight spectrometer for neutron inelastic scattering research has been interfaced to a PDP-15/30 computer. The computer is used for experimental data acquisition and analysis and for apparatus control. This report was prepared to summarize the functions of the computer and to act as a users' guide to the software system

  10. Goal-recognition-based adaptive brain-computer interface for navigating immersive robotic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Alqumsan, Mohammad; Ebert, Felix; Peer, Angelika

    2017-06-01

    Objective. This work proposes principled strategies for self-adaptations in EEG-based Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) as a way out of the bandwidth bottleneck resulting from the considerable mismatch between the low-bandwidth interface and the bandwidth-hungry application, and a way to enable fluent and intuitive interaction in embodiment systems. The main focus is laid upon inferring the hidden target goals of users while navigating in a remote environment as a basis for possible adaptations. Approach. To reason about possible user goals, a general user-agnostic Bayesian update rule is devised to be recursively applied upon the arrival of evidences, i.e. user input and user gaze. Experiments were conducted with healthy subjects within robotic embodiment settings to evaluate the proposed method. These experiments varied along three factors: the type of the robot/environment (simulated and physical), the type of the interface (keyboard or BCI), and the way goal recognition (GR) is used to guide a simple shared control (SC) driving scheme. Main results. Our results show that the proposed GR algorithm is able to track and infer the hidden user goals with relatively high precision and recall. Further, the realized SC driving scheme benefits from the output of the GR system and is able to reduce the user effort needed to accomplish the assigned tasks. Despite the fact that the BCI requires higher effort compared to the keyboard conditions, most subjects were able to complete the assigned tasks, and the proposed GR system is additionally shown able to handle the uncertainty in user input during SSVEP-based interaction. The SC application of the belief vector indicates that the benefits of the GR module are more pronounced for BCIs, compared to the keyboard interface. Significance. Being based on intuitive heuristics that model the behavior of the general population during the execution of navigation tasks, the proposed GR method can be used without prior tuning for the

  11. Wyrm: A Brain-Computer Interface Toolbox in Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venthur, Bastian; Dähne, Sven; Höhne, Johannes; Heller, Hendrik; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    In the last years Python has gained more and more traction in the scientific community. Projects like NumPy, SciPy, and Matplotlib have created a strong foundation for scientific computing in Python and machine learning packages like scikit-learn or packages for data analysis like Pandas are building on top of it. In this paper we present Wyrm ( https://github.com/bbci/wyrm ), an open source BCI toolbox in Python. Wyrm is applicable to a broad range of neuroscientific problems. It can be used as a toolbox for analysis and visualization of neurophysiological data and in real-time settings, like an online BCI application. In order to prevent software defects, Wyrm makes extensive use of unit testing. We will explain the key aspects of Wyrm's software architecture and design decisions for its data structure, and demonstrate and validate the use of our toolbox by presenting our approach to the classification tasks of two different data sets from the BCI Competition III. Furthermore, we will give a brief analysis of the data sets using our toolbox, and demonstrate how we implemented an online experiment using Wyrm. With Wyrm we add the final piece to our ongoing effort to provide a complete, free and open source BCI system in Python.

  12. Natural interfaces for interacting with a virtual control desk of a nuclear power plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghina, Mauricio Alves da Cunha e

    2012-01-01

    Due to very strict standards of safe operation of a nuclear power plant operators must be well trained so they can operate it within the necessary safety procedures. This is done through training simulators, which enable the user operation, as close as possible to the real control desk, and can be inserted accident situations, so they train, how to return the plant to a normal operating condition. Normally is used two types of simulator. Preferred is the full scope simulator, what is a computational dynamics program of the plant used in conjunction with a physical replica of the control desk, but this type of simulator involves a high construction cost. The second type is what uses synoptic windows of various regions of the original control desk, its construction cost is smaller, but it have a little fidelity to the original appearance of the table. Currently, with the use of virtual reality, control desks can be modeled in 3D, making the simulator interface is very similar to the appearance of the real control desk with a low cost construction. This work shows the use of natural interfaces for operator interaction with the virtual control desk, in order that it does not use any mechanical device for displaying and acting with it. For procedures that were used, such as: computer vision to recognize the position of the operator's and observation of their hands to the work of the desk controls and voice recognition. (author)

  13. Challenges in clinical applications of brain computer interfaces in individuals with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger eRupp

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain computer interfaces (BCIs are devices that measure brain activities and translate them into control signals used for a variety of applications. Among them are systems for communication, environmental control, neuroprostheses, exoskeletons or restorative therapies. Over the last years the technology of BCIs has reached a level of matureness allowing them to be used not only in research experiments supervised by scientists, but also in clinical routine with patients with neurological impairments supervised by clinical personnel or caregivers. However, clinicians and patients face many challenges in the application of BCIs. This particularly applies to high spinal cord injured patients, in whom artificial ventilation, autonomic dysfunctions, neuropathic pain or the inability to achieve a sufficient level of control during a short-term training may limit the successful use of a BCI. Additionally, spasmolytic medication and the acute stress reaction with associated episodes of depression may have a negative influence on the modulation of brain waves and therefore the ability to concentrate over an extended period of time. Although BCIs seem to be a promising assistive technology for individuals with high spinal cord injury systematic investigations are highly needed to obtain realistic estimates of the percentage of users that for any reason may not be able to operate a BCI in a clinical setting.

  14. Operation of a P300-based brain-computer interface by patients with spinocerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoji Okahara

    Full Text Available Objective: We investigated the efficacy of a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI for patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA, which is often accompanied by cerebellar impairment. Methods: Eight patients with SCA and eight age- and gender-matched healthy controls were instructed to input Japanese hiragana characters using the P300-based BCI with green/blue flicker. All patients depended on some assistance in their daily lives (modified Rankin scale: mean 3.5. The chief symptom was cerebellar ataxia; no cognitive deterioration was present. A region-based, two-step P300-based BCI was used. During the P300 task, eight-channel EEG data were recorded, and a linear discriminant analysis distinguished the target from other nontarget regions of the matrix. Results: The mean online accuracy in BCI operation was 82.9% for patients with SCA and 83.2% for controls; no significant difference was detected. Conclusion: The P300-based BCI was operated successfully not only by healthy controls but also by individuals with SCA. Significance: These results suggest that the P300-based BCI may be applicable for patients with SCA. Keywords: BCI, BMI, P300, Visual stimuli, Spinocerebellar ataxia

  15. What Do IT-People Know About the (Nordic) History of Computers and User Interfaces?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms

    2009-01-01

    :  This paper reports a preliminary, empirical exploration of what IT-people know about the history of computers and user interfaces.  The principal motivation for the study is that the younger generations such as students in IT seem to know very little about these topics.  The study employed...... to become the designation or even the icon for the computer.  In other words, one of the key focal points in the area of human-computer interaction: to make the computer as such invisible seems to have been successful...

  16. Rapid prototyping of an EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guger, C; Schlögl, A; Neuper, C; Walterspacher, D; Strein, T; Pfurtscheller, G

    2001-03-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) is modified by motor imagery and can be used by patients with severe motor impairments (e.g., late stage of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) to communicate with their environment. Such a direct connection between the brain and the computer is known as an EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI). This paper describes a new type of BCI system that uses rapid prototyping to enable a fast transition of various types of parameter estimation and classification algorithms to real-time implementation and testing. Rapid prototyping is possible by using Matlab, Simulink, and the Real-Time Workshop. It is shown how to automate real-time experiments and perform the interplay between on-line experiments and offline analysis. The system is able to process multiple EEG channels on-line and operates under Windows 95 in real-time on a standard PC without an additional digital signal processor (DSP) board. The BCI can be controlled over the Internet, LAN or modem. This BCI was tested on 3 subjects whose task it was to imagine either left or right hand movement. A classification accuracy between 70% and 95% could be achieved with two EEG channels after some sessions with feedback using an adaptive autoregressive (AAR) model and linear discriminant analysis (LDA).

  17. Programmable logic controller optical fibre sensor interface module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allwood, Gary; Wild, Graham; Hinckley, Steven

    2011-12-01

    Most automated industrial processes use Distributed Control Systems (DCSs) or Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) for automated control. PLCs tend to be more common as they have much of the functionality of DCSs, although they are generally cheaper to install and maintain. PLCs in conjunction with a human machine interface form the basis of Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, combined with communication infrastructure and Remote Terminal Units (RTUs). RTU's basically convert different sensor measurands in to digital data that is sent back to the PLC or supervisory system. Optical fibre sensors are becoming more common in industrial processes because of their many advantageous properties. Being small, lightweight, highly sensitive, and immune to electromagnetic interference, means they are an ideal solution for a variety of diverse sensing applications. Here, we have developed a PLC Optical Fibre Sensor Interface Module (OFSIM), in which an optical fibre is connected directly to the OFSIM located next to the PLC. The embedded fibre Bragg grating sensors, are highly sensitive and can detect a number of different measurands such as temperature, pressure and strain without the need for a power supply.

  18. Electromagnetic control of mass transfer at liquid/liquid interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saadi, B.

    2006-04-01

    Most metallurgical processes, such as steel refining or nuclear waste processing; the interfaces between two liquid phases are the regions of mass transfer. These transfers require the implementation of a means of stirring to accelerate the kinetics of the pollutants transfer between both phases. This thesis deals with the use of the electromagnetic forces to stir, without any material contact, the bath core and the interface in order to control or even increase the kinetic transfers. To achieve this, two complementary experimental installations were used. The first experiment allows the measurement of the Indium transfer, initially dissolved in mercury towards a covering electrolyte layer and the velocity field in mercury. The performed experiments, determine the topology of the fields flows speeds in the mercury bath, moreover the behaviour of the transfer kinetics versus the intensity of the magnetic field are established. This evolution is correlated with the dynamic behaviour of the mercury surface. The second installation allows the characterization of an element transfer (Pb, Zr or Ce) initially contained in a fluorinated salt towards an antimony matrix containing lithium. It appears that all transfers kinetics are very fast. The proposed experimental set-up is particularly efficient for Cerium transfer (limited by the interface) but does not present any action for Zirconium transfer. (author)

  19. UIMX: A User Interface Management System For Scientific Computing With X Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foody, Michael

    1989-09-01

    Applications with iconic user interfaces, (for example, interfaces with pulldown menus, radio buttons, and scroll bars), such as those found on Apple's Macintosh computer and the IBM PC under Microsoft's Presentation Manager, have become very popular, and for good reason. They are much easier to use than applications with traditional keyboard-oriented interfaces, so training costs are much lower and just about anyone can use them. They are standardized between applications, so once you learn one application you are well along the way to learning another. The use of one reinforces the common elements between applications of the interface, and, as a result, you remember how to use them longer. Finally, for the developer, their support costs can be much lower because of their ease of use.

  20. Real-time image processing and control interface for remote operation of a microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Hesong; Wilder, Joseph

    1999-08-01

    A real-time image processing and control interface for remote operation of a microscope is presented in this paper. The system has achieved real-time color image display for 640 X 480 pixel images. Multi-resolution image representation can be provided for efficient transmission through the network. Through the control interface the computer can communicate with the programmable microscope via the RS232 serial ports. By choosing one of three scanning patterns, a sequence of images can be saved as BMP or PGM files to record information on an entire microscope slide. The system will be used by medical and graduate students at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey for distance learning. It can be used in many network-based telepathology applications.

  1. Workshops of the Fifth International Brain-Computer Interface Meeting: Defining the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Jane E; Guger, Christoph; Allison, Brendan; Anderson, Charles W; Batista, Aaron; Brouwer, Anne-Marie A-M; Brunner, Clemens; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Gunduz, Aysegul; Gupta, Disha; Kübler, Andrea; Leeb, Robert; Lotte, Fabien; Miller, Lee E; Müller-Putz, Gernot; Rutkowski, Tomasz; Tangermann, Michael; Thompson, David Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Fifth International Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) Meeting met June 3-7 th , 2013 at the Asilomar Conference Grounds, Pacific Grove, California. The conference included 19 workshops covering topics in brain-computer interface and brain-machine interface research. Topics included translation of BCIs into clinical use, standardization and certification, types of brain activity to use for BCI, recording methods, the effects of plasticity, special interest topics in BCIs applications, and future BCI directions. BCI research is well established and transitioning to practical use to benefit people with physical impairments. At the same time, new applications are being explored, both for people with physical impairments and beyond. Here we provide summaries of each workshop, illustrating the breadth and depth of BCI research and high-lighting important issues for future research and development.

  2. Software and man-machine interface considerations for a nuclear plant computer replacement and upgrade project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, G.; Robinson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the key software functions and Man-Machine Interface considerations in a computer replacement and upgrade project for a nuclear power plant are described. The project involves the installation of two separate computer systems: an Emergency Response Facilities Computer System (ERFCS) and a Plant Process Computer System (PPCS). These systems employ state-of-the-art computer hardware and software. The ERFCS is a new system intended to provide enhanced functions to meet NRC post-TMI guidelines. The PPCS is intended to replace and upgrade an existing obsolete plant computer system. A general overview of the hardware and software aspects of the replacement and upgrade is presented. The work done to develop the upgraded Man-Machine Interface is described. For the ERFCS, a detailed discussion is presented of the work done to develop logic to evaluate the readiness and performance of safety systems and their supporting functions. The Man-Machine Interface considerations of reporting readiness and performance to the operator are discussed. Finally, the considerations involved in the implementation of this logic in real-time software are discussed.. For the PPCS, a detailed discussion is presented of some new features

  3. Design guidelines for the use of audio cues in computer interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumikawa, D.A.; Blattner, M.M.; Joy, K.I.; Greenberg, R.M.

    1985-07-01

    A logical next step in the evolution of the computer-user interface is the incorporation of sound thereby using our senses of ''hearing'' in our communication with the computer. This allows our visual and auditory capacities to work in unison leading to a more effective and efficient interpretation of information received from the computer than by sight alone. In this paper we examine earcons, which are audio cues, used in the computer-user interface to provide information and feedback to the user about computer entities (these include messages and functions, as well as states and labels). The material in this paper is part of a larger study that recommends guidelines for the design and use of audio cues in the computer-user interface. The complete work examines the disciplines of music, psychology, communication theory, advertising, and psychoacoustics to discover how sound is utilized and analyzed in those areas. The resulting information is organized according to the theory of semiotics, the theory of signs, into the syntax, semantics, and pragmatics of communication by sound. Here we present design guidelines for the syntax of earcons. Earcons are constructed from motives, short sequences of notes with a specific rhythm and pitch, embellished by timbre, dynamics, and register. Compound earcons and family earcons are introduced. These are related motives that serve to identify a family of related cues. Examples of earcons are given.

  4. Preliminary Specifications for the PS Transverse Damper Control Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Blas, A

    2003-01-01

    The transverse feedback system foreseen for the PS in 2004 is composed of different units to be remotely controlled and monitored: the pick-up amplifiers, the DSPU, the fine delay, the driver and power amplifiers. A special VME unit being dedicated to the pick-up amplifier ("The VMOD-TRX: a device for communication with remote instrumentation", A. Barreira Sevillano, J. Belleman, PS/BD/Note 96-02), the new interface will have to deal with the remaining parts of the loop.

  5. FPGA implementation of PCI to CAMAC interface for Embedded CAMAC Controller (ECC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, K.; Behere, Anita; Ghodgaonkar, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    CAMAC controllers are used for control systems and nuclear physics experiments. Control applications need more number of physically distributed crates with regular scanning of all the parameters, the control being with a centralized computer. On the other hand, nuclear physics experiments need a high throughput with a large number of parameters in one or more crates. The nature of events is random hence buffering of data in LIST mode acquisition is needed. For a large number of parameters, this translates to high transfer rate. Hence it is essential that the CAMAC readout time is minimized and also the data transfer speed is improved to achieve maximum effective throughput. The ECC is designed to achieve these objectives using an embedded controller with PC architecture having PCI bus as interface for add on logic. The PCI Add-on to CAMAC interface protocol has been implemented in an AL TERA FPGA and all the functionality coded in VHDL. This paper discusses the design aspects of the FPGA implementation of the PCI to CAMAC interface. (author)

  6. Ethical Issues in Brain-Computer Interface Research, Development, and Dissemination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlek, Rutger; Steines, David; Szibbo, Dyana; Kübler, Andrea; Schneider, Mary-Jane; Haselager, Pim; Nijboer, Femke

    The steadily growing field of brain-computer interfacing (BCI) may develop useful technologies, with a potential impact not only on individuals, but also on society as a whole. At the same time, the development of BCI presents significant ethical and legal challenges. In a workshop during the 4th

  7. Detection of User Independent Single Trial ERPs in Brain Computer Interfaces: An Adaptive Spatial Filtering Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leza, Cristina; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2017-01-01

    Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) use brain signals to communicate with the external world. The main challenges to address are speed, accuracy and adaptability. Here, a novel algorithm for P300 based BCI spelling system is presented, specifically suited for single-trial detection of Event...

  8. Myndplay: Measuring Attention Regulation with Single Dry Electrode Brain Computer Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, C.N.; Irrmischer, M.; Guo, Y.; Friston, K.; Faisal, A.; Hill, S.; Peng, H.

    2015-01-01

    Future applications for the detection of attention can be helped by the development and validation of single electrode brain computer interfaces that are small and user-friendly. The two objectives of this study were: to (1) understand the correlates of attention regulation as detected with the

  9. Brain-computer interface using P300 and virtual reality: A gaming approach for treating ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohani, Darius Adam; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel brain-computer interface (BCI) system aiming at the rehabilitation of attention-deficit/hyperactive disorder in children. It uses the P300 potential in a series of feedback games to improve the subjects' attention. We applied a support vector machine (SVM) using temporal...

  10. Performance of Brain-computer Interfacing based on tactile selective sensation and motor imagery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Lin; Sheng, Xinjun; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie

    2018-01-01

    We proposed a multi-class tactile brain-computer interface that utilizes stimulus-induced oscillatory dynamics. It was hypothesized that somatosensory attention can modulate tactile induced oscillation changes, which can decode different sensation attention tasks. Subjects performed four tactile...

  11. As We May Think and Be: Brain-computer interfaces to expand the substrate of mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijail Demian Serruya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Over a half-century ago, the scientist Vannevar Bush explored the conundrum of how to tap the exponentially rising sea of human knowledge for the betterment of humanity. In his description of a hypothetical electronic library he dubbed the memex, he anticipated internet search and online encyclopedias (Bush, 1945. By blurring the boundary between brain and computer, brain-computer interfaces (BCI could lead to more efficient use of electronic resources (Schalk, 2008. We could expand the substrate of the mind itself rather than merely interfacing it to external computers. Components of brain-computer interfaces could be re-arranged to create brain-brain interfaces, or tightly interconnected links between a person’s brain and ectopic neural modules. Such modules – whether sitting in a bubbling Petri dish, rendered in reciprocally linked integrated circuits, or implanted in our belly – would mark the first step on to a path of breaking out of the limitations imposed by our phylogenetic past Novel BCI architectures could generate novel abilities to navigate and access information that might speed translational science efforts and push the boundaries of human knowledge in an unprecedented manner.

  12. Bigger data for big data: from Twitter to brain-computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Etienne B; Stahl, Frederic; Gaber, Mohamed Medhat

    2014-02-01

    We are sympathetic with Bentley et al.'s attempt to encompass the wisdom of crowds in a generative model, but posit that a successful attempt at using big data will include more sensitive measurements, more varied sources of information, and will also build from the indirect information available through technology, from ancillary technical features to data from brain-computer interfaces.

  13. Ethical Issues in Brain-Computer Interface Research, Development, and Dissemination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlek, R.J.; Steines, D.; Szibbo, D.; Kübler, A.; Schneider, M.J.; Haselager, W.F.G.; Nijboer, F.

    2012-01-01

    The steadily growing field of brain–computer interfacing (BCI) may develop useful technologies, with a potential impact not only on individuals, but also on society as a whole. At the same time, the development of BCI presents significant ethical and legal challenges. In a workshop during the 4th

  14. The Asilomar Survey: Stakeholders' Opinions on Ethical Issues Related to Brain-Computer Interfacing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, Femke; Clausen, Jens; Allison, Brendan Z.; Haselager, Pim

    2013-01-01

    Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) research and (future) applications raise important ethical issues that need to be addressed to promote societal acceptance and adequate policies. Here we report on a survey we conducted among 145 BCI researchers at the 4th International BCI conference, which took place

  15. The Asilomar Survey: Stakeholders’ Opinions on Ethical Issues Related to Brain-Computer Interfacing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, F.; Clausen, J.; Allison, B.Z.; Haselager, W.F.G.

    2013-01-01

    Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) research and (future) applications raise important ethical issues that need to be addressed to promote societal acceptance and adequate policies. Here we report on a survey we conducted among 145 BCI researchers at the 4th International BCI conference, which took place

  16. Citation analysis of Computer Standards & Interfaces: Technical or also non-technical focus?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. van de Kaa (Geerten); H.J. de Vries (Henk); B. Baskaran (Balakumaran)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThis paper analyzes to which extent research published in Computer Standards & Interfaces (CSI) has a technical focus. We find that CSI has been following its scope very closely in the last three years and that the majority of its publications have a technical focus. Articles published

  17. Toward affective brain-computer interfaces : exploring the neurophysiology of affect during human media interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mühl, C.

    2012-01-01

    Affective Brain-Computer Interfaces (aBCI), the sensing of emotions from brain activity, seems a fantasy from the realm of science fiction. But unlike faster-than-light travel or teleportation, aBCI seems almost within reach due to novel sensor technologies, the advancement of neuroscience, and the

  18. Touch in Computer-Mediated Environments: An Analysis of Online Shoppers' Touch-Interface User Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sorim

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, one of the most fundamental changes in current computer-mediated environments has been input devices, moving from mouse devices to touch interfaces. However, most studies of online retailing have not considered device environments as retail cues that could influence users' shopping behavior. In this research, I examine the…

  19. Computer control of shielded cell operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffords, W.R. III.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes in detail a computer system to remotely control shielded cell operations. System hardware, software, and design criteria are discussed. We have designed a computer-controlled buret that provides a tenfold improvement over the buret currently in service. A computer also automatically controls cell analyses, calibrations, and maintenance. This system improves conditions for the operators by providing a safer, more efficient working environment and is expandable for future growth and development

  20. Control system user interface for accelerator commissioning and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrott, D.; Keeley, D.; Kolte, G.; Mikic, Z.; Lee, M.; Corbett, J.; Howry, S.; King, A.

    1991-01-01

    An Interactive Accelerator Interface Module (AIM) has been developed in a workstation environment for the purposes of assisting in the commissioning and operation of any storage ring/collider system. The function of AIM is to integrate modeling and simulation codes into accelerator and beamline control systems for the purpose of rapid on-line data analysis and error-correction, resulting in significant time-saving. A system dependent module provides for the translation of specific control system data files to appropriate input format for application programs within AIM. Interactive screen graphics, including system function diagrams, menus, beamline element status and update information are standard in AIM. AIM is currently connected to the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) control system, but is easily transportable to other facilities. This paper describes the development of AIM and its applications on SLC