WorldWideScience

Sample records for interacting water masses

  1. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry to determine artificial sweeteners in environmental waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Daniela; Borrull, Francesc; Fontanals, Núria; Marcé, Rosa Maria

    2015-06-01

    Artificial sweeteners are food additives employed as sugar substitutes which are now considered to be emerging organic contaminants. In the present study, a method is developed for the determination of a group of artificial sweeteners in environmental waters. Considering the polar and hydrophilic character of these compounds, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography is proposed for their separation as an alternative to traditional reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Two stationary phases with different chemistry were compared for this purpose. For the detection of the analytes, high-resolution mass spectrometry (Orbitrap) was employed to take advantage of its benefits in terms of reliable quantification and confirmation for the measurement of accurate masses. Solid-phase extraction was chosen as the sample treatment, in which the extract in a mixture of NH4OH:MeOH:ACN (1:4:15) was directly injected into the chromatographic system, simplifying the analytical procedure. The optimized method was validated on river and waste water samples. For example, in the case of effluent water samples, limits of detection ranged from 0.002 to 0.7 μg/L and limits of quantification ranged from 0.004 to 1.5 μg/L. Apparent (whole method) recoveries ranged from 57 to 74% with intra-day precision (%RSD, n = 5) ranging from 6 to 25%. The method was successfully applied to water samples from different rivers in Catalonia and different waste water treatment plants in Tarragona. Acesulfame, cyclamate, saccharine and sucralose were found in several samples.

  2. Water mass interaction in the confluence zone of the Daning River and the Yangtze River--a driving force for algal growth in the Three Gorges Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbach, Andreas; Wang, Lijing; Chen, Hao; Hu, Wei; Schleicher, Nina; Zheng, Binghui; Norra, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    Increasing eutrophication and algal bloom events in the Yangtze River Three Gorges Reservoir, China, are widely discussed with regard to changed hydrodynamics and nutrient transport and distribution processes. Insights into water exchange and interaction processes between water masses related to large-scale water level fluctuations in the reservoir are crucial to understand water quality and eutrophication dynamics. Therefore, confluence zones of tributaries with the Yangtze River main stream are dedicated key interfaces. In this study, water quality data were recorded in situ and on-line in varying depths with the MINIBAT towed underwater multi-sensor system in the confluence zone of the Daning River and the Yangtze River close to Wushan City during 1 week in August 2011. Geostatistical evaluation of the water quality data was performed, and results were compared to phosphorus contents of selective water samples. The strongly rising water level throughout the measurement period caused Yangtze River water masses to flow upstream into the tributary and supply their higher nutrient and particulate loads into the tributary water body. Rapid algal growth and sedimentation occurred immediately when hydrodynamic conditions in the confluence zone became more serene again. Consequently, water from the Yangtze River main stream can play a key role in providing nutrients to the algal bloom stricken water bodies of its tributaries.

  3. Problems of interaction between water and fuel containing masses inside the object 'Shelter' of Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukhnovs'kij, Yi.R.; Kobrin, O.Je.; Tokarchuk, M.V.; Tokarevs'kij, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    The main forms of the existence of nuclear fuel and major concomitant factors of nuclear and ecological danger of the object 'Shelter' are presented. The processes of interaction between water and fuel containing materials have been analysed on the basis of experimental data

  4. Wood–water interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang

    2011-01-01

    Predicting the performance of wood for decades ahead is important when using the material for structural purposes. The performance is closely related to the hierarchical material structure of wood and the dependent interaction with water in the structure. Accurately predicting wood performance...... therefore requires an understanding of material structure from molecular to macroscopic level as well as of the impact of water molecules. The objective of this work is to investigate the performance of wood in terms of mechanical response of the material and effect of water. To understand the latter, one...... must first know in which parts of the wood structure, water is located. If parts of the water in wood are held in capillaries in the wood structure, these water molecules interact with the material differently than those held within wood cell walls. In this study, the occurrence of capillary water...

  5. The determination of acrylamide in environmental and drinking waters by large-volume injection - hydrophilic-interaction liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backe, Will J; Yingling, Virginia; Johnson, Todd

    2014-03-21

    A simple and sensitive analytical method was developed to quantify levels of acrylamide in environmental and drinking waters. The analytical method consisted of solvent exchanging acrylamide from 2mL of water into 2mL of dichloromethane using acetonitrile as an intermediate. The sample was then directly analyzed by large-volume (750μL) injection - hydrophilic-interaction liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The method detection limit and reporting level were 2.4ng/L and 17ng/L of acrylamide, respectively. The recovery of acrylamide during solvent exchange was 95±2.8% and the matrix effects were 12±2.2% in river water. The use of atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization reduced matrix effects; however, it also reduced method sensitivity by a factor of 2.2 compared to electrospray ionization. Matrix effects were compensated for by the use of an isotopically-labeled internal standard and the method accuracy was 89±3.0% at 25ng/L of acrylamide and 102±2.6% at 250ng/L of acrylamide. The precision of the method was less than 6% relative standard deviation at both 25ng/L and 250ng/L of acrylamide. Samples from a sand-and-gravel mine and a drinking-water treatment plant were acquired to demonstrate the method. The concentrations of acrylamide at the sand-and-gravel mine were up to 280ng/L. In the drinking-water treatment plant, the concentration of acrylamide was approximately double in the finished drinking water when compared to other stages in the drinking-water treatment process. Disinfection or fluoridation may result in higher concentrations of acrylamide in finished drinking water; however, further research in this area is necessary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Water spray interaction with air-steam mixtures under containment spray conditions: comparison of heat and mass transfer modelling with the TOSQAN spray tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malet, J.; Lemaitre, P.; Porcheron, E.; Vendel, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: During the course of a hypothetical severe accident in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), hydrogen can be produced by the reactor core oxidation and distributed into the reactor containment according to convection flows and water steam wall condensation. In order to mitigate the risk of detonation generated by a high local hydrogen concentration, spray systems are used in the containment. The TOSQAN programme has been created to simulate separate-effect tests representative of typical accidental thermal-hydraulic flow conditions in the reactor containment. The present work concerns the interaction of a water spray, used at the top of the containment in order to reduce the steam partial pressure, with air-steam mixtures. The main phenomena occurring when water spray is used are the mixing induced by spray entrainment and the condensation on droplets. In order to improve the latter phenomena, different levels of modelling can be used. The objective of this paper is to analyze experimental results obtained for water spray interaction with air-steam mixtures using different heat and mass transfer modelling. For this purpose, two modelling issues have been used: the first one is devoted for the determination of the gas thermodynamical properties, and the second one concerns the droplets characterization. In the first one, the gas thermodynamical analysis is performed using depressurization, gas temperature variation and humidity decrease during the spray injection. In this modelling, heat and mass transfer between the spray and the surrounding gas is treated in a global way by energy balance between the total amount of water and the gas. In the second one, droplets characterization is obtained by means of droplet size, temperature and velocities evolutions. In this modelling, the spray is considered as a single droplet falling with an initial velocity. Droplet interactions are neglected. Assessment of these two modelling is performed

  7. Influence of a thermal gradient on water-rock interactions and mass transport in geologic media (marine pelagic clay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyfried, W.E. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A brief outline of the role of thermodiffusional processes in mass transport and sediment alteration for a sediment/seawater system that is subjected to a thermal gradient and maximum temperature and pressure condition, such as in a subseabed repository is presented. The author underscores the need to investigate the effect of basic physical and chemical parameters on Soret coefficients for various electrolyte fluids. Such experiments will require the design and development of unique hydrothermal apparatus

  8. Water/rock interactions and mass transport within a thermal gradient Application to the confinement of high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, Ch.; Ecole Normale Superieure, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses

    1998-01-01

    The initial stage of a high level nuclear waste disposal will be characterised by a large heat release within the near-field environment of the canisters. This heat flux caused by radioactive decay will lead to an increase of temperature and a subsequent thermal gradient between the 'hot' canisters and the 'cold'geological medium. In addition, this thermal gradient will decrease with time due to the heat decay although it could last hundred years. What will be the consequences of such a thermal field varying both on space and time for the alteration of the different constituents of the near field environment. In particular, what could be the effects on the radionuclides migration in the accidental case of an early breach of a canister during the thermal stage? This study brings significant answers to these questions in the light of a performance assessment study. This work is supported by a triple methodological approach involving experimental studies, modelling calculations and a natural analogues study. This complete work demonstrates that a thermal gradient leads to a large re-distribution of elements within the system: some elements are incorporated in the solid phases of the hot end (Si, Zr, Ca) whereas some others are in those of the cold end (Fe, Al, Zn). The confrontation of the results of very simple experiments with the results of a model built on equilibrium thermodynamics allow us to evidence the probable mechanisms causing this mass transport: out-of-equilibrium thermodiffusion processes coupled to irreversible precipitation. Moreover, the effects of the variation of temperatures with time is studied by the way of a natural system which underwent a similar temperature evolution as a disposal and which was initially rich in uranium: the Jurassic Alpine bauxites. In addition, part of the initial bauxite escaped this temperature transformations due to their incorporation in outer thrusting nappes. They are used as a reference. (author)

  9. Mass spectrometric analysis of protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Jonas; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Roepstorff, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for identification of interaction partners and structural characterization of protein interactions because of its high sensitivity, mass accuracy and tolerance towards sample heterogeneity. Several tools that allow studies of protein interaction are now...... available and recent developments that increase the confidence of studies of protein interaction by mass spectrometry include quantification of affinity-purified proteins by stable isotope labeling and reagents for surface topology studies that can be identified by mass-contributing reporters (e.g. isotope...... labels, cleavable cross-linkers or fragment ions. The use of mass spectrometers to study protein interactions using deuterium exchange and for analysis of intact protein complexes recently has progressed considerably....

  10. Seismic Characterization of Oceanic Water Masses, Water Mass Boundaries, and Mesoscale Eddies SE of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Andrew R.; Smillie, Matthew W.; Cooper, Joanna K.; Bowman, M. Hamish; Vennell, Ross; Holbrook, W. Steven; Frew, Russell

    2018-02-01

    The Subtropical and Subantarctic Fronts, which separate Subtropical, Subantarctic, and Antarctic Intermediate Waters, are diverted to the south of New Zealand by the submerged continental landmass of Zealandia. In the upper ocean of this region, large volumes of dissolved or suspended material are intermittently transported across the Subtropical Front; however, the mechanisms of such transport processes are enigmatic. Understanding these oceanic boundaries in three dimensions generally depends on measurements collected from stationary vessels and moorings. The details of these data sets, which are critical for understanding how water masses interact and mix at the fine-scale (seismic reflection images of oceanic water masses have been produced using petroleum industry data. These seismic sections clearly show three main water masses, the boundary zones (fronts) between them, and associated thermohaline fine structure that may be related to the mixing of water masses in this region. Interpretations of the data suggest that the Subtropical Front in this region is a landward-dipping zone, with a width that can vary between 20 and 40 km. The boundary zone between Subantarctic Waters and the underlying Antarctic Intermediate Waters is also observed to dip landward. Several isolated lenses have been identified on the three data sets, ranging in size from 9 to 30 km in diameter. These lenses are interpreted to be mesoscale eddies that form at relatively shallow depths along the south side of the Subtropical Front.

  11. Features of Red Sea Water Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartadikaria, Aditya; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    Features of Red Sea water mass can be divided into three types but best to be grouped into two different classes that are split at the potential density line σθ=27.4. The surface water (0-50 m) and the intermediate water (50-200 m) have nearly identical types of water mass. They appear as a maxima salinity layer for the water mass that has σθ > 26.0, and as a minimum salinity layer for water mass that has σθ water masses are strongly affected by mixing that is controlled by seasonal variability, fresh water intrusion of the Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water (GAIW), and eddies variability. Two types of mixing; isopycnal and diapycnal mixing are part of important physical phenomena that explain the change of water mass in the Red Sea. The isopycnal mixing occurs at the neutral potential density line, connecting the Red Sea with its adjacent channel, the Gulf of Aden. Diapycnal mixing is found as a dominant mixing mode in the surface of the Red Sea Water and mainly due to energetic eddy activity. Density gradients, across which diapycnal mixing occurs, in the Red Sea are mainly due to large variations in salinity. The isolation of an extreme haline water mass below the thermocline contributes to the generation of the latitudinal shift and low diapycnal mixing. This finding further explains the difference of spatial kinetic mixing between the RSW and the Indian Ocean basin.

  12. Features of Red Sea Water Masses

    KAUST Repository

    Kartadikaria, Aditya R.

    2015-04-01

    Features of Red Sea water mass can be divided into three types but best to be grouped into two different classes that are split at the potential density line σθ=27.4. The surface water (0-50 m) and the intermediate water (50-200 m) have nearly identical types of water mass. They appear as a maxima salinity layer for the water mass that has σθ > 26.0, and as a minimum salinity layer for water mass that has σθ < 26.0. These types of water masses are strongly affected by mixing that is controlled by seasonal variability, fresh water intrusion of the Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water (GAIW), and eddies variability. Two types of mixing; isopycnal and diapycnal mixing are part of important physical phenomena that explain the change of water mass in the Red Sea. The isopycnal mixing occurs at the neutral potential density line, connecting the Red Sea with its adjacent channel, the Gulf of Aden. Diapycnal mixing is found as a dominant mixing mode in the surface of the Red Sea Water and mainly due to energetic eddy activity. Density gradients, across which diapycnal mixing occurs, in the Red Sea are mainly due to large variations in salinity. The isolation of an extreme haline water mass below the thermocline contributes to the generation of the latitudinal shift and low diapycnal mixing. This finding further explains the difference of spatial kinetic mixing between the RSW and the Indian Ocean basin.

  13. Study on water-sediment interaction in samples from Rio das Velhas - Minas Gerais State - Brazil using instrumental neutron activation analysis, and argon plasma coupled mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veado, Maria Adelaide R.V.; Oliveira, Arno H. de; Revel, G.; Pinte, G.; Toulhoat, P.

    1999-01-01

    Sorption of the metallic elements in aqueous solutions in surface of the hydroxides affects the transport of heavy elements in the freshwaters. Sorption and the chemistry of the hydroxides are important studies for knowledge in geology, waters and waste treatment, and environment studies. In the industrial mining region areas, the river surface waters are subject to modifications in its physical and chemistries properties: pH, DBO, conductivity and alkalinity. Instrumental neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), have ben used for the determination of toxic heavy metals and others pollutants in the Das Velhas river in State of Minas Gerais, in south-east Brazil. Water samples were collected with acidification on site, which provoked a change of its natural pH. Consequently, metallic elements associated to hydroxides and to particles in suspension were liberated. The objective of this paper is to show the different behavior of any elements, in water of Das Velhas river, with relation of its chemical forms (cations or anions), the solubility degree, the pH and the presence of rare earth elements. (author)

  14. Water masses in the Gulf of Aden

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Al Saafani, M.A.; Shenoi, S.S.C.

    Hydrographic data collected from Gulf of Aden since 1920 have been compiled to identify and refine the definitions of water masses in the Gulf of Aden (GA) and to describe their spatio-temporal variability. Four water masses have been identified...

  15. Water masses of Visakhapatnam shelf

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RamaRaju, V.S.; Sarma, V.V.; Rao, B.P.; Rao, V.S.

    The T-S relationships of shelf waters off Visakhapatnam in the Bay of Bengal are studied for the different seasons with the data collected during February 1979 to January 1981. The T-S relationships indicate distinct characteristics of the water...

  16. Features of Red Sea Water Masses

    KAUST Repository

    Kartadikaria, Aditya R.; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    by seasonal variability, fresh water intrusion of the Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water (GAIW), and eddies variability. Two types of mixing; isopycnal and diapycnal mixing are part of important physical phenomena that explain the change of water mass in the Red

  17. Groundwater-surface water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, P.A.; Clausen, B.; Hunt, B.; Cameron, S.; Weir, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter discusses natural and modified interactions between groundwater and surface water. Theory on recharge to groundwater from rivers is introduced, and the relative importance of groundwater recharge from rivers is illustrated with an example from the Ngaruroro River, Hawke's Bay. Some of the techniques used to identify and measure recharge to groundwater from gravel-bed rivers will be outlined, with examples from the Ngaruroro River, where the recharge reach is relatively well defined, and from the Rakaia River, where it is poorly defined. Groundwater recharged from rivers can have characteristic chemical and isotopic signatures, as shown by Waimakariri River water in the Christchurch-West Melton groundwater system. The incorporation of groundwater-river interaction in a regional groundwater flow model is outlined for the Waimea Plains, and relationships between river scour and groundwater recharge are examined for the Waimakariri River. Springs are the result of natural discharge from groundwater systems and are important water sources. The interactions between groundwater systems, springs, and river flow for the Avon River in New Zealand will be outlined. The theory of depletion of stream flow by groundwater pumpage will be introduced with a case study from Canterbury, and salt-water intrusion into groundwater systems with examples from Nelson and Christchurch. The theory of artificial recharge to groundwater systems is introduced with a case study from Hawke's Bay. Wetlands are important to flora, and the relationship of the wetland environment to groundwater hydrology will be discussed, with an example from the South Taupo wetland. (author). 56 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Mass loss from interacting close binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavec, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    The three well-defined classes of evolved binary systems that show evidence of present and/or past mass loss are the cataclysmic variables, the Algols, and Wolf-Rayet stars. It is thought that the transformation of supergiant binary systems into the very short-period cataclysmic variables must have been a complex process. The new evidence that has recently been obtained from the far ultraviolet spectra that a certain subclass of the Algols (the Serpentids) are undergoing fairly rapid evolution is discussed. It is thought probable that the remarkable mass outflow observed in them is connected with a strong wind powered by accretion. The origin of the circumbinary clouds or flat disks that probably surround many strongly interacting binaries is not clear. Attention is also given to binary systems with hot white dwarf or subdwarf components, such as the symbiotic objects and the BQ stars; it is noted that in them both components may be prone to an enhanced stellar wind.

  19. Liquid nitrogen - water interaction experiments for fusion reactor accident scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duckworth, R.; Murphy, J.; Pfotenhauer, J.; Corradini, M.

    2001-01-01

    With the implementation of superconducting magnets in fusion reactors, the possibility exists for the interaction between water and cryogenic systems. The interaction between liquid nitrogen and water was investigated experimentally and numerically. The rate of pressurization and peak pressure were found to be driven thermodynamically by the expansion of the water and the boil-off of the liquid nitrogen and did not have a vapor explosion nature. Since the peak pressure was small in comparison to previous work with stratified geometries, the role of the geometry of the interacting fluids has been shown to be significant. Comparisons of the peak pressure and the rate of pressurization with respect to the ratio of the liquid nitrogen mass to water mass reveal no functional dependence as was observed in the liquid helium-water experiments. A simple thermodynamic model provides a fairly good description of the pressure rise data. From the data, the model will allow one to extract the interaction area of the water. As with previous liquid helium-water interaction experiments, more extensive investigation of the mass ratio and interaction geometry is needed to define boundaries between explosive and non-explosive conditions. (authors)

  20. Transport and transformation of surface water masses across the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transport and transformation of surface water masses across the Mascarene Plateau during the Northeast Monsoon season. ... Mixing occurs in the central gap between intermediate water masses (Red Sea Water [RSW] and Antarctic Intermediate Water [AAIW]) as well as in the upper waters (Subtropical Surface Water ...

  1. Mass transfer in water-saturated concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, A.; Claisse, P.A.; Harris, A.W.; Nickerson, A.K.

    1990-01-01

    Cements and concretes are often considered as components of barriers for the containment of radioactive waste. The performance of such materials as mainly physical barriers to the transport of dissolved radionuclides depends on the mass transfer characteristics of the material. In particular the diffusion and sorption behavior of the radionuclides and the water permeability are important. These parameters also influence how the chemistry of the concrete is imposed on the repository. In addition, the transport of gas through concrete controls the way in which gases escape from the repository. Diffusion and gas transport have been measured in a variety of cementitious materials, covering both structural concretes and cementitious backfills; all possible repository construction materials. Measurements have been made using aqueous iodide, strontium and caesium ions and tritiated water as diffusants. The results show that the diffusion of tritiated water is more rapid than that of other species, whilst the transport of strontium and caesium is hindered by sorption; particularly in materials containing blast furnace slag. The transport of gas in these materials has been found to be very sensitive to the degree of water saturation and is extremely low in fully saturated structural concretes. Cementitious backfills have, nevertheless, been identified that have appreciable gas transport even when almost water saturated. The consequences of the results for the performance of cementitious barriers are discussed

  2. Thermobaricity, cabbeling, and water-mass conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Trevor J.

    1987-05-01

    The efficient mixing of heat and salt along neutral surfaces (by mesoscale eddies) is shown to lead to vertical advection through these neutral surfaces. This is due to the nonlinearities of the equation of state of seawater through terms like ∂2ρ/∂θ∂p (thermobaric effect) and ∂2ρ/∂ θ2 (cabbeling). Cabbeling always causes a sinking or downwelling of fluid through neutral surfaces, whereas thermobaricity can lead to a vertical velocity (relative to neutral surfaces) of either sign. In this paper it is shown that for reasonable values of the lateral scalar diffusivity (especially below a depth of 1000 m), these two processes cause vertical velocities of the order of 10-7 m s-1 through neutral surfaces (usually downward!) and cause water-mass conversion of a magnitude equal to that caused by a vertical diffusivity of 10-4 m2 s-1 (often equivalent to a negative diffusivity). Both thermobaricity and cabbeling can occur in the presence of any nonzero amount of small-scale turbulence and so will not be detected by microstructure measurements. The conservation equations for tracers are considered in a nonorthogonal coordinate frame that moves with neutral surfaces in the ocean. Since only mixing processes cause advection across neutral surfaces, it is useful to regard this vertical advection as a symptom of various mixing processes rather than as a separate physical process. It is possible to derive conservative equations for scalars that do not contain the vertical advective term explicity. In these conservation equations, the terms that represent mixing processes are substantially altered. It is argued that this form of the conservation equations is the most appropriate when considering water-mass transformation, and some examples are given of its application in the North Atlantic. It is shown that the variation of the vertical diffusivity with height does not cause water-mass transformation. Also, salt fingering is often 3-4 times more effective at

  3. Interaction of water with epoxy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Dana Auburn

    2009-07-01

    The chemistries of reactants, plasticizers, solvents and additives in an epoxy paint are discussed. Polyamide additives may play an important role in the absorption of molecular iodine by epoxy paints. It is recommended that the unsaturation of the polyamide additive in the epoxy cure be determined. Experimental studies of water absorption by epoxy resins are discussed. These studies show that absorption can disrupt hydrogen bonds among segments of the polymers and cause swelling of the polymer. The water absorption increases the diffusion coefficient of water within the polymer. Permanent damage to the polymer can result if water causes hydrolysis of ether linkages. Water desorption studies are recommended to ascertain how water absorption affects epoxy paint.

  4. Constraints on WIMP masses and interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enqvist, K.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that cosmology, experiments and unitarity considerations limit the mass and coupling g' of a generic, heavy WIMP from the above as well as from the below. There are absolute lower limits of 4x10 -5 g and 6x10 -5 g for the couplings of Diracn and Majorana WIMPs, respectively. In U(1)' models cosmology implies an upper limit of about 1 TeV on the Z' and on the WIMP masses, but only in the absence of Z-Z' mixing. (orig.)

  5. Water masses and property distribution in the EEZ of Mauritius

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSousa, S.N.; Singbal, S.Y.S.; George, M.D.

    Water masses and their properties have been studied in the Mauritian during September-October, 1987. Surface water is characterizEd. by two water masses: 1) a warm (temp. 27 degrees C) and relatively saline water (salinity 35.3 x 10 sup(-3)) which...

  6. Garvey-Kelson mass relations and n-p interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Zaochun; Meng Jie; Chen Yongshou

    2001-01-01

    Two Garvey-Kelson mass relations are found to be directly related to the n-p interaction. In the case of the same nuclear core, the neutron-proton interaction energy between two neutrons and one proton ε 2n-1p is experimentally found to be close to that between one neutron and two protons ε 1n-2p , which is equivalent to the first Garvey-Kelson mass relation. The sum of ε 2n-1p and ε 1n-2p is close to the n-p interaction energy between two neutrons and two protons ε 2n-2p , which leads to the second Garvey-Kelson mass relation. An explanation of these two n-p interaction relations is presented. It is shown that both of these mass relations hold more accurately when the core is an even-even core

  7. Inferences on mass composition and tests of hadronic interactions from 0.3 to 100 EeV using the water-Cherenkov detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allekotte, I.; Almela, M.; Zuccarello, F.; van den Berg, Adriaan; Scholten, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    We present a new method for probing the hadronic interaction models atultrahigh energy and extracting details about mass composition. This isdone using the time profiles of the signals recorded with thewater-Cherenkov detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The profilesarise from a mix of the

  8. Dark Mass Creation During EWPT Via Dark Energy Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Kisslinger, Leonard S.; Casper, Steven

    2013-01-01

    We add Dark Matter Dark Energy terms with a quintessence field interacting with a Dark Matter field to a MSSM EW Lagrangian previously used to calculate the magnetic field created during the EWPT. From the expectation value of the quintessence field we estimate the Dark Matter mass for parameters used in previous work on Dark Matter-Dark Energy interactions.

  9. Weak interactions, quark masses and spontaneous violation of parity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingsley, R.L.

    1976-09-01

    A six quark model is discussed for the weak interactions of hadrons in which parity is violated spontaneously in an SU(2) x U(1) gauge theory. Quarks with very small masses are required and their weak interactions approximate those of the Weinberg-Salam model. Suppression of strangeness-changing neutral currents requires at least seven quarks. (author)

  10. Interaction with Mass Media: The Importance of Rhythm and Tempo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    Stresses that understanding the impact of interaction with mass media requires conceptualizing media as an institutionalized social form. A critical feature of this process is the grammatical character of media interaction in the form of rhythm and tempo, because these rhythms and tempos become established in everyday routine. (SKC)

  11. Selected Topics on Mass Transport in Gas-solid Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2004-01-01

    The present article is a short review containing examples of the role of mass transport in the solid state during gas-solid interactions. Examples are taken from the authors' research on the interaction of carbon and/or nitrogen with iron-based metals. Topics dealt with are diffusion-controlled d......The present article is a short review containing examples of the role of mass transport in the solid state during gas-solid interactions. Examples are taken from the authors' research on the interaction of carbon and/or nitrogen with iron-based metals. Topics dealt with are diffusion...... on the kinetics of phenomena in the solid state. Various experimental techniques were applied to investigate these phenomena; it is however beyond the scope of the present article to treat experimental conditions in detail. The interested reader is referred to the original work for in depth discussions...

  12. Formation rate of water masses in the Japan Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hideyuki; Ito, Toshimichi; Yoon, Jong-Hwan

    2007-01-01

    Water masses in the subsurface and the intermediate layer are actively formed due to strong winter convection in the Japan Sea. It is probable that some fraction of pollution is carried into the layer below the sea surface together with these water masses, so it is important to estimate the formation rate and turnover time of water masses to study the fate of pollutants. The present study estimates the annual formation rate and the turnover time of water masses using a three-dimensional ocean circulation model and a particle chasing method. The total annual formation rate of water masses below the sea surface amounted to about 3.53±0.55 Sv in the Japan Sea. Regarding representative intermediate water masses, the annual formation rate of the Upper portion of the Japan Sea Proper Water (UJSPW) and the Japan Sea Intermediate Water (JSIW) were estimated to be about 0.38±0.11 and 1.43±0.16 Sv, respectively, although there was little evidence of the formation of deeper water masses below a depth of about 1500 m in a numerical experiment. An estimate of turnover time shows that the UJSPW and the JSIW circulate in the intermediate layer of the Japan Sea with timescales of about 22.1 and 2.2 years, respectively. (author)

  13. Hexagonal boron nitride and water interaction parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yanbin; Aluru, Narayana R., E-mail: aluru@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Wagner, Lucas K. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801-3080 (United States)

    2016-04-28

    The study of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in microfluidic and nanofluidic applications at the atomic level requires accurate force field parameters to describe the water-hBN interaction. In this work, we begin with benchmark quality first principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations on the interaction energy between water and hBN, which are used to validate random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. We then proceed with RPA to derive force field parameters, which are used to simulate water contact angle on bulk hBN, attaining a value within the experimental uncertainties. This paper demonstrates that end-to-end multiscale modeling, starting at detailed many-body quantum mechanics and ending with macroscopic properties, with the approximations controlled along the way, is feasible for these systems.

  14. Interaction between water, sediments and radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snodgrass, W.J.; McKee, P.; Garnett, J.; Stieff, L.

    1988-08-01

    A model-based measurements program was carried out to evaluate the primary mechanisms controlling transport of uranium 238 and thorium 232 decay chain radionuclides in Quirke Lake, a water body draining much of the uranium mining and milling district near Elliot Lake, Ontario. This program included studies of radionuclide accumulation in sediments, particle settling and lake mass-balance studies. Also, sediment studies were undertaken to evaluate chemical fractionation, mineralogical associations, and sediment-water adsorption and release. A limnocorral experiment was conducted in an isolated portion of a lake to measure radium 226 removal from the water column and diffusion from the sediments back to the water. Modelling studies were made to assess the data. Substantial agreement was obtained using the model originally developed for the AECB between model predictions and observations for Quirke Lake and for the limnocorrals. Further work is required to complete the studies undertaken in this project to assess the significance of the efflux of radionuclides from the sediments. These studies include a laboratory program to measure kinetics of adsorption, sediment-water modelling studies of the results and a field measurement program to develop a mass-balance analysis for thorium. (numerous refs)

  15. Interactive Effect of Air-Water Ratio and Temperature on the Air ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows User

    KEYWORDS: Interactive effect, air-water ratio, temperature, volatile organic compounds, removal efficiency. [Received ... The rate of mass transfer of a VOC from wastewater to the ... where ΔHo is heat of evaporation of 1 mole of component.

  16. Mass imbalances in EPANET water-quality simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael J.; Janke, Robert; Taxon, Thomas N.

    2018-04-01

    EPANET is widely employed to simulate water quality in water distribution systems. However, in general, the time-driven simulation approach used to determine concentrations of water-quality constituents provides accurate results only for short water-quality time steps. Overly long time steps can yield errors in concentration estimates and can result in situations in which constituent mass is not conserved. The use of a time step that is sufficiently short to avoid these problems may not always be feasible. The absence of EPANET errors or warnings does not ensure conservation of mass. This paper provides examples illustrating mass imbalances and explains how such imbalances can occur because of fundamental limitations in the water-quality routing algorithm used in EPANET. In general, these limitations cannot be overcome by the use of improved water-quality modeling practices. This paper also presents a preliminary event-driven approach that conserves mass with a water-quality time step that is as long as the hydraulic time step. Results obtained using the current approach converge, or tend to converge, toward those obtained using the preliminary event-driven approach as the water-quality time step decreases. Improving the water-quality routing algorithm used in EPANET could eliminate mass imbalances and related errors in estimated concentrations. The results presented in this paper should be of value to those who perform water-quality simulations using EPANET or use the results of such simulations, including utility managers and engineers.

  17. ISOLTRAP Mass Measurements for Weak-Interaction Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellerbauer, A.; Delahaye, P.; Herlert, A.; Audi, G.; Guenaut, C.; Lunney, D.; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Mukherjee, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Weber, C.; Yazidjian, C.; Blaum, K.; Bollen, G.; Schwarz, S.; George, S.; Schweikhard, L.

    2006-01-01

    The conserved-vector-current (CVC) hypothesis of the weak interaction and the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix are two fundamental postulates of the Standard Model. While existing data on CVC supports vector current conservation, the unitarity test of the CKM matrix currently fails by more than two standard deviations. High-precision mass measurements performed with the ISOLTRAP experiment at ISOLDE/CERN provide crucial input for these fundamental studies by greatly improving our knowledge of the decay energy of super-allowed β decays. Recent results of mass measurements on the β emitters 18Ne, 22Mg, 34Ar, and 74Rb as pertaining to weak-interaction studies are presented

  18. Critical mass variation of 239Pu with water dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearlstein, S.

    1996-01-01

    The critical mass of an unreflected solid sphere of 239 Pu is ∼ 10 kg. The increase in critical mass observed for small water dilutions of unreflected 239 Pu spheres is paradoxical. Introducing small amounts of water uniformly throughout the sphere increases the spherical volume containing the same amount of 239 Pu as the critical solid sphere. The increase in radius decreases the surface-to-volume ratio of the sphere, which has the effect to first order of decreasing the neutron leakage, which is proportional to the surface, relative to the fissions, which are proportional to the volume. The reduction in neutron leakage is expected to reduce the critical mass, but instead, the critical mass is observed to increase. It is discussed how changes in the fast neutron spectrum with corresponding changes in the nuclear parameters result in an increase in critical mass for small water dilutions

  19. Identifying water mass depletion in northern Iraq observed by GRACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, G.; Olsthoorn, T.N.; Al-manmi, D.A.M.A.; Schrama, E.J.O.; Smidt, E.H.

    2015-01-01

    Observations acquired by Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission indicate a mass loss of 146 ± 6 mm equivalent water height (EWH) in northern Iraq between 2007 and 2009. These data are used as an independent validation of lake mass variations and a rainfall-runoff model, which is

  20. Recent Advances in Water Analysis with Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAskill, John A.; Tsikata, Edem

    2014-01-01

    We report on progress made in developing a water sampling system for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds in water with a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS). Two approaches are described herein. The first approach uses a custom water pre-concentrator for performing trap and purge of VOCs from water. The second approach uses a custom micro-volume, split-splitless injector that is compatible with air and water. These water sampling systems will enable a single GC-based instrument to analyze air and water samples for VOC content. As reduced mass, volume, and power is crucial for long-duration, manned space-exploration, these water sampling systems will demonstrate the ability of a GCMS to monitor both air and water quality of the astronaut environment, thereby reducing the amount of required instrumentation for long duration habitation. Laboratory prototypes of these water sampling systems have been constructed and tested with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer as well as a thermal conductivity detector. Presented herein are details of these water sampling system with preliminary test results.

  1. A Review of Fire Interactions and Mass Fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Finney

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The character of a wildland fire can change dramatically in the presence of another nearby fire. Understanding and predicting the changes in behavior due to fire-fire interactions cannot only be life-saving to those on the ground, but also be used to better control a prescribed fire to meet objectives. In discontinuous fuel types, such interactions may elicit fire spread where none otherwise existed. Fire-fire interactions occur naturally when spot fires start ahead of the main fire and when separate fire events converge in one location. Interactions can be created intentionally during prescribed fires by using spatial ignition patterns. Mass fires are among the most extreme examples of interactive behavior. This paper presents a review of the detailed effects of fire-fire interaction in terms of merging or coalescence criteria, burning rates, flame dimensions, flame temperature, indraft velocity, pulsation, and convection column dynamics. Though relevant in many situations, these changes in fire behavior have yet to be included in any operational-fire models or decision support systems.

  2. Experimental study on interaction between a positive mass and a negative effective mass through a mass–spring system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Zhou

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the interaction between a positive mass and a negative effective mass through a three-mass chain connected with elastic springs, a pair of masses is designed to have an effective negative mass, and it interacts with the third positive one as if an equivalent two-mass chain. The dynamics of the equivalent two-mass chain shows that the two bodies may be self-accelerated in same direction when the effective mass becomes negative, the experiment is also conducted to demonstrate this type of motion. We further show that the energy principle (Hamilton’s principle is applicable if the energy of the negative mass unit is properly characterized. The result may be relevant to composite with cells of effective negative mass, their interaction with matrix may lead to more richer unexpected macroscopic responses.

  3. Interactions between simple radicals and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespo-Otero, Rachel; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Suardiaz, Reynier; Montero, Luis A.; Sander, Wolfram

    2008-01-01

    The interactions of the simple radicals CH 3 , NH 2 , OH, and F with water have been studied by DFT (UB3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p)) and ab initio (RHF-UCCSD(T)/6-311++G(2d,2p)) methods. In this order the number of lone pairs (from zero to three), the electronegativity, and the strength of the X-H bonds increase (X = C, N, and O). The various minima of the radical-water complexes were located using the multiple minima hypersurface (MMH) approach which had previously been proven to be useful for closed-shell molecules. The role of the unpaired electron in hydrogen bonding was investigated using the natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. A considerable contribution of the unpaired electron to the complex stabilization was only found for the methyl radical and the fluorine atom, whereas in the aminyl and the hydroxyl radical the role of the unpaired electron is negligible

  4. Ground water chemistry and water-rock interaction at Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Front, K.

    1992-02-01

    Bedrock investigations for the final repository for low- and intermediate level wastes (VLJ repository) generated at the Olkiluoto (TVO-I and TVO-II) nuclear power plant, stareted in 1980. Since 1988 the area has been investigated for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. In the report the geochemistry at the nuclear waste investigation site, Olkiluoto, is evaluated. The hydrogeological data are collected from boreholes drilled down to 1000-m depth into Proterozoic crystalline bedrock. The interpretation is based on groundwater chemistry and isotope data, mineralogical data, and the structure and hydrology of the bedrock, using correlation diagrams and thermodynamic calculations (PHREEQE). The hydrogeochemistry and major processes controlling the groundwater chemistry are discussed. The groundwater types are characterized by water-rock interaction but they also show features of other origins. The fresh and brackish waters are contaminated by varying amounts of young meteoric water and brackish seawater. The saline water contains residues of possibly ancient hydrothermal waters, imprints of which are occasionally seen in the rock itself. Different mixing phenomenas are indicated by the isotope contents (O-l8/H-2, H-3) and the Ca/Cl, Na/Cl, HCO 3 /Cl, SO 4 /Cl, Br/Cl, SI(calcite)/SI(dolomite) ratios. The interaction between bedrock and groundwater is reflected by the behaviour of pH, Eh, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Fe, HCO 3 and S0 4 . Dissolution and precipitation of calcite and pyrite, and aluminosilicate hydrolysis play the major role in defining the groundwater composition of the above components

  5. OTEC Cold Water Pipe-Platform Subsystem Dynamic Interaction Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varley, Robert [Lockheed Martin Corporation, Manassas, VA (United States); Halkyard, John [John Halkyard and Associates, Houston, TX (United States); Johnson, Peter [BMT Scientific Marine Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Shi, Shan [Houston Offshore Engineering, Houston, TX (United States); Marinho, Thiago [Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). LabOceano

    2014-05-09

    A commercial floating 100-megawatt (MW) ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power plant will require a cold water pipe (CWP) with a diameter of 10-meter (m) and length of up to 1,000 m. The mass of the cold water pipe, including entrained water, can exceed the mass of the platform supporting it. The offshore industry uses software-modeling tools to develop platform and riser (pipe) designs to survive the offshore environment. These tools are typically validated by scale model tests in facilities able to replicate real at-sea meteorological and ocean (metocean) conditions to provide the understanding and confidence to proceed to final design and full-scale fabrication. However, today’s offshore platforms (similar to and usually larger than those needed for OTEC applications) incorporate risers (or pipes) with diameters well under one meter. Secondly, the preferred construction method for large diameter OTEC CWPs is the use of composite materials, primarily a form of fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP). The use of these material results in relatively low pipe stiffness and large strains compared to steel construction. These factors suggest the need for further validation of offshore industry software tools. The purpose of this project was to validate the ability to model numerically the dynamic interaction between a large cold water-filled fiberglass pipe and a floating OTEC platform excited by metocean weather conditions using measurements from a scale model tested in an ocean basin test facility.

  6. A numerical study of two interacting coronal mass ejections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Schmidt

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction in the solar wind between two coronal mass ejections (CMEs is investigated using numerical simulations. We show that the nature of the interaction depends on whether the CME magnetic structures interact, but in all cases the result is an equilisation of the speed of the two CMEs. In the absence of magnetic interaction, the forward shock of the faster trailing CME interacts with the slow leading CME, and accelerates it. When the two CMEs have magnetic fields with the same sense of rotation, magnetic reconnection occurs between the two CMEs, leading to the formation of a single magnetic structure: in the most extreme cases, one CME "eats" the other. When the senses of rotation are opposite, reconnection does not occur, but the CMEs collide in a highly non-elastic manner, again forming a single structure. The possibility of enhanced particle acceleration in such processes is assessed. The presence of strong magnetic reconnection provides excellent opportunities for the acceleration of thermal particles, which then form a seed population for further acceleration at the CME shocks. The presence of a large population of seed particles will thus lead to an overall increase in energetic particle fluxes, as suggested by some observations.

  7. Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Parachute Finite Mass Inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinglong Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Parachute inflation is coupled with sophisticated fluid-structure interaction (FSI and flight mechanic behaviors in a finite mass situation. During opening, the canopy often experiences the largest deformation and loading. To predict the opening phase of a parachute, a computational FSI model for the inflation of a parachute, with slots on its canopy fabric, is developed using the arbitrary Lagrangian-Euler coupling penalty method. In a finite mass situation, the fluid around the parachute typically has an unsteady flow; therefore, a more complex opening phase and FSI dynamics of a parachute are investigated. Navier-Stokes (N-S equations for uncompressible flow are solved using an explicit central difference method. The three-dimensional visualization of canopy deformation as well as the evolution of dropping velocity and overload is obtained and compared with the experimental results. This technique could be further applied in the airdrop test of a parachute for true prediction of the inflation characteristics.

  8. Mass imbalances in EPANET water-quality simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Michael J.; Janke, Robert; Taxon, Thomas N.

    2018-04-06

    EPANET is widely employed to simulate water quality in water distribution systems. However, the time-driven simulation approach used to determine concentrations of water-quality constituents provides accurate results, in general, only for small water-quality time steps; use of an adequately short time step may not be feasible. Overly long time steps can yield errors in concentrations and result in situations in which constituent mass is not conserved. Mass may not be conserved even when EPANET gives no errors or warnings. This paper explains how such imbalances can occur and provides examples of such cases; it also presents a preliminary event-driven approach that conserves mass with a water-quality time step that is as long as the hydraulic time step. Results obtained using the current approach converge, or tend to converge, to those obtained using the new approach as the water-quality time step decreases. Improving the water-quality routing algorithm used in EPANET could eliminate mass imbalances and related errors in estimated concentrations.

  9. Thermal interaction of molten copper with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyszkowski, W.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental work was performed to study the thermal interaction between molten copper particles (in the range of temperature from the copper melting point to about 1800 0 C) and water from about 15-80 0 C. The transient temperatures of the copper particles and water before and during their thermal interaction were measured. The history of the phenomena was filmed by means of a high speed FASTAX camera (to 8000 f/s). Classification of the observed phenomena and description of the heat-transfer modes were derived. One among the phenomena was the thermal explosion. The necessary conditions for the thermal explosion are discussed and their physical interpretation is given. According to the hypothesis proposed, the thermal explosion occurs when the molten metal has the temperature of its solidification and the heat transfer on its surface is sufficiently intensive. The 'sharp-change' of the crystalline structure during the solidification of the molten metal is the cause of the explosion fragmentation. (author)

  10. Intracellular water exchange for measuring the dry mass, water mass and changes in chemical composition of living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Feijó Delgado

    Full Text Available We present a method for direct non-optical quantification of dry mass, dry density and water mass of single living cells in suspension. Dry mass and dry density are obtained simultaneously by measuring a cell's buoyant mass sequentially in an H2O-based fluid and a D2O-based fluid. Rapid exchange of intracellular H2O for D2O renders the cell's water content neutrally buoyant in both measurements, and thus the paired measurements yield the mass and density of the cell's dry material alone. Utilizing this same property of rapid water exchange, we also demonstrate the quantification of intracellular water mass. In a population of E. coli, we paired these measurements to estimate the percent dry weight by mass and volume. We then focused on cellular dry density - the average density of all cellular biomolecules, weighted by their relative abundances. Given that densities vary across biomolecule types (RNA, DNA, protein, we investigated whether we could detect changes in biomolecular composition in bacteria, fungi, and mammalian cells. In E. coli, and S. cerevisiae, dry density increases from stationary to exponential phase, consistent with previously known increases in the RNA/protein ratio from up-regulated ribosome production. For mammalian cells, changes in growth conditions cause substantial shifts in dry density, suggesting concurrent changes in the protein, nucleic acid and lipid content of the cell.

  11. Intracellular Water Exchange for Measuring the Dry Mass, Water Mass and Changes in Chemical Composition of Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Vivian C.; Son, Sungmin; Li, Yingzhong; Knudsen, Scott M.; Olcum, Selim; Higgins, John M.; Chen, Jianzhu; Grover, William H.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for direct non-optical quantification of dry mass, dry density and water mass of single living cells in suspension. Dry mass and dry density are obtained simultaneously by measuring a cell’s buoyant mass sequentially in an H2O-based fluid and a D2O-based fluid. Rapid exchange of intracellular H2O for D2O renders the cell’s water content neutrally buoyant in both measurements, and thus the paired measurements yield the mass and density of the cell’s dry material alone. Utilizing this same property of rapid water exchange, we also demonstrate the quantification of intracellular water mass. In a population of E. coli, we paired these measurements to estimate the percent dry weight by mass and volume. We then focused on cellular dry density – the average density of all cellular biomolecules, weighted by their relative abundances. Given that densities vary across biomolecule types (RNA, DNA, protein), we investigated whether we could detect changes in biomolecular composition in bacteria, fungi, and mammalian cells. In E. coli, and S. cerevisiae, dry density increases from stationary to exponential phase, consistent with previously known increases in the RNA/protein ratio from up-regulated ribosome production. For mammalian cells, changes in growth conditions cause substantial shifts in dry density, suggesting concurrent changes in the protein, nucleic acid and lipid content of the cell. PMID:23844039

  12. Mass and charge transfer within a floating water bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Elmar C.; Agostinho, Luewton L. F.; Eisenhut, Mathias; Woisetschläger, Jakob

    2010-11-01

    When high voltage is applied to pure water filled into two beakers close to each other, a connection forms spontaneously, giving the impression of a floating water bridge 1-8. This phenomenon is of special interest, since it comprises a number of phenomena currently tackled in modern water science. In this work, the charge and mass transfer through the water bridge are investigated with schlieren visualization and laser interferometry. It can be shown that the addition of a pH dye increases the H+ and OH- production with subsequent electrolysis, whereas schlieren and interferometric methods reveal another mechanism where charge and mass transfer appear to be coupled. Whereas this mechanism seems to be responsible for the electrolysis-less charge and mass transfer in the water bridge, it is increasingly superseded by the electrochemical mechanism with rising conductivity. Thus it can be shown that a pH dye does only indirectly visualize the charge transfer in the water bridge since it is dragged along with the water flow like any other dye, and additionally promotes conventional electrochemical conduction mechanisms, thereby enhancing electrolysis and reducing the masscoupled charge transport and thus destabilizing the bridge.

  13. Intermolecular interaction studies of glyphosate with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manon, Priti; Juglan, K. C.; Kaur, Kirandeep; Sethi, Nidhi; Kaur, J. P.

    2017-07-01

    The density (ρ), viscosity (η) and ultrasonic velocity (U) of glyphosate with water have been measured on different ultrasonic frequency ranges from 1MHz, 2MHz, 3MHz & 5MHz by varying concentrations (0.05%, 0.10%, 0.15%, 0.20%, 0.25%, 0.30%, 0.35%, & 0.40%) at 30°C. The specific gravity bottle, Ostwald's viscometer and quartz crystal interferometer were used to determine density (ρ), viscosity (η) and ultrasonic velocity (U). These three factors contribute in evaluating the other parameters as acoustic impedance (Z), adiabatic compressibility (β), relaxation time (τ), intermolecular free length (Lf), free volume (Vf), ultrasonic attenuation (α/f2), Rao's constant (R), Wada's constant (W) and relative strength (R). Solute-solvent interaction is confirmed by ultrasonic velocity and viscosity values, which increases with increase in concentration indicates stronger association between solute and solvent molecules. With rise in ultrasonic frequency the interaction between the solute and solvent particles decreases. The linear variations in Rao's constant and Wada's constant suggest the absence of complex formation.

  14. Water mass modification at the Agulhas retroflection: chlorofluoromethane studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Rana A.; Warner, Mark J.; Weiss, Ray F.

    1988-03-01

    Chlorofluoromethane (CFM) and hydrographic data from the 1983 Agulhas Retroflection cruise are used to show the importance of the region in ventilating thermocline and Intermediate Waters of the southwest Indian ocean gyre. Generally South Atlantic waters are more recently ventilated by at least two years than those of the South Indian Ocean, probably because the latter are farther downstream from the source regions near the South Atlantic subantarctic sector. A two-component mixing model shows that the outflow from the Agulhas Retroflection (14-4°C) was composed of South Indian water and at least 23% South Atlantic water. However, at the density of Indian sector Subantarctic Mode Water the inflow into the Agulhas Retroflection was well preserved in the outflow, and the South Atlantic and Indian waters appear to be ventilated by different water masses. In addition, strong interleaving was found throughout the survey area (between 14 and 4°C), characterized by correlations of negative salinity anomalies with high CFM concentrations. At the density of Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) there was interleaving of both low salinity water and higher salinity Red Sea Water. Using estimates of past atmospheric ratios of two CFMs, we calculate that AAIW within the retroflection was 50-75% diluted by mixing with CFM-free water since leaving the source region. Results from the two-component mixing model, which show substantial contributions of South Atlantic water in the outflow, suggest that the return flow for the 10 Sv leakage of Indian Ocean water via the Agulhas Current into the South Atlantic [ GORDON (1985) Science, 227, 1030-1033; GORDONet al. (1987) Deep-Sea Research, 34, 565-600] is occurring at thermocline and intermediate depths. A combination of active mixing in this region and similarity in the ventilation processes may be the reason that the South Atlantic and Indian thermoclines are coincident in temperature and salinity space (between 15 and 7°C) as noted

  15. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Atmosphere Water Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2011-07-04

    Understanding and quantifying the interaction of the atmosphere with underlying water surfaces is of great importance for a wide range of scientific fields such as water resources management, climate studies of ocean-atmosphere exchange, and regional weat

  16. NETPATH-WIN: an interactive user version of the mass-balance model, NETPATH

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kadi, A. I.; Plummer, Niel; Aggarwal, P.

    2011-01-01

    NETPATH-WIN is an interactive user version of NETPATH, an inverse geochemical modeling code used to find mass-balance reaction models that are consistent with the observed chemical and isotopic composition of waters from aquatic systems. NETPATH-WIN was constructed to migrate NETPATH applications into the Microsoft WINDOWS® environment. The new version facilitates model utilization by eliminating difficulties in data preparation and results analysis of the DOS version of NETPATH, while preserving all of the capabilities of the original version. Through example applications, the note describes some of the features of NETPATH-WIN as applied to adjustment of radiocarbon data for geochemical reactions in groundwater systems.

  17. Disappearance of a detached vapor mass in subcooled water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, Shigeaki; Miyasaka, Yoshiki; Izumi, Ryotaro.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments on pool transition boiling of water under atmospheric pressure on a heated surface 10 mm in diameter were conducted for subcooling 15 - 50 K. The mass flux of condensation of a detached coalescent vapor bubble was experimentally estimated by a mathematical model based on the mass transfer mechanism of condensation. As a result, it is clarified that the mass flux of condensation of the detached bubble was influenced by the initial growing velocity of a vapor bubble immediately following the detached bubble. The disappearance velocity of the detached bubble defined as a ratio of the bubble diameter at the departure to the time required until the disappearance, is in the range 0.2 to 2.0 m/sec. The disappearance velocity is proportional to the initial growing velocity of the bubble, to the square of the heat flux of the heated surface and to the cube of the wall superheat, separately. (author)

  18. Nuclear equipment to determine soil and water mass attenuation coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchi, O.L.A.D.; Nascimento Filho, V.F. do

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of substituting the monochannel gamma spectrometer, traditionally used in the gamma ray attenuation technique, for a less sophisticated and less expensive system of integral counting is studied. The proposed system can be operated by a non-specialized person. Three detection systems were used in the determination of the mass attenuation coefficients for different types of soil and for water. (M.A.C.) [pt

  19. Water masses in the Humboldt Current System: Properties, distribution, and the nitrate deficit as a chemical water mass tracer for Equatorial Subsurface Water off Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Nelson; Rojas, Nora; Fedele, Aldo

    2009-07-01

    Three sections are used to analyze the physical and chemical characteristics of the water masses in the eastern South Pacific and their distributions. Oceanographic data were taken from the SCORPIO (May-June 1967), PIQUERO (May-June 1969), and KRILL (June 1974) cruises. Vertical sections of temperature, salinity, σ θ, dissolved oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, and silicate were used to analyze the water column structure. Five water masses were identified in the zone through T- S diagrams: Subantarctic Water, Subtropical Water, Equatorial Subsurface Water, Antarctic Intermediate Water, and Pacific Deep Water. Their proportions in the sea water mixture are calculated using the mixing triangle method. Vertical sections were used to describe the geographical distributions of the water mass cores in the upper 1500 m. Several characteristic oceanographic features in the study area were analyzed: the shallow salinity minimum displacement towards the equator, the equatorial subsurface salinity maximum associated with a dissolved oxygen minimum zone and a high nutrient content displacement towards the south, and the equatorward intermediate Antarctic salinity minimum associated with a dissolved oxygen maximum. The nitrate deficit generated in the denitrification area off Peru and northern Chile is proposed as a conservative chemical tracer for the Equatorial Subsurface Waters off the coast of Chile, south of 25°S.

  20. Mass density fluctuations in quantum and classical descriptions of liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galib, Mirza; Duignan, Timothy T.; Misteli, Yannick; Baer, Marcel D.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Hutter, Jürg; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2017-06-01

    First principles molecular dynamics simulation protocol is established using revised functional of Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (revPBE) in conjunction with Grimme's third generation of dispersion (D3) correction to describe the properties of water at ambient conditions. This study also demonstrates the consistency of the structure of water across both isobaric (NpT) and isothermal (NVT) ensembles. Going beyond the standard structural benchmarks for liquid water, we compute properties that are connected to both local structure and mass density fluctuations that are related to concepts of solvation and hydrophobicity. We directly compare our revPBE results to the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr (BLYP) plus Grimme dispersion corrections (D2) and both the empirical fixed charged model (SPC/E) and many body interaction potential model (MB-pol) to further our understanding of how the computed properties herein depend on the form of the interaction potential.

  1. Arctic Ocean outflow and glacier-ocean interactions modify water over the Wandel Sea shelf (northeastern Greenland)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dmitrenko, Igor A.; Kirillov, Sergey A.; Rudels, Bert

    2017-01-01

    The first-ever conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) observations on the Wandel Sea shelf in northeastern Greenland were collected in April-May 2015. They were complemented by CTDs taken along the continental slope during the Norwegian FRAM 2014-2015 drift. The CTD profiles are used to reveal...... the origin of water masses and interactions with ambient water from the continental slope and the tidewater glacier outlet. The subsurface water is associated with the Pacific water outflow from the Arctic Ocean. The underlying halocline separates the Pacific water from a deeper layer of polar water that has...... interacted with the warm Atlantic water outflow through the Fram Strait, recorded below 140 m. Over the outer shelf, the halocline shows numerous cold density-compensated intrusions indicating lateral interaction with an ambient polar water mass across the continental slope. At the front of the tidewater...

  2. Combined stable isotope trajectories for water-rock interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blattner, P.; Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, Lower Hutt

    1981-01-01

    The 'mixed' model of water-rock interaction (1980 Workshop) is explained in detail. Based on the magnitude of the oxygen isotope shifts of their recharge water, different geothermal systems can be placed in an evolutionary series, from incipient (large shift of water) to mature (small shift of water). Isotopes of different chemical elements may be combined, to yield a stringent test of whether or not a given change in rock composition may be ascribed to interaction with water (L-shaped trajectories). For the acidic eruptives of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, available strontium and oxygen isotope data practically rule out an origin by partial melting of greywacke basement

  3. Inferences on mass composition and tests of hadronic interactions from 0.3 to 100 EeV using the water-Cherenkov detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Blažek, Jiří; Boháčová, Martina; Chudoba, Jiří; Ebr, Jan; Juryšek, Jakub; Mandát, Dušan; Palatka, Miroslav; Pech, Miroslav; Prouza, Michael; Řídký, Jan; Schovánek, Petr; Trávníček, Petr; Vícha, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 12 (2017), s. 1-22, č. článku 122003. ISSN 2470-0010 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015038; GA MŠk LG15014; GA MŠk EF16_013/0001402 Grant - others:OP VVV - AUGER-CZ(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/16_013/0001402 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Cherenkov detectors * Pierre Auger Observatory * tests of hadronic interactions Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics OBOR OECD: Particles and field physics Impact factor: 4.568, year: 2016

  4. Mechanisms of flow and water mass variability in Denmark Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Martin; Jochumsen, Kerstin; Quadfasel, Detlef; Mashayekh Poul, Hossein; Käse, Rolf H.

    2017-04-01

    The dense water export through Denmark Strait contributes significantly to the lower limb of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Overflow water is transported southwestward not only in the deep channel of the Strait, but also within a thin bottom layer on the Greenland shelf. The flow on the shelf is mainly weak and barotropic, exhibiting many recirculations, but may eventually contribute to the overflow layer in the Irminger Basin by spilling events in the northern Irminger Basin. Especially the circulation around Dohrn Bank and the Kangerdlussuaq Trough contribute to the shelf-basin exchange. Moored observations show the overflow in Denmark Strait to be stable during the last 20 years (1996-2016). Nevertheless, flow variability was noticed on time scales of eddies and beyond, i.e. on weekly and interannual scales. Here, we use a combination of mooring data and shipboard hydrographic and current data to address the dominant modes of variability in the overflow, which are (i) eddies, (ii) barotropic pulsations of the plume, (iii) lateral shifts of the plume core position, and (iv) variations in vertical extension, i.e. varying overflow thickness. A principle component analysis is carried out and related to variations in sea surface height and wind stress, derived from satellite measurements. Furthermore, a test for topographic waves is performed. Shelf contributions to the overflow core in the Irminger Basin are identified from measurements of temperature and salinity, as well as velocity, which were obtained during recent cruises in the region. The flow and water mass pattern obtained from the observational data is compared to simulations in a high resolution regional model (ROMS), where tracer release experiments and float deployments were carried out. The modelling results allow a separation between different atmospheric forcing modes (NAO+ vs NAO- situations), which impact the water mass distribution and alter the dense water pathways on the

  5. Mass size distribution of particle-bound water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canepari, S.; Simonetti, G.; Perrino, C.

    2017-09-01

    The thermal-ramp Karl-Fisher method (tr-KF) for the determination of PM-bound water has been applied to size-segregated PM samples collected in areas subjected to different environmental conditions (protracted atmospheric stability, desert dust intrusion, urban atmosphere). This method, based on the use of a thermal ramp for the desorption of water from PM samples and the subsequent analysis by the coulometric KF technique, had been previously shown to differentiate water contributes retained with different strength and associated to different chemical components in the atmospheric aerosol. The application of the method to size-segregated samples has revealed that water showed a typical mass size distribution in each one of the three environmental situations that were taken into consideration. A very similar size distribution was shown by the chemical PM components that prevailed during each event: ammonium nitrate in the case of atmospheric stability, crustal species in the case of desert dust, road-dust components in the case of urban sites. The shape of the tr-KF curve varied according to the size of the collected particles. Considering the size ranges that better characterize the event (fine fraction for atmospheric stability, coarse fraction for dust intrusion, bi-modal distribution for urban dust), this shape is coherent with the typical tr-KF shape shown by water bound to the chemical species that predominate in the same PM size range (ammonium nitrate, crustal species, secondary/combustion species - road dust components).

  6. Mass transfer resistance in ASFF reactors for waste water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettouney, H M; Al-Haddad, A A; Abu-Irhayem, T M

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of mass transfer resistances was performed for an aerated submerged fixed-film reactor (ASFF) for the treatment of waste water containing a mixture of sucrose and ammonia. Both external and internal mass transfer resistances were considered in the analysis, and characterized as a function of feed flow-rate and concentration. Results show that, over a certain operating regime, external mass transfer resistance in the system was greater for sucrose removal than ammonia. This is because the reaction rates for carbon removal were much larger than those of nitrogen. As a result, existence of any form of mass transfer resistance caused by inadequate mixing or diffusion limitations, strongly affects the overall removal rates of carbon more than nitrogen. Effects of the internal måss transfer resistance were virtually non-existent for ammonia removal. This behaviour was found over two orders of magnitude range for the effective diffusivity for ammonia, and one order of magnitude for the film specific surface area. However, over the same parameters' range, it is found that sucrose removal was strongly affected upon lowering its effective diffusivity and increasing the film specific surface area.

  7. Investigation of tungsten mass transfer in rarefied air oxygen and water vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evsikov, A.S.; Makeev, A.A.; Lyubimova, L.L.; Sinyavskij, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations of oxygen and water vapor effect on the rate of tungsten evaporation are presented. Methods for carrying out an experiment are presented. The experiments are carried out at the 2600 degC tungsten wire temperature and the pressure of oxygen and water vapors (2x10 -3 -5) Pa. Registration of final products of mass transfer is carried out by the DRON-2.0 diffractometer using a detachable substrate. Empirical dependence taking into account oxygen and water vapor effect on the rate of tungsten evaporation is suggested. It is marked that air oxygen and water vapor increase evaporation rate uniformly the difference is observed only in final products of interaction

  8. Microbial interactions in drinking water biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, Lúcia C.; Simões, M.; Vieira, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Drinking water distribution networks may be viewed as a large reactor where a number of chemical and microbiological processes are taking place. Control of microbial growth in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) often achieved through the addition of disinfectants, is essential to limit the spread of waterborne pathogens. However, microorganisms can resist disinfection through protection within biofilms and resistant host cells. Recent studies into the microbial ecology ...

  9. Interaction of Caffeine Molecular Associates with Water: Theory and Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Shestopalova, Anna V.

    1990-01-01

    Results of a Monte Carlo simulation of the association process of caffeine (1,3,7-trimethyl-2,6-dioxipurine) in water are presented. Simulation was performed in a cluster approximation ; the system contained 200 water molecules. The nature of the stabilization of caffeine stacking associates in water was considered. Hydrophobic behaviour of methyl group s during association of caffeine molecules in water is shown. The peculiarity of interaction of caffeine associates with wa...

  10. Preliminary experimental study of liquid lithium water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, X.M.; Tong, L.L.; Cao, X.W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Explosive reaction occurs when lithium temperature is over 300 °C. • The violence of liquid lithium water interaction increases with the initial temperature of liquid lithium. • The interaction is suppressed when the initial water temperature is above 70 °C. • Steam explosion is not ignorable in the risk assessment of liquid lithium water interaction. • Explosion strength of liquid lithium water interaction is evaluated by explosive yield. - Abstract: Liquid lithium is the best candidate for a material with low Z and low activation, and is one of the important choices for plasma facing materials in magnetic fusion devices. However, liquid lithium reacts violently with water under the conditions of loss of coolant accidents. The release of large heats and hydrogen could result in the dramatic increase of temperature and pressure. The lithium–water explosion has large effect on the safety of fusion devices, which is an important content for the safety assessment of fusion devices. As a preliminary investigation of liquid lithium water interaction, the test facility has been built and experiments have been conducted under different conditions. The initial temperature of lithium droplet ranged from 200 °C to 600 °C and water temperature was varied between 20 °C and 90 °C. Lithium droplets were released into the test section with excess water. The shape of lithium droplet and steam generated around the lithium were observed by the high speed camera. At the same time, the pressure and temperature in the test section were recorded during the violent interactions. The preliminary experimental results indicate that the initial temperature of lithium and water has an effect on the violence of liquid lithium water interaction.

  11. Preliminary experimental study of liquid lithium water interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, X.M.; Tong, L.L.; Cao, X.W., E-mail: caoxuewu@sjtu.edu.cn

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Explosive reaction occurs when lithium temperature is over 300 °C. • The violence of liquid lithium water interaction increases with the initial temperature of liquid lithium. • The interaction is suppressed when the initial water temperature is above 70 °C. • Steam explosion is not ignorable in the risk assessment of liquid lithium water interaction. • Explosion strength of liquid lithium water interaction is evaluated by explosive yield. - Abstract: Liquid lithium is the best candidate for a material with low Z and low activation, and is one of the important choices for plasma facing materials in magnetic fusion devices. However, liquid lithium reacts violently with water under the conditions of loss of coolant accidents. The release of large heats and hydrogen could result in the dramatic increase of temperature and pressure. The lithium–water explosion has large effect on the safety of fusion devices, which is an important content for the safety assessment of fusion devices. As a preliminary investigation of liquid lithium water interaction, the test facility has been built and experiments have been conducted under different conditions. The initial temperature of lithium droplet ranged from 200 °C to 600 °C and water temperature was varied between 20 °C and 90 °C. Lithium droplets were released into the test section with excess water. The shape of lithium droplet and steam generated around the lithium were observed by the high speed camera. At the same time, the pressure and temperature in the test section were recorded during the violent interactions. The preliminary experimental results indicate that the initial temperature of lithium and water has an effect on the violence of liquid lithium water interaction.

  12. Mass transfer behavior of tritium from air to water through the water surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takata, Hiroki; Nishikawa, Masabumi; Kamimae, Kozo

    2005-01-01

    It is anticipated that a certain amount of tritiated water exists in the atmosphere of tritium handling facilities, and it is recognized that the hazardous potential of tritiated water is rather high. Then, it is important to grasp the behavior of tritiated water for preserving of the radiation safety. The mass transfer behavior of tritium from air to water through the water surface was discussed in this study. The evaporation rate of water and the condensation rate of water were experimentally examined from measurement of change of the weight of distilled water. The tritium transfer rate from the tritiated water in air to the distilled water was also experimentally examined by using a liquid scintillation counter. Experimental results about change of tritium level in a small beaker placed in the atmosphere with tritiated water showed that diffusion of tritium in water and gas flow in the atmosphere gives considerable effect on tritium transfer. The estimation method of the tritium transfer made in this study was applied to explain the data at The Japan Atomic Power Company second power station at Tsuruga and good agreement was obtained. (author)

  13. Tritiated Water Interaction with Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-01-01

    Experiments conducted to study tritium permeation of stainless steel at ambient and elevated temperatures revealed that HT converts relatively quickly to HTO. Further, the HTO partial pressure contributes essentially equally with elemental tritium gas in driving permeation through the stainless steel. Such permeation appears to be due to dissociation of the water molecule on the hot stainless steel surface. There is an equilibrium concentration of HTO vapor above adsorbed gas on the walls of the experimental apparatus evident from freezing transients. The uptake process of tritium from the carrier gas involves both surface adsorption and isotopic exchange with surface bound water

  14. Modeling of soil-water-structure interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Tian

    as the developed nonlinear soil displacements and stresses under monotonic and cyclic loading. With the FVM nonlinear coupled soil models as a basis, multiphysics modeling of wave-seabed-structure interaction is carried out. The computations are done in an open source code environment, OpenFOAM, where FVM models...

  15. On Question of Interaction of Public Authorities and Mass Media in Modern Political Process

    OpenAIRE

    Kriukov O.; Pakhnin M.

    2018-01-01

    The paper considers the main aspects of public authorities’ interaction with media in the modern political process. The specific features of interaction between public authorities and mass media in the modern political process are determined. A distinction is made between the concepts of “communication media” and “mass media”, the results of which is that the above concepts are not identical.

  16. Water-mineral interaction in hygromechanics of clays exposed to environmental loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueckel, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    Water-mineral interaction in narrow interstices (<3 nm) in dense, saturated clays is discussed in view of recent experimental findings and molecular dynamics simulations. Consequences to the macroscopic behavior are considered. A mixture theory for two interacting constituents is developed. Effects of temperature and chemicals are discussed. A postulate of mass transfer of absorbed water from solid to fluid fraction caused by thermal or chemical load is then discussed. Theory of plasticity of clays affected by heat or chemicals is developed to deal with the effects of thermal and chemical consolidation

  17. Water-mediated ionic interactions in protein structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ISHWARYA( R SARANI( M KIRTI VAISHNAVI and K SEKAR. Supplementary table 1. List of complete water-mediated ionic interactions formed by different combinations of charged atoms and their corresponding occurrences. S. No. Type.

  18. A review of fire interactions and mass fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Finney; Sara S. McAllister

    2011-01-01

    The character of a wildland fire can change dramatically in the presence of another nearby fire. Understanding and predicting the changes in behavior due to fire-fire interactions cannot only be life-saving to those on the ground, but also be used to better control a prescribed fire to meet objectives. In discontinuous fuel types, such interactions may elicit fire...

  19. Shifting species interactions in terrestrial dryland ecosystems under altered water availability and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluney, Kevin E.; Belnap, Jayne; Collins, Scott L.; González, Angélica L.; Hagen, Elizabeth M.; Holland, J. Nathaniel; Kotler, Burt P.; Maestre, Fernando T.; Smith, Stanley D.; Wolf, Blair O.

    2012-01-01

    Species interactions play key roles in linking the responses of populations, communities, and ecosystems to environmental change. For instance, species interactions are an important determinant of the complexity of changes in trophic biomass with variation in resources. Water resources are a major driver of terrestrial ecology and climate change is expected to greatly alter the distribution of this critical resource. While previous studies have documented strong effects of global environmental change on species interactions in general, responses can vary from region to region. Dryland ecosystems occupy more than one-third of the Earth's land mass, are greatly affected by changes in water availability, and are predicted to be hotspots of climate change. Thus, it is imperative to understand the effects of environmental change on these globally significant ecosystems. Here, we review studies of the responses of population-level plant-plant, plant-herbivore, and predator-prey interactions to changes in water availability in dryland environments in order to develop new hypotheses and predictions to guide future research. To help explain patterns of interaction outcomes, we developed a conceptual model that views interaction outcomes as shifting between (1) competition and facilitation (plant-plant), (2) herbivory, neutralism, or mutualism (plant-herbivore), or (3) neutralism and predation (predator-prey), as water availability crosses physiological, behavioural, or population-density thresholds. We link our conceptual model to hypothetical scenarios of current and future water availability to make testable predictions about the influence of changes in water availability on species interactions. We also examine potential implications of our conceptual model for the relative importance of top-down effects and the linearity of patterns of change in trophic biomass with changes in water availability. Finally, we highlight key research needs and some possible broader impacts

  20. Importance of the virtual mass force in accelerating steam/water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Y.F.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    Virtual mass force is one of the forces that must be considered against accelerating a dispersed fluid flowing in the bulk of a continuous fluid. This force depends on the geometry of the interface and the flow pattern of the two fluids. For dilute two-phase flow mixtures where the bubbles are singly dispersed, the value of the virtual mass force coefficient is dependent on the geometry of the bubble. However, for high void fraction cases, such as depressurization initiated by a pipe break in light water reactors, more intense interaction is expected between the two phase and, therefore, the value of the virtual mass force must be well defined. The effects of implementing the virtual mass force term in the momentum equations of a two-fluid model may be significant for improving the stability of the solution of the conservation equations, the accuracy of the numerical results, and the computation time. In the current work, a new stability criterion is derived after implementing Hancox's model for the virtual mass force in the momentum equations of the six-equation two-phase flow model of TERMIT. A one-dimensional blow-down in a horizontal pipe is considered to investigate the importance of incorporating the virtual mass force in accelerating mixtures flows

  1. Water-Protein Interactions: The Secret of Protein Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Martini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water-protein interactions help to maintain flexible conformation conditions which are required for multifunctional protein recognition processes. The intimate relationship between the protein surface and hydration water can be analyzed by studying experimental water properties measured in protein systems in solution. In particular, proteins in solution modify the structure and the dynamics of the bulk water at the solute-solvent interface. The ordering effects of proteins on hydration water are extended for several angstroms. In this paper we propose a method for analyzing the dynamical properties of the water molecules present in the hydration shells of proteins. The approach is based on the analysis of the effects of protein-solvent interactions on water protons NMR relaxation parameters. NMR relaxation parameters, especially the nonselective (R1NS and selective (R1SE spin-lattice relaxation rates of water protons, are useful for investigating the solvent dynamics at the macromolecule-solvent interfaces as well as the perturbation effects caused by the water-macromolecule interactions on the solvent dynamical properties. In this paper we demonstrate that Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy can be used to determine the dynamical contributions of proteins to the water molecules belonging to their hydration shells.

  2. The interaction of water and hydrogen with nickel surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shan, Junjun

    2009-01-01

    As nickel and platinum are in the same group of the periodic table, the Ni(111) and Pt(111) surfaces may be expected to show similar interaction with water and hydrogen. However in this thesis, we show these interactions for Ni(111) are quite different from those of Pt(111). Moreover, our results

  3. Water's Interfacial Hydrogen Bonding Structure Reveals the Effective Strength of Surface-Water Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sucheol; Willard, Adam P

    2018-06-05

    We combine all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with a mean field model of interfacial hydrogen bonding to analyze the effect of surface-water interactions on the structural and energetic properties of the liquid water interface. We show that the molecular structure of water at a weakly interacting ( i.e., hydrophobic) surface is resistant to change unless the strength of surface-water interactions are above a certain threshold. We find that below this threshold water's interfacial structure is homogeneous and insensitive to the details of the disordered surface, however, above this threshold water's interfacial structure is heterogeneous. Despite this heterogeneity, we demonstrate that the equilibrium distribution of molecular orientations can be used to quantify the energetic component of the surface-water interactions that contribute specifically to modifying the interfacial hydrogen bonding network. We identify this specific energetic component as a new measure of hydrophilicity, which we refer to as the intrinsic hydropathy.

  4. Water Mass Classification on a Highly Variable Arctic Shelf Region: Origin of Laptev Sea Water Masses and Implications for the Nutrient Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauch, D.; Cherniavskaia, E.

    2018-03-01

    Large gradients and inter annual variations on the Laptev Sea shelf prevent the use of uniform property ranges for a classification of major water masses. The central Laptev Sea is dominated by predominantly marine waters, locally formed polynya waters and riverine summer surface waters. Marine waters enter the central Laptev Sea from the northwestern Laptev Sea shelf and originate from the Kara Sea or the Arctic Ocean halocline. Local polynya waters are formed in the Laptev Sea coastal polynyas. Riverine summer surface waters are formed from Lena river discharge and local melt. We use a principal component analysis (PCA) in order to assess the distribution and importance of water masses within the Laptev Sea. This mathematical method is applied to hydro-chemical summer data sets from the Laptev Sea from five years and allows to define water types based on objective and statistically significant criteria. We argue that the PCA-derived water types are consistent with the Laptev Sea hydrography and indeed represent the major water masses on the central Laptev Sea shelf. Budgets estimated for the thus defined major Laptev Sea water masses indicate that freshwater inflow from the western Laptev Sea is about half or in the same order of magnitude as freshwater stored in locally formed polynya waters. Imported water dominates the nutrient budget in the central Laptev Sea; and only in years with enhanced local polynya activity is the nutrient budget of the locally formed water in the same order as imported nutrients.

  5. Evolution of Mass Functions of Coeval Stars through Wind Mass Loss and Binary Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, F.R.N.; Izzard, R.G.; Langer, N.; de Mink, S.E.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate determinations of stellar mass functions and ages of stellar populations are crucial to much of astrophysics. We analyze the evolution of stellar mass functions of coeval main-sequence stars, including all relevant aspects of single and binary star evolution. We show that the slope of the

  6. Application of 1H NMR spectroscopy for determination of the interaction energy of cells with the water medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turov, V.V.; Gorbik, S.P.; Chujko, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The characteristics of bound water layers and the values of interface energy (γ s ) in live cell suspensions of bread yeast are determined by the method of 1 H NMR with the application of the liquid phase freezing technique. The concentrations of intracellular and extracellular bound water are determined. In terms of the dependence of γ s on the concentration of extracellular water, the energy of the intercellular interaction is determined as 109 J/g of dried cellular mass. In the cell suspension, a phase transition of the sol-gel type is registered. It is observed for the cell mass concentration equal to 10-12 mass%

  7. Results of measurements of thermal interaction between molten metal and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyszkowski, W.

    1975-10-01

    The report describes results of an experimental investigation into thermal interaction of molten metals with water. The experiments were performed in two stages: the aim of the first stage was to study the general character of thermal interaction between molten metal and water and to measure the Leidenfrost temperature of the inverse Leidenfrost phenomenon. The second stage was directed to the experimental study of the triggering mechanism of thermal explosion. The experimental material gathered in this study includes: 1) transient temperature measurements in the hot material and in water, 2) measurements of pressure and reactive force combined with thermal explosion, 3) high-speed films of thermal interaction, 4) investigation results of thermal explosion debris (microscopic, mechanical, metallographical and chemical). The most significant observation is, that small jets from the main particle mass occuring 1 to 10 msec before, precede thermal explosion. (orig.) [de

  8. Water-clay interactions. Experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaucher, Eric

    1998-01-01

    Clay minerals contribute to the chemical composition of soil and sediment groundwaters via surface and dissolution/precipitation reactions. The understanding of those processes is still today fragmentary. In this context, our experimental purpose is to identify the contribution of each reaction in the chemical composition of water in a water/clay System. Kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite are the reference clays. After a fine mineralogical study, the exchange equilibria between K + and H + are characterised. Different exchange sites are identified and the exchange capacities and selectivity coefficients are quantified. Then, mixtures of the three clays are equilibrated with acidic and basic (I≤10 -2 M) solutions at 25 deg. C, 60 deg. C, 80 deg. C, during 320 days. The System evolution is observed by chemical analysis of the solutions and mineralogical analysis by TEM. We show that montmorillonite is unstable compared to the kaolinite/amorphous silica assemblage for solutions of pH<7. Aqueous silica is probably controlled by the kinetics of dissolution of the montmorillonite in moderate pH media. In more acidic solutions, amorphous silica precipitates. Al is under control of 'kaolinite' neo-formations. The use of the selectivity coefficients in a numerical simulation shows that K + concentration depends on exchange reactions. The pH has a more complicated evolution, which is not completely understood. This evolution depends on both exchange equilibria and organic acid occurrence. In this type of experiments, we have demonstrated that the equilibrium equations between smectite and kaolinite are inexact. The problem of the thermodynamic nature of clays remains and is not resolved by these solubility experiments. (author) [fr

  9. Interaction of the Faroe Bank Channel overflow with Iceland Basin intermediate waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullgren, Jenny E.; Fer, Ilker; Darelius, Elin; Beaird, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The narrow and deep Faroe Bank Channel (FBC) is an important pathway for cold, dense waters from the Nordic Seas to flow across the Iceland-Scotland ridge into the North Atlantic. The swift, turbulent FBC overflow is associated with strong vertical mixing. Hydrographic profiles from a shipboard survey and two Slocum electric gliders deployed during a cruise in May-June 2012 show an intermediate water mass characterized by low salinity and low oxygen concentration between the upper waters of Atlantic origin and the dense overflow water. A weak low-salinity signal originating north-east of Iceland is discernible at the exit of the FBC, but smeared out by intense mixing. Further west (downstream) marked salinity and oxygen minima are found, which we hypothesize are indicators of a mixture of Labrador Sea Water and Intermediate Water from the Iceland Basin. Water mass characteristics vary strongly on short time scales. Low-salinity, low-oxygen water in the stratified interface above the overflow plume is shown to move along isopycnals toward the Iceland-Faroe Front as a result of eddy stirring and a secondary, transverse circulation in the plume interface. The interaction of low-salinity, low-oxygen intermediate waters with the overflow plume already at a short distance downstream of the sill, here reported for the first time, affects the final properties of the overflow waters through entrainment and mixing.

  10. Definition of mass spectrum of mesons taking into account relativistic character of interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinejkhan, M.; Zhaugasheva, S.A.; Karimzhan, K.

    2009-01-01

    Taking into account relativistic and nonlocal character of interactions, the mass spectrum of the mesons consisting of the light-light and light-heavy quarks with orbital and radial excitations, is determined. Our result show that good agreement with the experimental data for the slope and the intercept of the Regge trajectory can be obtained, only taking into account the nonperturbative and the nonlocal character of interactions. Dependence of constituent mass of constituent particles on mass of a free state is certain. When quarks are light the difference of current and valent masses of quarks is greater than valent masses of quarks, and when quarks are heavy the difference of these masses is insignificant. One of alternative variants of the account of nonlocality is suggested for the definition of properties of hadrons at large distances. Dependence of constituent mass on the radius of confinement is studied

  11. Influence of the tip mass on the tip-sample interactions in TM-AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pishkenari, Hossein Nejat, E-mail: nejat@mech.sharif.edu [Nano-Robotics Laboratory, Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, P.O. Box 11365-9465 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Meghdari, Ali [Nano-Robotics Laboratory, Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, P.O. Box 11365-9465 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    This paper focuses on the influences of the tip mass ratio (the ratio of the tip mass to the cantilever mass), on the excitation of higher oscillation eigenmodes and also on the tip-sample interaction forces in tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). A precise model for the cantilever dynamics capable of accurate simulations is essential for the investigation of the tip mass effects on the interaction forces. In the present work, the finite element method (FEM) is used for modeling the AFM cantilever to consider the oscillations of higher eigenmodes oscillations. In addition, molecular dynamics (MD) is used to calculate precise data for the tip-sample force as a function of tip vertical position with respect to the sample. The results demonstrate that in the presence of nonlinear tip-sample interaction forces, the tip mass ratio plays a significant role in the excitations of higher eigenmodes and also in the normal force applied on the surface. Furthermore, it has been shown that the difference between responses of the FEM and point-mass models in different system operational conditions is highly affected by the tip mass ratio. -- Highlights: {yields} A strong correlation exists between the tip mass ratio and the 18th harmonic amplitude. {yields} Near the critical tip mass ratio a small change in the tip mass may lead to a significant force change. {yields} Inaccuracy of the lumped model depends significantly on the tip mass ratio.

  12. Interaction of acetonitrile with thin films of solid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahr, S.; Kempter, V.

    2009-01-01

    Thin films of water were prepared on Ag at 124 K. Their properties were studied with metastable impact electron spectroscopy, reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption. The interaction of acetonitrile (ACN) with these films was studied with the abovementioned techniques. From the absence of any infrared activity in the initial adsorption stage, it is concluded that ACN adsorbs linearly and that the C≡N axis is aligned parallel to the water surface (as also found on neat Ag). Initially, the interaction with water surface species involves their dangling OD groups. During the completion of the first adlayer the ACN-ACN lateral interaction becomes of importance as well, and the ACN molecules become tilted with respect to the water surface. ACN shows propensity to stay at the surface after surface adsorption even during annealing up to the onset of desorption. The present results for the ACN-water interaction are compared with available classical molecular dynamics calculations providing the orientation profile for ACN on water as well as the ACN bonding properties.

  13. Generalized added masses computation for fluid structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzeri, L.; Cecconi, S.; Scala, M.

    1983-01-01

    The aim of this paper a description of a method to simulate the dynamic effect of a fluid between two structures by means of an added mass and an added stiffness. The method is based on a potential theory which assumes the fluid is inviscid and incompressible (the case of compressibility is discussed); a solution of the corresponding field equation is given as a superposition of elementary conditions (i.e. applicable to elementary boundary conditions). Consequently the pressure and displacements of the fluid on the boundary are given as a function of the series coefficients; the ''work lost'' (i.e. the work done by the pressures on the difference between actual and estimated displacements) is minimized, in this way the expansion coefficients are related to the displacements on the boundaries. Virtual work procedures are then used to compute added masses. The particular case of a free surface (with gravity effects) is discussed, it is shown how the effect can be modelled by means of an added stiffness term. Some examples relative to vibrations in reservoirs are given and discussed. (orig.)

  14. Transferability of polarizable models for ion-water electrostatic interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masia, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Studies of ion-water systems at condensed phase and at interfaces have pointed out that molecular and ionic polarization plays an important role for many phenomena ranging from hydrogen bond dynamics to water interfaces' structure. Classical and ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations reveal that induced dipole moments at interfaces (e.g. air-water and water-protein) are usually high, hinting that polarizable models to be implemented in classical force fields should be very accurate in reproducing the electrostatic properties of the system. In this paper the electrostatic properties of three classical polarizable models for ion-water interaction are compared with ab initio results both at gas and condensed phase. For Li + - water and Cl - -water dimers the reproducibility of total dipole moments obtained with high level quantum chemical calculations is studied; for the same ions in liquid water, Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics simulations are used to compute the time evolution of ionic and molecular dipole moments, which are compared with the classical models. The PD2-H2O model developed by the author and coworkers [Masia et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2004, 121, 7362] together with the gaussian intermolecular damping for ion-water interaction [Masia et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2005, 123, 164505] showed to be the fittest in reproducing the ab initio results from gas to condensed phase, allowing for force field transferability.

  15. The nepheloid bottom layer and water masses at the shelf break of the western Ross Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capello, Marco; Budillon, Giorgio; Cutroneo, Laura; Tucci, Sergio

    2009-06-01

    In the austral summers of 2000/2001 and 2002/2003 the Italian CLIMA Project carried out two oceanographic cruises along the northwestern margin of the Ross Sea, where the Antarctic Bottom Water forms. Here there is an interaction between the water masses on the sea floor of the outer shelf and slope with a consequent evolution of benthic nepheloid layers and an increase in total particulate matter. We observed three different situations: (a) the presence of triads (bottom structures characterized by a concomitant jump in turbidity, temperature, and salinity data) and high re-suspension phenomena related to the presence of the Circumpolar Deep Water and its mixing with cold, salty shelf waters associated with gravity currents; (b) the absence of triads with high re-suspension, implying that when the gravity currents are no longer active the benthic nepheloid layer may persist until the suspended particles settle to the sea floor, suggesting that the turbidity data can be used to study recent gravity current events; and (c) the absence of turbidity and sediment re-suspension phenomena supports the theory that a steady situation had been re-established and the current interaction no longer occurred or had finished sometime before.

  16. Interaction of water vapor with erbium and erbium dideuteride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, D.M.; Swartz, W.E. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The reaction of water vapor with erbium and erbium dideuteride thin films was studied by x-ray diffraction, mass spectrometry and Auger electron spectroscopy. The data indicate that significant reactions take place above 573 K forming both the hydride and the oxide. The data also indicate that isotopic displacement occurs. These are important considerations in hydrogen storage applications

  17. Renormalization of effective mass in self-assembled quantum dots due to electron-electron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babinski, A; Korkusinski, M; Hawrylak, P; Wasilewski, Z R; Potemski, M

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic-field dispersion of the multiexcitons related to the p shell of a single quantum dot (QD) is analysed in this work. The reduced cyclotron effective mass of carriers is determined from the energy splitting between the p + - and p − - related multiexcitonic emission lines. The reduced mass in the occupied QD was found to be larger than the mass related to the QD's single particle structure. The apparent increase of the reduced mass with increasing excitonic occupation of the dot is related to the mass renoralization due to electron-electron interactions within a multiexcitonic droplet

  18. Sustainable water services and interaction with water resources in Europe and in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraqué, B.; Formiga Johnsson, R. M.; Britto, A. L.

    2007-09-01

    The increasing interaction between large cities and nature makes "urban water" an issue: water resources and water services - including public water supply, sewage collection and treatment, and in large cities, storm water control -, which had become separate issues thanks to the process of water transport and treatment technologies, are now increasingly interfering with each other. We cannot take nature for granted anymore, and we need to protect water resources, if only to reduce the long term cost of transporting and treating water. In this paper, we compare the historical development of water industry technologies in European and Brazilian metropolitan areas, in their socio-economic and political context, tracing it through three "ages" of water technology and services which developed under civil engineering, sanitary engineering, and environmental engineering perspectives: the "quantity of water" and civil engineering paradigm was developed on the assumption that water should be drawn from natural environments far from the cities; in the "water quality" and chemical/sanitation engineering paradigm, water treatment was invented and allowed cities to take water from rivers closer to them and treat it, but also to reduce sewer discharge impacts; finally, the environmental engineering paradigm proposes to overcome the supply side perspective, by introducing demand side management, water conservation, water allocation flexibilisation, and an integrated approach to water services, water resources management, and land use policies.

  19. Myths and methodologies: Making sense of exercise mass and water balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuvront, Samuel N; Montain, Scott J

    2017-09-01

    What is the topic of this review? There is a need to revisit the basic principles of exercise mass and water balance, the use of common equations and the practice of interpreting outcomes. What advances does it highlight? We propose use of the following equation as a way of simplifying exercise mass and water balance calculations in conditions where food is not consumed and waste is not excreted: ∆body mass - 0.20 g/kcal -1  = ∆body water. The relative efficacy of exercise drinking behaviours can be judged using the following equation: percentage dehydration = [(∆body mass - 0.20 g kcal -1 )/starting body mass] × 100. Changes in body mass occur because of flux in liquids, solids and gases. This knowledge is crucial for understanding metabolism, health and human water needs. In exercise science, corrections to observed changes in body mass to estimate water balance are inconsistently applied and often misinterpreted, particularly after prolonged exercise. Although acute body mass losses in response to exercise can represent a close surrogate for body water losses, the discordance between mass and water balance equivalence becomes increasingly inaccurate as more and more energy is expended. The purpose of this paper is briefly to clarify the roles that respiratory water loss, gas exchange and metabolic water production play in the correction of body mass changes for fluid balance determinations during prolonged exercise. Computations do not include waters of association with glycogen because any movement of water among body water compartments contributes nothing to water or mass flux from the body. Estimates of sweat loss from changes in body mass should adjust for non-sweat losses when possible. We propose use of the following equation as a way of simplifying the study of exercise mass and water balance: ∆body mass - 0.20 g kcal -1  = ∆body water. This equation directly controls for the influence of energy expenditure on body mass

  20. Energetics of the protein-DNA-water interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marabotti Anna

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To understand the energetics of the interaction between protein and DNA we analyzed 39 crystallographically characterized complexes with the HINT (Hydropathic INTeractions computational model. HINT is an empirical free energy force field based on solvent partitioning of small molecules between water and 1-octanol. Our previous studies on protein-ligand complexes demonstrated that free energy predictions were significantly improved by taking into account the energetic contribution of water molecules that form at least one hydrogen bond with each interacting species. Results An initial correlation between the calculated HINT scores and the experimentally determined binding free energies in the protein-DNA system exhibited a relatively poor r2 of 0.21 and standard error of ± 1.71 kcal mol-1. However, the inclusion of 261 waters that bridge protein and DNA improved the HINT score-free energy correlation to an r2 of 0.56 and standard error of ± 1.28 kcal mol-1. Analysis of the water role and energy contributions indicate that 46% of the bridging waters act as linkers between amino acids and nucleotide bases at the protein-DNA interface, while the remaining 54% are largely involved in screening unfavorable electrostatic contacts. Conclusion This study quantifies the key energetic role of bridging waters in protein-DNA associations. In addition, the relevant role of hydrophobic interactions and entropy in driving protein-DNA association is indicated by analyses of interaction character showing that, together, the favorable polar and unfavorable polar/hydrophobic-polar interactions (i.e., desolvation mostly cancel.

  1. Mass Charge Interactions for Visualizing the Quantum Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Wolfgang

    Our goal is to integrate the objective and subjective aspects of our personal experience into a single complete theory of reality. To further this endeavor we replace elementary particles with elementary events as the building blocks of an event oriented description of that reality. The simplest event in such a conception is an adaptation of A. Wheeler's primitive explanatory--measurement cycle between internal observations experienced by an observer and their assumed physical causes. We will show how internal forces between charge and mass are required to complete the cyclic sequence of activity. This new formulation of internal material is easier to visualize and map to cognitive experiences than current formulations of sub-atomic physics. In our formulation, called Cognitive Action Theory, such internal forces balance the external forces of gravity-inertia and electricity-magnetism. They thereby accommodate outside influences by adjusting the internal structure of material from which all things are composed. Such accommodation is interpreted as the physical implementation of a model of the external physical world in the brain of a cognitive being or alternatively the response mechanism to external influences in the material of inanimate objects. We adopt the deBroglie-Bohm causal interpretation of QT to show that the nature of space in our model is mathematically equivalent to a field of clocks. Within this field small oscillations form deBroglie waves. This interpretation allows us to visualize the underlying structure of empty space with a charge-mass separation field in equilibrium, and objects appearing in space with quantum wave disturbances to that equilibrium occurring inside material. Space is thereby associated with the internal structure of material and quantum mechanics is shown to be, paraphrasing Heisenberg, the physics of the material that knows the world.

  2. Fuel cladding interaction with water coolant in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    Water coolant chemistry and corrosion processes are important factors in reliable operation of NPP's, as at elevated temperatures water is aggressive towards structural materials. Water regimes for commercial Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors were developed and proved to be satisfactory. Nevertheless, studies of operation experience continue and an amount of new Research and Development work is being conducted for further improvements of technology and better understanding of the physicochemical nature of those processes. In this report information is presented on the IAEA programme on fuel element cladding interaction with water coolant. Some results of this survey and recommendations made by the group of consultants who participated in this work are given as well as recommendations for continuation of this study. Separate abstracts were prepared for 6 papers of this report

  3. Non-potential interactions and the origin of masses of elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, J.

    1982-01-01

    We propose a fundamental assumption on internal states of particles. It follows from the fundamental assumption that: (1) the constituents of particles become non-particle objects; and (2) there appear naturally non-potential interactions. This non-potential interaction leads to a series of interesting results, one of which is that it yields the origin of masses of elementary particles. All mass values are given by the theory without pre-assumed mass values of the constituents (except the rest mass of the electron; mass is a physical quantity which appears only in particles but not in their constituents). The theoretically calculated mass values are in excellent agreement with the experimental values. In all calculations, only one constant b = 0.99935867 is introduced (bc being the speed of internal motion)

  4. Heat, mass and force flows in supersonic shockwave interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, John Michael

    There is no cost effective way to deliver a payload to space and, with rising fuel prices, currently the price to travel commercially is also becoming more prohibitive to the public. During supersonic flight, compressive shock waves form around the craft which could be harnessed to deliver an additional lift on the craft. Using a series of hanging plates below a lifting wing design, the total lift generated can be increased above conventional values, while still maintaining a similar lift-to-drag ratio. Here, we study some of the flows involved in supersonic shockwave interaction. This analysis uses ANSYS Fluent Computational Fluid Dynamics package as the modeler. Our findings conclude an increase of up to 30% lift on the modeled craft while maintaining the lift-to-drag profile of the unmodified lifting wing. The increase in lift when utilizing the shockwave interaction could increase transport weight and reduce fuel cost for space and commercial flight, as well as mitigating negative effects associated with supersonic travel.

  5. Probing neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the charged-current and neutral-current interaction rates of supernova neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Kwang-Chang; Lee, Fei-Fan; Lee, Feng-Shiuh; Lin, Guey-Lin; Liu, Tsung-Che; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The neutrino mass hierarchy is one of the neutrino fundamental properties yet to be determined. We introduce a method to determine neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the interaction rate of neutral current (NC) interactions, $\

  6. Kinetic energy and added mass of hydrodynamically interacting gas bubbles in liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jacobus B.W.

    1988-01-01

    By averaging the basic equations on microscale, expressions are derived for the effective added mass density and the kinetic energy density of a mixture of liquid and gas bubbles. Due to hydrodynamic interaction between the bubbles there appears to be a difference between the effective added mass

  7. Solvation of positive ions in water: the dominant role of water-water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krekeler, Christian; Site, Luigi Delle

    2007-01-01

    Local polarization effects, induced by monovalent and divalent positive ions in water, influence (and in turn are influenced by) the large-scale structural properties of the solvent. Experiments can only distinguish this process of interplay in a generic qualitative way. Instead, first-principles calculations can address the question at both the electronic and atomistic scale, accounting for electronic polarization as well as geometrical conformations. For this reason we study the extension of the scales' interconnection by means of first-principle Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics applied to systems of different size. In this way we identify the general aspects dominating the physics of the first solvation shell and their connection to the effects related to the formation of the outer shells and eventually the bulk. We show that while the influence of the ions is extended to the first shell only, the water-water interaction is instead playing a dominant role even within the first shell independently of the size or the charge of the ion. (fast track communication)

  8. The hydromedusae and water masses of the Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Navas-Pereira

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available This analysis of distribution and abundance of species of Hydromedusae completes a report (Vannucci & Navas, 1973b on the ecology of Indian Ocean Hydromedusae based on the zooplankton collected during the International Indian Ocean Expedition (IIOE. Distribution and abundance are taken here to be the ecological expression of variability of species in space and time. The aim was to identify the biological signature of below surface water masses that cannot be identified by remote sensing techniques. Selected species were taken as biological units, the oceanic water masses as defined by their T-S and T-O2 diagrammes were taken as the non biological units. Taken together they define different ecosystems of the Indian Ocean. About 45,000 specimens of hydromedusae taken at 480 stations were sorted from 900 plankton samples and all specimens were determined and counted. Several hauls, mostly stratified, were taken with closing nets, but not all contained hydromedusae. The distribution of each species was studied in relation to water salinity, temperature and dissolved oxygen; the limits of ecological tolerance and preference were defined by the environmental characteristics of the layers sampled by the nets and are given for each species. These can be grouped as follows: 1. Deep water species, cold tolerant, often eurytopic; 2. Antarctic species, cold loving, usually stenothermal with preference for low salinity; 3. Indian Ocean Central Water species, with preference for temperature lower than 19ºC and salinity not much higher than 35%o, usually found at sub-surface or intermediate depths, they may spread into the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal in surface layers; 4. Indian Ocean Equatorial System species, warm tolerant, usually prefer comparatively low salinity, high temperature and high oxygen content; 5. Bay of Bengal Surface Water species, found in surface layers of the Bay, with preference for low salinity, high temperature and high oxygen content

  9. Black sea annual and inter-annual water mass variations from space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yildiz, H.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Simav, M.

    2011-01-01

    influenced by the leakage of hydrological signals from the surrounding land. After applying the corresponding correction, we found a good agreement with water mass variations derived from steric-corrected satellite altimetry observations. Both GRACE and altimetry show significant annual water mass variations......This study evaluates the performance of two widely used GRACE solutions (CNES/GRGS RL02 and CSR RL04) in deriving annual and inter-annual water mass variations in the Black Sea for the period 2003–2007. It is demonstrated that the GRACE derived water mass variations in the Black Sea are heavily...

  10. Transboundary water interaction II: the influence of 'soft' power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeitoun, M.; Mirumachi, N.; Warner, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper seeks to broaden the analysis of transboundary water interaction, by examining and interpreting the influence of ‘soft’ power therein. The ‘soft’ power of persuasion is understood to be exercised through discursive and to a lesser extent ideational means, and is interpreted in terms of

  11. Monitoring water masses properties by Glider in Sardinia Channel during summer 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gana, Slim; Iudicone, Daniele; Ghenim, Leila; Mortier, Laurent; Testor, Pierre; Tintoré, Joaquin; Olita, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    ., 2003), often involving surface and intermediate waters, are generated by baroclinic instabilities of the AC itself. The AEs generally remain more or less included in the main AC flow. The AEs alongslope-downstream propagation usually ends in the Channel of Sardinia, where AEs dramatically interact with the bathymetry and can remain almost blocked in the Sardinia Channel area for several months before collapsing (Puillat et al., 2002). In order to clarify some of these processes, including the behavior of the Algerian current and associated eddies, our methodology is based on a combined approach using glider observations and sea surface features observed by satellite. By autonomously collecting high-quality observations in three dimensions, gliders allow high-resolution oceanographic monitoring and provide useful contributions for the understanding of mesoscale dynamics and multidisciplinary interactions (e.g., Hodges and Fratantoni, 2009). On top of that, the glider route follows the ground track of the satellite SARAL, equipped with a Ka band altimeter (AltiKa), with the view to implement a methodology of analysis as performed by Bouffard et al. (2010). The main objectives of the project are : • identification of the physical properties of the surface and intermediate water masses between Northern Tunisian Coast and Sardinia and evaluation of the transport of water, salt and heat through the area • study of the variability of the physical properties of surface and intermediate water masses through the use of in-situ and satellite data. • understanding exchanges through sub-basins and the complex interactions through eddies • validation of the operational hydrodynamic numerical model of the western Mediterranean (http://www.seaforecast.cnr.it/en/fl/wmed.php) through the use of in-situ and satellite data. 3. Preliminary results of the experiment The glider carried out 6 legs during the period spanning from the 16th of August 2014 to the 19th of September 2014

  12. Affinity purification combined with mass spectrometry to identify herpes simplex virus protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckes, David G

    2014-01-01

    The identification and characterization of herpes simplex virus protein interaction complexes are fundamental to understanding the molecular mechanisms governing the replication and pathogenesis of the virus. Recent advances in affinity-based methods, mass spectrometry configurations, and bioinformatics tools have greatly increased the quantity and quality of protein-protein interaction datasets. In this chapter, detailed and reliable methods that can easily be implemented are presented for the identification of protein-protein interactions using cryogenic cell lysis, affinity purification, trypsin digestion, and mass spectrometry.

  13. Dark-Matter Particles without Weak-Scale Masses or Weak Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Kumar, Jason

    2008-01-01

    We propose that dark matter is composed of particles that naturally have the correct thermal relic density, but have neither weak-scale masses nor weak interactions. These models emerge naturally from gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking, where they elegantly solve the dark-matter problem. The framework accommodates single or multiple component dark matter, dark-matter masses from 10 MeV to 10 TeV, and interaction strengths from gravitational to strong. These candidates enhance many direct and indirect signals relative to weakly interacting massive particles and have qualitatively new implications for dark-matter searches and cosmological implications for colliders

  14. Modeling decadal timescale interactions between surface water and ground water in the central Everglades, Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Newlin, Jessica T.; Krupa, Steven L.

    2006-04-01

    Surface-water and ground-water flow are coupled in the central Everglades, although the remoteness of this system has hindered many previous attempts to quantify interactions between surface water and ground water. We modeled flow through a 43,000 ha basin in the central Everglades called Water Conservation Area 2A. The purpose of the model was to quantify recharge and discharge in the basin's vast interior areas. The presence and distribution of tritium in ground water was the principal constraint on the modeling, based on measurements in 25 research wells ranging in depth from 2 to 37 m. In addition to average characteristics of surface-water flow, the model parameters included depth of the layer of 'interactive' ground water that is actively exchanged with surface water, average residence time of interactive ground water, and the associated recharge and discharge fluxes across the wetland ground surface. Results indicated that only a relatively thin (8 m) layer of the 60 m deep surfical aquifer actively exchanges surface water and ground water on a decadal timescale. The calculated storage depth of interactive ground water was 3.1 m after adjustment for the porosity of peat and sandy limestone. Modeling of the tritium data yielded an average residence time of 90 years in interactive ground water, with associated recharge and discharge fluxes equal to 0.01 cm d -1. 3H/ 3He isotopic ratio measurements (which correct for effects of vertical mixing in the aquifer with deeper, tritium-dead water) were available from several wells, and these indicated an average residence time of 25 years, suggesting that residence time was overestimated using tritium measurements alone. Indeed, both residence time and storage depth would be expected to be overestimated due to vertical mixing. The estimate of recharge and discharge (0.01 cm d -1) that resulted from tritium modeling therefore is still considered reliable, because the ratio of residence time and storage depth (used to

  15. Investigation of the proton-neutron interaction by high-precision nuclear mass measurements

    CERN Multimedia

    Savreux, R P; Akkus, B

    2007-01-01

    We propose to measure the atomic masses of a series of short-lived nuclides, including $^{70}$Ni, $^{122-130}$Cd, $^{134}$Sn, $^{138,140}$Xe, $^{207-210}$Hg, and $^{223-225}$Rn, that contribute to the investigation of the proton-neutron interaction and its role in nuclear structure. The high-precision mass measurements are planned for the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP that reaches the required precision of 10 keV in the nuclear mass determination.

  16. A mass conservative numerical solution of vertical water flow and mass transport equations in unsaturated porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S.C.; Lee, K.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Galerkin finite element method is used to solve the problem of one-dimensional, vertical flow of water and mass transport of conservative-nonconservative solutes in unsaturated porous media. Numerical approximations based on different forms of the governing equation, although they are equivalent in continuous forms, can result in remarkably different solutions in an unsaturated flow problem. Solutions given by a simple Galerkin method based on the h-based Richards equation yield a large mass balance error and an underestimation of the infiltration depth. With the employment of the ROMV (restoration of main variable) concept in the discretization step, the mass conservative numerical solution algorithm for water flow has been derived. The resulting computational schemes for water flow and mass transport are applied to sandy soil. The ROMV method shows good mass conservation in water flow analysis, whereas it seems to have a minor effect on mass transport. However, it may relax the time-step size restriction and so ensure an improved calculation output. (author)

  17. Steam Generator control in Nuclear Power Plants by water mass inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Wei [North Carolina State University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695-7909 (United States); Doster, J. Michael [North Carolina State University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695-7909 (United States)], E-mail: doster@eos.ncsu.edu; Mayo, Charles W. [North Carolina State University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695-7909 (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Control of water mass inventory in Nuclear Steam Generators is important to insure sufficient cooling of the nuclear reactor. Since downcomer water level is measurable, and a reasonable indication of water mass inventory near steady-state, conventional feedwater control system designs attempt to maintain downcomer water level within a relatively narrow operational band. However, downcomer water level can temporarily react in a reverse manner to water mass inventory changes, commonly known as shrink and swell effects. These complications are accentuated during start-up or low power conditions. As a result, automatic or manual control of water level is difficult and can lead to high reactor trip rates. This paper introduces a new feedwater control strategy for Nuclear Steam Generators. The new method directly controls water mass inventory instead of downcomer water level, eliminating complications from shrink and swell all together. However, water mass inventory is not measurable, requiring an online estimator to provide a mass inventory signal based on measurable plant parameters. Since the thermal-hydraulic response of a Steam Generator is highly nonlinear, a linear state-observer is not feasible. In addition, difficulties in obtaining flow regime and density information within the Steam Generator make an estimator based on analytical methods impractical at this time. This work employs a water mass estimator based on feedforward neural networks. By properly choosing and training the neural network, mass signals can be obtained which are suitable for stable, closed-loop water mass inventory control. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that water mass control can significantly improve the operation and safety of Nuclear Steam Generators.

  18. Steam Generator control in Nuclear Power Plants by water mass inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Wei; Doster, J. Michael; Mayo, Charles W.

    2008-01-01

    Control of water mass inventory in Nuclear Steam Generators is important to insure sufficient cooling of the nuclear reactor. Since downcomer water level is measurable, and a reasonable indication of water mass inventory near steady-state, conventional feedwater control system designs attempt to maintain downcomer water level within a relatively narrow operational band. However, downcomer water level can temporarily react in a reverse manner to water mass inventory changes, commonly known as shrink and swell effects. These complications are accentuated during start-up or low power conditions. As a result, automatic or manual control of water level is difficult and can lead to high reactor trip rates. This paper introduces a new feedwater control strategy for Nuclear Steam Generators. The new method directly controls water mass inventory instead of downcomer water level, eliminating complications from shrink and swell all together. However, water mass inventory is not measurable, requiring an online estimator to provide a mass inventory signal based on measurable plant parameters. Since the thermal-hydraulic response of a Steam Generator is highly nonlinear, a linear state-observer is not feasible. In addition, difficulties in obtaining flow regime and density information within the Steam Generator make an estimator based on analytical methods impractical at this time. This work employs a water mass estimator based on feedforward neural networks. By properly choosing and training the neural network, mass signals can be obtained which are suitable for stable, closed-loop water mass inventory control. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that water mass control can significantly improve the operation and safety of Nuclear Steam Generators

  19. Aqueduct: an interactive tool to empower global water risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig, Paul; Gassert, Francis

    2013-04-01

    The Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas (Aqueduct) is a publicly available, global database and interactive tool that maps indicators of water related risks for decision makers worldwide. Aqueduct makes use of the latest geo-statistical modeling techniques to compute a composite index and translate the most recently available hydrological data into practical information on water related risks for companies, investors, and governments alike. Twelve global indicators are grouped into a Water Risk Framework designed in response to the growing concerns from private sector actors around water scarcity, water quality, climate change, and increasing demand for freshwater. The Aqueduct framework includes indicators of water stress, variability in supply, storage, flood, drought, groundwater, water quality and social conflict, addressing both spatial and temporal variation in water hazards. It organizes indicators into three categories of risk that bring together multiple dimensions of water related risk into comprehensive aggregated scores, which allow for dynamic weighting to capture users' unique exposure to water hazards. All information is compiled into an online, open access platform, from which decision-makers can view indicators, scores, and maps, conduct global risk assessments, and export data and shape files for further analysis. Companies can use this tool to evaluate their exposure to water risks across operations and supply chains, investors to assess water-related risks in their portfolio, and public-sector actors to better understand water security. Additionally, the open nature of the data and maps allow other organizations to build off of this effort with new research, for example in the areas of water-energy or water-food relationships. This presentation will showcase the Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas online tool and the features and functionalities it offers, as well as explain how it can be used for both private and public sector applications. The session will

  20. Continental Subduction: Mass Fluxes and Interactions with the Wider Earth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Substantial parts of ultra-high pressure (UHP) terrains probably represent subducted passive continental margins (PCM). This contribution reviews and synthesises research on processes operating in such systems and their implication for the wider Earth system. PCM sediments are large repositories of volatiles including hydrates, nitrogen species, carbonates and hydrocarbons. Sediments and upper/ mid-crustal basement are rich in incompatible elements and are fertile for melting. Lower crust may be more mafic and refractory. Juvenile rift-related mafic rocks also have the potential to generate substantial volumes of granitoid melts, especially if they have been hydrated. Exposed UHP terrains demonstrate the return of continental crust from mantle depths, show evidence for substantial fluxes of aqueous fluid, anatexis and, in entrained orogenic peridotites, metasomatism of mantle rocks by crust- derived C-O-H fluids. However, substantial bodies of continental material may never return to the surface as coherent masses of rock, but remain sequestered in the mantle where they melt or become entrained in the deeper mantle circulation. Hence during subduction, PCM's become partitioned by a range of mechanisms. Mechanical partitioning strips away weaker sediment and middle/upper crust, which circulate back up the subduction channel, while denser, stronger transitional pro-crust and lower crust may "stall" near the base of the lithosphere or be irreversibly subducted to join the global mantle circulation. Under certain conditions sediment and upper crustal basement may reach depths for UHPM. Further partitioning takes place by anatexis, which either aids stripping and exhumation of the more melt-prone rock-masses through mechanical softening, or separates melt from residuum so that melt escapes and is accreted to the upper plate leading to "undercrusting", late-orogenic magmatism and further refinement of the crust. Melt that traverses sections of mantle will interact with

  1. Demonstration of isotope-mass balance approach for water budget analyses of El-burulus Lake, Nile Delta, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadek, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    The major elements of El-Burulus lake water system are rainfall, agricultural drainage discharge, groundwater, human activities, evaporation and water interaction between the lake and the Mediterranean sea. The principal input sources are agricultural drainage (8 drains at the southern borders of the lake), sea water as well as some contribution of precipitation, groundwater and human activities. Water is lost from the lake through evaporation and surface outflow. The present study has been conducted using isotopic / mass balance approach to investigate the water balance of El-Burulus lake and to emphasize the relative contribution of different input / output components which affect the environmental and hydrological terms of the system. An isotopic evaporation pan experiment was performed to estimate the parameters of relevance to water balance (isotopic composition of free air moisture and evaporating flux) and to simulate the isotopic enrichment of evaporation under atmospheric and hydraulic control. The isotopic mass balance approach employed herein facilitated the estimation of groundwater inflow to the lake, evaporated fraction of total lake inflow (E/I) and its fraction to outflow (E/O), ratio of surface inflow to surface outflow (I/O) as well as residence time of lake water. The isotopic mass balance approach has been validated by comparing the values of estimated parameters with the previous hydrological investigations; a quite good match has been indicated, the relevance of this approach is related to its integrative scale and the more simply implementation

  2. Soil-structure interaction Vol.3. Influence of ground water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costantino, C J

    1986-04-01

    This study has been performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by the Structural Analysis Division of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The study was conducted during the fiscal year 1965 on the program entitled 'Benchmarking of Structural Engineering Problems' sponsored by NRC. The program considered three separate but complementary problems, each associated with the soil-structure interaction (551) phase of the seismic response analysis of nuclear plant facilities. The reports, all entitled Soil-Structure Interaction, are presented in three separate volumes, namely: Vol. 1 Influence of Layering by AJ Philippacopoulos, Vol. 2 Influence of Lift-Off by C.A. Miller, Vol. 3 Influence of Ground Water by C.J. Costantino. The two problems presented in Volumes 2 and 3 were conducted at the City University of New York (CUNY) under subcontract to BNL. This report, Volume 3 of the report, presents a summary of the first year's effort on the subject of the influence of foundation ground water on the SSI phenomenon. A finite element computer program was developed for the two-phased formulation of the combined soil-water problem. This formulation is based on the Biot dynamic equations of motion for both the solid and fluid phases of a typical soil. Frequency dependent interaction coefficients were generated for the two-dimensional plane problem of a rigid surface footing moving against a saturated linear soil. The results indicate that interaction coefficients are significantly modified as compared to the comparable values for a dry soil, particularly for the rocking mode of response. Calculations were made to study the impact of the modified interaction coefficients on the response of a typical nuclear reactor building. The amplification factors for a stick model placed atop a dry and saturated soil were computed. It was found that pore water caused the rocking response to decrease and translational response to increase over the frequency range of interest, as

  3. Transboundary water justice: a combined reading of literature on critical transboundary water interaction and "justice", for analysis and diplomacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeitoun, M.; Warner, J.F.; Mirumachi, N.; Matthews, N.; McLaughlin, K.

    2014-01-01

    By reviewing and blending two main bodies of research (critical transboundary water interaction analysis and centuries of thought on social justice) this paper seeks to improve international transboundary water interaction analysis and diplomacy. Various implications for transboundary analysis and

  4. Shifting species interactions in terrestrial dryland ecosystems under altered water availability and climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluney, Kevin E; Belnap, Jayne; Collins, Scott L; González, Angélica L; Hagen, Elizabeth M; Nathaniel Holland, J; Kotler, Burt P; Maestre, Fernando T; Smith, Stanley D; Wolf, Blair O

    2012-08-01

    Species interactions play key roles in linking the responses of populations, communities, and ecosystems to environmental change. For instance, species interactions are an important determinant of the complexity of changes in trophic biomass with variation in resources. Water resources are a major driver of terrestrial ecology and climate change is expected to greatly alter the distribution of this critical resource. While previous studies have documented strong effects of global environmental change on species interactions in general, responses can vary from region to region. Dryland ecosystems occupy more than one-third of the Earth's land mass, are greatly affected by changes in water availability, and are predicted to be hotspots of climate change. Thus, it is imperative to understand the effects of environmental change on these globally significant ecosystems. Here, we review studies of the responses of population-level plant-plant, plant-herbivore, and predator-prey interactions to changes in water availability in dryland environments in order to develop new hypotheses and predictions to guide future research. To help explain patterns of interaction outcomes, we developed a conceptual model that views interaction outcomes as shifting between (1) competition and facilitation (plant-plant), (2) herbivory, neutralism, or mutualism (plant-herbivore), or (3) neutralism and predation (predator-prey), as water availability crosses physiological, behavioural, or population-density thresholds. We link our conceptual model to hypothetical scenarios of current and future water availability to make testable predictions about the influence of changes in water availability on species interactions. We also examine potential implications of our conceptual model for the relative importance of top-down effects and the linearity of patterns of change in trophic biomass with changes in water availability. Finally, we highlight key research needs and some possible broader impacts

  5. Water use, productivity and interactions among desert plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehleringer, J.R.

    1992-11-17

    Water plays a central role affecting all aspects of the dynamics in aridland ecosystems. Productivity, stability, and competitive interactions among ecosystem components within aridlands are key processes related directly to water in deserts. The ecological studies in this project revolve around one fundamental premise: that integrated aspects of plant metabolism provide insight into the structure and function of plant communities and ecosystems. While it is difficult to extrapolate from instantaneous physiological observations to higher scales, such as whole plant performance or to interactions between plants as components of ecosystems, several key aspects of plant metabolism are scalable. Analyses of stable isotopic composition in plant tissues at natural abundance levels provide a useful tool that can provide insight into the consequences of physiological processes over temporal and spatial scales. Some plant processes continuously fractionate among light and heavy stable isotopic forms of an element; over time this results in integrated measures of plant metabolism. For example, carbon isotope fractionation during photosynthesis results in leaf carbon isotopic composition that is a measure of the set-point for photosynthetic metabolism and of water-use efficiency. Thus it provides information on the temporal scaling of a key physiological process. In contrast, hydrogen is not fractionated during water uptake through the root. Soil water availability in shallow, deep, and/or groundwater layers vary spatially; therefore hydrogen isotope ratios of xylem sap provide a direct measure of the water source currently used by a plant. The longer-term record of carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios is recorded annually in xylem tissues (tree rings). The research in this project addresses variation in stable isotopic composition of aridland plants and its consequences for plant performance and community-level interactions.

  6. Studies on melt-water-structure interaction during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Okkonen, T.J.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Andersson, J.

    1996-10-01

    Results of a series of studies, on melt-water-structure interactions which occur during the progression of a core melt-down accident, are described. The emphasis is on the in-vessel interactions and the studies are both experimental and analytical. Since, the studies performed resulted in papers published in proceedings of the technical meetings, and in journals, copies of a set of selected papers are attached to provide details. A summary of the results obtained is provided for the reader who does not, or cannot, venture into the perusal of the attached papers. (au)

  7. Studies on melt-water-structure interaction during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Okkonen, T.J.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Andersson, J. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Div. of Nucl. Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Results of a series of studies, on melt-water-structure interactions which occur during the progression of a core melt-down accident, are described. The emphasis is on the in-vessel interactions and the studies are both experimental and analytical. Since, the studies performed resulted in papers published in proceedings of the technical meetings, and in journals, copies of a set of selected papers are attached to provide details. A summary of the results obtained is provided for the reader who does not, or cannot, venture into the perusal of the attached papers. (au).

  8. Hydrography and water masses in the southeastern Arabian Sea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The surface hydrography during March –April was dominated by the intrusion of low-salinity waters from the south;during May –June,the low-salinity waters were beginning to be replaced by the high- salinity waters from the north.There was considerable mixing at the bottom of the surface mixed layer,leading to interleaving ...

  9. Arctic Ocean outflow and glacier–ocean interactions modify water over the Wandel Sea shelf (northeastern Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Dmitrenko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The first-ever conductivity–temperature–depth (CTD observations on the Wandel Sea shelf in northeastern Greenland were collected in April–May 2015. They were complemented by CTDs taken along the continental slope during the Norwegian FRAM 2014–2015 drift. The CTD profiles are used to reveal the origin of water masses and interactions with ambient water from the continental slope and the tidewater glacier outlet. The subsurface water is associated with the Pacific water outflow from the Arctic Ocean. The underlying halocline separates the Pacific water from a deeper layer of polar water that has interacted with the warm Atlantic water outflow through the Fram Strait, recorded below 140 m. Over the outer shelf, the halocline shows numerous cold density-compensated intrusions indicating lateral interaction with an ambient polar water mass across the continental slope. At the front of the tidewater glacier outlet, colder and turbid water intrusions were observed at the base of the halocline. On the temperature–salinity plots these stations indicate a mixing line that is different from the ambient water and seems to be conditioned by the ocean–glacier interaction. Our observations of Pacific water are set within the context of upstream observations in the Beaufort Sea and downstream observations from the Northeast Water Polynya, and clearly show the modification of Pacific water during its advection across the Arctic Ocean. Moreover, ambient water over the Wandel Sea slope shows different thermohaline structures indicating the different origin and pathways of the on-shore and off-shore branches of the Arctic Ocean outflow through the western Fram Strait.

  10. Arctic Ocean outflow and glacier-ocean interactions modify water over the Wandel Sea shelf (northeastern Greenland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrenko, Igor A.; Kirillov, Sergey A.; Rudels, Bert; Babb, David G.; Toudal Pedersen, Leif; Rysgaard, Søren; Kristoffersen, Yngve; Barber, David G.

    2017-12-01

    The first-ever conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) observations on the Wandel Sea shelf in northeastern Greenland were collected in April-May 2015. They were complemented by CTDs taken along the continental slope during the Norwegian FRAM 2014-2015 drift. The CTD profiles are used to reveal the origin of water masses and interactions with ambient water from the continental slope and the tidewater glacier outlet. The subsurface water is associated with the Pacific water outflow from the Arctic Ocean. The underlying halocline separates the Pacific water from a deeper layer of polar water that has interacted with the warm Atlantic water outflow through the Fram Strait, recorded below 140 m. Over the outer shelf, the halocline shows numerous cold density-compensated intrusions indicating lateral interaction with an ambient polar water mass across the continental slope. At the front of the tidewater glacier outlet, colder and turbid water intrusions were observed at the base of the halocline. On the temperature-salinity plots these stations indicate a mixing line that is different from the ambient water and seems to be conditioned by the ocean-glacier interaction. Our observations of Pacific water are set within the context of upstream observations in the Beaufort Sea and downstream observations from the Northeast Water Polynya, and clearly show the modification of Pacific water during its advection across the Arctic Ocean. Moreover, ambient water over the Wandel Sea slope shows different thermohaline structures indicating the different origin and pathways of the on-shore and off-shore branches of the Arctic Ocean outflow through the western Fram Strait.

  11. Effective mass of a #betta#-particle in nuclear matter and OBE #betta#-n interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bando, Hiroharu; Nagata, Sinobu.

    1982-01-01

    The effective mass of a lambda particle (M sub( lambda )*) in nuclear matter is investigated within the framework of the lowest-order Brueckner theory by employing the Nijmegen OBE lambda -N interaction model D and F. The non-locality mass (M tilde sub( lamda )) and the energy mass (anti M sub( lambda )) are evaluated and discussed in the light of the characteristics of the two models. In comparison with the model D, the model F yields smaller anti M sub( lambda ) and larger anti M sub( lamb da ) reflecting the stronger Majorana exchange force and the stronger lambda N- sigma N coupling tensor force. Final results of M sub( lambda )*/M sub( lambda ) are 0.85 for D and 0.79 for F. In view of the effective lambda mass inferred from observed properties of the single particle potential for lambda , the model D interaction seems to be more adequate. (author)

  12. On line determination of deuterium in hydrogen water exchange reaction by mass spectrometry. IRP-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, J.D.; Alphonse, K.P.; Mishra, Sushama; Prabhu, S.A.; Mohan, Sadhana; Tangri, V.K.

    2007-01-01

    The Deuterium (D)/Hydrogen (H) analysis at low Concentration is generally carried out by Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometer is specially designed for the measurement of Mass 2 and 3 ratio. The Deuterium analysis of water and hydrogen in concentration range of a few ppm to about 1% plays an important role in the Heavy Water Production Plants. For the enrichment of the Deuterium concentration in H 2 O by H 2 - H 2 O exchange a catalyst is essential as reaction is relatively slow. Heavy Water Division has developed in house Platinum based catalyst for the isotopic exchange of Hydrogen and Water

  13. Nutrient characteristics of the water masses and their seasonal variability in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.; Shetye, S.; Maya, M.V.; Mangala, K.R.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    . (Position of Fig 1.) 3. Results and Discussion 3.1. Water masses in the area of observation You and Tomczak (1993) has reviewed the water masses in the Indian Ocean identified by the earlier workers ( Sverdrup et al. 1942; Mamalev, 1975; and Shcherbinin... at 200 m at 5° S in the meridional region of our observations and flows down to 800 m to the north and termed as Indian central water (ICW) (You and Tomczak, 1993). (position of Fig.2) 3.2. Seasonal variability of water masses The seasonal...

  14. Study of the water-rock interactions of spring waters in the Northern Apennines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturelli, G.; Toscani, L.

    2000-01-01

    Forty three spring waters have been investigated in the Apennine area of Reggio Emilia province (Parco Regionale del Gigante, Italy). On the basis of the Langelier-Ludwig diagram, the (Na+K+Cl) vs (Ca+Mg) plot and the Cl content, the waters have been divided in five main groups. The chemical composition of the waters suggests that calcite is practically the only source of Ca and alkalinity for group D and E reflect ion exchange and calcite and minor silicate dissolution during a strong water-rock interaction at depth [it

  15. Impact of bearing plates dimensions on interaction of mine workings support and rock mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Rotkegel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research presented in this article is to assess the impact of bearing plates dimensions on the interaction of steel arch support and rock mass. The analysis of the bearing plates was based on laboratory tests and numerical calculations using the FLAC3D program (a finite difference method and the strain-hardening/softening model based on prescribed variations of Mohr–Coulomb properties. The article presents the results of laboratory tests on selected bearing plates and the results of numerical analysis of the interaction between the bearing plates and rock mass with coal, clay stone and sandstone properties.

  16. Application of the Regional Water Mass Variations from GRACE Satellite Gravimetry to Large-Scale Water Management in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Ramillien

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Time series of regional 2° × 2° Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE solutions of surface water mass change have been computed over Africa from 2003 to 2012 with a 10-day resolution by using a new regional approach. These regional maps are used to describe and quantify water mass change. The contribution of African hydrology to actual sea level rise is negative and small in magnitude (i.e., −0.1 mm/y of equivalent sea level (ESL mainly explained by the water retained in the Zambezi River basin. Analysis of the regional water mass maps is used to distinguish different zones of important water mass variations, with the exception of the dominant seasonal cycle of the African monsoon in the Sahel and Central Africa. The analysis of the regional solutions reveals the accumulation in the Okavango swamp and South Niger. It confirms the continuous depletion of water in the North Sahara aquifer at the rate of −2.3 km3/y, with a decrease in early 2008. Synergistic use of altimetry-based lake water volume with total water storage (TWS from GRACE permits a continuous monitoring of sub-surface water storage for large lake drainage areas. These different applications demonstrate the potential of the GRACE mission for the management of water resources at the regional scale.

  17. Turbulent flow over an interactive alternating land-water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heerwaarden, C.; Mellado, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The alternating land-water surface is a challenging surface to represent accurately in weather and climate models, but it is of great importance for the surface energy balance in polar regions. The complexity of this surface lies in the fact that secondary circulations, which form at the boundary of water and land, interact strongly with the surface energy balance. Due to its large heat capacity, the water temperature adapts slowly to the flow, thus the properties of the atmosphere determine the uptake of energy from the water. In order to study this complex system in a simpler way, retaining only the most essential physics, we have simplified the full surface energy balance including radiation. We have derived a boundary condition that mimics the full balance and can be formulated as a so-called Robin boundary condition: a linear combination of Dirichlet (fixed temperature) and Neumann (fixed temperature gradient) ones. By spatially varying the coefficients, we are able to express land and water using this boundary condition. We have done a series of direct numerical simulations in which we generate artificial land-water patterns from noise created from a Gaussian spectrum centered around a dominant wave number. This method creates realistic random patterns, but we are still in control of the length scales. We show that the system can manifest itself in three regimes: micro-, meso- and macro-scale. In the micro-scale, we find perfect mixing of the near-surface atmosphere that results in identical air properties over water and land. In the meso-scale, secondary circulations alter the heat exchange considerably by advecting air between land and water. In addition, they bring the surface temperature of the land closer to that of the air, thereby modulating the energy loss due to outgoing longwave radiation. In the macro-scale regime, the flow over land and water become independent of each other and only the large scale forcings determine the energy balance.

  18. Influence of polyvinylpyrrolidone on the interaction between water and methanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Guettari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to determine the influence of a dissolved polymer, polyvinylpyrrolidone, on the interaction between water and methanol. First, the dynamic viscosities were measured for polymer solutions by a rotational concentric cylinder at 25 ºC and for the polymer concentration range from 0.1 to 0.6 g/dl. The results show a polynomial dependence of the viscosity on polymer concentration. On the hypothesis of a quasi-binary system, a pseudo Grumberg-Nissan constant, d'p, was introduced to quantify the interaction between unlike molecules in the presence of polymer. The interaction between unlike molecules due to the presence of the polymer was quantified by the deviation of the Grumberg-Nissan constant, δd'p= d p. Generally, this constant is negative which means that the interactions between water and methanol decrease in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone at 25 ºC. The presence of the polymer induces a perturbation of the dynamic equilibrium between free and complexed molecules

  19. Effective mass of omega meson and NNω interaction at finite temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, S.; Su, R.; Yu, P.K.N.

    1994-01-01

    By means of the thermofield dynamical theory, the effective mass of omega meson is calculated by summing the bubble diagrams. It is found that the formula for the effective mass of the ρ meson can also be used to describe the ω meson in the low density region, but the parameter n and the critical temperature T c depend on the density. The temperature and density dependence of one omega exchage potential of nucleon-nucleon interaction are given. The conjecture of Brown and Rho about the effective masses of mesons is discussed

  20. In-medium NN interactions and nucleon and meson masses studied with nucleon knockout reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Noro, T; Akiyoshi, H; Daito, I; Fujimura, H; Hatanaka, K; Ihara, F; Ishikawa, T; Ito, M; Kawabata, M; Kawabata, T; Maeda, Y; Matsuoka, N; Morinobu, S; Nakamura, M; Obayashi, E; Okihana, A; Sagara, K; Sakaguchi, H; Takeda, H; Taki, T; Tamii, A; Tamura, K; Yamazaki, H; Yoshida, H; Yoshimura, M; Yosoi, M

    2000-01-01

    Spin observables have been measured for (p, 2p) reactions aiming at studying medium effects on NN interactions in nuclear field. Observed strong density-dependent reduction of the analyzing power is consistent with a model calculation where reduction of nucleon and meson masses are taken into account. On the other hand, calculations with g-matrices in the Shroedinger framework does not predict the reduction. The spin-transfer coefficients, which data are not reproduced by the model calculation, are found to be sensitive to reduction rate of each meson mass and have a possibility to test scaling lows in mass reductions.

  1. Mass spectrometry in structural biology and biophysics architecture, dynamics, and interaction of biomolecules

    CERN Document Server

    Kaltashov, Igor A; Desiderio, Dominic M; Nibbering, Nico M

    2012-01-01

    The definitive guide to mass spectrometry techniques in biology and biophysics The use of mass spectrometry (MS) to study the architecture and dynamics of proteins is increasingly common within the biophysical community, and Mass Spectrometry in Structural Biology and Biophysics: Architecture, Dynamics, and Interaction of Biomolecules, Second Edition provides readers with detailed, systematic coverage of the current state of the art. Offering an unrivalled overview of modern MS-based armamentarium that can be used to solve the most challenging problems in biophysics, structural biol

  2. Modelling of interactions between variable mass and density solid particles and swirling gas stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardach-Święcicka, I; Kardaś, D; Pozorski, J

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the solid particles - gas interactions. For this purpose, numerical modelling was carried out by means of a commercial code for simulations of two-phase dispersed flows with the in-house models accounting for mass and density change of solid phase. In the studied case the particles are treated as spherical moving grains carried by a swirling stream of hot gases. Due to the heat and mass transfer between gas and solid phase, the particles are losing their mass and they are changing their volume. Numerical simulations were performed for turbulent regime, using two methods for turbulence modelling: RANS and LES.

  3. Rational designing of the internal water supply system in reconstructed residential buildings of mass standard series

    OpenAIRE

    Orlov Evgeny

    2018-01-01

    The issues of water supply system reconstruction in mass series buildings are reviewed with consideration of water- and resource saving. Principal points for location of plumbing cells in apartments, arrangement of water devices and wastewater receivers, selection of pipelines for reconstructed water line are described. Comparative analysis of design variants of inner water line before and following reconstruction are given. It was found that applying the developed system design approaches th...

  4. Coronal mass ejection and stream interaction region characteristics and their potential geomagnetic effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, G.M.; Russell, C.T.; Luhmann, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the largest geomagnetic storms are caused by extraordinary increases in the solar wind velocity and/or southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) produced by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their associated interplanetary shocks. However, much more frequent small to moderate increases in solar wind velocity and compressions in the IMF can be caused by either coronal mass ejections or fast/slow stream interactions. This study examines the relative statistics of the magnitudes of disturbances associated with the passage of both interplanetary coronal mass ejections and stream interaction regions, using an exceptionally continuous interplanetary database from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter at 0.7 AU throughout most of solar cycle 21. It is found that both stream interaction and CMEs produce magnetic fields significantly larger than the nominal IMF. Increases in field magnitude that are up to 2 and 3 times higher than the ambient field are observed for stream interaction regions and CMEs, respectively. Both stream interactions and CMEs produce large positive and negative Β z components at 0.7 AU, but only CMEs produce Β z magnitudes greater than 35 nT. CMEs are often associated with sustained periods of positive or negative Β z whereas stream interaction regions are more often associated with fluctuating Β z . CMEs tend to produce larger solar wind electric fields than stream interactions. Yet stream interactions tend to produce larger dynamic pressures than CMEs. Dst predictions based on solar wind duskward electric field and dynamic pressure indicate that CMEs produce the largest geomagnetic disturbances while the low-speed portion of stream interaction regions are least geomagnetically effective. Both stream interaction regions and CMEs contribute to low and moderate levels of activity with relative importance determined by their solar-cycle-dependent occurrence rates

  5. Chemical interaction of fresh and saline waters with compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Lehikoinen, J.; Melamed, A.; Pitkaenen, P.

    1996-01-01

    The interaction of compacted sodium bentonite with fresh and saline ground-water simulant was studied. The parameters varied in the experiments were the compositions of the solutions and oxygen and carbon dioxide content in the surroundings. The main interests of the study were the chemical changes in the experimental solution, bentonite porewater and bentonite together with the microstructural properties of bentonite. The major processes with fresh water were the diffusion of sodium, potassium, sulphate, bicarbonate and chloride from bentonite to the solution, and the diffusion of calcium and magnesium from the solution into bentonite. The major processes in the experiments with saline water were the diffusion of the sodium, magnesium, sulphate and bicarbonate from bentonite into the solution, and the diffusion of calcium from the solution into bentonite

  6. Core-concrete interactions with overlying water pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blose, R.E.; Powers, D.A.; Copus, E.R.; Brockmann, J.E.; Simpson, R.B.; Lucero, D.A.

    1993-11-01

    The WETCOR-1 test of simultaneous interactions of a high-temperature melt with water and a limestone/common-sand concrete is described. The test used a 34.1-kg melt of 76.8 w/o Al 2 O 3 , 16.9 w/o CaO, and 4.0 w/o SiO 2 heated by induction using tungsten susceptors. Once quasi-steady attack on concrete by the melt was established, an attempt was made to quench the melt at 1850 K with 295 K water flowing at 57 liters per minute. Net power into the melt at the time of water addition was 0.61 ± 0.19 W/cm 3 . The test configuration used in the WETCOR-1 test was designed to delay melt freezing to the walls of the test fixture. This was done to test hypotheses concerning the inherent stability of crust formation when high-temperature melts are exposed to water. No instability in crust formation was observed. The flux of heat through the crust to the water pool maintained over the melt in the test was found to be 0.52 ± 0.13 MW/m 2 . Solidified crusts were found to attenuate aerosol emissions during the melt concrete interactions by factors of 1.3 to 3.5. The combination of a solidified crust and a 30-cm deep subcooled water pool was found to attenuate aerosol emissions by factors of 3 to 15

  7. Regional Analysis of Energy, Water, Land and Climate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidwell, V. C.; Averyt, K.; Harriss, R. C.; Hibbard, K. A.; Newmark, R. L.; Rose, S. K.; Shevliakova, E.; Wilson, T.

    2014-12-01

    Energy, water, and land systems interact in many ways and are impacted by management and climate change. These systems and their interactions often differ in significant ways from region-to-region. To explore the coupled energy-water-land system and its relation to climate change and management a simple conceptual model of demand, endowment and technology (DET) is proposed. A consistent and comparable analysis framework is needed as climate change and resource management practices have the potential to impact each DET element, resource, and region differently. These linkages are further complicated by policy and trade agreements where endowments of one region are used to meet demands in another. This paper reviews the unique DET characteristics of land, energy and water resources across the United States. Analyses are conducted according to the eight geographic regions defined in the 2014 National Climate Assessment. Evident from the analyses are regional differences in resources endowments in land (strong East-West gradient in forest, cropland and desert), water (similar East-West gradient), and energy. Demands likewise vary regionally reflecting differences in population density and endowment (e.g., higher water use in West reflecting insufficient precipitation to support dryland farming). The effect of technology and policy are particularly evident in differences in the energy portfolios across the eight regions. Integrated analyses that account for the various spatial and temporal differences in regional energy, water and land systems are critical to informing effective policy requirements for future energy, climate and resource management. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Impact of river restoration on groundwater - surface water - interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Anne-Marie; Schirmer, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Since the end of the 19th century, flood protection was increasingly based on the construction of impermeable dams and side walls (BWG, 2003). In spite of providing flood protection, these measures also limited the connectivity between the river and the land, restricted the area available for flooding, and hampered the natural flow dynamics of the river. Apart from the debilitating effect on riverine ecosystems due to loss of habitats, these measures also limited bank filtration, inhibited the infiltration of storm water, and affected groundwater-surface water-interactions. This in turn had a profound effect on ecosystem health, as a lack of groundwater-surface water interactions led to decreased cycling of pollutants and nutrients in the hyporheic zone and limited the moderation of the water temperature (EA, 2009). In recent decades, it has become apparent that further damages to riverine ecosystems must be prohibited, as the damages to ecology, economy and society surmount any benefits gained from exploiting them. Nowadays, the restoration of rivers is a globally accepted means to restore ecosystem functioning, protect water resources and amend flood protection (Andrea et al., 2012; Palmer et al., 2005; Wortley et al., 2013). In spite of huge efforts regarding the restoration of rivers over the last 30 years, the question of its effectiveness remains, as river restorations often reconstruct a naturally looking rather than a naturally functioning stream (EA, 2009). We therefore focussed our research on the effectiveness of river restorations, represented by the groundwater-surface water-interactions. Given a sufficiently high groundwater level, a lack of groundwater-surface water-interactions after restoration may indicate that the vertical connectivity in the stream was not fully restored. In order to investigate groundwater-surface water-interactions we determined the thermal signature on the stream bed and in +/- 40 cm depth by using Distributed Temperature

  9. Experimental studies of thermal and chemical interactions between molten aluminum and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahani, A.A.; Corradini, M.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The possibility of rapid physical and chemical aluminum/water interactions during a core melt accident in a noncommercial reactor (e.g., HFIR, ATR) has resulted in extensive research to determine the mechanism by which these interactions occur and propagate on an explosive time scale. These events have been reported in nuclear testing facilities, i.e., during SPERT 1D experiment, and also in aluminum casting industries. Although rapid chemical reactions between molten aluminum and water have been subject of many studies, very few reliable measurements of the extent of the chemical reactions have thus far been made. We have modified an existing 1-D shock tube facility to perform experiments in order to determine the extent of the explosive thermal/chemical interactions between molton aluminum and water by measuring important physical quantities such as the maximum dynamic pressure and the amount of the generated hydrogen. Experimental results show that transient pressures greater than 69 MPa with a rise time of less than 125 {mu}sec can occur as the result of the chemical reaction of 4.2 grams of molton aluminum (approximately 15% of the total mass of the fuel of 28 grams) at 980 C with room temperature water.

  10. Evaluation of a mass-balance approach to determine consumptive water use in northeastern Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Patrick C.; Duncker, James J.; Over, Thomas M.; Marian Domanski,; ,; Engel, Frank

    2014-01-01

    A principal component of evaluating and managing water use is consumptive use. This is the portion of water withdrawn for a particular use, such as residential, which is evaporated, transpired, incorporated into products or crops, consumed by humans or livestock, or otherwise removed from the immediate water environment. The amount of consumptive use may be estimated by a water (mass)-balance approach; however, because of the difficulty of obtaining necessary data, its application typically is restricted to the facility scale. The general governing mass-balance equation is: Consumptive use = Water supplied - Return flows.

  11. The interaction effect of body mass index and age on fat-free mass, waist-to-hip ratio, and soft lean mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Shahab Jahanlou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research has shown that body mass index (BMI does not take into consideration the gender and ethnicity. The primary purpose of this study was to examine the interaction effect of the BMI and age on fat-free mass (FFM, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, and soft lean mass (SLM. The secondary purpose was to evaluate the practical significance of the findings by examining effect sizes. Materials and Methods: The study was comparative in nature and employed a factorial design. Due to nonexperimental nature of the investigation, no causal inferences were drawn. The nonprobability sample consisted of 19,356 adults. Analysis of the data included factorial analysis of variance, analysis of simple effects, calculation of mean difference effect sizes, and data transformation. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 22 was employed for the purpose of data manipulation and analysis. Results: The BMI by age interaction effects on FFM, F (10, 19,338 = 28.26, P < 0.01, on WHR, F (10, 19,338 = 18.46, P < 0.01, and on SLM, F (10, 19,338 = 14.65, P < 0.01, was statistically significant and ordinal in nature. Analysis of the effect sizes, ranging from 0.30 to 1.20, showed that the BMI and age influenced the WHR but their interaction effects on FFM and SLM, ranging from 0.04 to 0.36 and 0.03 to 0.33, respectively, were mainly negligible. Conclusion: Based on the examination of the statistical and practical significance of the results, it is concluded that the BMI and age together can influence the WHR but their interaction effect on the FFM and SLM is questionable.

  12. Water-magma interaction and plume processes in the 2008 Okmok eruption, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unema, Joel; Ort, Michael H.; Larsen, Jessica D; Neal, Christina; Schaefer, Janet R.

    2016-01-01

    Eruptions of similar explosivity can have divergent effects on the surroundings due to differences in the behavior of the tephra in the eruption column and atmosphere. Okmok volcano, located on Umnak Island in the eastern Aleutian Islands, erupted explosively between 12 July and 19 August 2008. The basaltic andesitic eruption ejected ∼0.24 km3dense rock equivalent (DRE) of tephra, primarily directed to the northeast of the vent area. The first 4 h of the eruption produced dominantly coarse-grained tephra, but the following 5 wk of the eruption deposited almost exclusively ash, much of it very fine and deposited as ash pellets and ashy rain and mist. Meteorological storms combined with abundant plume water to efficiently scrub ash from the eruption column, with a rapid decrease in deposit thickness with distance from the vent. Grain-size analysis shows that the modes (although not their relative proportions) are very constant throughout the deposit, implying that the fragmentation mechanisms did not vary much. Grain-shape features consistent with molten fuel-coolant interaction are common. Surface and groundwater drainage into the vents provided the water for phreatomagmatic fragmentation. The available water (water that could reach the vent area during the eruption) was ∼2.8 × 1010 kg, and the erupted magma totaled ∼7 × 1011 kg, which yield an overall water:magma mass ratio of ∼0.04, but much of the water was not interactive. Although magma flux dropped from 1 × 107 kg/s during the initial 4 h to 1.8 × 105 kg/s for the remainder of the eruption, most of the erupted material was ejected during the lower-mass-flux period due to its much greater length, and this tephra was dominantly deposited within 10 km downwind of the vent. This highlights the importance of ash scrubbing in the evaluation of hazards from explosive eruptions.

  13. Nanodisc-based Co-immunoprecipitation for Mass Spectrometric Identification of Membrane-interacting Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch-Jensen, Jonas; Roepstorff, Peter; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    enterotoxigenic Escherischia coli, GM1-nanodiscs were employed for co-immunoprecipitation. The B subunit of heat labile enterotoxin was identified as a specific interaction partner by mass spectrometry, thus demonstrating that nanodisc technology is useful for highly specific detection and identification...

  14. Genotype-covariate interaction effects and the heritability of adult body mass index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, Matthew R.; English, Geoffrey; Moser, Gerhard; Lloyd-Jones, Luke R; Triplett, Marcus A; Zhu, Zhihong; Nolte, Ilja M; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Snieder, Harold; Esko, Tonu; Milani, Lili; Mägi, Reedik; Metspalu, Andres; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Ingelsson, Erik; Johannesson, Magnus; Yang, Jian; Cesarini, David; Visscher, Peter M.

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic, with major health and economic costs. Here we estimate heritability for body mass index (BMI) in 172,000 sibling pairs and 150,832 unrelated individuals and explore the contribution of genotype-covariate interaction effects at common SNP loci. We find evidence for

  15. Detachment of particulate iron sulfide during shale-water interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, S.; Kreisserman, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing, a commonly used technique to extract oil and gas from shales, is controversial in part because of the threat it poses to water resources. The technique involves the injection into the subsurface of large amounts of fluid, which can become contaminated by fluid-rock interaction. The dissolution of pyrite is thought to be a primary pathway for the contamination of fracturing fluids with toxic elements, such as arsenic and lead. In this study, we use direct observations with atomic force microscopy to show that the dissolution of carbonate minerals in Eagle Ford shale leads to the physical detachment of embedded pyrite grains. To simulate the way fluid interacts with a fractured shale surface, we also reacted rock samples in a flow-through cell, and used environmental scanning electron microscopy to compare the surfaces before and after interaction with water. Crucially, our results show that the flux of particulate iron sulfide into the fluid may be orders of magnitude higher than the flux of pyrite from chemical dissolution. This result suggests that mechanical detachment of pyrite grains could be the dominant mode by which arsenic and other inorganic elements are mobilized in the subsurface. Thus, during hydraulic fracturing operations and in groundwater systems containing pyrite, the transport of many toxic species may be controlled by the transport of colloidal iron sulfide particles.

  16. Combined uses of water-table fluctuation (WTF), chloride mass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agadaga

    isotopes methods to investigate groundwater recharge ... and isotopic characterization of groundwater, rainfall and the unsaturated zone were also carried out using a ..... Chloride concentrations in soil water extracted by lixiviation from.

  17. Effect of the Discharge Water which Mixed Sewage Disposal Water with Seawater Desalting Treated Sewage for Bottom Sediment and Hypoxic Water Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ryoichi; Yamasaki, Koreyoshi; Minagawa, Tomoko; Iyooka, Hiroki; Kitano, Yoshinori

    For every time in summer season, hypoxic water mass has formed at the inner part of Hakata Bay. Field observation study has carried out at the inner part of Hakata Bay since 2004 with the particular aim of tracking the movement of hypoxic water mass. Hypoxic water masses form the end of June to September on this area because the consumption of oxygen in bottom water layers exceeds the re-supply of oxygen from the atmosphere. Under such hypoxic conditions, the seawater desalination plant has begun to use in 2005. After seawater desalination plant operation starting, hypoxic water mass tends to improve. In this research, the authors show the following result. After seawater desalination plant has begun to operate, the hypoxia around the mixed discharge water outlet tends to be improved.

  18. Thermally decarboxylated sodium bicarbonate: Interactions with water vapour, calorimetric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Volkova

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC was used to study interactions between water vapour and the surface of thermally converted sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3. The decarboxylation degree of the samples was varied from 3% to 35% and the humidity range was 54–100%. The obtained enthalpy values were all exothermic and showed a positive linear correlation with decarboxylation degrees for each humidity studied. The critical humidity, 75% (RHo, was determined as the inflection point on a plot of the mean−ΔHkJ/mole Na2CO3 against RH. Humidities above the critical humidity lead to complete surface dissolution. The water uptake (m was determined after each calorimetric experiment, complementing the enthalpy data. A mechanism of water vapour interaction with decarboxylated samples, including the formation of trona and Wegscheider’s salt on the bicarbonate surface is proposed for humidities below RHo. Keywords: Isothermal titration calorimetry, Sodium bicarbonate, Sodium carbonate, Trona salt, Wegscheider’s salt, Enthalpy, Relative humidity, Pyrolytic decarboxylation

  19. Heavy water stratification in a low-mass protostar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coutens, A.; Vastel, C.; Cazaux, S.; Bottinelli, S.; Caux, E.; Ceccarelli, C.; Demyk, K.; Taquet, V.; Wakelam, V.

    Context. Despite the low elemental deuterium abundance in the Galaxy, enhanced molecular deuterium fractionation has been found in the environments of low-mass star-forming regions and, in particular, the Class 0 protostar IRAS 16293-2422. Aims. The key program Chemical HErschel Surveys of Star

  20. Use of high-throughput mass spectrometry to elucidate host-pathogen interactions in Salmonella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodland, Karin D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Manes, Nathan P.; Shi, Liang; Yoon, Hyunjin; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred

    2008-12-01

    New improvements to mass spectrometry include increased sensitivity, improvements in analyzing the collected data, and most important, from the standpoint of this review, a much higher throughput allowing analysis of many samples in a single day. This short review describes how host-pathogen interactions can be dissected by mass spectrometry using Salmonella as a model system. The approach allowed direct identification of the majority of annotate Salmonella proteins, how expression changed under various in vitro growth conditions, and how this relates to virulence and expression within host cell cells. One of the most significant findings is that a very high percentage of the all annotated genes (>20%) are regulated post-transcriptionally. In addition, new and unexpected interactions have been identified for several Salmonella virulence regulators that involve protein-protein interactions suggesting additional functions of the regulator in coordinating virulence expression. Overall high throughput mass spectrometer provides a new view of pathogen-host interaction emphasizing the protein products and defining how protein interactions determine the outcome of infection.

  1. Use of high-throughput mass spectrometry to elucidate host pathogen interactions in Salmonella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodland, Karin D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Manes, Nathan P.; Shi, Liang; Yoon, Hyunjin; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred

    2008-12-01

    Capabilities in mass spectrometry are evolving rapidly, with recent improvements in sensitivity, data analysis, and most important, from the standpoint of this review, much higher throughput allowing analysis of many samples in a single day. This short review describes how these improvements in mass spectrometry can be used to dissect host-pathogen interactions using Salmonella as a model system. This approach enabled direct identification of the majority of annotated Salmonella proteins, quantitation of expression changes under various in vitro growth conditions, and new insights into virulence and expression of Salmonella proteins within host cell cells. One of the most significant findings is that a very high percentage of the all annotated genes (>20%) in Salmonella are regulated post-transcriptionally. In addition, new and unexpected interactions have been identified for several Salmonella virulence regulators that involve protein-protein interactions, suggesting additional functions of these regulators in coordinating virulence expression. Overall high throughput mass spectrometry provides a new view of pathogen-host interactions emphasizing the protein products and defining how protein interactions determine the outcome of infection.

  2. Water mass distributions and transports for the 2014 GEOVIDE cruise in the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ibáñez, Maribel I.; Pérez, Fiz F.; Lherminier, Pascale; Zunino, Patricia; Mercier, Herlé; Tréguer, Paul

    2018-04-01

    We present the distribution of water masses along the GEOTRACES-GA01 section during the GEOVIDE cruise, which crossed the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean and the Labrador Sea in the summer of 2014. The water mass structure resulting from an extended optimum multiparameter (eOMP) analysis provides the framework for interpreting the observed distributions of trace elements and their isotopes. Central Waters and Subpolar Mode Waters (SPMW) dominated the upper part of the GEOTRACES-GA01 section. At intermediate depths, the dominant water mass was Labrador Sea Water, while the deep parts of the section were filled by Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW) and North-East Atlantic Deep Water. We also evaluate the water mass volume transports across the 2014 OVIDE line (Portugal to Greenland section) by combining the water mass fractions resulting from the eOMP analysis with the absolute geostrophic velocity field estimated through a box inverse model. This allowed us to assess the relative contribution of each water mass to the transport across the section. Finally, we discuss the changes in the distribution and transport of water masses between the 2014 OVIDE line and the 2002-2010 mean state. At the upper and intermediate water levels, colder end-members of the water masses replaced the warmer ones in 2014 with respect to 2002-2010, in agreement with the long-term cooling of the North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre that started in the mid-2000s. Below 2000 dbar, ISOW increased its contribution in 2014 with respect to 2002-2010, with the increase being consistent with other estimates of ISOW transports along 58-59° N. We also observed an increase in SPMW in the East Greenland Irminger Current in 2014 with respect to 2002-2010, which supports the recent deep convection events in the Irminger Sea. From the assessment of the relative water mass contribution to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) across the OVIDE line, we conclude that the larger AMOC intensity in

  3. Water mass distributions and transports for the 2014 GEOVIDE cruise in the North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. García-Ibáñez

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the distribution of water masses along the GEOTRACES-GA01 section during the GEOVIDE cruise, which crossed the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean and the Labrador Sea in the summer of 2014. The water mass structure resulting from an extended optimum multiparameter (eOMP analysis provides the framework for interpreting the observed distributions of trace elements and their isotopes. Central Waters and Subpolar Mode Waters (SPMW dominated the upper part of the GEOTRACES-GA01 section. At intermediate depths, the dominant water mass was Labrador Sea Water, while the deep parts of the section were filled by Iceland–Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW and North-East Atlantic Deep Water. We also evaluate the water mass volume transports across the 2014 OVIDE line (Portugal to Greenland section by combining the water mass fractions resulting from the eOMP analysis with the absolute geostrophic velocity field estimated through a box inverse model. This allowed us to assess the relative contribution of each water mass to the transport across the section. Finally, we discuss the changes in the distribution and transport of water masses between the 2014 OVIDE line and the 2002–2010 mean state. At the upper and intermediate water levels, colder end-members of the water masses replaced the warmer ones in 2014 with respect to 2002–2010, in agreement with the long-term cooling of the North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre that started in the mid-2000s. Below 2000 dbar, ISOW increased its contribution in 2014 with respect to 2002–2010, with the increase being consistent with other estimates of ISOW transports along 58–59° N. We also observed an increase in SPMW in the East Greenland Irminger Current in 2014 with respect to 2002–2010, which supports the recent deep convection events in the Irminger Sea. From the assessment of the relative water mass contribution to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC across the OVIDE line, we conclude

  4. Increase of Total Body Water with Decrease of Body Mass while Running 100 km Nonstop--Formation of Edema?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Wirth, Andrea; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether ultraendurance runners in a 100-km run suffer a decrease of body mass and whether this loss consists of fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, or total body water. Male ultrarunners were measured pre- and postrace to determine body mass, fat mass, and skeletal muscle mass by using the anthropometric method. In addition,…

  5. Modeling the improvement of ultrafiltration membrane mass transfer when using biofiltration pretreatment in surface water applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netcher, Andrea C; Duranceau, Steven J

    2016-03-01

    In surface water treatment, ultrafiltration (UF) membranes are widely used because of their ability to supply safe drinking water. Although UF membranes produce high-quality water, their efficiency is limited by fouling. Improving UF filtrate productivity is economically desirable and has been attempted by incorporating sustainable biofiltration processes as pretreatment to UF with varying success. The availability of models that can be applied to describe the effectiveness of biofiltration on membrane mass transfer are lacking. In this work, UF water productivity was empirically modeled as a function of biofilter feed water quality using either a quadratic or Gaussian relationship. UF membrane mass transfer variability was found to be governed by the dimensionless mass ratio between the alkalinity (ALK) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). UF membrane productivity was optimized when the biofilter feed water ALK to DOC ratio fell between 10 and 14. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Surface-Water and Ground-Water Interactions in the Central Everglades, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Newlin, Jessica T.; Krest, James M.; Choi, Jungyill; Nemeth, Eric A.; Krupa, Steven L.

    2004-01-01

    Recharge and discharge are hydrological processes that cause Everglades surface water to be exchanged for subsurface water in the peat soil and the underlying sand and limestone aquifer. These interactions are thought to be important to water budgets, water quality, and ecology in the Everglades. Nonetheless, relatively few studies of surface water and ground water interactions have been conducted in the Everglades, especially in its vast interior areas. This report is a product of a cooperative investigation conducted by the USGS and the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) aimed at developing and testing techniques that would provide reliable estimates of recharge and discharge in interior areas of WCA-2A (Water Conservation Area 2A) and several other sites in the central Everglades. The new techniques quantified flow from surface water to the subsurface (recharge) and the opposite (discharge) using (1) Darcy-flux calculations based on measured vertical gradients in hydraulic head and hydraulic conductivity of peat; (2) modeling transport through peat and decay of the naturally occurring isotopes 224Ra and 223Ra (with half-lives of 4 and 11 days, respectively); and (3) modeling transport and decay of naturally occurring and 'bomb-pulse' tritium (half-life of 12.4 years) in ground water. Advantages and disadvantages of each method for quantifying recharge and discharge were compared. In addition, spatial and temporal variability of recharge and discharge were evaluated and controlling factors identified. A final goal was to develop appropriately simplified (that is, time averaged) expressions of the results that will be useful in addressing a broad range of hydrological and ecological problems in the Everglades. Results were compared with existing information about water budgets from the South Florida Water Management Model (SFWMM), a principal tool used by the South Florida Water Management District to plan many of the hydrological aspects of the

  7. The Character of the Solar Wind, Surface Interactions, and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the key characteristics of the proton-rich solar wind and describe how it may interact with the lunar surface. We suggest that solar wind can be both a source and loss of water/OH related volatiles, and review models showing both possibilities. Energy from the Sun in the form of radiation and solar wind plasma are in constant interaction with the lunar surface. As such, there is a solar-lunar energy connection, where solar energy and matter are continually bombarding the lunar surface, acting at the largest scale to erode the surface at 0.2 Angstroms per year via ion sputtering [1]. Figure 1 illustrates this dynamically Sun-Moon system.

  8. Water-Exit Process Modeling and Added-Mass Calculation of the Submarine-Launched Missile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jian

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the process that the submarine-launched missile exits the water, there is the complex fluid solid coupling phenomenon. Therefore, it is difficult to establish the accurate water-exit dynamic model. In the paper, according to the characteristics of the water-exit motion, based on the traditional method of added mass, considering the added mass changing rate, the water-exit dynamic model is established. And with help of the CFX fluid simulation software, a new calculation method of the added mass that is suit for submarine-launched missile is proposed, which can effectively solve the problem of fluid solid coupling in modeling process. Then by the new calculation method, the change law of the added mass in water-exit process of the missile is obtained. In simulated analysis, for the water-exit process of the missile, by comparing the results of the numerical simulation and the calculation of theoretical model, the effectiveness of the new added mass calculation method and the accuracy of the water-exit dynamic model that considers the added mass changing rate are verified.

  9. The interaction of wind and water in the desertification environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobberger, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    An appropriate process/response model for the physical basis of desertification is provided by the interactions of wind and water in the desert fringe environment. Essentially, the process of desertification can be thought of as a progressive environmental transition from predominantly fluvial to aeolian processes. This is a simple but useful way of looking at desertification; in this context, desertification is morphogenetic in character. To illustrate the model, a study of drought-related changes in central Mali will serve to trace the interrelated responses of geomorphologic processes to drought conditions.

  10. Fluid dynamic interaction between water hammer and centrifugal pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismaier, A.; Schluecker, E.

    2009-01-01

    Centrifugal pumps generate in piping systems noticeable pressure pulsations. In this paper the dynamic interaction between water hammer and pressure pulsations is presented. The experimental investigations were performed at a piping system with nominal diameter DN 100 (respectively NPS 4) and 75 m total length, built at the Institute for Process Technology and Machinery. Different measurements at this testing facility show that pulsating centrifugal pumps can damp pressure surges generated by fast valve closing. It is also shown that 1-dimensional fluid codes can be used to calculate this phenomenon. Furthermore it is presented that pressure surges pass centrifugal pumps almost unhindered, because they are hydraulic open.

  11. Thermal interaction for molten tin dropped into water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakeri, V.H.; Catton, I.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Plesset, M.S.

    1978-03-01

    Multiflash photography with extremely short duration exposure times per flash was used to observe the interaction of molten tin dropped into a water bath. Detailed photographic evidence is presented which demonstrates that transition, or nucleate boiling, is a possible triggering mechanism for vapor explosions. It was also found that the thermal constraints required to produce vapor explosions could be relaxed by introducing a stable thermal stratification within the coolant. In the present work, the threshold value of the initial tin temperature required for vapor explosion was reduced from about 500 to 343/sup 0/C.

  12. Thermal interaction for molten tin dropped into water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakeri, V.H.; Catton, I.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Plesset, M.S.

    1978-01-01

    Multiflash photography with extremely short duration exposure times per flash has been used to observe the interaction of molten tin dropped into a water bath. Detailed photographic evidence is presented which demonstrates that transition, or nucleate boiling, is a possible triggering mechanism for vapour explosions. It was also found that the thermal constraints required to produce vapour explosions could be relaxed by introducing a stable thermal stratification within the coolant. In the present work, the threshold value of the initial tin temperature required for vapour explosion was reduced from about 500 to 343 0 C. (author)

  13. Study on mechanical interaction between molten alloy and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Satoshi; Ueda, Nobuyuki; Nishi, Yoshihisa; Furuya, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Izumi

    1999-01-01

    Simulant experiments using low melting point molten alloy and water have been conducted to observe both fragmentation behavior of molten jet and boiling phenomena of water, and to measure both particle size and shape of fragmented solidified jet, focusing on post-pin-failure molten fuel-coolant interaction (FCl) which was important to evaluate the sequence of the initiating phase for metallic fueled FBR. In addition, characteristics of coolant boiling phenomena on FCIs have been investigated, focusing on the boiling heat transfer in the direct contact heat transfer mode. As a results, it is concluded that the fragmentation of poured molten alloy jet is affected by a degree of boiling of water and is classified into three modes by thermal conditions of both the instantaneous contact interface temperature of two liquids and subcooling of water. In the case of forced convection boiling in direct contact mode, it is found that the heat transfer performance is enhanced by increase of the heat transfer area, due to oscillation of the surface and fragmentation of molten alloy. As a results of preliminary investigation of FCI behavior for metallic fuel core based on these results, it is expected that the ejected molten fuel is fragmented into almost spherical particles due to the developed boiling of sodium. (author)

  14. Experimental and theoretical study of plasma-water interaction in electrothermal guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arensburg, Alex.

    1993-05-01

    This thesis comprises an experimental and theoretical study of the plasma- jet-water interaction in electrothermal guns. In the present work the plasma jet was produced by high current pulsed discharge in a plasma injector consisting of polyethylene capillary, closed at one end by a metallic anode and supported at the other end with a hollow cathode. A thin aluminium fuse placed inside the capillary and connecting both electrodes, provided an initial conducting element. A pulse forming network delivering a high current pulse through the fuse, exploded it and produced an aluminium plasma. Subsequently, ablation of the capillary wall begun as a result of its exposure to radiation from the fuse plasma. The ablation products were heated by the pulse current until ionized, replacing the fuse plasma by a polyethylene plasma thus sustaining the ablation process. The experimental investigation reported here used x-ray shadowgraphy to observe the plasma-working fluid interaction process. The working fluid was an aqueous solution of 92% water and 8% lead acetate gelatinized with agar. The penetration of the plasma jet into the working fluid was exposed on films at successive time intervals by means of x-ray shadowgraphy. When the water interacts with the plasma it also ablated. This ablation rate was estimated from energy conservation considerations. Peak pressures up to 3.5*10 8 Pa were measured during the process. At such pressure water does not undergo phase transformation when heated. Thus the mass density at the plasma water interface should be regarded as a continuous function of temperature. The determination of the temperature profile at the interface between the capillary plasma and the water requires the solution of the heat transfer and radiative transfer equations under ablation conditions. This constituted the main theoretical part of the present work. 36 refs., 4 tabs., 29 figs

  15. A MASSive Laboratory Tour. An Interactive Mass Spectrometry Outreach Activity for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungmann, Julia H.; Mascini, Nadine E.; Kiss, Andras; Smith, Donald F.; Klinkert, Ivo; Eijkel, Gert B.; Duursma, Marc C.; Cillero Pastor, Berta; Chughtai, Kamila; Chughtai, Sanaullah; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2013-07-01

    It is imperative to fascinate young children at an early stage in their education for the analytical sciences. The exposure of the public to mass spectrometry presently increases rapidly through the common media. Outreach activities can take advantage of this exposure and employ mass spectrometry as an exquisite example of an analytical science in which children can be fascinated. The presented teaching modules introduce children to mass spectrometry and give them the opportunity to experience a modern research laboratory. The modules are highly adaptable and can be applied to young children from the age of 6 to 14 y. In an interactive tour, the students explore three major scientific concepts related to mass spectrometry; the building blocks of matter, charged particle manipulation by electrostatic fields, and analyte identification by mass analysis. Also, the students carry out a mass spectrometry experiment and learn to interpret the resulting mass spectra. The multistage, inquiry-based tour contains flexible methods, which teach the students current-day research techniques and possible applications to real research topics. Besides the scientific concepts, laboratory safety and hygiene are stressed and the students are enthused for the analytical sciences by participating in "hands-on" work. The presented modules have repeatedly been successfully employed during laboratory open days. They are also found to be extremely suitable for (early) high school science classes during laboratory visit-focused field trips.

  16. Recharge Estimation Using Water, Chloride and Isotope Mass Balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogramaci, S.; Firmani, G.; Hedley, P.; Skrzypek, G.; Grierson, P. F.

    2014-12-01

    Discharge of surplus mine water into ephemeral streams may elevate groundwater levels and alter the exchange rate between streams and underlying aquifers but it is unclear whether volumes and recharge processes are within the range of natural variability. Here, we present a case study of an ephemeral creek in the semi-arid subtropical Hamersley Basin that has received continuous mine discharge for more than five years. We used a numerical model coupled with repeated measurements of water levels, chloride concentrations and the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope composition (δ2H and δ18O) to estimate longitudinal evapotranspiration and recharge rates along a 27 km length of Weeli Wolli Creek. We found that chloride increased from 74 to 120 mg/L across this length, while δ18O increased from -8.24‰ to -7.00‰. Groundwater is directly connected to the creek for the first 13 km and recharge rates are negligible. Below this point, the creek flows over a highly permeable aquifer and water loss by recharge increases to a maximum rate of 4.4 mm/d, which accounts for ~ 65% of the total water discharged to the creek. Evapotranspiration losses account for the remaining ~35%. The calculated recharge from continuous flow due to surplus water discharge is similar to that measured for rainfall-driven flood events along the creek. Groundwater under the disconnected section of the creek is characterised by a much lower Cl concentration and more depleted δ18O value than mining discharge water but is similar to flood water generated by large episodic rainfall events. Our results suggest that the impact of recharge from continuous flow on the creek has not extended beyond 27 km from the discharge point. Our approach using a combination of hydrochemical and isotope methods coupled with classical surface flow hydraulic modelling allowed evaluation of components of water budget otherwise not possible in a highly dynamic system that is mainly driven by infrequent but large episodic

  17. Probing protein interactions with hydrogen/deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry—A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percy, Andrew J.; Rey, Martial; Burns, Kyle M.; Schriemer, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Protein chemistry generates mass shifts useful for structure–function studies. ► H/DX supports a powerful mass shift method for protein interaction analysis. ► H/DX mass shifts are useful for determining binding data (K d , off-rates). ► Improved H/DX–MS workflows can accommodate complex protein systems. - Abstract: Assessing the functional outcome of protein interactions in structural terms is a goal of structural biology, however most techniques have a limited capacity for making structure–function determinations with both high resolution and high throughput. Mass spectrometry can be applied as a reader of protein chemistries in order to fill this void, and enable methodologies whereby protein structure–function determinations may be made on a proteome-wide level. Protein hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/DX) offers a chemical labeling strategy suitable for tracking changes in “dynamic topography” and thus represents a powerful means of monitoring protein structure–function relationships. This review presents the exchange method in the context of interaction analysis. Applications involving interface detection, quantitation of binding, and conformational responses to ligation are discussed, and commentary on recent analytical developments is provided.

  18. Characterization of Bacteria in Ballast Water Using MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Emami, K.; Askari, V.; Ullrich, M.; Mohinudeen, K.; Anil, A.C.; Khandeparker, L.; Burgess, J.G.; Mesbahi, E.

    To evaluate a rapid and cost-effective method for monitoring bacteria in ballast water, several marine bacterial isolates were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Since...

  19. On the implications of aerosol liquid water and phase separation for organic aerosol mass

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains data presented in the figures of the paper "On the implications of aerosol liquid water and phase separation for organic aerosol mass"...

  20. Biomarker Pigment Divinyl Chlorophyll a as a Tracer of Water Masses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejdandzic, Maja; Mihanovic, Hrvoje; Silovic, Tina; Henderiks, Jorijntje; Supraha, Luka; Polovic, Dorotea; Bosak, Suncica; Bosnjak, Ivana; Cetinic, Ivona; Olujic, Goran; hide

    2015-01-01

    The ecological preferences of different Phytoplankton types drive their temporal and spatial distributions, reflecting their dependence on certain temperature ranges, light levels, nutrient availability and other environmental gradients. Hence, some phytoplankton taxa can be used as water mass tracers (biotracers).

  1. Seasonal spreading of the Persian Gulf water mass in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prasad, T.G.; Ikeda, M.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    The characteristics of the subsurface salinity maximum associated with the Persian Gulf Water mass (PGW) are used to quantify the spreading and mixing of PGW in the thermocline of the Arabian Sea based on a bimonthly climatology of temperature...

  2. Interaction between litter quality and simulated water depth on decomposition of two emergent macrophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajun Xie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Both water depth and litter quality are important factors influencing litter decomposition in wetlands, but the interactive role of these factors in regulating mass loss and nutrient dynamics is far from clear. The responses of mass loss and nutrient dynamics to simulated water depths and litter quality are investigated in leaves of Carex brevicuspis and leaves and stems of Miscanthus sacchariflorus from the Dongting Lake, China. Three litter types differing in litter quality were incubated for 210 days at three water depths (0 cm, 5 cm, and 80 cm, relative to the water surface in a pond near the Dongting Lake. The litter mass remaining, nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P, organic carbon (organic C, cellulose, and lignin contents were analyzed during the controlled decomposition experiment. Moreover, water properties (temperature, dissolved oxygen content, and conductivity and fungal biomass were also characterized. Initial N and P contents were highest in C. brevicuspis leaves, intermediate in M. sacchariflorus leaves and lowest in M. sacchariflorus stems, whereas the organic C, cellulose, and lignin contents exhibited an opposite trend. After a 210 days incubation, decomposition rate was highest in M. sacchariflorus leaves (0.0034–0.0090 g g-1 DW day-1, in exponential decay model, intermediate in C. brevicuspis leaves (0.0019–0.0041 g g-1 DW day-1, and lowest in M. sacchariflorus stems (0.0005–0.0011 g g-1DW day-1. Decomposition rate of C. brevicuspis leaves was highest at 5 cm water depth, intermediate at 80 cm, and lowest at 0 cm. Decomposition rate of M. sacchariflorus leaves was higher at 5 cm, and 80 cm than at 0 cm water depths. Water depth had no effect on decomposition of M. sacchariflorus stems. At the end of incubation, N and P mineralization was completely in leaf litters with increasing rates along with increasing water depth, while nutrients were accumulated in M. sacchariflorus stem. Organic C, cellulose, and lignin decayed quickly

  3. Circulation and water masses of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.; Gouveia, A.D.; Shenoi, S.S.C.

    1500-3500 m). It is further speculated that the flow in this layer consists of a poleward western boundary current and a weak equatorward flow in the interior. It is not known if there is an annual cycle associated with the deep and the bottom water...

  4. Interactions between biochar and mycorrhizal fungi in a water-stressed agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickan, Bede S; Abbott, Lynette K; Stefanova, Katia; Solaiman, Zakaria M

    2016-08-01

    Biochar may alleviate plant water stress in association with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi but research has not been conclusive. Therefore, a glasshouse experiment was conducted to understand how interactions between AM fungi and plants respond to biochar application under water-stressed conditions. A twin chamber pot system was used to determine whether a woody biochar increased root colonisation by a natural AM fungal population in a pasture soil ('field' chamber) and whether this was associated with increased growth of extraradical AM fungal hyphae detected by plants growing in an adjacent ('bait') chamber containing irradiated soil. The two chambers were separated by a mesh that excluded roots. Subterranean clover was grown with and without water stress and harvested after 35, 49 and 63 days from each chamber. When biochar was applied to the field chamber under water-stressed conditions, shoot mass increased in parallel with mycorrhizal colonisation, extraradical hyphal length and shoot phosphorus concentration. AM fungal colonisation of roots in the bait chamber indicated an increase in extraradical mycorrhizal hyphae in the field chamber. Biochar had little effect on AM fungi or plant growth under well-watered conditions. The biochar-induced increase in mycorrhizal colonisation was associated with increased growth of extraradical AM fungal hyphae in the pasture soil under water-stressed conditions.

  5. Water/rock interactions and mass transport within a thermal gradient Application to the confinement of high level nuclear waste; Interactions solide/solution et transferts de matiere dans un gradient de temperature. Application au confinement des dechets nucleaires de haute-activite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poinssot, Ch [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d` Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets; [Ecole Normale Superieure, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Laboratoire de Geologie

    1999-12-31

    The initial stage of a high level nuclear waste disposal will be characterised by a large heat release within the near-field environment of the canisters. This heat flux caused by radioactive decay will lead to an increase of temperature and a subsequent thermal gradient between the `hot` canisters and the `cold`geological medium. In addition, this thermal gradient will decrease with time due to the heat decay although it could last hundred years. What will be the consequences of such a thermal field varying both on space and time for the alteration of the different constituents of the near field environment. In particular, what could be the effects on the radionuclides migration in the accidental case of an early breach of a canister during the thermal stage? This study brings significant answers to these questions in the light of a performance assessment study. This work is supported by a triple methodological approach involving experimental studies, modelling calculations and a natural analogues study. This complete work demonstrates that a thermal gradient leads to a large re-distribution of elements within the system: some elements are incorporated in the solid phases of the hot end (Si, Zr, Ca) whereas some others are in those of the cold end (Fe, Al, Zn). The confrontation of the results of very simple experiments with the results of a model built on equilibrium thermodynamics allow us to evidence the probable mechanisms causing this mass transport: out-of-equilibrium thermodiffusion processes coupled to irreversible precipitation. Moreover, the effects of the variation of temperatures with time is studied by the way of a natural system which underwent a similar temperature evolution as a disposal and which was initially rich in uranium: the Jurassic Alpine bauxites. In addition, part of the initial bauxite escaped this temperature transformations due to their incorporation in outer thrusting nappes. They are used as a reference. (author)

  6. Water/rock interactions and mass transport within a thermal gradient Application to the confinement of high level nuclear waste; Interactions solide/solution et transferts de matiere dans un gradient de temperature. Application au confinement des dechets nucleaires de haute-activite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poinssot, Ch. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets]|[Ecole Normale Superieure, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Laboratoire de Geologie

    1998-12-31

    The initial stage of a high level nuclear waste disposal will be characterised by a large heat release within the near-field environment of the canisters. This heat flux caused by radioactive decay will lead to an increase of temperature and a subsequent thermal gradient between the `hot` canisters and the `cold`geological medium. In addition, this thermal gradient will decrease with time due to the heat decay although it could last hundred years. What will be the consequences of such a thermal field varying both on space and time for the alteration of the different constituents of the near field environment. In particular, what could be the effects on the radionuclides migration in the accidental case of an early breach of a canister during the thermal stage? This study brings significant answers to these questions in the light of a performance assessment study. This work is supported by a triple methodological approach involving experimental studies, modelling calculations and a natural analogues study. This complete work demonstrates that a thermal gradient leads to a large re-distribution of elements within the system: some elements are incorporated in the solid phases of the hot end (Si, Zr, Ca) whereas some others are in those of the cold end (Fe, Al, Zn). The confrontation of the results of very simple experiments with the results of a model built on equilibrium thermodynamics allow us to evidence the probable mechanisms causing this mass transport: out-of-equilibrium thermodiffusion processes coupled to irreversible precipitation. Moreover, the effects of the variation of temperatures with time is studied by the way of a natural system which underwent a similar temperature evolution as a disposal and which was initially rich in uranium: the Jurassic Alpine bauxites. In addition, part of the initial bauxite escaped this temperature transformations due to their incorporation in outer thrusting nappes. They are used as a reference. (author)

  7. Heavy quark mass effects and improved tests of the flavor independence of strong interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, P.N. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); SLD Collaboration

    1998-08-01

    A review is given of latest results on tests of the flavor independence of strong interactions. Heavy quark mass effects are evident in the data and are now taken into account at next-to-leading order in QCD perturbation theory. The strong-coupling ratios {alpha}{sub s}{sup b}/{alpha}{sub s}{sup uds} and {alpha}{sub s}{sup c}/{alpha}{sub s}{sup uds} are found to be consistent with unity. Determinations of the b-quark mass m{sub b} (M{sub Z}) are discussed.

  8. Water vapor mass balance method for determining air infiltration rates in houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. DeWalle; Gordon M. Heisler

    1980-01-01

    A water vapor mass balance technique that includes the use of common humidity-control equipment can be used to determine average air infiltration rates in buildings. Only measurements of the humidity inside and outside the home, the mass of vapor exchanged by a humidifier/dehumidifier, and the volume of interior air space are needed. This method gives results that...

  9. Analysis of combined heat and mass transfer of water- Vapor in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the combined heat and mass transfer of water-vapor into a cylindrical zeolite adsorber has been numerically simulated The twodimensional heat and mass transfer equations are numerically solved using gPROMS program - a general Process Modeling System {lJ program, inserting the proper initial and ...

  10. Analysis of combined heat and mass transfer of water-vapor in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jn this paper, the combined heat and mass transfer of water-vapor into a cylindrical zeolite adsorber has been numerically simulated The twodimensional heat and mass transfer equations are numerically solved using gPROMS program - a general Process Modeling System [J] program, inserting the proper initial and ...

  11. Model description of dibenzothiophene mass transfer in oil/water dispersions with respect to biodesulfurization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis, C.L.M.; Leeuwen, van M.; Polderman, H.G.; Janssen, A.J.H.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed in order to describe the mass transfer rate of dibenzothiophene within the oil droplet to the oil/water interface of droplets created in a stirred tank reactor. The mass transfer rate of dibenzothiophene was calculated for various complex hydrocarbon distillates

  12. Investigation of structural responses of breakwaters for green water based on fluid-structure interaction analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Seung Lee

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the structural response of breakwaters installed on container carriers against green water impact loads was numerically investigated on the basis of the fluid-structure interaction analysis. A series of numerical studies is carried out to induce breakwater collapse under such conditions, whereby a widely accepted fluid-structure interaction analysis technique is adopted to realistically consider the phenomenon of green water impact loads. In addition, the structural behaviour of these breakwaters under green water impact loads is investigated simultaneously throughout the transient analysis. A verification study of the numerical results is performed using data from actual collapse incidents of breakwaters on container carriers. On the basis of the results of a series of numerical analyses, the pressure distribution of green water was accurately predicted with respect to wave mass and velocity. It is expected that the proposed analytical methodology and predicted pressure distribution could be used as a practical guideline for the design of breakwaters on container carriers.

  13. Water use, productivity and interactions among desert plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehleringer, J.R.

    1992-11-17

    Productivity, stability, and competitive interactions among ecosystem components within aridlands are key processes related directly to water in deserts. This project assumes that integrated aspects of plant metabolism provide insight into the structure and function of plant communities and ecosystems. While it is difficult to extrapolate from instantaneous physiological observations to higher scales, such as whole plant performance or to the interactions between plants as components of ecosystems, several key aspects of plant metabolism are scalable. Analyses of stable isotopic composition in plant tissues at natural abundance levels provide a useful tool that can provide insight into the consequences of physiological processes over temporal and spatial scales. Some plant processes continuously fractionate among light and heavy stable isotopic forms of an element; over time this results in integrated measures of plant metabolism. For example, carbon isotope fractionation during photosynthesis results in leaf carbon isotopic composition that is a measure of the set-point for photosynthetic metabolism and of water-use efficiency. Thus it provides information on the temporal scaling of a key physiological process.

  14. Water use, productivity and interactions among desert plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehleringer, J.R.

    1992-11-17

    Productivity, stability, and competitive interactions among ecosystem components within aridlands are key processes related directly to water in deserts. This project assumes that integrated aspects of plant metabolism provide insight into the structure and function of plant communities and ecosystems. While it is difficult to extrapolate from instantaneous physiological observations to higher scales, such as whole plant performance or to the interactions between plants as components of ecosystems, several key aspects of plant metabolism are scalable. Analyses of stable isotopic composition in plant tissues at natural abundance levels provide a useful tool that can provide insight into the consequences of physiological processes over temporal and spatial scales. Some plant processes continuously fractionate among light and heavy stable isotopic forms of an element; over time this results in integrated measures of plant metabolism. For example, carbon isotope fractionation during photosynthesis results in leaf carbon isotopic composition that is a measure of the set-point for photosynthetic metabolism and of water-use efficiency. Thus it provides information on the temporal scaling of a key physiological process.

  15. Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-01-01

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  16. Study on water-sediment interaction in samples from Rio das Velhas - Minas Gerais State - Brazil using instrumental neutron activation analysis, and argon plasma coupled mass spectroscopy; Estudo da interacao agua-sedimento em amostras do Rio das Velhas - MG utilizando os metodos: analise por ativacao neutronica instrumental (INAA) e espectrometria de massa acoplada a um plasma de argonio (ICP-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veado, Maria Adelaide R.V.; Oliveira, Arno H. de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Revel, G.; Pinte, G. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Lab. d`Analyse par Activation Pierre Sue; Toulhoat, P. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Unite Mixte de Recherche Analyse et Environnement

    1999-11-01

    Sorption of the metallic elements in aqueous solutions in surface of the hydroxides affects the transport of heavy elements in the freshwaters. Sorption and the chemistry of the hydroxides are important studies for knowledge in geology, waters and waste treatment, and environment studies. In the industrial mining region areas, the river surface waters are subject to modifications in its physical and chemistries properties: pH, DBO, conductivity and alkalinity. Instrumental neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), have ben used for the determination of toxic heavy metals and others pollutants in the Das Velhas river in State of Minas Gerais, in south-east Brazil. Water samples were collected with acidification on site, which provoked a change of its natural pH. Consequently, metallic elements associated to hydroxides and to particles in suspension were liberated. The objective of this paper is to show the different behavior of any elements, in water of Das Velhas river, with relation of its chemical forms (cations or anions), the solubility degree, the pH and the presence of rare earth elements. (author) 11 refs., 10 figs.; e-mail: adelaide at nuclear.ufmg.br; heeren at nuclear.ufmg.br; grevel at drecam.cea.fr; pierre.toulhoat at cea.fr

  17. Mass transfer of H2O between petroleum and water: implications for oil field water sample quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCartney, R.A.; Ostvold, T.

    2005-01-01

    Water mass transfer can occur between water and petroleum during changes in pressure and temperature. This process can result in the dilution or concentration of dissolved ions in the water phase of oil field petroleum-water samples. In this study, PVT simulations were undertaken for 4 petroleum-water systems covering a range of reservoir conditions (80-185 o C; 300-1000 bar) and a range of water-petroleum mixtures (volume ratios of 1:1000-300:1000) to quantify the extent of H 2 O mass transfer as a result of pressure and temperature changes. Conditions were selected to be relevant to different types of oil field water sample (i.e. surface, downhole and core samples). The main variables determining the extent of dilution and concentration were found to be: (a) reservoir pressure and temperature, (b) pressure and temperature of separation of water and petroleum, (c) petroleum composition, and (d) petroleum:water ratio (PWR). The results showed that significant dilution and concentration of water samples could occur, particularly at high PWR. It was not possible to establish simple guidelines for identifying good and poor quality samples due to the interplay of the above variables. Sample quality is best investigated using PVT software of the type used in this study. (author)

  18. Groundwater and surface-water interactions and impacts of human activities in the Hailiutu catchment, northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi; Zhou, Yangxiao; Wenninger, Jochen; Uhlenbrook, Stefan; Wang, Xusheng; Wan, Li

    2017-08-01

    The interactions between groundwater and surface water have been significantly affected by human activities in the semi-arid Hailiutu catchment, northwest China. Several methods were used to investigate the spatial and temporal interactions between groundwater and surface water. Isotopic and chemical analyses of water samples determined that groundwater discharges to the Hailiutu River, and mass balance equations were employed to estimate groundwater seepage rates along the river using chemical profiles. The hydrograph separation method was used to estimate temporal variations of groundwater discharges to the river. A numerical groundwater model was constructed to simulate groundwater discharges along the river and to analyze effects of water use in the catchment. The simulated seepage rates along the river compare reasonably well with the seepage estimates derived from a chemical profile in 2012. The impacts of human activities (river-water diversion and groundwater abstraction) on the river discharge were analyzed by calculating the differences between the simulated natural groundwater discharge and the measured river discharge. Water use associated with the Hailiutu River increased from 1986 to 1991, reached its highest level from 1992 to 2000, and decreased from 2001 onwards. The reduction of river discharge might have negative impacts on the riparian ecosystem and the water availability for downstream users. The interactions between groundwater and surface water as well as the consequences of human activities should be taken into account when implementing sustainable water resources management in the Hailiutu catchment.

  19. Impact of water-fertilizer interaction on yields of crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahlown, M.A.; Iqbal, M.; Junejo, M.R.; Ghaffar, A.

    2002-01-01

    Water-fertilizer interaction was studied on wheat and cotton during crop seasons of 1995 to 1998 in the Fordwah Eastern Sadiqia (south), Irrigation and Drainage Project. Irrigation levels applied included 0.75, 1.00 and 1.25 times the evapotranspiration (ET), while fertilizer doses were 75, 100 and 125 percent of recommendations of NPK for district Bahawalnagar. The experiment was conducted at four different locations of the project, where soil was medium textured, free from salinity/alkalinity and sufficiently drained, with water table in the range of 2-3m from the soil surface. Wheat variety Inqalab-91 and cotton variety CLM-109 were sown at their recommended time of sowing, seed rate and management practices. Irrigation was applied in consideration of open-pan evaporation and crop co-efficient for the respective crop, when sum total of the products of pan-evaporation and KC values reached 7.5 cm. Irrigation was applied to all the plots according to treatment allowance, i.e. , with 25 percent cut and addition to .75 and 1.25 Et levels, respectively. The results indicated that irrigation levels had non-significant effect on wheat and cotton yields. The results clearly negate the concept of heavy irrigation, generally exercised by our farming community. Light irrigation as a results of 0.75 Et indication were equally effective: rather, these were economical and efficient under the scarce water availability. Fertilizer had somewhat significant response. Irrigation and fertilizer did not exhibit much significant interaction. In case of wheat, the two inputs were independent, while cotton had significant inter-dependence of the two variables. The experiment gave the conclusion that both wheat and cotton crops should be applied lighter irrigation and NPK fertilizer must be applied in compliance to recommendations, for efficient and economical use of the available crop-production resources. (author)

  20. Characterization of goat colostrum oligosaccharides by nano-liquid chromatography on chip quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Ortiz, A; Salcedo, J; Barile, D; Bunyatratchata, A; Moreno, F J; Martin-García, I; Clemente, A; Sanz, M L; Ruiz-Matute, A I

    2016-01-08

    A detailed qualitative and quantitative characterization of goat colostrum oligosaccharides (GCO) has been carried out for the first time. Defatted and deproteinized colostrum samples, previously treated by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) to remove lactose, were analyzed by nanoflow liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (Nano-LC-Chip-Q-TOF MS). Up to 78 oligosaccharides containing hexose, hexosamine, fucose, N-acetylneuraminic acid or N-glycolylneuraminic acid monomeric units were identified in the samples, some of them detected for the first time in goat colostra. As a second step, a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS) methodology was developed for the separation and quantitation of the main GCO, both acidic and neutral carbohydrates. Among other experimental chromatographic conditions, mobile phase additives and column temperature were evaluated in terms of retention time, resolution, peak width and symmetry of target carbohydrates. Narrow peaks (wh: 0.2-0.6min) and good symmetry (As: 0.8-1.4) were obtained for GCO using an acetonitrile:water gradient with 0.1% ammonium hydroxide at 40°C. These conditions were selected to quantify the main oligosaccharides in goat colostrum samples. Values ranging from 140 to 315mgL(-1) for neutral oligosaccharides and from 83 to 251mgL(-1) for acidic oligosaccharides were found. The combination of both techniques resulted to be useful to achieve a comprehensive characterization of GCO. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Interaction of mass-loaded solar wind flow with blunt body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breus, T.K.; Krymskii, A.M.; Mitnitskii, V.Ya.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the numerical modeling of the solar wind interaction with Venus taking into account the mass loading effect due to the photoionization of the Venus neutral oxygen corona. The analysis has shown that this effect unambiguously explains the number of peculiarities of the SW-Venus interaction pattern that could not be quantitatively explained before, namely the shock front position, and the characteristics of the SW flow and magnetic field in the Venus ionosheath observed from experiments onboard of Venera-9 and -10 and Pioneer-Venus spacecraft. (author)

  2. Bolt-Grout Interactions in Elastoplastic Rock Mass Using Coupled FEM-FDM Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Deb

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical procedure based on finite element method (FEM and finite difference method (FDM for the analysis of bolt-grout interactions are introduced in this paper. The finite element procedure incorporates elasto-plastic concepts with Hoek and Brown yield criterion and has been applied for rock mass. Bolt-grout interactions are evaluated based on finite difference method and are embedded in the elasto-plastic procedures of FEM. The experimental validation of the proposed FEM-FDM procedures and numerical examples of a bolted tunnel are provided to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method for practical applications.

  3. Surface water and groundwater interaction in Marala - Khanki area, Punjab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, W.; Ahmad, M.; Latif, Z.; Tariq, J.A.; Malik, M.R.

    2011-07-01

    Isotope hydrological investigations were carried out in two selected areas of Indus Basin viz. Haripur Area and Chashma- Taunsa Area for elucidating various aspects of surface water and groundwater interaction. Groundwater samples were collected on seasonal basis (low and high river discharge periods) while surface water samples were collected more frequently (weekly or monthly basis). Isotopic data suggested that there is no contribution of surface water to groundwater recharge in Haripur Area and rain is the prevailing source of groundwater recharge. The data further revealed that isotopic values of the Haripur pocket of Tarbela Lake are higher than those of Main Lake / Indus River meaning that there is a significant contribution of base flow in this pocket. Indus River appeared to be the dominant source of groundwater recharge at most of the locations in Chashma- Taunsa Area. Isotopic data of Indus River showed an increase at Taunsa as compared to Chashma in low flow period indicating the high contribution of base flow at this point in time. Stable isotopes were successfully used to quantify the base flow contribution. (author)

  4. Small scale lithium-lead/water-interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranert, O.; Kottowski, H.

    1991-01-01

    One current concept in fusion blanket design is to utilize water as the coolant and liquid lithium-lead as the breeding/neutron multiplier material. Considering the complex design of the blanket module, it is likely that a water leakage into the liquid alloy may occur due to a tube rupture provoking an intolerable pressure increase in the blanket module. The pressure increase is caused by the combined chemical and thermohydraulic reaction of lithium-lead with water. Experiments which simulate such a transient event are necessary to obtain information which is important for the blanket module design. The interaction has been investigated by conducting small-scale experiments at various injection pressures, alloy- and coolant temperatures. Besides using eutectic Li 17 Pb 83 , Li 7 Pb 2 , lithium and lead have been used. Among other results, the experiments indicate increasing chemical reaction with increasing lithium concentration. At the same time, the chemical reaction inhibits violent thermohydaulic reactions due to the attenuating effect of the hydrogen produced. The preliminary epxerimental results from Li 17 Pb 83 and Li 7 Pb 2 reveal that the pressure- and temperature transients caused by the chemical and thermohydraulic reactions lie within technically manageable limits. (orig.)

  5. Reactor water chemistry relevant to coolant-cladding interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    The report is a summary of the work performed in a frame of a Coordinated Research Program organized by the IAEA and carried out from 1981 till 1986. It consists of a survey on our knowledge on coolant-cladding interaction: the basic phenomena, the relevant parameters, their control and the modelling techniques implemented for their assessment. Based upon the results of this Coordinated Research Program, the following topics are reviewed on the report: role of water chemistry in reliable operation of nuclear power plants; water chemistry specifications and their control; behaviour of fuel cladding materials; corrosion product behaviour and crud build-up in reactor circuits; modelling of corrosion product behaviour. This report should be of interest to water chemistry supervisors at the power plants, to experts in utility engineering departments, to fuel designers, to R and D institutes active in the field and to the consultants of these organizations. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 3 papers included in the Annex of this document. Refs, figs, tabs

  6. [Mass maritime casualty incidents in German waters: structures and resources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castan, J; Paschen, H-R; Wirtz, S; Dörges, V; Wenderoth, S; Peters, J; Blunk, Y; Bielstein, A; Kerner, T

    2012-07-01

    The Central Command for Maritime Emergencies was founded in Germany in 2003 triggered by the fire on board of the cargo ship "Pallas" in 1998. Its mission is to coordinate and direct measures at or above state level in maritime emergency situations in the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. A special task in this case is to provide firefighting and medical care. To face these challenges at sea emergency doctors and firemen have been specially trained. This form of organization provides a concept to counter mass casualty incidents and peril situations at sea. Since the foundation of the Central Command for Maritime Emergencies there have been 5 operations for firefighting units and 4 for medical response teams. Assignments and structure of the Central Command for Maritime Emergencies are unique in Europe.

  7. Spreading of water masses and regeneration of silica and sup(226)Ra in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.; Yuan-Hui, Li

    The magnitudes of silica and sup(226) RA inputs to water (through particle regeneration, in situ, and from sediments) and the validity of observed Si and sup(226) Ra as tracers of water masses and advective processes were examined in the Indian...

  8. Water masses and general hydrography along the west coast of India during early March

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshBabu, V.; Varkey, M.J.; Das, V.K.; Gouveia, A.D.

    Structure of water masses along the west coast of India from Bombay to Trivandrum has been studied through vertical sections of temperature, salinity and density during 3-17 March 1977. The Arabian Sea high salinity water spreads south as a core...

  9. Silicon Isotope Fractionation During Acid Water-Igneous Rock Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boorn, S. H.; van Bergen, M. J.; Vroon, P. Z.

    2007-12-01

    Silica enrichment by metasomatic/hydrothermal alteration is a widespread phenomenon in crustal environments where acid fluids interact with silicate rocks. High-sulfidation epithermal ore deposits and acid-leached residues at hot-spring settings are among the best known examples. Acid alteration acting on basalts has also been invoked to explain the relatively high silica contents of the surface of Mars. We have analyzed basaltic-andesitic lavas from the Kawah Ijen volcanic complex (East Java, Indonesia) that were altered by interaction with highly acid (pH~1) sulfate-chloride water of its crater lake and seepage stream. Quantitative removal of major elements during this interaction has led to relative increase in SiO2 contents. Our silicon isotope data, obtained by HR-MC-ICPMS and reported relative to the NIST RM8546 (=NBS28) standard, show a systematic increase in &δ&&30Si from -0.2‰ (±0.3, 2sd) for unaltered andesites and basalts to +1.5‰ (±0.3, 2sd) for the most altered/silicified rocks. These results demonstrate that silicification induced by pervasive acid alteration is accompanied by significant Si isotope fractionation, so that alterered products become isotopically heavier than the precursor rocks. Despite the observed enrichment in SiO2, the rocks have experienced an overall net loss of silicon upon alteration, if Nb is considered as perfectly immobile. The observed &δ&&30Si values of the alteration products appeared to correlate well with the inferred amounts of silicon loss. These findings would suggest that &28Si is preferentially leached during water-rock interaction, implying that dissolved silica in the ambient lake and stream water is isotopically light. However, layered opaline lake sediments, that are believed to represent precipitates from the silica-saturated water show a conspicuous &30Si-enrichment (+1.2 ± 0.2‰). Because anorganic precipitation is known to discriminate against the heavy isotope (e.g. Basile- Doelsch et al., 2006

  10. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Controlling Thermal Cracks in Mass Concrete Foundation by Circulating Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchao Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes an engineering experience of solving the problem of thermal cracking in mass concrete by using a large project, Zhongguancun No.1 (Beijing, China, as an example. A new method is presented for controlling temperature cracks in the mass concrete of a foundation. The method involves controlled cycles of water circulating between the surface of mass concrete foundation and the atmospheric environment. The temperature gradient between the surface and the core of the mass concrete is controlled at a relatively stable state. Water collected from the well-points used for dewatering and from rainfall is used as the source for circulating water. Mass concrete of a foundation slab is experimentally investigated through field temperature monitoring. Numerical analyses are performed by developing a finite element model of the foundation with and without water circulation. The calculation parameters are proposed based on the experiment, and finite element analysis software MIDAS/CIVIL is used to calculate the 3D temperature field of the mass concrete during the entire process of heat of hydration. The numerical results are in good agreement with the measured results. The proposed method provides an alternative practical basis for preventing thermal cracks in mass concrete.

  11. Impact of generalized Yukawa interactions on the lower Higgs-mass bound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gies, Holger [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Jena (Germany); Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Abbe Center of Photonics, Jena (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Jena (Germany); Sondenheimer, Rene [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Jena (Germany); Warschinke, Matthias [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Jena (Germany); Chiba University, Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Chiba (Japan)

    2017-11-15

    We investigate the impact of operators of higher canonical dimension on the lower Higgs-mass consistency bound by means of generalized Higgs-Yukawa interactions. Analogously to higher-order operators in the bare Higgs potential in an effective field theory approach, the inclusion of higher-order Yukawa interactions, e.g., φ{sup 3} anti ψψ, leads to a diminishing of the lower Higgs-mass bound and thus to a shift of the scale of new physics towards larger scales by a few orders of magnitude without introducing a metastability in the effective Higgs potential. We observe that similar renormalization group mechanisms near the weak-coupling fixed point are at work in both generalizations of the microscopic action. Thus, a combination of higher-dimensional operators with generalized Higgs as well as Yukawa interactions does not lead to an additive shift of the lower mass bound, but it relaxes the consistency bounds found recently only slightly. On the method side, we clarify the convergence properties of different projection and expansion schemes for the Yukawa potential used in the functional renormalization group literature so far. (orig.)

  12. A first principles study of the acetylene-water interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzeli, Demeter [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, National and Kapodistrain University of Athens, P.O. Box 64 004, 157 10 Zografou, Athens, (Greece); Mavridis, Aristides [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, National and Kapodistrain University of Athens, P.O. Box 64 004, 157 10 Zografou, Athens, (Greece); Xantheas, Sotiris S. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 906 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999, MS K8-91, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2000-04-08

    We present an extensive study of the stationary points on the acetylene-water (AW) ground-state potential energy surface (PES) aimed in establishing accurate energetics for the two different bonding scenarios that are considered. Those include arrangements in which water acts either as a proton acceptor from one of the acetylene hydrogen atoms or a proton donor to the triple bond. We used a hierarchy of theoretical methods to account for electron correlation [MP2 (second-order Moller-Plesset), MP4 (fourth-order Moller-Plesset), and CCSD(T) (coupled-cluster single double triple)] coupled with a series of increasing size augmented correlation consistent basis sets (aug-cc-pVnZ, n=2,3,4). We furthermore examined the effect of corrections due to basis set superposition error (BSSE). We found that those have a large effect in altering the qualitative features of the PES of the complex. They are responsible for producing a structure of higher (C{sub 2v}) symmetry for the global minimum. Zero-point energy (ZPE) corrections were found to increase the stability of the C{sub 2v} arrangement. For the global (water acceptor) minimum of C{sub 2v} symmetry our best estimates are {delta}E{sub e}=-2.87 kcal/mol ({delta}E{sub 0}=-2.04 kcal/mol) and a van der Waals distance of R{sub e}=2.190 Aa. The water donor arrangement lies 0.3 kcal/mol (0.5 kcal/mol including ZPE corrections) above the global minimum. The barrier for its isomerization to the global minimum is E{sub e}=0.18 kcal/mol; however, inclusion of BSSE- and ZPE-corrections destabilize the water donor arrangement suggesting that it can readily convert to the global minimum. We therefore conclude that there exists only one minimum on the PES in accordance with previous experimental observations. To this end, vibrational averaging and to a lesser extend proper description of intermolecular interactions (BSSE) were found to have a large effect in altering the qualitative features of the ground-state PES of the acetylene-water

  13. A first principles study of the acetylene-water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeli, Demeter; Mavridis, Aristides; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2000-01-01

    We present an extensive study of the stationary points on the acetylene-water (AW) ground-state potential energy surface (PES) aimed in establishing accurate energetics for the two different bonding scenarios that are considered. Those include arrangements in which water acts either as a proton acceptor from one of the acetylene hydrogen atoms or a proton donor to the triple bond. We used a hierarchy of theoretical methods to account for electron correlation [MP2 (second-order Moller-Plesset), MP4 (fourth-order Moller-Plesset), and CCSD(T) (coupled-cluster single double triple)] coupled with a series of increasing size augmented correlation consistent basis sets (aug-cc-pVnZ, n=2,3,4). We furthermore examined the effect of corrections due to basis set superposition error (BSSE). We found that those have a large effect in altering the qualitative features of the PES of the complex. They are responsible for producing a structure of higher (C 2v ) symmetry for the global minimum. Zero-point energy (ZPE) corrections were found to increase the stability of the C 2v arrangement. For the global (water acceptor) minimum of C 2v symmetry our best estimates are ΔE e =-2.87 kcal/mol (ΔE 0 =-2.04 kcal/mol) and a van der Waals distance of R e =2.190 Aa. The water donor arrangement lies 0.3 kcal/mol (0.5 kcal/mol including ZPE corrections) above the global minimum. The barrier for its isomerization to the global minimum is E e =0.18 kcal/mol; however, inclusion of BSSE- and ZPE-corrections destabilize the water donor arrangement suggesting that it can readily convert to the global minimum. We therefore conclude that there exists only one minimum on the PES in accordance with previous experimental observations. To this end, vibrational averaging and to a lesser extend proper description of intermolecular interactions (BSSE) were found to have a large effect in altering the qualitative features of the ground-state PES of the acetylene-water complex. (c) 2000 American Institute

  14. Carbon-nitrogen-water interactions: is model parsimony fruitful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puertes, Cristina; González-Sanchis, María; Lidón, Antonio; Bautista, Inmaculada; Lull, Cristina; Francés, Félix

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that carbon and nitrogen cycles are highly intertwined and both should be explained through the water balance. In fact, in water-controlled ecosystems nutrient deficit is related to this water scarcity. For this reason, the present study compares the capability of three models in reproducing the interaction between the carbon and nitrogen cycles and the water cycle. The models are BIOME-BGCMuSo, LEACHM and a simple carbon-nitrogen model coupled to the hydrological model TETIS. Biome-BGCMuSo and LEACHM are two widely used models that reproduce the carbon and nitrogen cycles adequately. However, their main limitation is that these models are quite complex and can be too detailed for watershed studies. On the contrary, the TETIS nutrient sub-model is a conceptual model with a vertical tank distribution over the active soil depth, dividing it in two layers. Only the input of the added litter and the losses due to soil respiration, denitrification, leaching and plant uptake are considered as external fluxes. Other fluxes have been neglected. The three models have been implemented in an experimental plot of a semi-arid catchment (La Hunde, East of Spain), mostly covered by holm oak (Quercus ilex). Plant transpiration, soil moisture and runoff have been monitored daily during nearly two years (26/10/2012 to 30/09/2014). For the same period, soil samples were collected every two months and taken to the lab in order to obtain the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, microbial biomass carbon, ammonium and nitrate. In addition, between field trips soil samples were placed in PVC tubes with resin traps and were left incubating (in situ buried cores). Thus, mineralization and nitrification accumulated fluxes for two months, were obtained. The ammonium and nitrate leaching accumulated for two months were measured using ion-exchange resin cores. Soil respiration was also measured every field trip. Finally, water samples deriving from runoff, were collected

  15. Phonon transport in a one-dimensional harmonic chain with long-range interaction and mass disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hangbo; Zhang, Gang; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-11-01

    Atomic mass and interatomic interaction are the two key quantities that significantly affect the heat conduction carried by phonons. Here, we study the effects of long-range (LR) interatomic interaction and mass disorder on the phonon transport in a one-dimensional harmonic chain with up to 105 atoms. We find that while LR interaction reduces the transmission of low-frequency phonons, it enhances the transmission of high-frequency phonons by suppressing the localization effects caused by mass disorder. Therefore, LR interaction is able to boost heat conductance in the high-temperature regime or in the large size regime, where the high-frequency modes are important.

  16. Mathematical modeling of water mass balance for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Jaafar Sahari; Nik Suhaimi Mat Hassan

    2006-01-01

    Gas and water management are key to achieving good performance from a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack. Water plays a critical role in PEMFC. The proton conductivity is increase with the water content. In order to achieve enough hydration, water is normally introduced into the cell externally by a variety of methods such as liquid injection, steam introduction, and humidification of reactants by passing them through humidifiers before entering the cell. In this paper, mathematical modeling of water mass balance for PEMFC at anode and cathode side are proposed by using external humidification and assume that steady state, constant pressure, constant temperature and gases distribution are uniform

  17. Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Fosetyl-Aluminum in Airborne Particulate Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Buiarelli

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fosetyl-aluminum is a synthetic fungicide administered to plants especially to prevent diseases caused by the members of the Peronosporales and several Phytophthora species. Herein, we present a selective liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS method to analyze residues of fosetyl-A1 in air particulate matter. This study was performed in perspective of an exposure assessment of this substance of health concern in environments where high levels of fosetly-Al, relatively to airborne particulate matter, can be found after spraying it. The cleanup procedure of the analyte, from sampled filters of atmospheric particulate matter, was optimized using a Strata X solid-phase extraction cartridge, after accelerated extraction by using water. The chromatographic separation was achieved using a polymeric column based on hydrophilic interaction in step elution with water/acetonitrile, whereas the mass spectrometric detection was performed in negative electrospray ionization. The proposed method resulted to be a simple, fast, and suitable method for confirmation purposes.

  18. Seasonal water mass distribution in the Indonesian throughflow entering the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coatanoan, C.; Metzl, N.; Fieux, M.; Coste, B.

    1999-09-01

    A multiparametric approach is used to analyze the seasonal properties of water masses in the eastern Indian Ocean. The data were measured during two cruises of the Java Australia Dynamic Experiment (JADE) program carried out during two opposite seasons: August 1989 (SE monsoon) and February-March 1992 (NW monsoon). These cruises took place at the end of a La Niña event and during an El Niño episode, respectively. Seven sources have been identified in the studied region for the 200-800 m layer: the Subtropical Indian Water, the Indian Central Water, the modified Antarctic Intermediate Water, the Indonesian Subsurface Water, the Indonesian Intermediate Water, the Arabian Sea-Persian Gulf Water (AS-PGW), and the Arabian Sea-Red Sea Water (AS-RSW). The selected tracers are potential temperature, salinity and oxygen with mass conservation and positive mixing coefficients as constraints. The analysis indicates the proportion of each water source along the Australia-Bali section and into the Indonesian channels. Although no large changes are observed for Indonesian waters, significant seasonal variations are found for the southern and northern Indian Ocean water. During the NW monsoon, the contribution of the AS-RSW increases at the entrance of the Indonesian archipelago whereas the contribution of the south Indian waters decreases in the northwest Australia basin. In a complementary study, nutrients are introduced into the multiparametric analysis in order to more clearly separate the signature of the north Indian waters (AS-PGW, AS-RSW) and to provide supplementary information on the biological history of the water masses, which is compared to large-scale primary production estimates.

  19. Electromagnetic aquametry electromagnetic wave interaction with water and moist substances

    CERN Document Server

    Kupfer, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    This book covers all aspects of Electromagnetic Aquametry. It summarizes the wide area of metrology and its applications in electromagnetic sensing of moist materials. The physical properties of water in various degrees of binding interacting with electromagnetic fields is presented by model systems. The book describes measurement methods and sensors in the frequency domain, TDR-techniques for environmental problems, methods and sensors for quality assessment of biological substances, and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. Environmental sciences, as well as civil and geoengineering, fossil fuels, food and pharmaceutical science are the main fields of application. A very wide frequency sprectrum is used for dielectric measurement methods, but the microwave range is clearly dominant. Multiparameter methods as well as methods of principal components and artificial neural networks for density independent measurements are described.

  20. A High-Resolution Model of Water Mass Transformation and Transport in the Weddell Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazel, J.; Stewart, A.

    2016-12-01

    The ocean circulation around the Antarctic margins has a pronounced impact on the global ocean and climate system. One of these impacts includes closing the global meridional overturning circulation (MOC) via formation of dense Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), which ventilates a large fraction of the subsurface ocean. AABW is also partially composed of modified Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW), a warm, mid-depth water mass whose transport towards the continent has the potential to induce rapid retreat of marine-terminating glaciers. Previous studies suggest that these water mass exchanges may be strongly influenced by high-frequency processes such as downslope gravity currents, tidal flows, and mesoscale/submesoscale eddy transport. However, evaluating the relative contributions of these processes to near-Antarctic water mass transports is hindered by the region's relatively small scales of motion and the logistical difficulties in taking measurements beneath sea ice.In this study we develop a regional model of the Weddell Sea, the largest established source of AABW. The model is forced by an annually-repeating atmospheric state constructed from the Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System data and by annually-repeating lateral boundary conditions constructed from the Southern Ocean State Estimate. The model incorporates the full Filchner-Ronne cavity and simulates the thermodynamics and dynamics of sea ice. To analyze the role of high-frequency processes in the transport and transformation of water masses, we compute the model's overturning circulation, water mass transformations, and ice sheet basal melt at model horizontal grid resolutions ranging from 1/2 degree to 1/24 degree. We temporally decompose the high-resolution (1/24 degree) model circulation into components due to mean, eddy and tidal flows and discuss the geographical dependence of these processes and their impact on water mass transformation and transport.

  1. Determination of Oxidized Phosphatidylcholines by Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Sala

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS approach for analysis of oxidized phosphatidylcholines by an Orbitrap Fourier Transform mass spectrometer in positive electrospray ionization (ESI coupled to hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC was developed. This method depends on three selectivity criteria for separation and identification: retention time, exact mass at a resolution of 100,000 and collision induced dissociation (CID fragment spectra in a linear ion trap. The process of chromatography development showed the best separation properties with a silica-based Kinetex column. This type of chromatography was able to separate all major lipid classes expected in mammalian samples, yielding increased sensitivity of oxidized phosphatidylcholines over reversed phase chromatography. Identification of molecular species was achieved by exact mass on intact molecular ions and CID tandem mass spectra containing characteristic fragments. Due to a lack of commercially available standards, method development was performed with copper induced oxidation products of palmitoyl-arachidonoyl-phosphatidylcholine, which resulted in a plethora of lipid species oxidized at the arachidonoyl moiety. Validation of the method was done with copper oxidized human low-density lipoprotein (LDL prepared by ultracentrifugation. In these LDL samples we could identify 46 oxidized molecular phosphatidylcholine species out of 99 possible candidates.

  2. Seasonal to Mesoscale Variability of Water Masses in Barrow Canyon,Chukchi Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, C.; Pickart, R. S.; Moore, K.; Ashjian, C. J.; Arrigo, K. R.; Grebmeier, J. M.; Vagle, S.; Itoh, M.; Berchok, C.; Stabeno, P. J.; Kikuchi, T.; Cooper, L. W.; Hartwell, I.; He, J.

    2016-02-01

    Barrow Canyon is one of the primary conduits by which Pacific-origin water exits the Chukchi Sea into the Canada Basin. As such, it is an ideal location to monitor the different water masses through the year. At the same time, the canyon is an energetic environment where mixing and entrainment can occur, modifying the pacific-origin waters. As part of the Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO) program, a transect across the canyon was occupied 24 times between 2010-2013 by international ships of opportunity passing through the region during summer and early-fall. Here we present results from an analysis of these sections to determine the seasonal evolution of the water masses and to investigate the nature of the mesoscale variability. The mean state shows the clear presence of six water masses present at various times through the summer. The seasonal evolution of these summer water masses is characterized both in depth space and in temperature-salinity (T-S) space. Clear patterns emerge, including the arrival of Alaskan coastal water and its modification in early-fall. The primary mesoscale variability is associated with wind-driven upwelling events which occur predominantly in September. The atmospheric forcing of these events is investigated as is the oceanic response.

  3. Baryon interactions from lattice QCD with physical quark masses - Nuclear forces and ΞΞ forces -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Takumi; Iritani, Takumi; Aoki, Sinya; Gongyo, Shinya; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Ikeda, Yoichi; Inoue, Takashi; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Miyamoto, Takaya; Nemura, Hidekatsu; Sasaki, Kenji

    2018-03-01

    We present the latest lattice QCD results for baryon interactions obtained at nearly physical quark masses. Nf = 2 + 1 nonperturbatively O(a)-improved Wilson quark action with stout smearing and Iwasaki gauge action are employed on the lattice of (96a)4 ≃(8.1fm)4 with a-1 ≃2.3 GeV, where mπ ≃146 MeV and mK ≃525 MeV. In this report, we study the two-nucleon systems and two-Ξ systems in 1S0 channel and 3S1-3D1 coupled channel, and extract central and tensor interactions by the HAL QCD method. We also present the results for the NΩ interaction in 5S2 channel which is relevant to the NΩ pair-momentum correlation in heavy-ion collision experiments.

  4. Selectivity differences of water-soluble vitamins separated on hydrophilic interaction stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuanzhong; Boysen, Reinhard I; Hearn, Milton T W

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the retention behavior and selectivity differences of water-soluble vitamins were evaluated with three types of polar stationary phases (i.e. an underivatized silica phase, an amide phase, and an amino phase) operated in the hydrophilic interaction chromatographic mode with ESI mass spectrometric detection. The effects of mobile phase composition, including buffer pH and concentration, on the retention and selectivity of the vitamins were investigated. In all stationary phases, the neutral or weakly charged vitamins exhibited very weak retention under each of the pH conditions, while the acidic and more basic vitamins showed diverse retention behaviors. With the underivatized silica phase, increasing the salt concentration of the mobile phase resulted in enhanced retention of the acidic vitamins, but decreased retention of the basic vitamins. These observations thus signify the involvement of secondary mechanisms, such as electrostatic interaction in the retention of these analytes. Under optimized conditions, a baseline separation of all vitamins was achieved with excellent peak efficiency. In addition, the effects of water content in the sample on retention and peak efficiency were examined, with sample stacking effects observed when the injected sample contained a high amount of water. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Quantifying Water-Rock Interactions during Hydraulic Fracturing from the Analysis of Flowback Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osselin, F.; Nightingale, M.; Kloppmann, W.; Gaucher, E.; Clarkson, C.; Mayer, B.

    2017-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technologies have facilitated the rapid development of shale gas and other unconventional resources throughout the world. In order to get sufficient access to the trapped hydrocarbon, it is necessary to fracture the bedrock and increase its permeability. Fracturing fluids are usually composed of tens of thousand of cubic meters of low salinity water with numerous additives, such as viscosity agent or breakers. The objective of this study was to investigate and quantify the water-rock interactions during hydraulic fracturing. This study was based on repeated sampling of flowback water from a hydraulically fractured well in Alberta, Canada. The flowback water was sampled 24 times during the first week and one last time after one, and analyzed for major ions and trace elements, as well as stable isotopes of sulfate and water among others. Results showed that salinity rapidly increases up to 100 000 mg/L at the end of the first week. We demonstrate that conservative species such as Na and Cl follow a clear two end-members mixing line, while some species including sulfate had much higher concentrations (8 times higher than the expected value from the mixing line). This indicates that the rapid increase of salinity in flowback water is caused by both mixing with formation water initially present in the shale formation, and from water-rock interactions triggered by the fracturing fluid and in some cases by the additives. Stable isotope data suggest that additional sulfate is mobilized as a consequence of pyrite oxidation, releasing sulfate, iron and potentially other heavy metals into the flowback water. This release of excess sulfate can be detrimental because it has the potential to promote scaling of sulfate minerals. Moreover, pyrite oxidation is a highly acidifying reaction and this may decrease the effectiveness of other additives, and promote carbonate minerals dissolution enhancing further scaling. We propose that a better control of the

  6. Interactions of flavoured oil in-water emulsions with polylactide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Rómulo; Domenek, Sandra; Ducruet, Violette

    2014-04-01

    Polylactide (PLA), a biobased polymer, might prove suitable as eco-friendly packaging, if it proves efficient at maintaining food quality. To assess interactions between PLA and food, an oïl in-water model emulsion was formulated containing aroma compounds representing different chemical structure classes (ethyl esters, 2-nonanone, benzaldehyde) at a concentration typically found in foodstuff (100 ppm). To study non-equilibrium effects during food shelf life, the emulsions were stored in a PLA pack (tray and lid). To assess equilibrium effects, PLA was conditioned in vapour contact with the aroma compounds at concentrations comparable to headspace conditions of real foods. PLA/emulsion interactions showed minor oil and aroma compound sorption in the packaging. Among tested aroma compounds, benzaldehyde and ethyl acetate were most sorbed and preferentially into the lid through the emulsion headspace. Equilibrium effects showed synergy of ethyl acetate and benzaldehyde, favouring sorption of additional aroma compounds in PLA. This should be anticipated during the formulation of food products. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Validation of the THIRMAL-1 melt-water interaction code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, C.C.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The THIRMAL-1 computer code has been used to calculate nonexplosive LWR melt-water interactions both in-vessel and ex-vessel. To support the application of the code and enhance its acceptability, THIRMAL-1 has been compared with available data from two of the ongoing FARO experiments at Ispra and two of the Corium Coolant Mixing (CCM) experiments performed at Argonne. THIRMAL-1 calculations for the FARO Scoping Test and Quenching Test 2 as well as the CCM-5 and -6 experiments were found to be in excellent agreement with the experiment results. This lends confidence to the modeling that has been incorporated in the code describing melt stream breakup due to the growth of both Kelvin-Helmholtz and large wave instabilities, the sizes of droplets formed, multiphase flow and heat transfer in the mixing zone surrounding and below the melt metallic phase. As part of the analysis of the FARO tests, a mechanistic model was developed to calculate the prefragmentation as it may have occurred when melt relocated from the release vessel to the water surface and the model was compared with the relevant data from FARO.

  8. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Ammonia-Oxidizing Thaumarchaeota in Distinct Arctic Water Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Müller

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most abundant archaeal groups on Earth is the Thaumarchaeota. They are recognized as major contributors to marine ammonia oxidation, a crucial step in the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen. Their universal success is attributed to a high genomic flexibility and niche adaptability. Based on differences in the gene coding for ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA, two different ecotypes with distinct distribution patterns in the water column have been identified. We used high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes combined with archaeal amoA functional gene clone libraries to investigate which environmental factors are driving the distribution of Thaumarchaeota ecotypes in the Atlantic gateway to the Arctic Ocean through an annual cycle in 2014. We observed the characteristic vertical pattern of Thaumarchaeota abundance with high values in the mesopelagic (>200 m water throughout the entire year, but also in the epipelagic (<200 m water during the dark winter months (January, March and November. The Thaumarchaeota community was dominated by three OTUs which on average comprised 76% ± 11 and varied in relative abundance according to water mass characteristics and not to depth or ammonium concentration, as suggested in previous studies. The ratios of the abundance of the different OTU types were similar to that of the functional amoA water cluster types. Together, this suggests a strong selection of ecotypes within different water masses, supporting the general idea of water mass characteristics as an important factor in defining microbial community structure. If indeed, as suggested in this study, Thaumarchaeota population dynamics are controlled by a set of factors, described here as water mass characteristics and not just depth alone, then changes in water mass flow will inevitably affect the distribution of the different ecotypes.

  9. Influence of ground water on soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantino, C.J.; Lung, R.H.; Graves, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    The study of structural response to seismic inputs has been extensively studied and, particularly with the advent of the growth of digital computer capability, has lead to the development of numerical methods of analysis which are used as standard tools for the design of structures. One aspect of the soil-structure interaction (SSI) process which has not been developed to the same degree of sophistication is the impact of ground water (or pure water) on the response of the soil-structure system. There are very good reasons for his state of affairs, however, not the least of which is the difficulty of incorporating the true constitutive behavior of saturated soils into the analysis. At the large strain end of the spectrum, the engineer is concerned with the potential development of failure conditions under the structure, and is typically interested in the onset of liquefaction conditions. The current state of the art in this area is to a great extent based on empirical methods of analysis which were developed from investigations of limited failure data from specific sites around the world. Since it is known that analytic solutions are available for only the simplest of configurations, a numerical finite element solution process was developed. Again, in keeping with typical SSI analyses, in order to make the finite element approach yield resonable results, a comparable transmitting boundary formulation was included in the development. The purpose of the transmitting boundary is, of course, to allow for the treatment of extended soil/water half-space problems. For the calculations presented herein, a simple one dimensional transmitting boundary model was developed and utilized

  10. Numerical analysis of heat and mass transfer for water recovery in an evaporative cooling tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunsub; Son, Gihun

    2017-11-01

    Numerical analysis is performed for water recovery in an evaporative cooling tower using a condensing heat exchanger, which consists of a humid air channel and an ambient dry air channel. The humid air including water vapor produced in an evaporative cooling tower is cooled by the ambient dry air so that the water vapor is condensed and recovered to the liquid water. The conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy and vapor concentration in each fluid region and the energy equation in a solid region are simultaneously solved with the heat and mass transfer boundary conditions coupled to the effect of condensation on the channel surface of humid air. The present computation demonstrates the condensed water film distribution on the humid air channel, which is caused by the vapor mass transfer between the humid air and the colder water film surface, which is coupled to the indirect heat exchange with the ambient air. Computations are carried out to predict water recovery rate in parallel, counter and cross-flow type heat exchangers. The effects of air flow rate and channel interval on the water recovery rate are quantified.

  11. Probing neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the charged-current and neutral-current interaction rates of supernova neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kwang-Chang; Lee, Fei-Fan; Lee, Feng-Shiuh; Lin, Guey-Lin; Liu, Tsung-Che; Yang, Yi

    2016-07-01

    The neutrino mass hierarchy is one of the neutrino fundamental properties yet to be determined. We introduce a method to determine neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the interaction rate of neutral current (NC) interactions, ν(bar nu) + p → ν(bar nu) + p, and inverse beta decays (IBD), bar nue + p → n + e+, of supernova neutrinos in scintillation detectors. Neutrino flavor conversions inside the supernova are sensitive to neutrino mass hierarchy. Due to Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, the full swapping of bar nue flux with the bar nux (x = μ, τ) one occurs in the inverted hierarchy, while such a swapping does not occur in the normal hierarchy. As a result, more high energy IBD events occur in the detector for the inverted hierarchy than the high energy IBD events in the normal hierarchy. By comparing IBD interaction rate with the mass hierarchy independent NC interaction rate, one can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  12. Probing neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the charged-current and neutral-current interaction rates of supernova neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Kwang-Chang; Lee, Fei-Fan; Lee, Feng-Shiuh; Lin, Guey-Lin; Liu, Tsung-Che; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The neutrino mass hierarchy is one of the neutrino fundamental properties yet to be determined. We introduce a method to determine neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the interaction rate of neutral current (NC) interactions, ν(ν-bar)+p→ν(ν-bar)+p, and inverse beta decays (IBD), ν-bar_e+p→n+e"+, of supernova neutrinos in scintillation detectors. Neutrino flavor conversions inside the supernova are sensitive to neutrino mass hierarchy. Due to Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, the full swapping of ν-bar_e flux with the ν-bar_x (x=μ, τ) one occurs in the inverted hierarchy, while such a swapping does not occur in the normal hierarchy. As a result, more high energy IBD events occur in the detector for the inverted hierarchy than the high energy IBD events in the normal hierarchy. By comparing IBD interaction rate with the mass hierarchy independent NC interaction rate, one can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  13. Studying groundwater and surface water interactions using airborne remote sensing in Heihe River basin, northwest China

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, C.; Liu, J.; Hu, Y.; Zheng, C.

    2015-01-01

    Managing surface water and groundwater as a unified system is important for water resource exploitation and aquatic ecosystem conservation. The unified approach to water management needs accurate characterization of surface water and groundwater interactions. Temperature is a natural tracer for identifying surface water and groundwater interactions, and the use of remote sensing techniques facilitates basin-scale temperature measurement. This study focuses on the Heihe River basin, the second...

  14. Water temperature, body mass and fasting heat production of pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Fredy A A; Cruz, Thaline M P DA; Mourão, Gerson B; Cyrino, José Eurico P

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge on fasting heat production (HEf) of fish is key to develop bioenergetics models thus improving feeding management of farmed species. The core of knowledge on HEf of farmed, neotropical fish is scarce. This study assessed the effect of body mass and water temperature on standard metabolism and fasting heat production of pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus, an omnivore, Neotropical fresh water characin important for farming and fisheries industries all through South American continent. An automated, intermittent flow respirometry system was used to measure standard metabolic rate (SMR) of pacu (17 - 1,050 g) at five water temperatures: 19, 23, 26, 29 and 33 °C. Mass specific SMR increased with increasing water temperature but decreased as function of body mass. The allometric exponent for scaling HEf was 0.788, and lied in the range recorded for all studied warm-water fish. The recorded van't Hoff factor (Q10) for pacu (2.06) shows the species low response to temperature increases. The model HEf = 0.04643×W0.7882×T1.837 allows to predict HEf (kJ d-1) from body mass (W, kg) and water temperature (T, °C), and can be used in bioenergetical models for the species.

  15. Water temperature, body mass and fasting heat production of pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FREDY A.A. AGUILAR

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Knowledge on fasting heat production (HEf of fish is key to develop bioenergetics models thus improving feeding management of farmed species. The core of knowledge on HEf of farmed, neotropical fish is scarce. This study assessed the effect of body mass and water temperature on standard metabolism and fasting heat production of pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus, an omnivore, Neotropical fresh water characin important for farming and fisheries industries all through South American continent. An automated, intermittent flow respirometry system was used to measure standard metabolic rate (SMR of pacu (17 - 1,050 g at five water temperatures: 19, 23, 26, 29 and 33 °C. Mass specific SMR increased with increasing water temperature but decreased as function of body mass. The allometric exponent for scaling HEf was 0.788, and lied in the range recorded for all studied warm-water fish. The recorded van't Hoff factor (Q10 for pacu (2.06 shows the species low response to temperature increases. The model HEf = 0.04643×W0.7882×T1.837 allows to predict HEf (kJ d-1 from body mass (W, kg and water temperature (T, °C, and can be used in bioenergetical models for the species.

  16. Using hydraulic modeling to simulate human interactions with water resources in an Omani irrigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthopoulou, Themis; Ertsen, Maurits; Düring, Bleda; Kolen, Jan

    2017-04-01

    In the dry Southern Oman, more than a thousand years ago, a large water system that connected the mountain mass with the coastal region was constructed. Its length (up to 30 km) and the fact that the coastal region has a rich groundwater aquifer create confusion as to why the system was initially built. Nonetheless, it was abandoned a couple of centuries later only to be partially revived by small farming communities in the 17th to 18th century. The focus of our research is one of the irrigation systems that used the water conveyed from the large water system. Not much is known about these small irrigation systems functioning in the Wadi Al Jizzi of the greater Sohar region. There are no written records and we can only make guesses about the way the systems were managed based on ethnographical studies and the traditional Omani techniques. On the other hand, the good preservation state of the canals offers a great opportunity for hydraulic reconstruction of irrigation events. More than that, the material remains suggest and at the same time limit the ways in which humans interacted with the system and the water resources of the region. All irrigation activities and some daily activities had to be realized through the canal system and only if the canal system permits it these actions would have been feasible. We created a conceptual model of irrigation that includes the human agent and feedback mechanisms through hydraulics and then we simulated irrigation events using the Sobek software. Scenarios and sensibility analysis were used to address the unknown aspects of the system. Our research yielded insights about the way the farming community interacted with the larger water system, the levels of co-ordination and co-operation required for successful irrigation and the predisposition of conflict and power relations.

  17. Electroneutrality and ionic interactions in the modeling of mass transport in dilute electrochemical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Swarnavo, E-mail: ss927@cornell.edu [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States); Aquino, Wilkins, E-mail: wa27@cornell.edu [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Highlights: > A simple ionic transport model including Coulombic interactions is proposed. > A connection between electroneutrality and Onsager's cross-flux terms is established. > Interionic flux densities are obtained from a constrained variational statement. > The numerical stiffness of the classical P-N-P system is bypassed using our proposed approach. - Abstract: We propose a simple, but novel mathematical and numerical approach to describe mass transport in dilute solutions, taking into consideration ionic interactions. Our proposed approach treats fluxes due to ionic interactions as additional unknowns in the transport equation. Through variational arguments, we derive a simple expression for these ionic fluxes in terms of the electroneutrality condition, which allows for a straightforward treatment of the new unknowns. Furthermore, a finite element formulation based on our mathematical model is presented. Finally, using the distribution of the interionic flux density and an energy dissipation function, we show that besides properly capturing flow due to ionic interactions, our model can also describe independent ionic flow as predicted by the conventional Nernst-Planck equation in regions where ionic interactions are weak.

  18. Bars and spirals in tidal interactions with an ensemble of galaxy mass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettitt, Alex R.; Wadsley, J. W.

    2018-03-01

    We present simulations of the gaseous and stellar material in several different galaxy mass models under the influence of different tidal fly-bys to assess the changes in their bar and spiral morphology. Five different mass models are chosen to represent the variety of rotation curves seen in nature. We find a multitude of different spiral and bar structures can be created, with their properties dependent on the strength of the interaction. We calculate pattern speeds, spiral wind-up rates, bar lengths, and angular momentum exchange to quantify the changes in disc morphology in each scenario. The wind-up rates of the tidal spirals follow the 2:1 resonance very closely for the flat and dark matter-dominated rotation curves, whereas the more baryon-dominated curves tend to wind-up faster, influenced by their inner bars. Clear spurs are seen in most of the tidal spirals, most noticeable in the flat rotation curve models. Bars formed both in isolation and interactions agree well with those seen in real galaxies, with a mixture of `fast' and `slow' rotators. We find no strong correlation between bar length or pattern speed and the interaction strength. Bar formation is, however, accelerated/induced in four out of five of our models. We close by briefly comparing the morphology of our models to real galaxies, easily finding analogues for nearly all simulations presenter here, showing passages of small companions can easily reproduce an ensemble of observed morphologies.

  19. A model for cross-cultural reciprocal interactions through mass media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Avella, Juan Carlos; Cosenza, Mario G; San Miguel, Maxi

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the problem of cross-cultural interactions through mass media in a model where two populations of social agents, each with its own internal dynamics, get information about each other through reciprocal global interactions. As the agent dynamics, we employ Axelrod's model for social influence. The global interaction fields correspond to the statistical mode of the states of the agents and represent mass media messages on the cultural trend originating in each population. Several phases are found in the collective behavior of either population depending on parameter values: two homogeneous phases, one having the state of the global field acting on that population, and the other consisting of a state different from that reached by the applied global field; and a disordered phase. In addition, the system displays nontrivial effects: (i) the emergence of a largest minority group of appreciable size sharing a state different from that of the applied global field; (ii) the appearance of localized ordered states for some values of parameters when the entire system is observed, consisting of one population in a homogeneous state and the other in a disordered state. This last situation can be considered as a social analogue to a chimera state arising in globally coupled populations of oscillators.

  20. Role of particle masses in the magnetic field generation driven by the parity violating interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvornikov, Maxim, E-mail: maxdvo@izmiran.ru [Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radiowave Propagation (IZMIRAN), 142190 Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Physics Faculty, National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Avenue, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); II. Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Hamburg, 149 Luruper Chaussee, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-09-10

    Recently the new model for the generation of strong large scale magnetic fields in neutron stars, driven by the parity violating interaction, was proposed. In this model, the magnetic field instability results from the modification of the chiral magnetic effect in presence of the electroweak interaction between ultrarelativistic electrons and nucleons. In the present work we study how a nonzero mass of charged particles, which are degenerate relativistic electrons and nonrelativistic protons, influences the generation of the magnetic field in frames of this approach. For this purpose we calculate the induced electric current of these charged particles, electroweakly interacting with background neutrons and an external magnetic field, exactly accounting for the particle mass. This current is calculated by two methods: using the exact solution of the Dirac equation for a charged particle in external fields and computing the polarization operator of a photon in matter composed of background neutrons. We show that the induced current is vanishing in both approaches leading to the zero contribution of massive particles to the generated magnetic field. We discuss the implication of our results for the problem of the magnetic field generation in compact stars.

  1. Modeling and experimental validation of water mass balance in a PEM fuel cell stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Araya, Samuel Simon; Olesen, Anders Christian

    2016-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells require good hydration in order to deliver high performance and ensure long life operation. Water is essential for proton conductivity in the membrane which increases by nearly six orders of magnitude from dry to fully hydrated. Adequate water...... management in PEM fuel cell is crucial in order to avoid an imbalance between water production and water removal from the fuel cell. In the present study, a novel mathematical zero-dimensional model has been formulated for the water mass balance and hydration of a polymer electrolyte membrane. This model...... is validated against experimental data. In the results it is shown that the fuel cell water balance calculated by this model shows better fit with experimental data-points compared with model where only steady state operation were considered. We conclude that this discrepancy is due a different rate of water...

  2. Water-rock interaction in a high-FeO olivine rock in nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellmuth, K.H.; Lindberg, A.; Tullborg, E.L.

    1992-12-01

    The long-term behaviour in nature of high-FeO olivine rock in contact with surface water has been studied at the Lovasjaervi instrusion, SE-Finland. The rock has been proposed as a high-capasity, higly reactive redox-buffer backfill in a repository for spent fuel. Favourable groundwater chemistry is a major parameter relevant to safety of such a repository. Reducing conditions favour the retardation of long-lived, redox-sensitive radionuclides. Weathering influences have been studied at the natural outcrop of the rock mass. The interaction of oxidizing surface waters with rock at greater depths has been studied by using fissure filling minerals. Investigation of weathered rock from the outcrop indicates that the olivine rock is highly reactive on a geological time scale and its redox capasity is available although the instrusion as a whole is surprisingly well preserved. The fissure fillings studied allow the conclusion that oxygen seems to be efficiently removed from intruding surface water. Oxidation seem to have caused visible effects only along very conducting fractures and near the contact zones of the surrounding granitic rock. Stable isotope data of fissure filling calcites indicate that the influence of surface waters can be traced clearly down to a depth of about 50 m, but also at greater depths re-equilibration has occurred. Groundwater data from the site were not available. (orig.)

  3. African genetic ancestry interacts with body mass index to modify risk for uterine fibroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Ayush; Edwards, Todd L; Hartmann, Katherine E; Torstenson, Eric S; Wellons, Melissa; Schreiner, Pamela J; Velez Edwards, Digna R

    2017-07-01

    Race, specifically African ancestry, and obesity are important risk factors for uterine fibroids, and likely interact to provide the right conditions for fibroid growth. However, existing studies largely focus on the main-effects rather than their interaction. Here, we firstly provide evidence for interaction between categories of body mass index (BMI) and reported-race in relation to uterine fibroids. We then investigate whether the association between inferred local European ancestry and fibroid risk is modified by BMI in African American (AA) women in the Vanderbilt University Medical Center bio-repository (BioVU) (539 cases and 794 controls) and the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study (CARDIA, 264 cases and 173 controls). We used multiple logistic regression to evaluate interactions between local European ancestry and BMI in relation to fibroid risk, then performed fixed effects meta-analysis. Statistical significance threshold for local-ancestry and BMI interactions was empirically estimated with 10,000 permutations (p-value = 1.18x10-4). Admixture mapping detected an association between European ancestry and fibroid risk which was modified by BMI (continuous-interaction p-value = 3.75x10-5) around ADTRP (chromosome 6p24); the strongest association was found in the obese category (ancestry odds ratio (AOR) = 0.51, p-value = 2.23x10-5). Evaluation of interaction between genotyped/imputed variants and BMI in this targeted region suggested race-specific interaction, present in AAs only; strongest evidence was found for insertion/deletion variant (6:11946435), again in the obese category (OR = 1.66, p-value = 1.72x10-6). We found nominal evidence for interaction between local ancestry and BMI at a previously reported region in chromosome 2q31-32, which includes COL5A2, and TFPI, an immediate downstream target of ADTRP. Interactions between BMI and SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) found in this region in AA women were also detected in an

  4. Exploring effects of strong interactions in enhancing masses of dynamical origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabo Montes de Oca, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    A previous study of the dynamical generation of masses in massless QCD is considered from another viewpoint. The quark mass is assumed to have a dynamical origin and is substituted for by a scalar field without self-interaction. The potential for the new field background is evaluated up to two loops. Expressing the running coupling in terms of the scale parameter μ, the potential minimum is chosen to fix m top =175 GeV when μ 0 =498 MeV. The second derivative of the potential predicts a scalar field mass of 126.76 GeV. This number is close to the value 114 GeV, which preliminary data taken at CERN suggested to be associated with the Higgs particle. However, the simplifying assumptions limit the validity of the calculations done, as indicated by the large value of α=(g 2 )/(4π)=1.077 obtained. However, supporting statements about the possibility of improving the scheme come from the necessary inclusion of weak and scalar field couplings and mass counterterms in the renormalization procedure, in common with the seemingly needed consideration of the massive W and Z fields, if the real conditions of the SM model are intended to be approached. (orig.)

  5. Mass-controlled capillary viscometer for a Newtonian liquid: Viscosity of water at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digilov, Rafael M.; Reiner, M.

    2007-03-01

    The operation principle of the mass-controlled capillary viscometer is presented for a Newtonian liquid. The derived equation for the temporal changes of the mass in a liquid column draining under gravity through a discharge capillary tube accounts self-consistently for the inertial convective term associated with the acceleration effect. The viscosity of water measured at different temperatures using the new approach is in good agreement with literature data.

  6. [The mass-spectrometry studies of the interaction of polyhexamethyleneguanidine with lipids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysytsia, A V; Rebriiev, A V

    2014-01-01

    In this work the integral components of the cytoplasmic membrane, lecithin and cholesterol were used for mass spectrometry analysis carried out on polyhexamethyleneguanidine (PHMG) mixtures with lipids. The study was performed by mass-spectrometry methods of the MALDI-TOF MS. Our results showed that despite the common use of PHGM polymer derivatives as disinfectants the persistent intermolecular complexes of PHMG oligomers with lipids were not formed. The binding of polycation PHMG with the membrane has been explained by the model proposed. According to this model PHGM can adhere to negatively charged plasma membrane of bacterial cell due to electrostatic interaction and the formation of loop-like structures. Similar stereochemistry mechanism makes the adsorption of the investigated polycation to membrane robust. The mechanism described together with additional destructive factors provides a reasonable explanation for the PHMG induced damage of bacterial cell plasma membrane and the biocide action of disinfectants prepared on the basis of the PHMG salts.

  7. Interaction of aerosol particles composed of protein and saltswith water vapor: hygroscopic growth and microstructural rearrangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mikhailov

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of aerosol particles composed of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA and the inorganic salts sodium chloride and ammonium nitrate with water vapor has been investigated by hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA experiments complemented by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and Köhler theory calculations (100-300nm particle size range, 298K, 960hPa. BSA was chosen as a well-defined model substance for proteins and other macromolecular compounds, which constitute a large fraction of the water-soluble organic component of air particulate matter. Pure BSA particles exhibited deliquescence and efflorescence transitions at 35% relative humidity ( and a hygroscopic diameter increase by up to 10% at 95% in good agreement with model calculations based on a simple parameterisation of the osmotic coefficient. Pure NaCl particles were converted from near-cubic to near-spherical shape upon interaction with water vapor at relative humidities below the deliquescence threshold (partial surface dissolution and recrystallisation, and the diameters of pure NH4NO3 particles decreased by up to 10% due to chemical decomposition and evaporation. Mixed NaCl-BSA and NH4NO3-BSA particles interacting with water vapor exhibited mobility equivalent diameter reductions of up to 20%, depending on particle generation, conditioning, size, and chemical composition (BSA dry mass fraction 10-90%. These observations can be explained by formation of porous agglomerates (envelope void fractions up to 50% due to ion-protein interactions and electric charge effects on the one hand, and by compaction of the agglomerate structure due to capillary condensation effects on the other. The size of NH4NO3-BSA particles was apparently also influenced by volatilisation of NH4NO3, but not as much as for pure salt particles, i.e. the protein inhibited the decomposition of NH4NO3 or the evaporation of the decomposition products NH3 and HNO3. The

  8. Internal hydraulic control in the Little Belt, Denmark - observations of flow configurations and water mass formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtegaard Nielsen, Morten; Vang, Torben; Chresten Lund-Hansen, Lars

    2017-12-01

    Internal hydraulic control, which occurs when stratified water masses are forced through an abrupt constriction, plays an enormous role in nature on both large and regional scales with respect to dynamics, circulation, and water mass formation. Despite a growing literature on this subject surprisingly few direct observations have been made that conclusively show the existence of and the circumstances related to internal hydraulic control in nature. In this study we present observations from the Little Belt, Denmark, one of three narrow straits connecting the Baltic Sea and the North Sea. The observations (comprised primarily of along-strait, detailed transects of salinity and temperature; continuous observations of flow velocity, salinity, and temperature at a permanent station; and numerous vertical profiles of salinity, temperature, fluorescence, and flow velocity in various locations) show that internal hydraulic control is a frequently occurring phenomenon in the Little Belt. The observations, which are limited to south-going flows of approximately two-layered water masses, show that internal hydraulic control may take either of two configurations, i.e. the lower or the upper layer being the active, accelerating one. This is connected to the depth of the pycnocline on the upstream side and the topography, which is both deepening and contracting toward the narrow part of the Little Belt. The existence of two possible flow configurations is known from theoretical and laboratory studies, but we believe that this has never been observed in nature and reported before. The water masses formed by the intense mixing, which is tightly connected with the presence of control, may be found far downstream of the point of control. The observations show that these particular water masses are associated with chlorophyll concentrations that are considerably higher than in adjacent water masses, showing that control has a considerable influence on the primary production and

  9. Thermohaline structure and water masses in the north of Antarctic Peninsula from data collected in situ by southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana E. K. C. Wainer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Western Antarctic Peninsula is rapidly warming and exhibits high indices of biodiversity concentrated mostly along its continental shelf. This region has great importance due to the the mixing caused by the interaction of waters from Weddell Sea (MW, Bransfield Strait (EB and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (CCA transmits thermohaline characteristics and nutrients of different sites and finally connects with all the world’s oceans. However, studies focusing on the temporal variability of the region’s oceanographic conditions that finally determine the water mass formation are sparse due to the logistical difficulties of conducting oceanographic surveys and traditional monitoring during the winter. For this study, variations of the thermohaline structure and water masses in the vicinity and below the sea ice in the North of the Antarctic Peninsula (AP and Scotia Sea (SS were recorded between February and November 2008 by two female southern elephant seals (SES, Mirounga leonina tagged with Conductivity–Temperature–Depth/Satellite-Relay Data Logger (CTD–SRDL. One thousand three hundred and thirty vertical profiles of temperature and salinity were collected by seals which were tagged by the MEOP-BR Project team at the Elephant Island, South Shetlands. These profiles, together with spread state diagrams allowed the identification of water masses and their variances in the ocean’s vertical structure. Among the set of identified water masses we cite: Antarctic Surface Water (AASW, Winter Water (WW, Warm Deep Water (WDW, Modified Warm Deep Water (MWDW, Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW, Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (UCDW, Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW and Ice Shelf Water (ISW. Our results show that the oceanic vertical structure undergoes changes that cannot be traditionally monitored, particularly during the Austral winter and that SES are important and modern oceanographic data collection platforms allowing for the improvement of our

  10. Mass transfer of SCWO processes: Molecular diffusion and mass transfer coefficients of inorganic nitrate species in sub- and supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goemans, M.G.E.; Gloyna, E.F. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Buelow, S.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Molecular diffusion coefficients of lithium-, sodium-, potassium-, cesium-, calcium-, and strontium nitrate in subcritical water were determined by analysis of Taylor dispersion profiles. Pressures ranged from 300 to 500 bar at temperatures ranging from 25{degrees}C to 300{degrees}C. The reported diffusion values were determined at infinite dilution. Molecular diffusion coefficients were 10 to 20 times faster in near-critical subcritical water than in water at ambient temperature and pressure (ATP). These findings implied that the diffusion rates were more liquid like than they were gas like, hence experimental results were correlated with diffusion models for liquids. The subcritical diffusion data presented in this work, and supercritical diffusion results published elsewhere were correlated with hydrodynamic diffusion equations. Both the Wilke-Chang correlation and the Stokes-Einstein equation yielded predictions within 10% of the experimental results if the structure of the diffusing species could be estimated. The effect of the increased diffusion rates on mass transfer rates in supercritical water oxidation applications was quantified, with emphasis on heterogeneous oxidation processes. This study and results published elsewhere showed that diffusion limited conditions are much more likely to be encountered in SCWO processes than commonly acknowledged.

  11. The interaction between surface water and groundwater and its ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surface water; groundwater; stable isotopes; water quality; Second Songhua River basin. .... The total dissolved solid (TDS) was calculated by the con- centrations of major ions in ...... evaluating water quality management effectiveness; J.

  12. Influence of the effective mass of water molecule on thermal neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, M.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of the effective water molecule mass on the thermal neutron scattering on the nucleus of the hydrogen atom has been investigated. Besides the actual water molecule mass (M = 18) the investigations have been carried out with its two effective values (M1 = 16 and M2 = 20). The differential and total cross sections have been calculated for the incident thermal neutron energy E o = 1 eV. Investigation results show different prominence of the quantum effects and for M2 the appearance of peaks in the quasielastic scattering. (author)

  13. Lattice QCD studies on baryon interactions in the strangeness -2 sector with physical quark masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kenji; Aoki, Sinya; Doi, Takumi; Gongyo, Shinya; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Ikeda, Yoichi; Inoue, Takashi; Iritani, Takumi; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Miyamoto, Takaya

    2018-03-01

    We investigate baryon-baryon (BB) interactions in the strangeness S = -2 sector via the coupled-channel HAL QCD method which enables us to extract the scattering observables from Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter (NBS) wave function on the lattice. The simulations are performed with (almost) physical quark masses (mπ = 146MeV) and a huge lattice volume of La = 8.1fm. We discuss the fate of H-dibaryon state through the ΛΛ and NΞ coupled-channel scatterings

  14. Lattice QCD studies on baryon interactions in the strangeness -2 sector with physical quark masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasaki Kenji

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate baryon-baryon (BB interactions in the strangeness S = −2 sector via the coupled-channel HAL QCD method which enables us to extract the scattering observables from Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter (NBS wave function on the lattice. The simulations are performed with (almost physical quark masses (mπ = 146MeV and a huge lattice volume of La = 8.1fm. We discuss the fate of H-dibaryon state through the ΛΛ and NΞ coupled-channel scatterings

  15. Visualizing fungal metabolites during mycoparasitic interaction by MALDI mass spectrometry imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzlechner, Matthias; Reitschmidt, Sonja; Gruber, Sabine; Zeilinger, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Studying microbial interactions by MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) directly from growing media is a difficult task if high sensitivity is demanded. We present a quick and robust sample preparation strategy for growing fungi (Trichoderma atroviride, Rhizoctonia solani) on glass slides to establish a miniaturized confrontation assay. By this we were able to visualize metabolite distributions by MALDI MSI after matrix deposition with a home‐built sublimation device and thorough recrystallization. We present for the first time MALDI MSI data for secondary metabolite release during active mycoparasitism. PMID:26959280

  16. Molecular theory of mass transfer kinetics and dynamics at gas-water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Akihiro; Garrett, Bruce C

    2008-01-01

    The mass transfer mechanism across gas-water interface is studied with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The MD results provide a robust and qualitatively consistent picture to previous studies about microscopic aspects of mass transfer, including interface structure, free energy profiles for the uptake, scattering dynamics and energy relaxation of impinging molecules. These MD results are quantitatively compared with experimental uptake measurements, and we find that the apparent inconsistency between MD and experiment could be partly resolved by precise decomposition of the observed kinetics into elemental steps. Remaining issues and future perspectives toward constructing a comprehensive multi-scale description of interfacial mass transfer are summarized.

  17. Dynamics of urokinase receptor interaction with Peptide antagonists studied by amide hydrogen exchange and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Danø, Keld

    2004-01-01

    Using amide hydrogen exchange combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, we have in this study determined the number of amide hydrogens on several peptides that become solvent-inaccessible as a result of their high-affinity interaction with the urokinase-type plasminogen activator...... receptor (uPAR). These experiments reveal that at least six out of eight amide hydrogens in a synthetic nine-mer peptide antagonist (AE105) become sequestered upon engagement in uPAR binding. Various uPAR mutants with decreased affinity for this peptide antagonist gave similar results, thereby indicating...... that deletion of the favorable interactions involving the side chains of these residues in uPAR does not affect the number of hydrogen bonds established by the main chain of the peptide ligand. The isolated growth factor-like domain (GFD) of the cognate serine protease ligand for uPAR showed 11 protected amide...

  18. Diffusive-dispersive mass transfer in the capillary fringe: Impact of water table fluctuations and heterogeneities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grathwohl, Peter; Haberer, Cristina; Ye, Yu

    Diffusive–dispersive mass transfer in the capillary fringe is important for many groundwater quality issues such as transfer of volatile compounds into (and out of) the groundwater, the supply of oxygen for aerobic degradation of hydrocarbons as well as for precipitation of minerals (e.g. iron...... hydroxides). 2D-laboratory scale experiments were used to investigate the transfer of oxygen into groundwater under non-reactive and reactive conditions, at steady state and with water table fluctuations. Results show that transfer of oxygen is limited by transverse dispersion in the capillary fringe...... and the dispersion coefficients are the same as below the water table. Water table fluctuations cause temporarily increased fluxes of oxygen into groundwater during draining conditions and entrapped air after water table rise. High-permeability inclusions in the capillary fringe enhance mass transfer of oxygen...

  19. Large-Scale Ichthyoplankton and Water Mass Distribution along the South Brazil Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo-Soares, Luis Carlos Pinto; Garcia, Carlos Alberto Eiras; Freire, Andrea Santarosa; Muelbert, José Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Ichthyoplankton is an essential component of pelagic ecosystems, and environmental factors play an important role in determining its distribution. We have investigated simultaneous latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients in ichthyoplankton abundance to test the hypothesis that the large-scale distribution of fish larvae in the South Brazil Shelf is associated with water mass composition. Vertical plankton tows were collected between 21°27′ and 34°51′S at 107 stations, in austral late spring and early summer seasons. Samples were taken with a conical-cylindrical plankton net from the depth of chlorophyll maxima to the surface in deep stations, or from 10 m from the bottom to the surface in shallow waters. Salinity and temperature were obtained with a CTD/rosette system, which provided seawater for chlorophyll-a and nutrient concentrations. The influence of water mass on larval fish species was studied using Indicator Species Analysis, whereas environmental effects on the distribution of larval fish species were analyzed by Distance-based Redundancy Analysis. Larval fish species were associated with specific water masses: in the north, Sardinella brasiliensis was found in Shelf Water; whereas in the south, Engraulis anchoita inhabited the Plata Plume Water. At the slope, Tropical Water was characterized by the bristlemouth Cyclothone acclinidens. The concurrent analysis showed the importance of both cross-shelf and latitudinal gradients on the large-scale distribution of larval fish species. Our findings reveal that ichthyoplankton composition and large-scale spatial distribution are determined by water mass composition in both latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients. PMID:24614798

  20. Large-scale ichthyoplankton and water mass distribution along the South Brazil Shelf.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos Pinto de Macedo-Soares

    Full Text Available Ichthyoplankton is an essential component of pelagic ecosystems, and environmental factors play an important role in determining its distribution. We have investigated simultaneous latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients in ichthyoplankton abundance to test the hypothesis that the large-scale distribution of fish larvae in the South Brazil Shelf is associated with water mass composition. Vertical plankton tows were collected between 21°27' and 34°51'S at 107 stations, in austral late spring and early summer seasons. Samples were taken with a conical-cylindrical plankton net from the depth of chlorophyll maxima to the surface in deep stations, or from 10 m from the bottom to the surface in shallow waters. Salinity and temperature were obtained with a CTD/rosette system, which provided seawater for chlorophyll-a and nutrient concentrations. The influence of water mass on larval fish species was studied using Indicator Species Analysis, whereas environmental effects on the distribution of larval fish species were analyzed by Distance-based Redundancy Analysis. Larval fish species were associated with specific water masses: in the north, Sardinella brasiliensis was found in Shelf Water; whereas in the south, Engraulis anchoita inhabited the Plata Plume Water. At the slope, Tropical Water was characterized by the bristlemouth Cyclothone acclinidens. The concurrent analysis showed the importance of both cross-shelf and latitudinal gradients on the large-scale distribution of larval fish species. Our findings reveal that ichthyoplankton composition and large-scale spatial distribution are determined by water mass composition in both latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients.

  1. Large-scale ichthyoplankton and water mass distribution along the South Brazil Shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo-Soares, Luis Carlos Pinto; Garcia, Carlos Alberto Eiras; Freire, Andrea Santarosa; Muelbert, José Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Ichthyoplankton is an essential component of pelagic ecosystems, and environmental factors play an important role in determining its distribution. We have investigated simultaneous latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients in ichthyoplankton abundance to test the hypothesis that the large-scale distribution of fish larvae in the South Brazil Shelf is associated with water mass composition. Vertical plankton tows were collected between 21°27' and 34°51'S at 107 stations, in austral late spring and early summer seasons. Samples were taken with a conical-cylindrical plankton net from the depth of chlorophyll maxima to the surface in deep stations, or from 10 m from the bottom to the surface in shallow waters. Salinity and temperature were obtained with a CTD/rosette system, which provided seawater for chlorophyll-a and nutrient concentrations. The influence of water mass on larval fish species was studied using Indicator Species Analysis, whereas environmental effects on the distribution of larval fish species were analyzed by Distance-based Redundancy Analysis. Larval fish species were associated with specific water masses: in the north, Sardinella brasiliensis was found in Shelf Water; whereas in the south, Engraulis anchoita inhabited the Plata Plume Water. At the slope, Tropical Water was characterized by the bristlemouth Cyclothone acclinidens. The concurrent analysis showed the importance of both cross-shelf and latitudinal gradients on the large-scale distribution of larval fish species. Our findings reveal that ichthyoplankton composition and large-scale spatial distribution are determined by water mass composition in both latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients.

  2. Baryon interactions from lattice QCD with physical masses — strangeness S = -1 sector —

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemura, Hidekatsu; Aoki, Sinya; Doi, Takumi; Gongyo, Shinya; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Ikeda, Yoichi; Inoue, Takashi; Iritani, Takumi; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Miyamoto, Takaya; Sasaki, Kenji

    2018-03-01

    We present our recent results of baryon interactions with strangeness S = -1 based on Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter (NBS) correlation functions calculated fromlattice QCD with almost physical quark masses corresponding to (mk,mk) ≈ (146, 525) MeV and large volume (La)4 ≈ (96a)4 ≈ (8.1 fm)4. In order to perform a comprehensive study of baryon interactions, a large number of NBS correlation functions from NN to ΞΞ are calculated simultaneously by using large scale computer resources. In this contribution, we focus on the strangeness S = -1 channels of the hyperon interactions by means of HAL QCD method. Four sets of three potentials (the 3S1 - 3 D1 central, 3S1 - 3 D1 tensor, and the 1S0 central potentials) are presented for the ∑N - ∑N (the isospin I = 3/2) diagonal, the ∧N - ∧N diagonal, the ∧N → ∑N transition, and the ∑N - ∑N (I = 1/2) diagonal interactions. Scattering phase shifts for ∑N (I = 3/2) system are presented.

  3. Baryon interactions from lattice QCD with physical masses — strangeness S = -1 sector —

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemura Hidekatsu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present our recent results of baryon interactions with strangeness S = −1 based on Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter (NBS correlation functions calculated fromlattice QCD with almost physical quark masses corresponding to (mk,mk ≈ (146, 525 MeV and large volume (La4 ≈ (96a4 ≈ (8.1 fm4. In order to perform a comprehensive study of baryon interactions, a large number of NBS correlation functions from NN to ΞΞ are calculated simultaneously by using large scale computer resources. In this contribution, we focus on the strangeness S = −1 channels of the hyperon interactions by means of HAL QCD method. Four sets of three potentials (the 3S1 − 3 D1 central, 3S1 − 3 D1 tensor, and the 1S0 central potentials are presented for the ∑N − ∑N (the isospin I = 3/2 diagonal, the ∧N − ∧N diagonal, the ∧N → ∑N transition, and the ∑N − ∑N (I = 1/2 diagonal interactions. Scattering phase shifts for ∑N (I = 3/2 system are presented.

  4. A sampling framework for incorporating quantitative mass spectrometry data in protein interaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, George; Loh, Po-Ru; Berger, Bonnie

    2013-10-04

    Comprehensive protein-protein interaction (PPI) maps are a powerful resource for uncovering the molecular basis of genetic interactions and providing mechanistic insights. Over the past decade, high-throughput experimental techniques have been developed to generate PPI maps at proteome scale, first using yeast two-hybrid approaches and more recently via affinity purification combined with mass spectrometry (AP-MS). Unfortunately, data from both protocols are prone to both high false positive and false negative rates. To address these issues, many methods have been developed to post-process raw PPI data. However, with few exceptions, these methods only analyze binary experimental data (in which each potential interaction tested is deemed either observed or unobserved), neglecting quantitative information available from AP-MS such as spectral counts. We propose a novel method for incorporating quantitative information from AP-MS data into existing PPI inference methods that analyze binary interaction data. Our approach introduces a probabilistic framework that models the statistical noise inherent in observations of co-purifications. Using a sampling-based approach, we model the uncertainty of interactions with low spectral counts by generating an ensemble of possible alternative experimental outcomes. We then apply the existing method of choice to each alternative outcome and aggregate results over the ensemble. We validate our approach on three recent AP-MS data sets and demonstrate performance comparable to or better than state-of-the-art methods. Additionally, we provide an in-depth discussion comparing the theoretical bases of existing approaches and identify common aspects that may be key to their performance. Our sampling framework extends the existing body of work on PPI analysis using binary interaction data to apply to the richer quantitative data now commonly available through AP-MS assays. This framework is quite general, and many enhancements are likely

  5. Break-through of Mass Integration in Textile Industry through Development of Generic Water Recycle Schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    processing is one of the largest and oldest industries world-wide and responsible for a substantial resource consumption and pollution. Especially the wet processing part of the industry, i.e. pre-treatment, dyeing, printing and finishing, is polluting and resource consuming in terms of both water, energy...... dyehouse, Trevira Neckelmann A/S, has now for two consecutive years successfully implemented direct water recycling saving 40 % water. Mass Integration and water pinch techniques were used to identify the potentials and combined with textile intelligence to achieve the best system design for the reuse...... of water, energy and chemicals. The same approach of combining pinch techniques and textile intelligence was applied in South African textile industry. System designs for water recycling in both cotton and acrylic wet treatment were developed. The system for cotton was successfully documented in full scale...

  6. The water masses and volumetry of the southern Agulhas Current region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, H. R.; Lutjeharms, J. R. E.; Brundrit, G. B.

    1993-06-01

    It has been suggested that the southern termination of the Agulhas Current plays a crucial role in the global circulation of thermocline water and thus in global climate. Due to a lack of modern hydrographic observations in this region, no detailed description of water masses or a fine-scale volumetric census for this geographic area had been carried out. Such an analysis of a collection of recent high-quality hydrographic measurements shows that the warm, saline, surface water of Agulhas Current origin contributes very little to the overall volume of the upper 1500 m of the water column in the area. Occasional equatorward leakages from south of the Subtropical Convergence are represented by a range of low-salinity outliers, but they represent <1% of the total volume. The distribution of water volume in temperature/salinity space for the Agulhas Retroflection is less diverse that that of the world ocean as a whole, 25% of the total volume of the region being contained in only 21 fine-scale temperature/salinity classes. North Atlantic Deep Water is the dominant water mass, accounting for 40% of the total volume. Deep Water in general accounts for 60% of the total volume.

  7. Bacterial flora analysis of coliforms in sewage, river water, and ground water using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Niina, Kouki; Matsuwaki, Tomonori; Nukazawa, Kei; Iguchi, Atsushi

    2018-01-28

    The aim of this study was to rapidly and effectively analyze coliforms, which are the most fundamental indicators of water quality for fecal pollution, using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Coliform bacteria were isolated from municipal sewage, river water, and groundwater. For each sample, 100 isolates were determined by MALDI-TOF MS. In addition, these same 100 isolates were also identified via 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Obtained MALDI-TOF MS data were compared with the 16S rRNA sequencing analysis, and the validity of MALDI-TOF MS for classification of coliform bacteria was examined. The concordance rate of bacterial identification for the 100 isolates obtained by MALDI-TOF MS analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for sewage, river water, and ground water were 96%, 74%, and 62% at the genus level, respectively. Among the sewage, river water, and ground water samples, the coliform bacterial flora were distinct. The dominant genus of coliforms in sewage, river water, and groundwater were Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., and Serratia spp., respectively. We determined that MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid and accurate tool that can be used to identify coliforms. Therefore, without using conventional 16S rRNA sequencing, it is possible to rapidly and effectively classify coliforms in water using MALDI-TOF MS.

  8. Water masses as a unifying framework for understanding the Southern Ocean Carbon Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Iudicone

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The scientific motivation for this study is to understand the processes in the ocean interior controlling carbon transfer across 30° S. To address this, we have developed a unified framework for understanding the interplay between physical drivers such as buoyancy fluxes and ocean mixing, and carbon-specific processes such as biology, gas exchange and carbon mixing. Given the importance of density in determining the ocean interior structure and circulation, the framework is one that is organized by density and water masses, and it makes combined use of Eulerian and Lagrangian diagnostics. This is achieved through application to a global ice-ocean circulation model and an ocean biogeochemistry model, with both components being part of the widely-used IPSL coupled ocean/atmosphere/carbon cycle model.

    Our main new result is the dominance of the overturning circulation (identified by water masses in setting the vertical distribution of carbon transport from the Southern Ocean towards the global ocean. A net contrast emerges between the role of Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW, associated with large northward transport and ingassing, and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW, associated with a much smaller export and outgassing. The differences in their export rate reflects differences in their water mass formation processes. For SAMW, two-thirds of the surface waters are provided as a result of the densification of thermocline water (TW, and upon densification this water carries with it a substantial diapycnal flux of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC. For AAIW, principal formatin processes include buoyancy forcing and mixing, with these serving to lighten CDW. An additional important formation pathway of AAIW is through the effect of interior processing (mixing, including cabelling that serve to densify SAMW.

    A quantitative evaluation of the contribution of mixing, biology and gas exchange to the DIC evolution per water mass reveals that

  9. On the effect of interaction of molybdenum trioxide and magnesium oxide in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunin, V.M.; Karelin, A.I.; Solov'eva, L.N.

    1992-01-01

    Interaction of molybdenum trioxide and magnesium oxide in water was studied. It is shown that molybdenum trioxide forms consecutively magnesium molybdate, dimolybdate and magnesium polymolybdates with magnesium oxide

  10. Identifying specific protein interaction partners using quantitative mass spectrometry and bead proteomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Boulon, Séverine; Lam, Yun Wah; Urcia, Roby; Boisvert, François-Michel; Vandermoere, Franck; Morrice, Nick A.; Swift, Sam; Rothbauer, Ulrich; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Lamond, Angus

    2008-01-01

    The identification of interaction partners in protein complexes is a major goal in cell biology. Here we present a reliable affinity purification strategy to identify specific interactors that combines quantitative SILAC-based mass spectrometry with characterization of common contaminants binding to affinity matrices (bead proteomes). This strategy can be applied to affinity purification of either tagged fusion protein complexes or endogenous protein complexes, illustrated here using the well-characterized SMN complex as a model. GFP is used as the tag of choice because it shows minimal nonspecific binding to mammalian cell proteins, can be quantitatively depleted from cell extracts, and allows the integration of biochemical protein interaction data with in vivo measurements using fluorescence microscopy. Proteins binding nonspecifically to the most commonly used affinity matrices were determined using quantitative mass spectrometry, revealing important differences that affect experimental design. These data provide a specificity filter to distinguish specific protein binding partners in both quantitative and nonquantitative pull-down and immunoprecipitation experiments. PMID:18936248

  11. The interaction evolution model of mass incidents with delay in a social network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Liang'an; Ma, Chenyang

    2017-10-01

    Recent years have witnessed rapid development of information technology. Today, modern media is widely used for the purpose of spreading information rapidly and widely. In particular, through micro-blog promotions, individuals tend to express their viewpoints and spread information on the internet, which could easily lead to public opinions. Moreover, government authorities also disseminate official information to guide public opinion and eliminate any incorrect conjecture. In this paper, a dynamical model with two delays is investigated to exhibit the interaction evolution between the public and official opinion fields in network mass incidents. Based on the theory of differential equations, the interaction mechanism between two public opinion fields in a micro-blog environment is analyzed. Two delays are proposed in the model to depict the response delays of public and official opinion fields. Some stable conditions are obtained, which shows that Hopf bifurcation can occur as delays cross critical values. Further, some numerical simulations are carried out to verify theoretical results. Our model indicates that there exists a golden time for government intervention, which should be emphasized given the impact of modern media and inaccurate rumors. If the government releases official information during the golden time, mass incidents on the internet can be controlled effectively.

  12. Landslide/reservoir interaction: 3D numerical modelling of the Vajont rockslide and generated water wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, G.; Imposimato, S.; Roddeman, D.; Frattini, P.

    2012-04-01

    Fast moving landslides can be originated along slopes in mountainous terrains with natural and artificial lakes, or fjords at the slope foot. This landslides can reach extremely high speed and the impact with the immobile reservoir water can be influenced by the local topography and the landslide mass profile. The impact can generate large impulse waves and landslide tsunami. Initiation, propagation and runup are the three phases that need to be considered. The landslide evolution and the consequent wave can be controlled by the initial mass position (subaerial, partially or completely submerged), the landslide speed, the type of material, the subaerial and subaqueous slope geometry, the landslide depth and length at the impact, and the water depth. Extreme events have been caused by subaerial landslides: the 1963 Vajont rockslide (Italy), the 1958 Lituya Bay event (Alaska), the Tafjord and the Loen multiple events event (Norway), also from volcanic collapses (Hawaii and Canary islands). Various researchers completed a systematic experimental work on 2D and 3D wave generation and propagation (Kamphuis and Bowering, 1970; Huber, 1980; Müller, 1995; Huber and Hager, 1997; Fritz, 2002; Zweifel, 2004; Panizzo et al., 2005; Heller, 2007; Heller and Kinnear, 2010; Sælevik et al., 2009), using both rigid blocks and deformable granular" masses. Model data and results have been used to calibrate and validate numerical modelling tools (Harbitz, 1992; Jiang and LeBlond, 1993; Grilli et al., 2002; Grilli and Watts, 2005; Lynett and Liu, 2005; Tinti et al., 2006; Abadie et al., 2010) generally considering simplified rheologies (e.g. viscous rheologies) for subaerial subaqueous spreading. We use a FEM code (Roddeman, 2011; Crosta et al., 2006, 2009, 2010, 2011) adopting an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach to give accurate results for large deformations. We model both 2D and fully 3D events considering different settings. The material is considered as a fully deformable elasto

  13. Quantifying Protein-Carbohydrate Interactions Using Liquid Sample Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuyu; Shams-Ud-Doha, Km; Daneshfar, Rambod; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2015-01-01

    The application of liquid sample desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (liquid sample DESI-MS) for quantifying protein-carbohydrate interactions in vitro is described. Association constants for the interactions between lysozyme and β-D-GlcNAc-(1 → 4)-β-D-GlcNAc-(1 → 4)-D-GlcNAc and β-D-GlcNAc-(1 → 4)-β-D-GlcNAc-(1 → 4)-β-D-GlcNAc-(1 → 4)-D-GlcNAc, and between a single chain antibody and α-D-Galp-(1 → 2)-[α-D-Abep-(1 → 3)]-α-D-Manp-OCH3 and β-D-Glcp-(1 → 2)-[α-D-Abep-(1 → 3)]-α-D-Manp-OCH3 measured using liquid sample DESI-MS were found to be in good agreement with values measured by isothermal titration calorimetry and the direct ESI-MS assay. The reference protein method, which was originally developed to correct ESI mass spectra for the occurrence of nonspecific ligand-protein binding, was shown to reliably correct liquid sample DESI mass spectra for nonspecific binding. The suitability of liquid sample DESI-MS for quantitative binding measurements carried out using solutions containing high concentrations of the nonvolatile biological buffer phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was also explored. Binding of lysozyme to β-D-GlcNAc-(1 → 4)-β-D-GlcNAc-(1 → 4)-D-GlcNAc in aqueous solutions containing up to 1× PBS was successfully monitored using liquid sample DESI-MS; with ESI-MS the binding measurements were limited to concentrations less than 0.02 X PBS.

  14. Determination of Arsenic in Sinus Wash and Tap Water by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnell, Anna M.; Nahan, Keaton; Holloway, Dawone; Vonderheide, Anne P.

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is a toxic element to which humans are primarily exposed through food and water; it occurs as a result of human activities and naturally from the earth's crust. An experiment was developed for a senior level analytical laboratory utilizing an Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) for the analysis of arsenic in household…

  15. On the Origin of Microheterogeneity : A Mass Spectrometric Study of Dimethyl Sulfoxide-Water Binary Mixture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shin, Dong Nam; Wijnen, Jan W.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.; Wakisaka, Akihiro

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the microscopic solvent structure of dimethyl sulfoxide-water mixtures and its influence on the solvation structure of solute from a clustering point of View, by means of a specially designed mass spectrometric system. It was observed that the propensity to the cluster formation is

  16. Determination of vibration frequency depending on abrasive mass flow rate during abrasive water jet cutting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hreha, P.; Radvanská, A.; Hloch, Sergej; Peržel, V.; Krolczyk, G.; Monková, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 77, 1-4 (2014), s. 763-774 ISSN 0268-3768 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Abrasive water jet * Abrasive mass flow rate * Vibration Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.458, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00170-014-6497-9#page-1

  17. Effect of aging on mass transfer naphthalene from creosotes to water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshafie, M.; Ghoshal, S.

    2002-01-01

    Semi-gelatinous interfacial films or 'skins' have been observed to form at the interface of creosote and water when creosote is aged (contacted over an extended time period) in water under quiescent conditions for a few days. The objective of the research is to investigate whether aging of creosote-water interfaces and the formation of interfacial films retard dissolution of a target solute, naphthalene, from samples of creosote. Mass transfer experiments were conducted in gently stirred flow-through reactors where the NAPL was coated on glass beads so as to keep the NAPL and the aqueous phases segregated. The aqueous concentration in the reactor effluent was determined in samples collected at different time points and the equilibrium partitioning coefficients and area-independent mass transfer coefficients were calculated. Over the period of one week, the mass transfer rate coefficients of the naphthalene from creosote to water underwent approximately 30% reduction. Further reduction was observed up to 3 weeks of aging. This significant reduction in mass transfer coefficient has important implications on potential rates of dissolution of the solutes, and thus on rates of clean up of creosote-contaminated sites. (author)

  18. Formation and spreading of Arabian Sea high-salinity water mass

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Prasad, T.G.

    The formation and seasonal spreading of the Arabian Sea High-Salinity Water (ASHSW) mass were studied based on the monthly mean climatology of temperature and salinity in the Arabian Sea, north of the equator and west of 80 degrees E, on a 2 degrees...

  19. Sequential estimation of surface water mass changes from daily satellite gravimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramillien, G. L.; Frappart, F.; Gratton, S.; Vasseur, X.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a recursive Kalman filtering approach to map regional spatio-temporal variations of terrestrial water mass over large continental areas, such as South America. Instead of correcting hydrology model outputs by the GRACE observations using a Kalman filter estimation strategy, regional 2-by-2 degree water mass solutions are constructed by integration of daily potential differences deduced from GRACE K-band range rate (KBRR) measurements. Recovery of regional water mass anomaly averages obtained by accumulation of information of daily noise-free simulated GRACE data shows that convergence is relatively fast and yields accurate solutions. In the case of cumulating real GRACE KBRR data contaminated by observational noise, the sequential method of step-by-step integration provides estimates of water mass variation for the period 2004-2011 by considering a set of suitable a priori error uncertainty parameters to stabilize the inversion. Spatial and temporal averages of the Kalman filter solutions over river basin surfaces are consistent with the ones computed using global monthly/10-day GRACE solutions from official providers CSR, GFZ and JPL. They are also highly correlated to in situ records of river discharges (70-95 %), especially for the Obidos station where the total outflow of the Amazon River is measured. The sparse daily coverage of the GRACE satellite tracks limits the time resolution of the regional Kalman filter solutions, and thus the detection of short-term hydrological events.

  20. Mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea as revealed by ARGO floats

    OpenAIRE

    X. Carton; P. L'Hegaret

    2011-01-01

    By analysing ARGO float data over the last four years, some aspects of the mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea are described.

    The Red Sea Water outflow is strong in the Southwestern Gulf of Aden, in particular when a cyclonic gyre predominates in this region. Salinities of 36.5 and temperatures of 16 °C are found there between 600 and 1000 m depths. The Red Sea Water is more dilute in the eastern part of the Gulf, and fragments of this ...

  1. Portable mass spectrometer for express analysis of dissolved in water substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogan, V.T.; Pavlov, A.K.; Savchenko, M.I.; Dobychin, O.E.

    1999-01-01

    The mass spectrometer for analysis under field conditions of chemical composition of dissolved in water substances is described. Special attention is paid to developing portable mass analyzer and device for a probe inlet. The device is intended for the systems of direct autonomous control of water basins contamination. Depending on the level of required work degree of autonomy and loading rate of the device, its dimensions and consumption way vary. The tests of the pilot device having 370x420x570 mm size, 23 kg mass and ≤ 40 W consumption capacity were carried out. The resolution capacity of the device is 100 (at the level of ≤ 3%) and relative sensitivity - ≤ 10 -6 [ru

  2. The interaction of two coronal mass ejections: Influence of relative orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugaz, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Schwadron, N. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Manchester IV, W. B. [Center for Space Environment Modeling, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2013-11-20

    We report on a numerical investigation of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that interact as they propagate in the inner heliosphere. We focus on the effect of the orientation of the CMEs relative to each other by performing four different simulations with the axis of the second CME rotated by 90° from one simulation to the next. Each magnetohydrodynamic simulation is performed in three dimensions with the Space Weather Modeling Framework in an idealized setting reminiscent of solar minimum conditions. We extract synthetic satellite measurements during and after the interaction and compare the different cases. We also analyze the kinematics of the two CMEs, including the evolution of their widths and aspect ratios. We find that the first CME contracts radially as a result of the interaction in all cases, but the amount of subsequent radial expansion depends on the relative orientation of the two CMEs. Reconnection between the two ejecta and between the ejecta and the interplanetary magnetic field determines the type of structure resulting from the interaction. When a CME with a high inclination with respect to the ecliptic overtakes one with a low inclination, it is possible to create a compound event with a smooth rotation in the magnetic field vector over more than 180°. Due to reconnection, the second CME only appears as an extended 'tail', and the event may be mistaken for a glancing encounter with an isolated CME. This configuration differs significantly from the one usually studied of a multiple-magnetic-cloud event, which we found to be associated with the interaction of two CMEs with the same orientation.

  3. Regional GRACE-based estimates of water mass variations over Australia: validation and interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, L.; Ramillien, G.; Frappart, F.; Leblanc, M.

    2013-04-01

    Time series of regional 2°-by-2° GRACE solutions have been computed from 2003 to 2011 with a 10 day resolution by using an energy integral method over Australia [112° E 156° E; 44° S 10° S]. This approach uses the dynamical orbit analysis of GRACE Level 1 measurements, and specially accurate along-track K Band Range Rate (KBRR) residuals (1 μm s-1 level of error) to estimate the total water mass over continental regions. The advantages of regional solutions are a significant reduction of GRACE aliasing errors (i.e. north-south stripes) providing a more accurate estimation of water mass balance for hydrological applications. In this paper, the validation of these regional solutions over Australia is presented as well as their ability to describe water mass change as a reponse of climate forcings such as El Niño. Principal component analysis of GRACE-derived total water storage maps show spatial and temporal patterns that are consistent with independent datasets (e.g. rainfall, climate index and in-situ observations). Regional TWS show higher spatial correlations with in-situ water table measurements over Murray-Darling drainage basin (80-90%), and they offer a better localization of hydrological structures than classical GRACE global solutions (i.e. Level 2 GRGS products and 400 km ICA solutions as a linear combination of GFZ, CSR and JPL GRACE solutions).

  4. Neutrino mass, the right-handed interaction and the double beta decay, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Masaru; Kotani, Tsuneyuki; Nishiura, Hiroyuki; Okuda, Kazuko; Takasugi, Eiichi.

    1981-01-01

    Based on the formulae for the double β decay obtained in the previous paper, the general properties of 0 + → J + transitions are discussed and the analysis of the experimental data is presented. It is found that, for the two neutrino mode, the 0 + → 0 + transition in the two nucleon (2n)-mechanism dominates over the 0 + → 2 + transition as well as the contribution from the N*-mechanism. For the neutrinoless mode, only the 0 + → 0 + transition in the 2n-mechanism is allowed if there is no right-handed interaction. When the right-handed interaction gives a sizable contribution, the role of the 0 + → 2 + transition becomes as important as the 0 + → 0 + transition in this mode. It is concluded that the experimental data on the ratio of the 128 Te to 130 Te half-lives by Hennecke et al. suggest that neutrinos are Majorana particles, if we take the Vergados estimation of the nuclear matrix elements. Moreover, we find that the weighted average of neutrino masses is around 34 eV if there is no right-handed interaction. (author)

  5. INTERACTION BETWEEN TWO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE 2013 MAY 22 LARGE SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Liu-Guan; Xu, Fei; Gu, Bin; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Li, Gang; Jiang, Yong; Le, Gui-Ming; Shen, Cheng-Long; Wang, Yu-Ming; Chen, Yao

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the eruption and interaction of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the large 2013 May 22 solar energetic particle event using multiple spacecraft observations. Two CMEs, having similar propagation directions, were found to erupt from two nearby active regions (ARs), AR11748 and AR11745, at ∼08:48 UT and ∼13:25 UT, respectively. The second CME was faster than the first CME. Using the graduated cylindrical shell model, we reconstructed the propagation of these two CMEs and found that the leading edge of the second CME caught up with the trailing edge of the first CME at a height of ∼6 solar radii. After about two hours, the leading edges of the two CMEs merged at a height of ∼20 solar radii. Type II solar radio bursts showed strong enhancement during this two hour period. Using the velocity dispersion method, we obtained the solar particle release (SPR) time and the path length for energetic electrons. Further assuming that energetic protons propagated along the same interplanetary magnetic field, we also obtained the SPR time for energetic protons, which were close to that of electrons. These release times agreed with the time when the second CME caught up with the trailing edge of the first CME, indicating that the CME-CME interaction (and shock-CME interaction) plays an important role in the process of particle acceleration in this event

  6. Upper Arctic Ocean water masses harbor distinct communities of heterotrophic flagellates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Monier

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquity of heterotrophic flagellates (HFL in marine waters has been recognized for several decades, but the phylogenetic diversity of these small (ca. 0.8–20 μm cell diameter, mostly phagotrophic protists in the upper pelagic zone of the ocean is underappreciated. Community composition of microbes, including HFL, is the result of past and current environmental selection, and different taxa may be indicative of food webs that cycle carbon and energy very differently. While all oceanic water columns can be density stratified due to the temperature and salinity characteristics of different water masses, the Arctic Ocean is particularly well stratified, with nutrients often limiting in surface waters and most photosynthetic biomass confined to a subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer, where light and nutrients are both available. This physically well-characterized system provided an opportunity to explore the community diversity of HFL from different water masses within the water column. We used high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques as a rapid means of surveying the diversity of HFL communities in the southern Beaufort Sea (Canada, targeting the surface, the subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer (SCM and just below the SCM. In addition to identifying major clades and their distribution, we explored the micro-diversity within the globally significant but uncultivated clade of marine stramenopiles (MAST-1 to examine the possibility of niche differentiation within the stratified water column. Our results strongly suggested that HFL community composition was determined by water mass rather than geographical location across the Beaufort Sea. Future work should focus on the biogeochemical and ecological repercussions of different HFL communities in the face of climate-driven changes to the physical structure of the Arctic Ocean.

  7. Experimental study of simulant melt stream-water thermal interaction in pool and narrow geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, K.S.; Jasmin Sudha, A.; Murthy, S.S.; Rao, E.H.V.M.; Lydia, G.; Das, S.K.; Harvey, J.; Kannan, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Small scale experiments were carried out to investigate the thermal interaction characteristics of a few kilograms of Sn Pb, Bi and Zn as hot melt, in the film boiling region of water in an attempt to simulate a coherent fuel coolant interaction during a postulated severe accident in a nuclear reactor. Melt stream solidification and detached debris generation were studied with different melt superheat up to 200 deg. C, at different coolant temperatures of 30 deg. C, 50 deg. C, 70 deg. C, 90 deg. C, in pool geometry and in long narrow coolant column. The material was heated in an Alumina crucible and poured through a hot stainless steel funnel with a nozzle diameter of 7.7 mm, into the coolant. A stainless steel plate was used to collect the solidified mass after the interaction. Temperature monitoring was done in the coolant column close to the melt stream. The melt stream movement inside the coolant was imaged using a video camera at 25 fps. Measured melt stream entry velocity was around 1.5 m/sec. For low melt superheat and low coolant temperature, solidified porous tree like structure extended from the collector plate up to the melt release point. For water temperature of 70 deg. C, the solidified bed height at the center was found to decrease with increase in the melt superheat up to 150 deg. C. Fragmentation was found to occur when the melt superheat exceeded 200 deg. C. Particle size distribution was obtained for the fragmented debris. In 1D geometry, with 50 deg. C superheat, columnar solidification was observed with no fine debris. The paper gives the details of the results obtained in the experiments and highlights the role of Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and the melt physical properties on the fragmentation kinetics. (authors)

  8. Reactivity of the Bacteria-Water Interface: Linking Nutrient Availability to Bacteria-Metal Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowle, D. A.; Daughney, C. J.; Riley, J. L.

    2002-12-01

    Identifying and quantifying the controls on metal mobilities in geologic systems is critical in order to understand processes such as global element cycling, metal transport in near-surface water-rock systems, sedimentary diagenesis, and mineral formation. Bacteria are ubiquitous in near-surface water-rock systems, and numerous laboratory and field studies have demonstrated that bacteria can facilitate the formation and dissolution of minerals, and enhance or inhibit contaminant transport. However, despite the growing evidence that bacteria play a key role in many geologic processes in low temperature systems, our understanding of the influence of the local nutrient dynamics of the system of interest on bacteria-metal interactions is limited. Here we present data demonstrating the effectiveness of coupling laboratory experiments with geochemical modeling to isolate the effect of nutrient availability on bacterially mediated proton and metal adsorption reactions. Experimental studies of metal-bacteria interactions were conducted in batch reactors as a function of pH, and solid-solute interactions after growth in a variety of defined and undefined media. Media nutrient composition (C,N,P) was quantified before and after harvesting the cells. Surface complexation models (SCM) for the adsorption reactions were developed by combining sorption data with the results of acid-base titrations, and in some cases zeta potential titrations of the bacterial surface. Our results indicate a clear change in both buffering potential and metal binding capacity of the cell walls of Bacillus subtilis as a function of initial media conditions. Combining current studies with our past studies on the effects of growth phase and others work on temperature dependence on metal adsorption we hope to develop a holistic surface complexation model for quantifying bacterial effects on metal mass transfer in many geologic systems.

  9. Water mass census in the Nordic seas using climatological and observational data sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piacsek, S.; Allard, R.; McClean, J.

    2008-01-01

    We have compared and evaluated the water mass census in the Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian (Gin) Sea area from climatologies, observational data sets and model output. The four climatologies evaluated were: the 1998 and 2001 versions of the World Ocean Atlas (WOA98, WOA01), and the United States Navy's GDEM90 (Generalized Digital Environmental Model) and MODAS01 (Modular Ocean Data Assimilation System) climatologies. Three observational data sets were examined: the multidecadal (1965-1995) set contained on the National Oceano- graphic Data Centre's (NODC) WOD98 (World Ocean Data) Cd-Rom, and two seasonal data sets extracted from observations taken on six cruises by the SACLANT Research Center (SACLANTCEN) of NATO/Italy between 1986-1989. The model data is extracted from a global model run at 1/3 degree resolution for the years 1983-1997, using the Pop (Parallel Ocean Program) model of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The census computations focused on the Norwegian Sea, in the southern part of the Gin Sea, between 10 0 W-10 0 E and 60 0 N-70 0 N, especially for comparisons with the hydro casts and the model. Cases of such evaluation computations included: (a) short term comparisons with quasi-synoptic CTD surveys carried out over a 4-year period in the southeastern Gin Sea; (b) climatological comparisons utilizing all available casts from the WOD98 Cd-Rom, with four climatologies; and (c) a comparison between the WOA01 climatology and the Pop model output ending in 1997. In this region in the spring, the fraction of ocean water that has salinity above 34.85 is ∼94%, and that has temperatures above 0 0 C is ∼33%. Three principal water masses dominated the census: the Atlantic water A W, the deep water D W and an intermediate water mass defined as Lower Arctic Intermediate Water (LAIW). Besides these classes, both the climatologies and the observations exhibited the significant presence of deep water masses with T-S characteristics that do not fall into the named

  10. Logs and completion data for water and mass balance wells in Mortandad and Ten Site Canyons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLin, S.G.; Koch, R.J.

    1997-10-01

    Twenty-four monitoring wells were drilled and completed in December 1994 as part of a water and mass balance study for the shallow perched aquifer in the Mortandad Canyon alluvium and in the lower part of Ten-Site Canyon. The wells penetrated the alluvium containing the aquifer and were completed into the top of the weathered tuff. Twelve of these wells encountered the Tshirege Member (Cooing Unit 1 g) of the Bandelier Tuff below the canyon alluvium, while ten wells made contact with the Cerro Toledo interval, which lies between the Tshirege and Otowi Members of the Bandelier Tuff. The remaining two wells were completed into the alluvium above the weathered tuff contact. These wells provide access for continuous water level measurement and water sampling. Data from these new wells will be used to determine changes in alluvial aquifer water storage, water quality sampling, and estimation of seepage into the unsaturated Bandelier Tuff below the alluvium. This report documents drilling activities and well completion logs for the water and mass balance study. These wells also provide critical new data for fourteen north-south vertical cross-sections constructed for the canyon alluvium

  11. Transient turbid water mass reduces temperature-induced coral bleaching and mortality in Barbados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallès, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is seen as one of the greatest threats to the world’s coral reefs and, with the continued rise in sea surface temperature predicted into the future, there is a great need for further understanding of how to prevent and address the damaging impacts. This is particularly so for countries whose economies depend heavily on healthy reefs, such as those of the eastern Caribbean. Here, we compare the severity of bleaching and mortality for five dominant coral species at six representative reef sites in Barbados during the two most significant warm-water events ever recorded in the eastern Caribbean, i.e., 2005 and 2010, and describe prevailing island-scale sea water conditions during both events. In so doing, we demonstrate that coral bleaching and subsequent mortality were considerably lower in 2010 than in 2005 for all species, irrespective of site, even though the anomalously warm water temperature profiles were very similar between years. We also show that during the 2010 event, Barbados was engulfed by a transient dark green turbid water mass of riverine origin coming from South America. We suggest that reduced exposure to high solar radiation associated with this transient water mass was the primary contributing factor to the lower bleaching and mortality observed in all corals. We conclude that monitoring these episodic mesoscale oceanographic features might improve risk assessments of southeastern Caribbean reefs to warm-water events in the future. PMID:27326377

  12. Wave-induced mass transport affects daily Escherichia coli fluctuations in nearshore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhongfu; Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of diel variability of fecal indicator bacteria concentration in nearshore waters is of particular importance for development of water sampling standards and protection of public health. Significant nighttime increase in Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration in beach water, previously observed at marine sites, has also been identified in summer 2000 from fixed locations in waist- and knee-deep waters at Chicago 63rd Street Beach, an embayed, tideless, freshwater beach with low currents at night (approximately 0.015 m s–1). A theoretical model using wave-induced mass transport velocity for advection was developed to assess the contribution of surface waves to the observed nighttime E. coli replenishment in the nearshore water. Using average wave conditions for the summer season of year 2000, the model predicted an amount of E. coli transported from water of intermediate depth, where sediment resuspension occurred intermittently, that would be sufficient to have elevated E. coli concentration in the surf and swash zones as observed. The nighttime replenishment of E. coli in the surf and swash zones revealed here is an important phase in the cycle of diel variations of E. coli concentration in nearshore water. According to previous findings in Ge et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2010, 44, 6731–6737), enhanced current circulation in the embayment during the day tends to displace and deposit material offshore, which partially sets up the system by the early evening for a new period of nighttime onshore movement. This wave-induced mass transport effect, although facilitating a significant base supply of material shoreward, can be perturbed or significantly influenced by high currents (orders of magnitude larger than a typical wave-induced mass transport velocity), current-induced turbulence, and tidal forcing.

  13. Early Detection of Biofouling on Water Purification Membranes by Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakka Ravindran, Swathy; Kumar, Ramesh; Srimany, Amitava; Philip, Ligy; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2018-01-02

    By direct analysis of water purification membranes using ambient ionization mass spectrometry, an attempt has been made to understand the molecular signatures of bacterial fouling. Membrane based purification methods are used extensively in water treatment, and a major challenge for them is biofouling. The buildup of microbes and their extracellular polymeric matrix clog the purification membranes and reduce their efficiency. To understand the early stages of bacterial fouling on water purification membranes, we have used desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS), where ion formation occurs in ambient conditions and the ionization event is surface sensitive. Biosurfactants at the air-water interface generated by microorganisms as a result of quorum sensing, influence the water-membrane interface and are important for the bacterial attachment. We show that these biosurfactants produced by bacteria can be indicator molecular species signifying initiation of biofilms on membrane surfaces, demonstrated by specific DESI MS signatures. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the best studied models for biofilm formation, this process is mediated by rhamnolipids forewarning bacterial fouling. Species dependent variation of such molecules can be used for the precise identification of the microorganisms, as revealed by studies on P. aeroginosa (ATCC 25619). The production of biosurfactants is tightly regulated at the transcriptional level by the quorum-sensing (QS) response. Thus, secretion of these extracellular molecules across the membrane surface allows rapid screening of the biofilm community. We show that, the ambient ionization mass spectrometry can detect certain toxic heavy metals present in water, using surfactant-metal complexes as analytes. We believe that such studies conducted on membranes in various input water streams will help design suitable membrane processes specific to the input streams.

  14. Mass Spectrometry Identification of N-Chlorinated Dipeptides in Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guang; Jiang, Ping; Li, Xing-Fang

    2017-04-04

    We report the identification of N-chlorinated dipeptides as chlorination products in drinking water using complementary high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) and quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometry techniques. First, three model dipeptides, tyrosylglycine (Tyr-Gly), tyrosylalanine (Tyr-Ala), and phenylalanylglycine (Phe-Gly), reacted with sodium hypochlorite, and these reaction solutions were analyzed by QTOF. N-Cl-Tyr-Gly, N,N-di-Cl-Tyr-Gly, N-Cl-Phe-Gly, N,N-di-Cl-Phe-Gly, N-Cl-Tyr-Ala, and N,N-di-Cl-Tyr-Ala were identified as the major products based on accurate masses, 35 Cl/ 37 Cl isotopic patterns, and MS/MS spectra. These identified N-chlorinated dipeptides were synthesized and found to be stable in water over 10 days except N,N-di-Cl-Phe-Gly. To enable sensitive detection of N-chlorinated dipeptides in authentic water, we developed a high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. N-Cl-Tyr-Gly, N,N-di-Cl-Tyr-Gly, N-Cl-Phe-Gly, N-Cl-Tyr-Ala, and N,N-di-Cl-Tyr-Ala along with their corresponding dipeptides were detected in authentic tap water samples. The dipeptides were clearly detected in the raw water, but the N-chlorinated dipeptides were at background levels. These results suggest that the N-chlorinated dipeptides are produced by chlorination. This study has identified N-chlorinated dipeptides as new disinfection byproducts in drinking water. The strategy developed in this study can be used to identify chlorination products of other peptides in drinking water.

  15. Mass fluxes and spatial trends of xenobiotics in the waters of the city of Halle, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinstorf, F.; Strauch, G.; Schirmer, K.; Glaeser, H.-R.; Moeder, M.; Wennrich, R.; Osenbrueck, K.; Schirmer, M.

    2008-01-01

    The behaviour and the effects of xenobiotics including pharmaceuticals and fragrances in the environment are widely unknown. In order to improve our knowledge, field investigations and modelling approaches for the entire area of the city of Halle/Saale, Germany, were performed. The distribution of the concentration values and mass fluxes are exemplified using indicators such as Bisphenol A, t-Nonylphenol, Carbamacepine, Galaxolide, Tonalide, Gadolinium and isotopes. Concentrations at a magnitude of ng/L to μg/L were found ubiquitously in the ground and surface waters. Using the concentration values, the impact of the city concerning the indicators was not always evident. Only the assessment of the mass fluxes shows significant urban impacts along the city passage. The calculation of the mass fluxes shows increasing values for all investigated xenobiotics during the city passage; only Bisphenol A stagnates. A balance model of water and indicator mass fluxes was built up for the entire city area. - Xenobiotics are ubiquitous in the investigated urban aquatic system and are quantified by a large scale mass balance to find spatial trends

  16. Simulation of heat and mass transfer in boiling water with the Melodif code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freydier, P.; Chen, O.; Olive, J.; Simonin, O.

    1991-04-01

    The Melodif code is developed at Electricite de France, Research and Development Division. It is an eulerian two dimensional code for the simulation of turbulent two phase flows (a three dimensional code derived from Melodif, ASTRID, is currently being prepared). Melodif is based on the two fluid model, solving the equations of conservation for mass, momentum and energy, for both phases. In such a two fluid model, the description of interfacial transfers between phases is a crucial issue. The model used applies to a dominant continuous phase, and a dispersed phase. A good description of interfacial momentum transfer exists in the standard MELODIF code: the drag force, the apparent mass force... are taken into account. An important factor for interfacial transfers is the interfacial area per volume unit. With the assumption of spherical gas bubbles, an equation has been written for this variable. In the present wok, a model has been tested for interfacial heat and mass transfer in the case of boiling water: it is assumed that mass transfer is controlled by heat transfer through the latent massic energy taken in the phase that vaporizes (or condenses). This heat and mass transfer model has been tested in various configurations: - a cylinder with water flowing inside, is being heated. Boiling takes place near the wall, while bubbles migrating to the core of the flow recondense. This roughly simulates a sub-cooled boiling phenomenon. - a box containing liquid water is depressurized. Boiling takes place in the whole volume of the fluid. The Melodif code can simulate this configuration due to the implicitation of the relation between interphase mass transfer and the pressure variable

  17. Isotropic background for interacting two fluid scenario coupled with zero mass scalar field in modified gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirde, V.R.; Shekh, S.H.

    2016-01-01

    The modified theories of gravity have engrossed much attention in the last decade, especially f(R) gravity. In this contextual exploration, we investigate interaction between barotropic fluid and dark energy with zero-mass scalar field for the spatially homogeneous and isotropic flat FRW universe. In this universe, the field equations correspond to the particular choice of f(R) = R+bR m . The exact solutions of the field equations are obtained by applying volumetric power law and exponential law of expansion. In power and exponential law of expansion, the universe shows both matter dominated and DE era for b ≤ 0 and b ≥ 0 and remain present in dark era respectively, but power law model is fully occupying with real matter for b > 0 and for b < 0 exponential model expands with negative pressure and remain present in matter dominated phase respectively. The physical behavior of the universe has been discussed by using some physical quantities

  18. Experimental investigation of modal interactions in a beam-mass structure using bispectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, K.A.

    2001-01-01

    Observations and results pertaining to experiments with a beam-mass structure are presented. The experiments were conducted with the objective of understanding and characterizing the nonlinear interactions that occur during the motions of the structure, through the use of third-order spectra (bispectrum and bicoherence spectrum). The structure, tuned for two-to-one internal (autoparametric) resonance between its first two modes. was harmonically excited. The effect of misalignment between the components of the structure on bispectrum was also contemplated. The experimental results are provided in the form of frequency spectra, phase portraits, frequency-response curves, bispectra, and bicoherence spectra. Experimental observations of transitions from periodic to modulated motions are also presented. The potential of bispectral estimates for detecting the quadratic phase coupling among the participating modes during bifurcations and modulated motions is also contemplated. The current study is also relevant to other parametrically resonant structures like ships, rings, shells, and arches, etc. (author)

  19. Study of mass transfer at the air-water interface by an isotopic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlivat, L.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown by analysing the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes distribution in liquid and water vapor, that the processes taking place on a very small scale near the liquid can be investigated. The effect of molecular mass transfer is directly obtained without having to perform difficult measurements in the air in the immediate vicinity of the water surface. Experiments are carried out in the air-water tunnel especially designed for the simulation of ocean atmosphere energy exchanges. The wind velocities vary from 0.7 to 7m/sec. The experimental results obtained do not support the classical Reynolds' analogy between momentum and mass transfer down to the interface and the theory proposed by Sheppard, but they are in agreement with Sverdrup's, Kitaigorodskiy and Volkov's and Brutsaert's theories, all of which involve a layer just above the air-water interface through which mass transfer is dominated by molecular diffusion. The thickness of this layer in the two first theories is shown to decrease with increasing wind velocity. Direct application of Brutsaert's theory for roughness Reynolds numbers smaller than one is in good agreement with the experimental data obtained [fr

  20. Oxygen isotope fractionation effects in soil water via interaction with cations (Mg, Ca, K, Na) adsorbed to phyllosilicate clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerter, Erik; Finstad, Kari; Schaefer, Justin; Goldsmith, Gregory R.; Dawson, Todd; Amundson, Ronald

    2014-07-01

    In isotope-enabled hydrology, soil and vadose zone sediments have been generally considered to be isotopically inert with respect to the water they host. This is inconsistent with knowledge that clay particles possessing an electronegative surface charge and resulting cation exchange capacity (CEC) interact with a wide range of solutes which, in the absence of clays, have been shown to exhibit δ18O isotope effects that vary in relation to the ionic strength of the solutions. To investigate the isotope effects caused by high CEC clays in mineral-water systems, we created a series of monominerallic-water mixtures at gravimetric water contents ranging from 5% to 32%, consisting of pure deionized water of known isotopic composition with homoionic (Mg, Ca, Na, K) montmorillonite. Similar mixtures were also created with quartz to determine the isotope effect of non-, or very minimally-, charged mineral surfaces. The δ18O value of the water in these monominerallic soil analogs was then measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) after direct headspace CO2 equilibration. Mg- and Ca-exchanged homoionic montmorillonite depleted measured δ18O values up to 1.55‰ relative to pure water at 5% water content, declining to 0.49‰ depletion at 30% water content. K-montmorillonite enriched measured δ18O values up to 0.86‰ at 5% water content, declining to 0.11‰ enrichment at 30% water. Na-montmorillonite produces no measureable isotope effect. The isotope effects observed in these experiments may be present in natural, high-clay soils and sediments. These findings have relevance to the interpretation of results of direct CO2-water equilibration approaches to the measurement of the δ18O value of soil water. The adsorbed cation isotope effect may bear consideration in studies of pedogenic carbonate, plant-soil water use and soil-atmosphere interaction. Finally, the observed isotope effects may prove useful as molecular scale probes of the nature of mineral-water

  1. Water quality responses to the interaction between surface water and groundwater along the Songhua River, NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yanguo; Hu, Bin; Zheng, Jieqiong; Wang, Jinsheng; Zhai, Yuanzheng; Zhu, Chen

    2018-03-01

    Investigation of surface water and groundwater interaction (SW-GW interaction) provides basic information for regional water-resource protection, management, and development. In this survey of a 10-km-wide area along both sides of the Songhua River, northeast China, the hydrogeochemical responses to different SW-GW interactions were studied. Three types of SW-GW interactions were identified—"recharge", "discharge", and "flow-through"—according to the hydraulic connection between the surface water and groundwater. The single factor index, principal component analysis, and hierarchical cluster analysis of the hydrogeochemistry and pollutant data illuminated the hydrogeochemical response to the various SW-GW interactions. Clear SW-GW interactions along the Songhua River were revealed: (1) upstream in the study area, groundwater usually discharges into the surface water, (2) groundwater is recharged by surface water downstream, and (3) discharge and flow-through coexist in between. Statistical analysis indicated that the degree of hydrogeochemical response in different types of hydraulic connection varied, being clear in recharge and flow-through modes, and less obvious in discharge mode. During the interaction process, dilution, adsorption, redox reactions, nitrification, denitrification, and biodegradation contributed to the pollutant concentration and affected hydrogeochemical response in the hyporheic zone.

  2. A direct method for soil-structure interaction analysis based on frequency-dependent soil masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danisch, R.; Delinic, K.; Marti, J.; Trbojevic, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    In a soil-structure interaction analysis, the soil, as a subsystem of the global vibrating system, exerts a strong influence on the response of the nuclear reactor building to the earthquake excitation. The volume of resources required for dealing with the soil have led to a number of different types of frequency-domain solutions, most of them based on the impedance function approach. These procedures require coupling the soil to the lumped-mass finite-element model of the reactor building. In most practical cases, the global vibrating system is analysed in the time domain (i.e. modal time history, linear or non-linear direct time-integration). Hence, it follows that the frequency domain solution for soil must be converted to an 'equivalent' soil model in the time domain. Over the past three decades, different approaches have been developed and used for earthquake analysis of nuclear power plants. In some cases, difficulties experienced in modelling the soil have affected the methods of global analysis, thus leading to approaches like the substructuring technique, e.g. 3-step method. In the practical applications, the limitations of each specific method must be taken into account in order to avoid unrealistic results. The aim of this paper is to present the recent development on an equivalent SDOF system for soil including frequency-dependent soil masses. The method will be compared with the classical 3-step method. (author)

  3. Тhe mass-spectrometry studies of the interaction of polyhexamethyleneguanidine with lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Lysytsya

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work the integral components of the cytoplasmic membrane, lecithin and cholesterol were used for mass spectrometry analysis carried out on polyhexamethyleneguanidine (PHMG mixtures with lipids. The study was performed by mass-spectrometry methods of the MALDI-TOF MS. Our results showed that despite the common use of PHGM polymer derivatives as disinfectants the persistent intermolecular complexes of PHMG oligomers with lipids were not formed. The binding of polycation PHMG with the membrane has been explained by the model proposed. According to this model PHGM can adhere to negatively charged plasma membrane of bacterial cell due to electrostatic interaction and the formation of loop-like structures. Similar stereochemistry mechanism makes the adsorption of the investigated polycation to membrane robust. The mechanism described together with additional destructive factors provides a reasonable explanation for the PHMG induced damage of bacterial cell plasma membrane and the biocide action of disinfectants prepared on the basis of the PНMG salts.

  4. Gateways and Water Mass Mixing in the Late Cretaceous North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharian Rostami, M.; Martin, E. E.; MacLeod, K. G.; Poulsen, C. J.; Vande Guchte, A.; Haynes, S.

    2017-12-01

    Regions of intermediate/deep water formation and water-mass mixing in the North Atlantic are poorly defined for the Late Cretaceous, a time of gateway evolution and cooler conditions following the Mid Cretaceous greenhouse. Improved proxy data combined with modeling efforts are required to effectively evaluate the relationship between CO2, paleogeography, and circulation during this cooler interval. We analyzed and compiled latest Cretaceous (79 - 66 Ma) ɛNd and δ13C records from seven bathyal (paleodepths 0.2 - 2 km) and eight abyssal (paleodepths > 2 km) sites in the North Atlantic. Data suggest local downwelling of Northern Component Water (NCW; ɛNd -9.5 and δ13C 1.7 ‰) is the primary source of intermediate/deep water masses in the basin. As this water flows southward and ages, δ13C values decrease and ɛNd values increase; however, additional chemical changes at several sites require mixing with contributions from several additional water masses. Lower ɛNd ( -10) and higher δ13C ( 1.9 ‰) values in the deep NW part of the basin indicate proximal contributions from a region draining old continental crust, potentially representing deep convection following opening of the Labrador Sea. In the deep NE Iberian Basin, higher ɛNd ( -7) and lower δ13C ( 0.8 ‰) during the Campanian suggest mixing with a Tethyan source (ɛNd -7 and δ13C 0.1 ‰) whose importance decreased with restriction of that gateway in the Maastrichtian. Data from bathyal sites suggest additional mixing. In the SE Cape Verde region, observed ɛNd variations from -10 in the Campanian to -13 and -12 in the early and late Maastrichtian, respectively, may record variations in output rates of Tethyan and/or NCW sources and Demerara Bottom Water (ɛNd -16), a proposed warm saline intermediate water mass formed in shallow, equatorial seas. Pacific inflow through the Caribbean gateway impacts intermediate sites at Blake Nose (ɛNd values -8), particularly the shallowest site during the late

  5. Water absorption in PEEK and PEI matrices. Contribution to the understanding of water-polar group interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courvoisier, E.; Bicaba, Y.; Colin, X.

    2016-05-01

    The water absorption in two aromatic linear polymers (PEEK and PEI) was studied between 10% and 90% RH at 30, 50 and 70°C. It was found that these polymers display classical Henry and Fick's behaviors. Moreover, they have very close values of equilibrium water concentration C∞ and water diffusivity D presumably because their respective polar groups establish molecular interactions of the same nature with water. This assumption was checked from a literature compilation of values of C∞ and D for a large variety of linear and tridimensional polymers containing a single type of polar group. It was then evidenced that almost all types of carbonyl group (in particular, those belonging to imides, amides and ketones) have the same molar contribution to water absorption, except those belonging to esters which are much less hydrophilic. Furthermore, hydroxyl and sulfone groups are much more hydrophilic than carbonyl groups so that their molar contribution is located on another master curve. On this basis, semi-empirical structure/water transport property relationships were proposed. It was found that C∞ increases exponentially with the concentration of polar groups (presumably because water is doubly bonded), but also with the intensity of their molecular interactions with water. In contrast, D is inversely proportional to C∞, which means that polar group-water interactions slow down the rate of water diffusion.

  6. Caffeine-water-polypeptide interaction in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghabi, Habib; Dhahbi, Mahmoud

    1999-04-01

    The interaction of caffeine monomer with the synthetic polypeptides polyasparagine (pAg) and polyaspartic acid (pAsp) was studied by UV spectrophotometry. The results show that different types of interactions are possible depending on the nature of polypeptide. The form of the complex was discussed.

  7. Interacting temperature and water activity modulate production of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    West African Journal of Applied Ecology ... Concentrations of DA were further modulated by interactions of temperature and aw. ... was at 0.98 aw and 35°C while the lowest was at 0.96 aw and 35°C. The abiotic interactions that supported biomass production appeared different from what was required for production of DA.

  8. Distribution and ventilation of water masses in the western Ross Sea inferred from CFC measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivaro, Paola; Ianni, Carmela; Magi, Emanuele; Massolo, Serena; Budillon, Giorgio; Smethie, William M.

    2015-03-01

    During the CLIMA Project (R.V. Italica cruise PNRA XVI, January-February 2001), hydrographic and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) observations were obtained, particularly in the western Ross Sea. Their distribution demonstrated water mass structure and ventilation processes in the investigated areas. In the surface waters (AASW) the CFC saturation levels varied spatially: CFCs were undersaturated in all the areas (range from 80 to 90%), with the exception of few stations sampled near Ross Island. In particular, the Terra Nova Bay polynya, where high salinity shelf water (HSSW) is produced, was a low-saturated surface area (74%) with respect to CFCs. Throughout most of the shelf area, the presence of modified circumpolar deep water (MCDW) was reflected in a mid-depth CFC concentration minima. Beneath the MCDW, CFC concentrations generally increased in the shelf waters towards the seafloor. We estimated that the corresponding CFCs saturation level in the source water region for HSSW was about 68-70%. Waters with high CFC concentrations were detected in the western Ross Sea on the down slope side of the Drygalski Trough, indicating that AABW was being supplied to the deep Antarctic Basin. Estimates of ventilation ages depend strongly on the saturation levels. We calculated ventilation ages using the saturation level calibrated tracer ratio, CFC11/CFC12. We deduced a mean residence time of the shelf waters of about 6-7 years between the western Ross Sea source and the shelf break.

  9. Mass transfer between waste canister and water seeping in rock fractures. Revisiting the Q-equivalent model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neretnieks, Ivars; Liu Longcheng; Moreno, Luis

    2010-03-01

    Models are presented for solute transport between seeping water in fractured rock and a copper canister embedded in a clay buffer. The migration through an undamaged buffer is by molecular diffusion only as the clay has so low hydraulic conductivity that water flow can be neglected. In the fractures and in any damaged zone seeping water carries the solutes to or from the vicinity of the buffer in the deposition hole. During the time the water passes the deposition hole molecular diffusion aids in the mass transfer of solutes between the water/buffer interface and the water at some distance from the interface. The residence time of the water and the contact area between the water and the buffer determine the rate of mass transfer between water and buffer. Simple analytical solutions are presented for the mass transfer in the seeping water. For complex migration geometries simplifying assumptions are made that allow analytical solutions to be obtained. The influence of variable apertures on the mass transfer is discussed and is shown to be moderate. The impact of damage to the rock around the deposition hole by spalling and by the presence of a cemented and fractured buffer is also explored. These phenomena lead to an increase of mass transfer between water and buffer. The overall rate of mass transfer between the bulk of the water and the canister is proportional to the overall concentration difference and inversely proportional to the sum of the mass transfer resistances. For visualization purposes the concept of equivalent flowrate is introduced. This entity can be thought as of the flowrate of water that will be depleted of its solute during the water passage past the deposition hole. The equivalent flowrate is also used to assess the release rate of radionuclides from a damaged canister. Examples are presented to illustrate how various factors influence the rate of mass transfer

  10. Analysis of bromate in drinking water using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry without sample pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Koji; Asami, Mari; Takei, Kanako; Akiba, Michihiro

    2011-01-01

    An analytical method for determining bromate in drinking water was developed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The (18)O-enriched bromate was used as an internal standard. The limit of quantification (LOQ) of bromate was 0.2 µg/L. The peak of bromate was separated from those of coexisting ions (i.e., chloride, nitrate and sulfate). The relative and absolute recoveries of bromate in two drinking water samples and in a synthesized ion solution (100 mg/L chloride, 10 mg N/L nitrate, and 100 mg/L sulfate) were 99-105 and 94-105%, respectively. Bromate concentrations in 11 drinking water samples determined by LC-MS/MS were water without sample pretreatment.

  11. Matrix isolation study of the interaction between water and the aromatic π-electron system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engdahl, A.; Nelander, B.

    1987-01-01

    The interaction of water (H 2 O, D 2 O, HDO) with toluene, the xylenes, pseudocumene, mesitylene, pentamethylbenzene, and hexamethylbenzene in argon matrices has been studied with infrared spectroscopy. Interaction energy estimates are given. The shapes of the observed absorption bands suggest that water executes a complicated motion relative to the ring plane of the aromatic hydrocarbon. The infrared spectrum of the benzene-water complex has been recorded as a function of temperature in argon, krypton, and nitrogen matrices

  12. A combined model of heat and mass transfer for the in situ extraction of volatile water from lunar regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, P.

    2018-05-01

    Chemical analysis of lunar soil samples often involves thermal processing to extract their volatile constituents, such as loosely adsorbed water. For the characterization of volatiles and their bonding mechanisms it is important to determine their desorption temperature. However, due to the low thermal diffusivity of lunar regolith, it might be difficult to reach a uniform heat distribution in a sample that is larger than only a few particles. Furthermore, the mass transport through such a sample is restricted, which might lead to a significant delay between actual desorption and measurable outgassing of volatiles from the sample. The entire volatiles extraction process depends on the dynamically changing heat and mass transfer within the sample, and is influenced by physical parameters such as porosity, tortuosity, gas density, temperature and pressure. To correctly interpret measurements of the extracted volatiles, it is important to understand the interaction between heat transfer, sorption, and gas transfer through the sample. The present paper discusses the molecular kinetics and mechanisms that are involved in the thermal extraction process and presents a combined parametrical computation model to simulate this process. The influence of water content on the gas diffusivity and thermal diffusivity is discussed and the issue of possible resorption of desorbed molecules within the sample is addressed. Based on the multi-physical computation model, a case study for the ProSPA instrument for in situ analysis of lunar volatiles is presented, which predicts relevant dynamic process parameters, such as gas pressure and process duration.

  13. INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP ON ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2005, EPA's Office of Water and Office of Research and Development collaborated to present eleven arsenic training events. The workshops provided in-depth treatment technology training to help those affected; state drinking water staff, design engineers, system owners and cert...

  14. Eastern South Pacific water mass geometry during the last glacial-interglacial transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pol-Holz, R.; Reyes, D.; Mohtadi, M.

    2012-12-01

    The eastern South Pacific is characterized today by a complex thermocline structure where large salinity and oxygen changes as a function of depth coexist. Surface waters from tropical origin float on top of subantarctic fresher water (the so-called 'shallow salinity minimum of the eastern south Pacific'), which in turn, flow above aged equatorial and deeper recently ventilated Antarctic Intermediate waters. Little is known however about the water mass geometry changes that could have occurred during the last glacial maximum boundary conditions (about 20,000 years before the present), despite this information being critical for the assessment of potential mechanisms that have been proposed as explanations for the deglacial onset of low oxygen conditions in the area and the atmospheric CO2 increase during the same time. Here we present benthic and planktonic foraminifera stable isotope and radiocarbon data from a set of sediment cores from the Chilean continental margin covering a large -yet still limited- geographical area and depth range. Sedimentations rates were relatively high (>10 cm/kyr) precluding major caveats from bioturbation in all of our archives. The distribution of δ13C of ΣCO2 shows the presence of a very depleted (δ13C < -1‰ V-PDB) water mass overlaying more recently ventilated waters at intermediate depths as indicated by thermocline foraminifer dwellers being more depleted in 13C than the benthic species. The origin of this depleted end-member is probably upwelling from the Southern Ocean as expressed by the radiocarbon content and the large reservoir effect associated with the last glacial maximum and the beginning of the deglaciation along the margin. Our data suggest that the Tropical waters that today bath the lower latitude cores was displaced by surface waters of southern origin and therefore in line with the evidence of a latitudinal shift of the frontal systems.

  15. Integrated modeling of groundwater–surface water interactions in a tile-drained agricultural field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosemeijer, J.C.; Velde, van der Y.; McLaren, R.G.; Geer, van F.C.; Broers, H.P.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of groundwater–surface water interaction is needed to evaluate and simulate water and solute transport in catchments. However, direct measurements of the contributions of different flow routes from specific surfaces within a catchment toward the surface water are rarely

  16. Water mass distribution in Fram Strait and over the Yermak Plateau in summer 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Rudels

    Full Text Available The water mass distribution in northern Fram Strait and over the Yermak Plateau in summer 1997 is described using CTD data from two cruises in the area. The West Spitsbergen Current was found to split, one part recirculated towards the west, while the other part, on entering the Arctic Ocean separated into two branches. The main inflow of Atlantic Water followed the Svalbard continental slope eastward, while a second, narrower, branch stayed west and north of the Yermak Plateau. The water column above the southeastern flank of the Yermak Plateau was distinctly colder and less saline than the two inflow branches. Immediately west of the outer inflow branch comparatively high temperatures in the Atlantic Layer suggested that a part of the extraordinarily warm Atlantic Water, observed in the boundary current in the Eurasian Basin in the early 1990s, was now returning, within the Eurasian Basin, toward Fram Strait. The upper layer west of the Yermak Plateau was cold, deep and comparably saline, similar to what has recently been observed in the interior Eurasian Basin. Closer to the Greenland continental slope the salinity of the upper layer became much lower, and the temperature maximum of the Atlantic Layer was occasionally below 
    0.5 °C, indicating water masses mainly derived from the Canadian Basin. This implies that the warm pulse of Atlantic Water had not yet made a complete circuit around the Arctic Ocean. The Atlantic Water of the West Spitsbergen Current recirculating within the strait did not extend as far towards Greenland as in the 1980s, leaving a broader passage for waters from the Atlantic and intermediate layers, exiting the Arctic Ocean. A possible interpretation is that the circulation pattern alternates between a strong recirculation of the West Spitsbergen Current in the strait, and a larger exchange of Atlantic Water between the Nordic Seas and the inner parts of the Arctic Ocean.

    Key words: Oceanography: general

  17. Do interacting coronal mass ejections play a role in solar energetic particle events?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Vourlidas, A.

    2014-01-01

    Gradual solar energetic (E > 10 MeV) particle (SEP) events are produced in shocks driven by fast and wide coronal mass ejections (CMEs). With a set of western hemisphere 20 MeV SEP events, we test the possibility that SEP peak intensities, Ip, are enhanced by interactions of their associated CMEs with preceding CMEs (preCMEs) launched during the previous 12 hr. Among SEP events with no, 1, or 2 or more (2+) preCMEs, we find enhanced Ip for the groups with preCMEs, but no differences in TO+TR, the time from CME launch to SEP onset and the time from onset to SEP half-peak Ip. Neither the timings of the preCMEs relative to their associated CMEs nor the preCME widths W pre , speeds V pre , or numbers correlate with the SEP Ip values. The 20 MeV Ip of all the preCME groups correlate with the 2 MeV proton background intensities, consistent with a general correlation with possible seed particle populations. Furthermore, the fraction of CMEs with preCMEs also increases with the 2 MeV proton background intensities. This implies that the higher SEP Ip values with preCMEs may not be due primarily to CME interactions, such as the 'twin-CME' scenario, but are explained by a general increase of both background seed particles and more frequent CMEs during times of higher solar activity. This explanation is not supported by our analysis of 2 MeV proton backgrounds in two earlier preCME studies of SEP events, so the relevance of CME interactions for larger SEP event intensities remains unclear.

  18. Emergence of the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation from dark matter-baryon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famaey, Benoit; Khoury, Justin; Penco, Riccardo

    2018-03-01

    The observed tightness of the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation (MDAR) poses a fine-tuning challenge to current models of galaxy formation. We propose that this relation could arise from collisional interactions between baryons and dark matter (DM) particles, without the need for modification of gravity or ad hoc feedback processes. We assume that these interactions satisfy the following three conditions: (i) the relaxation time of DM particles is comparable to the dynamical time in disk galaxies; (ii) DM exchanges energy with baryons due to elastic collisions; (iii) the product between the baryon-DM cross section and the typical energy exchanged in a collision is inversely proportional to the DM number density. As a proof of principle, we present an example of a particle physics model that gives a DM-baryon cross section with the desired density and velocity dependence. For consistency with direct detection constraints, our DM particles must be either very light (m ll mb) or very heavy (mgg mb), corresponding respectively to heating and cooling of DM by baryons. In both cases, our mechanism applies and an equilibrium configuration can in principle be reached. In this exploratory paper, we focus on the heavy DM/cooling case because it is technically simpler, since the average energy exchanged turns out to be approximately constant throughout galaxies. Under these assumptions, we find that rotationally-supported disk galaxies could naturally settle to equilibrium configurations satisfying a MDAR at all radii without invoking finely tuned feedback processes. We also discuss issues related to the small scale clumpiness of baryons, as well as predictions for pressure-supported systems. We argue in particular that galaxy clusters do not follow the MDAR despite being DM-dominated because they have not reached their equilibrium configuration. Finally, we revisit existing phenomenological, astrophysical and cosmological constraints on baryon-DM interactions in light

  19. Mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea as revealed by ARGO floats

    OpenAIRE

    Carton, X.; L'Hegaret, P.; Baraille, R.

    2012-01-01

    By analysing ARGO float data over the last four years, a few aspects of the mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea are described.

    The Red Sea Outflow Water (RSOW) is concentrated in the Southwestern Gulf of Aden, in particular when a cyclonic gyre predominates in this region. Salinities of 36.5 and temperatures of 16 °C are found in this area at depths between 600 and 1000 m. RSOW is more dilute in the eastern part of the Gulf, where intense and relative...

  20. The Interaction between Zein and Lecithin in Ethanol-Water Solution and Characterization of Zein–Lecithin Composite Colloidal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lei; Sun, Cuixia; Wang, Di; Gao, Yanxiang

    2016-01-01

    Lecithin, a naturally small molecular surfactant, which is widely used in the food industry, can delay aging, enhance memory, prevent and treat diabetes. The interaction between zein and soy lecithin with different mass ratios (20:1, 10:1, 5:1, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2) in ethanol-water solution and characterisation of zein and lecithin composite colloidal nanoparticles prepared by antisolvent co-precipitation method were investigated. The mean size of zein-lecithin composite colloidal nanoparticles was firstly increased with the rise of lecithin concentration and then siginificantly decreased. The nanoparticles at the zein to lecithin mass ratio of 5:1 had the largest particle size (263 nm), indicating that zein and lecithin formed composite colloidal nanoparticles, which might aggregate due to the enhanced interaction at a higher proportion of lecithin. Continuing to increase lecithin concentration, the zein-lecithin nanoparticles possibly formed a reverse micelle-like or a vesicle-like structure with zein in the core, which prevented the formation of nanoparticle aggregates and decreased the size of composite nanoparticles. The presence of lecithin significantly reduced the ζ-potential of zein-lecithin composite colloidal nanoparticles. The interaction between zein and lecithin enhanced the intensity of the fluorescence emission of zein in ethanol-water solution. The secondary structure of zein was also changed by the addition of lecithin. Differential scanning calorimetry thermograms revealed that the thermal stability of zein-lecithin nanoparticles was enhanced with the rise of lecithin level. The composite nanoparticles were relatively stable to elevated ionic strengths. Possible interaction mechanism between zein and lecithin was proposed. These findings would help further understand the theory of the interaction between the alcohol soluble protein and the natural small molecular surfactant. The composite colloidal nanoparticles formed in this study can

  1. The Interaction between Zein and Lecithin in Ethanol-Water Solution and Characterization of Zein-Lecithin Composite Colloidal Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lei; Sun, Cuixia; Wang, Di; Gao, Yanxiang

    2016-01-01

    Lecithin, a naturally small molecular surfactant, which is widely used in the food industry, can delay aging, enhance memory, prevent and treat diabetes. The interaction between zein and soy lecithin with different mass ratios (20:1, 10:1, 5:1, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2) in ethanol-water solution and characterisation of zein and lecithin composite colloidal nanoparticles prepared by antisolvent co-precipitation method were investigated. The mean size of zein-lecithin composite colloidal nanoparticles was firstly increased with the rise of lecithin concentration and then siginificantly decreased. The nanoparticles at the zein to lecithin mass ratio of 5:1 had the largest particle size (263 nm), indicating that zein and lecithin formed composite colloidal nanoparticles, which might aggregate due to the enhanced interaction at a higher proportion of lecithin. Continuing to increase lecithin concentration, the zein-lecithin nanoparticles possibly formed a reverse micelle-like or a vesicle-like structure with zein in the core, which prevented the formation of nanoparticle aggregates and decreased the size of composite nanoparticles. The presence of lecithin significantly reduced the ζ-potential of zein-lecithin composite colloidal nanoparticles. The interaction between zein and lecithin enhanced the intensity of the fluorescence emission of zein in ethanol-water solution. The secondary structure of zein was also changed by the addition of lecithin. Differential scanning calorimetry thermograms revealed that the thermal stability of zein-lecithin nanoparticles was enhanced with the rise of lecithin level. The composite nanoparticles were relatively stable to elevated ionic strengths. Possible interaction mechanism between zein and lecithin was proposed. These findings would help further understand the theory of the interaction between the alcohol soluble protein and the natural small molecular surfactant. The composite colloidal nanoparticles formed in this study can

  2. Study of the interaction of liquid with the surface of mass standards of high accuracy stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Varas, Lautaro; Castro, Claudio S.C.; Cacais, Fabio L.; Pires, Manoel J. M.; Loayza Mendoza, Victor M.

    2011-01-01

    The long term stability of mass standards depends on the interaction between the surface and environment molecules. From this point of view, a study was investigated of the effect on stainless steel surfaces by liquids frequently used in hydrostatic weighing (FC40) and in cleaning procedures of mass standards (isopropyl alcohol). Firstly, mass weighing difference was measured as function of time with a gravimetric method. Additionally, stainless steel samples were analyzed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The standard used for the gravimetric mass difference determination was immersed in FC40. The samples analyzed by XPS were previously immersed in both FC40 and isopropyl alcohol. Mass differences were obtained with an uncertainty of 1 μg when FC40 was used. Preliminary results have suggested that FC40 is not chemically bound to stainless steel surfaces and the mass gain was due to physisorbed molecules on the surface. (author) [es

  3. Hydrogen absorption mechanisms and hydrogen interactions - defects: implications to stress corrosion of nickel based alloys in pressurized water reactors primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jambon, F.

    2012-01-01

    Since the late 1960's, a special form of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been identified for Alloy 600 exposed to pressurized water reactors (PWR) primary water: intergranular cracks develop during the alloy exposure, leading, progressively, to the complete ruin of the structure, and to its replacement. The main goal of this study is therefore to evaluate in which proportions the hydrogen absorbed by the alloy during its exposure to the primary medium can be responsible for SCC crack initiation and propagation. This study is aimed at better understanding of the hydrogen absorption mechanism when a metallic surface is exposed to a passivating PWR primary medium. A second objective is to characterize the interactions of the absorbed hydrogen with the structural defects of the alloy (dislocations, vacancies...) and evaluate to what extent these interactions can have an embrittling effect in relation with SCC phenomenon. Alloy 600-like single-crystals were exposed to a simulated PWR medium where the hydrogen atoms of water or of the pressuring hydrogen gas were isotopically substituted with deuterium, used as a tracer. Secondary ion mass spectrometry depth-profiling of deuterium was performed to characterize the deuterium absorption and localization in the passivated alloy. The results show that the hydrogen absorption during the exposure of the alloy to primary water is associated with the water molecules dissociation during the oxide film build-up. In an other series of experiments, structural defects were created in recrystallized samples, and finely characterized by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, before or after the introduction of cathodic hydrogen. These analyses exhibited a strong hydrogen/defects interaction, evidenced by their structural reorganization under hydrogenation (coalescence, migrations). However, thermal desorption spectroscopy analyses indicated that these interactions are transitory, and dependent on

  4. Distribution of oxygen isotopes in the water masses of Drake Passage and the South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Michael P.; Grose, Katie E.; McDonagh, Elaine L.; Heywood, Karen J.; Frew, Russell D.; Dennis, Paul F.

    1999-09-01

    Measurements of the ratio of stable isotopes of oxygen (18O and 16O) from samples collected on World Ocean Circulation Experiment sections SR1b (eastern Drake Passage) and A11 (Punta Arenas to Cape Town) are used, together with hydrographic data, to deduce information about the formation and variability of South Atlantic and Southern Ocean water masses. The Drake Passage surface waters south of the Polar Front (PF) are isotopically light (δ18O around -0.4‰) owing to the influence of meteoric waters. The salinity and δ18O of the A11 surface waters yield an apparent freshwater end-member which is much isotopically lighter than the local precipitation, thus advection of these waters from farther south dominates over local effects in determining the surface water properties. The Drake Passage section shows unusual proximity of the two main fronts of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (the PF and Subantarctic Front (SAF)), and we observe cold, fresh, and isotopically light water derived from the temperature-minimum Winter Water at the SAF. This water is of the correct density to freshen the intermediate water north of the SAF and thus play a role in the formation of the comparatively fresh Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) of the South Atlantic. This confirms the role of Antarctic water in forming the South Atlantic variety of AAIW. Across the A11 section the oxygen isotope and salinity data at the AAIW core show very similar traces, with waters in the Malvinas Current loop showing lowest values of both. At the eastern boundary of the South Atlantic, the input of Red Sea Water from east of South Africa is observed via the presence of anomalously isotopically heavy AAIW. We deduce potentially significant temporal variability in the isotopic composition of Weddell Sea Deep Water (WSDW) by comparing the Drake Passage data to earlier data covering the outflow of the Weddell Sea. The A11 data show WSDW consistent with such variability, indicating that its effects could

  5. Investigating the Interannual Variability of the Circulation and Water Mass Formation in the Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofianos, S. S.; Papadopoulos, V. P.; Denaxa, D.; Abualnaja, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The interannual variability of the circulation and water mass formation in the Red Sea is investigated with the use of a numerical model and the combination of satellite and in-situ observations. The response of Red Sea to the large-scale variability of atmospheric forcing is studied through a 30-years simulation experiment, using MICOM model. The modeling results demonstrate significant trends and variability that are mainly located in the central and northern parts of the basin. On the other hand, the exchange pattern between the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean at the strait of Bab el Mandeb presents very weak interannual variability. The results verify the regularity of the water mass formation processes in the northern Red Sea but also show significant variability of the circulation and thermohaline conditions in the areas of formation. Enhanced water mass formation conditions are observed during specific years of the simulation (approximately five years apart). Analysis of recent warm and cold events in the northernmost part of the basin, based on a combination of atmospheric reanalysis results and oceanic satellite and in-situ observations, shows the importance of the cyclonic gyre that is prevailing in this part of the basin. This gyre can effectively influence the sea surface temperature (SST) and intensify or mitigate the winter effect of the atmospheric forcing. Upwelling induced by persistent periods of the gyre functioning drops the SST over the northernmost part of the Red Sea and can produce colder than normal winter SST even without extreme atmospheric forcing. These mechanisms are crucial for the formation of intermediate and deep water masses in the Red Sea and the strength of the subsequent thermohaline cells.

  6. Thermal analysis of mass concrete embedded with double-layer staggered heterogeneous cooling water pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jian; Hu Yu; Zuo Zheng; Jin Feng; Li Qingbin

    2012-01-01

    Removal of hydration heat from mass concrete during construction is important for the quality and safety of concrete structures. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element program for thermal analysis of mass concrete embedded with double-layer staggered heterogeneous cooling water pipes was developed based on the equivalent equation of heat conduction including the effect of cooling water pipes and hydration heat of concrete. The cooling function of the double-layer staggered heterogeneous cooling pipes in a concrete slab was derived from the principle of equivalent cooling. To improve the applicability and precision of the equivalent heat conduction equation under small flow, the cooling function was revised according to its monotonicity and empirical formulas of single-phase forced-convection heat transfer in tube flow. Considering heat hydration of concrete at later age, a double exponential function was proposed to fit the adiabatic temperature rise curve of concrete. Subsequently, the temperature variation of concrete was obtained, and the outlet temperature of cooling water was estimated through the energy conservation principle. Comparing calculated results with actual measured data from a monolith of an arch dam in China, the numerical model was proven to be effective in sufficiently simulating accurate temperature variations of mass concrete. - Highlights: ► Three-dimensional program is developed to model temperature history of mass concrete. ► Massive concrete is embedded with double-layer heterogeneous cooling pipes. ► Double exponential function is proposed to fit the adiabatic temperature rise curve. ► Outlet temperature of cooling water is estimated. ► A comparison is made between the calculated and measured data.

  7. Interactions between cement grouts and sulphate bearing ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, P.L.; Duerden, S.L.; Atkins, K.M.; Majumdar, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    The physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of mixtures of Ordinary Portland cement and blastfurnace slag or pulverized fuel ash, exposed to a sulphate-bearing ground water at different temperatures and pressures, were investigated in order to assess the long term durability of cements for encapsulating radioactive waste and backfilling a repository. The effect of the ground water on the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the cements is minimal. Calcite and C-S-H are present in all the samples and are durable throughout the test. Dimensional changes in the cements during setting and curing may cause weaknesses in the materials which may increase the effects of a percolating ground water. (author)

  8. Numerical study of coupled heat and mass transfer in geothermal water cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourouni, K.; Bassem, M.M.; Chaibi, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Cross flow mechanical cooling towers, widely spreads all over the south region of Tunisia are used for cooling geothermal water for agriculture and domestic ends. These towers are sized empirically and present several problems in regard to operation and electrical energy consumption. This work aims to study the thermal behaviour of this type of cooling towers through a developed mathematical model considering the variation of the water mass flow rate inside the tower. The analysis of the water and air temperatures distribution along the cooling tower had underlined the negative convection phenomenon at a certain height of the tower. This analysis has shown also that the difference in water temperature between the inlet and the outlet of the tower is much higher than the one of air due to the dominance of the evaporative potential compared to the convective one. In addition, the variations of the air humidity along the cooling tower and the quantity of evaporated water have been investigated. The loss of water by evaporation is found to be 5.1% of the total quantity of water feeding the cooling tower. Interesting future prospects are expected for validation of the developed model to optimize the operating of the cooling tower

  9. Pellet-clad interaction in water reactor fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this seminar is was to draw up a comprehensive picture of the pellet clad interaction and its impact on the fuel rod. This document is a detailed abstract of the papers presented during the following five sessions: industrial goals, fuel material behaviour in PCI situation, cladding behaviour relevant to PCI, in pile rod behaviour and modelling of the mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding. (A.L.B.)

  10. Pellet-clad interaction in water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this seminar is was to draw up a comprehensive picture of the pellet clad interaction and its impact on the fuel rod. This document is a detailed abstract of the papers presented during the following five sessions: industrial goals, fuel material behaviour in PCI situation, cladding behaviour relevant to PCI, in pile rod behaviour and modelling of the mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding. (A.L.B.)

  11. Air-sea fluxes and satellite-based estimation of water masses formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabia, Roberto; Klockmann, Marlene; Fernandez-Prieto, Diego; Donlon, Craig

    2015-04-01

    Recent work linking satellite-based measurements of sea surface salinity (SSS) and sea surface temperature (SST) with traditional physical oceanography has demonstrated the capability of generating routinely satellite-derived surface T-S diagrams [1] and analyze the distribution/dynamics of SSS and its relative surface density with respect to in-situ measurements. Even more recently [2,3], this framework has been extended by exploiting these T-S diagrams as a diagnostic tool to derive water masses formation rates and areas. A water mass describes a water body with physical properties distinct from the surrounding water, formed at the ocean surface under specific conditions which determine its temperature and salinity. The SST and SSS (and thus also density) at the ocean surface are largely determined by fluxes of heat and freshwater. The surface density flux is a function of the latter two and describes the change of the density of seawater at the surface. To obtain observations of water mass formation is of great interest, since they serve as indirect observations of the thermo-haline circulation. The SSS data which has become available through the SMOS [4] and Aquarius [5] satellite missions will provide the possibility of studying also the effect of temporally-varying SSS fields on water mass formation. In the present study, the formation of water masses as a function of SST and SSS is derived from the surface density flux by integrating the latter over a specific area and time period in bins of SST and SSS and then taking the derivative of the total density flux with respect to density. This study presents a test case using SMOS SSS, OSTIA SST, as well as Argo ISAS SST and SSS for comparison, heat fluxes from the NOCS Surface Flux Data Set v2.0, OAFlux evaporation and CMORPH precipitation. The study area, initially referred to the North Atlantic, is extended over two additional ocean basins and the study period covers the 2011-2012 timeframe. Yearly, seasonal

  12. Infrared reflection absorption study of water interaction with H ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Silicon crystal has diamond lattice structure with sp3 hybridization. The surfaces .... using ceramic heater (pyrolytic graphite/pyrolytic boron nitride). The sample ... considerable structural changes due to large scale decomposition of water and ...

  13. Modeling UTLS water vapor: Transport/Chemistry interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulstad, Line

    2005-01-01

    This thesis was initially meant to be a study on the impact on chemistry and climate from UTLS water vapor. However, the complexity of the UTLS water vapor and its recent changes turned out to be a challenge by it self. In the light of this, the overall motivation for the thesis became to study the processes controlling UTLS water vapor and its changes. Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas, involved in important climate feedback loops. Thus, a good understanding of the chemical and dynamical behavior of water vapor in the atmosphere is crucial for understanding the climate changes in the last century. Additionally, parts of the work was motivated by the development of a coupled climate chemistry model based on the CAM3 model coupled with the Chemical Transport Model Oslo CTM2. The future work will be concentrated on the UTLS water vapor impact on chemistry and climate. We are currently studying long term trends in UTLS water vapor, focusing on identification of the different processes involved in the determination of such trends. The study is based on natural as well as anthropogenic climate forcings. The ongoing work on the development of a coupled climate chemistry model will continue within our group, in collaboration with Prof. Wei-Chyung Wang at the State University of New York, Albany. Valuable contacts with observational groups are established during the work on this thesis. These collaborations will be continued focusing on continuous model validation, as well as identification of trends and new features in UTLS water vapor, and other tracers in this region. (Author)

  14. Direct sampling of chemical weapons in water by photoionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syage, Jack A; Cai, Sheng-Suan; Li, Jianwei; Evans, Matthew D

    2006-05-01

    The vulnerability of water supplies to toxic contamination calls for fast and effective means for screening water samples for multiple threats. We describe the use of photoionization (PI) mass spectrometry (MS) for high-speed, high-throughput screening and molecular identification of chemical weapons (CW) threats and other hazardous compounds. The screening technology can detect a wide range of compounds at subacute concentrations with no sample preparation and a sampling cycle time of approximately 45 s. The technology was tested with CW agents VX, GA, GB, GD, GF, HD, HN1, and HN3, in addition to riot agents and precursors. All are sensitively detected and give simple PI mass spectra dominated by the parent ion. The target application of the PI MS method is as a routine, real-time early warning system for CW agents and other hazardous compounds in air and in water. In this work, we also present comprehensive measurements for water analysis and report on the system detection limits, linearity, quantitation accuracy, and false positive (FP) and false negative rates for concentrations at subacute levels. The latter data are presented in the form of receiver operating characteristic curves of the form of detection probability P(D) versus FP probability P(FP). These measurements were made using the CW surrogate compounds, DMMP, DEMP, DEEP, and DIMP. Method detection limits (3sigma) obtained using a capillary injection method yielded 1, 6, 3, and 2 ng/mL, respectively. These results were obtained using 1-microL injections of water samples without any preparation, corresponding to mass detection limits of 1, 6, 3, and 2 pg, respectively. The linear range was about 3-4 decades and the dynamic range about 4-5 decades. The relative standard deviations were generally <10% at CW subacute concentrations levels.

  15. Detailed evaluation of the natural circulation mass flow rate of water propelled by using an air injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Rae-Joon; Ha, Kwang-Soon; Kim, Jae-Cheol; Hong, Seong-Wan; Kim, Sang-Baik

    2008-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) air-water two-phase natural circulation flow in the thermohydraulic evaluation of reactor cooling mechanism by external self-induced flow - one-dimensional' (THERMES-1D) experiment has been verified and evaluated by using the RELAP5/MOD3 computer code. Experimental results on the 1D natural circulation mass flow rate of water propelled by using an air injection have been evaluated in detail. The RELAP5 results have shown that an increase in the air injection rate to 50% of the total heat flux leads to an increase in the water circulation mass flow rate. However, an increase in the air injection rate from 50 to 100% does not affect the water circulation mass flow rate, because of the inlet area condition. As the height increases in the air injection part, the void fraction increases. However, the void fraction in the upper part of the air injector maintains a constant value. An increase in the air injection mass flow rate leads to an increase in the local void fraction, but it has no influence on the local pressure. An increase in the coolant inlet area leads to an increase in the water circulation mass flow rate. However, the water outlet area does not have an influence on the water circulation mass flow rate. As the coolant outlet moves to a lower position, the water circulation mass flow rate decreases. (author)

  16. Rapid quantification of underivatized amino acids in plasma by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) coupled with tandem mass-spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinsen, Hubertus C M T; Schiebergen-Bronkhorst, B G M; Roeleveld, M W; Jans, J J M; de Sain-van der Velden, M G M; Visser, G; van Hasselt, P M; Verhoeven-Duif, N M

    2016-09-01

    Amino acidopathies are a class of inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) that can be diagnosed by analysis of amino acids (AA) in plasma. Current strategies for AA analysis include cation exchange HPLC with post-column ninhydrin derivatization, GC-MS, and LC-MS/MS-related methods. Major drawbacks of the current methods are time-consuming procedures, derivative problems, problems with retention, and MS-sensitivity. The use of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) columns is an ideal separation mode for hydrophilic compounds like AA. Here we report a HILIC-method for analysis of 36 underivatized AA in plasma to detect defects in AA metabolism that overcomes the major drawbacks of other methods. A rapid, sensitive, and specific method was developed for the analysis of AA in plasma without derivatization using HILIC coupled with tandem mass-spectrometry (Xevo TQ, Waters). Excellent separation of 36 AA (24 quantitative/12 qualitative) in plasma was achieved on an Acquity BEH Amide column (2.1×100 mm, 1.7 μm) in a single MS run of 18 min. Plasma of patients with a known IEM in AA metabolism was analyzed and all patients were correctly identified. The reported method analyzes 36 AA in plasma within 18 min and provides baseline separation of isomeric AA such as leucine and isoleucine. No separation was obtained for isoleucine and allo-isoleucine. The method is applicable to study defects in AA metabolism in plasma.

  17. [Determination of hydroxyproline in liver tissue by hydrophilic interaction chromatography-quadrupole/electrostatic field orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Qi, Shenglan; Xu, Ying; Xiao, Zhun; Fu, Yadong; Chen, Jiamei; Yang, Tao; Liu, Ping

    2017-12-08

    A method for the determination of hydroxyproline (Hyp) in liver tissue of mice by hydrophilic interaction chromatography-quadrupole/electrostatic field orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry (HILIC-HRMS) was developed. The liver tissue samples of normal mice and liver fibrosis mice induced by carbon tetrachloride were hydrolyzed by concentrated hydrochloric acid. After filtrated and diluted by solution, the diluent was separated on an Hypersil GOLD HILIC column (100 mm×2.1 mm, 3 μm). Water-acetonitrile (28:72, v/v)were used as the mobile phases with isocratic elution. Finally, the target analytes were detected in positive model by HRMS equipped with an electrospray ionization source. The linear range of hydroxyproline was from 0.78 to 100.00 μg/L with the correlation coefficient ( R 2 ) of 0.9983. The limit of quantification was 0.78 μg/L. By detecting the spiked samples, the recoveries were in the range of 97.4%-100.9% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) between 1.4% and 2.0%. In addition, comparison of the measurement results by this method and the chloramine T method was proceeded. It was found that the linear correlation between the two methods was very good, and the Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.927. And this method had simpler operation procedure and higher accuracy than chloramine T method. This method can be used for the quick determination of hydroxyproline in liver tissue samples.

  18. On the Origin of Microheterogeneity : Mass Spectrometric Studies of Acetonitrile-Water and Dimethyl Sulfoxide-Water Binary Mixtures (Part 2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shin, Dong Nam; Wijnen, Jan W.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.; Wakisaka, Akihiro

    2002-01-01

    The microscopic structures of acetonitrile-water and DMSO-water binary mixed solvents and their influence on the solvation for solutes (some alcohols and phenol) have been studied on the basis of the cluster structures observed through a specially designed mass spectrometer. In acetonitrile-water

  19. Fermionic particles with positron-dependent mass in the presence of inversely quadratic Yukawa potential and tensor interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahar, M.K.; Yasuk, F.

    2013-01-01

    Approximate solutions of the Dirac equation with positron-dependent mass are presented for the inversely quadratic Yukawa potential and Coulomb-like tensor interaction by using the asymptotic iteration method. The energy eigenvalues and the corresponding normalized eigenfunctions are obtained in the case of positron-dependent mass and arbitrary spin-orbit quantum number k state and approximation on the spin-orbit coupling term. (author)

  20. Origin and evolution of formation water at the Jujo-Tecominoacan oil reservoir, Gulf of Mexico. Part 1: Chemical evolution and water-rock interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkle, Peter, E-mail: birkle@iie.org.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), Gerencia de Geotermia, Av. Reforma 113, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62490 (Mexico); Garcia, Bernardo Martinez; Milland Padron, Carlos M. [PEMEX Exploracion y Produccion, Region Sur, Activo Integral Bellota-Jujo, Diseno de Explotacion, Cardenas, Tabasco (Mexico)

    2009-04-15

    The origin and evolution of formation water from Upper Jurassic to Upper Cretaceous mudstone-packstone-dolomite host rocks at the Jujo-Tecominoacan oil reservoir, located onshore in SE-Mexico at a depth from 5200 to 6200 m.b.s.l., have been investigated, using detailed water geochemistry from 12 producer wells and six closed wells, and related host rock mineralogy. Saline waters of Cl-Na type with total dissolved solids from 10 to 23 g/L are chemically distinct from hypersaline Cl-Ca-Na and Cl-Na-Ca type waters with TDS between 181 and 385 g/L. Bromine/Cl and Br/Na ratios suggest the subaerial evaporation of seawater beyond halite precipitation to explain the extreme hypersaline components, while less saline samples were formed by mixing of high salinity end members with surface-derived, low salinity water components. The dissolution of evaporites from adjacent salt domes has little impact on present formation water composition. Geochemical simulations with Harvie-M{phi}ller-Weare and PHRQPITZ thermodynamic data sets suggest secondary fluid enrichment in Ca, HCO{sub 3} and Sr by water-rock interaction. The volumetric mass balance between Ca enrichment and Mg depletion confirms dolomitization as the major alteration process. Potassium/Cl ratios below evaporation trajectory are attributed to minor precipitation of K feldspar and illitization without evidence for albitization at the Jujo-Tecominoacan reservoir. The abundance of secondary dolomite, illite and pyrite in drilling cores from reservoir host rock reconfirms the observed water-rock exchange processes. Sulfate concentrations are controlled by anhydrite solubility as indicated by positive SI-values, although anhydrite deposition is limited throughout the lithological reservoir column. The chemical variety of produced water at the Jujo-Tecominoacan oil field is related to a sequence of primary and secondary processes, including infiltration of evaporated seawater and original meteoric fluids, the subsequent

  1. Origin and evolution of formation water at the Jujo-Tecominoacan oil reservoir, Gulf of Mexico. Part 1: Chemical evolution and water-rock interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkle, Peter; Garcia, Bernardo Martinez; Milland Padron, Carlos M.

    2009-01-01

    The origin and evolution of formation water from Upper Jurassic to Upper Cretaceous mudstone-packstone-dolomite host rocks at the Jujo-Tecominoacan oil reservoir, located onshore in SE-Mexico at a depth from 5200 to 6200 m.b.s.l., have been investigated, using detailed water geochemistry from 12 producer wells and six closed wells, and related host rock mineralogy. Saline waters of Cl-Na type with total dissolved solids from 10 to 23 g/L are chemically distinct from hypersaline Cl-Ca-Na and Cl-Na-Ca type waters with TDS between 181 and 385 g/L. Bromine/Cl and Br/Na ratios suggest the subaerial evaporation of seawater beyond halite precipitation to explain the extreme hypersaline components, while less saline samples were formed by mixing of high salinity end members with surface-derived, low salinity water components. The dissolution of evaporites from adjacent salt domes has little impact on present formation water composition. Geochemical simulations with Harvie-Mφller-Weare and PHRQPITZ thermodynamic data sets suggest secondary fluid enrichment in Ca, HCO 3 and Sr by water-rock interaction. The volumetric mass balance between Ca enrichment and Mg depletion confirms dolomitization as the major alteration process. Potassium/Cl ratios below evaporation trajectory are attributed to minor precipitation of K feldspar and illitization without evidence for albitization at the Jujo-Tecominoacan reservoir. The abundance of secondary dolomite, illite and pyrite in drilling cores from reservoir host rock reconfirms the observed water-rock exchange processes. Sulfate concentrations are controlled by anhydrite solubility as indicated by positive SI-values, although anhydrite deposition is limited throughout the lithological reservoir column. The chemical variety of produced water at the Jujo-Tecominoacan oil field is related to a sequence of primary and secondary processes, including infiltration of evaporated seawater and original meteoric fluids, the subsequent mixing of

  2. Special features of high-speed interaction of supercavitating solids in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishchenko, Aleksandr, E-mail: ichan@niipmm.tsu.ru; Afanas’eva, Svetlana, E-mail: s.a.afanasyeva@mail.ru; Burkin, Viktor, E-mail: v.v.burkin@mail.ru; Diachkovskii, Aleksei, E-mail: lex-okha@mail.ru; Korolkov, Leonid, E-mail: dmm1@sibmail.com; Moiseev, Dmitrii; Khabibullin, Marat, E-mail: lenmar07@rambler.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36, Lenin Ave., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Akinshin, Ruslan, E-mail: rakinshin@yandex.ru; Borisenkov, Igor, E-mail: rakinshin@yandex.ru [Subdivision of applied problems under the RAS presidium 3, Gubkin St, Moscow, 117971 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Special features of material behavior of a supercavitating projectile are investigated at various initial velocities of entering water on the basis of the developed stress-strain state model with possibility of destruction of solids when moving in water and interacting with various underwater barriers with the use of consistent methodological approach of mechanics of continuous media. The calculation-experimental method was used to study the modes of motion of supercavitating projectiles at sub- and supersonic velocities in water medium after acceleration in the barrelled accelerator, as well as their interaction with barriers. Issues of stabilization of the supercavitating projectile on the initial flight path in water were studied. Microphotographs of state of solids made of various materials, before and after interaction with water, at subsonic and supersonic velocities were presented. Supersonic velocity of the supercavitating projectile motion in water of 1590 m/s was recorded.

  3. Special features of high-speed interaction of supercavitating solids in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishchenko, Aleksandr; Afanas’eva, Svetlana; Burkin, Viktor; Diachkovskii, Aleksei; Korolkov, Leonid; Moiseev, Dmitrii; Khabibullin, Marat; Akinshin, Ruslan; Borisenkov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Special features of material behavior of a supercavitating projectile are investigated at various initial velocities of entering water on the basis of the developed stress-strain state model with possibility of destruction of solids when moving in water and interacting with various underwater barriers with the use of consistent methodological approach of mechanics of continuous media. The calculation-experimental method was used to study the modes of motion of supercavitating projectiles at sub- and supersonic velocities in water medium after acceleration in the barrelled accelerator, as well as their interaction with barriers. Issues of stabilization of the supercavitating projectile on the initial flight path in water were studied. Microphotographs of state of solids made of various materials, before and after interaction with water, at subsonic and supersonic velocities were presented. Supersonic velocity of the supercavitating projectile motion in water of 1590 m/s was recorded

  4. Fingerprinting North Atlantic water masses near Iceland using Nd-isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Norbert [Institut fuer Umweltphysik, INF229, Heidelberg (Germany); Waldner, Astrid [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Montagna, Paolo [CNR - ISMAR, Bologna (Italy); Colin, Christophe [IDES, Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Wu, Qiong [State Key Laboratory, Tongji University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-07-01

    The radiogenic {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratio of seawater is a valuable tracer of north Atlantic circulation pathways, driven by continental runoff (freshwater and Aeolian dust), boundary exchange and advection and thus mixing patterns. A region of particular interest in the North Atlantic is the overflow across the Iceland-Scotland Ridge injecting water from the Arctic Ocean into the Iceland basin (Iceland Scotland Overflow Water). However, Iceland itself constitutes a local source for Nd due to possible leaching of young volcanic basalts adding radiogenic {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd to seawater. We have conducted an intense survey of physical properties and Nd-isotope composition between Iceland and the Azores that allows to fingerprint different water masses of the North Atlantic through the {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratio and that demonstrates the very local influence of volcanic material to the seawater Nd cycle. A first local transect is achieved from the open ocean to the outflow of the Vatnajoekull glacier. Runoff influences seawater Nd in close vicinity (< 40 km near the outflow). A along shelf transect provide a similar observation. From Iceland to the Azores, however, water masses of the sub-tropical and sub-polar gyre are clearly distinguishable.

  5. Determination of low-level acrylamide in drinking water by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucentini, Luca; Ferretti, Emanuele; Veschetti, Enrico; Achene, Laura; Turrio-Baldassarri, Luigi; Ottaviani, Massimo; Bogialli, Sara

    2009-01-01

    A simple and sensitive liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) method has been developed and validated to confirm and quantify acrylamide monomer (AA) in drinking water using [13C3] acrylamide as internal standard (IS). After a preconcentration by solid-phase extraction with spherical activated carbon, analytes were chromatographed on IonPac ICE-AS1 column (9 x 250 mm) under isocratic conditions using acetonitrile-water-0.1 M formic acid (43 + 52 + 5, v/v/v) as the mobile phase. Analysis was achieved using a triple-quadrupole mass analyzer equipped with a turbo ion spray interface. For confirmation and quantification of the analytes, MS data acquisition was performed in the multireaction monitoring mode, selecting 2 precursor ion to product ion transitions for both AA and IS. The method was validated for linearity, sensitivity, accuracy, precision, extraction efficiency, and matrix effect. Linearity in tap water was observed over the concentration range 0.1-2.0 microg/L. Limits of detection and quantification were 0.02 and 0.1 microg/L, respectively. Interday and intraday assays were performed across 3 validation levels (0.1, 0.5, and 1.5 microg/L). Accuracy (as mean recovery) ranged from 89.3 to 96.2% with relative standard deviation water in compliance with European Union and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards.

  6. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN FORMING STARS AND DENSE GAS IN THE SMALL LOW-MASS CLUSTER CEDERBLAD 110

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd, E. F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837 (United States); Wong, T. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bourke, T. L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Thompson, K. L., E-mail: ladd@bucknell.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

    2011-12-20

    We present observations of dense gas and outflow activity in the Cederblad 110 region of the Chamaeleon I dark cloud complex. The region contains nine forming low-mass stars in evolutionary stages ranging from Class 0 to Class II/III crowded into a 0.2 pc region with high surface density ({Sigma}{sub YSO} {approx} 150 pc{sup -2}). The analysis of our N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1{yields}0) maps indicates the presence of 13 {+-} 3 solar masses of dense (n {approx} 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}) gas in this region, much of which is unstable against gravitational collapse. The most unstable material is located near the Class 0 source MMS-1, which is almost certainly actively accreting material from its dense core. Smaller column densities of more stable dense gas are found toward the region's Class I sources, IRS 4, 11, and 6. Little or no dense gas is colocated with the Class II and III sources in the region. The outflow from IRS 4 is interacting with the dense core associated with MMS-1. The molecular component of the outflow, measured in the (J = 1{yields}0) line of {sup 12}CO, appears to be deflected by the densest part of the core, after which it appears to plow through some of the lower column density portions of the core. The working surface between the head of the outflow lobe and the dense core material can be seen in the enhanced velocity dispersion of the dense gas. IRS 2, the Class III source that produces the optical reflection nebula that gives the Cederblad 110 region its name, may also be influencing the dense gas in the region. A dust temperature gradient across the MMS-1 dense core is consistent with warming from IRS 2, and a sharp gradient in dense gas column density may be caused by winds from this source. Taken together, our data indicate that this region has been producing several young stars in the recent past, and that sources which began forming first are interacting with the remaining dense gas in the region, thereby influencing current and future star

  7. The development of water services and their interaction with water resources in European and Brazilian cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraqué, B.; Formiga Johnsson, R. M.; Nogueira de Paiva Britto, A. L.

    2008-08-01

    The extension and complexity of large cities creates "urban water" and a related issue: public water services, including public water supply, sewage collection and treatment, and storm water control, had previously become a policy sector separate from water resource allocation issues thanks to water transport and treatment technologies. Large metropolitan areas today cannot take nature for granted anymore, and they need to protect water resources, if only to reduce the long term cost of transporting and treating water. In this paper, we compare the historical development of water services in European and Brazilian metropolitan areas, placing the technological developments in their geographic, socio-economic and political contexts. Our frame is to follow the successive contributions of civil engineering, sanitary engineering, and environmental engineering: the "quantity of water" and civil engineering paradigm allowed to mobilise water in and out of the city, and up the hills or the floors; in the "water quality" and chemical/sanitary engineering paradigm, water treatment gave more freedom to cities to take water from rivers closer to them, but also to reduce sewer discharge impacts; lastly, the environmental engineering paradigm proposes to overcome the supply side perspective, by introducing demand side management, water conservation, water allocation flexibilisation, and an integrated approach to water services, water resources management, and land use policies.

  8. The development of water services and their interaction with water resources in European and Brazilian cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Barraqué

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The extension and complexity of large cities creates "urban water" and a related issue: public water services, including public water supply, sewage collection and treatment, and storm water control, had previously become a policy sector separate from water resource allocation issues thanks to water transport and treatment technologies. Large metropolitan areas today cannot take nature for granted anymore, and they need to protect water resources, if only to reduce the long term cost of transporting and treating water. In this paper, we compare the historical development of water services in European and Brazilian metropolitan areas, placing the technological developments in their geographic, socio-economic and political contexts. Our frame is to follow the successive contributions of civil engineering, sanitary engineering, and environmental engineering: the "quantity of water" and civil engineering paradigm allowed to mobilise water in and out of the city, and up the hills or the floors; in the "water quality" and chemical/sanitary engineering paradigm, water treatment gave more freedom to cities to take water from rivers closer to them, but also to reduce sewer discharge impacts; lastly, the environmental engineering paradigm proposes to overcome the supply side perspective, by introducing demand side management, water conservation, water allocation flexibilisation, and an integrated approach to water services, water resources management, and land use policies.

  9. The Interaction between Zein and Lecithin in Ethanol-Water Solution and Characterization of Zein?Lecithin Composite Colloidal Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Lei; Sun, Cuixia; Wang, Di; Gao, Yanxiang

    2016-01-01

    Lecithin, a naturally small molecular surfactant, which is widely used in the food industry, can delay aging, enhance memory, prevent and treat diabetes. The interaction between zein and soy lecithin with different mass ratios (20:1, 10:1, 5:1, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2) in ethanol-water solution and characterisation of zein and lecithin composite colloidal nanoparticles prepared by antisolvent co-precipitation method were investigated. The mean size of zein-lecithin composite colloidal nanoparti...

  10. Probing neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the charged-current and neutral-current interaction rates of supernova neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Kwang-Chang [Center for General Education, Chang Gung University,Kwei-Shan, Taoyuan, 333, Taiwan (China); Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (LeCosPA), National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Lee, Fei-Fan [Institute of Physics, National Chiao Tung University,Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Lee, Feng-Shiuh [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University,Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, Guey-Lin [Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (LeCosPA), National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, National Chiao Tung University,Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Liu, Tsung-Che [Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (LeCosPA), National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Yang, Yi [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University,Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China)

    2016-07-22

    The neutrino mass hierarchy is one of the neutrino fundamental properties yet to be determined. We introduce a method to determine neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the interaction rate of neutral current (NC) interactions, ν(ν-bar)+p→ν(ν-bar)+p, and inverse beta decays (IBD), ν-bar{sub e}+p→n+e{sup +}, of supernova neutrinos in scintillation detectors. Neutrino flavor conversions inside the supernova are sensitive to neutrino mass hierarchy. Due to Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, the full swapping of ν-bar{sub e} flux with the ν-bar{sub x} (x=μ, τ) one occurs in the inverted hierarchy, while such a swapping does not occur in the normal hierarchy. As a result, more high energy IBD events occur in the detector for the inverted hierarchy than the high energy IBD events in the normal hierarchy. By comparing IBD interaction rate with the mass hierarchy independent NC interaction rate, one can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  11. Salt water and skin interactions: new lines of evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajo, Jose Manuel; Maraver, Francisco

    2018-04-01

    In Health Resort Medicine, both balneotherapy and thalassotherapy, salt waters and their peloids, or mud products are mainly used to treat rheumatic and skin disorders. These therapeutic agents act jointly via numerous mechanical, thermal, and chemical mechanisms. In this review, we examine a new mechanism of action specific to saline waters. When topically administered, this water rich in sodium and chloride penetrates the skin where it is able to modify cellular osmotic pressure and stimulate nerve receptors in the skin via cell membrane ion channels known as "Piezo" proteins. We describe several models of cutaneous adsorption/desorption and penetration of dissolved ions in mineral waters through the skin (osmosis and cell volume mechanisms in keratinocytes) and examine the role of these resources in stimulating cutaneous nerve receptors. The actions of salt mineral waters are mediated by a mechanism conditioned by the concentration and quality of their salts involving cellular osmosis-mediated activation/inhibition of cell apoptotic or necrotic processes. In turn, this osmotic mechanism modulates the recently described mechanosensitive piezoelectric channels.

  12. Computer programs for the numerical modelling of water flow in rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croney, P.; Richards, L.R.

    1985-08-01

    Water flow in rock joints provides a very important possible route for the migration of radio-nuclides from radio-active waste within a repository back to the biosphere. Two computer programs DAPHNE and FPM have been developed to model two dimensional fluid flow in jointed rock masses. They have been developed to run on microcomputer systems suitable for field locations. The fluid flows in a number of jointed rock systems have been examined and certain controlling functions identified. A methodology has been developed for assessing the anisotropic permeability of jointed rock. A number of examples of unconfined flow into surface and underground openings have been analysed and ground water lowering, pore water pressures and flow quantities predicted. (author)

  13. The Martian hydrologic cycle - Effects of CO2 mass flux on global water distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    The Martian CO2 cycle, which includes the seasonal condensation and subsequent sublimation of up to 30 percent of the planet's atmosphere, produces meridional winds due to the consequent mass flux of CO2. These winds currently display strong seasonal and hemispheric asymmetries due to the large asymmetries in the distribution of insolation on Mars. It is proposed that asymmetric meridional advection of water vapor on the planet due to these CO2 condensation winds is capable of explaining the observed dessication of Mars' south polar region at the current time. A simple model for water vapor transport is used to verify this hypothesis and to speculate on the effects of changes in orbital parameters on the seasonal water cycle.

  14. Stable isotope reactive transport modeling in water-rock interactions during CO2 injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Juan J.; Lagneau, Vincent; Agrinier, Pierre

    2010-05-01

    Stable isotopes can be of great usefulness in the characterization and monitoring of CO2 sequestration sites. Stable isotopes can be used to track the migration of the CO2 plume and identify leakage sources. Moreover, they provide unique information about the chemical reactions that take place on the CO2-water-rock system. However, there is a lack of appropriate tools that help modelers to incorporate stable isotope information into the flow and transport models used in CO2 sequestration problems. In this work, we present a numerical tool for modeling the transport of stable isotopes in groundwater reactive systems. The code is an extension of the groundwater single-phase flow and reactive transport code HYTEC [2]. HYTEC's transport module was modified to include element isotopes as separate species. This way, it is able to track isotope composition of the system by computing the mixing between the background water and the injected solution accounting for the dependency of diffusion on the isotope mass. The chemical module and database have been expanded to included isotopic exchange with minerals and the isotope fractionation associated with chemical reactions and mineral dissolution or precipitation. The performance of the code is illustrated through a series of column synthetic models. The code is also used to model the aqueous phase CO2 injection test carried out at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory site (Palisades, New York, USA) [1]. References [1] N. Assayag, J. Matter, M. Ader, D. Goldberg, and P. Agrinier. Water-rock interactions during a CO2 injection field-test: Implications on host rock dissolution and alteration effects. Chemical Geology, 265(1-2):227-235, July 2009. [2] Jan van der Lee, Laurent De Windt, Vincent Lagneau, and Patrick Goblet. Module-oriented modeling of reactive transport with HYTEC. Computers & Geosciences, 29(3):265-275, April 2003.

  15. Interventions and Interactions: Understanding Coupled Human-Water Dynamics for Improved Water Resources Management in the Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crootof, A.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding coupled human-water dynamics offers valuable insights to address fundamental water resources challenges posed by environmental change. With hydropower reshaping human-water interactions in mountain river basins, there is a need for a socio-hydrology framework—which examines two-way feedback loops between human and water systems—to more effectively manage water resources. This paper explores the cross-scalar interactions and feedback loops between human and water systems in river basins affected by run-of-the-river hydropower and highlights the utility of a socio-hydrology perspectives to enhance water management in the face of environmental change. In the Himalayas, the rapid expansion of run-of-the-river hydropower—which diverts streamflow for energy generation—is reconfiguring the availability, location, and timing of water resources. This technological intervention in the river basin not only alters hydrologic dyanmics but also shapes social outcomes. Using hydropower development in the highlands of Uttarakhand, India as a case study, I first illustrate how run-of-the-river projects transform human-water dynamics by reshaping the social and physical landscape of a river basin. Second, I emphasize how examining cross-scalar feedbacks among structural dynamics, social outcomes, and values and norms in this coupled human-water system can inform water management. Third, I present hydrological and social literature, raised separately, to indicate collaborative research needs and knowledge gaps for coupled human-water systems affected by run-of-the-river hydropower. The results underscore the need to understand coupled human-water dynamics to improve water resources management in the face of environmental change.

  16. Spatial Distributions of DDTs in the Water Masses of the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrizo, Daniel; Sobek, Anna; Salvadó, Joan A; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2017-07-18

    There is a scarcity of data on the amount and distribution of the organochlorine pesticide dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites in intermediate and deep ocean water masses. Here, the distribution and inventories of DDTs in water of the Arctic shelf seas and the interior basin are presented. The occurrence of ∑ 6 DDT (0.10-66 pg L -1 ) in the surface water was dominated by 4,4'-DDE. In the Central Arctic Ocean increasing concentrations of DDE with depth were observed in the Makarov and Amundsen basins. The increasing concentrations down to 2500 m depth is in accordance with previous findings for PCBs and PBDEs. Similar concentrations of DDT and DDEs were found in the surface water, while the relative contribution of DDEs increased with depth, demonstrating a transformation over time and depth. Higher concentrations of DDTs were found in the European part of the Arctic Ocean; these distributions likely reflect a combination of different usage patterns, transport, and fate of these compounds. For instance, the elevated concentrations of DDTs in the Barents and Atlantic sectors of the Arctic Ocean indicate the northbound Atlantic current as a significant conveyor of DDTs. This study contributes to the very rare data on OCPs in the vast deep-water compartments and combined with surface water distribution across the Arctic Ocean helps to improve our understanding of the large-scale fate of DDTs in the Arctic.

  17. Stable Isotope Analyses of water and Aqueous Solutions by Conventional Dual-inlet Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horita, Juske [ORNL; Kendall, C. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA

    2004-01-01

    The foundation of various analytical methods for the stable isotope composition of water and other aqueous samples (natural abundance, {sup 1}H : {sup 2}H (D) = 99.985 : 0.015 atom%, and {sup 16}O : {sup 17}O : {sup 18}O = 99.762 : 0.038 : 0.200 atom%) was established during the Manhatten Project in the U.S.A., when large amounts of heavy water were produced for nuclear reactors (see Kirshenbaum, 1951, for a detailed account). From early on, there was great interest in the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions of water, because they are the ideal tracers of water sources and reactions. The increased analytical precisions made possible by the subsequent development of modern gas-source isotope-ratio mass spectrometers with dual-inlets and multi-collectors, have caused the proliferation of new analytical methods and applications for the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions of water. These stable isotopes have found wide applications in basic as well as applied sciences (chemistry, geology, hydrology, biology, medical sciences, and food sciences). This is because water is ubiquitous, is an essential and predominant ingredient of living organisms, and is perhaps the most reactive compound in the Earth.

  18. Interaction of ultra-high intensity laser pulse with a mass limited targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, A.A.; Platonov, K.Yu.; Limpouch, J.; Psikal, J.; Kawata, S.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses may be produced now via CPA scheme by using very short laser pulses of a relatively low energy. Interaction of such pulses with massive target is not very efficient as the energy delivered to charged particles spreads out quickly over large distances and it is redistributed between many secondary particles. One possibility to limit this undesirable energy spread is to use mass limited targets (MLT), for example droplets, big clusters or small foil sections. This is an intermediate regime in target dimensions between bulk solid and nanometer-size atomic cluster targets. A few experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out on laser absorption, fast particle generation and induced nuclear fusion reactions in the interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with MLT plasma. We investigate here laser interactions with MLT via 2D3V relativistic electromagnetic PIC simulations. We assume spherical droplet as a typical MLT. However, the sphere is represented in 2D simulations by an infinite cylinder irradiated uniformly along its length. We assume that MLT is fully ionized before main pulse interaction either due to insufficient laser contrast or due to a prepulse. For simplicity, we assume homogeneous plasma of high initial temperature. We analyze the interaction of relativistic laser pulses of various polarizations with targets of different shapes, such as a foil, quadrant and sphere. The mechanisms of laser absorption, electron and ion acceleration are clarified for different laser and target parameters. When laser interacts with the target front side, kinetic energy of electrons rises rapidly with fast oscillations in the kinetic and field energy, caused by electron oscillations in the laser field. Small energy oscillations, observed later, are caused by the electron motion back and forth through the droplet. Approximately 40% of laser energy is transferred to the kinetic energy of electrons

  19. Influence of ground water on soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantino, C.J.; Graves, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    The basic problem consists of a liner flexible structure situated at or near the surface of a soil half-space. In keeping with typical small strain seismic analyses, the soil skeleton is represented as a linear medium in which all potential nonlinearities are at most lumped together into an equivalent hysteretic damping modulus. In addition, the ground water level is located at some depth relatively close to the structure, and in a position to impact on the seismic response of the facility. In order to estimate the response of this oil-water system, the two-phased medium formulation of Biot was used to treat the response of the solids and water as two separate linear media, coupled together through soil permeability and volume effects. (orig./HP)

  20. Characterization of simultaneous heat and mass transfer phenomena for water vapour condensation on a solid surface in an abiotic environment--application to bioprocesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Akhilesh; Kondjoyan, Alain; Fontaine, Jean-Pierre

    2012-07-01

    The phenomenon of heat and mass transfer by condensation of water vapour from humid air involves several key concepts in aerobic bioreactors. The high performance of bioreactors results from optimised interactions between biological processes and multiphase heat and mass transfer. Indeed in various processes such as submerged fermenters and solid-state fermenters, gas/liquid transfer need to be well controlled, as it is involved at the microorganism interface and for the control of the global process. For the theoretical prediction of such phenomena, mathematical models require heat and mass transfer coefficients. To date, very few data have been validated concerning mass transfer coefficients from humid air inflows relevant to those bioprocesses. Our study focussed on the condensation process of water vapour and developed an experimental set-up and protocol to study the velocity profiles and the mass flux on a small size horizontal flat plate in controlled environmental conditions. A closed circuit wind tunnel facility was used to control the temperature, hygrometry and hydrodynamics of the flow. The temperature of the active surface was controlled and kept isothermal below the dew point to induce condensation, by the use of thermoelectricity. The experiments were performed at ambient temperature for a relative humidity between 35-65% and for a velocity of 1.0 ms⁻¹. The obtained data are analysed and compared to available theoretical calculations on condensation mass flux.

  1. Scaling Soil Microbe-Water Interactions from Pores to Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, S.; Katul, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    The spatial scales relevant to soil microbial activity are much finer than scales relevant to whole-ecosystem function and biogeochemical cycling. On the one hand, how to link such different scales and develop scale-aware biogeochemical and ecohydrological models remains a major challenge. On the other hand, resolving these linkages is becoming necessary for testing ecological hypotheses and resolving data-theory inconsistencies. Here, the relation between microbial respiration and soil moisture expressed in water potential is explored. Such relation mediates the water availability effects on ecosystem-level heterotrophic respiration and is of paramount importance for understanding CO2 emissions under increasingly variable rainfall regimes. Respiration has been shown to decline as the soil dries in a remarkably consistent way across climates and soil types (open triangles in Figure). Empirical models based on these respiration-moisture relations are routinely used in Earth System Models to predict moisture effects on ecosystem respiration. It has been hypothesized that this consistency in microbial respiration decline is due to breakage of water film continuity causing in turn solute diffusion limitations in dry conditions. However, this hypothesis appears to be at odds with what is known about soil hydraulic properties. Water film continuity estimated from soil water retention (SWR) measurements at the 'Darcy' scale breaks at far less negative water potential (micro-level relevant to microbial activity. Such downscaling resolves the inconsistency between respiration thresholds and hydrological thresholds. This result, together with observations of residual microbial activity well below -15 MPa (dashed back curve in Figure), lends support to the hypothesis that soil microbes are substrate-limited in dry conditions.

  2. Investigation of interactions between water and ion exchanger perfluorinated membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Said, Chakir

    1983-01-01

    In this research thesis, the author, by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), shows the privileged situation of the first absorbed water molecules which come and fix about cations and fill up the first hydration sphere. He reports the study of Nafion membranes provided by DuPont de Nemours: chemical definition (chemical structure, properties, and microstructure), interest of the use of NMR, results and discussion (influence of water content, of temperature, of thermal cycling), and other results obtained by using different techniques (electronic paramagnetic resonance or EPR, differential calorimetry and thermo-porometry, mechanical measurements) [fr

  3. Interactions Between Prokaryotes and Dissolved Organic Matter in Marine Waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traving, Sachia Jo

    organic bound carbon equal in size to atmospheric carbon dioxide. Prokaryotes mediate the fate of a large part of marine DOM, which is their principal source of energy and substrate. However, a large fraction is also left behind in the water column persisting for millennia, and prokaryotes may hold...... the key to understanding the mechanisms controlling the cycling of DOM within marine waters. In the thesis presented here, the aim was to investigate the activity and composition of prokaryotes to determine their functional role in DOM utilization. The thesis incorporates a range of study systems...

  4. Molecular dynamics study of the silica-water-SDA interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szyja, B.M.; Jansen, A.P.J.; Verstraelen, T.; Santen, van R.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we have applied the molecular dynamics simulations in order to analyse the role of the structure directing tetrapropylammonium ions in the aggregation process that leads to silicalite formation. We address the specific question of how the interactions between silica precursor species

  5. Structural interaction of novel dendrimer and subunits with water

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    interaction study with solvents are essential [4-6] and several subunits are used for .... slowed down the viscous flow with higher excess limiting viscosities of the 2,4,6- ..... Practical Organic Chemistry, 5th ed.; Wiley: New York; 1989; p 300. 14.

  6. Waters Without Borders: Scarcity and the Future of State Interactions over Shared Water Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    earth’s water is fresh water , stored in rivers, lakes, reservoirs, glaciers, permanent snow, groundwater aquifers, and the atmosphere. 10 This... freshwater resources between and within countries. 13 There is significant media attention given to intra-state water sharing issues. One...intrusion into coastal ground freshwater sources, among other effects. Consequently, water scarcity brought about by climate change could drive

  7. General relativistic dynamics of an extreme mass-ratio binary interacting with an external body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Casals, Marc

    2017-10-01

    We study the dynamics of a hierarchical three-body system in the general relativistic regime: an extreme mass-ratio inner binary under the tidal influence of an external body. The inner binary consists of a central Schwarzschild black hole and a test body moving around it. We discuss three types of tidal effects on the orbit of the test body. First, the angular momentum of the inner binary precesses around the angular momentum of the outer binary. Second, the tidal field drives a "transient resonance" when the radial and azimuthal frequencies are commensurable. In contrast with resonances driven by the gravitational self-force, this tidal-driven resonance may boost the orbital angular momentum and eccentricity (a relativistic version of the Kozai-Lidov effect). Finally, for an orbit-dynamical effect during the nonresonant phase, we calculate the correction to the innermost stable circular (mean) orbit due to the tidal interaction. Hierarchical three-body systems are potential sources for future space-based gravitational wave missions, and the tidal effects that we find could contribute significantly to their waveform.

  8. Determination of thiopurine S-methyltransferase activity by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography hyphenated with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecher, Daniel; Dokupilová, Svetlana; Zelinková, Zuzana; Peppelenbosch, Maikel; Mikušová, Veronika; Mikuš, Peter

    2017-08-05

    Thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) plays an important role in the metabolism of thiopurines used in the therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In this work a new progressive method for the determination of TPMT activity in red blood cells lysates was developed. Analysis was carried out by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) hyphenated with mass spectrometry (MS). In comparison with reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), that has been typically applied in determination of TPMT activity, the HILIC significantly improved the analytical signal provided by MS, shortened analysis time, and improved chromatographic resolution. The HILIC-HPLC-MS method was optimized and validated, providing favorable parameters of detection and quantitation limits (5.5 and 16.5pmol/mL, respectively), linearity (coefficient of determination 0.9999 in the range of 0.01-1.0nmol/mL), recovery and precision (93.25-100.37% with RSD 1.06-1.32% in the whole concentration range of QC samples). Moreover, in contrast to the conventional RP-HPLC-UV approach, the complex phenotype TPMT profiles can be reliably and without interferences monitored using the HILIC-HPLC-MS method. Such advanced monitoring can provide valuable detail information on the thiopurines (e.g. evaluating ratio of methylated and non-methylated 6-mercaptopurine) and, by that, TPMT action in biological systems before and during the therapy of IBD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Aedes-Borne Virus-Mosquito Interactions: Mass Spectrometry Strategies and Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pando-Robles, Victoria; Batista, Cesar V

    2017-06-01

    Aedes-borne viruses are responsible for high-impact neglected tropical diseases and unpredictable outbreaks such as the ongoing Zika epidemics. Aedes mosquitoes spread different arboviruses such as Dengue virus (DENV), Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), and Zika virus, among others, and are responsible for the continuous emergence and reemergence of these pathogens. These viruses have complex transmission cycles that include two hosts, namely the Aedes mosquito as a vector and susceptible vertebrate hosts. Human infection with arboviruses causes diseases that range from subclinical or mild to febrile diseases, encephalitis, and hemorrhagic fever. Infected mosquitoes do not show detectable signs of disease, even though the virus maintains a lifelong persistent infection. The infection of the Aedes mosquito by viruses involves a molecular crosstalk between cell and viral proteins. An understanding of how mosquito vectors and viruses interact is of fundamental interest, and it also offers novel perspectives for disease control. In recent years, mass spectrometry (MS)-based strategies in combination with bioinformatics have been successfully applied to identify and quantify global changes in cellular proteins, lipids, peptides, and metabolites in response to viral infection. Although the information about proteomics in the Aedes mosquito is limited, the information that has been reported can set up the basis for future studies. This review reflects how MS-based approaches have extended our understanding of Aedes mosquito biology and the development of DENV and CHIKV infection in the vector. Finally, this review discusses future challenges in the field.

  10. Multiple tuned mass damper based vibration mitigation of offshore wind turbine considering soil-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussan, Mosaruf; Sharmin, Faria; Kim, Dookie

    2017-08-01

    The dynamics of jacket supported offshore wind turbine (OWT) in earthquake environment is one of the progressing focuses in the renewable energy field. Soil-structure interaction (SSI) is a fundamental principle to analyze stability and safety of the structure. This study focuses on the performance of the multiple tuned mass damper (MTMD) in minimizing the dynamic responses of the structures objected to seismic loads combined with static wind and wave loads. Response surface methodology (RSM) has been applied to design the MTMD parameters. The analyses have been performed under two different boundary conditions: fixed base (without SSI) and flexible base (with SSI). Two vibration modes of the structure have been suppressed by multi-mode vibration control principle in both cases. The effectiveness of the MTMD in reducing the dynamic response of the structure is presented. The dynamic SSI plays an important role in the seismic behavior of the jacket supported OWT, especially resting on the soft soil deposit. Finally, it shows that excluding the SSI effect could be the reason of overestimating the MTMD performance.

  11. Interactions of nucleobases with alkali earth metal cations--electrospray ionization mass spectrometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frańska, Magdalena

    2007-01-01

    Interactions of nucleobases with alkali earth metal cations have been studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Nucleobases containing at least one oxygen atom form stable complexes with alkali earth metal cations. This phenomenon can be explained on the grounds of the well known theory of hard and soft acids and bases. Uracil and thymine make complexes only when in their deprotonoted forms. The cations of great radii (Sr(2+), Ba(2+)) are more prone to form complexes of stoichiometry 1:1 with uracil and thymine than the cations of small radii (Mg(2+), Ca(2+)). On the other hand, Mg(2+) forms complexes of stoichiometry 2:1 and 3:2 with uracil and thymine. Gas-phase stabilities of the 1:1 complexes are higher for the cations of small radii, in contrast to the solution stabilities. For cytosine and 9- methylhypoxantine the 1:1 complexes of their deprotonated forms are observed at higher cone voltage as a result of HCl molecule loss from the complexes containing the counter ion (Cl(-)). In solution, more stable complexes are formed with metal cations of low radii. Gas-phase stability of the complexes formed by deprotonated 9- methyl-hypoxantine increases with increasing metal cation radius.

  12. Some aspects of shelter FCM surfaces with water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhidkov, A.V.; Gonchar, V.V.; Veklich, E.L.

    2000-01-01

    The water affinity and adhesion energy temperature dependences for all main sort of FCM have been both measured for the first time. It was established that FCM are slightly hydrophilous only and their wettability depends on its certain type, The data obtained allows to suggest the certain technological recommendations concerning the FCM of Shelter object treatment

  13. Lithium-lead/water interaction. Large break experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savatteri, C.; Gemelli, A.

    1991-01-01

    One current concept in fusion blanket module design is to utilize water as coolant and liquid lithium-lead as breeding/neutron-multiplier material. Considering the possibility of certain off-normal events, it is possible that water leakage into the liquid metal may occur due to a tube rupture. The lithium-lead/water contact can lead to a thermal and chemical reaction which should provoke an intolerable pressure increase in the blanket module. For realistic simulation of such in-blanket events, the Blanket Safety Test (BLAST) facility has been built. It simulates the transient event by injecting subcooled water under high pressure into a stagnant pool of about 500 kg liquid Pb-17Li. Eight fully instrumented large break tests were carried out under different conditions. The aim of the experiments is to study the chemical and thermal process and particularly: The pressurization history of the reaction vessel, the formation and deposition of the reaction products, the identification and propagation of the reaction zones and the temperature transient in the liquid metal. In this paper the results of all tests performed are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  14. Studying groundwater and surface water interactions using airborne remote sensing in Heihe River basin, northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Liu, J.; Hu, Y.; Zheng, C.

    2015-05-01

    Managing surface water and groundwater as a unified system is important for water resource exploitation and aquatic ecosystem conservation. The unified approach to water management needs accurate characterization of surface water and groundwater interactions. Temperature is a natural tracer for identifying surface water and groundwater interactions, and the use of remote sensing techniques facilitates basin-scale temperature measurement. This study focuses on the Heihe River basin, the second largest inland river basin in the arid and semi-arid northwest of China where surface water and groundwater undergoes dynamic exchanges. The spatially continuous river-surface temperature of the midstream section of the Heihe River was obtained by using an airborne pushbroom hyperspectral thermal sensor system. By using the hot spot analysis toolkit in the ArcGIS software, abnormally cold water zones were identified as indicators of the spatial pattern of groundwater discharge to the river.

  15. Studying groundwater and surface water interactions using airborne remote sensing in Heihe River basin, northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Managing surface water and groundwater as a unified system is important for water resource exploitation and aquatic ecosystem conservation. The unified approach to water management needs accurate characterization of surface water and groundwater interactions. Temperature is a natural tracer for identifying surface water and groundwater interactions, and the use of remote sensing techniques facilitates basin-scale temperature measurement. This study focuses on the Heihe River basin, the second largest inland river basin in the arid and semi-arid northwest of China where surface water and groundwater undergoes dynamic exchanges. The spatially continuous river-surface temperature of the midstream section of the Heihe River was obtained by using an airborne pushbroom hyperspectral thermal sensor system. By using the hot spot analysis toolkit in the ArcGIS software, abnormally cold water zones were identified as indicators of the spatial pattern of groundwater discharge to the river.

  16. Eukaryotic Plankton Species Diversity in the Western Channel of the Korea Strait using 18S rDNA Sequences and its Implications for Water Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Rae; Song, Eun Hye; Lee, Tongsup

    2018-03-01

    Organisms entering the East Sea (Sea of Japan) through the Korea Strait, together with water, salt, and energy, affect the East Sea ecosystem. In this study, we report on the biodiversity of eukaryotic plankton found in the Western Channel of the Korea Strait for the first time using small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (18S rDNA) sequences. We also discuss the characteristics of water masses and their physicochemical factors. Diverse taxonomic groups were recovered from 18S rDNA clone libraries, including putative novel, higher taxonomic entities affiliated with Cercozoa, Raphidophyceae, Picozoa, and novel marine Stramenopiles. We also found that there was cryptic genetic variation at both the intraspecific and interspecific levels among arthropods, diatoms, and green algae. Specific plankton assemblages were identified at different sampling depths and they may provide useful information that could be used to interpret the origin and the subsequent mixing history of the water masses that contribute to the Tsushima Warm Current waters. Furthermore, the biological information highlighted in this study may help improve our understanding about the complex water mass interactions that were highlighted in the Korea Strait.

  17. Quantitative Detection of Trace Malachite Green in Aquiculture Water Samples by Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaowei; Yang, Shuiping; Chingin, Konstantin; Zhu, Liang; Zhang, Xinglei; Zhou, Zhiquan; Zhao, Zhanfeng

    2016-08-11

    Exposure to malachite green (MG) may pose great health risks to humans; thus, it is of prime importance to develop fast and robust methods to quantitatively screen the presence of malachite green in water. Herein the application of extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) has been extended to the trace detection of MG within lake water and aquiculture water, due to the intensive use of MG as a biocide in fisheries. This method has the advantage of obviating offline liquid-liquid extraction or tedious matrix separation prior to the measurement of malachite green in native aqueous medium. The experimental results indicate that the extrapolated detection limit for MG was ~3.8 μg·L(-1) (S/N = 3) in lake water samples and ~0.5 μg·L(-1) in ultrapure water under optimized experimental conditions. The signal intensity of MG showed good linearity over the concentration range of 10-1000 μg·L(-1). Measurement of practical water samples fortified with MG at 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mg·L(-1) gave a good validation of the established calibration curve. The average recoveries and relative standard deviation (RSD) of malachite green in lake water and Carassius carassius fish farm effluent water were 115% (6.64% RSD), 85.4% (9.17% RSD) and 96.0% (7.44% RSD), respectively. Overall, the established EESI-MS/MS method has been demonstrated suitable for sensitive and rapid (malachite green in various aqueous media, indicating its potential for online real-time monitoring of real life samples.

  18. Continuum model for water movement in an unsaturated fractured rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, R.R.; Klavetter, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    The movement of fluids in a fractured, porous medium has been the subject of considerable study. This paper presents a continuum model that may be used to evaluate the isothermal movement of water in an unsaturated, fractured, porous medium under slowly changing conditions. This continuum model was developed for use in evaluating the unsaturated zone at the Yucca Mountain site as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. Thus its development has been influenced by the conditions thought to be present at Yucca Mountain. A macroscopic approach and a microscopic approach are used to develop a continuum model to evaluate water movement in a fractured rock mass. Both approaches assume that the pressure head in the fractures and the matrix are identical in a plane perpendicular to flow. Both approaches lead to a single-flow equation for a fractured rock mass. The two approaches are used to calculate unsaturated hydrologic properties, i.e., relative permeability and saturation as a function of pressure head, for several types of tuff underlying Yucca Mountain, using the best available hydrologic data for the matrix and the fractures. Rock mass properties calculated by both approaches are similar

  19. GSFLOW model simulations used to evaluate the impact of irrigated agriculture on surface water - groundwater interaction

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — Watershed-scale coupled surface water (SW) – groundwater (GW) flow modeling was used to examine changes in streamflow and SW – GW interaction resulting from...

  20. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry imaging for characterizing plant-microbe interactions using liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, R. K.; Anderton, C.; Weston, D. J.; Carrell, A. A.; Paša-Tolić, L.; Veličković, D.; Tfaily, M.

    2017-12-01

    The rhizosphere consists of a diverse community of plants, bacteria and fungi that are interacting with each other and with complex soil matrix they occupy. By studying the chemical signaling and processes that occur within this dynamic microenvironment, we will further our understanding of the symbiotic and competitive interaction within microbial communities. Field studies and bulk analyses shed light on the mechanisms by which environmental perturbations alter carbon and nitrogen cycling, but what is less clear are the intra- and interspecies molecular transformations and transactions between the different constituents within the rhizosphere. Chemical imaging by liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry (LESA-MS) is a highly sensitive technique capable of providing both spatial and molecular information. Here, we examined the chemical interactions among a tripartite system of peat moss (Sphagnum fallax), cyanobacteria (Nostoc muscorium), and fungus (Trizdiaspa). We coupled LESA source to both a 15 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICR-MS), for ultrahigh mass resolution and mass accuracy results, and a Thermo Velos-LTQ mass spectrometer, for tandem MS of selected molecules to increase confidence in molecular identifications. With LESA-MS approach we spatially probed the tripartite interactions and isolated cultures using a coordinate system that can be mapped back and overlaid onto the original image. Using this method, we mapped an array of metabolic distributions within the model sphagnum microbiome. For instance, we identified carbendazim, an anti-fungal agent, distributed within the interaction zone between the bacteria and fungi, while glyceropcholine and sucrose were localized within the sphagnum and fungus interaction zone. Further analysis will look into larger metabolites, lipids, and small proteins.

  1. Brine crude oil interactions at the oil-water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakravarty, Krishna Hara; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    The impact of brine salinity and its ionic composition on oil displacement efficiency has been investigated extensively in recent years due to the potential of enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Wettability alterations through relative interactions at the mineral surface have been the basis of proposed...... in enhancing oil emulsion formation by increasing interactions between polar acids and brine solutions. The results propose the potential use of HPO42- ions in reservoirs having inactive mineral surfaces. The relative oil affinity of different ions including K+, Na+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ (cations), and Cl-, SO42...... and thus reduces the interfacial viscoelasticity of the trapped oil. These results show significant correlation between oil emulsion formation and increased oil recovery. Copyright 2015; Society of Petroleum Engineers...

  2. Integrative Mass Spectrometry Approaches to Monitor Protein Structures, Modifications, and Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lössl, P.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis illustrates the current standing of mass spectrometry (MS) in molecular and structural biology. The primary aim of the herein described research is to facilitate protein characterization by combining mass spectrometric methods among each other and with complementary analytical

  3. Water masses transform at mid-depths over the Antarctic Continental Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead Silvester, Jess; Lenn, Yueng-Djern; Polton, Jeffrey; Phillips, Helen E.; Morales Maqueda, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    The Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) controls the oceans' latitudinal heat distribution, helping to regulate the Earth's climate. The Southern Ocean is the primary place where cool, deep waters return to the surface to complete this global circulation. While water mass transformations intrinsic to this process predominantly take place at the surface following upwelling, recent studies implicate vertical mixing in allowing transformation at mid-depths over the Antarctic continental slope. We deployed an EM-Apex float near Elephant Island, north of the Antarctic Peninsula's tip, to profile along the slope and use potential vorticity to diagnose observed instabilities. The float captures direct heat exchange between a lens of Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (UCDW) and surrounding Lower Circumpolar Deep Waters (LCDW) at mid-depths and over the course of several days. Heat fluxes peak across the top and bottom boundaries of the UCDW lens and peak diffusivities across the bottom boundary are associated with shear instability. Estimates of diffusivity from shear-strain finestructure parameterisation and heat fluxes are found to be in reasonable agreement. The two-dimensional Ertel potential vorticity is elevated both inside the UCDW lens and along its bottom boundary, with a strong contribution from the shear term in these regions and instabilities are associated with gravitational and symmetric forcing. Thus, shear instabilities are driving turbulent mixing across the lower boundary between these two water masses, leading to the observed heat exchange and transformation at mid-depths over the Antarctic continental slope. This has implications for our understanding of the rates of upwelling and ocean-atmosphere exchanges of heat and carbon at this critical location.

  4. Multivariate NIR studies of seed-water interaction in Scots Pine Seeds (Pinus sylvestris L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Lestander, Torbjörn

    2003-01-01

    This thesis describes seed-water interaction using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, multivariate regression models and Scots pine seeds. The presented research covers classification of seed viability, prediction of seed moisture content, selection of NIR wavelengths and interpretation of seed-water interaction modelled and analysed by principal component analysis, ordinary least squares (OLS), partial least squares (PLS), bi-orthogonal least squares (BPLS) and genetic algorithms. The potenti...

  5. Rapid determination of uranium in natural waters by fthermal emission mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.R.; Caylor, J.D.; Rogers, E.R.; Cole, S.H.

    1977-03-01

    A method has been developed to rapidly analyze natural water samples for part-per-trillion (ng/l) concentrations of uranium using a custom-built thermal-emission mass spectrometer. The filtered water sample is spiked with 233 U as an internal standard and extracted with a 2 percent solution of TOPO (trioctylphosphine oxide) in carbon tetrachloride. An aliquot of the organic phase is evaporated and the uranium in the residue extracted with aqueous ammonium carbonate. A 5j-μl aliquot is taken and dried on a flat uranium concentration of 3 ng/l will yield a count rate greater than three times the standard deviation, plus the mean of the background, and is defined as the lowest determinable concentration. The standard deviation of the method is 3 percent at accuracy of the method has been evaluated by comparing the results with a fluorescence procedure. There is very good agreement for water samples with uranium concentrations from 200 to 1000 ng/l. The mass spectrometer is a 6-in. -radius, 60-degree-sector instrument equipped for ion counting and having a vacuum system allowing rapid sample changing while maintaining a high source vacuum. A multiplexer and high-voltage s witch provide synchronized peak switching and scaler gating for monitoring three isotopes of uranium 238, 235, and 233. With this instrument, an analyst can achieve an analysis rate in excess of 50 samples per eight-hour shift

  6. [Determination of five representative ultraviolet filters in water by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yiran; Huang, Yun; Zhao, Tingting; Cai, Qian; Luo, Yu; Huang, Bin; Zhang, Yuxia; Pan, Xuejun

    2014-06-01

    A method for the determination of five representative organic UV filters: ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate (EHMC), benzophenone-3 (BP-3), 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC), octocrylene (OC), homosalate (HMS) in water was investigated. The method was ased on derivatization, solid phase extraction (SPE), followed by determination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The variables involved in the derivatization of BP-3 and HMS were optimized, and SPE conditions were studied. For derivatization, 100 microL N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) was used as derivatization reagent and reacted with BP-3 and HMS at 100 degrees C for 100 min. For SPE, the pH value of water sample was adjusted to 3-5. The Oasis HLB cartridges were employed and the solution of ethyl acetate and dichloromethane (1 : 1, v/v) was used as the eluting solvent, and good recoveries of the target compounds were obtained. The limits of detection (LODs) and the limits of quantification (LOQs) for the five target compounds in water samples were 0.5-1.2 ng/L and 1.4-4.0 ng/L, respectively. The recoveries of spiked water samples were 87.85%-102.34% with good repeatability and reproducibility (RSD < 5%, n = 3) for all the target compounds. Finally, the validated method was applied to analysis the representative UV filters in water samples collected from a wastewater treatment plant in Kunming city of Yunnan province.

  7. Analysis of isothiazolinones in environmental waters by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafoth, Astrid; Gabriel, Sabine; Sacher, Frank; Brauch, Heinz-Jürgen

    2007-09-14

    This paper describes an analytical method for the determination of five biocides of isothiazolinone type (2-methyl-3-isothiazolinone (MI), 5-chloro-2-methyl-3-isothiazolinone (CMI), 1,2-benzisothiazolinone (BIT), 2-octyl-3-isothiazolinone (OI), 4,5-dichloro-2-octyl-3-isothiazolinone (DCOI)) in environmental waters. The method is based on pre-concentration of the analytes by solid-phase extraction onto a mixture of a polymeric material and RP-C18 material and subsequent determination by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). One of the target compounds (BIT) is derivatised with diazomethane after pre-concentration to improve its chromatographic performance. The method was optimised with respect to pre-concentration conditions (liquid-liquid extraction versus solid-phase extraction, solid-phase material, elution solvent and volume) and extensively validated. Applying the method to surface waters, groundwaters, and drinking waters, limits of detection between 0.01 and 0.1 microg/l could be achieved and the repeatability was below 10% for all compounds except for MI. Additional investigations showed that the stability of the isothiazolinones in environmental waters is limited and sample storage at 4 degrees C is mandatory to preserve the target biocides. First investigations of influents and effluents of a wastewater treatment plant showed that conventional wastewater treatment exhibits a high efficiency for removal of the isothiazolinones. In river waters, the target isothiazolinones could not be detected.

  8. Body mass, energy intake, and water consumption of rats and humans during space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, C. E.; Miller, M. M.; Baer, L. A.; Moran, M. M.; Steele, M. K.; Stein, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Alteration of metabolism has been suggested as a major limiting factor to long-term space flight. In humans and primates, a negative energy balance has been reported. The metabolic response of rats to space flight has been suggested to result in a negative energy balance. We hypothesized that rats flown in space would maintain energy balance as indicated by maintenance of caloric intake and body mass gain. Further, the metabolism of the rat would be similar to that of laboratory-reared animals. We studied the results from 15 space flights lasting 4 to 19 d. There was no difference in average body weight (206 +/- 13.9 versus 206 +/- 14.8 g), body weight gain (5.8 +/- 0.48 versus 5.9 +/- 0.56 g/d), caloric intake (309 +/- 21.0 versus 309 +/- 20.1 kcal/kg of body mass per day), or water intake (200 +/- 8.6 versus 199 +/- 9.3 mL/kg of body mass per day) between flight and ground control animals. Compared with standard laboratory animals of similar body mass, no differences were noted. The observations suggested that the negative balance observed in humans and non-human primates may be due to other factors in the space-flight environment.

  9. Mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea as revealed by ARGO floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, X.; L'Hegaret, P.; Baraille, R.

    2012-03-01

    By analysing ARGO float data over the last four years, a few aspects of the mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea are described. The Red Sea Outflow Water (RSOW) is concentrated in the Southwestern Gulf of Aden, in particular when a cyclonic gyre predominates in this region. Salinities of 36.5 and temperatures of 16 °C are found in this area at depths between 600 and 1000 m. RSOW is more dilute in the eastern part of the Gulf, where intense and relatively barotropic gyres mix it with Indian ocean Central Water. RSOW is also detected along the northeastern coast of Socotra, and fragments of RSOW are found between one and three degrees of latitude north of this island. In the whole Gulf of Aden, the correlation between the deep motions of the floats and the sea-level anomaly measured by altimetry is strong, at regional scale. The finer scale details of the float trajectories are not sampled by altimetry and are often related to the anomalous water masses that the floats encounter. The Persian Gulf Water (PGW) is found in the float profiles near Ras ash Sharbatat (near 57° E, 18° N), again with 36.5 in salinity and about 18-19 °C in temperature. These observations were achieved in winter when the southwestward monsoon currents can advect PGW along the South Arabian coast. Fragments of PGW were also observed in the Arabian Sea between 18 and 20° N and 63 and 65° E in summer, showing that this water mass can escape the Gulf of Oman southeastward, during that season. Kinetic energy distributions of floats with respect to distance or angle share common features between the two regions (Gulf of Aden and Arabian Sea), in particular peaks at 30, 50 and 150 km scales and along the axis of monsoon currents. Hydrological measurements by floats are also influenced by the seasonal variations of PGW and RSOW in these regions.

  10. Mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea as revealed by ARGO floats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Carton

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available By analysing ARGO float data over the last four years, a few aspects of the mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea are described.

    The Red Sea Outflow Water (RSOW is concentrated in the Southwestern Gulf of Aden, in particular when a cyclonic gyre predominates in this region. Salinities of 36.5 and temperatures of 16 °C are found in this area at depths between 600 and 1000 m. RSOW is more dilute in the eastern part of the Gulf, where intense and relatively barotropic gyres mix it with Indian ocean Central Water. RSOW is also detected along the northeastern coast of Socotra, and fragments of RSOW are found between one and three degrees of latitude north of this island. In the whole Gulf of Aden, the correlation between the deep motions of the floats and the sea-level anomaly measured by altimetry is strong, at regional scale. The finer scale details of the float trajectories are not sampled by altimetry and are often related to the anomalous water masses that the floats encounter.

    The Persian Gulf Water (PGW is found in the float profiles near Ras ash Sharbatat (near 57° E, 18° N, again with 36.5 in salinity and about 18–19 °C in temperature. These observations were achieved in winter when the southwestward monsoon currents can advect PGW along the South Arabian coast. Fragments of PGW were also observed in the Arabian Sea between 18 and 20° N and 63 and 65° E in summer, showing that this water mass can escape the Gulf of Oman southeastward, during that season.

    Kinetic energy distributions of floats with respect to distance or angle share common features between the two regions (Gulf of Aden and Arabian Sea, in particular peaks at 30, 50 and 150 km scales and along the axis of monsoon currents. Hydrological measurements by floats are also influenced by the seasonal variations of PGW and RSOW in these regions.

  11. Integral-functional representation of mass operator of quasiparticles interacting with polarizational phonons at T = 0 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkach, M.V.

    2002-01-01

    The integral-functional representation of mass operator of spinless quasiparticles interacting with polarizational phonons at T = 0 K is obtained for the first time. This representation is equivalent to the infinite branched integral fraction. It does not depend on the binding force and effectively takes into account the many phonon processes

  12. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography-mass spectrometry for anionic metabolic profiling of urine from antibiotic-treated rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Miranda G M; Swann, Jonathan R; Wilson, Ian D; Somsen, Govert W; de Jong, Gerhardus J

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography-mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS) was used for anionic metabolic profiling of urine from antibiotic-treated rats to study microbial-host co-metabolism. Rats were treated with the antibiotics penicillin G and streptomycin sulfate for four or eight days and compared

  13. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography-mass spectrometry for anionic metabolic profiling of urine from antibiotic-treated rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Miranda G M; Swann, Jonathan R.; Wilson, Ian D.; Somsen, Govert W.; de Jong, Gerhardus J.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography-mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS) was used for anionic metabolic profiling of urine from antibiotic-treated rats to study microbial-host co-metabolism. Rats were treated with the antibiotics penicillin G and streptomycin sulfate for four or eight days and compared

  14. Combined adverse effects of maternal smoking and high body mass index on heart development in offspring : evidence for interaction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baardman, M.E.; Kerstjens-Frederikse, W.S.; Corpeleijn, E.; de Walle, H.E.K.; Hofstra, R.M.W.; Berger, R.M.F.; Bakker, M.K.

    Objective To study the influence of a possible interaction between maternal smoking and high body mass index (BMI) on the occurrence of specific congenital heart anomalies (CHA) in offspring. Design Case-control study. Setting Data from a population-based birth defects registry in the Netherlands.

  15. Simulation of the Regional Ground-Water-Flow System and Ground-Water/Surface-Water Interaction in the Rock River Basin, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckem, Paul F.

    2009-01-01

    A regional, two-dimensional, areal ground-water-flow model was developed to simulate the ground-water-flow system and ground-water/surface-water interaction in the Rock River Basin. The model was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Rock River Coalition. The objectives of the regional model were to improve understanding of the ground-water-flow system and to develop a tool suitable for evaluating the effects of potential regional water-management programs. The computer code GFLOW was used because of the ease with which the model can simulate ground-water/surface-water interactions, provide a framework for simulating regional ground-water-flow systems, and be refined in a stepwise fashion to incorporate new data and simulate ground-water-flow patterns at multiple scales. The ground-water-flow model described in this report simulates the major hydrogeologic features of the modeled area, including bedrock and surficial aquifers, ground-water/surface-water interactions, and ground-water withdrawals from high-capacity wells. The steady-state model treats the ground-water-flow system as a single layer with hydraulic conductivity and base elevation zones that reflect the distribution of lithologic groups above the Precambrian bedrock and a regionally significant confining unit, the Maquoketa Formation. In the eastern part of the Basin where the shale-rich Maquoketa Formation is present, deep ground-water flow in the sandstone aquifer below the Maquoketa Formation was not simulated directly, but flow into this aquifer was incorporated into the GFLOW model from previous work in southeastern Wisconsin. Recharge was constrained primarily by stream base-flow estimates and was applied uniformly within zones guided by regional infiltration estimates for soils. The model includes average ground-water withdrawals from 1997 to 2006 for municipal wells and from 1997 to 2005 for high-capacity irrigation, industrial, and commercial wells. In addition

  16. Strong CH/O interactions between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and water: Influence of aromatic system size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veljković, Dušan Ž

    2018-03-01

    Energies of CH/O interactions between water molecule and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with a different number of aromatic rings were calculated using ab initio calculations at MP2/cc-PVTZ level. Results show that an additional aromatic ring in structure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons significantly strengthens CH/O interactions. Calculated interaction energies in optimized structures of the most stable tetracene/water complex is -2.27 kcal/mol, anthracene/water is -2.13 kcal/mol and naphthalene/water is -1.97 kcal/mol. These interactions are stronger than CH/O contacts in benzene/water complex (-1.44 kcal/mol) while CH/O contacts in tetracene/water complex are even stronger than CH/O contacts in pyridine/water complexes (-2.21 kcal/mol). Electrostatic potential maps for different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were calculated and used to explain trends in the energies of interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Selective and sensitive detection of chromium(VI) in waters using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldy, Effie; Wolff, Chloe; Miao, Zhixin; Chen, Hao

    2013-09-01

    From 2000 through 2011, there were 14 criminal cases of violations of the Clean Water Act involving the discharge of chromium, a toxic heavy metal, into drinking and surface water sources. As chromium(VI), a potential carcinogen present in the environment, represents a significant safety concern, it is currently the subject of an EPA health risk assessment. Therefore, sensitive and selective detection of this species is highly desired. This study reports the analysis of chromium(VI) in water samples by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) following its reduction and complexation with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC). The reduction and subsequent complexation produce a characteristic [Cr(III)O]-PDC complex which can be detected as a protonated ion of m/z 507 in the positive ion mode. The detection is selective to chromium(VI) under acidic pH, even in the presence of chromium(III) and other metal ions, providing high specificity. Different water samples were examined, including deionized, tap, and river waters, and sensitive detection was achieved. In the case of deionized water, quantification over the concentration range of 3.7 to 148ppb gave an excellent correlation coefficient of 0.9904 using the enhanced MS mode scan. Using the single-reaction monitoring (SRM) mode (monitoring the characteristic fragmentation of m/z 507 to m/z 360), the limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 0.25ppb. The LOD of chromium(VI) for both tap and river water samples was determined to be 2.0ppb. A preconcentration strategy using simple vacuum evaporation of the aqueous sample was shown to further improve the ESI signal by 15 fold. This method, with high sensitivity and selectivity, should provide a timely solution for the real-world analysis of toxic chromium(VI). Copyright © 2012 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fluorescent Water Soluble Polymers for Isozyme-Selective Interactions with Matrix Metalloproteinase-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Rinku; Scott, Michael D.; Haldar, Manas K.; Ganguly, Bratati; Srivastava, D. K.; Friesner, Daniel L.; Mallik, Sanku

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are overexpressed in various pathological conditions, including various cancers. Although these isozymes have similar active sites, the patterns of exposed amino acids on their surfaces are different. Herein, we report the synthesis and molecular interactions of two water-soluble, fluorescent polymers which demonstrate selective interactions with MMP-9 compared to MMP-7 and -10. PMID:21367603

  19. Interaction of ethanol and water with the {1014} surface of calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, David; Gray, R J; Sand, K K

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to model the interaction between ethanol, water, and the {1014} surface of calcite. Our results demonstrate that a single ethanol molecule is able to form two interactions with the mineral surface (both Ca-O and O-H), resulting in a highly ordered, st...

  20. Molten LWR core material interactions with water and with concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlgren, D.A.; Buxton, L.D.; Muir, J.F.; Murfin, W.B.; Nelson, L.S.; Powers, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear power reactors are designed and operated to minimize the possibility of fuel melting. Nevertheless, in order to assess the risks associated with reactor operation, a realistic assessment is required for postulated accident sequences in which melting occurs. To investigate the experimental basis of the fuel melt accident analyses, a comprehensive review was performed at Sandia Laboratories. The results of that study indicated several phenomenological areas where additional experimental data should be gathered to verify common assumptions made in risk studies. In particular, vapor explosions and molten core material/concrete interactions were identified for further study. Results of these studies are presented

  1. Seasonal water mass distribution in the Indonesian throughflow entering the Indian Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Coatanoan, Christine; Metzl, N; Fieux, M; Coste, B

    1999-01-01

    A multiparametric approach is used to analyze the seasonal properties of water masses in the eastern Indian Ocean. The data were measured during two cruises of the Java Australia Dynamic Experiment (JADE) program carried out during two opposite seasons: August 1989 (SE monsoon) and February-March 1992 (NW monsoon). These cruises took place at the end of a La Nina event and during an EI. Nino episode, respectively. Seven sources have been identified in the studied region for the 200-800 m laye...

  2. Interaction in triple systems of neodymium nitrate, water and nitrates of trimethylammonium and tetramethylammonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeva, M.K.; Zhuravlev, E.F.

    1977-01-01

    At 20 and 40 deg C the mutual solubility is studied in systems neodymium nitrate-water-trimethylamine nitrate and neodymium nitrate-water-tetramethylammonium nitrate. It has been established that the above systems belong to those with chemical interaction of the components. The compounds have been isolated preparatively, their composition has been confirmed analytically, and their thermal behaviour studied

  3. Effects of the Interaction of Caffeine and Water on Voice Performance: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franca, Maria Claudia; Simpson, Kenneth O.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this "pilot" investigation was to study the effects of the interaction of caffeine and water intake on voice as evidenced by acoustic and aerodynamic measures, to determine whether ingestion of 200 mg of caffeine and various levels of water intake have an impact on voice. The participants were 48 females ranging in age…

  4. Processes of water rock interaction in the Turonian aquifer of Oum Er-Rabia Basin, Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettazarini, Said

    2005-12-01

    Possible water rock interaction processes, in the Moroccan basin of Oum Er-Rabia, were discussed by a geochemical study of groundwater from the Turonian limestone aquifer, the most important water resource in the region. Different types of water according to the classification of Piper were defined. Waters have shown an evolution from dominant CHO3 Ca Mg type through mixed to SO4 Cl Ca Mg type. The use of geochemical diagrams and chemical speciation modeling method has shown that water rock interaction is mainly controlled by carbonate and anhydrite dissolution, ion exchange and reverse ion exchange processes. Water rock equilibrium conditions are favorable for the precipitation of calcite, dolomite, kaolinite and magnesian smectite.

  5. Interaction enthalpies of solid human serum albumin with water-dioxane mixtures: comparison with water and organic solvent vapor sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirotkin, Vladimir A.; Faizullin, Djihanguir A.

    2004-01-01

    Enthalpy changes (ΔH tot ) on the immersion of dehydrated human serum albumin (HSA) into water-dioxane mixtures have been measured using a Setaram BT-2.15 calorimeter at 298 K. Thermodynamic activity of water was varied from 0 to 1. Calorimetric results are discussed together with the FTIR-spectroscopic data on water and organic solvent vapor adsorption/desorption isotherms on solid HSA. Dioxane sorption exhibits a pronounced hysteresis. Calorimetric and dioxane desorption dependencies consist of two parts. No dioxane sorption was observed in low water activity region (a w tot values are close to zero. At water activity about 0.5 the sharp exothermic drop of the interaction enthalpy values was observed. This exothermic drop is accompanied by the sharp increase in the amount of sorbed dioxane and additional water sorption (compared with that for pure water). Dioxane adsorption branch resembles a smooth curve. In this case, solid HSA binds more than 300 mol dioxane/mol HSA at low water activities. By using a water activity-based comparison we distinguished between dioxane-assisted and dioxane-competitive effect on water sorption. The obtained results demonstrate that the hydration 'history' of solid protein is an important factor that controls as the state of protein macromolecule as well as the sorption of low-molecular organic molecules

  6. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Glenn Charles [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  7. Two complementary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods to study the excretion and metabolic interaction of edaravone and taurine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dao-quan; Zheng, Xiao-xiao; Li, Yin-jie; Bian, Ting-ting; Yu, Yan-yan; Du, Qian; Yang, Dong-zhi; Jiang, Shui-shi

    2014-11-01

    In this study, two independent and complementary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods were respectively developed and validated for the determination of edaravone or taurine in rat urine, feces and bile after intravenous administration, using 3-methyl-l-p-tolyl-5-pyrazolone and sulfanilic acid as the internal standards (IS). Edaravone was separated on an Agilent Eclipse Plus C18 column (100×2.1 mm, 3.5 μm) using methanol and water (containing 5 mM ammonium formate and 0.02% formic acid) as mobile phase, while taurine was performed on a Waters Atlantis HILIC Silica column (150×2.1 mm, 3 μm) using acetonitrile and water (containing 5mM ammonium formate and 0.2% formic acid) as mobile phase. The mass analysis was performed in a Triple Quadrupole mass spectrometer via multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) with negative ionization mode. The optimized mass transition ion pairs (m/z) for quantification were 173.1→92.2 and 187.2→106.0 for edaravone and its IS, 124.1→80.0 and 172.0→80.0 for taurine and its IS, respectively. The validated methods have been successfully applied to the excretion and metabolism interaction study of edaravone and taurine in rats after independent intravenous administration and co-administration with a single dose. The results demonstrated that there were no significant alternations on the metabolism and cumulative excretion rate of edaravone and taurine, implying that the proposed combination therapy was pharmacologically viable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Calculation of mass flow and steam quality distribution on fuel elements of light-water cooled boiling water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermanns, H.J.

    1977-04-01

    By the example of light-water cooled nuclear reactors, the state of the calculation methods at disposal for calculating mass flow and steam quality distribution (sub-channel analysis) is indicated. Particular regard was paid to the transport phenomena occurring in reactor fuel elements in the range of two phase flow. Experimentally determined values were compared with recalculations of these experiments with the sub-channel code COBRA; from the results of these comparing calculations, conclusions could be drawn on the suitability of this code for defined applications. Limits of reliability could be determined to some extent. Based on the experience gained and the study of individual physical model concepts, recognized as being important, a sub-channel model was drawn up and the corresponding numerical computer code (SIEWAS) worked out. Experiments made at GE could be reproduced with the code SIEWAS with sufficient accuracy. (orig.) [de

  9. Radionuclide behavior in water saturated porous media: Diffusion and infiltration coupling of thermodynamically and kinetically controlled radionuclide water - mineral interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spasennykh, M.Yu.; Apps, J.A.

    1995-05-01

    A model is developed describing one dimensional radionuclide transport in porous media coupled with locally reversible radionuclide water-mineral exchange reactions and radioactive decay. Problems are considered in which radionuclide transport by diffusion and infiltration processes occur in cases where radionuclide water-solid interaction are kinetically and thermodynamically controlled. The limits of Sr-90 and Cs-137 migration are calculated over a wide range of the problem variables (infiltration velocity, distribution coefficients, and rate constants of water-mineral radionuclide exchange reactions)

  10. Interaction of the Helium, Hydrogen, Air, Argon, and Nitrogen Bubbles with Graphite Surface in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartali, Ruben; Otyepka, Michal; Pykal, Martin; Lazar, Petr; Micheli, Victor; Gottardi, Gloria; Laidani, Nadhira

    2017-05-24

    The interaction of the confined gas with solid surface immersed in water is a common theme of many important fields such as self-cleaning surface, gas storage, and sensing. For that reason, we investigated the gas-graphite interaction in the water medium. The graphite surface was prepared by mechanical exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The surface chemistry and morphology were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, profilometry, and atomic force microscopy. The surface energy of HOPG was estimated by contact angle measurements using the Owens-Wendt method. The interaction of gases (Ar, He, H 2 , N 2 , and air) with graphite was studied by a captive bubble method, in which the gas bubble was in contact with the exfoliated graphite surface in water media. The experimental data were corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations. The surface energy of HOPG equaled to 52.8 mJ/m 2 and more of 95% of the surface energy was attributed to dispersion interactions. The results on gas-surface interaction indicated that HOPG surface had gasphilic behavior for helium and hydrogen, while gasphobic behavior for argon and nitrogen. The results showed that the variation of the gas contact angle was related to the balance between the gas-surface and gas-gas interaction potentials. For helium and hydrogen the gas-surface interaction was particularly high compared to gas-gas interaction and this promoted the favorable interaction with graphite surface.

  11. Water-mass dynamics of an Arctic cold-water coral reef: First results from a new ocean observatory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flögel, Sascha; Karstensen, Johannes; Linke, Peter; Pfannkuche, Olaf; Ashastina, Kseniia; Dullo, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Cold-water coral reefs occur at various sites along the European continental margin, like in the Mediterranean Sea, on carbonate mounds West off Ireland, or at shallower depths between 100 and 350 m on the Norwegian shelf. Their occurrence is related to different physical parameters like temperature, salinity, seawater density, dissolved oxygen, and to other environmental parameters such as internal wave activity, nutrient supply, strong currents, which keep sediment input low, etc. Here, we present first results from a long-term observation in one of the nortnermost cold-water coral reefs at 70.5°N - the Stjernsund in northern Norway. The Stjernsund is a 30 km long and up to 3.5 km wide sound connecting the open North Atlantic with a fjord system. A deep-seated SW-NE oriented morainic sill with varying depths (203-236 m) splits the more than 400 m deep sound into two troughs. Living Lophelia pertusa dominated reef complexes occur on the NW slope between 235 and 305 m water depths and on the SE slope between 245 and 280 m. To investigate the dominating physical and biogeochemical boundary conditions a new modular seafloor observatory, MoLab, consisting of five sea-floor observatories and two moorings was deployed for 100 days during the summer of 2012. The various lander systems and moorimgs were equipped with sensors to measure current velocities and directions, temperature, salinity, pressure, pH, turbidity, fluorescence, oxygen concentration and saturation. Results showed that near-bottom salinities, temperature and current velocities are dominated by a semi-diurnal tidal forcing (pronounced M2 constituent), which cause vertical water mass movements of up to 100 m. These influence large parts of the living reef. Closer examination revealed overturning cells on the south-eastern slope of the sill during high tide, when Atlantic Water flows over the sill. The appearance of living cold-water corals is limited to a density envelope of sigma-theta=27.25-27.50 kg/m-3

  12. The effect of water level in a prey-predator interactions: A nonlinear analysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiboub Fellah, N.; Bouguima, S.M.; Moussaoui, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new model describing the interaction between predator and prey in Parloup Lake. ► Existence of periodic solution is proved. ► Seasonal variation in water level is an important factor for persitence. - Abstract: Water level may influence local community dynamics. We examine how seasonal variations in water level affect the outcome of prey-predator interactions in Parloup Lake in the south of France. We propose a new model to describe the annual cycle of persistence by using continuation theorem of coincidence degree.

  13. Quantification of four artificial sweeteners in Finnish surface waters with isotope-dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkola, Noora; Sainio, Pirjo

    2014-01-01

    The artificial sweeteners sucralose (SCL), acesulfame (ACS), saccharin (SAC), and cyclamate (CYC) have been detected in environmental waters in Europe and North America. Higher environmental levels are expected in view of the increasing consumption of these food additives. In this study, an isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) LC–MS/MS method was developed and validated for quantifying the four artificial sweeteners in boreal lakes (n = 3) and rivers (n = 12). The highest concentrations of ACS, SAC, CYC and SCL were 9,600, 490, 210 and 1000 ng/L, respectively. ACS and SAC were detected in all studied samples, and CYC and SCL in 98% and 56% of the samples. Seasonal trends of ACS and SAC were observed in some rivers. ACS and SCL concentrations in rivers correlated linearly with population equivalents of the wastewater treatment plants in the catchment areas, whereas SAC and CYC concentrations depend more on the source. -- Highlights: • A reliable method for analysing artificial sweeteners in water was validated. • Artificial sweeteners were quantified in boreal rivers and lakes. • Most concentrations were in accordance with previous European studies. • Acesulfame and saccharine concentrations were high in the most contaminated rivers. • Correlation observed between concentrations and mean water throughflow in rivers. -- High concentrations of artificial sweeteners were obtained, which indicates slow or negligible degradation of these compounds in boreal surface waters

  14. Monthly Variation of Taiwan Strait Through-flow Transports and Associated Water Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, S.; Sheu, D.; Kuo, H.

    2005-05-01

    Through-flow transports and associated water masses are analyzed using current data measured by bottom-mounted and ship-board ADCP (1999-2001) across the central Taiwan Strait and strait-wide hydrographic data acquired from 79 CTD survey cruises (1986-2003). The East Asian monsoon, from southwest in July to August and northeast in October to March, controls the transport fluctuation which peaks in August (2.34 Sv northward), is hampered by the northeast monsoon after September and diminishes to the minimum (0.26 Sv southward) in December. The standard deviation of the calculated transport ranges from 0.56 to 1.05 Sv during northeast monsoon months and is relatively small in other months. A cluster analysis together with conventional T-S diagrams identifies the saline and warm Kuroshio Branch Water (KBW), the less saline South China Sea Surface Water (SCSSW), the brackish and cold China Coastal Water (CCW), the saline Subsurface Water (SW) (depth > 100 m) and the Diluted Coastal Water (DCW). The majority of the northward transport in summer carries the SCSSW to the East China Sea. Meanwhile, the DCW appears off the northwest bank of the strait and the SW resides in the bottom layer of a deep trench in the southeastern strait. The onset of the northeast monsoon in September drives the CCW from the Yangtze river mouth to the northern strait. In the southern strait, the northward-moving KBW replaces the SCSSW and meets the southward-intruding CCW in the middle strait during November to April.

  15. The Mechanisms of Water Exchange: The Regulatory Roles of Multiple Interactions in Social Wasps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Devanshu; Karsai, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary benefits of task fidelity and improving information acquisition via multiple transfers of materials between individuals in a task partitioned system have been shown before, but in this paper we provide a mechanistic explanation of these phenomena. Using a simple mathematical model describing the individual interactions of the wasps, we explain the functioning of the common stomach, an information center, which governs construction behavior and task change. Our central hypothesis is a symmetry between foragers who deposit water and foragers who withdraw water into and out of the common stomach. We combine this with a trade-off between acceptance and resistance to water transfer. We ultimately derive a mathematical function that relates the number of interactions that foragers complete with common stomach wasps during a foraging cycle. We use field data and additional model assumptions to calculate values of our model parameters, and we use these to explain why the fullness of the common stomach stabilizes just below 50 percent, why the average number of successful interactions between foragers and the wasps forming the common stomach is between 5 and 7, and why there is a variation in this number of interactions over time. Our explanation is that our proposed water exchange mechanism places natural bounds on the number of successful interactions possible, water exchange is set to optimize mediation of water through the common stomach, and the chance that foragers abort their task prematurely is very low.

  16. Electric portfolio modeling with stochastic water - climate interactions: Implications for co-management of water and electric utilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldeyesus, Tibebe Argaw

    Water supply constraints can significantly restrict electric power generation, and such constraints are expected to worsen with future climate change. The overarching goal of this thesis is to incorporate stochastic water-climate interactions into electricity portfolio models and evaluate various pathways for water savings in co-managed water-electric utilities. Colorado Springs Utilities (CSU) is used as a case study to explore the above issues. The thesis consists of three objectives: Characterize seasonality of water withdrawal intensity factors (WWIF) for electric power generation and develop a risk assessment framework due to water shortages; Incorporate water constraints into electricity portfolio models and evaluate the impact of varying capital investments (both power generation and cooling technologies) on water use and greenhouse gas emissions; Compare the unit cost and overall water savings from both water and electric sectors in co-managed utilities to facilitate overall water management. This thesis provided the first discovery and characterization of seasonality of WWIF with distinct summertime and wintertime variations of +/-17% compared to the power plant average (0.64gal/kwh) which itself is found to be significantly higher than the literature average (0.53gal/kwh). Both the streamflow and WWIF are found to be highly correlated with monthly average temperature (r-sq = 89%) and monthly precipitation (r-sq of 38%) enabling stochastic simulation of future WWIF under moderate climate change scenario. Future risk to electric power generation also showed the risk to be underestimated significantly when using either the literature average or the power plant average WWIF. Seasonal variation in WWIF along with seasonality in streamflow, electricity demand and other municipal water demands along with storage are shown to be important factors for more realistic risk estimation. The unlimited investment in power generation and/or cooling technologies is also

  17. Hydrophysical correlation and water mass indication of optical physiological parameters of picophytoplankton in Prydz Bay during autumn 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Ma, Yuxin; Lin, Ling; He, Jianfeng

    2012-12-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) is efficient in detecting both abundance and optical physiological parameters including cell size and cellular carbon content-side scatter (SSC), carotenoids-green and orange fluorescence (FL1 and FL2), and red fluorescence-chlorophylls (FL3) can be obtained by FCM. The utilization of these physiological parameters in indicating water masses in Prydz Bay was investigated for the first time. Picophytoplankton were very sensitive to hydrophysical changes and present distinct characteristics of water masses: Picophytoplankton in water closer to the Amery Ice Shelf were more affected by salinity than by temperature, while temperature became more important than salinity the nearer the picophytoplankton were to the deep sea. The picophytoplankton dealt with declines in light by increasing the size of cells, which increase the fixation of carbon. This can also be increased by high temperature and salinity. Pure water masses can increase the content of chlorophylls and cellular carbon. Generally, the distributions of all the five parameters at upper water depths were less affected by temperature and salinity than by water masses; and these parameters can be as indicators to Summer Surface Water (SSW), Winter Water (WW) and Continental Shelf Water (CSW). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Time of Emergence of Ocean Interior Acidification and De-oxygenation in a Water Mass Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, M.; Frenger, I.; Froelicher, T. L.; Rodgers, K. B.; Schlunegger, S.; Sasano, D.; Ishii, M.

    2016-02-01

    Potential marine ecosystem stressors, such as acidification and de-oxygenation, are expected to impact biology over the course of the 21st century. Detection of these changes in ocean biogeochemistry is made complicated by the background natural variability of the climate system (Frölicher et al., 2007 and Rodgers et al., 2015). Here we present a novel method for the interpretation of ocean interior measurement for environmental change. We use a water mass framework to compare a high-frequency repeat hydrographic section at 165E in the Pacific (Sasano et al., 2015) with initial condition ensemble experiments ran with GFDL's Earth System Model (ESM2M). In this study, "emergence" for a trend occurs when an anthropogenic signal (either modeled or observed) exceeds the noise (envelope of spread amongst ensemble members, generated by internal variability). By using a water mass as opposed to the standard depth framework, we remove the effects of anthropogenic trends and internal variability of deepening isopycnals, allowing for greater emergence of bio-geochemical signals. We find that emergence of anthropogenic trends in acidification and omega aragonite emerge sooner and with greater confidence than do trends in ocean interior oxygen concentrations. More broadly, this study demonstrates the utility of applying initial condition ensembles to interpret ocean interior variability and trends, rather than the traditional practice of using observations to validate models.

  19. Study of water mass transfer dynamics in frescoes by dielectric spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmi, R.; Riminesi, C.

    2008-01-01

    The knowledge of moisture content (M C) is essential for determining the state of preservation of various types of hand-work: from building materials such as bricks and concrete, to objects of artistic value, in particular frescoes and mural paintings. In all above, moisture is the primary source of damages, as it affects the durability of porous materials. Dielectric properties of porous materials are strongly affected by the presence of water, suggesting dielectric spectroscopy as a suitable non-invasive diagnostic technique. The development of a quantitative relationship between M C and permittivity requires to investigate the dynamics of water mass transfer in porous media, and to determine its effect on the dielectric properties. In this paper a coupled mass transfer/dielectric problem is introduced and solved numerically, based on a finite element model. Results are compared to experimental dielectric measurements performed on plaster samples by the open coaxial method. The application of the dielectric technique to frescoes monitoring is proposed, showing the results obtained is an on-site study.

  20. Interrogating the architecture of protein assemblies and protein interaction networks by cross-linking mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Fan; Heck, Albert J R

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are involved in almost all processes of the living cell. They are organized through extensive networks of interaction, by tightly bound macromolecular assemblies or more transiently via signaling nodes. Therefore, revealing the architecture of protein complexes and protein interaction

  1. Studying Protein-Protein Interactions by Biotin AP-Tagged Pulldown and LTQ-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhongqiu; Jia, Yuemeng; Li, Hui

    2017-01-01

    The study of protein-protein interactions represents a key aspect of biological research. Identifying unknown protein binding partners using mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has evolved into an indispensable strategy in drug discovery. The classic approach of immunoprecipitation with specific antibodies against the proteins of interest has limitations, such as the need for immunoprecipitation-qualified antibody. The biotin AP-tag pull-down system has the advantage of high specificity, ease of use, and no requirement for antibody. It is based on the high specificity, high affinity interaction between biotin and streptavidin. After pulldown, in-gel tryptic digestion and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis of sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) protein bands can be performed. In this work, we provide protocols that can be used for the identification of proteins that interact with FOXM1, a protein that has recently emerged as a potential biomarker and drug target in oncotherapy, as an example. We focus on the pull-down procedure and assess the efficacy of the pulldown with known FOXM1 interactors such as β-catenin. We use a high performance LTQ Orbitrap MSn system that combines rapid LTQ ion trap data acquisition with high mass accuracy Orbitrap analysis to identify the interacting proteins.

  2. Simulating shock-bubble interactions at water-gelatin interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, Stefan; Kaiser, Jakob; Bermejo-Moreno, Ivan; Adams, Nikolaus

    2016-11-01

    Biomedical problems are often driven by fluid dynamics, as in vivo organisms are usually composed of or filled with fluids that (strongly) affected their physics. Additionally, fluid dynamical effects can be used to enhance certain phenomena or destroy organisms. As examples, we highlight the benign potential of shockwave-driven kidney-stone lithotripsy or sonoporation (acoustic cavitation of microbubbles) to improve drug delivery into cells. During the CTR SummerProgram 2016 we have performed axisymmetric three-phase simulations of a shock hitting a gas bubble in water near a gelatin interface mimicking the fundamental process during sonoporation. We used our multi-resolution finite volume method with sharp interface representation (level-set), WENO-5 shock capturing and interface scale-separation and compared the results with a diffuse-interface method. Qualitatively our simulation results agree well with the reference. Due to the interface treatment the pressure profiles are sharper in our simulations and bubble collapse dynamics are predicted at shorter time-scales. Validation with free-field collapse (Rayleigh collapse) shows very good agreement. The project leading to this application has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (Grant agreement No 667483).

  3. The exploration of trophic structure modeling using mass balance Ecopath model of Tangerang coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, N. N.; Kamal, M.; Wardiatno, Y.; Rozi

    2018-04-01

    Ecopath model approach was used to describe trophic interaction, energy flows and ecosystem condition of Tangerang coastal waters. This model consists of 42 ecological groups, of which 41 are living groups and one is a detritus group. Trophic levels of these groups vary between 1.0 (for primary producers and detritus) to 4.03 (for tetraodontidae). Groups with trophic levels 2≤TLfish, while detritus has a positive impact on the majority of demersal fish. Leiognathidae havea negative impact on phytoplankton, zooplankton and several other groups. System omnivory index for this ecosystem is 0.151. System primary production/respiration (P/R) ratio of Tangerang coastal waters is 1.505. This coastal ecosystem is an immatureecosystem because it hasdegraded. Pedigree index for this model is 0.57. This model describes ecosystem condition affected by overfishing and antropogenic activities. Therefore, through Ecopath model we provide some suggestions about the ecosystem-based fisheries management.

  4. Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Symposium on Water-Rock Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellmann, Roland [Institute for Earth Sciences - ISTerre, CNRS UMR 5275 Grenoble (France); Pitsch, Helmut [IRSN, DSDP, SPIIC, BP17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    The 14. edition of the International Symposium on Water-Rock Interaction was held from 9-14 June 2013 in the Palais des Papes in the historic city of Avignon, located in southeastern France. As is the tradition with WRI symposia, earth scientists and guests from around the world convened over a week's time to exchange the latest ideas, advances, and data covering some of the most important aspects of rock-water interactions. The research that was presented in both oral and poster format covered studies derived from experimental and laboratory work, modeling and theoretical approaches, and field measurements. The presentations at the symposium showed the immense range of conditions associated with natural, experimental, and theoretical rock-water systems, encompassing a wide range of pH, as well as temperature and pressure conditions ranging from ambient to beyond the critical point of water. In addition, as can be evidenced from the presentations, many water-rock systems are increasingly being described in terms of control by both abiotic and biogeochemical processes. Advances in fundamental WRI research are also making significant contributions to better understanding current environmental problems, which are quite often highlighted in today's media headlines. Reflecting the importance of these environmental and societal challenges, an important number of presentations in this symposium described the current state of the knowledge concerning acid mine drainage, geological CO{sub 2} sequestration, shale gas extraction, aquifer salinization and diminishing potable water resources, and nuclear waste storage. Some 260 manuscripts were submitted to WRI-14 by scientists from 37 countries. Each manuscript was peer reviewed for scientific content by two reviewers. In the end, 230 manuscripts were accepted for either oral or poster presentation at the symposium. Each one of these papers can be found in this special symposium volume. The WRI-14 symposium has been

  5. Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Symposium on Water-Rock Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellmann, Roland; Pitsch, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    The 14. edition of the International Symposium on Water-Rock Interaction was held from 9-14 June 2013 in the Palais des Papes in the historic city of Avignon, located in southeastern France. As is the tradition with WRI symposia, earth scientists and guests from around the world convened over a week's time to exchange the latest ideas, advances, and data covering some of the most important aspects of rock-water interactions. The research that was presented in both oral and poster format covered studies derived from experimental and laboratory work, modeling and theoretical approaches, and field measurements. The presentations at the symposium showed the immense range of conditions associated with natural, experimental, and theoretical rock-water systems, encompassing a wide range of pH, as well as temperature and pressure conditions ranging from ambient to beyond the critical point of water. In addition, as can be evidenced from the presentations, many water-rock systems are increasingly being described in terms of control by both abiotic and biogeochemical processes. Advances in fundamental WRI research are also making significant contributions to better understanding current environmental problems, which are quite often highlighted in today's media headlines. Reflecting the importance of these environmental and societal challenges, an important number of presentations in this symposium described the current state of the knowledge concerning acid mine drainage, geological CO 2 sequestration, shale gas extraction, aquifer salinization and diminishing potable water resources, and nuclear waste storage. Some 260 manuscripts were submitted to WRI-14 by scientists from 37 countries. Each manuscript was peer reviewed for scientific content by two reviewers. In the end, 230 manuscripts were accepted for either oral or poster presentation at the symposium. Each one of these papers can be found in this special symposium volume. The WRI-14 symposium has been

  6. Land Use, Climate, and Water Resources—Global Stages of Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujay S. Kaushal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Land use and climate change can accelerate the depletion of freshwater resources that support humans and ecosystem services on a global scale. Here, we briefly review studies from around the world, and highlight those in this special issue. We identify stages that characterize increasing interaction between land use and climate change. During the first stage, hydrologic modifications and the built environment amplify overland flow via processes associated with runoff-dominated ecosystems (e.g., soil compaction, impervious surface cover, drainage, and channelization. During the second stage, changes in water storage impact the capacity of ecosystems to buffer extremes in water quantity and quality (e.g., either losses in snowpack, wetlands, and groundwater recharge or gains in water and nutrient storage behind dams in reservoirs. During the third stage, extremes in water quantity and quality contribute to losses in ecosystem services and water security (e.g., clean drinking water, flood mitigation, and habitat availability. During the final stage, management and restoration strategies attempt to regain lost ecosystem structure, function, and services but need to adapt to climate change. By anticipating the increasing interaction between land use and climate change, intervention points can be identified, and management strategies can be adjusted to improve outcomes for realistic expectations. Overall, global water security cannot be adequately restored without considering an increasing interaction between land use and climate change across progressive stages and our ever-increasing human domination of the water cycle from degradation to ecosystem restoration.

  7. Land Use, Climate, and Water Resources-Global Stages of Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Sujay S; Gold, Arthur J; Mayer, Paul M

    2017-10-24

    Land use and climate change can accelerate the depletion of freshwater resources that support humans and ecosystem services on a global scale. Here, we briefly review studies from around the world, and highlight those in this special issue. We identify stages that characterize increasing interaction between land use and climate change. During the first stage, hydrologic modifications and the built environment amplify overland flow via processes associated with runoff-dominated ecosystems (e.g., soil compaction, impervious surface cover, drainage, and channelization). During the second stage, changes in water storage impact the capacity of ecosystems to buffer extremes in water quantity and quality (e.g., either losses in snowpack, wetlands, and groundwater recharge or gains in water and nutrient storage behind dams in reservoirs). During the third stage, extremes in water quantity and quality contribute to losses in ecosystem services and water security (e.g., clean drinking water, flood mitigation, and habitat availability). During the final stage, management and restoration strategies attempt to regain lost ecosystem structure, function, and services but need to adapt to climate change. By anticipating the increasing interaction between land use and climate change, intervention points can be identified, and management strategies can be adjusted to improve outcomes for realistic expectations. Overall, global water security cannot be adequately restored without considering an increasing interaction between land use and climate change across progressive stages and our ever-increasing human domination of the water cycle from degradation to ecosystem restoration.

  8. Development of non-bonded interaction parameters between graphene and water using particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejagam, Karteek K; Singh, Samrendra; Deshmukh, Sanket A

    2018-05-05

    New Lennard-Jones parameters have been developed to describe the interactions between atomistic model of graphene, represented by REBO potential, and five commonly used all-atom water models, namely SPC, SPC/E, SPC/Fw, SPC/Fd, and TIP3P/Fs by employing particle swarm optimization (PSO) method. These new parameters were optimized to reproduce the macroscopic contact angle of water on a graphene sheet. The calculated line tension was in the order of 10 -11 J/m for the droplets of all water models. Our molecular dynamics simulations indicate the preferential orientation of water molecules near graphene-water interface with one OH bond pointing toward the graphene surface. Detailed analysis of simulation trajectories reveals the presence of water molecules with ≤∼1, ∼2, and ∼4 hydrogen bonds at the surface of air-water interface, graphene-water interface, and bulk region of the water droplet, respectively. Presence of water molecules with ≤∼1 and ∼2 hydrogen bonds suggest the existence of water clusters of different sizes at these interfaces. The trends observed in the libration, bending, and stretching bands of the vibrational spectra are closely associated with these structural features of water. The inhomogeneity in hydrogen bond network of water at the air-water and graphene-water interface is manifested by broadening of the peaks in the libration band for water present at these interfaces. The stretching band for the molecules in water droplet shows a blue shift as compared to the pure bulk water, which conjecture the presence of weaker hydrogen bond network in a droplet. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Experimental studies of thermal and chemical interactions between molten aluminum and nuclear dispersion fuels with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farahani, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    Because of the possibility of rapid physical and chemical molten fuel-water interactions during a core melt accident in noncommercial or experimental reactors, it is important to understand the interactions that might occur if these materials were to contact water. An existing vertical 1-D shock tube facility was improved and a gas sampling device to measure the gaseous hydrogen in the upper chamber of the shock tube was designed and built to study the impact of a water column driven downward by a pressurized gas onto both molten aluminum (6061 alloy) and oxide and silicide depleted nuclear dispersion fuels in aluminum matrices. The experiments were carried out with melt temperatures initially at 750 to 1,000 C and water at room temperature and driving pressures of 0.5 and 1 MPa. Very high transient pressures, in many cases even larger than the thermodynamic critical pressure of the water (∼ 20 MPa), were generated due to the interactions between the water and the crucible and its contents. The molten aluminum always reacted chemically with the water but the reaction did not increase consistently with increasing melt temperature. An aluminum ignition occurred when water at room temperature impacted 28.48 grams of molten aluminum at 980.3 C causing transient pressures greater than 69 MPa. No signs of aluminum ignition were observed in any of the experiments with the depleted nuclear dispersion fuels, U 3 O 8 -Al and U 3 Si 2 -Al. The greater was the molten aluminum-water chemical reaction, the finer was the debris recovered for a given set of initial conditions. Larger coolant velocities (larger driving pressures) resulted in more melt fragmentation but did not result in more molten aluminum-water chemical reaction. Decreasing the water temperature also resulted in more melt fragmentation and did not suppress the molten aluminum-water chemical reaction

  10. Determination of 36Cl/Cl ratio in ground water using the accelerator mass spectrometry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Suman; Deodhar, A.S.; Saravana Kumar, U.; Surendran, P.; Shrivastava, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Nair, J.P.; Yadav, M.L.; Hemalatha, M.; Sparrow, H.; Mahata, K.; Thomas, R.G.; Bhagwat, P.V.; Kailas, S.; Kale, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) programme using the 14 MV Pelletron Accelerator at Mumbai has been initiated with major emphasis on the determination of 36 Cl in water samples, of interest to hydrology and environment. In order to carry out the AMS measurement, a beam chopper to cut down beam intensity by a factor of 20 has been developed and commissioned. A multi-anode gas -si detector has been built to separate 36 Cl from the interfering 36 S. A new TPS system has been procured to operate the machine in the GVM mode. Standard and blank samples from Prime lab, Purdue have been employed in these measurements to standardise the technique for 36 Cl/Cl ratio determination. The detector was calibrated using the stable 35,37 Cl ions. The background 36 Cl in the system has been measured using the blank sample from Purdue and it was estimated that the ratio of 36 Cl/Cl was of the order of 10 -13 in the present setup. Ground water samples collected from South India were converted to AgCl and put in the SNICS ion source for the AMS measurements. These ground water samples, with 14 C content estimated to be in the range of 1 to 4 pMC indicate that the samples may be more than 35,000 years old. Using the AMS technique we have determined the 36 Cl/Cl ratio values for these ground water samples. They are found to range between 2 to 5 x 10 -12 . Additional measurements are planned to determine the age of the water samples and to understand the reasons for the observed high values of 36 Cl in these samples. (author)

  11. Multicomponent mass transport model: a model for simulating migration of radionuclides in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washburn, J.F.; Kaszeta, F.E.; Simmons, C.S.; Cole, C.R.

    1980-07-01

    This report presents the results of the development of a one-dimensional radionuclide transport code, MMT2D (Multicomponent Mass Transport), for the AEGIS Program. Multicomponent Mass Transport is a numerical solution technique that uses the discrete-parcel-random-wald (DPRW) method to directly simulate the migration of radionuclides. MMT1D accounts for: convection;dispersion; sorption-desorption; first-order radioactive decay; and n-membered radioactive decay chains. Comparisons between MMT1D and an analytical solution for a similar problem show that: MMT1D agrees very closely with the analytical solution; MMT1D has no cumulative numerical dispersion like that associated with solution techniques such as finite differences and finite elements; for current AEGIS applications, relatively few parcels are required to produce adequate results; and the power of MMT1D is the flexibility of the code in being able to handle complex problems for which analytical solution cannot be obtained. Multicomponent Mass Transport (MMT1D) codes were developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to predict the movement of radiocontaminants in the saturated and unsaturated sediments of the Hanford Site. All MMT models require ground-water flow patterns that have been previously generated by a hydrologic model. This report documents the computer code and operating procedures of a third generation of the MMT series: the MMT differs from previous versions by simulating the mass transport processes in systems with radionuclide decay chains. Although MMT is a one-dimensional code, the user is referred to the documentation of the theoretical and numerical procedures of the three-dimensional MMT-DPRW code for discussion of expediency, verification, and error-sensitivity analysis

  12. Enhanced methane emission during carbonaceous sediment-basalt interactions as a mechanism for mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, A. I.; Day, J. M.; Ryabov, V. V.; Taylor, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    Precise dating techniques have established the contemporaneous eruption of the Siberian Traps at the beginning of the Permian faunal mass extinction at 248 ± 2 Ma. Within a relatively limited time-period ( 1 Ma), the Siberian Traps expelled approximately ninety percent of its total volume ( 1.5 Mkm3), each episode of volcanism adding substantial amounts of CO2, CH4, and SO2 to the atmosphere. The Permian-Triassic Boundary shows average organic carbon isotope excursions of -6.4 ± 4.4‰ (253 Ma), from a long-term average δ13Corg of -25‰. Retallack and Jahren [2008; Journal of Geology] suggested that eruption into C-rich sediments and resulting methane degassing would satisfy necessary conditions to cause such large, variable perturbations in the carbon isotope record. To test this hypothesis, we measured C isotope variations in upper crustal sediments and metalliferous basalts from the Khungtukun and Dzhatul Intrusions, of the Siberian Traps. We find that δ13C values for Siberian coal and sandstones are restricted at -23 to -25‰, with similar values measured in the metalliferous basalts. Anticipated thermogenic methane from disassociation of these sources would be considerably lighter and consistent with low δ13C isotopic values. We further test this mechanism by employing a zero dimensional energy balance model to examine three key parameters: eruption duration, amounts of CO2 and CH4 emission, and the frequency of eruptions. Greater methane emissions than previously estimated due to carbonaceous sediment-basalt interactions have a sustained temperature effect due to high global warming potential (GWP), between 28 and 36 over 100 years compared to the CO2 reference value. Our model predicts that a quick succession of massive effusive eruptions would cause a sustained and substantial temperature effect consistent with estimated equatorial levels of 40°C during the Permian-Triassic Boundary. This mechanism could explain the deficit between the amount of

  13. Comprehensive Characterization of Minichromosome Maintenance Complex (MCM) Protein Interactions Using Affinity and Proximity Purifications Coupled to Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Marie-Line; Bastin, Charlotte; Lévesque, Dominique; Boisvert, François-Michel

    2016-09-02

    The extensive identification of protein-protein interactions under different conditions is an important challenge to understand the cellular functions of proteins. Here we use and compare different approaches including affinity purification and purification by proximity coupled to mass spectrometry to identify protein complexes. We explore the complete interactome of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex by using both approaches for all of the different MCM proteins. Overall, our analysis identified unique and shared interaction partners and proteins enriched for distinct biological processes including DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell cycle regulation. Furthermore, we mapped the changes in protein interactions of the MCM complex in response to DNA damage, identifying a new role for this complex in DNA repair. In summary, we demonstrate the complementarity of these approaches for the characterization of protein interactions within the MCM complex.

  14. Salinity maxima associated with some sub-surface water masses in the upper layers of the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varadachari, V.V.R.; Murty, C.S.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    The distribution of some sub-surface water masses in the western bay of Bengal during the south-west monsoon period is presented. Based on the salinity maxima and sigma t values the existence of waters of Persian Gulf and Red Sea origin could...

  15. Spatial patterns of bacterial abundance, activity and community composition in relation to water masses in the eastern Mediterranean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yokokawa, Taichi; De Corte, Daniele; Sintes, Eva; Herndl, Gerhard J.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the variation of bacterial activity and community composition between and within specific water masses, samples were collected throughout the water column at 5 stations in the eastern Mediterranean Sea corresponding to the regions of the northern Aegean, mid-Aegean, western Cretan,

  16. Water level observations from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for improving estimates of surface water-groundwater interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandini, Filippo; Butts, Michael; Vammen Jacobsen, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    spatial resolution; ii) spatially continuous profiles along or across the water body; iii) flexible timing of sampling. A semi-synthetic study was conducted to analyse the value of the new UAV-borne datatype for improving hydrological models, in particular estimates of GW (Groundwater)- SW (Surface Water...

  17. Geochemical study of water-rock interaction processes on geothermal systems of alkaline water in granitic massif

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buil gutierrez, B.; Garcia Sanz, S.; Lago San Jose, M.; Arranz Yague, E.; Auque Sanz, L.

    2002-01-01

    The study of geothermal systems developed within granitic massifs (with alkaline waters and reducing ORP values) is a topic of increasing scientific interest. These systems are a perfect natural laboratory for studying the water-rock interaction processes as they are defined by three main features: 1) long residence time of water within the system, 2) temperature in the reservoir high enough to favour reaction kinetics and finally, 3) the comparison of the chemistry of the incoming and outgoing waters of the system allows for the evaluation of the processes that have modified the water chemistry and its signature, The four geothermal systems considered in this paper are developed within granitic massifs of the Spanish Central Pyrenes; these systems were studied from a geochemical point of view, defining the major, trace and REE chemistry of both waters and host rocks and then characterizing the composition and geochemical evolution of the different waters. Bicarbonate-chloride-sodic and bicarbonate-sodic compositions are the most representative of the water chemistry in the deep geothermal system, as they are not affected by secondary processes (mixing, conductive cooling, etc). (Author)

  18. Imbalance in Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions and its Relationship to the Coastal Zone Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontar, Y. A.; Ozorovich, Y. R.; Salokhiddinov, A. T.

    2011-12-01

    We report here some efforts and results in studying the imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions and processes of groundwater-surface water interactions and groundwater flooding creating hazards in the coastal zones. Hazards, hydrological and geophysical risk analysis related to imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions and groundwater flooding have been to a large extent under-emphasized for coastal zone applications either due to economical limitations or underestimation of significance of imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions. This is particularly true for tsunamis creating salt water intrusion to coastal aquifers, even though most tsunami hazard assessments have in the past relied on scenario or deterministic type models, and to increasing mineralization of potable water because of intensive water diversions and also the abundance of highly toxic pollutants (mainly pesticides) in water, air and food, which contribute to the deterioration of the coastal population's health. In the wake of pressing environmental and economic issues, it is of prime importance for the scientific community to shed light onto the great efforts by hydrologists and geophysicists to quantify conceptual uncertainties and to provide quality assurances of potential coastal zone hazard evaluation and prediction under conditions of imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions. This paper proposes consideration of two case studies which are important and significant for future understanding of a concept of imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions and development and essential for feasibility studies of hazards in the coastal zone. The territory of the Aral Sea Region in Central Asia is known as an ecological disaster coastal zone. It is now obvious that, in order to provide reasonable living conditions to the coastal zone population, it is first of all necessary to drastically improve the quality of the water dedicated to human needs. Due

  19. Chemical mass transport between fluid fine tailings and the overlying water cover of an oil sands end pit lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dompierre, Kathryn A.; Barbour, S. Lee; North, Rebecca L.; Carey, Sean K.; Lindsay, Matthew B. J.

    2017-06-01

    Fluid fine tailings (FFT) are a principal by-product of the bitumen extraction process at oil sands mines. Base Mine Lake (BML)—the first full-scale demonstration oil sands end pit lake (EPL)—contains approximately 1.9 × 108 m3 of FFT stored under a water cover within a decommissioned mine pit. Chemical mass transfer from the FFT to the water cover can occur via two key processes: (1) advection-dispersion driven by tailings settlement; and (2) FFT disturbance due to fluid movement in the water cover. Dissolved chloride (Cl) was used to evaluate the water cover mass balance and to track mass transport within the underlying FFT based on field sampling and numerical modeling. Results indicated that FFT was the dominant Cl source to the water cover and that the FFT is exhibiting a transient advection-dispersion mass transport regime with intermittent disturbance near the FFT-water interface. The advective pore water flux was estimated by the mass balance to be 0.002 m3 m-2 d-1, which represents 0.73 m of FFT settlement per year. However, the FFT pore water Cl concentrations and corresponding mass transport simulations indicated that advection rates and disturbance depths vary between sample locations. The disturbance depth was estimated to vary with location between 0.75 and 0.95 m. This investigation provides valuable insight for assessing the geochemical evolution of the water cover and performance of EPLs as an oil sands reclamation strategy.

  20. A critical discussion of the physics of wood–water interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybring, Emil Engelund; Thygesen, L. G.; Svensson, Staffan

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews recent findings on wood–water interaction and puts them into context of established knowledge in the field. Several new findings challenge prevalent theories and are critically discussed in an attempt to advance current knowledge and highlight gaps. The focus of this review...... is put on water in the broadest concept of wood products, that is, the living tree is not considered. Moreover, the review covers the basic wood–water relation, states and transitions. Secondary effects such as the ability of water to alter physical properties of wood are only discussed in cases where...

  1. Comparison of approaches for measuring the mass accommodation coefficient for the condensation of water and sensitivities to uncertainties in thermophysical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P; Riipinen, Ilona

    2012-11-08

    We compare and contrast measurements of the mass accommodation coefficient of water on a water surface made using ensemble and single particle techniques under conditions of supersaturation and subsaturation, respectively. In particular, we consider measurements made using an expansion chamber, a continuous flow streamwise thermal gradient cloud condensation nuclei chamber, the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, aerosol optical tweezers, and electrodynamic balances. Although this assessment is not intended to be comprehensive, these five techniques are complementary in their approach and give values that span the range from near 0.1 to 1.0 for the mass accommodation coefficient. We use the same semianalytical treatment to assess the sensitivities of the measurements made by the various techniques to thermophysical quantities (diffusion constants, thermal conductivities, saturation pressure of water, latent heat, and solution density) and experimental parameters (saturation value and temperature). This represents the first effort to assess and compare measurements made by different techniques to attempt to reduce the uncertainty in the value of the mass accommodation coefficient. Broadly, we show that the measurements are consistent within the uncertainties inherent to the thermophysical and experimental parameters and that the value of the mass accommodation coefficient should be considered to be larger than 0.5. Accurate control and measurement of the saturation ratio is shown to be critical for a successful investigation of the surface transport kinetics during condensation/evaporation. This invariably requires accurate knowledge of the partial pressure of water, the system temperature, the droplet curvature and the saturation pressure of water. Further, the importance of including and quantifying the transport of heat in interpreting droplet measurements is highlighted; the particular issues associated with interpreting measurements of condensation

  2. Interaction of water with (silico)aluminophosphate zeotypes: a comparative investigation using dispersion-corrected DFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Michael

    2016-06-21

    Porous aluminophosphates (AlPOs) and silicoaluminophosphates (SAPOs) with zeolite-like structures have received considerable attention as potential adsorbents for heat transformation applications using water adsorption/desorption cycles. Since a detailed experimental characterisation of the water adsorption properties has only been performed for some of these materials, such as AlPO-18 (AEI topology) and SAPO-34 (CHA topology), more systematic insights regarding the influence of the pore topology and (for SAPOs) the arrangement of the framework protons on the affinity towards water are lacking. To study the relationships between structure and properties in more detail, the interaction of water with six structurally different AlPOs (with AEI, AFX, CHA, ERI, GIS, RHO topologies) and their SAPO analogues was investigated using dispersion-corrected density-functional theory (DFT-D) calculations. Different possible locations of silicon atoms and charge-balancing protons were considered for the SAPO systems. The calculations for SAPOs at low water loadings (one H2O molecule per framework proton) revealed that the interaction energies exhibit a considerable variation, ranging from -75 to -100 kJ mol(-1) (per water molecule). The differences in interaction energy were rationalised with the different structural environment of the framework protons at which the water molecules are adsorbed. At high water uptakes (near saturation), interaction energies in the range of -65 kJ mol(-1) were obtained for all AlPOs, and there was no evidence for a marked influence of pore size and/or topology on the interaction strength. The interaction of water with SAPOs was found to be approximately 5 kJ mol(-1) stronger than for AlPOs due to an increased contribution of electrostatic interactions. An analysis of the structural changes upon water adsorption revealed striking differences between the distinct topologies, with the materials with GIS and RHO topologies being distorted much more

  3. Interaction of SO2 with the Surface of a Water Nanodroplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jie; Zhu, Chongqin; Li, Lei; Richmond, Geraldine L; Francisco, Joseph S; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2017-11-29

    We present a comprehensive computational study of interaction of a SO 2 with water molecules in the gas phase and with the surface of various sized water nanodroplets to investigate the solvation behavior of SO 2 in different atmospheric environments. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) simulation shows that, in the gas phase and at a temperature of 300 K, the dominant interaction between SO 2 and H 2 O is (SO 2 ) S···O (H 2 O) , consistent with previous density-functional theory (DFT) computation at 0 K. However, at the surface of a water nanodroplet, BOMD simulation shows that the hydrogen-bonding interaction of (SO 2 ) O···H (H 2 O) becomes increasingly important with the increase of droplet size, reflecting a marked effect of the water surface on the SO 2 solvation. This conclusion is in good accordance with spectroscopy evidence obtained previously (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 16806; J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2006, 128, 3256). The prevailing interaction (SO 2 ) O···H (H 2 O) on a large droplet is mainly due to favorable exposure of H atoms of H 2 O at the air-water interface. Indeed, the conversion of the dominant interaction in the gas phase (SO 2 ) S···O (H 2 O) to the dominant interaction on the water nanodroplet (SO 2 ) O···H (H 2 O) may incur effects on the SO 2 chemistry in atmospheric aerosols because the solvation of SO 2 at the water surface can affect the reactive sites and electrophilicity of SO 2 . Hence, the solvation of SO 2 on the aerosol surface may have new implications when studying SO 2 chemistry in the aerosol-containing troposphere.

  4. The influence of surfactant on mass transfer coefficients in evaporation of volatile organic compound from water basin

    OpenAIRE

    Bunyakan, C.; Malakarn, S.; Tongurai, C.

    2002-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been found in wastewater of many chemical industries. Evaporation of VOCs from open water basin in waste treatment facilities causes air-pollution and has been regulated in many countries. Reduction or prevention of VOCs evaporation from open water basin is then necessary. The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of surface film generated by an insoluble surfactant on the mass transfer coefficient of VOCs evaporating from water. Hexadeca...

  5. Determination of 15N nitrates in water samples using mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moya, P.; Aguirre, E.; Gallardo, P.

    2000-01-01

    The nitrogen element (Z = 7) has two stable isotopes, whose relative quantities are 99.64% for 14 N and 0.36% for 15 N. Nitrogen is part of many processes and reactions that are important to life and that affect the quality of the water. Within the nitrogen cycle there are kinetic and thermodynamic fractionation processes, which are potentially important for tracing its sources and demands. Water contamination due to nitrates is a serious problem that is affecting large parts of the biosphere. Surface water contamination can be remedied by prevention and control measures, but the problem becomes acute when the contamination penetrates to groundwater water. Contaminated groundwater can remain in the aquifers for centuries, even milleniums, and decontamination is very difficult, if not impossible. Isotopic techniques can help to evaluate how vulnerable the groundwater is to contamination from the surface when its displacement speed and extra load area are determined. Then the sources of surface contamination (natural, industrial, agricultural, domestic) can be identified. Isotopic techniques can also describe an incipient contamination, and they can provide an early alert when chemical or biological indicators do not reveal any signs for concern. The isotopic fractionation of several nitrogen compounds provide the basis for using 15 N as a hydrological isotope tool. There are three main sources of nitrogen contamination in water, these are: organic nitrogen in the soil, nitrogenized fertilizers, domestic, industrial and animal wastes. The following technical procedure describes the method for determining the isotopic ration 15 N/ 14 N in nitrates in water. The nitrate is separated from the water using ion exchange columns through a resin, which is eluded with HCI and with the addition of silver oxide becomes silver nitrate. This solution is freeze-dried and submitted to combustion at 850 in a sealed quartz tube, using copper/copper oxide for the nitrogen reduction

  6. Groundwater sustainability and groundwater/surface-water interaction in arid Dunhuang Basin, northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jingjing; Ma, Rui; Hu, Yalu; Sun, Ziyong; Wang, Yanxin; McCarter, Colin P. R.

    2018-03-01

    The Dunhuang Basin, a typical inland basin in northwestern China, suffers a net loss of groundwater and the occasional disappearance of the Crescent Lake. Within this region, the groundwater/surface-water interactions are important for the sustainability of the groundwater resources. A three-dimensional transient groundwater flow model was established and calibrated using MODFLOW 2000, which was used to predict changes to these interactions once a water diversion project is completed. The simulated results indicate that introducing water from outside of the basin into the Shule and Danghe rivers could reverse the negative groundwater balance in the Basin. River-water/groundwater interactions control the groundwater hydrology, where river leakage to the groundwater in the Basin will increase from 3,114 × 104 m3/year in 2017 to 11,875 × 104 m3/year in 2021, and to 17,039 × 104 m3/year in 2036. In comparison, groundwater discharge to the rivers will decrease from 3277 × 104 m3/year in 2017 to 1857 × 104 m3/year in 2021, and to 510 × 104 m3/year by 2036; thus, the hydrology will switch from groundwater discharge to groundwater recharge after implementing the water diversion project. The simulation indicates that the increased net river infiltration due to the water diversion project will raise the water table and then effectively increasing the water level of the Crescent Lake, as the lake level is contiguous with the water table. However, the regional phreatic evaporation will be enhanced, which may intensify soil salinization in the Dunhuang Basin. These results can guide the water allocation scheme for the water diversion project to alleviate groundwater depletion and mitigate geo-environmental problem.

  7. Characterizing the interaction of groundwater and surface water in the karst aquifer of Fangshan, Beijing (China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Haibo; Wei, Jiahua; Wang, Rong; Xin, Baodong

    2017-03-01

    Correct understanding of groundwater/surface-water (GW-SW) interaction in karst systems is of greatest importance for managing the water resources. A typical karst region, Fangshan in northern China, was selected as a case study. Groundwater levels and hydrochemistry analyses, together with isotope data based on hydrogeological field investigations, were used to assess the GW-SW interaction. Chemistry data reveal that water type and the concentration of cations in the groundwater are consistent with those of the surface water. Stable isotope ratios of all samples are close to the local meteoric water line, and the 3H concentrations of surface water and groundwater samples are close to that of rainfall, so isotopes also confirm that karst groundwater is recharged by rainfall. Cross-correlation analysis reveals that rainfall leads to a rise in groundwater level with a lag time of 2 months and groundwater exploitation leads to a fall within 1 month. Spectral analysis also reveals that groundwater level, groundwater exploitation and rainfall have significantly similar response periods, indicating their possible inter-relationship. Furthermore, a multiple nonlinear regression model indicates that groundwater level can be negatively correlated with groundwater exploitation, and positively correlated with rainfall. The overall results revealed that groundwater level has a close correlation with groundwater exploitation and rainfall, and they are indicative of a close hydraulic connection and interaction between surface water and groundwater in this karst system.

  8. Hydrogen bonding interactions between ethylene glycol and water: density, excess molar volume, and spectral study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JianBin; ZHANG PengYan; MA Kai; HAN Fang; CHEN GuoHua; WEI XiongHui

    2008-01-01

    Studies of the density and the excess molar volume of ethylene glycol (EG)-water mixtures were carried out to illustrate the hydrogen bonding interactions of EG with water at different temperatures, The re-sults suggest that a likely complex of 3 ethylene glycol molecules bonding with 4 water molecules in an ethylene glycol-water mixture (EGW) is formed at the maximal excess molar volume, which displays stronger absorption capabilities for SO2 when the concentration of SO2 reaches 400×106 (volume ratio) in the gas phase. Meanwhile, FTIR and UV spectra of EGWs were recorded at various EG concentra-tions to display the hydrogen bonding interactions of EG with water. The FTIR spectra show that the stretching vibrational band of hydroxyl in the EGWs shifts to a lower frequency and the bending vibra-tional band of water shifts to a higher frequency with increasing the EG concentration, respectively. Furthermore, the UV spectra show that the electron transferring band of the hydroxyl oxygen in EG shows red shift with increasing the EG concentration. The frequency shifts in FTIR spectra and the shifts of absorption bands in UV absorption spectra of EGWs are interpreted as the strong hydrogen bonding interactions of the hydrogen atoms in water with the hydroxyl oxygen atoms of EG.

  9. Water-rock interaction during diagenesis and thermal recovery, Cold Lake, Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abercrombie, H.J.

    1988-12-01

    Fluid and rocks interact at high temperatures during diagenesis and steam assisted thermal recovery of bitumen from the Clearwater Formation at Cold Lake, Alberta. A study was carried out to assess the effects of natural diagenesis in rocks of the formation, and using these data, to relate the chemical and isotopic compositions of fluids produced during thermal recovery to water-rock interactions occurring in the reservoir. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies on core from Leming and Marguerite Lake document a variety of diagenetic clays including mixed layer minerals smectite-illite and chlorite-smectite, chlorite, illite, berthierine and kaolinite. A method for internally generating factors to convert clay mineral XRD peak heights to relative weight percents was used. Semi-quantitative results show that smectite-illite is ubiquitous and the most abundant clay present. Details are provided of the diagenetic sequence illustrating water-rock interaction over a prolonged period. Three types of water were found to be produced from the wells: injected water, formation water associated with bitumen, and bottom water from the underlying McMurray Formation. Produced water compositions were used to estimate in-situ temperatures of fluids produced from reservoirs. It is concluded that equilibrium closed-system models can be applied to natural diagenesis and artificial diagenesis induced during thermal recovery. 132 refs., 52 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Interaction of surface water and groundwater in the Nile River basin: isotopic and piezometric evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Seifu; Abdalla, Osman; Sefelnasr, Ahmed; Tindimugaya, Callist; Mustafa, Osman

    2017-05-01

    Past discussions around water-resources management and development in the River Nile basin disregard groundwater resources from the equation. There is an increasing interest around factoring the groundwater resources as an integral part of the Nile Basin water resources. This is hampered by knowledge gap regarding the groundwater resources dynamics (recharge, storage, flow, quality, surface-water/groundwater interaction) at basin scale. This report provides a comprehensive analysis of the state of surface-water/groundwater interaction from the headwater to the Nile Delta region. Piezometric and isotopic (δ18O, δ2H) evidence reveal that the Nile changes from a gaining stream in the headwater regions to mostly a loosing stream in the arid lowlands of Sudan and Egypt. Specific zones of Nile water leakage to the adjacent aquifers is mapped using the two sources of evidence. Up to 50% of the surface-water flow in the equatorial region of the Nile comes from groundwater as base flow. The evidence also shows that the natural direction and rate of surface-water/groundwater interaction is largely perturbed by human activities (diversion, dam construction) particularly downstream of the Aswan High Dam in Egypt. The decrease in discharge of the Nile River along its course is attributed to leakage to the aquifers as well as to evaporative water loss from the river channel. The surface-water/groundwater interaction occurring along the Nile River and its sensitivity to infrastructure development calls for management strategies that account groundwater as an integral part of the Nile Basin resources.

  11. Investigating the spatio-temporal variability in groundwater and surface water interactions: a multi-technical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unland, N. P.; Cartwright, I.; Andersen, M. S.; Rau, G. C.; Reed, J.; Gilfedder, B. S.; Atkinson, A. P.; Hofmann, H.

    2013-03-01

    The interaction between groundwater and surface water along the Tambo and Nicholson Rivers, southeast Australia, was investigated using 222Rn, Cl, differential flow gauging, head gradients, electrical conductivity (EC) and temperature profiling. Head gradients, temperature profiles, Cl concentrations and 222Rn activities all indicate higher groundwater fluxes to the Tambo River in areas of increased topographic variation where the potential to form large groundwater-surface water gradients is greater. Groundwater discharge to the Tambo River calculated by Cl mass balance was significantly lower (1.48 × 104 to 1.41 × 103 m3 day-1) than discharge estimated by 222Rn mass balance (5.35 × 105 to 9.56 × 103 m3 day-1) and differential flow gauging (5.41 × 105 to 6.30 × 103 m3 day-1). While groundwater sampling from the bank of the Tambo River was intended to account for the variability in groundwater chemistry associated with river-bank interaction, the spatial variability under which these interactions occurs remained unaccounted for, limiting the use of Cl as an effective tracer. Groundwater discharge to both the Tambo and Nicholson Rivers was the highest under high flow conditions in the days to weeks following significant rainfall, indicating that the rivers are well connected to a groundwater system that is responsive to rainfall. Groundwater constituted the lowest proportion of river discharge during times of increased rainfall that followed dry periods, while groundwater constituted the highest proportion of river discharge under baseflow conditions (21.4% of the Tambo in April 2010 and 18.9% of the Nicholson in September 2010).

  12. Mass matrices of weak interaction, quark flavour mixing and exponential form of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Torre, A.

    1995-01-01

    The quark mixing matrix is diagonalized. The use of the exponential parametrization leads to straightforward results, obtained in exact form, without simplifying assumptions. In this study, it is defined weak interaction eigenstates in the sense of Fritzch and Planckl. The relevant mass matrices are derived and are shown to belong to Barnhill canonical forms. It is proven that, at lowest order, these matrices exhibit a democratic structure. The mechanism of democracy breaking is finally discussed

  13. Mass spectra and fusion cross sections for 20Ne+24Mg interaction at 55 and 85 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotowski, K.; Belery, P.; Delbar, T.; El Masri, Y.; Gregoire, G.; Janssens, R.; Vervier, J.; Paic, G.; Albinska, M.; Albinski, J.; Kopta, S.; Kozik, T.; Planeta, R.

    1981-01-01

    Inclusive γ spectra from the 20 Ne+ 24 Mg interaction have been measured using 55- and 85-MeV 20 Ne ions. The identification of γ lines allows the determination of mass spectra in the region 12< or =A< or =43. Experimental results are compared with statistical model calculations. The total reaction and fusion cross sections are extracted. Cross sections for inelastic scattering, few nucleon transfers, and deep inelastic scattering are estimated

  14. Effect of interaction between inclusions in a gas-liquid mixture on interphase heat and mass transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigmatulin, B.I.; Kroshilin, A.E.; Kroshilin, V.E.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of interaction between inclusions in a gas-liquid mixture on interphase heat and mass transfer is analyzed. It is taken into account that inclusions (bubbles or drops) are not in a pure carrier phase, but in a disperse medium, mean properties of which are determined by the presence of other inclusions in it and by a temperature field around them. The consideration is carried out in the framework of two model of monodisperse mixture, i.e. that with a chaotic distribution of inclusions, and that with a regular distribution, when the distance between centers of inclusions is fixed. The correlation functions method is shown to be effective for the both models. Mean temperature fields around inclusions are determined along with the intensity of interphase heat and mass transfer. The dependences obtained are in a satisfactory agreement with experimental data. The dependence of interphase heat and mass transfer on the structure of disperse mixture is analyzed

  15. On-line solid-phase extraction coupled to hydrophilic interaction chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of polar drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanals, Núria; Marcé, Rosa M; Borrull, Francesc

    2011-09-02

    The present study describes the first fully automated method based on on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) coupled to hydrophilic interaction chromatography-electrospray-mass spectrometry (HILIC-(ESI)MS) to determine a group of polar drugs that includes illicit drugs (such as cocaine, morphine, codeine and metabolites) and pharmaceuticals in environmental water samples. The SPE was performed using a highly retentive polymeric sorbent. The HILIC separation was optimised and the initial high organic content of the chromatographic mobile phase, was also suitable for the proper on-line elution of the analytes retained in the SPE column and for enhancing the ESI ionisation efficiency. This method allows the loading of samples of up to 250ml of ultrapure water or 10ml of environmental water samples spiked at low ngl(-1) levels of the analytes. The method yields near 100% recoveries for all the analytes. The method was also validated with environmental water samples with linear ranges from 5 to 1000ngl(-1) and limits of detection ≤2ngl(-1) for most of the compounds. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Similar mid-depth Atlantic water mass provenance during the Last Glacial Maximum and Heinrich Stadial 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Jacob N. W.; Huang, Kuo-Fang; Oppo, Delia W.; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Mulitza, Stefan; Blusztajn, Jurek; Piotrowski, Alexander M.

    2018-05-01

    The delivery of freshwater to the North Atlantic during Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1) is thought to have fundamentally altered the operation of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Although benthic foraminiferal carbon isotope records from the mid-depth Atlantic show a pronounced excursion to lower values during HS1, whether these shifts correspond to changes in water mass proportions, advection, or shifts in the carbon cycle remains unclear. Here we present new deglacial records of authigenic neodymium isotopes - a water mass tracer that is independent of the carbon cycle - from two cores in the mid-depth South Atlantic. We find no change in neodymium isotopic composition, and thus water mass proportions, between the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and HS1, despite large decreases in carbon isotope values at the onset of HS1 in the same cores. We suggest that the excursions of carbon isotopes to lower values were likely caused by the accumulation of respired organic matter due to slow overturning circulation, rather than to increased southern-sourced water, as typically assumed. The finding that there was little change in water mass provenance in the mid-depth South Atlantic between the LGM and HS1, despite decreased overturning, suggests that the rate of production of mid-depth southern-sourced water mass decreased in concert with decreased production of northern-sourced intermediate water at the onset of HS1. Consequently, we propose that even drastic changes in the strength of AMOC need not cause a significant change in South Atlantic mid-depth water mass proportions.

  17. Тhe mass-spectrometry studies of the interaction of polyhexamethyleneguanidine with lipids

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Lysytsya; A. V. Rebriev

    2014-01-01

    In this work the integral components of the cytoplasmic membrane, lecithin and cholesterol were used for mass spectrometry analysis carried out on polyhexamethyleneguanidine (PHMG) mixtures with lipids. The study was performed by mass-spectrometry methods of the MALDI-TOF MS. Our results showed that despite the common use of PHGM polymer derivatives as disinfectants the persistent intermolecular complexes of PHMG oligomers with lipids were not formed. The binding of polycation PHMG with the m...

  18. Thermogravimetric analysis-mass spectrometry (TG-MS) of selected Chinese palygorskites-Implications for structural water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Hongfei; Yang, Jing; Frost, Ray L.

    2011-01-01

    Four Chinese palygorskites clay minerals have been analysed by thermogravimetric analysis-mass spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. The structural water of the palygorskite dehydrates in the temperature range of 30-625 o C, as shown in the thermogravimetric analysis and mass spectrometric curves. The mass spectrometric curves combined the differential thermogravimetric curves enable the detailed determination of the main dehydration steps. The results show that the dehydration occurs in four main steps: (a) elimination of interparticle water and partial zeolitic water at below 110 o C, (b) release of the rest part of zeolitic water from the structural layer of palygorskite at about 160 o C, (c) dehydration of one part of bound water at about 340 o C and (d) loss of the rest part of bound water at around 450 o C. The temperatures of dehydration of the palygorskite minerals are found to be influenced by the geological environment and the amount and kind of impurities. The evolved gases in the decomposition process are various because of the different amounts and kind of impurities. It is also found that decarbonization takes place at around 600 o C due to the decomposition of calcite and dolomite impurities in these minerals. It is evident by the mass spectrometric curve that the water is given out from the samples and carbon dioxide originates from the impurity calcite and dolomite.

  19. CFD validation of a supercritical water flow for SCWR design heat and mass fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelofs, F.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, J.A.; Komen, E.M.J.; Lowenberg, M.; Starflinger, J.

    2007-01-01

    The applicability of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for water under supercritical conditions in supercritical water reactors (SCWR) has still to be verified. In the recent past, CFD validation analyses were performed by various institutes for supercritical water in vertical tubes based on the well known experimental data from Yamagata. However, validation using data from experiments with working conditions closer to the actual operational conditions of such reactors is needed. From a literature survey the experiments performed by Herkenrath are selected to perform validation analyses at higher heat fluxes and a higher mass flux. The accuracy of CFD using RANS (Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes) turbulence modelling for supercritical fluids under conditions close to the operational conditions of a supercritical water reactor is determined. It is concluded that the wall temperature can be predicted by RANS CFD, using the RNG k-ε turbulence model, with accuracy in the range of 5% for heat fluxes up to 1100 kW/m 2 and for a bulk enthalpy up to 2200 kJ/kg. For a bulk enthalpy exceeding 2200 kJ/kg, a significant lower accuracy of the CFD predictions (about 3%) is found for the simulations of the experiments of Yamagata in comparison with the simulations of the experiments of Herkenrath. For these experiments, the accuracy is about 18 per cent. This might be a result of the fact that the CFD analyses do not simulate the flattening of the temperature profile at about 2200 kJ/kg which is found in the experiments of Herkenrath. However, the obtained accuracies ranging from 3% to 18% are still deemed to be acceptable for many design purposes. (authors)

  20. Determination of seven pyrethroids and six pyrethrins in water by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ccanccapa, alexander; Masia, Ana; Pico, Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Pyrethroids are the synthetic analogues of pyrethrins which were developed as pesticides from the extracts of dried and powdered flower heads of Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium. They are increasingly used in agriculture due to their broad biological activity and slow development of pest resistance. Contamination of fresh-water ecosystems appears either because of the direct discharge of industrial and agricultural effluents or as a result of effluents from sewage treatment works; residues can thus accumulate in the surrounding biosphere [1, 2]. These substances, mostly determined by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) can be difficult to analyse due to their volatility and degradability. The purpose of this study is, as an alternative, to develop a fast and sensitive multi-residue method for the target analysis of 7 pyrethroids and the 6 natural pyrethrins currently used in water samples by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The compounds included in the study were acrinathrin, etofenprox, cyfluthrin, esfenvalerate, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and flumethrin as pyrethroids and a commercial mix of pyrethrins containing Cinerin I, Jasmolin I, pyrethrin I, cinerin II, jasmolin II, pyrethrins II in different percentages. As a preliminary step, the ionization and fragmentation of the compounds were optimized injecting individual solutions of each analyte at 10 ppm in the system, using a gradient elution profile of water-methanol both with 10 mM ammonium formate. The ESI conditions were: capillary voltage 4000 V, nebulizer15 psi, source temperature 300◦C and gas flow 10 L min-1. [M+H]+, [M+Na]+ ,[M+NH3]+ ,[M+NH4+]+ were tested as precursor ions. The most intense signal was for ammonium adduct for all compounds. The optimal fragmentor range for product ions were between 20 to 80 ev and the collision energy ranged between 5 to 86 ev. The efficiency of the method was tested in water samples from Turia River without any known exposure to

  1. Interaction effects of water salinity and hydroponic growth medium on eggplant yield, water-use efficiency, and evapotranspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnoosh Mahjoor

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Eggplant (Solanum melongena L. is a plant native to tropical regions of Southeast Asia. The water crisis and drought on the one hand and eggplant greenhouse crop development as one of the most popular fruit vegetables for people on the other hand, led to the need for more research on the use of saline water and water stress to optimize salinity level and their impact on eggplant evapotranspiration and encounter better yield and crop quality. The objective of the present study was to investigate the interactions of water salinity and hydroponic growth medium on qualitative and quantitative properties of eggplant and its water-use efficiency. The study used the factorial experiment based on completely randomized design with three replications of four levels of water salinity (electrical conductivity of 0.8 (control, 2.5, 5, and 7 dS m−1 and three growth media (cocopeat, perlite, and a 50–50 mixture of the two by volume. Total yield, yield components, evapotranspiration, and water-use efficiency were determined during two growing periods, one each in 2012 and 2013. All of these indices decreased significantly as water salinity increased. Water with of 0.8 dS m−1 produced an average eggplant yield of 2510 g per plant in 2012 and 2600 g in 2013. The highest yield was observed in cocopeat. Water with 7 dS m−1 reduced yield to 906 g per plant in 2012 and to 960 g in 2013. Lowest yield was observed in perlite. The highest evapotranspiration values occurred in cocopeat at the lowest salinity in both years. Cocopeat and the cocopeat–perlite mixture were equally good substrates. The mixture significantly improved the quantitative and qualitative properties of eggplant yield.

  2. Critical masses of bare homogeneous spherical UO2-water mixtures at intermediate enrichments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendon, G.L.; Stratton, W.

    1999-01-01

    Critical masses of bare homogeneous spherical UO 2 -water mixtures at various intermediate fissile enrichments determined by multigroup, transport theory is presented. This work was performed to provide support for particular issues encountered by the nuclear industry when operating in the intermediate enrichment regime, namely, the validation of codes used to set criticality safety limits. Validation is normally performed with a comparison of computational results and applicable experiments. However, this may be difficult in some cases because of the lack of sufficient applicable experiments in the intermediate enrichment range. If a large extension of the area of applicability from an experiment to the desired application exists, then an alternative means for validation must be employed. Ideal interpretations of standard ANSI/ANS 8.1 Section 4.3 (1983) implies that perhaps an independent code and data system may be employed for validation purposes

  3. Mass fractionation during transonic escape and implications for loss of water from Mars and Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahnle, K.J.; Kasting, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen from a planetary atmosphere can remove heavier gases as well as hydrogen, provided that the escape rate is sufficiently large. Analytic approximations for the degree of mass fractionation of a trace species during hydrodynamic escape are compared with accurate numerical solutions for the case of transonic outflow. The analytic approximations are most accurate when the ratio of molecular weights of the heavier and lighter constituents is large so that nonlinear terms in the momentum equation for the heavy constituent become small. The simplest analytic formula is readily generalized to the case where a heavy constituent is also a major species. Application of the generalized formula to hypothetical episodes of hydrodynamic escape from Venus and Mars suggests that both hydrogen and oxygen could have escaped; thus, substantial quantities of water may have been lost without the need to oxidize large amounts of the crust. 29 references

  4. Mass transfer of corrosion products in high temperature, high pressure water circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodd, J.T.; Nicholson, F.D.

    1976-01-01

    The CWL-3 loop is used to study the mass transfer of corrosion products in water at 270 0 C for pressures up to 6.9 MPa. Two parallel Zircaloy-2 test sections are heated directly by a low voltage a.c. electrical current to give a heat flux up to 500 W cm -2 and a heat rating up to 1500 W cm -1 . Coolant flow rates can be varied up to 0.4 kg cm -2 s -1 with or without boiling. A tracer technique has been developed to monitor continuously the deposition of corrosion products in the test sections during operation of the loop. Magnetite deposits 2.6 nm thick can be readily detected. (author)

  5. Simultaneous determination of mass and thermal accommodation coefficients from temporal evolution of an evaporating water microdroplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zientara, M; Jakubczyk, D; Derkachov, G; Kolwas, K; Kolwas, M

    2005-01-01

    Scattering of coherent light by an evaporating droplet of pure water several micrometres in size was investigated. The droplet was levitated in an electrodynamic trap placed in a small climatic chamber. The evolution of the droplet radius and the evolution dynamics were investigated by means of analysing the scattering patterns with the aid of Mie theory. A numerical model of droplet evolution, incorporating the kinetic effects near the droplet surface, was constructed. Application of this model to the experimental data allowed us to determine the mass and thermal accommodation coefficients to be α C = 0.12 ± 0.02 and α T = 0.65 ± 0.09, respectively. This model enabled us to determine with high precision the temperature evolution of the droplet and the relative humidity in the droplet vicinity

  6. Water-rock interactions and the pH stability of groundwater from Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebinger, M.H.

    1992-01-01

    Titrations of acidic solutions in waters from the tuff and carbonate aquifers at Yucca Mountain were simulated using the geochemical codes PHREEQE and EQ3/6. The simulations tested pH stability of the waters in the presence of different minerals and in their absence. Two acidic solutions, 10 -4 HCl and 10 -4 M UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 , were titrated in to the water. Little pH and/or compositional change resulted in the groundwater when the HCl solution was titrated, but significant pH and CO 2 fugacity changes were observed when UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 was titrated. Water interactions with alkali feldspar, quartz or cristobalite, and Ca-smectite buffered the pH and compositional changes in the carbonate water and decreased the magnitude of pH and compositional changes when small volumes of UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 added to the tuffaceous waters

  7. Cold leg condensation tests. Task C. Steam--water interaction tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodrick, J.R.; Loiselle, V.

    1974-03-01

    A report is presented of tests to determine the condensation efficiency of ECC water injected into a quality fluid mixture flowing through the cold leg. In particular, a specific objective was to determine if the mixture of ECC water and quality fluid reached thermodynamic equilibrium before exiting the cold leg. Further, the stability of the ECC water/quality fluid interaction would be assessed by interpretation of thermocouple records and utilization of a section of cold leg piping with view ports to film the interaction whenever possible. The cold leg condensation tests showed complete condensation of the 5 lbm/sec steam quality mixtures in the cold leg by the ECC water flows of the test matrix. The cold leg exit fluid temperature remained below the saturation temperature and had good agreement with the predicted cold leg outlet temperature, calculated assuming total condensation. (U.S.)

  8. Water pollution control in river basin by interactive fuzzy interval multiobjective programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, N.B.; Chen, H.W. [National Cheng-Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Environmental Engineering; Shaw, D.G.; Yang, C.H. [Academia Sinica, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Inst. of Economics

    1997-12-01

    The potential conflict between protection of water quality and economic development by different uses of land within river basins is a common problem in regional planning. Many studies have applied multiobjective decision analysis under uncertainty to problems of this kind. This paper presents the interactive fuzzy interval multiobjective mixed integer programming (IFIMOMIP) model to evaluate optimal strategies of wastewater treatment levels within a river system by considering the uncertainties in decision analysis. The interactive fuzzy interval multiobjective mixed integer programming approach is illustrated in a case study for the evaluation of optimal wastewater treatment strategies for water pollution control in a river basin. In particular, it demonstrates how different types of uncertainty in a water pollution control system can be quantified and combined through the use of interval numbers and membership functions. The results indicate that such an approach is useful for handling system complexity and generating more flexible policies for water quality management in river basins.

  9. Investigating the Interaction of Water Vapour with Aminopropyl Groups on the Surface of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Geo; Musso, Giorgia Elena; Bottinelli, Emanuela; Cossi, Maurizio; Marchese, Leonardo; Berlier, Gloria

    2017-04-05

    The interaction of water molecules with the surface of hybrid silica-based mesoporous materials is studied by 29 Si, 1 H and 13 C solid-state NMR and IR spectroscopy, with the support of ab initio calculations. The surface of aminopropyl-grafted mesoporous silica nanoparticles is studied in the dehydrated state and upon interaction with controlled doses of water vapour. Former investigations described the interactions between aminopropyl and residual SiOH groups; the present study shows the presence of hydrogen-bonded species (SiOH to NH 2 ) and weakly interacting "free" aminopropyl chains with restricted mobility, together with a small amount of protonated NH 3 + groups. The concentration of the last-named species increased upon interaction with water, and this indicates reversible and fast proton exchange from water molecules to a fraction of the amino groups. Herein, this is discussed and explained for the first time, by a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Balancing the Interactions of Ions, Water, and DNA in the Drude Polarizable Force Field

    OpenAIRE

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Recently we presented a first-generation all-atom Drude polarizable force field for DNA based on the classical Drude oscillator model, focusing on optimization of key dihedral angles followed by extensive validation of the force field parameters. Presently, we describe the procedure for balancing the electrostatic interactions between ions, water, and DNA as required for development of the Drude force field for DNA. The proper balance of these interactions is shown to impact DNA stability and...

  11. Application of a contaminant mass balance method at an old landfill to assess the impact on water resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Nanna Isbak; Milosevic, Nemanja; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    2012-01-01

    linking soil and groundwater contamination to surface water pollution are required. This paper presents a method which provides an estimate of the contaminant mass discharge, using a combination of a historical investigation and contaminant mass balance approach. The method works at the screening level...... and could be part of a risk assessment. The study site was Risby Landfill, an old unlined landfill located in a clay till setting on central Zealand, Denmark. The contaminant mass discharge was determined for three common leachate indicators: chloride, dissolved organic carbon and ammonium. For instance......, the mass discharge of chloride from the landfill was 9.4ton/year and the mass discharge of chloride to the deep limestone aquifer was 1.4ton/year. This resulted in elevated concentrations of leachate indicators (chloride, dissolved organic carbon and ammonium) in the groundwater. The mass discharge...

  12. Shifting Scarcities? The Energy Intensity of Water Supply Alternatives in the Mass Tourist Resort of Benidorm, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyerim Yoon

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The energy intensity of water—‘energy (electricity-for-water’—is calculated for Benidorm, a mass tourism resort in the Spanish Mediterranean coast, where the urban water cycle has evolved in response to a series of episodes of water stress. The analysis is based on primary data compiled from various actors involved in the urban water cycle encompassing water extraction, end uses, and wastewater treatment, including tertiary treatment. The results provide one of the first analyses of the relations between energy and water in a mass tourist center, which may be of potential interest for other tourist areas. It is estimated that a total of 109 GWh/year of electricity is required to operate the water cycle of Benidorm. About 4% of total energy use in Benidorm is dedicated to extracting, transporting, and treating water. The most energy-intensive stage is represented by end uses, which accounts for 20% of the total energy use in Benidorm when the energy required for water pumping and hot water use is considered. Additionally, energy intensity for water extraction was estimated for normal, wet, and two dry year scenarios. In comparison with the normal scenario, energy intensity is six times larger when desalinated water is incorporated during a dry year, whereas the emergency interbasin water transfer resulted in a more moderate increase in energy intensity. While treated wastewater and emergency water transfers appear to be a more convenient solution in energy terms, the strong impulse given to desalination in Spain is forcing local water authorities towards the use of a resource that is much more energy intensive, although, on the other hand, much less dependent on the vagaries of climate. In light of recent technological and managerial developments, the Benidorm case illuminates the challenges appearing in the analysis of the water-energy nexus, especially the fact that scarcity may be transferred from water to energy.

  13. Impact of water-deficit stress on tritrophic interactions in a wheat-aphid-parasitoid system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Suhail Ahmed

    Full Text Available Increasing temperature and CO2 concentrations can alter tritrophic interactions in ecosystems, but the impact of increasingly severe drought on such interactions is not well understood. We examined the response of a wheat-aphid-parasitoid system to variation in water-deficit stress levels. Our results showed that arid area clones of the aphid, Sitobion avenae (Fabricius, tended to have longer developmental times compared to semiarid and moist area clones, and the development of S. avenae clones tended to be slower with increasing levels of water-deficit. Body sizes of S. avenae clones from all areas decreased with increasing water-deficit levels, indicating their declining adaptation potential under drought. Compared to arid area clones, moist area clones of S. avenae had a higher frequency of backing under severe water stress only, but a higher frequency of kicking under well-watered conditions only, suggesting a water-deficit level dependent pattern of resistance against the parasitoid, Aphidius gifuensis (Ashmead. The number of S. avenae individuals attacked by the parasitoid in 10 min showed a tendency to decrease with increasing water-deficit levels. Clones of S. avenae tended to have lower parasitism rates under treatments with higher water-deficit levels. The development of the parasitoid tended to be slower under higher levels of water-deficit stress. Thus, the bottom-up effects of water-deficit stressed plants were negative on S. avenae. However, the top-down effects via parasitoids were compromised by water-deficit, which could favor the growth of aphid populations. Overall, the first trophic level under water-deficit stress was shown to have an indirect and negative impact on the third trophic level parasitoid, suggesting that parasitoids could be increasingly vulnerable in future warming scenarios.

  14. Experimental study of the molten glass/water thermal interaction under free and forced conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakeri, V.H.; Catton, I.; Kastenberg, W.E.

    1978-01-01

    Molten glass interacts explosively with water under certain contact mode conditions. The contact mode found explosive is as follows: Molten glass enters the water bath in the film boiling regime (as predicted by Dhir's correlation), and soon after entry the vapor film is perturbed sufficiently by an external pressure pulse. The ensuing reaction proceeds basically along the same lines as energetic tin/water interactions observed by several investigators. In the absence of this pressure pulse, the event is nonenergetic. The present findings are for a combination in which the hot material has a very low thermal diffusivity and the calculated interface temperature is significantly (approximately 180 K) below its melting temperature. This is similar to the characteristics of the UO 2 /sodium or UO 2 /water combinations. The observed explosive glass/water interactions show growth times on the order of a few milliseconds. The particulate size distribution from the present tests was coarser than the particulate size distribution from some in-pile and out-of-pile UO 2 /sodium interaction tests

  15. Patterns in coupled water and energy cycle: Modeling, synthesis with observations, and assessing the subsurface-landsurface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, A.; Kollet, S. J.; Sulis, M.

    2013-12-01

    In the terrestrial hydrological cycle, the atmosphere and the free groundwater table act as the upper and lower boundary condition, respectively, in the non-linear two-way exchange of mass and energy across the land surface. Identifying and quantifying the interactions among various atmospheric-subsurface-landsurface processes is complicated due to the diverse spatiotemporal scales associated with these processes. In this study, the coupled subsurface-landsurface model ParFlow.CLM was applied over a ~28,000 km2 model domain encompassing the Rur catchment, Germany, to simulate the fluxes of the coupled water and energy cycle. The model was forced by hourly atmospheric data from the COSMO-DE model (numerical weather prediction system of the German Weather Service) over one year. Following a spinup period, the model results were synthesized with observed river discharge, soil moisture, groundwater table depth, temperature, and landsurface energy flux data at different sites in the Rur catchment. It was shown that the model is able to reproduce reasonably the dynamics and also absolute values in observed fluxes and state variables without calibration. The spatiotemporal patterns in simulated water and energy fluxes as well as the interactions were studied using statistical, geostatistical and wavelet transform methods. While spatial patterns in the mass and energy fluxes can be predicted from atmospheric forcing and power law scaling in the transition and winter months, it appears that, in the summer months, the spatial patterns are determined by the spatially correlated variability in groundwater table depth. Continuous wavelet transform techniques were applied to study the variability of the catchment average mass and energy fluxes at varying time scales. From this analysis, the time scales associated with significant interactions among different mass and energy balance components were identified. The memory of precipitation variability in subsurface hydrodynamics

  16. KETERKAITAN BERBAGAI KONSEP INTERAKSI AIR DALAM PRODUK PANGAN [Interrelation on Water Interaction Concepts in Foods]--Komunikasi Singkat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dede R. Adawiyah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The idea of water interaction with chemicals in the food dry matter or solid was inspired from gas interaction with surface active chemicals, almost a hundred years ago, such as association of gases with active carbon. However, until now the mechanisms and consequences of water molecule associated with chemicals in food solid is still in debate among the food scientists. The concept of water interaction or association with chemicals in the food solid or dry matter was initially introduced as water activity (aw, then in the terminology of “Bound Water”. Water activity concept was further developed by Labuza in 1960s. The concept or idea of glass transition temperature (Tg from Polymers Science discipline was applied to foods in decade of 1980 by Slade & Levine, who denied or negated the earlier concepts of bound water and water activity. In glass transition concept of food products, water functions as a plasticizer related to the textural properties and safety of the products. Knowledge of structure and behaviours of water molecule is required to understand how water interacts or associates with chemicals in food solid. The unique nature of water molecule is a tetrahedral structure with 4 polar angles, which behaves strongly binding or being bound by polar or ionic chemicals in food solid. A number of physicochemical forces act how water molecules interact in complex ways with chemicals in food solid, and the interaction among water molecules in foods. Both types of water interaction lead to the consept of three fractions of bound water as well as to the varities of food characteristics, including preservability and food qualities, either appraisable or unacceptable by consummers. Relationship analyses among various parameter data of associated water in foods such as aw, Me, Tg, and enriched by NMR data, specific weight and specific heat of bound water, indicated that among the different concepts of water interaction in foods were

  17. Assessing interactions of hydrophilic nanoscale TiO{sub 2} with soil water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priester, John H.; Ge, Yuan; Chang, Vivian [University of California, Santa Barbara, Bren School of Environmental Science and Management (United States); Stoimenov, Peter K. [University of California, Santa Barbara, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Schimel, Joshua P. [University of California, Santa Barbara, Earth Research Institute (United States); Stucky, Galen D. [University of California, Santa Barbara, UC Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (United States); Holden, Patricia A., E-mail: holden@bren.ucsb.edu [University of California, Santa Barbara, Bren School of Environmental Science and Management (United States)

    2013-09-15

    The implications of manufactured nanoscale materials (MNMs) in unsaturated soil are mostly unknown. Owing to its widespread use, nanoscale (n) TiO{sub 2} is expected to enter soils where its accumulation could impact soil processes. Yet fundamental information is lacking regarding nTiO{sub 2} in situ wettability, i.e., interactions with soil water that relate to nTiO{sub 2} exposure and bioavailability. To probe nTiO{sub 2} interactions with soil water, we amended a natural soil with 20 mg per g of P25 nTiO{sub 2}, a high-production, hydrophilic MNM that, based on its small size (25 nm nominal), provides ample specific surface area (SSA) for water sorption. We then measured nTiO{sub 2}-amended soil SSA, and conducted a dynamic water vapor conditioning experiment. Early time-course water sorption into soil, with and without nTiO{sub 2}, was clearly diffusional. Over 9 months, soil water content asymptotically equilibrated. However, despite amending with nTiO{sub 2} levels that increased the soil SSA by 16 %, measured water sorption rates and endpoint soil water contents were mostly unchanged by P25 nTiO{sub 2}. Our results indicate that as-manufactured hydrophilic P25 nTiO{sub 2} was hydrophobic in soil, a finding relevant to nTiO{sub 2} bioavailability and transport.

  18. Behavior of uranium under conditions of interaction of rocks and ores with subsurface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omel'Yanenko, B. I.; Petrov, V. A.; Poluektov, V. V.

    2007-10-01

    The behavior of uranium during interaction of subsurface water with crystalline rocks and uranium ores is considered in connection with the problem of safe underground insulation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Since subsurface water interacts with crystalline rocks formed at a high temperature, the mineral composition of these rocks and uranium species therein are thermodynamically unstable. Therefore, reactions directed toward the establishment of equilibrium proceed in the water-rock system. At great depths that are characterized by hindered water exchange, where subsurface water acquires near-neutral and reducing properties, the interaction is extremely sluggish and is expressed in the formation of micro- and nanoparticles of secondary minerals. Under such conditions, the slow diffusion redistribution of uranium with enrichment in absorbed forms relative to all other uranium species is realized as well. The products of secondary alteration of Fe- and Ti-bearing minerals serve as the main sorbents of uranium. The rate of alteration of minerals and conversion of uranium species into absorbed forms is slow, and the results of these processes are insignificant, so that the rocks and uranium species therein may be regarded as unaltered. Under reducing conditions, subsurface water is always saturated with uranium. Whether water interacts with rock or uranium ore, the equilibrium uranium concentration in water is only ≤10-8 mol/l. Uraninite ore under such conditions always remains stable irrespective of its age. The stability conditions of uranium ore are quite suitable for safe insulation of SNF, which consists of 95% uraninite (UO2) and is a confinement matrix for all other radionuclides. The disposal of SNF in massifs of crystalline rocks at depths below 500 m, where reducing conditions are predominant, is a reliable guarantee of high SNF stability. Under oxidizing conditions of the upper hydrodynamic zone, the rate of interaction of rocks with subsurface water

  19. Interactions of forests, climate, water resources, and humans in a changing environment: research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge Sun; Catalina Segura

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the special issue “Interactions of Forests, Climate, Water Resources, and Humans in a Changing Environment” is to present case studies on the influences of natural and human disturbances on forest water resources under a changing climate. Studies in this collection of six papers cover a wide range of geographic regions from Australia to Nigeria with spatial...

  20. Sensitivity analysis of the surface water- groundwater interaction for the sandy area of the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez del Campo, E.; Jousma, G.; Massop, H.T.L.

    1993-01-01

    The "Sensitivity Analysis of the Surface Water- Groundwater Interaction for the Sandy Area of the Netherlands" was carried out in the framework of a bilateral research project in support of the implementation of a nationwide geohydrological information system (REGIS) in the Netherlands. This project, conducted in cooperation between the TNO Institute for Applied Scientific Research (IGG-TNO) and !he Winand Staring Centre for Integrated Land, Soil and Water Research (SC-DLO), is aimed at defin...

  1. Interactions of Forests, Climate, Water Resources, and Humans in a Changing Environment: Research Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Ge; Segura, Catalina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the special issue “Interactions of Forests, Climate, Water Resources, and Humans in a Changing Environment” is to present case studies on the influences of natural and human disturbances on forest water resources under a changing climate. Studies in this collection of six papers cover a wide range of geographic regions from Australia to Nigeria with spatial research scale spanning from a tree leaf, to a segment of forest road, and large basins with mixed land uses. T...

  2. Experimental Investigation of Mechanical Properties of Black Shales after CO2-Water-Rock Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Lyu, Qiao; Ranjith, Pathegama Gamage; Long, Xinping; Ji, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The effects of CO2-water-rock interactions on the mechanical properties of shale are essential for estimating the possibility of sequestrating CO2 in shale reservoirs. In this study, uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) tests together with an acoustic emission (AE) system and SEM and EDS analysis were performed to investigate the mechanical properties and microstructural changes of black shales with different saturation times (10 days, 20 days and 30 days) in water dissoluted with gaseous/supe...

  3. Chemical speciation analysis for bromine in tap water by ion chromatography/inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Keigo; Suzuki, Yoshinari; Furuta, Naoki

    2010-01-01

    Bromide compounds in tap water were measured by using a hyphenated technique of ion chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (IC/ICP-MS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). We identified bromide ion (Br - ), bromate ion (BrO 3 - ), bromochloroacetic acid (BCAA), dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) and bromodichloroacetic acid (BDCAA) by standard addition methods with IC/ICP-MS. Moreover, we identified BCAA and BDCAA by ESI-MS after separation with IC. Br - , BrO 3 - , BCAA, DBAA and BDCAA in tap water collected from around Tokyo area were quantified by IC/ICP-MS. The maximum concentration of BrO 3 - (1.8 ng mL -1 ) was observed in tap water collected from Bunkyo-ku, although this concentration was lower than 10 ng mL -1 , which is the regulated concentration in Japan. DBAA, which is regulated by United States Environmental Protection Agency, was detected in tap water collected from all sites, except for Ome. However, since BrO 3 - and DBAA are toxic, it is necessary to continue monitoring bromide compounds in tap water. (author)

  4. Protein Charge and Mass Contribute to the Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Protein-Protein Interactions in a Minimal Proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu; Wang, Hong; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2013-01-01

    We constructed and simulated a ‘minimal proteome’ model using Langevin dynamics. It contains 206 essential protein types which were compiled from the literature. For comparison, we generated six proteomes with randomized concentrations. We found that the net charges and molecular weights of the proteins in the minimal genome are not random. The net charge of a protein decreases linearly with molecular weight, with small proteins being mostly positively charged and large proteins negatively charged. The protein copy numbers in the minimal genome have the tendency to maximize the number of protein-protein interactions in the network. Negatively charged proteins which tend to have larger sizes can provide large collision cross-section allowing them to interact with other proteins; on the other hand, the smaller positively charged proteins could have higher diffusion speed and are more likely to collide with other proteins. Proteomes with random charge/mass populations form less stable clusters than those with experimental protein copy numbers. Our study suggests that ‘proper’ populations of negatively and positively charged proteins are important for maintaining a protein-protein