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Sample records for intense neutrino beams

  1. Intense muon beams and neutrino factories

    Parsa, Z.

    2000-01-01

    High intensity muon sources are needed in exploring neutrino factories, lepton flavor violating muon processes, and lower energy experiments as the stepping phase towards building higher energy μ + μ - colliders. We present a brief overview, sketch of a neutrino source, and an example of a muon storage ring at BNL with detector(s) at Fermilab, Sudan, etc. Physics with low energy neutrino beams based on muon storage rings (μSR) and conventional Horn Facilities are described and compared. CP violation Asymmetries and a new Statistical Figure of Merit to be used for comparison is given. Improvements in the sensitivity of low energy experiments to study Flavor changing neutral currents are also included

  2. Physics Potential of Very Intense Conventional Neutrino Beams

    Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Burguet-Castell, J; Casper, David William; DOnega, M; Gilardoni, S S; Hernández, Pilar; Mezzetto, Mauro

    2001-01-01

    The physics potential of high intensity conventional beams is explored. We consider a low energy super beam which could be produced by a proposed new accelerator at CERN, the Super Proton Linac. Water Cherenkov and liquid oil scintillator detectors are studied as possible candidates for a neutrino oscillation experiment which could improve our current knowledge of the atmospheric parameters and measure or severely constrain the parameter connecting the atmospheric and solar realms. It is also shown that a very large water detector could eventually observe leptonic CP violation. The reach of such an experiment to the neutrino mixing parameters would lie in-between the next generation of neutrino experiments (MINOS, OPERA, etc) and a future neutrino factory.

  3. R & D of a Gas-Filled RF Beam Profile Monitor for Intense Neutrino Beam Experiments

    Yonehara, K. [Fermilab; Backfish, M. [Fermilab; Moretti, A. [Fermilab; Tollestrup, A. V. [Fermilab; Watts, A. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. M. [Fermilab; Abrams, R. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Cummings, M. A.; Dudas, A. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, R. P. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Kazakevich, G. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Neubauer, M. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Liu, Q. [Case Western Reserve U.

    2017-05-01

    We report the R&D of a novel radiation-robust hadron beam profile monitor based on a gas-filled RF cavity for intense neutrino beam experiments. An equivalent RF circuit model was made and simulated to optimize the RF parameter in a wide beam intensity range. As a result, the maximum acceptable beam intensity in the monitor is significantly increased by using a low-quality factor RF cavity. The plan for the demonstration test is set up to prepare for future neutrino beam experiments.

  4. Proton Beam Intensity Upgrades for the Neutrino Program at Fermilab

    Bhat, C. M. [Fermilab

    2016-12-15

    Fermilab is committed to upgrading its accelerator complex towards the intensity frontier to pursue HEP research in the neutrino sector and beyond. The upgrade has two steps: 1) the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP), which is underway, has its primary goal to start providing 700 kW beam power on NOvA target by the end of 2017 and 2) the foreseen PIP–II will replace the existing LINAC, a 400 MeV injector to the Booster, by an 800 MeV superconducting LINAC by the middle of next decade, with output beam intensity from the Booster increased significantly and the beam power on the NOvA target increased to <1.2 MW. In any case, the Fermilab Booster is going to play a very significant role for the next two decades. In this context, we have recently developed and commissioned an innovative beam injection scheme for the Booster called "early injection scheme". This scheme is already in operation and has a potential to increase the Booster beam intensity from the PIP design goal by a considerable amount with a reduced beam emittance and beam loss. In this paper, we will present results from our experience from the new scheme in operation, current status and future plans.

  5. Proton Drivers for neutrino beams and other high intensity applications

    Garoby, R; Koseki, T; Thomason, J

    2013-01-01

    CERN, Fermilab, J-PARC and RAL tentatively plan to have proton accelerators delivering multi-MW of beam power in view of enhancing their physics reach especially in the domain of neutrinos. These plans are described, together with their benefits for other applications.

  6. The ideal neutrino beams

    Lindroos, Mats

    2009-01-01

    The advance in neutrino oscillation physics is driven by the availability of well characterized and high flux neutrino beams. The three present options for the next generation neutrino oscillation facility are super beams, neutrino factories and beta-beams. A super-beam is a very high intensity classical neutrino beam generated by protons impinging on a target where the neutrinos are generated by the secondary particles decaying in a tunnel down streams of the target. In a neutrino factory the neutrinos are generated from muons decaying in a storage ring with long straight sections pointing towards the detectors. In a beta-beam the neutrinos are also originating from decay in a storage ring but the decaying particles are radioactive ions rather than muons. I will in this presentation review the three options and discuss the pros and cons of each. The present joint design effort for a future high intensity neutrino oscillation in Europe within a common EU supported design study, EURONU, will also be presented....

  7. The ideal neutrino beams

    Lindroos, Mats

    2009-06-01

    The advance in neutrino oscillation physics is driven by the availability of well characterized and high flux neutrino beams. The three present options for the next generation neutrino oscillation facility are super beams, neutrino factories and beta-beams. A super-beam is a very high intensity classical neutrino beam generated by protons impinging on a target where the neutrinos are generated by the secondary particles decaying in a tunnel down streams of the target. In a neutrino factory the neutrinos are generated from muons decaying in a storage ring with long straight sections pointing towards the detectors. In a beta-beam the neutrinos are also originating from decay in a storage ring but the decaying particles are radioactive ions rather than muons. I will in this presentation review the three options and discuss the pros and cons of each. The present joint design effort for a future high intensity neutrino oscillation in Europe within a common EU supported design study, EURONU, will also be presented. The design study will explore the physics reach, the detectors, the feasibility, the safety issues and the cost for each of the options so that the the community can take a decision on what to build when the facilities presently under exploitation and construction have to be replaced.

  8. Hardron production and neutrino beams

    Guglielmi, A.

    2006-11-01

    The precise measurements of the neutrino mixing parameters in the oscillation experiments at accelerators require new high-intensity and high-purity neutrino beams. Ancillary hadron-production measurements are then needed as inputs to precise calculation of neutrino beams and of atmospheric neutrino fluxes.

  9. Beam and experiments summary [neutrino studies

    Blondel, A; Campanelli, M; Cervera-Villanueva, Anselmo; Cline, David B; Collot, J; De Jong, M; Donini, Andrea; Dydak, Friedrich; Edgecock, R; Gavela-Legazpi, Maria Belen; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González-Garciá, M Concepción; Gruber, P; Harris, D A; Hernández, Pilar; Kuno, Y; Litchfield, P J; McFarland, K; Mena, O; Migliozzi, P; Palladino, Vittorio; Panman, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Para, A; Peña-Garay, C; Pérez, P; Rigolin, Stefano; Romanino, Andrea; Rubbia, André; Strolin, P; Wojcicki, S G

    2000-01-01

    The discovery of neutrino oscillations marks a major milestone in the history of neutrino physics, and opens a new window to the still mysterious origin of masses and flavour mixing. Many current and forthcoming experiments will. Answer open questions; however, a major step forward, up to and possibly including CP violation in the neutrino-mixing matrix, requires the neutrino beams from a neutrino factory. The neutrino factory is a new concept for producing neutrino beams of unprecedented quality in terms of intensity, flavour composition, and precision of the beam parameters. Most importantly, the neutrino factory is the only known way to generate a high- intensity beam of electron neutrinos of high energy. The neutrino beam from a neutrino factory, in particular the electron-neutrino beam, enables the exploration of otherwise inaccessible domains in neutrino oscillation physics by exploiting baselines of planetary dimensions. Suitable detectors pose formidable challenges but seem within reach with only mode...

  10. Transverse Beam Halo Measurements at High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) using Vibrating Wire Monitor

    Chung, M.; Hanna, B.; Scarpine, V.; Shiltsev, V.; Steimel, J.; Artinian, S.; Arutunian, S.

    2015-02-26

    The measurement and control of beam halos will be critical for the applications of future high-intensity hadron linacs. In particular, beam profile monitors require a very high dynamic range when used for the transverse beam halo measurements. In this study, the Vibrating Wire Monitor (VWM) with aperture 60 mm was installed at the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) front-end to measure the transverse beam halo. A vibrating wire is excited at its resonance frequency with the help of a magnetic feedback loop, and the vibrating and sensitive wires are connected through a balanced arm. The sensitive wire is moved into the beam halo region by a stepper motor controlled translational stage. We study the feasibility of the vibrating wire for the transverse beam halo measurements in the low-energy front-end of the proton linac.

  11. Monochromatic neutrino beams

    Bernabeu, Jose; Burguet-Castell, Jordi; Espinoza, Catalina; Lindroos, Mats

    2005-01-01

    In the last few years spectacular results have been achieved with the demonstration of non vanishing neutrino masses and flavour mixing. The ultimate goal is the understanding of the origin of these properties from new physics. In this road, the last unknown mixing [U e3 ] must be determined. If it is proved to be non-zero, the possibility is open for Charge Conjugation-Parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector. This will require precision experiments with a very intense neutrino source. Here a novel method to create a monochromatic neutrino beam, an old dream for neutrino physics, is proposed based on the recent discovery of nuclei that decay fast through electron capture. Such nuclei will generate a monochromatic directional neutrino beam when decaying at high energy in a storage ring with long straight sections. We also show that the capacity of such a facility to discover new physics is impressive, so that fine tuning of the boosted neutrino energy allows precision measurements of the oscillation parameters even for a [U e3 ] mixing as small as 1 degree. We can thus open a window to the discovery of CP violation in neutrino oscillations

  12. Literature in Focus Beta Beams: Neutrino Beams

    2009-01-01

    By Mats Lindroos (CERN) and Mauro Mezzetto (INFN Padova, Italy) Imperial Press, 2009 The beta-beam concept for the generation of electron neutrino beams was first proposed by Piero Zucchelli in 2002. The idea created quite a stir, challenging the idea that intense neutrino beams only could be produced from the decay of pions or muons in classical neutrino beams facilities or in future neutrino factories. The concept initially struggled to make an impact but the hard work by many machine physicists, phenomenologists and theoreticians over the last five years has won the beta-beam a well-earned position as one of the frontrunners for a possible future world laboratory for high intensity neutrino oscillation physics. This is the first complete monograph on the beta-beam concept. The book describes both technical aspects and experimental aspects of the beta-beam, providing students and scientists with an insight into the possibilities o...

  13. Large acceptance magnetic focussing horns for production of a high intensity narrow band neutrino beam at the AGS

    Carroll, A.; Chimienti, L.; Leonhardt, W.; Monaghan, R.; Ryan, G.; Sandberg, J.; Sims, W.; Smith, G.; Stillman, P.; Thorwarth, H.

    1985-01-01

    A set of two large acceptance (20 to 140 mrad) horns have been designed and built to form a parallel beam of 3 GeV/c pions and kaons for the production of an intense, dichromatic neutrino beam. A set of beam plugs and collimators determined the momentum of the particles which pass through the horns. The cooling and maintenance of the horns and target was a particular concern since they were operated with an incident intensity of over 10/sup 13/ proton/sec. These systems were designed for simplicity, reliability, and easy replacement.

  14. Large acceptance magnetic focussing horns for production of a high intensity narrow band neutrino beam at the AGS

    Carroll, A.; Chimienti, L.; Leonhardt, W.

    1985-01-01

    A set of two large acceptance (20 to 140 mrad) horns have been designed and built to form a parallel beam of 3 GeV/c pions and kaons for the production of an intense, dichromatic neutrino beam. A set of beam plugs and collimators determined the momentum of the particles which pass through the horns. The cooling and maintenance of the horns and target was a particular concern since they were operated with an incident intensity of over 10 13 proton/sec. These systems were designed for simplicity, reliability, and easy replacement

  15. Probing Neutrino Properties with Long-Baseline Neutrino Beams

    Marino, Alysia

    2015-01-01

    This final report on an Early Career Award grant began in April 15, 2010 and concluded on April 14, 2015. Alysia Marino's research is focussed on making precise measurements of neutrino properties using intense accelerator-generated neutrino beams. As a part of this grant, she is collaborating on the Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) long-baseline neutrino experiment, currently taking data in Japan, and on the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) design effort for a future Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) in the US. She is also a member of the NA61/SHINE particle production experiment at CERN, but as that effort is supported by other funds, it will not be discussed further here. T2K was designed to search for the disappearance of muon neutrinos (?_?) and the appearance of electron neutrinos (?_e), using a beam of muon neutrino beam that travels 295 km across Japan towards the Super-Kamiokande detector. In 2011 T2K first reported indications of ?_e appearance, a previously unobserved mode of neutrino oscillations. In the past year, T2K has published a combined analysis of ?_? disappearance and ?_e appearance, and began collecting taking data with a beam of anti-neutrinos, instead of neutrinos, to search for hints of violation of the CP symmetry of the universe. The proposed DUNE experiment has similar physics goals to T2K, but will be much more sensitive due to its more massive detectors and new higher-intensity neutrino beam. This effort will be very high-priority particle physics project in the US over the next decade.

  16. Telecommunication with neutrino beams

    Saenz, A.W.; Ueberall, H.; Kelly, F.J.; Padgett, D.W.; Seeman, N.

    1977-01-01

    Collimated neutrino beams in the energy range 1 to 100 gigaelectron volts, now available from high-energy proton accelerators, are proposed as a potential means for telecommunication over global distances. Quantitative estimates of the feasibility of this proposal based on a particular detector configuration are presented

  17. A muon storage ring for neutrino beams

    Lee, W.; Neuffer, D.

    1988-01-01

    A muon storage ring can provide electron and muon neutrino beams of precisely knowable flux. Constraints on muon collection and storage-ring design are discussed. Sample muon storage rings are presented and muon and neutrino intensities are estimated. Experimental use of the ν-beams, detector properties, and possible variations are described. Future directions for conceptual designs are outlined. 11 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  18. A Very Intense Neutrino Super Beam Experiment for Leptonic CP Violation Discovery based on the European Spallation Source Linac: A Snowmass 2013 White Paper

    Baussan, E; Bogomilov, M.; Bouquerel, E.; Cederkäll, J.; Christiansen, P.; Coloma, P.; Cupial, P.; Danared, H.; Densham, C.; Dracos, M.; Ekelöf, T.; Eshraqi, M.; Fernandez Martinez, E.; Gaudiot, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Koutchouk, J.P.; Lindroos, M.; Matev, R.; McGinnis, D.; Mezzetto, M.; Miyamoto, R.; Mosca, L.; Ohlsson, T.; Öhman, H.; Osswald, F.; Peggs, S.; Poussot, P.; Ruber, R.; Tang, J.Y.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wildner, E.; Wurtz, J.

    2014-01-01

    Very intense neutrino beams and large neutrino detectors will be needed in order to enable the discovery of CP violation in the leptonic sector. We propose to use the proton linac of the European Spallation Source currently under construction in Lund, Sweden to deliver, in parallel with the spallation neutron production, a very intense, cost effective and high performance neutrino beam. The baseline program for the European Spallation Source linac is that it will be fully operational at 5 MW average power by 2022, producing 2 GeV 2.86 ms long proton pulses at a rate of 14 Hz. Our proposal is to upgrade the linac to 10 MW average power and 28 Hz, producing 14 pulses/s for neutron production and 14 pulses/s for neutrino production. Furthermore, because of the high current required in the pulsed neutrino horn, the length of the pulses used for neutrino production needs to be compressed to a few $\\mu$s with the aid of an accumulator ring. A long baseline experiment using this Super Beam and a megaton underground ...

  19. The use the a high intensity neutrino beam from the ESS proton linac for measurement of neutrino CP violation and mass hierarchy

    Baussan, E.; Ekelof, T.; Martinez, E.Fernandez; Ohman, H.; Vassilopoulos, N.

    2012-01-01

    It is proposed to complement the ESS proton linac with equipment that would enable the production, concurrently with the production of the planned ESS beam used for neutron production, of a 5 MW beam of 10$^{23}$ 2.5 GeV protons per year in microsecond short pulses to produce a neutrino Super Beam, and to install a megaton underground water Cherenkov detector in a mine to detect $\

  20. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    Edgecock, T.R.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Hansen, C.; Benedetto, E.; Jensen, E.; Kosmicki, A.; Martini, M.; Osborne, J.; Prior, G.; Stora, T.; Melo-Mendonca, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Waaijer, C.; Cupial, P.; Chancé, A.; Longhin, A.; Payet, J.; Zito, M.; Baussan, E.; Bobeth, C.; Bouquerel, E.; Dracos, M.; Gaudiot, G.; Lepers, B.; Osswald, F.; Poussot, P.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wurtz, J.; Zeter, V.; Bielski, J.; Kozien, M.; Lacny, L.; Skoczen, B.; Szybinski, B.; Ustrzycka, A.; Wroblewski, A.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Balint, P.; Fourel, C.; Giraud, J.; Jacob, J.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Mitrofanov, S.; Loiselet, M.; Keutgen, Th.; Delbar, Th.; Debray, F.; Trophine, C.; Veys, S.; Daversin, C.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Kravchuk, V.L.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; De Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Collazuol, G.; Laveder, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Mezzetto, M.; Signorini, C.; Vardaci, E.; Di Nitto, A.; Brondi, A.; La Rana, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Moro, R.; Palladino, V.; Gelli, N.; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hirsh, T.Y.; Schaumann, M.; Stahl, A.; Wehner, J.; Bross, A.; Kopp, J.; Neuffer, D.; Wands, R.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, P.; Agarwalla, S.K.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Donini, A.; Ghosh, T.; Gómez Cadenas, J.J.; Hernández, P.; Martín-Albo, J.; Mena, O.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Agostino, L.; Buizza-Avanzini, M.; Marafini, M.; Patzak, T.; Tonazzo, A.; Duchesneau, D.; Mosca, L.; Bogomilov, M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Akhmedov, E.; Blennow, M.; Lindner, M.; Schwetz, T.; Fernández Martinez, E.; Maltoni, M.; Menéndez, J.; Giunti, C.; González García, M. C.; Salvado, J.; Coloma, P.; Huber, P.; Li, T.; López-Pavón, J.; Orme, C.; Pascoli, S.; Meloni, D.; Tang, J.; Winter, W.; Ohlsson, T.; Zhang, H.; Scotto-Lavina, L.; Terranova, F.; Bonesini, M.; Tortora, L.; Alekou, A.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Kurup, A.; Jenner, L.J.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Pozimski, J.; Back, J.J.; Harrison, P.; Beard, K.; Bogacz, A.; Berg, J.S.; Stratakis, D.; Witte, H.; Snopok, P.; Bliss, N.; Cordwell, M.; Moss, A.; Pattalwar, S.; Apollonio, M.

    2013-02-20

    The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of {\\mu}+ and {\\mu}- beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular 6He and 18Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the ph...

  1. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    T. R. Edgecock

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fréjus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of μ^{+} and μ^{-} beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt magnetized iron neutrino detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular ^{6}He and ^{18}Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fréjus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the physics reach of each facility, in particular for the measurement of CP violation in the lepton sector, and estimated the cost of construction. These have demonstrated that the best facility to build is the Neutrino Factory. However, if a powerful proton driver is constructed for another purpose or if the MEMPHYS detector is built for astroparticle physics, the Super Beam also becomes very attractive.

  2. Neutrino beam plasma instability

    positron or electron–proton plasma in the context of early universe, stars and supernova ... proper. Of course, in their later work on kinetic theory (KT) [5] of neutrino plasma inter- .... for electron also with additional electric potential term.

  3. NCenter wide band neutrino beam

    Stutte, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    This memo describes the physical properties of the currently operating N-Center wide band neutrino beam---commonly called the triplet train, following a past tradition of a triplet lens configuration. In reality, in order to gain a larger momentum acceptance and to minimize the angular divergence of the beam, a quadruplet beam (4 lenses) employing point-to-parallel optics at a central momentum of 300 GeV was built. 6 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  4. The neutrino factory beam and experiments

    Blondel, A; Campanelli, M; Cervera-Villanueva, Anselmo; Cline, David B; Collot, J; De Jong, M; Donini, Andrea; Dydak, Friedrich; Edgecock, R; Gavela-Legazpi, Maria Belen; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González-Garciá, M Concepción; Gruber, P M; Harris, D A; Hernández, Pilar; Kuno, Y; Litchfield, P J; McFarland, K; Mena, O; Migliozzi, P; Palladino, Vittorio; Panman, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Para, A; Peña-Garay, C; Pérez, P; Rigolin, Stefano; Romanino, Andrea; Rubbia, André; Strolin, P; Wojcicki, S G

    2000-01-01

    The discovery of neutrino oscillations marks a major milestone in the history of neutrino physics, and opens a new window to the still mysterious origin of masses and flavour-mixing. Many current and forthcoming experiments will answer open questions; however, a major step forward, up to and possibly including CP violation in the neutrino-mixing matrix, requires the neutrino beams from a \

  5. CERN fires up neutrino beams

    2006-01-01

    "CERN has switched on a new neutrino beam, aimed through the earth to the INFN Gran Sasso Laboratories some 730km away near Rome. This is the latest additin to a global endeavour to understand this most elusive of particles and unlock the secrest it carries about the origins and evolution of our Universe." (2 pages)

  6. ASTOR, concept of a combined acceleration and storage ring for the production of intense pulsed or continuous beams of neutrinos, pions, muons, kaons and neutrons

    Joho, W.

    1983-01-01

    A new concept for a high intensity accelerator for 2 GeV protons using the continuous 590 MeV beam from the present ring cyclotron has been worked out at SIN. To suppress the cosmic background in neutrino experiments a pulsed beam with high peak current and low duty cycle is required. Using the so called phase expansion effect 1,2 one can combine the acceleration and storage effect in a single isochronous cyclotron ASTOR. With the help of several RF cavities, positioned at different radii, it is possible to operate ASTOR either in a pulsed mode at 1500 Hz or in a continuous mode. The anticipated beam powers are .8 MW and 4 MW respectively. The ASTOR concept is also applicable in a possible kaon factory design, acting as an interface between the SIN ring cyclotron and a 50 Hz synchrotron for 15 to 20 GeV protons

  7. Study and conception of the decay ring of a neutrino facility using the β decays of the helium 6 and neon 18 nuclei produced by an intense beam of protons hitting various targets

    Chance, A.

    2007-09-01

    The study of the neutrino oscillation between its different flavours needs pure and very intense flux of energetic, well collimated neutrinos with a well determined energy spectrum. So, a dedicated machine seems necessary nowadays. Among the different concepts of neutrino facilities, the one which will be studied here, called Beta-Beams, lies on the neutrino production by beta decay of radioactive ions after their acceleration. More precisely, the thesis is focused on the study and the design of the race-track-shaped storage ring of the high energy ions. Its aim is to store the ions until decaying. After a brief description of the neutrino oscillation mechanism and a review of the different experiments, an introduction to the neutrino facility concept and more precisely to the Beta-Beams will be given. Then, the issues linked to the Beta-Beams will be presented. After a description of the beam transport formalism, a first design and the optical properties of the ring will be then given. The effects of the misalignment and of the field errors in the dipoles have been studied. The dynamic aperture optimization is then realized. Handling of the decay losses or the energy collimation scheme will be developed. The off-momentum injection needed in presence of a circulating beam will be explained. Finally, the specific radiofrequency program needed by the beam merging will be presented. (author)

  8. Applicability of neutrino beams to Earth exploration

    Dolgoshein, B.A.; Kalinovskij, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    The projects on applicability of neutrino beams from high energy accelerators for geological exploration and study of the Earth structure are discussed. The GENIUS (Geological Exploration by Neutrino Induced Underground Sound) project is among them. It covers detecting and studying space-time characteristics of acoustic signal arising in case of neutrino interaction with Earth depth rocks discussed. The GEMINI (Geological Exploration with Muons Induced by neutrino interactions) project represents one more possibility for using geotron neutrino beam for the purpose of geological exploration. The GEOSCAN project represents the possibility for applying high energy neutrino beams for the purpose of the Earth translusence to determine the changes in the density of internal part of the Earth. The necessity of detailed investigations of the problem of applicability of neutrino beams in the field of the Earth exploration is pointed out

  9. A measurement of muon neutrino disappearance with the MINOS detectors and NuMI beam

    Ospanov, Rustem [Texas U.

    2008-08-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline two-detector neutrino oscillation experiment that uses a high intensity muon neutrino beam to investigate the phenomena of neutrino oscillations. The neutrino beam is produced by the NuMI facility at Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, and is observed at near and far detectors placed 734 km apart. The neutrino interactions in the near detector are used to measure the initial muon neutrino fl The vast majority of neutrinos travel through the near detector and Earth matter without interactions. A fraction of muon neutrinos oscillate into other fl vors resulting in the disappearance of muon neutrinos at the far detector. This thesis presents a measurement of the muon neutrino oscillation parameters in the framework of the two-neutrino oscillation hypothesis.

  10. The SPL-based Neutrino Super Beam

    Baussan, E; Bobeth, C; Bouquerel, E; Caretta, O; Cupial, P; Davenne, T; Densham, C; Dracos, M; Fitton, M; Gaudiot, G; Kozien, M; Lacny, L; Lepers, B; Longhin, A; Loveridge, P; Osswald, F; Poussot, P; Rooney, M; Skoczen, B; Szybinski, B; Ustrzycka, A; Vassilopoulos, N; Wilcox, D; Wroblewski, A; Wurtz, J; Zeter, V; Zito, M

    2012-01-01

    The EUROnu Super Beam work package has studied a neutrino beam based on SPL at CERN and aimed at MEMPHYS, a large water Cherenkov detector, proposed for the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (Fr\\'ejus tunnel, France), with a baseline of 130 km. The aim of this proposed experiment is to study the CP violation in the neutrino sector. In the study reported here, we have developed the conceptual design of the neutrino beam, especially the target and the magnetic focusing device. Indeed, this beam present several unprecedented challenges, like the high primary proton beam power (4 MW), the high repetition rate (50 Hz) and the low energy of the protons (4.5 GeV). The design is completed by a study of all the main component of the system, starting from the transport system to guide the beam to the target up to the beam dump.

  11. Beta Beams: an accelerator based facility to explore Neutrino oscillation physics

    Wildner, E; Hansen, C; De Melo Mendonca, T; Stora, T; Payet, J; Chance, A; Zorin, V; Izotov, I; Rasin, S; Sidorov, A; Skalyga, V; De Angelis, G; Prete, G; Cinausero, M; Kravchuk, VL; Gramegna, F; Marchi, T; Collazuol, G; De Rosa, G; Delbar, T; Loiselet, M; Keutgen, T; Mitrofanov, S; Lamy, T; Latrasse, L; Marie-Jeanne, M; Sortais, P; Thuillier, T; Debray, F; Trophime, C; Hass, M; Hirsh, T; Berkovits, D; Stahl, A

    2011-01-01

    The discovery that the neutrino changes flavor as it travels through space has implications for the Standard Model of particle physics (SM)[1]. To know the contribution of neutrinos to the SM, needs precise measurements of the parameters governing the neutrino oscillations. This will require a high intensity beam-based neutrino oscillation facility. The EURONu Design Study will review three currently accepted methods of realizing this facility (the so-called Super-Beams, Beta Beams and Neutrino Factories) and perform a cost assessment that, coupled with the physics performance, will give means to the European research authorities to make a decision on the layout and construction of the future European neutrino oscillation facility. ”Beta Beams” produce collimated pure electron neutrino and antineutrino beams by accelerating beta active ions to high energies and letting them decay in a race-track shaped storage ring. EURONu Beta Beams are based on CERNs infrastructure and the fact that some of the already ...

  12. Study and conception of the decay ring of a neutrino facility using the {beta} decays of the helium 6 and neon 18 nuclei produced by an intense beam of protons hitting various targets; Etude et conception de l'anneau de desintegration d'une usine a neutrinos utilisant les decroissances {beta} des noyaux helium 6 et neon 18 produits par un faisceau intense de protons frappant diverses cibles

    Chance, A

    2007-09-15

    The study of the neutrino oscillation between its different flavours needs pure and very intense flux of energetic, well collimated neutrinos with a well determined energy spectrum. So, a dedicated machine seems necessary nowadays. Among the different concepts of neutrino facilities, the one which will be studied here, called Beta-Beams, lies on the neutrino production by beta decay of radioactive ions after their acceleration. More precisely, the thesis is focused on the study and the design of the race-track-shaped storage ring of the high energy ions. Its aim is to store the ions until decaying. After a brief description of the neutrino oscillation mechanism and a review of the different experiments, an introduction to the neutrino facility concept and more precisely to the Beta-Beams will be given. Then, the issues linked to the Beta-Beams will be presented. After a description of the beam transport formalism, a first design and the optical properties of the ring will be then given. The effects of the misalignment and of the field errors in the dipoles have been studied. The dynamic aperture optimization is then realized. Handling of the decay losses or the energy collimation scheme will be developed. The off-momentum injection needed in presence of a circulating beam will be explained. Finally, the specific radiofrequency program needed by the beam merging will be presented. (author)

  13. Study of Anti-Neutrino Beam with Muon Monitor in the T2K experiment

    Hiraki, Takahiro

    The T2K experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. In 2013, the T2K collaboration observed electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam at 7.3 sigma significance. One of the next main goals of the T2K experiment is to measure electron anti-neutrino appearance. In June 2014 we took anti-neutrino beam data for the first time. The anti-neutrino beam was obtained by reversing the polarity of horn focusing magnets. To monitor the direction and intensity of the neutrino beam which is produced from the decay of pions and kaons, the muon beam is continuously measured by Muon Monitor (MUMON). To reconstruct the profile of the muon beam, MUMON is equipped with 49 sensors distributed on a plane behind the beam dump. In this report, we show some results of the anti-neutrino beam data taken by monitors including MUMON. In particular, dependence of the muon beam intensity on electric current of the horns, correlation between the proton beam position and the MUMON profile, and beam stability are presented. Comparison between the data and Monte Carlo simulation is also discussed.

  14. Study of anti-neutrino beam with Muon Monitor in the T2K experiment

    Hiraki, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    The T2K experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. In 2013, the T2K collaboration observed electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam at 7.3 sigma significance. One of the next main goals of the T2K experiment is to measure electron anti-neutrino appearance. In June 2014 we took anti-neutrino beam data for the first time. The anti-neutrino beam was obtained by reversing the polarity of horn focusing magnets. To monitor the direction and intensity of the neutrino beam which is produced from the decay of pions and kaons, the muon beam is continuously measured by Muon Monitor (MUMON). To reconstruct the profile of the muon beam, MUMON is equipped with 49 sensors distributed on a plane behind the beam dump. In this report, we show some results of the anti-neutrino beam data taken by monitors including MUMON. In particular, dependence of the muon beam intensity on electric current of the horns, correlation between the proton beam position and the MUMON profile, and beam stability are presented. Comparison between the data and Monte Carlo simulation is also discussed. (author)

  15. Neutrino parameters with magical beta-beam at INO

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Choubey, Sandhya; Raychaudhuri, Amitava [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Allahabad (India)], E-mail: sanjib@hri.res.in

    2008-11-01

    We have studied the physics reach of an experiment where neutrinos produced in a beta-beam facility at CERN are observed in a large magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). The idea of beta-beam is based on the production of a pure, intense, collimated beam of electron neutrinos or their antiparticles via the beta decay of accelerated radioactive ions circulating in a storage ring. Interestingly, the CERN-INO distance of 7152 km happens to be tantalizingly close to the so-called 'magic' baseline where the sensitivity to the neutrino mass ordering (sign of {delta}m{sup 2}{sub 31} {identical_to} m{sup 2}{sub 3} - m{sup 2}{sub 1}) and more importantly, {theta}{sub 13}, goes up significantly, while the sensitivity to the unknown CP phase is absent. This permits such an experiment involving the golden P{sub e{mu}} channel to make precise measurements of the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} and neutrino mass hierarchy avoiding the issues of intrinsic degeneracies and correlations which plague other baselines.

  16. Influence of flavor oscillations on neutrino beam instabilities

    Mendonça, J. T., E-mail: titomend@ist.utl.pt [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 05508-090 São Paulo SP (Brazil); Haas, F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970 Porto Alegre RS (Brazil); Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain and Instituto de Investigaciones Energeticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    We consider the collective neutrino plasma interactions and study the electron plasma instabilities produced by a nearly mono-energetic neutrino beam in a plasma. We describe the mutual interaction between neutrino flavor oscillations and electron plasma waves. We show that the neutrino flavor oscillations are not only perturbed by electron plasmas waves but also contribute to the dispersion relation and the growth rates of neutrino beam instabilities.

  17. Study of different type neutrino oscillations based on neutrino beams from 600 GeV

    Aref'ev, A.S.

    1994-01-01

    The problems of the different type neutrino oscillations based on a wide-band and narrow-band neutrino beam from the 600 GeV UNK-1 machine using the Baical Neutrino Telescope (4200 km from a accelerator) are discussed. The main parameters of the neutrino channel are presented. 17 refs.; 12 figs.; 1 tab

  18. Search for lepton number violating charged current processes with neutrino beams

    Kanemura, Shinya; Kuno, Yoshitaka; Ota, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel idea on measurements to understand which physics mechanism is responsible for the origin of a small neutrino mass, by searching for the processes of lepton number violating charged current interaction with incident of a neutrino beam. It turns out that only the proposed measurements could provide a potential to discriminate the mechanisms, in particular the ones called loop-induced mechanisms of neutrino mass generation, from the others. The expected rates of these processes based on some theoretical assumptions are estimated. They are found to be sizable so that detection of such processes could be achievable at near detectors in future highly intense neutrino-beam facilities

  19. Plasma Lens for Muon and Neutrino Beams

    Kahn, Stephen; Korenev, Sergey; Bishai, Mary; Diwan, Milind; Gallardo, Juan; Hershcovitch, Ady; Johnson, Brant

    2008-04-01

    The plasma lens is examined as an alternate to focusing horns and solenoids for use in a neutrino or muon beam facility. The plasma lens concept is based on a combined high-current lens/target configuration. The current is fed at electrodes located upstream and downstream from the target where pion capturing is needed. The current flows primarily in the plasma, which has a lower resistivity than the target. A second plasma lens section, with an additional current feed, follows the target to provide shaping of the plasma stability. The geometry of the plasma is shaped to provide optimal pion capture. Simulations of this plasma lens system have shown a 25% higher neutrino production than the horn system. A plasma lens has additional advantage: larger axial current than horns, minimal neutrino contamination during antineutrino running, and negligible pion absorption or scattering. Results from particle simulations using a plasma lens will be presented.

  20. Hadronic models and experimental data for the neutrino beam production

    Collazuol, G; Guglielmi, A M; Sala, P R

    2000-01-01

    The predictions of meson production by 450 GeV/c protons on Be using the Monte Carlo FLUKA standalone and GEANT-FLUKA and GEANT-GHEISHA in GEANT are compared with available experimental measurements. The comparison enlightens the improvements of the hadronic generator models of the present standalone code FLUKA with respect to the 1992 version which is embedded into GEANT-FLUKA. Worse results were obtained with the GHEISHA package. A complete simulation of the SPS neutrino beam line at CERN showed significant variations in the intensity and composition of the neutrino beam when FLUKA standalone instead of the GEANT-FLUKA package is used to simulate particle production in the Be target.

  1. Hadronic models and experimental data for the neutrino beam production

    Collazuol, G.; Ferrari, A.; Guglielmi, A.; Sala, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    The predictions of meson production by 450 GeV/c protons on Be using the Monte Carlo FLUKA standalone and GEANT-FLUKA and GEANT-GHEISHA in GEANT are compared with available experimental measurements. The comparison enlightens the improvements of the hadronic generator models of the present standalone code FLUKA with respect to the 1992 version which is embedded into GEANT-FLUKA. Worse results were obtained with the GHEISHA package. A complete simulation of the SPS neutrino beam line at CERN showed significant variations in the intensity and composition of the neutrino beam when FLUKA standalone instead of the GEANT-FLUKA package is used to simulate particle production in the Be target

  2. Plasma Lens for Muon and Neutrino Beams

    Kahn, S.A.; Korenev, S.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M.; Gallardo, J.C.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnson, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    The plasma lens is examined as an alternate to focusing horns and solenoids for use in a neutrino or muon beam facility. The plasma lens concept is based on a combined high-energy lens/target configuration. The current is fed at electrodes located upstream and downstream from the target where pion capturing is needed. The current flows primarily in the plasma, which has a lower resistivity than the target. A second plasma lens section, with an additional current feed, follows the target to provide shaping of the plasma for optimum focusing. The plasma lens is immersed in an additional solenoid magnetic field to facilitate the plasma stability. The geometry of the plasma is shaped to provide optimal pion capture. Simulations of this plasma lens system have shown a 25% higher neutrino production than the horn system. Plasma lenses have the additional advantage of negligible pion absorption and scattering by the lens material and reduced neutrino contamination during anti-neutrino running. Results of particle simulations using plasma lens will be presented

  3. First events from the CNGS neutrino beam detected in the OPERA experiment

    Acquafredda, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Anokhina, A.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Arrabito, L.; Autiero, D.; Badertscher, A.; Bergnoli, A.; Bersani Greggio, F.; Besnier, M.; Beyer, M.; Bondil-Blin, S.; Borer, K.; Boucrot, J.; Boyarkin, V.; Bozza, C.; Brugnera, R.; Buontempo, S.; Caffari, Y.; Campagne, Jean-Eric; Carlus, B.; Carrara, E.; Cazes, A.; Chaussard, L.; Chernyavsky, M.; Chiarella, V.; Chon-Sen, N.; Chukanov, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Consiglio, L.; Cozzi, M.; Dal Corso, F.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Damet, J.; De Lellis, G.; Declais, Y.; Descombes, T.; De Serio, M.; Di Capua, F.; Di Ferdinando, D.; Di Giovanni, A.; Di Marco, N.; Di Troia, C.; Dmitrievski, S.; Dracos, M.; Duchesneau, D.; Dulach, B.; Dusini, S.; Ebert, J.; Enikeev, R.; Ereditato, A.; Esposito, L.S.; Fanin, C.; Favier, J.; Felici, G.; Ferber, T.; Fournier, L.; Franceschi, A.; Frekers, D.; Fukuda, T.; Fukushima, C.; Galkin, V.I.; Galkin, V.A.; Gallet, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Gaudiot, G.; Giacomelli, G.; Giarmana, O.; Giorgini, M.; Girard, L.; Girerd, C.; Goellnitz, C.; Goldberg, J.; Gornoushkin, Y.; Grella, G.; Grianti, F.; Guerin, C.; Guler, M.; Gustavino, C.; Hagner, C.; Hamane, T.; Hara, T.; Hauger, M.; Hess, M.; Hoshino, K.; Ieva, M.; Incurvati, M.; Jakovcic, K.; Janicsko Csathy, J.; Janutta, B.; Jollet, C.; Juget, F.; Kazuyama, M.; Kim, S.H.; Kimura, M.; Knuesel, J.; Kodama, K.; Kolev, D.; Komatsu, M.; Kose, U.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kreslo, I.; Krumstein, Z.; Laktineh, I.; de La Taille, C.; Le Flour, T.; Lieunard, S.; Ljubicic, A.; Longhin, A.; Malgin, A.; Manai, K.; Mandrioli, G.; Mantello, U.; Marotta, A.; Marteau, J.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Matveev, V.; Messina, M.; Meyer, L.; Micanovic, S.; Migliozzi, P.; Miyamoto, S.; Monacelli, Piero; Monteiro, I.; Morishima, K.; Moser, U.; Muciaccia, M.T.; Mugnier, P.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Napolitano, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Nonoyama, Y.; Nozdrin, A.; Ogawa, S.; Olchevski, A.; Orlandi, D.; Ossetski, D.; Paoloni, A.; Park, B.D.; Park, I.G.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pellegrino, L.; Pessard, H.; Pilipenko, V.; Pistillo, C.; Polukhina, N.; Pozzato, M.; Pretzl, K.; Publichenko, P.; Raux, L.; Repellin, J.P.; Roganova, T.; Romano, G.; Rosa, G.; Rubbia, A.; Ryasny, V.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Ryzhikov, D.; Sadovski, A.; Sanelli, C.; Sato, O.; Sato, Y.; Saveliev, V.; Savvinov, N.; Sazhina, G.; Schembri, A.; Schmidt Parzefall, W.; Schroeder, H.; Schutz, H.U.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Sewing, J.; Shibuya, H.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Song, J.S.; Spaeti, R.; Spinetti, M.; Stanco, L.; Starkov, N.; Stipcevic, M.; Strolin, Paolo Emilio; Sugonyaev, V.; Takahashi, S.; Tereschenko, V.; Terranova, F.; Tezuka, I.; Tioukov, V.; Tikhomirov, I.; Tolun, P.; Toshito, T.; Tsarev, V.; Tsenov, R.; Ugolino, U.; Ushida, N.; Van Beek, G.; Verguilov, V.; Vilain, P.; Votano, L.; Vuilleumier, J.L.; Waelchli, T.; Waldi, R.; Weber, M.; Wilquet, G.; Wonsak, B.; Wurth, R.; Wurtz, J.; Yakushev, V.; Yoon, C.S.; Zaitsev, Y.; Zamboni, I.; Zimmerman, R.

    2006-01-01

    The OPERA neutrino detector at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory (LNGS) was designed to perform the first detection of neutrino oscillations in appearance mode, through the study of nu_mu to nu_tau oscillations. The apparatus consists of a lead/emulsion-film target complemented by electronic detectors. It is placed in the high-energy, long-baseline CERN to LNGS beam (CNGS) 730 km away from the neutrino source. In August 2006 a first run with CNGS neutrinos was successfully conducted. A first sample of neutrino events was collected, statistically consistent with the integrated beam intensity. After a brief description of the beam and of the various sub-detectors, we report on the achievement of this milestone, presenting the first data and some analysis results.

  4. Intense ion beam generator

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Sudan, R.N.

    1977-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for producing intense megavolt ion beams are disclosed. In one embodiment, a reflex triode-type pulsed ion accelerator is described which produces ion pulses of more than 5 kiloamperes current with a peak energy of 3 MeV. In other embodiments, the device is constructed so as to focus the beam of ions for high concentration and ease of extraction, and magnetic insulation is provided to increase the efficiency of operation

  5. Physics at a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility

    Bandyopadhyay, A; Choubey, S; Gandhi, R; Goswami, S; Roberts, B L; Bouchez, J; Antoniadis, I; Ellis, J; Giudice, G F; Schwetz, T; Umasankar, S; Karagiorgi, G; Aguilar-Arevalo, A; Conrad, J M; Shaevitz, M H; Pascoli, S; Geer, S; Campagne, J E; Rolinec, M; Blondel, A

    2009-01-01

    The conclusions of the Physics Working Group of the International Scoping Study of a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility (the ISS) are presented. The ISS was carried out by the international community between NuFact05, (the 7th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Super-beams, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome, 21-26 June 2005) and NuFact06 (Ivine, CA, 24-30 August 2006). The physics case for an extensive experimental programme to understand the properties of the neutrino is presented and the role of high-precision measurements of neutrino oscillations within this programme is discussed in detail. The performance of second-generation super-beam experiments, beta-beam facilities and the Neutrino Factory are evaluated and a quantitative comparison of the discovery potential of the three classes of facility is presented. High-precision studies of the properties of the muon are complementary to the study of neutrino oscillations. The Neutrino Factory has the potential to provide extremely intense muon beams and the physics potential of such beams is discussed in the final section of the report.

  6. Beta Beams for Precision Measurements of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters

    Wildner, E; Hansen, C; De Melo Mendonca, T; Stora, T; Damjanovic, S; Payet, J; Chancé, A; Zorin, V; Izotov, I; Rasin, S; Sidorov, A; Skalyga, V; De Angelis, G; Prete, G; Cinausero, M; Kravchuk, V; Gramegna, F; Marchi, T; Collazuol, G; Mezzetto, M; Delbar, T; Loiselet, M; Keutgen, T; Mitrofanov, S; Burt, G; Dexter, A; Lamy, T; Latrasse, L; Marie-Jeanne, M; Sortais, P; Thuillier, T; Debray, F; Trophime, C; Hass, M; Hirsh, T; Berkovits, D; Stahl, A; Vardaci, E; Di Nitto, A; Brondi, A; La Rana, G; Moro, R; De Rosa, G; Palladino, V

    2012-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations have implications for the Standard Model of particle physics. The CERN Beta Beam has outstanding capabilities to contribute to precision measurements of the parameters governing neutrino oscillations. The FP7 collaboration EUROnu (2008-2012) is a design study that will review three facilities (Super-Beams, Beta Beams and Neutrino Factories) and perform a cost assessment that, coupled with the physics performance, will give means to the European research authorities to make decisions on future European neutrino oscillation facilities. ”Beta Beams” produce collimated pure electron (anti)neutrinos by accelerating beta active ions to high energies and having them decay in a storage ring. Using existing machines and infrastructure is an advantage for the cost evaluation; however, this choice is also constraining the Beta Beams. Recent work to make the Beta Beam facility a solid option will be described: production of Beta Beam isotopes, the 60 GHz pulsed ECR source development, integratio...

  7. Beam tests of ionization chambers for the NuMI neutrino beam

    Robert M. Zwaska et al.

    2003-09-25

    We have conducted tests at the Fermilab Booster of ionization chambers to be used as monitors of the NuMI neutrino beamline. The chambers were exposed to proton fluxes of up to 10{sup 12} particles/cm{sup 2}/1.56 {micro}s. We studied space charge effects which can reduce signal collection from the chambers at large charged particle beam intensities.

  8. Neutrino Factory Targets and the MICE Beam

    Walaron, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    The future of particle physics in the next 20 years must include detailed study of neutrinos. The first proof of physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics is evident in results from recent neutrino experiements which imply that neutrinos have mass and flavour mixing. The Neutrino Factory is the leading contender to measure precisely the neutrino mixing parameters to probe beyond the Standard Model physics.

  9. CAPTAIN-Miner@@a. Neutrino-Argon Scattering in a Medium-Energy Neutrino Beam

    Mauger, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    The NuMI facility at Fermilab is currently providing an extremely intense beam of neutrinos for the NO@@A, MINER@@A and MINOS+ experiments. By installing the 5-ton CAPTAIN liquid argon TPC in front of the MINER@@A detector in the NuMI beamline and combining the data from the CAPTAIN, MINER@@A and MINOS+ detectors, a broad program of few-GeV neutrino cross section measurements on argon can be pursued. These measurements will be extremely helpful for future oscillation experiments. By directly comparing the cross sections on argon to MINER@@A@@@s scintillator (CH) target, a new level of precision can be achieved in the measurements of the effects of the nucleus on neutrino interactions. These effects are of interest to not only the particle physics but also the nuclear physics community. This document describes in detail the physics goals of the CAPTAIN-MINER@@A experiment, in addition to a first estimate of the technical resources required to install, commission and operate the CAPTAIN detector in front of the MINERVA detector.

  10. CAPTAIN-Minerνa. Neutrino-Argon Scattering in a Medium-Energy Neutrino Beam

    Mauger, Christopher M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-29

    The NuMI facility at Fermilab is currently providing an extremely intense beam of neutrinos for the NOνA, MINERνA and MINOS+ experiments. By installing the 5-ton CAPTAIN liquid argon TPC in front of the MINERνA detector in the NuMI beamline and combining the data from the CAPTAIN, MINERνA and MINOS+ detectors, a broad program of few-GeV neutrino cross section measurements on argon can be pursued. These measurements will be extremely helpful for future oscillation experiments. By directly comparing the cross sections on argon to MINERνA’s scintillator (CH) target, a new level of precision can be achieved in the measurements of the effects of the nucleus on neutrino interactions. These effects are of interest to not only the particle physics but also the nuclear physics community. This document describes in detail the physics goals of the CAPTAIN-MINERνA experiment, in addition to a first estimate of the technical resources required to install, commission and operate the CAPTAIN detector in front of the MINERVA detector.

  11. Search for sterile neutrinos at a new short-baseline CERN neutrino beam

    Mauri, N.

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years the experimental results on neutrino/anti-neutrino oscillations at Short-Baseline (SBL) showed a tension with several phenomenological models. The recent and carefully recomputed anti-neutrino fluxes from nuclear reactors have further increased this tension drawing a picture not fully compatible with the 3 neutrino oscillation scenario. A sterile neutrino is a neutral lepton which does not couple with W/Z bosons. it is not an exotic particle, its existence being a natural consequence of neutrinos having a non-zero mass. Sterile neutrinos can mix with the active ones through additional mass eigenstates, with no necessary mass scale. We will present an experimental search for sterile neutrinos with a new CERN-SPS neutrino beam using muon spectrometers and large LAr detectors. To definitely clarify the physics issue, the proposed experiment will study oscillations in a muon neutrino / antineutrino beam both in appearance and disappearance modes, exploring the Δm 2 ∼ 1 eV 2 range

  12. Experimental use of neutrinos from ISABELLE beam dumps

    Bozoki, G.E.; Thorndike, A.M.; Mann, A.K.

    1978-01-01

    The technical feasibility and possible applicability of using ISABELLE beam dumps as powerful sources for directed high-energy neutrino bursts are investigated. In the present machine design two dump systems are applied to absorb the extracted fast beams. The expected normal beam extraction rate is 1 to 2 per day, when about (6.3 to 7.5) x 10 14 protons are hitting the external targets during a pulse length of approx. 50 μs. These protons are considered so far to be useless. The neutrinos produced could be used for the following activities: the study of coherent neutrino regeneration, calibration and permanent testing of cosmic-ray and astrophysical neutrino detectors, research on the practical applicability of neutrinos in telecommunication, and certain astro- and geophysical applications. Tailoring the system to meet these activities is illustrated. 6 figures

  13. Green light for neutrino beam to pass below the Alps

    Abbott, A

    1999-01-01

    CERN council have approved a plan to send a beam of muon neutrinos under the Alps from Geneva to the Gran Sasso laboratories near Rome. INFN is organising two experiments - OPERA and ICANOE, to study the neutrino oscillations as they travel (1/2 pg)

  14. High intensity neutrino source superconducting solenoid cyrostat design

    Page, T.M.; Nicol, T.H.; Feher, S.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is involved in the development of a 100 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. The solenoid cryostat will house the helium vessel, suspension system, thermal shield, multilayer insulation, power leads, instrumentation, a vacuum vessel and cryogenic distribution lines. This paper discusses the requirements and detailed design of these superconducting solenoid cryostats.

  15. Intense electron and ion beams

    Molokovsky, Sergey Ivanovich

    2005-01-01

    Intense Ion and Electron Beams treats intense charged-particle beams used in vacuum tubes, particle beam technology and experimental installations such as free electron lasers and accelerators. It addresses, among other things, the physics and basic theory of intense charged-particle beams; computation and design of charged-particle guns and focusing systems; multiple-beam charged-particle systems; and experimental methods for investigating intense particle beams. The coverage is carefully balanced between the physics of intense charged-particle beams and the design of optical systems for their formation and focusing. It can be recommended to all scientists studying or applying vacuum electronics and charged-particle beam technology, including students, engineers and researchers.

  16. Measurement of the neutrino velocity with the ICARUS detector at the CNGS beam

    Antonello, M.; Aprili, P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (AQ) (Italy); Baiboussinov, B.; Baldo Ceolin, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e INFN, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy); Benetti, P.; Calligarich, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica e INFN, Universita di Pavia, Via Bassi 6, I-27100, Pavia (Italy); Canci, N. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (AQ) (Italy); Centro, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e INFN, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy); Cesana, A. [INFN, Sezione di Milano e Politecnico, Via Celoria 16, I-20133, Milano (Italy); Cieslik, K. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Cline, D.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, LA (United States); Cocco, A.G. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e INFN, Universita Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Dabrowska, A. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Dequal, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e INFN, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy); Dermenev, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospekt 60-letiya Oktyabrya 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Dolfini, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica e INFN, Universita di Pavia, Via Bassi 6, I-27100, Pavia (Italy); Farnese, C.; Fava, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e INFN, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy); Ferrari, A. [CERN, European Laboratory for Particle Physics, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); and others

    2012-06-18

    At the end of the 2011 run, the CERN CNGS neutrino beam has been briefly operated in lower intensity mode with {approx}10{sup 12} p.o.t./pulse and with a proton beam structure made of four LHC-like extractions, each with a narrow width of {approx}3 ns, separated by 524 ns. This very tightly bunched beam allowed a very accurate time-of-flight measurement of neutrinos from CERN to LNGS on an event-by-event basis. The ICARUS T600 detector (CNGS2) has collected 7 beam-associated events, consistent with the CNGS collected neutrino flux of 2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} p.o.t. and in agreement with the well-known characteristics of neutrino events in the LAr-TPC. The time of flight difference between the speed of light and the arriving neutrino LAr-TPC events has been analysed. The result {delta}t=0.3{+-}4.9(stat.){+-}9.0(syst.) ns is compatible with the simultaneous arrival of all events with speed equal to that of light. This is in a striking difference with the reported result of OPERA (OPERA Collaboration, 2011) claiming that high energy neutrinos from CERN arrive at LNGS {approx}60 ns earlier than expected from luminal speed.

  17. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    Wangler, T.P.

    1993-01-01

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. The author describes what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. Initial results are presented from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam

  18. Search for Decays of Heavy Neutrinos with the PS Beam

    2002-01-01

    The experiment searches for neutrino decay, primarily into the e|+e|-@n^e and @g@g@n^e modes. Neutrino masses in the region between 1 and 400~MeV will be explored. The beam used is the neutrino PS beam used for the oscillation experiments. The apparatus consists of a decay volume @=30~m long and a calorimeter @=8~radiation lengths thick and @=20~m|2 in surface. The detectors are flash-tube modules of the type developed at Saclay for the proton-stability experiment. Scintillator hodoscopes give the timing information necessary for the trigger logic and background rejection.

  19. Diagram of the CNGS neutrino beam

    Jean-Luc Caron

    2001-01-01

    Protons accelerated in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN collide with a graphite target producing mainly pions and kaons, particles with short lifetimes, which will decay in the decay tube, producing muon neutrinos. Some of these neutrinos are expected to change into another type called the tau neutrino that will be looked for by a huge detector 732 km away in Gran Sasso, Italy.

  20. Symmetry tests with intense hadron beams

    Vogt, E.W.

    1994-08-01

    The Government of Canada has pulled the plug on funding of the KAON facility in Canada. But the science opportunities for symmetry tests with the kinds of beams that KAON would have provided remain. For example, the full intensity of kaons, which KAON would have provided, is needed to find the magnitude and phase of V td and therefore to describe direct CP violation. The combination of K + → π + ν ν - and K L o → π o ν ν - serve this purpose. A variety of other symmetry tests are possible with the kind of intense beams of kaons, antinucleons, other hadrons and neutrinos which KAON would have provided. A perspective will be given for such experiments and their future prospects, now that KAON will not be built. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  1. Neutrino SuperBeams at Fermilab

    Parke, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    In this talk I will give a brief description of long baseline neutrino physics, the LBNE experiment and Project X at Fermilab. A brief outline of the physics of long baseline neutrino experiments, LBNE and Project X at Fermilab is given in this talk.

  2. Proposal to perform a high - statisics neutrino scattering experiment using a fine - grained detector in the NuMI Beam

    Morfin, J.G.; /Fermilab; McFarland, K.; /Rochester U.

    2003-12-01

    The NuMI facility at Fermilab will provide an extremely intense beam of neutrinos for the MINOS neutrino-oscillation experiment. The spacious and fully-outfitted MINOS near detector hall will be the ideal venue for a high-statistics, high-resolution {nu} and {bar {nu}}-nucleon/nucleus scattering experiment. The experiment described here will measure neutrino cross-sections and probe nuclear effects essential to present and future neutrino-oscillation experiments. Moreover, with the high NuMI beam intensity, the experiment will either initially address or significantly improve our knowledge of a wide variety of neutrino physics topics of interest and importance to the elementary-particle and nuclear-physics communities.

  3. New initiatives on lepton flavor violation and neutrino oscillation with high intense muon and neutrino sources

    Kuno, Yoshitaka; Pakvasa, Sandip

    2002-01-01

    The area of physics involving muons and neutrinos has become exciting in particle physics. Using their high intensity sources, physicists undertake, in various ways, extensive searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model, such as tests of supersymmetric grand unification (SUSY-GUT) and precision measurements of the muon and neutrino properties, which will in future extend to ambitious studies such as determination of the three-generation neutrino mixing matrix elements and CP violation in the lepton sector. The physics of this field is advancing, with potential improvements of the source

  4. Neutrino Factory

    Bogomilov, M; Tsenov, R; Dracos, M; Bonesini, M; Palladino, V; Tortora, L; Mori, Y; Planche, T; Lagrange, J  B; Kuno, Y; Benedetto, E; Efthymiopoulos, I; Garoby, R; Gilardoini, S; Martini, M; Wildner, E; Prior, G; Blondel, A; Karadzhow, Y; Ellis, M; Kyberd, P; Bayes, R; Laing, A; Soler, F  J  P; Alekou, A; Apollonio, M; Aslaninejad, M; Bontoiu, C; Jenner, L  J; Kurup, A; Long, K; Pasternak, J; Zarrebini, A; Poslimski, J; Blackmore, V; Cobb, J; Tunnell, C; Andreopoulos, C; Bennett, J  R  J; Brooks, S; Caretta, O; Davenne, T; Densham, C; Edgecock, T  R; Fitton, M; Kelliher, D; Loveridge, P; McFarland, A; Machida, S; Prior, C; Rees, G; Rogers, C; Rooney, M; Thomason, J; Wilcox, D; Booth, C; Skoro, G; Back, J  J; Harrison, P; Berg, J  S; Fernow, R; Gallardo, J  C; Gupta, R; Kirk, H; Simos, N; Stratakis, D; Souchlas, N; Witte, H; Bross, A; Geer, S; Johnstone, C; Mokhov, N; Neuffer, D; Popovic, M; Strait, J; Striganov, S; Morfín, J  G; Wands, R; Snopok, P; Bogacz, S  A; Morozov, V; Roblin, Y; Cline, D; Ding, X; Bromberg, C; Hart, T; Abrams, R  J; Ankenbrandt, C  M; Beard, K  B; Cummings, M  A  C; Flanagan, G; Johnson, R  P; Roberts, T  J; Yoshikawa, C  Y; Graves, V  B; McDonald, K  T; Coney, L; Hanson, G

    2014-01-01

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that $\\theta_{13} > 0$. The measured value of $\\theta_{13}$ is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti)neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO$\

  5. Neutrino factories

    Dydak, F.

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of neutrino oscillations marks a major milestone in the history of neutrino physics, and opens a window to what lies beyond the Standard Model. Many current and forthcoming experiments will answer open questions; however, a major step forward, up to and possibly including CP violation in the neutrino mixing matrix, will be offered by the neutrino beams from a neutrino factory. The neutrino factory is a new concept for producing neutrino beams of unprecedented quality in terms of intensity, flavour composition, and precision of the beam parameters. These beams enable the exploration of otherwise inaccessible domains in neutrino oscillation physics by exploiting baselines of planetary dimensions. Suitable detectors pose formidable challenges but seem within reach with only moderate extrapolations from existing technologies. Although the main physics attraction of the neutrino factory is in the area of neutrino oscillations, an interesting spectrum of further opportunities ranging from high-precision, high-rate neutrino scattering to physics with high-intensity stopped muons comes with it

  6. Energy dependence of CP-violation reach for monochromatic neutrino beam

    Bernabéu, José; Espinoza, Catalina

    2008-06-01

    The ultimate goal of future neutrino facilities is the determination of CP violation in neutrino oscillations. Besides | U (e 3) | ≠ 0, this will require precision experiments with a very intense neutrino source and energy control. With this objective in mind, the creation of monochromatic neutrino beams from the electron capture decay of boosted ions by the SPS of CERN has been proposed. We discuss the capabilities of such a facility as a function of the energy of the boost and the baseline for the detector. We compare the physics potential for two different configurations: (I) γ = 90 and γ = 195 (maximum achievable at present SPS) to Frejus; (II) γ = 195 and γ = 440 (maximum achievable at upgraded SPS) to Canfranc. We conclude that the SPS upgrade to 1000 GeV is important to reach a better sensitivity to CP violation iff it is accompanied by a longer baseline.

  7. Energy dependence of CP-violation reach for monochromatic neutrino beam

    Bernabeu, Jose; Espinoza, Catalina

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate goal of future neutrino facilities is the determination of CP violation in neutrino oscillations. Besides |U(e3)|≠0, this will require precision experiments with a very intense neutrino source and energy control. With this objective in mind, the creation of monochromatic neutrino beams from the electron capture decay of boosted ions by the SPS of CERN has been proposed. We discuss the capabilities of such a facility as a function of the energy of the boost and the baseline for the detector. We compare the physics potential for two different configurations: (I) γ=90 and γ=195 (maximum achievable at present SPS) to Frejus; (II) γ=195 and γ=440 (maximum achievable at upgraded SPS) to Canfranc. We conclude that the SPS upgrade to 1000 GeV is important to reach a better sensitivity to CP violation iff it is accompanied by a longer baseline

  8. Wide-band neutrino beams at 1000 GeV

    Malensek, A.; Stutte, L.

    1983-01-01

    In a previous publication, S. Mori discussed various broad-band neutrino and antineutrino beams using 1000 GeV protons on target. A new beam (SST) has been designed which provides the same neutrino flux as the quadrupole triplet (QT) while suppressing the wrong sign flux by a factor of 18. It also provides more than twice as much high energy antineutrino flux than the sign-selected bare target (SSBT) and in addition, has better neutrino suppression. While it is possible to increase the flux obtained from the single horn system over that previously described, the conclusion which states any horn focussing system seems to be of marginal use for Tevatron neutrino physics, is unchanged. Neutrino and antineutrino event rates and wrong sign backgrounds were computed using NUADA for a 100 metric ton detector of radius 1.5 meters. Due to radiation considerations and the existing transformer location, the horn beam is placed in its usual position inside the Target Tube. All other beams are placed in Fronthall. Thus, for the wide-band Fronthall trains a decay distance of 520 meters is used, versus 400 meters for the horn train

  9. Intense low energy positron beams

    Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

    1993-01-01

    Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e + beams exist producing of the order of 10 8 - 10 9 e + /sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e + beams with intensities greater than 10 9 e + /sec and current densities of the order of 10 13 - 10 14 e + sec - 1 cm -2 . Intense e + beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B + moderators or by increasing the available activity of B + particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e + collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e + beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e + microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e + diffraction and other fields. Intense e + beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies

  10. A Measurement of Neutrino Charged Current Interactions and a Search for Muon Neutrino Disappearance with the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam

    Nakajima, Yasuhiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we report on a measurement of muon neutrino inclusive charged current interactions on carbon in the few GeV region, using the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. The all neutrino mode data collected in the SciBooNE experiment is used for this analysis. We collected high-statistics CC interaction sample at SciBooNE, and extracted energy dependent inclusive charged current interaction rates and cross sections for a wide energy range from 0.25 GeV to ~3 GeV. We measure the interaction rates with 6-15% precision, and the cross sections with 10-30% precision. We also made an energy integrated measurements, with the precisions of 3% for the rate, and 8% for the cross section measurements. This is the first measurement of the CC inclusive cross section on carbon around 1 GeV. This inclusive interaction measurement is nearly free from effects of hadron re-interactions in the nucleus. Hence, it is complementary to other exclusive cross section measurements, and essential to understand the neutrino interaction cross sections in the few GeV region, which is relevant to ongoing and future neutrino oscillation experiments. This analysis also provides the normalization for SciBooNE's previous cross section ratio measurements for charged current coherent pion production and neutral current neutral pion production. Then, a precise comparison between our previous measurements and the model predictions becomes possible. The result of the interaction rate measurement is used to constrain the product of the neutrino flux and the cross section at the other experiment on the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam: Mini-BooNE. We conducted a search for short-baseline muon neutrino disappearance using data both from SciBooNE and MiniBooNE, to test a possible neutrino oscillation with sterile neutrinos which is suggested by the LSND experiment. With this constraint by SciBooNE, we significantly reduced the flux and the cross section uncertainties at MiniBooNE, and achieved the

  11. Movable detector to search for neutrino oscillations in the BNL neutrino beam

    Bozoki, G.; Fainberg, A.; Weygand, D.; Fagg, L.; Uberall, H.; Goldberg, M.; Meadows, B.; Saenz, A.W.; Seeman, N.

    1980-01-01

    A simple, straightforward, and economic experiment utilizing a set of water Cherenkov counters is proposed to search for neutrino oscillations in the AGS neutrino beam. The detector will be movable and will be able to provide reasonable counting rates up to 2 km downstream of the pion decay tunnel. Whereas previous accelerator experiments have sought to increase the ratio l/p (with l the neutrino path length and p its momentum) by decreasing p, increasing l is suggested instead. Further, by making measurements at several different values of l with the same apparatus, many sources of systematic error are eliminated. The experiment will measure beam-associated muon- and electron-type events at each position. A change in the ratio of muon- to electron-type events as a function of position would be evidence for ν/sub μ/ + ν/sub e/ oscillations. Sensitivity in terms of (Δm) 2 (the square of the mass difference in the mass eigenstates) can be as low as 0.1 eV 2 , for full mixing, which is below the most probable value found by Reines et al for Δm 2 in their electron neutrino reactor experiment. This experiment would be parasitic, running behind the usual neutrino beam experiments, assuming the nominal beam energy (peaked at 1 GeV), and would thus make a minimal demand on AGS support. It is suggested that the first two measurements be made inside the Isabelle tunnel at the points of intersection with the AGS neutrino beam. No further excavations would be required, and the data could be taken before ISA equipment is installed

  12. Physics Reach with a Monochromatic Neutrino Beam from Electron Capture

    Bernabeu, J.; Espinoza, C.; Lindroos, M.

    2005-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments from different sources have demonstrated non-vanishing neutrino masses and flavour mixings. The next experiments have to address the determination of the connecting mixing U(e3) and the existence of the CP violating phase. Whereas U(e3) measures the strength of the oscillation probability in appearance experiments, the CP phase acts as a phase-shift in the interference pattern. Here we propose to separate these two parameters by energy dependence, using the novel idea of a monochromatic neutrino beam facility based on the acceleration of ions that decay fast through electron capture. Fine tuning of the boosted neutrino energy allows precision measurements able to open a window for the discovery of CP violation, even for a mixing as small as 1 degree

  13. 16th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Future Neutrino Beam Facilities

    2015-01-01

    These proceedings present the written contributions from participants of the 16th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Future Neutrino Beam Facilities (NUFACT 2014) that was held at the University of Glasgow (Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom) from 25-30 August 2014. This edition of the NUFACT annual meetings, which started in 1999, consisted of 24 plenary and 92 parallel talks and various poster sessions, with the participation of 124 delegates. Furthermore, the International Neutrino Summer School 2014 was held from 10-22 August 2014 at St Andrews, Scotland, in the two weeks before NUFACT 2014. It was intended for young scientists with an interest in neutrino physics in such a way that they would be able to participate and contribute to the NUFACT workshop as well. The objectives of the NUFACT workshops are to review progress on different studies for future accelerator-based neutrino oscillation facilities, with the goal to discover the mass hierarchy of neutrinos, CP violation in the leptonic s...

  14. Intense beams of light ions

    Camarcat, Noel

    1985-01-01

    Results of experiments performed in order to accelerate intense beams of light and heavier ions are presented. The accelerating diodes are driven by existing pulsed power generators. Optimization of the generator structure is described in chapter I. Nuclear diagnostics of the accelerated light ion beams are presented in chapter II. Chapter III deals with the physics of intense charged particle beams. The models developed are applied to the calculation of the performances of the ion diodes described in the previous chapters. Chapter IV reports preliminary results on a multiply ionized carbon source driven by a 0.1 TW pulsed power generator. (author) [fr

  15. Environmental assessment -- Proposed neutrino beams at the Main Injector project

    1997-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to build a beamline on the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) site to accommodate an experimental research program in neutrino physics. The proposed action, called Neutrino Beams at the Main Injector (NuMI), is to design, construct, operate and decommission a facility for producing and studying a high flux beam of neutrinos in the energy range of 1 to 40 GeV (1 GeV is one billion or 10 9 electron volts). The proposed facility would initially be dedicated to two experiments, COSMOS (Cosmologically Significant Mass Oscillations) and MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search). The neutrino beam would pass underground from Fermilab to northern Minnesota. A tunnel would not be built in this intervening region because the neutrinos easily pass through the earth, not interacting, similar to the way that light passes through a pane of glass. The beam is pointed towards the MINOS detector in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. Thus, the proposed project also includes construction, operation and decommissioning of the facility located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota that houses this MINOS detector. This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the DOE's National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021). This EA documents DOE's evaluation of potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed construction and operation of NuMI at Fermilab and its far detector facility located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. Any future use of the facilities on the Fermilab site would require the administrative approval of the Director of Fermilab and would undergo a separate NEPA review. Fermilab is a Federal high-energy physics research laboratory in Batavia, Illinois operated on behalf of the DOE by Universities Research Association, Inc

  16. Environmental assessment -- Proposed neutrino beams at the Main Injector project

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to build a beamline on the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) site to accommodate an experimental research program in neutrino physics. The proposed action, called Neutrino Beams at the Main Injector (NuMI), is to design, construct, operate and decommission a facility for producing and studying a high flux beam of neutrinos in the energy range of 1 to 40 GeV (1 GeV is one billion or 10{sup 9} electron volts). The proposed facility would initially be dedicated to two experiments, COSMOS (Cosmologically Significant Mass Oscillations) and MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search). The neutrino beam would pass underground from Fermilab to northern Minnesota. A tunnel would not be built in this intervening region because the neutrinos easily pass through the earth, not interacting, similar to the way that light passes through a pane of glass. The beam is pointed towards the MINOS detector in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. Thus, the proposed project also includes construction, operation and decommissioning of the facility located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota that houses this MINOS detector. This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the DOE`s National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021). This EA documents DOE`s evaluation of potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed construction and operation of NuMI at Fermilab and its far detector facility located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. Any future use of the facilities on the Fermilab site would require the administrative approval of the Director of Fermilab and would undergo a separate NEPA review. Fermilab is a Federal high-energy physics research laboratory in Batavia, Illinois operated on behalf of the DOE by Universities Research Association, Inc.

  17. Beam simulation tools for GEANT4 (and neutrino source applications)

    V.Daniel Elvira, Paul Lebrun and Panagiotis Spentzouris email daniel@fnal.gov

    2002-01-01

    Geant4 is a tool kit developed by a collaboration of physicists and computer professionals in the High Energy Physics field for simulation of the passage of particles through matter. The motivation for the development of the Beam Tools is to extend the Geant4 applications to accelerator physics. Although there are many computer programs for beam physics simulations, Geant4 is ideal to model a beam going through material or a system with a beam line integrated to a complex detector. There are many examples in the current international High Energy Physics programs, such as studies related to a future Neutrino Factory, a Linear Collider, and a very Large Hadron Collider

  18. A new design for the CERN-Fréjus neutrino Super Beam

    Longhin, A

    2011-01-01

    We present an optimization of the hadron focusing system for a low-energy high-intensity conventional neutrino beam (Super-Beam) proposed on the basis of the HP-SPL at CERN with a beam power of 4 MW and an energy of 4.5 GeV. The far detector would be a 440 kton Water Cherenkov detector (MEMPHYS) located at a baseline of 130 km in the Fr\\'ejus site. The neutrino fluxes simulation relies on a new GEANT4 based simulation coupled with an optimization algorithm based on the maximization of the sensitivity limit on the $\\theta_{13}$ mixing angle. A new configuration adopting a multiple horn system with solid targets is proposed which improves the sensitivity to $\\theta_{13}$ and the CP violating phase $\\delta_{CP}$.

  19. The Case for Muon-based Neutrino Beams

    Huber, Patrick [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Bross, Alan [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Palmer, Mark [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-11-03

    For the foreseeable future, high energy physics accelerator capabilities in the US will be deployed to study the physics of the neutrino sector. In this context, it is useful to explore the sensitivities and limiting systematic effects of the planned neutrino oscillation program, so that we can evaluate the issues that must be addressed in order to ensure the success of these efforts. It is only in this way that we will ultimately be able to elucidate the fundamental physics processes involved. We conclude that success can only be guaranteed by, at some point in the future, being able to deploy muon accelerator capabilities. Such capabilities provide the only route to precision neutrino beams with which to study and mitigate, at the sub-percent level, the limiting systematic issues of future oscillation measurements. Thus this analysis argues strongly for maintaining a viable accelerator research program towards future muon accelerator capabilities.

  20. Search for Sterile Neutrinos Using the MiniBooNE Beam

    Sorel, Michel [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The possible existence of light sterile neutrinos in Nature is motivated, and the prospects to extend sterile neutrino searches beyond current limits is substantiated, using the MiniBooNE neutrino beam and detector at Fermilab. We report on the neutrino flux predictions for the MiniBooNE experiment, on the characterization of the charged-current, quasi-elastic interactions of muon neutrinos ({nu}{sub {mu}}n {yields} {mu}{sup -}p) observed, and on the experiment's sensitivity to sterile neutrinos via muon neutrino disappearance.

  1. Beam Dynamics Studies for High-Intensity Beams in the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082016; Benedikt, Michael

    With the discovery of the Higgs boson, the existence of the last missing piece of the Standard Model of particle physics (SM) was confirmed. However, even though very elegant, this theory is unable to explain, for example, the generation of neutrino masses, nor does it account for dark energy or dark matter. To shed light on some of these open questions, research in fundamental particle physics pursues two complimentary approaches. On the one hand, particle colliders working at the high-energy frontier, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), located in Geneva, Switzerland, are utilized to investigate the fundamental laws of nature. Alternatively, fixed target facilities require high-intensity beams to create a large flux of secondary particles to investigate, for example, rare particle decay processes, or to create neutrino beams. This thesis investigates limitations arising during the acceleration of high-intensity beams at the CERN Proton Synchrotro...

  2. Transport of intense ion beams

    Lambertson, G.; Laslett, L.J.; Smith, L.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of using intense bursts of heavy ions to initiate an inertially confined fusion reaction has stimulated interest in the transport of intense unneutralized heavy ion beams by quadrupole or solenoid systems. This problem was examined in some detail, using numerical integration of the coupled envelope equations for the quadrupole case. The general relations which emerge are used to develop examples of high energy transport systems and as a basis for discussing the limitations imposed by a transport system on achievable intensities for initial acceleration

  3. Absolute intensities of supersonic beams

    Beijerinck, H.C.W.; Habets, A.H.M.; Verster, N.F.

    1977-01-01

    In a molecular beam experiment the center-line intensity I(0) (particles s -1 sterad -1 ) and the flow rate dN/dt (particles s -1 ) of a beam source are important features. To compare the performance of different types of beam sources the peaking factor, kappa, is defined as the ratio kappa=π(I(0)/dN/dt). The factor π is added to normalize to kappa=1 for an effusive source. The ideal peaking factor for the supersonic flow from a nozzle follows from continuum theory. Numerical values of kappa are available. Experimental values of kappa for an argon expansion are presented in this paper, confirming these calculations. The actual center-line intensity of a supersonic beam source with a skimmer is reduced in comparison to this ideal intensity if the skimmer shields part of the virtual source from the detector. Experimental data on the virtual source radius are given enabling one to predict this shielding quantitatively. (Auth.)

  4. Construction of Superconducting Magnet System for the J-PARC Neutrino Beam Line

    Nakamoto, T.; Wanderer, P.; Sasaki, K.; Ajima, Y.; Araoka, O.; Fujii, Y.; Hastings, N.; Higashi, N.; Iida, M.; Ishii, T.; Kimura, N.; Kobayashi, T.; Makida, Y.; Nakadaira, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Ohhata, H.; Okamura, T.; Sakashita, K.; Sugawara, S.; Suzuki, S.; Tanaka, K.; Tomaru, T.; Terashima, A.; Yamamoto, A.; Ichikawa, A.; Kakuno, H.; Anerella, M.; Escallier, J.; Ganetis, G.; gupta, R.; Jain, A.; Muratore, J.; Parker, B.; Boussuge, T.; Charrier, J.-P.; Arakawa, M.; Ichihara, T.; Minato, T.; Okada, Y.; Itou, A.; Kumaki, T.; Nagami, M.; Takahashi, T.

    2009-10-18

    Following success of a prototype R&D, construction of a superconducting magnet system for J-PARC neutrino beam line has been carried out since 2005. A new conceptual beam line with the superconducting combined function magnets demonstrated the successful beam transport to the neutrino production target.

  5. Limits on neutrino oscillations in the CNGS neutrino beam and event classification with the OPERA detector

    Ferber, Torben

    2012-09-15

    OPERA, the oscillation project with emulsion-tracking apparatus, is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It combines an almost pure, high-energy {nu}{sub {mu}} beam produced at the SPS accelerator at CERN, Switzerland, with the OPERA neutrino detector located at a distance of about 730 km in the LNGS underground laboratory in Italy. By using a lead/photo emulsion target, {nu}{sub {tau}} charged current (CC) interactions of {nu}{sub {tau}} from {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillations can be observed on an event-by-event basis with very low background rates. Within this thesis, a {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance search is described that uses a flux normalization. independent measurement of the CC event fraction as a function of the hadronic energy as measured by the electronic detectors of OPERA. This allows to derive limits on {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub {mu}} oscillations, complementary to the main {nu}{sub {tau}} appearance analysis. For maximal mixing, vertical stroke {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 23} vertical stroke >4.4 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} is excluded at 90% C.L. by the disappearance analysis. This thesis represents the first application of this method, including systematic uncertainties, in a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment.

  6. Limits on neutrino oscillations in the CNGS neutrino beam and event classification with the OPERA detector

    Ferber, Torben

    2012-09-01

    OPERA, the oscillation project with emulsion-tracking apparatus, is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It combines an almost pure, high-energy ν μ beam produced at the SPS accelerator at CERN, Switzerland, with the OPERA neutrino detector located at a distance of about 730 km in the LNGS underground laboratory in Italy. By using a lead/photo emulsion target, ν τ charged current (CC) interactions of ν τ from ν μ → ν τ oscillations can be observed on an event-by-event basis with very low background rates. Within this thesis, a ν μ →ν μ disappearance search is described that uses a flux normalization. independent measurement of the CC event fraction as a function of the hadronic energy as measured by the electronic detectors of OPERA. This allows to derive limits on ν μ →ν μ oscillations, complementary to the main ν τ appearance analysis. For maximal mixing, vertical stroke Δm 2 23 vertical stroke >4.4 x 10 -3 eV 2 is excluded at 90% C.L. by the disappearance analysis. This thesis represents the first application of this method, including systematic uncertainties, in a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment.

  7. The capabilities of monochromatic EC neutrino beams with the SPS upgrade

    Espinoza, C; Bernabeu, J

    2008-01-01

    The goal for future neutrino facilities is the determination of the U(e3) mixing and CP violation in neutrino oscillations. This will require precision experiments with a very intense neutrino source and energy control. With this objective in mind, the creation of monochromatic neutrino beams from the electron capture decay of boosted ions by the SPS of CERN has been proposed. We discuss the capabilities of such a facility as a function of the energy of the boost and the baseline for the detector. We conclude that the SPS upgrade to 1000 GeV is crucial to reach a better sensitivity to CP violation iff it is accompanied by a longer baseline. We compare the physics potential for two different configurations: I) γ = 90 and γ = 195 (maximum achievable at present SPS) to Frejus; II) γ = 195 and γ = 440 (maximum achievable at upgraded SPS) to Canfranc. The main conclusion is that, whereas the gain in the determination of U(e3) is rather modest, setup II provides much better sensitivity to CP violation

  8. The capabilities of monochromatic EC neutrino beams with the SPS upgrade

    Espinoza, C.; Bernabéu, J.

    2008-05-01

    The goal for future neutrino facilities is the determination of the U(e3) mixing and CP violation in neutrino oscillations. This will require precision experiments with a very intense neutrino source and energy control. With this objective in mind, the creation of monochromatic neutrino beams from the electron capture decay of boosted ions by the SPS of CERN has been proposed. We discuss the capabilities of such a facility as a function of the energy of the boost and the baseline for the detector. We conclude that the SPS upgrade to 1000 GeV is crucial to reach a better sensitivity to CP violation iff it is accompanied by a longer baseline. We compare the physics potential for two different configurations: I) γ = 90 and γ = 195 (maximum achievable at present SPS) to Frejus; II) γ = 195 and γ = 440 (maximum achievable at upgraded SPS) to Canfranc. The main conclusion is that, whereas the gain in the determination of U(e3) is rather modest, setup II provides much better sensitivity to CP violation.

  9. On the importance of low-energy beta-beams for supernova neutrino physics

    Jachowicz, N.; McLaughlin, G.C.

    2005-01-01

    Beta beams, which are neutrino beams produced by the beta decay of nuclei that have been accelerated to high gamma factor, were original proposed for high energy applications, such as the measurement of the third neutrino mixing angle θ 13 . Volpe suggested that a beta beam run at lower gamma factor, would be useful for neutrino measurements in the tens of MeV range. We suggest to exploit the flexibility these beta beam facilities offer, combined with the fact that beta-beam neutrino energies overlap with supernova-neutrino energies, to construct 'synthetic' spectra that approximate an incoming supernova-neutrino energy-distribution. Using these constructed spectra we are able to reproduce total and differential folded supernova-neutrino cross-sections very accurately. We illustrate this technique using Deuterium, 16 O, and 208 Pb. This technique provides an easy and straightforward way to apply the results of a beta-beam neutrino-nucleus measurement to the corresponding supernova-neutrino detector, virtually eliminating potential uncertainties due to nuclear-structure calculations. (author)

  10. How well do we need to know the beam properties at a neutrino factory?

    Geer, S.; Crisan, C.

    2000-01-01

    In principle, a neutrino factory can produce a beam with a well known ν e and ν μ flux. In practice, the uncertainties on the muon beam properties will introduce uncertainties into the calculated neutrino fluxes. The authors explore the relationship between the beam systematics and the systematic uncertainties on predicted event rates at a far site. The desired precision with which they must know the beam momentum, direction, divergence, momentum spread, and polarization are discussed

  11. Observing a light dark matter beam with neutrino experiments

    Deniverville, Patrick; Pospelov, Maxim; Ritz, Adam

    2011-10-01

    We consider the sensitivity of fixed-target neutrino experiments at the luminosity frontier to light stable states, such as those present in models of MeV-scale dark matter. To ensure the correct thermal relic abundance, such states must annihilate via light mediators, which in turn provide an access portal for direct production in colliders or fixed targets. Indeed, this framework endows the neutrino beams produced at fixed-target facilities with a companion “dark matter beam,” which may be detected via an excess of elastic scattering events off electrons or nuclei in the (near-)detector. We study the high-luminosity proton fixed-target experiments at LSND and MiniBooNE, and determine that the ensuing sensitivity to light dark matter generally surpasses that of other direct probes. For scenarios with a kinetically-mixed U(1)' vector mediator of mass mV, we find that a large volume of parameter space is excluded for mDM˜1-5MeV, covering vector masses 2mDM≲mV≲mη and a range of kinetic mixing parameters reaching as low as κ˜10-5. The corresponding MeV-scale dark matter scenarios motivated by an explanation of the galactic 511 keV line are thus strongly constrained.

  12. Beam intensity monitoring for the external proton beam at LAMPF

    Barrett, R.J.; Anderson, B.D.; Willard, H.B.; Anderson, A.N.; Jarmie, N.

    1975-07-01

    Three different intensity monitors were tested in the external proton beam at LAMPF, and together cover the entire range of beam currents available. A 800 kg Faraday cup was installed and used to measure the absolute intensity to better than 1 percent for beam currents up to several nanoamperes. A high gain ion chamber was used as part of the calibration procedure for the Faraday cup, and was found to be useful when monitoring very small beam intensities, being reliable down to the few picoampere level. A secondary emission monitor was also tested, calibrated, and found to be trustworthy only for beams of greater than 50 pA intensity. (auth)

  13. Neutrino Physics

    CERN. Geneva; Dydak, Friedrich

    2001-01-01

    Starting from a review of theoretical concepts and experimental results in the early years of neutrino physics after Pauli's 1930 letter, today's double role of the neutrino as a cornerstone of the Standard Model and as a promising probe of physics beyond the Standard Model will be discussed. Topics comprise: - Conventional neutrino beams - Neutrinos as probes of the nucleon structure - Neutrinos from the universe - Dirac or Majorana neutrinos - Neutrino oscillations - MNS matrix - CP violation in the lepton sector - Neutrino factory.

  14. Neutrino Physics

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    2002-01-01

    Starting from a review of theoretical concepts and experimental results in the early years of neutrino physics after Pauli's 1930 letter, today's double role of the neutrino as a cornerstone of the Standard Model and as a promising probe of physics beyond the Standard Model will be discussed. Topics comprise: - Conventional neutrino beams - Neutrinos as probes of the nucleon structure - Neutrinos from the universe - Dirac or Majorana neutrinos - Neutrino oscillations - MNS matrix - CP violation in the lepton sector - Neutrino factory.

  15. Intense-proton-beam transport through an insulator beam guide

    Hanamori, Susumu; Kawata, Shigeo; Kikuchi, Takashi; Fujita, Akira; Chiba, Yasunobu; Hikita, Taisuke; Kato, Shigeru

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we study intense-proton-beam transport through an insulator guide. In our previous papers (Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 34 (1995) L520, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 35 (1996) L1127) we proposed a new system for intense-electron-beam transport using an insulator guide. In contrast to the electron beam, an intense-proton beam tends to generate a virtual anode, because of the large proton mass. The virtual anode formation at the initial stage is prevented by prefilled plasma in this system. During and after this, electrons are extracted from the plasma generated at the insulator surface by the proton beam space charge and expand over the transport area. The proton beam charge is effectively neutralized by the electrons. Consequently, the proton beam propagates efficiently through the insulator beam guide. The electron extraction is self-regulated by the net space charge of the proton beam. (author)

  16. Search for Muon Neutrino Disappearance in the Booster Neutrino Beam of Fermilab; Busqueda de Desaparicion de Neutrinos del Muon en el Haz de Neutrinos del Booster de Fermilab

    Mendez Mendez, Diana Patricia [Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Mexico City (Mexico)

    2015-01-01

    In this work we carried out the disappearance analysis of muon neutrinos produced in the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam, using the data released to the public by the collaborations of the MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments. The calculations were made with programs in C and C++, implementing the ROOT libraries. From the analysis, using both the classical Pearson method and the Feldman and Cousins frequentist corrections, we obtained the 90\\% C.L. limit for the oscillation parameters sin22θ and Δm2 in the region 0.1 ≤ Δm2 ≤ 10 eV2 using a two neutrino model. The result presented in this work is consistent with the official one, with small deviations ascribed to round-off errors in the format of the used data, as well as statistical fluctuations in the generation of fake experiments used in the Feldman and Cousins method. As the official one, our result is consistent with the null oscillation hypothesis. This work was carried out independently to the MiniBooNE and SciBooNE collaborations and its results are not official.

  17. Beam-intensity limitations in linear accelerators

    Jameson, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Recent demand for high-intensity beams of various particles has renewed interest in the investigation of beam current and beam quality limits in linear RF and induction accelerators and beam-transport channels. Previous theoretical work is reviewed, and new work on beam matching and stability is outlined. There is a real need for extending the theory to handle the time evolution of beam emittance; some present work toward this goal is described. The role of physical constraints in channel intensity limitation is emphasized. Work on optimizing channel performance, particularly at low particle velocities, has resulted in major technological advances. The opportunities for combining such channels into arrays are discussed. 50 references

  18. Neutrino velocity measurement with the OPERA experiment in the CNGS beam

    Brunetti, G.

    2011-05-01

    The thesis concerns the measurement of the neutrino velocity with the OPERA experiment in the CNGS beam. There are different theoretical models that allow for Lorentz violating effects which can be investigated with measurements on terrestrial neutrino beams. The MINOS experiment published in 2007 a measure on the muon neutrinos over a distance of 730 km finding a deviation with respect to the expected time of flight of 126 ns with a statistical error of 32 ns and a systematic error of 64 ns. The OPERA experiment observes as well muon neutrinos 730 km away from the source, with a sensitivity significantly better than MINOS thanks to the higher number of interactions in the detector due to the higher energy beam and the much more sophisticated timing system explicitly upgraded in view of the neutrino velocity measurement. This system is composed by atomic cesium clocks and GPS receivers operating in 'common view mode'. Thanks to this system a time-transfer between the two sites with a precision at the level of 1 ns is possible. Moreover, a Fast Waveform Digitizer was installed along the proton beam line at CERN in order to measure the internal time structure of the proton pulses that are sent to the CNGS target. The result on the neutrino velocity is the most precise measurement so far with terrestrial neutrino beams: the neutrino time of flight was determined with a statistical uncertainty of about 10 ns and a systematic uncertainty smaller than 20 nano-seconds. (author)

  19. The CERN neutrino beam to Gran Sasso (NGS). Conceptual technical design

    Elsener, K [ed.; Acquistapace, G; Baldy, J L; Ball, A E; Bonnal, P; Buhler-Broglin, M; Carminati, F; Cennini, E; Ereditato, A; Falaleev, V; Faugeras, P; Ferrari, A; Foa, L; Fortuna, G; Genand, R; Grant, A L; Henny, L; Hilaire, A; Huebner, K; Inigo-Golfin, J; Kissler, K H; Lopez-Hernandez, L A; Maugain, J M; Mayoud, M; Migliozzi, P; Missiaen, D; Palladino, V; Papadopoulos, I M; Peraire, S; Pietropaolo, F; Rangod, S; Revol, J P; Roche, J; Sala, P; Sanelli, C; Stevenson, G R; Tomat, B; Tsesmelis, E; Valbuena, R; Vincke, H; Weisse, E; Wilhelmsson, M

    1998-05-19

    The conceptual design of a new neutrino facility at CERN is presented. Starting with 400 GeV/c protons from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), a neutrino beam is produced which is directed towards the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory in Italy, 732 km away from CERN, where large, complex detectors will allow long-baseline experiments searching for neutrino oscillation phenomena to be performed. (orig.)

  20. Performance Of A Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Exposed To The WANF Neutrino Beam

    Arneodo, F.; Bonesini, M.; di Tigliole, A.Borio; Boschetti, B.; Bueno, A.; Calligarich, E.; Casagrande, F.; Cavalli, D.; Cavanna, F.; Cennini, P.; Centro, S.; Cesana, E.; Cline, D.; Curioni, A.; De Mitri, I.; De Vecchi, C.; Dolfini, R.; Ferrari, A.; Ghezzi, A.; Guglielmi, A.; Kisiel, J.; Mannocchi, G.; de la Ossa, A.Martinez; Matthey, C.; Mauri, F.; Montanari, C.; Navas, S.; Negri, P.; Nicoletto, M.; Otwinowski, S.; Paganoni, M.; Palamara, O.; Pepato, A.; Periale, L.; Mortari, G.Piano; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Puccini, A.; Pullia, A.; Ragazzi, S.; Rancati, T.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.L.; Redaelli, N.; Rondio, E.; Rubbia, A.; Rubbia, C.; Sala, P.R.; Sergiampietri, F.; Sobczyk, J.; Suzuki, S.; de Fatis, T.Tabarelli; Terrani, M.; Terranova, F.; Tonazzo, A.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wang, H.; Zalewska, A.

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of the first exposure of a Liquid Argon TPC to a multi-GeV neutrino beam. The data have been collected with a 50 liters ICARUS-like chamber located between the CHORUS and NOMAD experiments at the CERN West Area Neutrino Facility (WANF). We discuss both the instrumental performance of the detector and its capability to identify and reconstruct low multiplicity neutrino interactions.

  1. The CERN neutrino beam to Gran Sasso (NGS). Conceptual technical design

    Elsener, K.; Acquistapace, G.; Baldy, J.L.; Ball, A.E.; Bonnal, P.; Buhler-Broglin, M.; Carminati, F.; Cennini, E.; Ereditato, A.; Falaleev, V.; Faugeras, P.; Ferrari, A.; Foa, L.; Fortuna, G.; Genand, R.; Grant, A.L.; Henny, L.; Hilaire, A.; Huebner, K.; Inigo-Golfin, J.; Kissler, K.H.; Lopez-Hernandez, L.A.; Maugain, J.M.; Mayoud, M.; Migliozzi, P.; Missiaen, D.; Palladino, V.; Papadopoulos, I.M.; Peraire, S.; Pietropaolo, F.; Rangod, S.; Revol, J.P.; Roche, J.; Sala, P.; Sanelli, C.; Stevenson, G.R.; Tomat, B.; Tsesmelis, E.; Valbuena, R.; Vincke, H.; Weisse, E.; Wilhelmsson, M.

    1998-01-01

    The conceptual design of a new neutrino facility at CERN is presented. Starting with 400 GeV/c protons from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), a neutrino beam is produced which is directed towards the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory in Italy, 732 km away from CERN, where large, complex detectors will allow long-baseline experiments searching for neutrino oscillation phenomena to be performed. (orig.)

  2. On the Neutrino Opera in the CNGS Beam

    Assis A. V. D. B.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this brief paper, we solve the relativistic kinematics related to the intersection be- tween a relativistic beam of particles (neutrinos, e.g. and consecutive detectors. The gravitational effects are neglected, but the effect of the Earth rotation is taken into con- sideration under a simple approach in which we consider two instantaneous inertial reference frames in relation to the fixed stars: an instantaneous inertial frame of refer- ence having got the instantaneous velocity of rotation (about the Earth axis of rotation of the Cern at one side, the lab system of reference in which the beam propagates, and another instantaneous inertial system of reference having got the instantaneous velocity of rotation of the detectors at Gran Sasso at the other side, this latter being the system of reference of the detectors. Einstein’s relativity theory provides a velocity of intersection between the beam and the detectors greater than the velocity of light in the empty space as derived in this paper, in virtue of the Earth rotation. We provide a simple calculation for the discrepancy between a correct measure for the experiment and a measure arising due to the effect derived in this paper.

  3. Physics at a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility

    Bandyopadhyay, A.; Choubey, S.; Gandhi, R.; Goswami, S.; Roberts, B. L.; Bouchez, J.; Antoniadis, I.; Ellis, J.; Giudice, G. F.; Schwetz, T.; Umasankar, S.; Karagiorgi, G.; Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Conrad, J. M.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Pascoli, S.; Geer, S.; Campagne, J. E.; Rolinec, M.; Blondel, A.; Campanelli, M.; Kopp, J.; Lindner, M.; Peltoniemi, J.; Dornan, P. J.; Long, K.; Matsushita, T.; Rogers, C.; Uchida, Y.; Dracos, M.; Whisnant, K.; Casper, D.; Chen, Mu-Chun; Popov, B.; Aysto, J.; Marfatia, D.; Okada, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Jungmann, K.; Lesgourgues, J.; Zisman, M.; Tortola, M. A.; Friedland, A.; Davidson, S.; Antusch, S.; Biggio, C.; Donini, A.; Fernandez-Martinez, E.; Gavela, B.; Maltoni, M.

    2009-01-01

    The conclusions of the Physics Working Group of the International Scoping Study of a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility (the ISS) are presented. The ISS was carried out by the international community between NuFact05, (the 7th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and

  4. A Proposal for a Three Detector Short-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Program in the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam

    Antonello, M.; Bellini, V.; Benetti, P.; Bertolucci, S.; Bilokon, H.; Boffelli, F.; Bonesini, M.; Bremer, J.; Calligarich, E.; Centro, S.; Cocco, A.G.; Dermenev, A.; Falcone, A.; Farnese, C.; Fava, A.; Ferrari, A.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Guglielmi, A.; Ivashkin, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Kisiel, J.; Kose, U.; Mammoliti, F.; Mannocchi, G.; Menegolli, A.; Meng, G.; Mladenov, D.; Montanari, C.; Nessi, M.; Nicoletto, M.; Noto, F.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Plonski, P.; Potenza, R.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.L.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Sala, P.; Scaramelli, A.; Sobczyk, J.; Spanu, M.; Stefan, D.; Sulej, R.; Sutera, C.M.; Torti, M.; Tortorici, F.; Varanini, F.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wachala, T.; Zani, A.; Adams, C.; Andreopoulos, C.; Ankowski, A.M.; Asaadi, J.; Bagby, L.; Baller, B.; Barros, N.; Bass, M.; Bishai, M.; Bitadze, A.; Bugel, L.; Camilleri, L.; Cavanna, F.; Chen, H.; Chi, C.; Church, E.; Cianci, D.; Collin, G.H.; Conrad, J.M.; De Geronimo, G.; Dharmapalan, R.; Djurcic, Z.; Ereditato, A.; Esquivel, J.; Evans, J.; Fleming, B.T.; Foreman, W.M.; Freestone, J.; Gamble, T.; Garvey, G.; Genty, V.; Goldi, D.; Gramellini, E.; Greenlee, H.; Guenette, R.; Hackenburg, A.; Hanni, R.; Ho, J.; Howell, J.; James, C.; Jen, C.M.; Jones, B.J.P.; Kalousis, L.N.; Karagiorgi, G.; Ketchum, W.; Klein, J.; Klinger, J.; Kreslo, I.; Kudryavtsev, V.A.; Lissauer, D.; Livesly, P.; Louis, W.C.; Luthi, M.; Mariani, C.; Mavrokoridis, K.; McCauley, N.; McConkey, N.; Mercer, I.; Miao, T.; Mills, G.B.; Montanari, D.; Moon, J.; Moss, Z.; Mufson, S.; Norris, B.; Nowak, J.; Pal, S.; Palamara, O.; Pater, J.; Pavlovic, Z.; Perkin, J.; Pulliam, G.; Qian, X.; Qiuguang, L.; Radeka, V.; Rameika, R.; Ratoff, P.N.; Richardson, M.; von Rohr, C.Rudolf; Russell, B.; Schmitz, D.W.; Shaevitz, M.H.; Sippach, B.; Soderberg, M.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spitz, J.; Spooner, N.; Strauss, T.; Szelc, A.M.; Taylor, C.E.; Terao, K.; Thiesse, M.; Thompson, L.; Thomson, M.; Thorn, C.; Toups, M.; Touramanis, C.; Van de Water, R.G.; Weber, M.; Whittington, D.; Wongjirad, T.; Yu, B.; Zeller, G.P.; Zennamo, J.; Acciarri, R.; An, R.; Barr, G.; Blake, A.; Bolton, T.; Bromberg, C.; Caratelli, D.; Carls, B.; Convery, M.; Dytmam, S.; Eberly, B.; Gollapinni, S.; Graham, M.; Grosso, R.; Hen, O.; Hewes, J.; Horton-Smith, G.; Johnson, R.A.; Joshi, J.; Jostlein, H.; Kaleko, D.; Kirby, B.; Kirby, M.; Kobilarcik, T.; Li, Y.; Littlejohn, B.; Lockwitz, S.; Lundberg, B.; Marchionni, A.; Marshall, J.; McDonald, K.; Meddage, V.; Miceli, T.; Mooney, M.; Moulai, M.H.; Murrells, R.; Naples, D.; Nienaber, P.; Paolone, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pate, S.; Pordes, S.; Raaf, J.L.; Rebel, B.; Rochester, L.; Schukraft, A.; Seligman, W.; St. John, J.; Tagg, N.; Tsai, Y.; Usher, T.; Wolbers, S.; Woodruff, K.; Xu, M.; Yang, T.; Zhang, C.; Badgett, W.; Biery, K.; Brice, S.J.; Dixon, S.; Geynisman, M.; Moore, C.; Snider, E.; Wilson, P.

    2015-01-01

    A Short-Baseline Neutrino (SBN) physics program of three LAr-TPC detectors located along the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab is presented. This new SBN Program will deliver a rich and compelling physics opportunity, including the ability to resolve a class of experimental anomalies in neutrino physics and to perform the most sensitive search to date for sterile neutrinos at the eV mass-scale through both appearance and disappearance oscillation channels. Using data sets of 6.6e20 protons on target (P.O.T.) in the LAr1-ND and ICARUS T600 detectors plus 13.2e20 P.O.T. in the MicroBooNE detector, we estimate that a search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino appearance can be performed with ~5 sigma sensitivity for the LSND allowed (99% C.L.) parameter region. In this proposal for the SBN Program, we describe the physics analysis, the conceptual design of the LAr1-ND detector, the design and refurbishment of the T600 detector, the necessary infrastructure required to execute the program, and a possible...

  5. Testing CPT conservation using the NuMI neutrino beam with the MINOS experiment

    Auty, David John [Univ. of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-01

    The MINOS experiment was designed to measure neutrino oscillation parameters with muon neutrinos. It achieves this by measuring the neutrino energy spectrum and flavor composition of the man-made NuMI neutrino beam 1km after the beam is formed and again after 735 km. By comparing the two spectra it is possible to measure the oscillation parameters. The NuMI beam is made up of 7.0%$\\bar{v}$μ, which can be separated from the vμ because the MINOS detectors are magnetized. This makes it possible to study $\\bar{v}$μ oscillations separately from those of muon neutrinos, and thereby test CPT invariance in the neutrino sector by determining the $\\bar{v}$μ oscillation parameters and comparing them with those for vμ, although any unknown physics of the antineutrino would appear as a difference in oscillation parameters. Such a test has not been performed with beam $\\bar{v}$μ before. It is also possible to produce an almost pure $\\bar{v}$μ beam by reversing the current through the magnetic focusing horns of the NuMI beamline, thereby focusing negatively, instead of positively charged particles. This thesis describes the analysis of the 7% $\\bar{v}$μ component of the forward horn current NuMI beam. The $\\bar{v}$μ of a data sample of 3.2 x 10{sup 20} protons on target analysis found 42 events, compared to a CPT conserving prediction of 58.3-7.6+7.6(stat.)-3.6+3.6(syst.) events. This corresponds to a 1.9 σ deficit, and a best fit value of Δ$\\bar{m}$322 = 18 x 10-3 eV2 and sin2 2$\\bar{θ}$23 = 0.55. This thesis focuses particularly on the selection of $\\bar{v}$μ events, and investigates possible improvements of the selection algorithm. From this a different selector was chosen, which corroborated the findings of the original selector. The

  6. Neutrino Beam Simulations and Data Checks for the NOvA Experiment

    Del Tutto, Marco [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents a study of the NuMI beam line intended to clarify how the particle trajectories through the focusing system and consequently the neutrino event yield are affected by the variation of the Horn Currents.

  7. NESSiE: an experimental search for sterile neutrinos with the CERN-SPS beam

    Sirri, G.

    2013-01-01

    Anomalies observed in neutrino oscillation experiments show a tension with the standard three-flavor neutrino framework and seem to require at least an additional sterile neutrino with a mass at the eV scale. NESSiE (Neutrino Experiment with SpectrometerS in Europe) is an experiment at a new CERN Short- Baseline neutrino beam proposed to definitely address the sterile neutrino issue. The experiment is composed by two magnetic spectrometers at different distances from the proton target. Their design allows to measure the charge and momentum of the muons in a wide energy range, from few hundred MeV, using a magnetic field in air, up to several GeV measuring the bending and range of the muon in a large iron dipolar magnet. The spectrometers will complement large LAr detectors used as a target. The time scale foresees to start taking data by 2016.

  8. High resolution muon computed tomography at neutrino beam facilities

    Suerfu, B.; Tully, C.G.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has an indispensable role in constructing 3D images of objects made from light materials. However, limited by absorption coefficients, X-rays cannot deeply penetrate materials such as copper and lead. Here we show via simulation that muon beams can provide high resolution tomographic images of dense objects and of structures within the interior of dense objects. The effects of resolution broadening from multiple scattering diminish with increasing muon momentum. As the momentum of the muon increases, the contrast of the image goes down and therefore requires higher resolution in the muon spectrometer to resolve the image. The variance of the measured muon momentum reaches a minimum and then increases with increasing muon momentum. The impact of the increase in variance is to require a higher integrated muon flux to reduce fluctuations. The flux requirements and level of contrast needed for high resolution muon computed tomography are well matched to the muons produced in the pion decay pipe at a neutrino beam facility and what can be achieved for momentum resolution in a muon spectrometer. Such an imaging system can be applied in archaeology, art history, engineering, material identification and whenever there is a need to image inside a transportable object constructed of dense materials

  9. A study of muon neutrino disappearance in the MINOS detectors and the NuMI beam

    Ling, Jiajie [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2010-01-01

    There is now substantial evidence that the proper description of neutrino involves two representations related by the 3 x 3 PMNS matrix characterized by either distinct mass or flavor. The parameters of this mixing matrix, three angles and a phase, as well as the mass differences between the three mass eigenstates must be determined experimentally. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search experiment is designed to study the flavor composition of a beam of muon neutrinos as it travels between the Near Detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory at 1 km from the target, and the Far Detector in the Soudan iron mine in Minnesota at 735 km from the target. From the comparison of reconstructed neutrino energy spectra at the near and far location, precise measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters from muon neutrino disappearance and electron neutrino appearance are expected. It is very important to know the neutrino flux coming from the source in order to achieve the main goal of the MINOS experiment: precise measurements of the atmospheric mass splitting |Δm232|, sin2 θ23. The goal of my thesis is to accurately predict the neutrino flux for the MINOS experiment and measure the neutrino mixing angle and atmospheric mass splitting.

  10. Electron Cloud induced instabilities in the Fermilab Main Injector(MI) for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) project

    Sonnad, Kiran G.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Venturini, Marco; Celata, Christine; Grote, David

    2006-01-01

    The electrostatic particle-in-cell codeWARP is currently being expanded in order to study electron cloud effects on the dynamics of the beam in storage rings. Results for the Fermilab main injector (MI) show the existence of a threshold in the electron density beyond which there is rapid emittance growth. The Fermilab MI is being considered for an upgrade as part of the high intensity neutrino source (HINS) effort, which will result in a significant increasing of the bunch intensity relative to its present value, placing it in a regime where electron-cloud effects are expected to become important. Various results from the simulations using WARP are discussed here

  11. Beam monitoring system for intense neutron source

    Tron, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Monitoring system realizing novel principle of operation and allowing to register a two-dimensional beam current distribution within entire aperture (100...200 mm) of ion pipe for a time in nanosecond range has been designed and accomplished for beam control of the INR intense neutron source, for preventing thermo-mechanical damage of its first wall. Key unit of the system is monitor of two-dimensional beam current distribution, elements of which are high resistant to heating by the beam and to radiation off the source. The description of the system and monitor are presented. Implementation of the system for the future sources with more high intensities are discussed. (author)

  12. Neutrinos

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    The Standard Model predicts that the neutrinos are massless and do not mix. Generic extensions of the Standard Model predict that neutrinos are massive (but, very likely, much lighter than the charged fermions). Therefore, the search for neutrino masses and mixing tests the Standard Model and probes new phasics. Measurements of various features of the fluxes of atmospheric, solar and, more recently, reactor neutrinos have provided evidence for neutrino oscillations and therefore for neutrino masses and mixing. These results have significant theoretical implications: new physics exists, and its scale can be estimated. There are interesting lessons for grand unified theories and for models of extra dimensions. The measured neutrino flavor parameters pose a challenge to flavor models.

  13. Study of the appearance of oscillating electron neutrinos issued from muon neutrino beam in the K2K experiment

    Argyriades, J.

    2006-05-01

    The work presented in this thesis has been done in the K2K experiment. His principle consists in the use of a beam of muon neutrinos, which flux has been measured at short and long distances. Those data enable us to study the effects of neutrino oscillation, particularly by measuring ν μ disappearance. Although this is not an appearance experiment, electronic neutrinos oscillation has been searched. In spite of no signal of appearance, this study enables to constrain oscillation parameters (Δm 23 2 , sin 2 2θ 13 ). With one event for 1,07 expected event from background, the exclusion area edges are close to the best actual limits, provided by Chooz experiment. By setting Δm 23 2 .= 2,8.10 -3 eV 2 , a limit at 90% confident level is reached: sin 2 2θ 13 < 0,2. (author)

  14. Measurement of CP violation at a Neutrino Factory

    Gómez-Cadenas, J J

    2001-01-01

    The prospects of measuring CP violation in the leptonic sector using the intense neutrino beams arising from muon decay in the straight sections of a muon accumulator ring (the so-called neutrino factory) are discussed.

  15. Properties and interactions of neutrino (1977-1980) beam dump experiments

    Tsukerman, I.S.

    1981-01-01

    Data on search of instantaneous muon and electron neutrinos in experiments of beam dump type are presented in the review. Neutrino is formed in decays of particles rusulted from pN interactions. First experiments of the dump beam type have been realized at the CERN/SPS accelerator in 1975 and Serpukhov accelerator by the ITEF-IFVE group in 1977 with proton energies of 26 and 70 GeV, respectively. The results of beam dump experiments of the second generation in 1979 in CERN are considered in detail. These experiments have been intended for measuring the effect of instantaneous neutrino. The conclusion is drawn on the presence of instantaneous muon neutrinos in the above experiments [ru

  16. Proposal for characterization of muon spectrometers for neutrino beam lines with the Baby MIND

    Noah, E

    2015-01-01

    Neutrino detectors based on state-of-the-art plastic scintillators read out with solid state photo-sensors, as well as new magnetization schemes, have been developed in the framework of AIDA. Meaningful size prototypes are under construction. In the framework of the CERN neutrino platform, we propose to test a Totally Active Scintillator Detector (TASD) and a prototype of a Magnetized Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND), called Baby MIND in the H8 beam line in 2016-2018. The design of the detectors and the purpose and plans for the beam tests are presented. An opportunity to use the Baby MIND detector in a real neutrino beam at JPARC for the measurement of the cross-section ratio between Water and scintillator (WAGASCI experiment) is described.

  17. From neutrino physics to beam polarisation. A high precision story at the ILC

    Vormwald, Benedikt

    2014-03-01

    In this thesis, we investigate the experimental prospects of studying a supersymmetric model with bilinearly broken R parity at the International Linear Collider. In this model, neutrinos mix with the supersymmetric neutralinos such that neutrino properties can be probed by examining neutralino decays, which incorporate usually a lepton and a W/Z boson. As a study case, we focus on the determination of the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle θ 23 , which is accessible via the ratio of the neutralino branching ratios BR(χ 0 1 →Wμ)/BR(χ 0 1 →Wτ). A detailed simulation of the International Large Detector has been performed for all Standard Model backgrounds and for χ 0 1 -pair production within a simplified model. The study is based on ILC beam parameters according to the Technical Design Report for a center-of-mass energy of √(s)=500 GeV. From muonic χ 0 1 decays, we find that the χ 0 1 mass can be reconstructed with an uncertainty of δ(m χ 0 1 )=(40(stat.)+35(syst.)) MeV for an integrated luminosity of ∫Ldt=500 fb -1 . The ratio of branching ratios can be determined to a precision of δ(BR(χ 0 1 →Wμ)/BR(χ 0 1 →Wτ))=2.9%. Due to this, the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle can be deduced with a precision comparable to modern neutrino experiments. Thus, the ILC is capable to test whether bRPV SUSY is the mechanism of neutrino mass generation. As also shown in the bRPV SUSY study of this thesis, beam polarisation is an important parameter in physics analyses at the ILC. The beam polarisation is measured with two Compton polarimeters per electron/positron beam. In order to achieve the design goal of an envisaged precision of 0.25%, the detector nonlinearity of the used Cherenkov detectors has to be determined very precisely. Herein, the main source of nonlinearity is expected to originate from the involved photomultipliers. For this reason, a differential nonlinearity measurement as well as a linearisation method is developed. The working

  18. From neutrino physics to beam polarisation. A high precision story at the ILC

    Vormwald, Benedikt

    2014-03-15

    In this thesis, we investigate the experimental prospects of studying a supersymmetric model with bilinearly broken R parity at the International Linear Collider. In this model, neutrinos mix with the supersymmetric neutralinos such that neutrino properties can be probed by examining neutralino decays, which incorporate usually a lepton and a W/Z boson. As a study case, we focus on the determination of the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle θ{sub 23}, which is accessible via the ratio of the neutralino branching ratios BR(χ{sup 0}{sub 1}→Wμ)/BR(χ{sup 0}{sub 1}→Wτ). A detailed simulation of the International Large Detector has been performed for all Standard Model backgrounds and for χ{sup 0}{sub 1}-pair production within a simplified model. The study is based on ILC beam parameters according to the Technical Design Report for a center-of-mass energy of √(s)=500 GeV. From muonic χ{sup 0}{sub 1} decays, we find that the χ{sup 0}{sub 1} mass can be reconstructed with an uncertainty of δ(m{sub χ{sup 0}{sub 1}})=(40(stat.)+35(syst.)) MeV for an integrated luminosity of ∫Ldt=500 fb{sup -1}. The ratio of branching ratios can be determined to a precision of δ(BR(χ{sup 0}{sub 1}→Wμ)/BR(χ{sup 0}{sub 1}→Wτ))=2.9%. Due to this, the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle can be deduced with a precision comparable to modern neutrino experiments. Thus, the ILC is capable to test whether bRPV SUSY is the mechanism of neutrino mass generation. As also shown in the bRPV SUSY study of this thesis, beam polarisation is an important parameter in physics analyses at the ILC. The beam polarisation is measured with two Compton polarimeters per electron/positron beam. In order to achieve the design goal of an envisaged precision of 0.25%, the detector nonlinearity of the used Cherenkov detectors has to be determined very precisely. Herein, the main source of nonlinearity is expected to originate from the involved photomultipliers. For this reason, a differential

  19. Edge imaging in intense beams

    S. Bernal

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of rings of charge observed near the edge of beams from high-perveance guns is described with a simple ray tracing technique inspired by the particle-core model. We illustrate the technique, which has no analog in light optics, with examples from experiments employing solenoid focusing of an electron beam. The rings of charge result from the combined effects of external focusing and space-charge forces acting on paraxial fringe particles with relatively large initial transverse velocities. The model is independent of the physical mechanisms responsible for the fringe particles. Furthermore, the focal length for edge imaging in a uniform focusing channel is derived using a linearized trajectory equation for the motion of fringe particles. Counterintuitively, the focal length decreases as the beam current increases.

  20. Frontiers of particle beams: Intensity limitations

    Dienes, M.; Month, M.; Turner, S.

    1992-01-01

    The present volume is the proceedings of the latest of these joint schools, held on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, in 1990. This course dealt with intensity limitations and was centered on a series of lectures which could be divided into the following main categories: Self and environmental fields, Coherent instabilities and their simulation, Beam-beam interaction, Other multiparticle effects, Beam source limitations, Engineering limitations. (orig.)

  1. Physics at a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility

    Bandyopadhyay, A; Gandhi, R; Goswami, S; Roberts, B L; Bouchez, J; Antoniadis, I; Ellis, J; Giudice, G F; Schwetz, T; Umansankar, S; Karagiorgi, G; Aguilar-Arevalo, A; Conrad, J M; Shaevitz, M H; Pascoli, Silvia; Geer, S; Rolinec, M; Blondel, A; Campanelli, M; Kopp, J; Lindner, M; Peltoniemi, J; Dornan, P J; Long, K; Matsushita, T; Rogers, C; Uchida, Y; Dracos, M; Whisnant, K; Casper, D; Chen, Mu-Chun; Popov, B; Aysto, J; Marfatia, D; Okada, Y; Sugiyama, H; Jungmann, K; Lesgourgues, J; Murayama, France H; Zisman, M; Tortola, M A; Friedland, A; Antusch, S; Biggio, C; Donini, A; Fernandez-Martinez, E; Gavela, B; Maltoni, M; Lopez-Pavon, J; Rigolin, S; Mondal, N; Palladino, V; Filthaut, F; Albright, C; de Gouvea, A; Kuno, Y; Nagashima, Y; Mezzetoo, M; Lola, S; Langacker, P; Baldini, A; Nunokawa, H; Meloni, D; Diaz, M; King, S F; Zuber, K; Akeroyd, A G; Grossman, Y; Farzan, Y; Tobe, K; Aoki, Mayumi; Kitazawa, N; Yasuda, O; Petcov, S; Romanino, A; Chimenti, P; Vacchi, A; Smirnov, A Yu; Couce, Italy E; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Hernandez, P; Sorel, M; Valle, J W F; Harrison, P F; Lundardini, C; Nelson, J K; Barger, V; Everett, L; Huber, P; Winter, W; Fetscher, W; van der Schaaf, A

    2009-01-01

    The conclusions of the Physics Working Group of the international scoping study of a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility (the ISS) are presented. The ISS was carried by the international community between NuFact05, (the 7th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Superbeams, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome, June 21-26, 2005) and NuFact06 (Ivine, California, 24{30 August 2006). The physics case for an extensive experimental programme to understand the properties of the neutrino is presented and the role of high-precision measurements of neutrino oscillations within this programme is discussed in detail. The performance of second generation super-beam experiments, beta-beam facilities, and the Neutrino Factory are evaluated and a quantitative comparison of the discovery potential of the three classes of facility is presented. High-precision studies of the properties of the muon are complementary to the study of neutrino oscillations. The Neutrino Factory has the potential to provide ...

  2. Design of a neutrino source based on beta beams

    E. Wildner

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available “Beta beams” produce collimated pure electron (antineutrino beams by accelerating beta active ions to high energies and having them decay in a racetrack shaped storage ring of 7 km circumference, the decay ring. EUROnu beta beams are based on CERN infrastructures and existing machines. Using existing machines may be an advantage for the cost evaluation, but will also constrain the physics performance. The isotope pair of choice for the beta beam is ^{6}He and ^{18}Ne. However, before the EUROnu studies one of the required isotopes, ^{18}Ne, could not be produced in rates that satisfy the needs for physics of the beta beam. Therefore, studies of alternative beta emitters, ^{8}Li and ^{8}B, with properties interesting for a beta beam have been proposed and have been studied within EUROnu. These alternative isotopes could be produced by using a small storage ring, in which the beam traverses a target, creating the ^{8}Li and ^{8}B isotopes. This production ring, the injection linac and the target system have been evaluated. Measurements of the cross section of the reactions to produce the beta beam isotopes show interesting results. A device to collect the produced isotopes from the target has been developed and tested. However, the yields of ^{8}Li and ^{8}B, using the production ring for production of ^{8}Li and ^{8}B, is not yet, according to simulations, giving the rates of isotopes that would be needed. Therefore, a new method of producing the ^{18}Ne isotope has been developed and tested giving good production rates. A 60 GHz ECRIS prototype, the first in the world, was developed and tested for ion production with contributions from EUROnu. The decay ring lattices for the ^{8}Li and ^{8}B have been developed and the lattice for ^{6}He and ^{18}Ne has been optimized to ensure the high intensity ion beam stability.

  3. Search for Muon Neutrino Disappearance in a Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrino Beam

    Nakajima, Yasuhiro; Collaboration, for the SciBooNE

    2010-01-01

    We report a search for muon neutrino disappearance in the $\\Delta m^{2}$ region of 0.5-40 $eV^2$ using data from both SciBooNE and MiniBooNE experiments. SciBooNE data provides a constraint on the neutrino flux, so that the sensitivity to $\

  4. Neutrino Oscillation Experiment at JHF

    2002-01-01

    T2K is a long baseline neutrino experiment designed to investigate how neutrinos change from one flavor to another as they travel (neutrino oscillations). An intense beam of muon neutrinos is generated at the J-PARC nuclear physics site on the East coast of Japan and directed across the country to the Super-Kamiokande neutrino detector in the mountains of western Japan. The beam is measured once before it leaves the J-PARC site, using the near detector ND280, and again at Super-K, 295 km away: the change in the measured intensity and composition of the beam is used to provide information on the properties of neutrinos. The high intensity neutrino beam is produced in an off-axis configuration. The peak neutrino energy is tuned to the oscillation maximum of ∼ 0.6 GeV to maximize the sensitivity to neutrino oscillations. The science goals of T2K can be summarized as follows: •\tsearch for CP violation in the neutrino sector •\tdiscovery of νμ → νe ( i.e. the confirmation that θ13 > 0 ) •\tprecision ...

  5. Beam control and matching for the transport of intense beams

    Li, H.; Bernal, S.; Godlove, T.; Huo, Y.; Kishek, R.A.; Haber, I.; Quinn, B.; Walter, M.; Zou, Y.; Reiser, M.; O'Shea, P.G.

    2005-01-01

    The transport of intense beams for heavy-ion inertial fusion demands tight control of beam characteristics from the source to the target. The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER), which uses a low-energy (10 keV), high-current electron beam to model the transport physics of a future recirculator driver, employs real-time beam characterization and control in order to optimize beam quality throughout the strong focusing lattice. We describe the main components and operation of the diagnostics/control system in UMER. It employs phosphor screens, real-time image analysis, quadrupole scans and electronic skew correctors. The procedure is not only indispensable for optimum transport over a long distance, but also provides important insights into the beam physics involved. We discuss control/optimization issues related to beam steering, quadrupole rotation errors and rms envelope matching

  6. Observation of Muon Neutrino Charged Current Events in an Off-Axis Horn-Focused Neutrino Beam Using the NOvA Prototype Detector

    Diaz, Enrique Arrieta [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The NOνA is a long base-line neutrino oscillation experiment. It will study the oscillations between muon and electron neutrinos through the Earth. NOνA consists of two detectors separated by 810 km. Each detector will measure the electron neutrino content of the neutrino (NuMI) beam. Differences between the measurements will reveal details about the oscillation channel. The NOνA collaboration built a prototype detector on the surface at Fermilab in order to develop calibration, simulation, and reconstruction tools, using real data. This 220 ton detector is 110 mrad off the NuMI beam axis. This off-axis location allows the observation of neutrino interactions with energies around 2 GeV, where neutrinos come predominantly from charged kaon decays. During the period between October 2011 and April 2012, the prototype detector collected neutrino data from 1.67 × 1020 protons on target delivered by the NuMI beam. This analysis selected a number of candidate charged current muon neutrino events from the prototype data, which is 30% lower than predicted by the NOνA Monte Carlo simulation. The analysis suggests that the discrepancy comes from an over estimation of the neutrino flux in the Monte Carlo simulation, and in particular, from neutrinos generated in charged kaon decays. The ratio of measured divided by the simulated flux of muon neutrinos coming from charged kaon decays is: 0.70+0.108 -0.094. The NOνA collaboration may use the findings of this analysis to introduce a more accurate prediction of the neutrino flux produced by the NuMI beam in future Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Intense positron beams and possible experiments

    Lynn, K.G.; Frieze, W.E.

    1983-07-01

    In this paper, we survey some of the ideas that have been proposed regarding the production of intense beams of low energy positrons. Various facilities to produce beams of this type are already under design or construction and other methods beyond those in use have been previously discussed. Moreover, a variety of potential experiments utilizing intense positron beams have been suggested. It is to be hoped that this paper can serve as a useful summary of some of the current ideas, as well as a stimulation for new ideas to be forthcoming at the workshop. 31 references

  8. Results of a beam dump experiment at the CERN SPS neutrino facility

    T. Hansl

    1978-03-01

    Full Text Available We report results from a beam dump experiment that has been performed at the CERN SPS neutrino facility using the CDHS neutrino counter detector. Limits on dimuon and trimuon production by new penetrating neutral particles are given. A new source of prompt electron and muon neutrinos has been observed giving (1.2±0.4× 10−7 νe or νμ per incident proton with neutrino angle smaller than 1.85 mrad and Eν > 20 GeV. If these prompt neutrinos are attributed to charmed meson pair production, the inclusive DD production cross section could be of the order of 30 ωb. If axions are existing their production rate relative to π0 mesons is found to be less than 0.5 × 10−8.

  9. Intense pulsed ion beams for fusion applications

    Humphries, S. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    The subject of this review paper is the field of intense pulsed ion beam generation and the potential application of the beams to fusion research. Considerable progress has been made over the past six years. The ion injectors discussed utilize the introduction of electrons into vacuum acceleration gaps in conjunction with high voltage pulsed power technology to achieve high output current. Power levels from injectors exceeding 1000 MW/cm 2 have been obtained for pulse lengths on the order of 10 -7 sec. The first part of the paper treats the physics and technology of intense ion beams. The second part is devoted to applications of intense ion beams in fusion research. A number of potential uses in magnetic confinement systems have been proposed

  10. Fan beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    Hill, Patrick M.

    A fan beam proton therapy is developed which delivers intensity modulated proton therapy using distal edge tracking. The system may be retrofit onto existing proton therapy gantries without alterations to infrastructure in order to improve treatments through intensity modulation. A novel range and intensity modulation system is designed using acrylic leaves that are inserted or retracted from subsections of the fan beam. Leaf thicknesses are chosen in a base-2 system and motivated in a binary manner. Dose spots from individual beam channels range between 1 and 5 cm. Integrated collimators attempting to limit crosstalk among beam channels are investigated, but found to be inferior to uncollimated beam channel modulators. A treatment planning system performing data manipulation in MATLAB and dose calculation in MCNPX is developed. Beamlet dose is calculated on patient CT data and a fan beam source is manually defined to produce accurate results. An energy deposition tally follows the CT grid, allowing straightforward registration of dose and image data. Simulations of beam channels assume that a beam channel either delivers dose to a distal edge spot or is intensity modulated. A final calculation is performed separately to determine the deliverable dose accounting for all sources of scatter. Treatment plans investigate the effects that varying system parameters have on dose distributions. Beam channel apertures may be as large as 20 mm because the sharp distal falloff characteristic of proton dose provides sufficient intensity modulation to meet dose objectives, even in the presence of coarse lateral resolution. Dose conformity suffers only when treatments are delivered from less than 10 angles. Jaw widths of 1--2 cm produce comparable dose distributions, but a jaw width of 4 cm produces unacceptable target coverage when maintaining critical structure avoidance. Treatment time for a prostate delivery is estimated to be on the order of 10 minutes. Neutron production

  11. Delivering the world’s most intense muon beam

    S. Cook

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A new muon beam line, the muon science innovative channel, was set up at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, in Osaka, Japan, using the 392 MeV proton beam impinging on a target. The production of an intense muon beam relies on the efficient capture of pions, which subsequently decay to muons, using a novel superconducting solenoid magnet system. After the pion-capture solenoid, the first 36° of the curved muon transport line was commissioned and the muon flux was measured. In order to detect muons, a target of either copper or magnesium was placed to stop muons at the end of the muon beam line. Two stations of plastic scintillators located upstream and downstream from the muon target were used to reconstruct the decay spectrum of muons. In a complementary method to detect negatively charged muons, the x-ray spectrum yielded by muonic atoms in the target was measured in a germanium detector. Measurements, at a proton beam current of 6 pA, yielded (10.4±2.7×10^{5}  muons per watt of proton beam power (μ^{+} and μ^{-}, far in excess of other facilities. At full beam power (400 W, this implies a rate of muons of (4.2±1.1×10^{8}  muons s^{−1}, among the highest in the world. The number of μ^{-} measured was about a factor of 10 lower, again by far the most efficient muon beam produced. The setup is a prototype for future experiments requiring a high-intensity muon beam, such as a muon collider or neutrino factory, or the search for rare muon decays which would be a signature for phenomena beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. Such a muon beam can also be used in other branches of physics, nuclear and condensed matter, as well as other areas of scientific research.

  12. Neutrino Factory: status and prospects

    Long, K.

    2011-01-01

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the Standard Model. The study of sub-leading effects in neutrino oscillations has begun with the race to measure θ 13 consensus is emerging within the international community that a novel neutrino source is required to allow sensitive searches for leptonic CP violation to be carried out and the neutrino mass-hierarchy to be determined. The Neutrino Factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to out-perform the other proposed facilities. The physics case for the Neutrino Factory will be reviewed and the baseline design of the facility being developed by the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration will be described.

  13. Steps towards the Neutrino Factory

    Long, K.

    2012-01-01

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the Standard Model. The study of sub-leading effects in neutrino oscillations has begun with the race to measure θ 13 . A consensus is emerging within the international community that a novel neutrino source is required to allow sensitive searches for leptonic CP violation to be carried out and the neutrino mass-hierarchy to be determined. The Neutrino Factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to out-perform the other proposed facilities. The physics case for the Neutrino Factory will be reviewed and the baseline design of the facility being developed by the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration will be described.

  14. CrossRef Neutrino factories

    Wildner, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Neutrinos are produced by many processes in our universe. These elusive particles reach the earth having a certain energy permitting them to react with nuclei in detectors that are specifically designed to probe their properties. However, to get higher intensities and higher energy neutrinos for better statistics and better physics reach, the use of accelerators is necessary to advance in the field of neutrino research. To produce neutrinos with an accelerator, one needs to send a high power beam onto a target to get particles or isotopes that produce neutrinos with the required properties, by decay. The parent particles have to be collected and prepared for injection into an accelerating structure. Accelerator-based experiments can tune the energy of the produced neutrinos by boosting and controlling the energy of the parent particle. The produced neutrinos will travel the distance between the source and the detector, generally through earth; the distance the neutrino travels through earth, the energy of the...

  15. Case for neutrino oscillations

    Ramond, P.

    1982-01-01

    The building of a machine capable of producing an intense, well-calibrated beam of muon neutrinos is regarded by particle physicists with keen interest because of its ability of studying neutrino oscillations. The possibility of neutrino oscillations has long been recognized, but it was not made necessary on theoretical or experimental grounds; one knew that oscillations could be avoided if neutrinos were massless, and this was easily done by the conservation of lepton number. The idea of grand unification has led physicists to question the existence (at higher energies) of global conservation laws. The prime examples are baryon-number conservation, which prevents proton decay, and lepton-number conservation, which keeps neutrinos massless, and therefore free of oscillations. The detection of proton decay and neutrino oscillations would therefore be an indirect indication of the idea of Grand Unification, and therefore of paramount importance. Neutrino oscillations occur when neutrinos acquire mass in such a way that the neutrino mass eigenstates do not match the (neutrino) eigenstates produced by the weak interactions. We shall study the ways in which neutrinos can get mass, first at the level of the standard SU 2 x U 1 model, then at the level of its Grand Unification Generalizations

  16. Intense ion beams for inertial confinement fusion

    Mehlhorn, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    Intense beams of light of heavy ions are being studied as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) drivers for high yield and energy. Heavy and light ions have common interests in beam transport, targets, and alternative accelerators. Self-pinched transport is being jointly studied. This article reviews the development of intense ion beams for ICF. Light-ion drivers are highlighted because they are compact, modular, efficient and low cost. Issues facing light ions are: (1) decreasing beam divergence; (2) increasing beam brightness; and (3) demonstrating self-pinched transport. Applied-B ion diodes are favored because of efficiency, beam brightness, perceived scalability, achievable focal intensity, and multistage capability. A light-ion concept addressing these issues uses: (1) an injector divergence of ≤ 24 mrad at 9 MeV; (2) two-stage acceleration to reduce divergence to ≤ 12 mrad at 35 MeV; and (3) self-pinched transport accepting divergences up to 12 mrad. Substantial progress in ion-driven target physics and repetitive ion diode technology is also presented. Z-pinch drivers are being pursued as the shortest pulsed power path to target physics experiments and high-yield fusion. However, light ions remain the pulsed power ICF driver of choice for high-yield fusion energy applications that require driver standoff and repetitive operation. 100 refs

  17. Multicharged and intense heavy ion beam sources

    Kutner, V.B.

    1981-01-01

    The cyclotron plasma-are source (PIG), duoplasmatron (DP), laser source (LS), electron beam ion source (EBIS) and electron cyclotron resonance source (ECRS) from the viewpoint of generating intense and high charge state beams are considered. It is pointed out that for the last years three types of multicharged ion sources-EBIS, ECR and LS have been essentially developed. In the EBIS source the Xe 48+ ions are produced. The present day level of the development of the electron-beam ionization technique shows that by means of this technique intensive uranium nuclei beams production becomes a reality. On the ECR source Xe 26+ approximately 4x10 10 h/s, Asub(r)sup(12+) approximately 10 12 h/s intensive ion beams are produced. In the laser source a full number of C 6+ ions during one laser pulse constitutes not less than 10 10 from the 5x10mm 2 emission slit. At the present time important results are obtained pointing to the possibility to separate the ion component of laser plasma in the cyclotron central region. On the PIG source the Xe 15+ ion current up to 10μA per pulse is produced. In the duoplasmatron the 11-charge state of xenon ion beams is reached [ru

  18. Production of high intensity radioactive beams

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1990-04-01

    The production of radioactive nuclear beams world-wide is reviewed. The projectile fragmentation and the ISOL approaches are discussed in detail, and the luminosity parameter is used throughout to compare different production methods. In the ISOL approach a thin and a thick target option are distinguished. The role of storage rings in radioactive beam research is evaluated. It is concluded that radioactive beams produced by the projectile fragmentation and the ISOL methods have complementary characteristics and can serve to answer different scientific questions. The decision which kind of facility to build has to depend on the significance and breadth of these questions. Finally a facility for producing a high intensity radioactive beams near the Coulomb barrier is proposed, with an expected luminosity of ∼10 39 cm -2 s -1 , which would yield radioactive beams in excess of 10 11 s -1 . 9 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  19. Intense particle beam and multiple applications

    Ueda, M.; Machida, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Multiple Application Intense Particle Beam project is an experiment in which an injector of high energy neutral or ionized particles will be used to diagnose high density and high temperature plasmas. The acceleration of the particles will be carried out feeding a diode with a high voltage pulse produced by a Marx generator. Other apllications of intense particle beam generated by this injector that could be explored in the future include: heating and stabilization of compact toroids, treatment of metallic surfaces and ion implantation. (author) [pt

  20. Intense ion beam research at Los Alamos

    Rej, D.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Davis, H.A.; Faehl, R.J.; Gautier, D.C.; Greenly, J.B.; Henins, I.; Linton, T.W.; Muenchausen, R.E.; Waganaar, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    Two new interdisciplinary programs are underway at Los Alamos involving the physics and technology of intense light ion beams. In contrast to high-power ICF applications, the LANL effort concentrates on the development of relatively low-voltage (50 to 800 kV) and long-pulsewidth (0.1 to 1 μs) beams. The first program involves the 1.2 MV, 300-kJ Anaconda generator which has been fitted with an extraction ion diode. Long pulsewidth ion beams have been accelerated, propagated, and extracted for a variety of magnetic field conditions. The primary application of this beam is the synthesis of novel materials. Initial experiments on the congruent evaporative deposition of metallic and ceramic thin films are reported. The second program involves the development of a 120-keV, 50-kA, 1-μs proton beam for the magnetic fusion program as an ion source for an intense diagnostic neutral beam. Ultra-bright, pulsed neutral beams will be required to successfully measure ion temperatures and thermalized alpha particle energy distributions in large, dense, ignited tokamaks such as ITER

  1. Intense ion beam research at Los Alamos

    Rej, D.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Davis, H.A.; Faehl, R.J.; Gautier, D.C.; Greenly, J.B.; Henins, I.; Linton, T.W.; Muenchausen, R.E.; Waganaar, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Two new interdisciplinary programs are underway at Los Alamos involving the physics and technology of intense light ion beams. In contrast to high-power ICF applications, the LANL effort concentrates on the development of relatively low-voltage (50 to 800 kV) and long pulsewidth (0.1 to 1 μs) beams. The first program involves the 1.2 MV, 300-kJ Anaconda generator which has been fitted with an extraction ion diode. Long pulsewidth ion beams have been accelerated, propagated, and extracted for a variety of magnetic field conditions. The primary application of this beam is the synthesis of novel materials. Initial experiments on the congruent evaporative deposition of metallic and ceramic thin films are reported. The second program involves the development of a 120-keV, 50-kA, 1-μs proton beam for the magnetic fusion program as an ion source for an intense diagnostic neutral beam. Ultra-bright, pulsed neutral beams will be required to successfully measure ion temperatures and thermalized alpha particle distributions in large, dense, ignited tokamaks such as ITER

  2. Beam intensity increases at the intense pulsed neutron source accelerator

    Potts, C.; Brumwell, F.; Norem, J.; Rauchas, A.; Stipp, V.; Volk, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) accelerator system has managed a 40% increase in time average beam current over the last two years. Currents of up to 15.6μA (3.25 x 10 12 protons at 30 Hz) have been successfully accelerated and cleanly extracted. Our high current operation demands low loss beam handling to permit hands-on maintenance. Synchrotron beam handling efficiencies of 90% are routine. A new H - ion source which was installed in March of 1983 offered the opportunity to get above 8 μA but an instability caused unacceptable losses when attempting to operate at 10 μA and above. Simple techniques to control the instabilities were introduced and have worked well. These techniques are discussed below. Other improvements in the regulation of various power supplies have provided greatly improved low energy orbit stability and contributed substantially to the increased beam current

  3. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy.

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques. A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0-255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets. Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage. Overall, the sharp distal

  4. International Scoping Study (ISS) for a future neutrino factory and Super-Beam facility. Detectors and flux instrumentation for future neutrino facilities

    Abe, T; Aihara, H; Andreopoulos, C; Ankowski, A; Badertscher, A; Battistoni, G; Blondel, A; Bouchez, J; Bross, A; Ellis, M; Bueno, A; Camilleri, L; Campagne, J E; Cazes, A; Cervera-Villanueva, A; De Lellis, G; Di Capua, F; Ereditato, A; Esposito, L S

    2009-01-01

    This report summarises the conclusions from the detector group of the International Scoping Study of a future Neutrino Factory and Super-Beam neutrino facility. The baseline detector options for each possible neutrino beam are defined as follows: 1. A very massive (Megaton) water Cherenkov detector is the baseline option for a sub-GeV Beta Beam and Super Beam facility. 2. There are a number of possibilities for either a Beta Beam or Super Beam (SB) medium energy facility between 1-5 GeV. These include a totally active scintillating detector (TASD), a liquid argon TPC or a water Cherenkov detector. 3. A 100 kton magnetized iron neutrino detector (MIND) is the baseline to detect the wrong sign muon final states (golden channel) at a high energy (20-50 GeV) neutrino factory from muon decay. A 10 kton hybrid neutrino magnetic emulsion cloud chamber detector for wrong sign tau detection (silver channel) is a possible complement to MIND, if one needs to resolve degeneracies that appear in the δ-θ 13 parameter space.

  5. NESSiE: An experimental search for sterile neutrinos with the CERN-SPS beam

    Medinaceli, E.

    2013-01-01

    NESSiE (Neutrino Experiment with SpectrometerS in Europe) is an experiment dedicated to the search for sterile neutrinos beyond the Standard Model with the CERN-SPS neutrino beam. The experiment is based on two identical LAr-TPC's followed by magnetized spectrometers, observing the electron and muon neutrino events at the “Near” (600 m) and “Far” (1300 m) positions from the proton target. The main characteristics of the spectrometers are described here. Spectrometers will exploit a classical dipole magnetic field with iron slabs, and a new concept air-core magnet will perform charge identification and muon momentum measurements in the energy range from ∼100MeV to few GeV over a large transverse area (>50m 2 )

  6. NESSiE: An experimental search for sterile neutrinos with the CERN-SPS beam

    Medinaceli, E., E-mail: medinaceli@pd.infn.it [INFN and University of Padova (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    NESSiE (Neutrino Experiment with SpectrometerS in Europe) is an experiment dedicated to the search for sterile neutrinos beyond the Standard Model with the CERN-SPS neutrino beam. The experiment is based on two identical LAr-TPC's followed by magnetized spectrometers, observing the electron and muon neutrino events at the “Near” (600 m) and “Far” (1300 m) positions from the proton target. The main characteristics of the spectrometers are described here. Spectrometers will exploit a classical dipole magnetic field with iron slabs, and a new concept air-core magnet will perform charge identification and muon momentum measurements in the energy range from ∼100MeV to few GeV over a large transverse area (>50m{sup 2})

  7. NESSiE: An experimental search for sterile neutrinos with the CERN-SPS beam

    Medinaceli, E.; NESSiE Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    NESSiE (Neutrino Experiment with SpectrometerS in Europe) is an experiment dedicated to the search for sterile neutrinos beyond the Standard Model with the CERN-SPS neutrino beam. The experiment is based on two identical LAr-TPC's followed by magnetized spectrometers, observing the electron and muon neutrino events at the "Near" (600 m) and "Far" (1300 m) positions from the proton target. The main characteristics of the spectrometers are described here. Spectrometers will exploit a classical dipole magnetic field with iron slabs, and a new concept air-core magnet will perform charge identification and muon momentum measurements in the energy range from ∼ 100 MeV to few GeV over a large transverse area (> 50m2).

  8. Search for oscillations of a long-lived muon neutrino beam: a status report

    Sulak, L.R.; Soukas, A.; Wanderer, P.

    1977-01-01

    A study of the time evolution of a long-lived ν/sub mu/ beam is being performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Experiment 704). The proton momentum (1.5 GeV/c 2 ) is chosen to concentrate the ν/sub mu/ flux at very low energy where all background reactions are kinematically suppressed. Sensitivity to oscillations at large proper times tau varies as l/p (where l is the flight length and p is the momentum of the neutrino) is greatly enhanced by the resulting low neutrino momentum. Transformations ν/sub mu/ → ν/sub e/ are sensed via ν/sub e/n → e - p. An early exploratory test using the neutrino detector of the BNL elastic neutrino-proton scattering experiment will be run during 1977. A 200 ton detector for a definitive experiment is also discussed. 14 references

  9. Ionization chambers for monitoring in high-intensity charged particle beams

    McDonald, J; Viren, B; Diwan, M; Erwin, A R; Naples, D; Ping, H

    2003-01-01

    Radiation-hard ionization chambers were tested using an intense electron beam from the accelerator test facility at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The detectors were designed to be used as the basic element for monitoring muons in the Main Injector Neutrino beamline at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Measurements of linearity of response, voltage dependence, and the onset of ionization saturation as a function of gap voltage were performed.

  10. Observation of Electron Neutrino Appearance in the NuMI Beam with the NOvA Experiment

    Niner, Evan David [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    NOvA is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment that uses two functionally identical detectors separated by 810 kilometers at locations 14 milliradians off-axis from the NuMI muon neutrino beam at Fermilab. At these locations the beam energy peaks at 2 GeV. This baseline is the longest in the world for an accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiment, which enhances the sensitivity to the neutrino mass ordering. The experiment studies oscillations of the muon neutrino and anti-neutrino beam that is produced. Both detectors completed commissioning in the summer of 2014 and continue to collect data. One of the primary physics goals of the experiment is the measurement of electron neutrino appearance in the muon neutrino beam which yields measurements of the oscillation parameters sin213, δ , and the neutrino mass ordering within the standard model of neutrino oscillations. This thesis presents the analysis of data collected between February 2014 and May 2015, corresponding to 3.52 X 1020 protons-on-target. In this first analysis NOvA recorded 6 electron neutrino candidates, which is a 3.3σ observation of electron neutrino appearance. The T2K experiment performs the same measurement on a baseline of 295 kilometers and has a 1 σ preference for the normal mass ordering over the inverted ordering over the phase space of the CP violating parameter δ, which is also weakly seen in the NOvA result. By the summer of 2016 NOvA will triple its statistics due to increased beam power and a completed detector. If electron neutrinos continue to be observed at the current rate NOvA will be able to establish a mass ordering preference at a similar confidence level to T2K.

  11. Intense diagnostic neutral beam development for ITER

    Rej, D.J.; Henins, I.; Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J.

    1992-01-01

    For the next-generation, burning tokamak plasmas such as ITER, diagnostic neutral beams and beam spectroscopy will continue to be used to determine a variety of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, rotation, fluctuations, impurity content, current density profile, and confined alpha particle density and energy distribution. Present-day low-current, long-pulse beam technology will be unable to provide the required signal intensities because of higher beam attenuation and background bremsstrahlung radiation in these larger, higher-density plasmas. To address this problem, we are developing a short-pulse, intense diagnostic neutral beam. Protons or deuterons are accelerated using magnetic-insulated ion-diode technology, and neutralized in a transient gas cell. A prototype 25-kA, 100-kV, 1-μs accelerator is under construction at Los Alamos. Initial experiments will focus on ITER-related issues of beam energy distribution, current density, pulse length, divergence, propagation, impurity content, reproducibility, and maintenance

  12. Photonuclear physics with low intensity photon beams

    Mecking, B.A.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments in photonuclear physics are discussed that require a low intensity photon beam and large acceptance detectors. This combination is especially suitable for the investigation of photoprocesses on nucleons and light nuclei. A specific experimental setup for the electron stretcher ring ELSA is presented. (orig.)

  13. Material studies for pulsed high-intensity proton beam targets

    Simos, N.; Kirk, H.; Ludewig, H.; Thieberger, P.; Weng, W-T.; McDonald, K.; Yoshimura, K.

    2004-01-01

    Intense beams for muon colliders and neutrino facilities require high-performance target stations of 1-4 MW proton beams. The physics requirements for such a system push the envelope of our current knowledge as to how materials behave under high-power beams for both short and long exposure. The success of an adopted scheme that generates, captures and guides secondary particles depends on the useful life expectancy of this critical system. This paper presents an overview of what has been achieved during the various phases of the experimental effort including a tentative plan to continue the effort by expanding the material matrix. The first phase of the project was to study the changes after irradiation in mechanical properties and specially in thermal expansion coefficient of various materials. During phase-I the study attention was primarily focused on Super-invar and in a lesser degree on Inconel-718. Invar is a metal alloy which predominantly consists of 62% Fe, 32% Ni and 5% Co. It is showed that this metal, whose non-irradiated properties held such promise, can only be considered a serious target candidate for an intense proton beam only if one can anneal the atomic displacements followed by the appropriate heat treatment to restore its favorable expansion coefficient. New materials that have been developed for various industrial needs by optimizing key properties, might be of value for the accelerator community. These materials like carbon-carbon composites, titanium alloys, the Toyota 'gum metal', the Vascomax material and the AlBeMet alloy will be explored and tested in the second phase of the project. (A.C.)

  14. THE PRIMARY TARGET FACILITY FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY BASED ON MUON BEAMS

    HASSENEIN, A.; KAHN, S.A.; KING, B.J.; KIRK, H.G.; LUDEWIG, H.; PALMER, R.B.; PEARSON, C.E.; SAMULYAK, R.; SIMOS, N.; STUMER, I.; THIEBERGER, P.; WEGGEL, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Neutrino beams from the decay of muons in a storage ring offer the prospect of very high flux, well-understood spectra, and equal numbers of electron and muon neutrinos, as desirable for detailed exploration of neutrino oscillations via long baseline detectors [1]. Such beams require. large numbers of muons, and hence a high performance target station at which a 1-4 MW proton beam of 16-24 GeV impinges on a compact target, all inside a high field solenoid channel to capture as much of the phase volume of soft pions as possible. A first concept was based on a carbon target, as reported in 2000 the Neutrino Factory Study-I [2]. A higher performance option based on a free mercury jet has been studied in 2001 as part of the Neutrino Factory Feasibility Study-II [3,4]. An overview of a mercury jet target facility is presented here, including requirements, design concept and summaries of simulated performance. Further details are presented in related papers at this conference

  15. Linac design for intense hadron beams

    Zhang, Chuan

    2009-12-14

    Based on the RFQ and H-type DTL structures, this dissertation is dedicated to study the beam dynamics in the presence of significantly strong space-charge effects while accelerating intense hadron beams in the low- and medium-{beta} region. Besides the 5 mA/30 mA, 17 MeV proton injector (RFQ+DTL) and the 125 mA, 40 MeV deuteron DTL of the EUROTRANS and IFMIF facilities, a 200 mA, 700 keV proton RFQ has been also intensively studied for a small-scale but ultra-intense neutron source FRANZ planned at Frankfurt University. The most remarkable properties of the FRANZ RFQ and the IFMIF DTL are the design beam intensities, 200 mA and 125 mA. A new design approach, which can provide a balanced and accelerated beam bunching at low energy, has been developed for intense beams. To design the IFMIF DTL and the injector DTL part of the EUROTRANS driver linac, which have been foreseen as the first real applications of the novel superconducting CH-DTL structure, intensive attempts have been made to fulfill the design goals under the new conditions. For the IFMIF DTL, the preliminary IAP design has been considerably improved with respect to the linac layout as well as the beam dynamics. By reserving sufficient drift spaces for the cryosystem, diagnostic devices, tuner and steerer, introducing SC solenoid lenses and adjusting the accelerating gradients and accordingly other configurations of the cavities, a more realistic, reliable and efficient linac system has been designed. On the other hand, the specifications and positions of the transverse focusing elements as well as the phase- and energy-differences between the bunch-center particle and the synchronous particle at the beginning of the {phi}{sub s}=0 sections have been totally redesigned. For the EUROTRANS injector DTL, in addition to the above-mentioned procedures, extra optimization concepts to coordinate the beam dynamics between two intensities have been applied. In the beam transport simulations for both DTL designs

  16. Linac design for intense hadron beams

    Zhang, Chuan

    2009-01-01

    Based on the RFQ and H-type DTL structures, this dissertation is dedicated to study the beam dynamics in the presence of significantly strong space-charge effects while accelerating intense hadron beams in the low- and medium-β region. Besides the 5 mA/30 mA, 17 MeV proton injector (RFQ+DTL) and the 125 mA, 40 MeV deuteron DTL of the EUROTRANS and IFMIF facilities, a 200 mA, 700 keV proton RFQ has been also intensively studied for a small-scale but ultra-intense neutron source FRANZ planned at Frankfurt University. The most remarkable properties of the FRANZ RFQ and the IFMIF DTL are the design beam intensities, 200 mA and 125 mA. A new design approach, which can provide a balanced and accelerated beam bunching at low energy, has been developed for intense beams. To design the IFMIF DTL and the injector DTL part of the EUROTRANS driver linac, which have been foreseen as the first real applications of the novel superconducting CH-DTL structure, intensive attempts have been made to fulfill the design goals under the new conditions. For the IFMIF DTL, the preliminary IAP design has been considerably improved with respect to the linac layout as well as the beam dynamics. By reserving sufficient drift spaces for the cryosystem, diagnostic devices, tuner and steerer, introducing SC solenoid lenses and adjusting the accelerating gradients and accordingly other configurations of the cavities, a more realistic, reliable and efficient linac system has been designed. On the other hand, the specifications and positions of the transverse focusing elements as well as the phase- and energy-differences between the bunch-center particle and the synchronous particle at the beginning of the φ s =0 sections have been totally redesigned. For the EUROTRANS injector DTL, in addition to the above-mentioned procedures, extra optimization concepts to coordinate the beam dynamics between two intensities have been applied. In the beam transport simulations for both DTL designs, no beam

  17. MINOS Sterile Neutrino Search

    Koskinen, David Jason [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment designed to measure properties of neutrino oscillation. Using a high intensity muon neutrino beam, produced by the Neutrinos at Main Injector (NuMI) complex at Fermilab, MINOS makes two measurements of neutrino interactions. The first measurement is made using the Near Detector situated at Fermilab and the second is made using the Far Detector located in the Soudan Underground laboratory in northern Minnesota. The primary goal of MINOS is to verify, and measure the properties of, neutrino oscillation between the two detectors using the v μ→ Vτ transition. A complementary measurement can be made to search for the existence of sterile neutrinos; an oft theorized, but experimentally unvalidated particle. The following thesis will show the results of a sterile neutrino search using MINOS RunI and RunII data totaling ~2.5 x 1020 protons on target. Due to the theoretical nature of sterile neutrinos, complete formalism that covers transition probabilities for the three known active states with the addition of a sterile state is also presented.

  18. EUROv Super Beam Studies

    Dracos, Marcos

    2011-01-01

    Neutrino Super Beams use conventional techniques to significantly increase the neutrino beam intensity compared to the present neutrino facilities. An essential part of these facilities is an intense proton driver producing a beam power higher than a MW. The protons hit a target able to accept the high proton beam intensity. The produced charged particles are focused by a system of magnetic horns towards the experiment detectors. The main challenge of these projects is to deal with the high beam intensity for many years. New high power neutrino facilities could be build at CERN profiting from an eventual construction of a high power proton driver. The European FP7 Design Study EUROv, among other neutrino beams, studies this Super Beam possibility. This paper will give the latest developments in this direction.

  19. Measurement of the neutrino velocity with the OPERA detector in the CNGS beam

    Adam, T.; Aleksandrov, A.; Altinok, O.; Alvarez Sanchez, P.; Anokhina, A.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Autiero, D.; Badertscher, A.; Dhahbi, A.Ben; Bertolin, A.; Bozza, C.; Brugiere, T.; Brugnera, R.; Brunet, F.; Brunetti, G.; Buontempo, S.; Carlus, B.; Cavanna, F.; Cazes, A.; Chaussard, L.; Chernyavsky, M.; Chiarella, V.; Chukanov, A.; Colosimo, G.; Crespi, M.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; De Serio, M.; Declais, Y.; del Amo Sanchez, P.; Di Capua, F.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Ferdinando, D.; Di Marco, N.; Dmitrievsky, S.; Dracos, M.; Duchesneau, D.; Dusini, S.; Dzhatdoev, T.; Ebert, J.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Egorov, O.; Ereditato, A.; Esposito, L.S.; Favier, J.; Ferber, T.; Fini, R.A.; Fukuda, T.; Garfagnini, A.; Giacomelli, G.; Giorgini, M.; Giovannozzi, M.; Girerd, C.; Goldberg, J.; Gollnitz, C.; Golubkov, D.; Goncharova, L.; Gornushkin, Y.; Grella, G.; Grianti, F.; Gschwendtner, E.; Guerin, C.; Guler, A.M.; Gustavino, C.; Hagner, C.; Hamada, K.; Hara, T.; Enikeev, R.; Hierholzer, M.; Hollnagel, A.; Ieva, M.; Ishida, H.; Ishiguro, K.; Jakovcic, K.; Jollet, C.; Jones, M.; Juget, F.; Kamiscioglu, M.; Kawada, J.; Kim, S.H.; Kimura, M.; Kiritsis, E.; Kitagawa, N.; Klicek, B.; Knuesel, J.; Kodama, K.; Komatsu, M.; Kose, U.; Kreslo, I.; Lazzaro, C.; Lenkeit, J.; Ljubicic, A.; Longhin, A.; Malgin, A.; Mandrioli, G.; Marteau, J.; Matsuo, T.; Matveev, V.; Mauri, N.; Mazzoni, A.; Medinaceli, E.; Meisel, F.; Meregaglia, A.; Migliozzi, P.; Mikado, S.; Missiaen, D.; Monacelli, P.; Morishima, K.; Moser, U.; Muciaccia, M.T.; Naganawa, N.; Naka, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Naumov, D.; Nikitina, V.; Nitti, F.; Ogawa, S.; Okateva, N.; Olchevsky, A.; Palamara, O.; Paoloni, A.; Park, B.D.; Park, I.G.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, Laura; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Pistillo, C.; Polukhina, N.; Pozzato, M.; Pretzl, K.; Pupilli, F.; Rescigno, R.; Riguzzi, F.; Roganova, T.; Rokujo, H.; Rosa, G.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rubbia, A.; Russo, A.; Ryasny, V.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Sato, O.; Sato, Y.; Sahnoun, Z.; Schembri, A.; Schuler, J.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Serrano, J.; Shakiryanova, I.; Sheshukov, A.; Shibuya, H.; Shoziyoev, G.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Song, J.S.; Spinetti, M.; Stanco, L.; Starkov, N.; Stellacci, S.; Stipcevic, M.; Strauss, T.; Takahashi, S.; Tenti, M.; Terranova, F.; Tezuka, I.; Tioukov, V.; Tolun, P.; N.T. Tran,i; Tufanli, S.; Vilain, P.; Vladimirov, M.; Votano, L.; Vuilleumier, J.L.; Wilquet, G.; Wonsak, B.; Wurtz, J.; Yakushev, V.; Yoon, C.S.; Yoshida, J.; Zaitsev, Y.; Zemskova, S.; Zghiche, A.

    2012-01-01

    The OPERA neutrino experiment at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory has measured the velocity of neutrinos from the CERN CNGS beam over a baseline of about 730 km with much higher accuracy than previous studies conducted with accelerator neutrinos. The measurement is based on high-statistics data taken by OPERA in the years 2009, 2010 and 2011. Dedicated upgrades of the CNGS timing system and of the OPERA detector, as well as a high precision geodesy campaign for the measurement of the neutrino baseline, allowed reaching comparable systematic and statistical accuracies. An early arrival time of CNGS muon neutrinos with respect to the one computed assuming the speed of light in vacuum of (60.7 \\pm 6.9 (stat.) \\pm 7.4 (sys.)) ns was measured. This anomaly corresponds to a relative difference of the muon neutrino velocity with respect to the speed of light (v-c)/c = (2.48 \\pm 0.28 (stat.) \\pm 0.30 (sys.)) \\times 10-5.

  20. The status of the search for muonless events in the broad band neutrino beam at NAL

    Aubert, B.; Benvenuti, A.; Cline, D.; Ford, W.T.; Imlay, R.; Ling, T.Y.; Mann, A.K.; Messing, F.; Piccioni, R.; Pilcher, J.; Reeder, D.D.; Rubbia, C.; Stefanski, R.; Sulak, L.

    The current status and results of the search for muonless events in the broad band neutrino beam at NAL are presented. An excess of events unaccompanied by muon is observed which cannot be explained by instrumental effects. The ratio of the unaccompanied events to the customary charged current events is 0.20+-0.05 for the mixture of ν and anti ν in this beam

  1. Results of a neutrino oscillation experiment performed at a meson factory beam-stop

    Mitchell, J.W.

    1989-04-01

    This document describes a neutrino oscillation experiment performed at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. The oscillation mode searched for is /bar /nu///sub μ/ → /bar /nu///sub e/. The first chapter is a review of the known properties of the neutrino and a description of the phenomenon of neutrino oscillation. Previous experimental limits on this unobserved phenomenon are also given. The second chapter describes the experimental apparatus used by the E645 experiment to detect neutrinos produced in the LAMPF beam stop. The salient features of the detector are its large mass (20 tons of CH 2 ), its fine segmentation (to allow good particle tracking), good energy resolution, its recording of the history both before and after tracks appear in the detector, an active cosmic-ray anticoincidence shield, and 2000 gm/cm 2 of passive cosmic-ray shielding. It is located 26.8 m from the neutrino source, which has a mean neutrino energy of 40 MeV. The third chapter details the reduction of the 1.3 million event data sample to a 49 event sample of neutrino candidates. Principle backgrounds are Michel electrons from stopping cosmic-ray muons and protons from np elastic scattering by cosmic-ray neutrons. The fourth chapter explains how background levels from neutrino-nuclear scattering are predicted. The result of a maximum-likelihood analysis reveals no evidence for oscillation. 90% confidence levels are set at δm 2 = .10 eV 2 for large mixing and sin 2 (2θ) = .014 for large δm 2 . 82 refs., 18 figs., 55 tabs

  2. Electron beam based transversal profile measurements of intense ion beams

    El Moussati, Said

    2014-01-01

    A non-invasive diagnostic method for the experimental determination of the transverse profile of an intense ion beam has been developed and investigated theoretically as well as experimentally within the framework of the present work. The method is based on the deflection of electrons when passing the electromagnetic field of an ion beam. To achieve this an electron beam is employed with a specifically prepared transversal profile. This distinguish this method from similar ones which use thin electron beams for scanning the electromagnetic field [Roy et al. 2005; Blockland10]. The diagnostic method presented in this work will be subsequently called ''Electron-Beam-Imaging'' (EBI). First of all the influence of the electromagnetic field of the ion beam on the electrons has been theoretically analyzed. It was found that the magnetic field causes only a shift of the electrons along the ion beam axis, while the electric field only causes a shift in a plane transverse to the ion beam. Moreover, in the non-relativistic case the magnetic force is significantly smaller than the Coulomb one and the electrons suffer due to the magnetic field just a shift and continue to move parallel to their initial trajectory. Under the influence of the electric field, the electrons move away from the ion beam axis, their resulting trajectory shows a specific angle compared to the original direction. This deflection angle practically depends just on the electric field of the ion beam. Thus the magnetic field has been neglected when analysing the experimental data. The theoretical model provides a relationship between the deflection angle of the electrons and the charge distribution in the cross section of the ion beam. The model however only can be applied for small deflection angles. This implies a relationship between the line-charge density of the ion beam and the initial kinetic energy of the electrons. Numerical investigations have been carried out to clarify the

  3. Proposal for SPS beam time for the baby MIND and TASD neutrino detector prototypes

    Asfandiyarov, R.; Blondel, A.; Bogomilov, M.; Bross, A.; Cadoux, F.; Cervera, A.; Izmaylov, A.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karpikov, I.; Khabibulin, M.; Khotyantsev, A.; Kopylov, A.; Kudenko, Y.; Matev, R.; Mineev, O.; Musienko, Y.; Nessi, M.; Noah, E.; Rubbia, A.; Shaykiev, A.; Soler, P.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Yershov, N.

    2015-01-01

    The design, construction and testing of neutrino detector prototypes at CERN are ongoing activities. This document reports on the design of solid state baby MIND and TASD detector prototypes and outlines requirements for a test beam at CERN to test these, tentatively planned on the H8 beamline in the North Area, which is equipped with a large aperture magnet. It is hoped that this will allow for the current proposal to be considered in light of the recently approved projects related to neutrino activities with the SPS in the North Area in the medium term 2015-2020.

  4. Measurement of the neutrino component of an antineutrino beam observed by a nonmagnetized detector

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Anderson, C. E.; Fleming, B. T.; Linden, S. K.; Spitz, J.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F. G.; Kobilarcik, T.; Marsh, W.; Moore, C. D.; Polly, C. C.; Russell, A. D.; Stefanski, R. J.; Zeller, G. P.; Bugel, L.; Conrad, J. M.; Karagiorgi, G.; Nguyen, V.

    2011-01-01

    Two methods are employed to measure the neutrino flux of the antineutrino-mode beam observed by the MiniBooNE detector. The first method compares data to simulated event rates in a high-purity ν μ -induced charged-current single π + (CC1π + ) sample while the second exploits the difference between the angular distributions of muons created in ν μ and ν μ charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) interactions. The results from both analyses indicate the prediction of the neutrino flux component of the predominately antineutrino beam is overestimated--the CC1π + analysis indicates the predicted ν μ flux should be scaled by 0.76±0.11, while the CCQE angular fit yields 0.65±0.23. The energy spectrum of the flux prediction is checked by repeating the analyses in bins of reconstructed neutrino energy, and the results show that the spectral shape is well-modeled. These analyses are a demonstration of techniques for measuring the neutrino contamination of antineutrino beams observed by future nonmagnetized detectors.

  5. Spectrum from the Proposed BNL Very Long Baseline Neutrino Facility

    Kahn, S A

    2005-01-01

    This paper calculates the neutrino flux that would be seen at the far detector location from the proposed BNL Very Long Baseline Neutrino Facility. The far detector is assumed to be located at an underground facility in South Dakota 2540 km from BNL. The neutrino beam facility uses a 1 MW upgraded AGS to provide an intense proton beam on the target and a magnetic horn to focus the secondary pion beam. The paper will examine the sensitivity of the neutrino flux at the far detector to the positioning of the horn and target so as to establish alignment tolerances for the neutrino system.

  6. Dedicated search for the time evolution of an electron neutrino beam at the Brookhaven AGS

    Bionta, R.; LoSecco, J.; Ong, R.; Stone, J.; Sulak, L.; Watts, R.; Cortez, B.; Foster, G.W.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment dedicated to the study of the time evolution of a neutrino beam enriched with ν/sub e/'s is suggested as feasible. It appears that the highest fluxes can be achieved with current beam lines at the Brookhaven AGS or the CERN PS. A configuration optimized for good sensitivity to neutrino eigenmass differences from 1 eV to 20 eV and mixing (Pontecorvo) angles down to 15 0 (comparable to the Cabibbo angle) is considered. The ν/sub e/ beam is formed using K/sub e3/ 0 decays. A simultaneously produced ν/sub μ/ beam from K/sub μ3/ 0 decay serves as the normalizer. Pion generated ν/sub μ/'s are suppressed to limit background. A massive detector is employed to obtain sufficient statistical power. It consists of a series of seven water Cerenkov modules (each with 180T fiducial mass), judiciously spaced along the ν line to provide flight paths from 40 m to 1000 m. The detector elements duplicate a recently developed technology that is eminently suited to this investigation. Simulation and reconstruction of neutrino events in a detector similar to the one suggested show sufficient resolution in angle, energy, position and event timing relative to the beam

  7. Neutrino oscillations on and off the beam: studies of the OPERA acquisition system performance

    Brugiere, T.

    2011-01-01

    OPERA (Oscillation Project with Emulsion-tracking Apparatus) is a neutrino beam experiment located in hall C of the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS), in Italia, under a equivalent of 3.8 km water (corresponding to a cut at 1.5 TeV for the muons). The first purpose of OPERA is the direct observation of the ν μ → ν τ oscillation in the atmospheric sector observing a ν τ appearance 730 km away from the target in a quasi pure ν μ beam (CNGS). OPERA is an hybrid detector with an instrumented target part (about 125000 bricks made with emulsion and lead sheets) and a spectrometer. Collecting data started in 2006 and 55000 events have been recorded. The first ν τ candidate have been observed this year. The work done during this thesis is oriented around three main topics: Define the trigger rules of the target tracker acquisition system for beam neutrino events, synchronise target tracker and RPC elements, implement the results inside the simulation and the study of the feasibility of an atmospheric neutrino analysis using o-beam data. The new trigger rules succeeds to reach the values of OPERA proposal, i.e. a trigger efficiency greater than 99%. This improvement have been done thanks to coincidence time windows with the CNGS beam during which lower cut are applied, allowing low multiplicity events to be kept. A deep study of electronic detectors intercalibration makes possible the target tracker and RPC data synchronisation. The analysis results are now included in the official simulation. This calibration work have been then used for a study of 'off-beam' atmospheric neutrino oscillation thanks to the selection of up-going particles. The analysis shown in the thesis has improved the OPERA detector understanding and demonstrates the feasibility of an observation of phenomena independent from the Cgs beam. Analysis on atmospherics neutrino detection and muons flux characterisation (seasonal variations for example) are now possible thanks to the

  8. Search for heavy neutrino decays in the BEBC beam dump experiment

    Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Haywood, S. J.; Parker, M. A.; Sarkar, S.; Barnham, K. W. J.; Bostock, P.; Faccini-Turluer, M. L.; Grässler, H.; Guy, J.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Idschok, U.; Klein, H.; Kreutzmann, H.; Krstic, J.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Nellen, B.; Talebzadeh, M.; Venus, W.; Vignaud, D.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wittek, W.; Wünsch, B.; WA66 Collaboration

    1985-10-01

    New limits on lepton mixing parameters are derived from a search for decays of heavy neutrinos in a proton beam dump experiment. The limits | Uøi| 2, | Ue i| 2 < 10 -6-10 -7 are obtained for neutrino mass eigenstates vi of mass between 0.5 and 1.75 GeV, which can be produced through mixing in charmed D meson decays. This is the first such limit on | Uøi| 2 for neutrino masses greater than 0.5 GeV. For the mass eigenstate v3 in particular, we obtain the limits | Uø3 | 2 < 10 -7-10 -8, | Ue3 | 2 < 10 -9-10 -10 for the mass range 150-190 MeV, assuming the v3 to be produced directly in charmed F meson decays.

  9. Intense pulsed heavy ion beam technology

    Masugata, Katsumi; Ito, Hiroaki

    2010-01-01

    Development of intense pulsed heavy ion beam accelerator technology is described for the application of materials processing. Gas puff plasma gun and vacuum arc discharge plasma gun were developed as an active ion source for magnetically insulated pulsed ion diode. Source plasma of nitrogen and aluminum were successfully produced with the gas puff plasma gun and the vacuum arc plasma gun, respectively. The ion diode was successfully operated with gas puff plasma gun at diode voltage 190 kV, diode current 2.2 kA and nitrogen ion beam of ion current density 27 A/cm 2 was obtained. The ion composition was evaluated by a Thomson parabola spectrometer and the purity of the nitrogen ion beam was estimated to be 86%. The diode also operated with aluminum ion source of vacuum arc plasma gun. The ion diode was operated at 200 kV, 12 kA, and aluminum ion beam of current density 230 A/cm 2 was obtained. The beam consists of aluminum ions (Al (1-3)+ ) of energy 60-400 keV, and protons (90-130 keV), and the purity was estimated to be 89%. The development of the bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA) was reported. A double coaxial type bipolar pulse generator was developed as the power supply of the BPA. The generator was tested with dummy load of 7.5 ohm, bipolar pulses of -138 kV, 72 ns (1st pulse) and +130 kV, 70 ns (2nd pulse) were successively generated. By applying the bipolar pulse to the drift tube of the BPA, nitrogen ion beam of 2 A/cm 2 was observed in the cathode, which suggests the bipolar pulse acceleration. (author)

  10. Using Quasi-Elastic Events to Measure Neutrino Oscillations with MINOS Detectors in the NuMI Neutrino Beam

    Watabe, Masaki [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2010-05-01

    MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search) experiment has been designed to search for a change in the avor composition of a beam of muon neutrinos as they travel between the Near Detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the Far Detector in the Soudan mine in Minnesota, 735 km from the target. The MINOS oscillation analysis is mainly performed with the charged current (CC) events and sensitive to constrain high- Δm2 values. However, the quasi-elastic (QEL) charged current interaction is dominant in the energy region important to access low- m2 values. For further improvement, the QEL oscillation analysis is performed in this dissertation. A data sample based on a total of 2.50 x 1020 POT is used for this analysis. In summary, 55 QEL-like events are observed at the Far detector while 87.06 ± 13.17 (syst:) events are expected with null oscillation hypothesis. These data are consistent with disappearance via oscillation with m2 = 2:10 0.37 (stat:) ± 0.24 (syst:) eV2 and the maximal mixing angle.

  11. Precision measurement of the neutrino velocity with the ICARUS detector in the CNGS beam

    Antonello, M; Benetti, P.; Boffelli, F.; Calligarich, E.; Canci, N.; Centro, S.; Cesana, A.; Cieslik, K.; Cline, D.B.; Cocco, A.G.; Dabrowska, A.; Dequal, D.; Dermenev, A.; Dolfini, R.; Farnese, C.; Fava, A.; Ferrari, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Guglielmi, A.; Haranczyk, M.; Holeczek, J.; Ivashkin, A.; Kisiel, J.; Kochanek, I.; Lagoda, J.; Mania, S.; Menegolli, A.; Meng, G.; Montanari, C.; Otwinowski, S.; Piazzoli, A.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Plonski, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.L.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Sala, P.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scaramelli, A.; Segreto, E.; Sergiampietri, F.; Stefan, D.; Stepaniak, J.; Sulej, R.; Szarska, M.; Terrani, M.; Varanini, F.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wang, H.G.; Yang, X.; Zalewska, A.; Zani, A.; Zaremba, K.; Alvarez Sanchez, P.; Biagi, L.; Barzaghi, R.; Betti, B.; Bernier, L.G.; Cerretto, G.; de Gaetani, C.; Esteban, H.; Feldmann, T.; Gonzalez Cobas, J.D.; Passoni, D.; Pettiti, V.; Pinto, L.; Serrano, J.; Spinnato, P.; Visconti, M.G.; Wlostowski, T.

    2012-01-01

    During May 2012, the CERN-CNGS neutrino beam has been operated for two weeks for a total of 1.8 10^17 pot in bunched mode, with a 3 ns narrow width proton beam bunches, separated by 100 ns. This tightly bunched beam structure allows a very accurate time of flight measurement of neutrinos from CERN to LNGS on an event-by-event basis. Both the ICARUS-T600 PMT-DAQ and the CERN-LNGS timing synchronization have been substantially improved for this campaign, taking ad-vantage of additional independent GPS receivers, both at CERN and LNGS as well as of the deployment of the "White Rabbit" protocol both at CERN and LNGS. The ICARUS-T600 detector has collected 25 beam-associated events; the corresponding time of flight has been accurately evaluated, using all different time synchronization paths. The measured neutrino time of flight is compatible with the arrival of all events with speed equivalent to the one of light: the difference between the expected value based on the speed of light and the measured value is tof_...

  12. Formation of an intense proton beam of microsecond duration

    Engelko, V [Efremov Inst. of Electrophysical Apparatus, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Giese, H; Schalk, S [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The proton beam facility PROFA serves as a test installation for ion source development and beam transport optimization for an intense pulsed proton beam of low kinetic energy, envisaged for ITER divertor load simulation. The present state of the investigations is discussed with emphasis on the diode operation parameters, beam divergence and beam transport efficiency. (author). 7 figs., 5 refs.

  13. A search for muon neutrino and antineutrino disappearance in the Booster Neutrino Beam

    Mahn, Kendall Brianna McConnel [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2009-04-01

    This dissertation presents a search for vμ and $\\bar{v}$μ disappearance with the MiniBooNE experiment in the Δm2 region of a few eV2. Disappearance measurements in this oscillation region constrain sterile neutrino models and CPT violation in the lepton sector. Fits to the shape of the vμ and $\\bar{v}$μ energy spectra reveal no evidence for disappearance in either mode. This is the first test of $\\bar{v}$μ disappearance between Δm2 = 0.1 - 10 eV2. In addition, prospects for performing a joint analysis using the SciBooNE detector in conjunction with MiniBooNE are discussed.

  14. Measurement of the neutrino velocity with the OPERA detector in the CNGS beam using the 2012 dedicated data

    Adam, T.; Aleksandrov, A.; Anokhina, A.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Autiero, D.; Badertscher, A.; Dhahbi, A.Ben; Beretta, M.; Bertolin, A.; Bozza, C.; Brugiere, T.; Brugnera, R.; Brunet, F.; Brunetti, G.; Buettner, B.; Buontempo, S.; Carlus, B.; Cavanna, F.; Cazes, A.; Chaussard, L.; Chernyavsky, M.; Chiarella, V.; Chukanov, A.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; De Serio, M.; del Amo Sanchez, P.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Ferdinando, D.; Di Marco, N.; Dmitrievsky, S.; Dracos, M.; Duchesneau, D.; Dusini, S.; Dzhatdoev, T.; Ebert, J.; Ereditato, A.; Esposito, L.S.; Favier, J.; Felici, G.; Ferber, T.; Fini, R.A.; Fukuda, T.; Garfagnini, A.; Giacomelli, G.; Girerd, C.; Goellnitz, C.; Goldberg, J.; Golubkov, D.; Gornushkin, Y.; Grella, G.; Grianti, F.; Guerin, C.; Guler, A.M.; Gustavino, C.; Hagner, C.; Hamada, K.; Hara, T.; Hierholzer, M.; Hollnagel, A.; Ishida, H.; Ishiguro, K.; Jakovcic, K.; Jollet, C.; Kamiscioglu, C.; Kamiscioglu, M.; Kawada, J.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, S.H.; Kimura, M.; Kitagawa, N.; Klicek, B.; Kodama, K.; Komatsu, M.; Kose, U.; Kreslo, I.; Lauria, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Lenkeit, J.; Ljubicic, A.; Longhin, A.; Mancini-Terracciano, C.; Malgin, A.; Mandrioli, G.; Marteau, J.; Matsuo, T.; Matveev, V.; Mauri, N.; Medinaceli, E.; Meregaglia, A.; Migliozzi, P.; Mikado, S.; Monacelli, P.; Montesi, M.C.; Morishima, K.; Moser, U.; Muciaccia, M.T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Naumov, D.; Nikitina, V.; Ogawa, S.; Olchevsky, A.; Ozaki, K.; Palamara, O.; Paoloni, A.; Park, B.D.; Park, I.G.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Pistillo, C.; Podgrudkov, D.; Polukhina, N.; Pozzato, M.; Pretzl, K.; Pupilli, F.; Rescigno, R.; Roda, M.; Roganova, T.; Rokujo, H.; Rosa, G.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rubbia, A.; Russo, A.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Sato, O.; Sato, Y.; Schembri, A.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Schuler, J.; Shakiryanova, I.; Sheshukov, A.; Shibuya, H.; Shoziyoev, G.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Song, J.S.; Spinetti, M.; Stanco, L.; Starkov, N.; Stellacci, S.M.; Stipcevic, M.; Strauss, T.; Takahashi, S.; Tenti, M.; Terranova, F.; Tioukov, V.; Tolun, P.; Tufanli, S.; Vilain, P.; Vladimirov, M.; Votano, L.; Vuilleumier, J.L.; Wilquet, G.; Wonsak, B.; Wurtz, J.; Yoon, C.S.; Yoshida, J.; Zaitsev, Y.; Zemskova, S.; Zghiche, A.; Zimmermann, R.

    2013-01-01

    In spring 2012 CERN provided two weeks of a short bunch proton beam dedicated to the neutrino velocity measurement over a distance of 730 km. The OPERA neutrino experiment at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory used an upgraded setup compared to the 2011 measurements, improving the measurement time accuracy. An independent timing system based on the Resistive Plate Chambers was exploited providing a time accuracy of $\\sim$1 ns. Neutrino and anti-neutrino contributions were separated using the information provided by the OPERA magnetic spectrometers. The new analysis profited from the precision geodesy measurements of the neutrino baseline and of the CNGS/LNGS clock synchronization. The neutrino arrival time with respect to the one computed assuming the speed of light in vacuum is found to be $\\delta t_\

  15. Method of enhancing cyclotron beam intensity

    Hudson, Ed D.; Mallory, Merrit L.

    1977-01-01

    When an easily ionized support gas such as xenon is added to the cold cathode in sources of the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron, large beam enhancements are produced. For example, .sup.20 Ne.sup.7+ is increased from 0.05 enA to 27 enA, and .sup.16 O.sup.5+ intensities in excess of 35 e.mu.A have been extracted for periods up to 30 minutes. Approximately 0.15 cc/min of the easily ionized support gas is supplied to the ion source through a separate gas feed line and the primary gas flow is reduced by about 30%.

  16. Unsteady thermal blooming of intense laser beams

    Ulrich, J. T.; Ulrich, P. B.

    1980-01-01

    A four dimensional (three space plus time) computer program has been written to compute the nonlinear heating of a gas by an intense laser beam. Unsteady, transient cases are capable of solution and no assumption of a steady state need be made. The transient results are shown to asymptotically approach the steady-state results calculated by the standard three dimensional thermal blooming computer codes. The report discusses the physics of the laser-absorber interaction, the numerical approximation used, and comparisons with experimental data. A flowchart is supplied in the appendix to the report.

  17. Muon flux measurement with silicon detectors in the CERN neutrino beams

    Heijne, H.M.

    1983-01-01

    The present work mainly describes the 'Neutrino Flux Monitoring' system (NFM), which has been built for the 400-GeV Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) neutrino beams. A treatment is given of some general subjects related to the utilization of silicon detectors and the properties of high-energy muons. Energy loss of minimal-ionizing particles, which has to be distinguished from energy deposition in the detector, is considered. Secondary radiation, also called 'spray', consisting of 'delta rays' and other cascade products, is shown to play an important role in the muon flux measurement inside a shield, especially for muons of high energy (> 100 GeV). Radiation induced damage in the detectors, which determines the long term performance, is discussed. The relation between the detector response and the real muon flux is determined. The use of NFM system for on-line beam monitoring is described. (Auth.)

  18. High repetition rate intense ion beam source

    Hammer, D.A.; Glidden, S.C.; Noonan, B.

    1992-01-01

    This final report describes a ≤ 150kV, 40kA, 100ns high repetition rate pulsed power system and intense ion beam source which is now in operation at Cornell University. Operation of the Magnetically-controlled Anode Plasma (MAP) ion diode at > 100Hz (burst mode for up to 10 pulse bursts) provides an initial look at repetition rate limitations of both the ion diode and beam diagnostics. The pulsed power systems are capable of ≥ 1kHz operation (up to 10 pulse bursts), but ion diode operation was limited to ∼100Hz because of diagnostic limitations. By varying MAP diode operating parameters, ion beams can be extracted at a few 10s of keV or at up to 150keV, the corresponding accelerating gap impedance ranging from about 1Ω to about 10Ω. The ability to make hundreds of test pulses per day at an average repetition rate of about 2 pulses per minute permits statistical analysis of diode operation as a function of various parameters. Most diode components have now survived more than 10 4 pulses, and the design and construction of the various pulsed power components of the MAP diode which have enabled us to reach this point are discussed. A high speed data acquisition system and companion analysis software capable of acquiring pulse data at 1ms intervals (in bursts of up to 10 pulses) and processing it in ≤ min is described

  19. Simulations of multistage intense ion beam acceleration

    Slutz, S.A.; Poukey, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    An analytic theory for magnetically insulated, multistage acceleration of high intensity ion beams, where the diamagnetic effect due to electron flow is important, has been presented by Slutz and Desjarlais. The theory predicts the existence of two limiting voltages called V 1 (W) and V 2 (W), which are both functions of the injection energy qW of ions entering the accelerating gap. As the voltage approaches V 1 (W), unlimited beam-current density can penetrate the gap without the formation of a virtual anode because the dynamic gap goes to zero. Unlimited beam current density can penetrate an accelerating gap above V 2 (W), although a virtual anode is formed. It was found that the behavior of these limiting voltages is strongly dependent on the electron density profile. The authors have investigated the behavior of these limiting voltages numerically using the 2-D particle-in-cell (PIC) code MAGIC. Results of these simulations are consistent with the superinsulated analytic results. This is not surprising, since the ignored coordinate eliminates instabilities known to be important from studies of single stage magnetically insulated ion diodes. To investigate the effect of these instabilities the authors have simulated the problem with the 3-D PIC code QUICKSILVER, which indicates behavior that is consistent with the saturated model

  20. Progress toward a microsecond duration, repetitively pulsed, intense- ion beam

    Davis, H.A.; Olson, J.C.; Reass, W.A.; Coates, D.M.; Hunt, J.W.; Schleinitz, H.M.; Greenly, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    A number of intense ion beams applications are emerging requiring repetitive high-average-power beams. These applications include ablative deposition of thin films, rapid melt and resolidification for surface property enhancement, advanced diagnostic neutral beams for the next generation of Tokamaks, and intense pulsed-neutron sources. We are developing a 200-250 keV, 15 kA, 1 μs duration, 1-30 Hz intense ion beam accelerator to address these applications

  1. Neutrino oscillations at proton accelerators

    Michael, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Data from many different experiments have started to build a first glimpse of the phenomenology associated with neutrino oscillations. Results on atmospheric and solar neutrinos are particularly clear while a third result from LSND suggests a possibly very complex oscillation phenomenology. As impressive as the results from current experiments are, it is clear that we are just getting started on a long-term experimental program to understand neutrino masses, mixings and the physics which produce them. A number of exciting fundamental physics possibilities exist, including that neutrino oscillations could demonstrate CP or CPT violation and could be tied to exotic high-energy phenomena including strings and extra dimensions. A complete exploration of oscillation phenomena demands many experiments, including those possible using neutrino beams produced at high energy proton accelerators. Most existing neutrino experiments are statistics limited even though they use gigantic detectors. High intensity proton beams are essential for producing the intense neutrino beams which we need for next generation neutrino oscillation experiments

  2. Neutrino Oscillations at Proton Accelerators

    Michael, Douglas

    2002-12-01

    Data from many different experiments have started to build a first glimpse of the phenomenology associated with neutrino oscillations. Results on atmospheric and solar neutrinos are particularly clear while a third result from LSND suggests a possibly very complex oscillation phenomenology. As impressive as the results from current experiments are, it is clear that we are just getting started on a long-term experimental program to understand neutrino masses, mixings and the physics which produce them. A number of exciting fundamental physics possibilities exist, including that neutrino oscillations could demonstrate CP or CPT violation and could be tied to exotic high-energy phenomena including strings and extra dimensions. A complete exploration of oscillation phenomena demands many experiments, including those possible using neutrino beams produced at high energy proton accelerators. Most existing neutrino experiments are statistics limited even though they use gigantic detectors. High intensity proton beams are essential for producing the intense neutrino beams which we need for next generation neutrino oscillation experiments.

  3. Low-intensity beam diagnostics with particle detectors

    Rovelli, A.; Ciavola, G.; Cuttone, G.; Finocchiaro, P.; Raia, G. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 44/A Catania, 95125 (Italy); De Martinis, C.; Giove, D. [INFN-LASA, Via F.lli Cervi 201 Segrate (Midway Islands), 20090 (Italy)

    1997-01-01

    The measure of low intensity beams at low-medium energy is one of the major challenge in beam diagnostics. This subject is of great interest for the design of accelerator-based medical and radioactive beam facilities. In this paper we discuss new developments in image-based devices to measure low-intensity beams. All the investigated devices must guarantee measurement of the total beam current and its transverse distribution. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Low-intensity beam diagnostics with particle detectors

    Rovelli, A.; Ciavola, G.; Cuttone, G.; Finocchiaro, P.; Raia, G.; De Martinis, C.; Giove, D.

    1997-01-01

    The measure of low intensity beams at low-medium energy is one of the major challenge in beam diagnostics. This subject is of great interest for the design of accelerator-based medical and radioactive beam facilities. In this paper we discuss new developments in image-based devices to measure low-intensity beams. All the investigated devices must guarantee measurement of the total beam current and its transverse distribution. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  5. High precision flux measurements in conventional neutrino beams: the ENUBET project

    Longhin, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The challenges of precision neutrino physics require measurements of absolute neutrino cross sec- tions at the GeV scale with exquisite (1%) precision. This precision is presently limited to by the uncertainties on neutrino flux at the source. A reduction of this uncertainty by one order of mag- nitude can be achieved monitoring the positron production in the decay tunnel originating from the K e 3 decays of charged kaons in a sign and momentum selected narrow band beam. This novel technique enables the measurement of the most relevant cross-sections for CP violation ( ν e and ̄ ν e ) with a precision of 1% and requires a special instrumented beam-line. Such non-conventional beam-line will be developed in the framework of the ENUBET Horizon-2020 Consolidator Grant, recently approved by the European Research Council. We present the Project, the first experimen- tal results on ultra-compact calorimeters that can embedded in the instrumented decay tunnel and the advances on the simulation of the beamline. A r...

  6. A search for neutral, heavy particles decaying to a neutriNO1and a single photon at the SPS wide-band neutrino beam

    Steele, D M

    1996-01-01

    A search is performed for single, isolated photons from X 0 decay, where X 0 represents either a neutrino excited state or an unknown, neutral, massive particle produced in a rare pi+ decay along the neutrino beam line as hypothesized by the KARMEN Collaboration[1] as a possible solution to their anomalous time spectra for pi+ -> u+ + vu. The analysis is performed using data from the NOMAD (WA96) experiment in the wide-band vu beam using the SPS accelerator situated at the European Center for Nuclear Research near Geneva, Switzerland. Out of a flux of vu resulting from 6.13 x 10*18 protons on target, seven events pass all cuts. The relative abundance of these events is entirely consistent with those expected from neutrino interactions in the detector. Upper limits are set at 90% condence level for the production rate of this particle as a function of its lifetime.

  7. Muon flux measurement with silicon detectors in the CERN neutrino beams

    Heijne, E.H.M.

    1983-01-01

    The neutrino beam installations at the CERN SPS accelerator are described, with emphasis on the beam monitoring systems. Especially the muon flux measurement system is considered in detail, and the calibration procedure and systematic aspects of the measurements are discussed. An introduction is given to the use of silicon semiconductor detectors and their related electronics. Other special chapters concern non-linear phenomena in the silicon detectors, radiation damage in silicon detectors, energy loss and energy deposition in silicon and a review of energy loss phenomena for high energy muons in matter. (orig.)

  8. Determining the hierarchy of neutrino masses with high density magnetized detectors at the Beta Beams

    Donini, A.; Fernandez-Martinez, E.; Rigolin, S.; Migliozzi, P.; Lavina, L. Scotto; Selvi, M.; De Fatis, T. Tabarelli; Terranova, F.

    2008-01-01

    Multi-kton iron detectors can be simultaneously exploited as far detectors for high energy Beta Beams and to determine the atmospheric ν μ flux in the multi-GeV range. These measurements can be combined in a highly non trivial manner to improve the sensitivity to the hierarchy of neutrino masses. Considering a Super-SPS based Beta Beam and a 40 kton far detector located ∼700 km from the source (CERN to Gran Sasso distance), we demonstrate that even with moderate detector granularities the sign of Δm 13 2 can be determined for θ 13 values greater than 4 deg.

  9. Materials processing with intense pulsed ion beams

    Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A.; Olson, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    We review research investigating the application of intense pulsed ion beams (IPIBs) for the surface treatment and coating of materials. The short range (0.1-10 μm) and high-energy density (1-50 J/cm 2 ) of these short-pulsed (≤ 1 μs) beams (with ion currents I = 5 - 50 kA, and energies E = 100 - 1000 keV) make them ideal to flash-heat a target surface, similar to the more familiar pulsed laser processes. IPIB surface treatment induces rapid melt and solidification at up to 10 10 K/s to cause amorphous layer formation and the production of non-equilibrium microstructures. At higher energy density the target surface is vaporized, and the ablated vapor is condensed as coatings onto adjacent substrates or as nanophase powders. Progress towards the development of robust, high-repetition rate IPIB accelerators is presented along with economic estimates for the cost of ownership of this technology

  10. Neutrino 2004: Collection of Presentations

    2004-01-01

    The scientific program covers the latest developments in neutrino physics, astrophysics and related topics through a set of invited talks and 2 poster sessions. The following issues are addressed: - solar neutrinos, - atmospheric neutrinos, - short and long baseline experiments, - neutrino oscillations, - double beta decay, - direct neutrino mass limits, - theory for neutrino masses, neutrino telescopes and ultra-high energy neutrinos, - dark matter searches, - neutrino in astrophysics and cosmology, and - future projects beams and experiments

  11. Neutrino 2004: Collection of Presentations

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The scientific program covers the latest developments in neutrino physics, astrophysics and related topics through a set of invited talks and 2 poster sessions. The following issues are addressed: - solar neutrinos, - atmospheric neutrinos, - short and long baseline experiments, - neutrino oscillations, - double beta decay, - direct neutrino mass limits, - theory for neutrino masses, neutrino telescopes and ultra-high energy neutrinos, - dark matter searches, - neutrino in astrophysics and cosmology, and - future projects beams and experiments.

  12. Generation of an intense pulsed positron beam and its applications

    Suzuki, Ryoichi; Mikado, Tomohisa; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Chiwaki, Mitsukuni; Yamazaki, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Yoshinori.

    1994-01-01

    A positron pulsing system for an intense positron beam generated by an electron linac has been developed at the Electrotechnical Laboratory. The pulsing system generates an intense pulsed positron beam of variable energy and variable pulse period. The pulsed positron beam is used as a non destructive probe for various materials researches. In this paper, we report the present status of the pulsed positron beam and its applications. (author)

  13. Measurement of νμ and νe Events in an Off-Axis Horn-Focused Neutrino Beam

    Adamson, P.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Choudhary, B. C.; Finley, D. A.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F. G.; Harris, D.; Hylen, J.; Kasper, P.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kourbanis, I.; Marchionni, A.; Marsh, W.; Mills, F.; Moore, C. D.; Prebys, E.; Russell, A. D.; Smart, W.; Spentzouris, P.

    2009-01-01

    We report the first observation of off-axis neutrino interactions in the MiniBooNE detector from the NuMI beam line at Fermilab. The MiniBooNE detector is located 745 m from the NuMI production target, at 110 mrad angle (6.3 deg.) with respect to the NuMI beam axis. Samples of charged-current quasielastic ν μ and ν e interactions are analyzed and found to be in agreement with expectation. This provides a direct verification of the expected pion and kaon contributions to the neutrino flux and validates the modeling of the NuMI off-axis beam.

  14. Superconducting magnet system for the J-PARC neutrino beam line. Development, construction and operation of superconducting magnets

    Sasaki, Ken-ichi; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Ajima, Yasuo; Okamura, Takahiro; Ogitsu, Toru; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Terashima, Akio; Tomaru, Takayuki; Higashi, Norio

    2010-01-01

    Superconducting combined-function magnets have been utilized for the 50-GeV, 750-kW proton beam line in the J-PARC neutrino experiment. The magnets are designed to provide a dipole field of 2.6 T combined with a quadrupole field of 19 T/m in a coil aperture of 173.4 mm at a nominal current of 7,345 A. Following the success of a prototype R and D project, a superconducting magnet system for the J-PARC neutrino beam line has been constructed since 2005. Using a new conceptual beam line with the superconducting combined-function magnets has demonstrated successful beam transport to the target neutrino production. (author)

  15. Longitudinal density modulation and energy conversion in intense beams

    Harris, J. R.; Neumann, J. G.; Tian, K.; O'Shea, P. G.

    2007-01-01

    Density modulation of charged particle beams may occur as a consequence of deliberate action, or may occur inadvertently because of imperfections in the particle source or acceleration method. In the case of intense beams, where space charge and external focusing govern the beam dynamics, density modulation may, under some circumstances, be converted to velocity modulation, with a corresponding conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy. Whether this will occur depends on the properties of the beam and the initial modulation. This paper describes the evolution of discrete and continuous density modulations on intense beams and discusses three recent experiments related to the dynamics of density-modulated electron beams

  16. Development of high intensity beam handling system, 4

    Yamanoi, Yutaka; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Minakawa, Michifumi

    1992-01-01

    We have constructed the new counter experimental hall at the KEK 12 GeV Proton Synchrotron (KEK-PS) in order to handle high intensity primary proton beams of up to 1x10 3 pps (protons per second), which is one order of magnitude greater than the present beam intensity of the KEK-PS, 1x10 12 pps. New technologies for handling high-intensity beams have, then, been developed and employed in the construction of the new hall. A part of our R/D work on handling high intensity beams will be reported. (author)

  17. Intense beams: The past, present, and future

    Yonas, G.; Sweeney, M.A.

    1998-06-01

    Nobody could have predicted the circuitous course of the last 30 years of progress in intense beams and pulsed power. There were many discoveries and twists and turns along the way, but the steady flow of understanding and technological advances has sustained the field. Pulsed power research began in the early 1960s with the development of the technology to test the reliability of nuclear weapons in a pulsed radiation environment. Because of the effort in the 1970s on an electron beam approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) at Sandia National Laboratories and at the Kurchatov Institute, simulation codes, diagnostics, and innovative pulsed power techniques such as self-magnetic insulation were developed. The electron approach ended in 1979, and the more promising ion approach continued. At the same time, z pinches, used since the early 1970s to evaluate the response of materials to keV X rays, were considered as an alternative to drive ICF capsules. The use of z pinches for ICF was discontinued in 1984 because of budget cuts and the belief that ions offered a route to the standoff requirement for energy applications. Now, in 1998, because of budget limitations and the 1995 discovery that the soft x-ray power achievable in a z-pinch implosion can be greatly enhanced, the ion approach has been suspended, and a new facility, X-1, proposed to achieve high yield in the laboratory with z pinches. In this paper the authors review the research paths that led to these changes, describe the present status of z pinches, and predict what the future holds. Although nobody can predict the future, the past 30 years have taught us some lessons that can be applied to the next 30 years. The paper concludes with some of these lessons learned

  18. ABSOLUTE NEUTRINO MASSES

    Schechter, J.; Shahid, M. N.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of using experiments timing the propagation of neutrino beams over large distances to help determine the absolute masses of the three neutrinos.......We discuss the possibility of using experiments timing the propagation of neutrino beams over large distances to help determine the absolute masses of the three neutrinos....

  19. High intensity beam dump for the Tevatron beam abort system

    Kidd, J.; Mokhov, N.; Murphy, T.; Palmer, M.; Toohig, T.; Turkot, F.; VanGinneken, A.

    1981-01-01

    The beam abort system proposed for the Fermilab Tevatron Accelerator will extract the proton beam from the ring in a single turn (approximately 20/mu/s) and direct it to an external beam dump. It is the function of the beam dump to absorb the unwanted beam and limit the escaping radiation to levels that are acceptable to the surrounding populace and apparatus. A beam dump that is expected to meet these requirements has been designed and constructed. Detailed design of the dump, including considerations leading to the choice of materials, are given. 6 refs

  20. European Strategy for Accelerator-Based Neutrino Physics

    Bertolucci, Sergio; Cervera, Anselmo; Donini, Andrea; Dracos, Marcos; Duchesneau, Dominique; Dufour, Fanny; Edgecock, Rob; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Gschwendtner, Edda; Kudenko, Yury; Long, Ken; Maalampi, Jukka; Mezzetto, Mauro; Pascoli, Silvia; Palladino, Vittorio; Rondio, Ewa; Rubbia, Andre; Rubbia, Carlo; Stahl, Achim; Stanco, Luca; Thomas, Jenny; Wark, David; Wildner, Elena; Zito, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Massive neutrinos reveal physics beyond the Standard Model, which could have deep consequences for our understanding of the Universe. Their study should therefore receive the highest level of priority in the European Strategy. The discovery and study of leptonic CP violation and precision studies of the transitions between neutrino flavours require high intensity, high precision, long baseline accelerator neutrino experiments. The community of European neutrino physicists involved in oscillation experiments is strong enough to support a major neutrino long baseline project in Europe, and has an ambitious, competitive and coherent vision to propose. Following the 2006 European Strategy for Particle Physics (ESPP) recommendations, two complementary design studies have been carried out: LAGUNA/LBNO, focused on deep underground detector sites, and EUROnu, focused on high intensity neutrino facilities. LAGUNA LBNO recommends, as first step, a conventional neutrino beam CN2PY from a CERN SPS North Area Neutrino Fac...

  1. Experimental neutrino physics

    Link, Jonathan M

    2018-01-01

    Neutrinos have a smaller mass than any other known particle and are the subject of intense recent studies, as well as this book. The author provides a coherent introduction to the necessary theoretical background and experimental methods used by modern neutrino physicists. It’s designed as a one-stop reference addressing what is currently known about the neutrino hypothesis, discovery of the neutrino, theory of weak interactions, solar neutrino puzzle, and neutrino oscillation. It then gives a detailed account of practical approaches for study of precision oscillations, neutrino mass and other neutrino properties, sterile neutrinos, and neutrino messengers from space and Earth’s interior.

  2. Neutrino radiation hazards: A paper tiger

    Cossairt, J.D.; Grossman, N.L.; Marshall, E.T.

    1996-09-01

    Neutrinos are present in the natural environment due to terrestrial, solar, and cosmic sources and are also produced at accelerators both incidentally and intentionally as part of physics research programs. Progress in fundamental physics research has led to the creation of beams of neutrinos of ever-increasing intensity and/or energy. The large size and cost associated with these beams attracts, and indeed requires, public interest, support, and some understanding of the 'exotic' particles produced, including the neutrinos. Furthermore, the very word neutrino ('little neutral one', as coined by Enrico Fermi) can lead to public concern due to confusion with 'neutron', a word widely associated with radiological hazards. Adding to such possible concerns is a recent assertion, widely publicized, that neutrinos from astronomical events may have led to the extinction of some biological species. Presented here are methods for conservatively estimating the dose equivalent due to neutrinos as well as an assessment of the possible role of neutrinos in biological extinction processes. It is found that neutrinos produced by the sun and modern particle accelerators produce inconsequential dose equivalent rates. Examining recent calculations concerning neutrinos incident upon the earth due to stellar collapse, it is concluded that it is highly unlikely that these neutrinos caused the mass extinctions of species found in the paleontological record. Neutrino radiation hazards are, then, truly a 'paper tiger'. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  3. A fast chopper for the Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS)

    Madrak, R.; Wildman, D.; /Fermilab; Dymokde-Bradshaw, A.; Hares, J.; Kellett, P.

    2008-10-01

    A fast chopper capable of kicking single 2.5 MeV H-bunches spaced at 325 MHz, at rates greater than 50 MHz is needed for the Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) [1]. Four 1.2 kV fast pulsers, designed and manufactured by Kentech Instruments Ltd., will drive a 0.5 m long meander made from a copper plated ceramic composite. Test results showing pulses from the first 1.2 kV pulser and meander results will be presented.

  4. Measurement of the nucleon structure function in the deep inelastic neutrino-iron scattering with a wide-band neutrino beam

    Flottmann, T.

    1982-01-01

    In this thesis the nucleon structure function xF 3 is determined from the inclusive measurement of the deep inelastic neutrino nucleon charged current interaction. The data were taken in the CERN wide band neutrino beam using the detector of the CERN-Dortmund-Heidelberg-Saclay collaboration. This detector serves at the same time as target, as hadron energy calorimeter and as muon spectrometer. One major aspect of this work was to study the possibility of using high statistics wide band beam data for structure function analysis. The systematic errors specific to this kind of beam are investigated. To obtain the differential cross sections about 100000 neutrino and 75000 antineutrino events in the energy range 20-200 GeV are analysed. The differential cross sections are normalized to the total cross sections, as measured in the narrow band beam by the same collaboration. The calculated structure function xF 3 shows significant deviations from scaling. These scaling violations are compared quantitatively with the predictions of quantum chromodynamics. (orig.) [de

  5. Secondary beam monitors for the NuMI facility at FNAL

    Kopp, S.; Bishai, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Diwan, M.; Erwin, A.R.; Harris, D.A.; Indurthy, D.; Keisler, R.; Kostin, M.; Lang, M.; MacDonald, J.; Marchionni, A.; Mendoza, S.; Morfin, J.; Naples, D.; Northacker, D.; Pavlovic, Z.; Phelps, L.; Ping, H.; Proga, M.; Vellissaris, C.; Viren, B.; Zwaska, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility is a conventional neutrino beam which produces muon neutrinos by focusing a beam of mesons into a long evacuated decay volume. We have built four arrays of ionization chambers to monitor the position and intensity of the hadron and muon beams associated with neutrino production at locations downstream of the decay volume. This article describes the chambers' construction, calibration, and commissioning in the beam

  6. Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report

    Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

    2012-09-05

    Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

  7. Search for heavy neutrino decays in the BEBC beam dump experiment

    Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Haywood, S.J.; Parker, M.A.; Sarkar, S.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Wachsmuth, H.; Barnham, K.W.J.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Talebzadeh, M.; Bostock, P.; Krstic, J.; Graessler, H.

    1985-01-01

    New limits on lepton mixing parameters are derived from a search for decays of heavy neutrinos in a proton beam dump experiment. The limits vertical strokeUsub(μi)vertical stroke 2 , vertical strokeUsub(ei)vertical stroke 2 -6 -10 -7 are obtained for neutrino mass eigenstates νsub(i) of mass between 0.5 and 1.75 GeV, which can be produced through mixing in charmed D meson decays. This is the first such limit on vertical strokeUsub(νi)vertical stroke 2 for neutrino masses greater than 0.5 GeV. For the mass eigenstate ν 3 in particular, we obtain the limits vertical strokeUsub(μ3)vertical stroke 2 -7 -10 -8 . vertical strokeUsub(e3)vertical stroke 2 -9 -10 -10 for the mass range 150-190 MeV, assuming the ν 3 to be produced directly in charmed F meson decays. (orig.)

  8. P-West High Intensity Secondary Beam Area Design Report

    Cox, A.; Currier, R.; Eartly, D.; Guthke, A.; Johnson, G.; Lee, D.; Dram, R.; Villegas, E.; Rest, J.; Tilles, E.; Vander Arend, P.

    1977-03-01

    This report gives the initial design parameters of a 1000 GeV High Intensity Superconducting Secondary Beam Laboratory to be situated in the Proton Area downstream of the existing Proton West experimental station. The area will provide Fermilab with a major capability for experimentation with pion and antiproton beams of intensities and of energies available at no other laboratory and with an electron beam with excellent spot size, intensity, and purity at energies far above that available at electron machines. Detailed beam design, area layouts, and cost estimates are presented, along with the design considerations.

  9. Consideration of fluctuation in secondary beam intensity of heavy ion beam probe measurements

    Fujisawa, A.; Iguchi, H.; Lee, S.; Hamada, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Heavy ion beam probes have capability to detect local electron density fluctuation in the interior of plasmas through the detected beam intensity fluctuation. However, the intensity fluctuation should suffer a certain degree of distortion from electron density and temperature fluctuations on the beam orbits, and as a result the signal can be quite different from the local density fluctuation. This paper will present a condition that the intensity fluctuation can be regarded as being purely local electron density fluctuation, together with discussion about the contamination of the fluctuation along the beam orbits to the beam intensity fluctuation. (author)

  10. Intense relativistic electron beam: generation and propagation

    Mittal, K.C.; Mondal, J.

    2010-01-01

    A general review of relativistic electron beam extracted from explosive field emission diode has been presented here. The beam current in the diode gap taking into account cathode and anode plasma expansion velocity and excluding the self magnetic field effect is directly proportional to gap voltage V 3/2 and inversely proportional to the square of the effective diode gap (d-vt). In the limit of high current, self magnetic field focusing effect comes into play and results in a critical current at which pinching will take place. When the diode current exceeds the critical current, the electron flow is in the para-potential regime. Different diode geometries such as planner, coaxial, rod-pinched, reflex triode are discussed qualitatively. When the beam is injected into a vacuum drift tube the propagation of the beam is only possible in presence of a strong axial magnetic field which prevents the beam expansion in the radial direction. If the beam is injected in the drift tube filled with dense plasma, then the redistribution of the plasma electrons effectively neutralizes the beam space charge, resulting subsequent propagation of the beam along the drift tube. The beam propagation through neutral gas is similar to the plasma filled drift tube. In this case both the neutral gas pressure and the beam current regulate the transmission of the REB. (author)

  11. Particle Identification in the T2K TPCs and study of the electron neutrino component in the T2K neutrino beam

    Giganti, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the work done on the TPCs of the Near Detector of the T2K experiment. T2K is an experiment installed in Japan and its main purpose is the measurement of the last angle of the neutrino mixing matrix, Θ 13 . The other two angles of the matrix have already been measured in the last years, through the phenomenon of the neutrino oscillations, showing that the neutrinos have masses different from zero. The measurement of the missing angle Θ 13 is of fundamental importance for the neutrino physics as, if this angle is different from zero, CP violation in the lepton sector can occur. Up to now only upper limits on the value of Θ 13 exist: the aim of T2K is to measure this angle or to put upper limits on it with a sensitivity 20 times better than the current limit. This measurement will be done measuring the appearance at the far detector, SuperKamiokande, of electron neutrinos in the muon neutrino beam produced at JPARC. The main background to the measurement of Θ 13 is the electron neutrinos produced together with the muon neutrinos in the beam: this component, expected to be of the order of 1% of the total neutrino flux, has to be measured at the T2K Near Detector, before the oscillations. This can be done selecting neutrino interactions in the Near Detector tracker and using the TPC particle identification capabilities to distinguish electrons from muons. This allows to select a sample of electron neutrino interactions and to measure their spectrum at the Near Detector. During this thesis I have developed the methods to perform the particle identification in the TPCs: the method is based on the measurement of the truncated mean of the energy deposited by the charged particles in the gas: at the typical energy of the T2K neutrinos the difference in the deposited energy between muons and electrons is of the order of 40% and for this reason a resolution better than 10% is needed to distinguish the two particles: as we will show in the thesis, with

  12. Longitudinal Schottky noise of intense beam

    Pestrikov, D.V.

    1990-01-01

    Some phenomena, which can be observed in the longitudinal Schottky spectra in storage ring with electron cooling as well as some technical details, which can be useful for the models of fitting are reviewed. Results shows that both the spectra and the power of the Schottky noise of the coasting beam are very sensitive to collective behaviour of the beam. This can be used for fitting of Schottky noise measurements and recalculation of beam parameters, parameters of cooling device. 9 refs.; 4 figs

  13. Conical pinched electron beam diode for intense ion beam source

    Matsukawa, Yoshinobu; Nakagawa, Yoshiro

    1982-01-01

    For the purpose of improvement of the pinched electron beam diode, the production of an ion beam by a diode with electrodes in a conical shape was studied at low voltage operation (--200 kV). The ion beam is emitted from a small region of the diode apex. The mean ion beam current density near the axis at 12 cm from the diode apex is two or three times that from an usual flat parallel diode with the same dimension and impedance. The brightness and the power brightness at the otigin are 450 MA/cm 2 sr and 0.12 TW/cm 2 sr respectively. (author)

  14. Fast wire scanner for intense electron beams

    T. Moore

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a cost-effective, fast rotating wire scanner for use in accelerators where high beam currents would otherwise melt even carbon wires. This new design uses a simple planetary gear setup to rotate a carbon wire, fixed at one end, through the beam at speeds in excess of 20  m/s. We present results from bench tests, as well as transverse beam profile measurements taken at Cornell’s high-brightness energy recovery linac photoinjector, for beam currents up to 35 mA.

  15. Neutrino Interactions

    Kamyshkov, Yuri; Handler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The neutrino group of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville was involved from 05/01/2013 to 04/30/2015 in the neutrino physics research funded by DOE-HEP grant DE-SC0009861. Contributions were made to the Double Chooz nuclear reactor experiment in France where second detector was commissioned during this period and final series of measurements has been started. Although Double Chooz was smaller experimental effort than competitive Daya Bay and RENO experiments, its several advantages make it valuable for understanding of systematic errors in measurements of neutrino oscillations. Double Chooz was the first experiment among competing three that produced initial result for neutrino angle θ_1_3 measurement, giving other experiments the chance to improve measured value statistically. Graduate student Ben Rybolt defended his PhD thesis on the results of Double Chooz experiment in 2015. UT group has fulfilled all the construction and analysis commitments to Double Chooz experiment, and has withdrawn from the collaboration by the end of the mentioned period to start another experiment. Larger effort of UT neutrino group during this period was devoted to the participation in another DOE-HEP project - NOvA experiment. The 14,000-ton 'FAR' neutrino detector was commissioned in northern Minnesota in 2014 together with 300-ton 'NEAR' detector located at Fermilab. Following that, the physics measurement program has started when Fermilab accelerator complex produced the high-intensity neutrino beam propagating through Earth to detector in MInnessota. UT group contributed to NOvA detector construction and developments in several aspects. Our Research Associate Athanasios Hatzikoutelis was managing (Level 3 manager) the construction of the Detector Control System. This work was successfully accomplished in time with the commissioning of the detectors. Group was involved in the development of the on-line software and study of the signatures of the cosmic ray backgrounds

  16. Neutrino Interactions

    Kamyshkov, Yuri [Univ. of Tennesse, Knoxville, TN (United States); Handler, Thomas [Univ. of Tennesse, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-10-24

    The neutrino group of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville was involved from 05/01/2013 to 04/30/2015 in the neutrino physics research funded by DOE-HEP grant DE-SC0009861. Contributions were made to the Double Chooz nuclear reactor experiment in France where second detector was commissioned during this period and final series of measurements has been started. Although Double Chooz was smaller experimental effort than competitive Daya Bay and RENO experiments, its several advantages make it valuable for understanding of systematic errors in measurements of neutrino oscillations. Double Chooz was the first experiment among competing three that produced initial result for neutrino angle θ13 measurement, giving other experiments the chance to improve measured value statistically. Graduate student Ben Rybolt defended his PhD thesis on the results of Double Chooz experiment in 2015. UT group has fulfilled all the construction and analysis commitments to Double Chooz experiment, and has withdrawn from the collaboration by the end of the mentioned period to start another experiment. Larger effort of UT neutrino group during this period was devoted to the participation in another DOE-HEP project - NOvA experiment. The 14,000-ton "FAR" neutrino detector was commissioned in northern Minnesota in 2014 together with 300-ton "NEAR" detector located at Fermilab. Following that, the physics measurement program has started when Fermilab accelerator complex produced the high-intensity neutrino beam propagating through Earth to detector in MInnessota. UT group contributed to NOvA detector construction and developments in several aspects. Our Research Associate Athanasios Hatzikoutelis was managing (Level 3 manager) the construction of the Detector Control System. This work was successfully accomplished in time with the commissioning of the detectors. Group was involved in the development of the on-line software and study of the signatures of the cosmic ray backgrounds

  17. Intense non-relativistic cesium ion beam

    Lampel, M.C.

    1984-02-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has constructed the One Ampere Cesium Injector as a proof of principle source to supply an induction linac with a high charge density and high brightness ion beam. This is studied here. An electron beam probe was developed as the major diagnostic tool for characterizing ion beam space charge. Electron beam probe data inversion is accomplished with the EBEAM code and a parametrically adjusted model radial charge distribution. The longitudinal charge distribution was not derived, although it is possible to do so. The radial charge distribution that is derived reveals an unexpected halo of trapped electrons surrounding the ion beam. A charge fluid theory of the effect of finite electron temperature on the focusing of neutralized ion beams (Nucl. Fus. 21, 529 (1981)) is applied to the problem of the Cesium beam final focus at the end of the injector. It is shown that the theory's predictions and assumptions are consistent with the experimental data, and that it accounts for the observed ion beam radius of approx. 5 cm, and the electron halo, including the determination of an electron Debye length of approx. 10 cm

  18. Issues in Acceleration of A Muon Beam for a Neutrino Factory

    J. Delayen; D. Douglas; L. Harwood; V. Lebedev; C. Leemann; L. Merminga

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a concept for acceleration of a large phase-space, pulsed muon beam from 190 MeV to 50 GeV as part of a collaborative study of the feasibility of a neutrino factory based on in-flight decay of muons. The muon beam's initial energy spread was ∼20% and each bunch has the physical size of a soccer ball. Production of the muons will be quite expensive, so prevention of loss due to scraping or decay is critical. The former drives the system to large apertures and the latter calls for high real-estate-average gradients. The solution to be presented utilizes a 3 GeV linac to capture the beam, a 4-pass recirculating linac to get the beam to 10 GeV, and then a 5-pass linac to get the beam to 50 GeV. Throughout the system, longitudinal dynamics issues far outweighed transverse dynamics issues. This paper focuses on the issues surrounding the choice of superconducting rf structures over copper structures

  19. THERMODYNAMIC INTERACTION OF THE PRIMARY PROTON BEAM WITH A MERCURY JET TARGET AT A NEUTRINO FACTORY SOURCE

    SIMOS, N.; LUDEWIG, H.; KIRK, H.; THIEBERGER, P.; MCDONALD, K.

    2001-01-01

    This paper addresses the thermodynamic interaction of an intense proton beam with the proposed mercury jet target at a neutrino factory or muon collider source, and the consequences of the generated pressure waves on the target integrity. Specifically, a 24 GeV proton beam with approximately 1.6e13 protons per pulse and a pulse length of 2 nanosec will interact with a 1 cm diameter mercury jet within a 20 Tesla magnetic field. In one option, a train of six such proton pulses is to be delivered on target within 2 microsec, in which case the state of the mercury jet following the interaction with each pulse is critical. Using the equation of state for mercury from the SESAME library, in combination with the energy deposition rates calculated the by the hadron interaction code MARS, the induced 3-D pressure field in the target is estimated. The consequent pressure wave propagation and attenuation in the mercury jet is calculated using an ANSYS code transient analysis, and the state of the mercury jet at the time of arrival of the subsequent pulse is assessed. The amplitude of the pressure wave reaching the nozzle that ejects the mercury jet into the magnetic field is estimated and the potential for mechanical damage is addressed

  20. An intense polarized beam by a laser ionization injection

    Ohmori, Chihiro; Hiramatsu, Shigenori; Nakamura, Takeshi.

    1990-12-01

    Accumulation of protons and polarized protons by photo-ionization injection are described. This method consists of (1)producing the neutral hydrogen beam by Lorentz stripping, (2)excitation of the neutral hydrogen beam with a laser, and (3)ionization of the hydrogen beam in the 2P excited state with another laser. When the laser for the excitation is circularly polarized, we can get a polarized proton beam. An ionization efficiency of 98% and a polarization of 80% can be expected by an intense laser beam from a FEL(Free Electron Laser). (author)

  1. Operation of the NuMI Beam Monitoring System

    Zwaska, Robert M.; Indurthy, Dharma; Keisler, Ryan; Kopp, Sacha; Mendoza, Steven; Pavlovich, Zarko; Proga, Marek; Bishai, Mary; Diwan, Milind; Viren, Brett; Harris, Debbie; Marchionni, Alberto; Morfin, Jorge; McDonald, Jeffrey; Naples, Donna; Northacker, David; Erwin, Albert; Ping, Huican; Velissaris, Cristos

    2006-01-01

    The NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) facility produces an intense neutrino beam for experiments. The NuMI Beam Monitoring system consists of four arrays of ion chambers that measure the intensity and distribution of the remnant hadron and tertiary muon beams produced in association with the neutrinos. The ion chambers operate in an environment of high particle fluxes and high radiation

  2. Ablative acceleration of thin foil targets by intense proton beams

    Miyamoto, S.; Ozaki, T.; Imasaki, K.; Higaki, S.; Nakai, S.

    1981-01-01

    A focused proton beam of up to 2 x 10 10 w/cm 2 was obtained using pinch-reflex ion diode connected to Reiden IV generator. Experiments of beam target interaction have been done using thin foil targets. In this power range the interaction was explained classically. The experimental dependence of ablation pressure on proton beam intensity was obtained as P sub(a) = 3 x 10 -3 I sup(0.7) bar (I in w/cm 2 ). (author)

  3. Tolerable Beam Loss at High-Intensity Machines

    Krivosheev, Oleg E.; Mokhov, Nikolai V.

    2000-01-01

    Tolerable beam losses are estimated for high-intensity ring accelerators with proton energy of 3 to 16 GeV. Dependence on beam energy, lattice and magnet geometry is studied via full Monte Carlo MARS14 simulations in lattice elements, shielding, tunnel and surrounding dirt with realistic geometry, materials and magnetic fields

  4. Anomolous, intensity dependent losses in Au(32+) beams

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Ahrens, L.; Calvani, H.

    1997-01-01

    The AGS Booster is a rapid cycling proton and heavy ion synchrotron. Anomolous, intensity dependent losses in Au(32+) beams have been observed in the AGS Booster. No collective signal is expected, or observed, but increasing the number of injected ions decreases the beam lifetime. The loss rates for Au(32+) are compared with those for Au(15+)

  5. Insulating materials resistance in intense radiation beams

    Oproiu, Constantin; Martin, Diana; Scarlat, Florin; Timus, Dan; Brasoveanu, Mirela; Nemtanu, Monica

    2002-01-01

    The paper emphasizes the main changes of the mechanical and electrical properties of some organic insulating materials exposed to accelerated electron beams. These materials are liable to be used in nuclear plants and particle accelerators. The principal mechanical and electrical properties analyzed were: tensile strength, fracture strength, tearing on fracture, dielectric strength, electrical resistivity, dielectric constant and tangent angle of dielectric losses. (authors)

  6. Intense e-beam interaction with matter

    Ritchie, R.H.; Crawford, O.H.

    1984-01-01

    This document describes work done in this period on certain nonlinear processes of potential importance at high energy densities in condensed matter, and on the theory of the electron slowing-down-cascade spectrum engendered in solids by e-beams

  7. Ballistic-neutralized chamber transport of intense heavy ion beams

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Oliver, B.V.; Clark, R.E.; Sharp, W.M.; Friedman, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of intense heavy ion beams propagating in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor chamber are presented. The ballistic-neutralized transport scheme studied uses 4 GeV Pb +1 ion beams injected into a low-density, gas-filled reactor chamber and the beam is ballistically focused onto an ICF target before entering the chamber. Charge and current neutralization of the beam is provided by the low-density background gas. The ballistic-neutralized simulations include stripping of the beam ions as the beam traverses the chamber as well as ionization of the background plasma. In addition, a series of simulations are presented that explore the charge and current neutralization of the ion beam in an evacuated chamber. For this vacuum transport mode, neutralizing electrons are only drawn from sources near the chamber entrance

  8. Neutrino mass

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    Despite intensive experimental work since the neutrino's existence was proposed by Pauli 60 years ago, and its first observation by Reines and Cowan almost 40 years ago, the neutrino's fundamental properties remain elusive. Among those properties are the masses of the three known flavors, properties under charge conjugation, parity and time-reversal, and static and dynamic electromagnetic moments. Mass is perhaps the most fundamental, as it constrains the other properties. The present status of the search for neutrino mass is briefly reviewed

  9. Production of radioactivity in local soil at AGS fast neutrino beam

    Gollon, P.J.; Hauptmann, M.G.; McIntyre, K.; Miltenberger, R.; Naidu, J.

    1984-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has recently decided to construct a new neutrino production target station at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). To determine the environmental impact of this addition, a study is being conducted in the vicinity of the old target area to determine the radiological consequences of operating this experimental facility. Typical BNL soil samples were placed at two locations near an operating target: at right angles to the target and behind thick shielding close to the direction of the incident beam. These samples were used to determine radionuclide production and leaching information. A core was taken from beneath the concrete floor of the old target area and a monitoring well was installed down-gradient of the facility. Preliminary results from all areas of the study are presented along with estimates of the potential environmental impact of the old and new facilities. 9 figures

  10. Search for tau-neutrino interactions in the BEBC beam dump experiment

    Talebzadeh, M.; Guy, J.; Venus, W.; Aderholz, M.; Barnham, K. W. J.; Bostock, P.; Clayton, E. F.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Faccini-Turluer, M. L.; Grässler, H.; Hultquist, K.; Hulth, P. O.; Kreutzmann, H.; Krstic, J.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Myatt, G.; Nellen, B.; Parker, M. A.; Schmitz, N.; Sewell, S.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Vignaud, D.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wittek, W.; Wünsch, B.; BEBC WA66 Collaboration

    A novel and efficient kinematic method is used to estimate the number of ντ charged current interactions with Eν > 20 GeV in the BEBC beam dump experiment. The result, -14±12 ντ events, is consistent with zero. The ratio of D s to D meson production in 400 GeV proton interactions in copper is estimated to be below 0.65 at 90% c.l. The oscillation probability P( νe→ ντ) averaged over the electron-(anti)neutrino spectrum is found to be below 18%. The hypothesis that νe and ντ are identical is excluded by about 6 standard deviations. A remarkable event is described: it contains a muon, a high pT photon and a high pT hadron.

  11. Search for tau-neutrino interactions in the BEBC beam dump experiment

    Talebzadeh, M.; Barnham, K.W.J.; Clayton, E.F.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Guy, J.; Venus, W.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Sewell, S.; Bostock, P.; Krstic, J.; Myatt, G.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.

    1987-01-01

    A novel and efficient kinematic method is used to estimate the number of ν τ charged current interactions with E ν > 20 GeV in the BEBC beam dump experiment. The result, -14±12 ν τ events, is consistent with zero. The ratio of D s to D meson production in 400 GeV proton interactions in copper is estimated to be below 0.65 at 90% c.l. The oscillation probability P(ν c → ν τ ) averaged over the electron-(anti)neutrino spectrum is found to be below 18%. The hypothesis that ν c and ν τ are identical is excluded by about 6 standard deviations. A remarkable event is described: it contains a muon, a high p T photon and a high p T hadron. (orig.)

  12. Charge breeding of intense radioactive beams

    Kester, O

    2001-01-01

    The efficient transformation of radioactive beams by charge breeding devices will critically influence the lay-out of the post accelerator of presently built first generation radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities as well as new second generation facilities. The size of the post-accelerator needed to bring the unstable nuclei to the energies required to study nuclear reactions depends on the charge state of the radioactive ions. The capability to raise that charge state from 1+ to n+, where n may correspond to a charge-to- mass ratio of 0.15 or higher, will therefore produce an enormous reduction in cost as well as the possibility to accelerate heavier masses. Thus the efficiency of the charge breeding scheme in comparison to the stripping scheme will be explored in the frame of the EU-network charge breeding. The two possible charge breeding schemes using either an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) or an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS), the demands to the sources and the present status of existi...

  13. Frontiers in neutrino physics - Transparencies

    Akhmedov, E.; Balantekin, B.; Conrad, J.; Engel, J.; Fogli, G.; Giunti, C.; Espinoza, C.; Lasserre, T.; Lazauskas, R.; Lhuiller, D.; Lindner, M.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Martini, M.; McLaughlin, G.; Mirizzi, A.; Pehlivan, Y.; Petcov, S.; Qian, Y.; Serenelli, A.; Stancu, I.; Surman, R.; Vaananen, D.; Vissani, F.; Vogel, P.

    2012-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the presentations. The purpose of the conference was to discuss the last advances in neutrino physics. The presentations dealt with: -) the measurement of the neutrino velocity, -) neutrino oscillations, -) anomaly in solar models and neutrinos, -) double beta decay, -) self refraction of neutrinos, -) cosmic neutrinos, -) antineutrino spectra from reactors, and -) some aspects of neutrino physics with radioactive ion beams. (A.C.)

  14. Faraday Cup - it is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams.

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    A Faraday Cup is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams. An electrically isolated metallic electrode intercepts the beam and captures all its charges. These charges are integrated using an current sensitive amplifier. When the beam impinges onto the electrode surface low energy electrons are liberated. In order to prevent these electrons from escaping the cup and thus falsifying the measurement, a repeller electrode with negative potential pushes the electrons back onto the electrode.

  15. Ion-beam plasma and propagation of intense compensated ion beams

    Gabovich, M.D.

    1977-01-01

    Discussed are the results of investigation of plasma properties recieved by neutralization of intensive ion beam space charge. Considered is the process of ion beam compensation by charges, formed as a result of gas ionization by this beam or by externally introduced ones. Emphasis is placed on collective phenomena in ion-beam plasma, in particular on non-linear effects limiting amplitude of oscillations. It is shown, that not only dinamic decompensation but the Coulomb collisions of ions with electrons as well as other collective oscillations significantly affects the propagation of compensated ion beams. All the processes are to be taken into account at solving the problem of obtaining ''superdense'' compensated beams

  16. Ion-beam plasma and propagation of intense compensated ion beams

    Gabovich, M D [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Fiziki

    1977-02-01

    Discussed are the results of investigation of plasma properties received by neutralization of intense ion beam space charge. Considered is the process of ion beam compensation by charges, formed as a result of gas ionization by this beam or by externally introduced ones. Emphasis is placed on collective phenomena in ion-beam plasma, in particular on non-linear effects limiting amplitude of oscillations. It is shown that not only dynamic decompensation but the Coulomb collisions of ions with electrons as well as other collective oscillations significantly affects the propagation of compensated ion beams. All the processes are to be taken into account in solving the problem of obtaining ''superdense'' compensated beams.

  17. A transparent vacuum window for high-intensity pulsed beams

    Monteil, M; Veness, R

    2011-01-01

    The HiRadMat (High-Radiation to Materials) facility Ill will allow testing of accelerator components, in particular those of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, under the impact of high-intensity pulsed beams. To reach this intensity range, the beam will be focused on a focal point where the target to be tested is located. A 60 mm aperture vacuum window will separate the vacuum of the beam line which is kept under high vacuum 10(-8) mbar, from the test area which is at atmospheric pressure. This window has to resist collapse due to beam passage. The high-intensity of the beam means that typical materials used for standard vacuum windows (such as stainless steel, aluminium and titanium alloy) cannot endure the energy deposition induced by the beam passage. Therefore, a vacuum window has been designed to maintain the differential pressure whilst resisting collapse due to the beam impact on the window. In this paper, we will present calculations of the energy transfer from beam to window, the design of the ...

  18. Anisotropy-Driven Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    Startsev, Edward; Qin, Hong

    2005-01-01

    In electrically neutral plasmas with strongly anisotropic distribution functions, free energy is available to drive different collective instabilities such as the electrostatic Harris instability and the transverse electromagnetic Weibel instability. Such anisotropies develop naturally in particle accelerators and may lead to a detoriation of beam quality. We have generalized the analysis of the classical Harris and Weibel instabilities to the case of a one-component intense charged particle beam with anisotropic temperature including the important effects of finite transverse geometry and beam space-charge. For a long costing beam, the delta-f particle-in-cell code BEST and the eighenmode code bEASt have been used to determine detailed 3D stability properties over a wide range of temperature anisotropy and beam intensity. A theoretical model is developed which describes the essential features of the linear stage of these instabilities. Both, the simulations and analytical theory, clearly show that moderately...

  19. Pulsed system for obtaining microdosimetric data with high intensity beams

    Zaider, M.; Dicello, J.F.; Hiebert, R.D.

    1977-01-01

    The use of heavy particle accelerators for radiation therapy requires high intensity beams in order to produce useful dose rates. The 800-MeV proton beam at LAMPF passes through different production targets to generate secondary pion beams. Conventional microdosimetric techniques are not applicable under these conditions because exceedingly high count rates result in detector damage, gas breakdown, and saturation effects in the electronics. We describe a new microdosimetric system developed at the Pion Biomedical Channel of LAMPF. The accelerator provides a variable low intensity pulse once every ten high intensity macropulses. The voltage on the detector is pulsed in coincidence with the low intensity pulse so that we were able to operate the detector under optimum data-taking conditions. A low noise two-stage preamplifier was built in connection with the pulsed mode operation. A comparison is made between data obtained in pulsed (high intensity beam) and unpulsed (low intensity beam) modes. The spectra obtained by the two methods agree within the experimental uncertainties

  20. Formation of a laser beam with a doughnut intensity distribution

    Sukhanov, I I; Troitskii, IU V; Iakushkin, S V

    1986-02-01

    The conditions of the simultaneous generation of TEM01 and TEM10 modes forming a beam with a doughnut intensity distribution are investigated. In the case of a complete suppression of the TEM00 mode, the ratio of the intensity at the crest of the ring to the intensity at the ring axis reaches 200 and is limited by dispersion in the optical elements of the resonator. Operation with mutual locking of TEM01 and TEM10 modes has been achieved which is characterized by complete spatial coherence of the ring-shaped beam.

  1. Neutrino sunshine

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    deficit is taken very seriously, and has led to ideas of neutrino oscillations, and oscillation resonances. If the different neutrino varieties - electron, muon and tau - have a mass, then they can oscillate between themselves. A neutrino beam starting off as pure muon-type, for example, would change its composition as it went along. Setting limits on this behaviour is an important objective in neutrino experiments, with 'long baseline' studies - beams covering a long distance between source and detector, playing a vital role. Lincoln Wolfenstein, one of the architects of the new neutrino oscillation scenarios, says 'it is still not clear whether neutrinos have masses or not'. Laboratory experiments try to measure these masses, but so far only upper Unfits have been established. These studies are beginning to reach the limit of their sensitivity and are unlikely to improve drastically. 'But there is indirect evidence,' says Wolfenstein, 'that neutrinos are much lighter.' The solar neutrino problem is really to solar neutrino opportunity,' he continues. Future experiments with gallium and other new neutrino detection techniques, coupled with new high energy neutrino studies, will answer the question

  2. Calculated intensity of high-energy neutron beams

    Mustapha, B.; Nolen, J.A.; Back, B.B.

    2004-01-01

    The flux, energy and angular distributions of high-energy neutrons produced by in-flight spallation and fission of a 400 MeV/A 238 U beam and by the break-up of a 400 MeV/A deuteron beam are calculated. In both cases very intense secondary neutron beams are produced, peaking at zero degrees, with a relatively narrow energy spread. Such secondary neutron beams can be produced with the primary beams from the proposed rare isotope accelerator driver linac. The break-up of a 400 kW deuteron beam on a liquid-lithium target can produce a neutron flux of >10 10 neutrons/cm 2 /s at a distance of 10 m from the target

  3. Intense relativistic electron beam generation from KALI-5000 pulse accelerator

    Roy, A.; Mondal, J.; Mitra, S.; Durga Praveen Kumar, D.; Sharma, Archana; Nagesh, K.V.; Chakravarthy, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    Intense Relativistic Electron Beam (IREB) with parameters 420 keV, 22 kA, 100 ns has been generated from indigenously developed pulse power system KALI- 5000. High current electron beam is generated from explosive field emission graphite cathodes. Studies have been conducted by changing the diameter of graphite cathode and also the anode cathode gap. In order to avoid prepulse effect it was concluded that anode cathode (AK) gap should be kept larger than estimated by the Child Langmuir relation. Beam voltage has been measured by a copper sulphate voltage divider, beam current by a self integrating Rogowski coil and B-dot probe. Electron beam diode Impedance and Perveance were obtained from the experimentally measured beam voltage and current. (author)

  4. Emittance growth due to space charge compensation and beam intensity instabilities in negative ion beams

    C. A. Valerio-Lizarraga

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The need to extract the maximum beam intensity with low transversal emittance often comes with the drawback of operating the ion source to limits where beam current instabilities arise, such fluctuations can change the beam properties producing a mismatch in the following sections of the machine. The space charge compensation (SCC generated by the beam particles colliding with the residual gas reaches a steady state after a build-up time. This paper shows how once in the steady state, the beam ends with a transversal emittance value bigger than the case without compensation. In addition, we study how the beam intensity variation can disturb the SCC dynamics and its impact on the beam properties. The results presented in this work come from 3-D simulations using tracking codes taking into account the secondary ions to estimate the degree of the emittance growth due to space charge and SCC.

  5. Improve beam position stability of SSRF BL15U beamline by using beam intensity feedback

    Li Guoqiang; Liang Dongxu; Yan Fen; Li Aiguo; Yu Xiaohan

    2013-01-01

    Background: The shaking of micro-focus spot in the vertical direction is found during the energy scan experiments, such as XAFS scan. The beam position of vertical direction changes obviously with the energy. Purpose: In order to make the beam position shaking amplitude less than 1/10 of the beam size. Methods: The beam position stability of SSRF BL15U beamline is improved by using beam intensity feedback. The feedback system include beam intensity monitor of the beamline and fine adjust mechanism of pitch 2 (the pitch angle of the second crystal of the double crystal monochromator). The feedback control of the beam position is realized by adjusting the pitch 2 to fix beam intensity at its maximum value. Results: The test results show that the vertical beam vibration below 10 Hz frequency is significantly reduced and also the beam position stability during photon energy scan is improved by more than 5 times. Conclusions: By adopting the new feedback systems, the stability of the beam spot on the specimen stage was dramatically improved which achieved the anticipated target. (authors)

  6. Workshop: Neutrino telescopes

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Despite being the most elusive of the known particles, neutrinos provide vital new physics insights. Most neutrino knowledge so far has come from studies using beams from reactors and accelerators, but in recent years important new contributions have resulted from investigation of natural neutrinos from cosmic rays, nearby stars (the sun), or distant sources, such as the 1987 supernova. The supernova observations marked the start of a new era in neutrino astronomy, but neutrino telescopes were anyway assured of an important ongoing role

  7. Workshop: Neutrino telescopes

    Anon.

    1990-05-15

    Despite being the most elusive of the known particles, neutrinos provide vital new physics insights. Most neutrino knowledge so far has come from studies using beams from reactors and accelerators, but in recent years important new contributions have resulted from investigation of natural neutrinos from cosmic rays, nearby stars (the sun), or distant sources, such as the 1987 supernova. The supernova observations marked the start of a new era in neutrino astronomy, but neutrino telescopes were anyway assured of an important ongoing role.

  8. Working Group Report: Neutrinos

    de Gouvea, A.; Pitts, K.; Scholberg, K.; Zeller, G. P. [et al.

    2013-10-16

    This document represents the response of the Intensity Frontier Neutrino Working Group to the Snowmass charge. We summarize the current status of neutrino physics and identify many exciting future opportunities for studying the properties of neutrinos and for addressing important physics and astrophysics questions with neutrinos.

  9. Preliminary consideration of a double, 480 GeV, fast cycling proton accelerator for production of neutrino beams at Fermilab

    Piekarz, Henryk; Hays, Steven; /Fermilab

    2007-03-01

    We propose to build the DSF-MR (Double Super-Ferric Main Ring), 480 GeV, fast-cycling (2 second repetition rate) two-beam proton accelerator in the Main Ring tunnel of Fermilab. This accelerator design is based on the super-ferric magnet technology developed for the VLHC, and extended recently to the proposed LER injector for the LHC and fast cycling SF-SPS at CERN. The DSF-MR accelerator system will constitute the final stage of the proton source enabling production of two neutrino beams separated by 2 second time period. These beams will be sent alternately to two detectors located at {approx} 3000 km and {approx} 7500 km away from Fermilab. It is expected that combination of the results from these experiments will offer more than 3 order of magnitudes increased sensitivity for detection and measurement of neutrino oscillations with respect to expectations in any current experiment, and thus may truly enable opening the window into the physics beyond the Standard Model. We examine potential sites for the long baseline neutrino detectors accepting beams from Fermilab. The current injection system consisting of 400 MeV Linac, 8 GeV Booster and the Main Injector can be used to accelerate protons to 45 GeV before transferring them to the DSF-MR. The implementation of the DSF-MR will allow for an 8-fold increase in beam power on the neutrino production target. In this note we outline the proposed new arrangement of the Fermilab accelerator complex. We also briefly describe the DSF-MR magnet design and its power supply, and discuss necessary upgrade of the Tevatron RF system for the use with the DSF-MR accelerator. Finally, we outline the required R&D, cost estimate and possible timeline for the implementation of the DSF-MR accelerator.

  10. MINERvA neutrino detector response measured with test beam data

    Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Araujo Del Castillo, C.; Bagby, L.; Bellantoni, L.; Bergan, W.F.; Bodek, A.; Bradford, R.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Butkevich, A.; Martinez Caicedo, D.A.; Carneiro, M.F.; Christy, M.E.; Chvojka, J.; Motta, H. da; Devan, J.

    2015-01-01

    The MINERvA collaboration operated a scaled-down replica of thesolid scintillator tracking and sampling calorimeter regions of the MINERvA detector in a hadron test beam at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. This paper reports measurements with samples of protons, pions, and electrons from 0.35 to 2.0 GeV/c momentum. The calorimetric response to protons, pions, and electrons is obtained from these data. A measurement of the parameter in Birks' law and an estimate of the tracking efficiency are extracted from the proton sample. Overall the data are well described by a Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation of the detector and particle interactions with agreements better than 4% for the calorimetric response, though some features of the data are not precisely modeled. These measurements are used to tune the MINERvA detector simulation and evaluate systematic uncertainties in support of the MINERvA neutrino cross-section measurement program

  11. MINERvA neutrino detector response measured with test beam data

    Aliaga, L. [Department of Physics, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Altinok, O. [Physics Department, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Araujo Del Castillo, C. [Sección Física, Departamento de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Apartado 1761, Lima (Peru); Bagby, L.; Bellantoni, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Bergan, W.F. [Department of Physics, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Bodek, A.; Bradford, R. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Bravar, A. [University of Geneva, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Budd, H. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Butkevich, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Martinez Caicedo, D.A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Carneiro, M.F. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Christy, M.E. [Hampton University, Department of Physics, Hampton, VA 23668 (United States); Chvojka, J. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Motta, H. da [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Devan, J. [Department of Physics, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); and others

    2015-07-21

    The MINERvA collaboration operated a scaled-down replica of thesolid scintillator tracking and sampling calorimeter regions of the MINERvA detector in a hadron test beam at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. This paper reports measurements with samples of protons, pions, and electrons from 0.35 to 2.0 GeV/c momentum. The calorimetric response to protons, pions, and electrons is obtained from these data. A measurement of the parameter in Birks' law and an estimate of the tracking efficiency are extracted from the proton sample. Overall the data are well described by a Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation of the detector and particle interactions with agreements better than 4% for the calorimetric response, though some features of the data are not precisely modeled. These measurements are used to tune the MINERvA detector simulation and evaluate systematic uncertainties in support of the MINERvA neutrino cross-section measurement program.

  12. High Intensity Beam Issues in the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    Aumon, Sandra; Rivkin, Leonid

    This PhD work is about limitations of high intensity proton beams observed in the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) and, in particular, about issues at injection and transition energies. With its 53 years, the CERN PS would have to operate beyond the limit of its performance to match the future requirements. Beam instabilities driven by transverse impedance and aperture restrictions are important issues for the operation and for the High-Luminosity LHC upgrade which foresees an intensity increase delivered by the injectors. The main subject of the thesis concerns the study of a fast transverse instability occurring at transition energy. The proton beams crossing this energy range are particularly sensitive to wake forces because of the slow synchrotron motion. This instability can cause a strong vertical emittance blow-up and severe losses in less than a synchrotron period. Experimental observations show that the particles at the peak density of the beam longitudinal distribution oscillate in the vertical plane du...

  13. Intense positron beam and its application to surface science

    Ito, Y.; Hirose, M.; Kanazawa, I.; Sueoka, O.; Takamura, S.; Okada, S.

    1992-01-01

    Intense pulsed slow positron beam has been produced using the 100 MeV electron LINAC of JAERI · Tokai. In order to use the beam for surface studies such as positron diffraction and positron microscopy, it was transferred from the solenoid magnetic field to field free region and then was brightness-enhanced. The beam size was reduced from 10 mmφ (in the magnetic field) to 0.5 mmφ after two stages of re-moderation. Using the intense brightness-enhanced positron beam we have observed for the first time RHEPD (Reflection High-Energy Positron Diffraction) patterns. A design of re-emission positron microscopy is also described. (author)

  14. CAS course on Intensity Limitations in Particle Beams at CERN

    CERN Accelerator School

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) recently organised a specialised course on Intensity Limitations in Particle Beams, at CERN from 2 to 11 November, 2015.     Many accelerators and storage rings, whether intended for particle physics experiments, synchrotron light sources or industrial applications, require beams of high brightness and the highest possible intensities. A good understanding of the possible limitations is required to achieve the desired performance. This course covered the interaction of beams with their surroundings and with other beams, as well as further collective effects. The lectures on the effects and possible mitigations were complemented by tutorials. The course was very successful, with 66 students representing 14 nationalities attending. Most participants came from European counties, but also from Armenia, China and Russia. Feedback from the participants was positive, reflecting the standard of the lectures and teaching. In addition to the academic pro...

  15. Geometrical theory of nonlinear phase distortion of intense laser beams

    Glaze, J.A.; Hunt, J.T.; Speck, D.R.

    1975-01-01

    Phase distortion arising from whole beam self-focusing of intense laser pulses with arbitrary spatial profiles is treated in the limit of geometrical optics. The constant shape approximation is used to obtain the phase and angular distribution of the geometrical rays in the near field. Conditions for the validity of this approximation are discussed. Geometrical focusing of the aberrated beam is treated for the special case of a beam with axial symmetry. Equations are derived that show both the shift of the focus and the distortion of the intensity distribution that are caused by the nonlinear index of refraction of the optical medium. An illustrative example treats the case of beam distortion in a Nd:Glass amplifier

  16. High intensity beam profile monitors for the LAMPF primary beam lines

    Hoffman, E.W.; Macek, R.J.; van Dyck, O.; Lee, D.; Harvey, A.; Bridge, J.; Cainet, J.

    1979-01-01

    Two types of beam profile monitors are in use at LAMPF to measure the properties of the 800 MeV, 500 μA proton beam external to the linac. Both types use secondary electron emission from a wire to produce a current signal proportional to the amount of proton beam that intercepts the wire. The wire scanner system uses a pair of orthogonal wires which are passed through the beam and the harp system uses two fixed planes of parallel wires. Most of the harps are not retractable and are exposed continuously to the primary beam. The high beam intensities available lead to a number of technical problems for instruments that intercept the beam or are close to primary beam targets. The thermal, electrical, radiation-damage, and material selection problems encountered, and some solutions which have been implemented are discussed

  17. Proposal for an intense slow positron beam facility at PSI

    Waeber, W.B.; Taqqu, D.; Zimmermann, U.; Solt, G.

    1990-05-01

    In the domain of condensed matter physics and materials sciences monoenergetic slow positrons in the form of highest intensity beams are demonstrated to be extreamly useful and considered to be highly needed. This conclusion has been reached and the scientific relevance of the positron probe has been highlighted at an international workshop in November 1989 at PSI, where the state of the art and the international situation on slow positron beams, the fields of application of intense beams and the technical possibilities at PSI for installing intense positron sources have been evaluated. The participants agreed that a high intensity beam as a large-scale user facility at PSI would serve fundamental and applied research. The analysis of responses given by numerous members of a widespread positron community has revealed a large research potential in the domain of solid-state physics, atomic physics and surface, thin-film and defect physics, for example. The excellent feature of slow positron beams to be a suitable probe also for lattice defects near surfaces or interfaces has attracted the interest not only of science but also of industry.In this report we propose the installation of an intense slow positron beam facility at PSI including various beam lines of different qualities and based on the Cyclotron production of β + emitting source material and on a highest efficiency moderation scheme which exceeds standard moderation efficiencies by two orders of magnitude. In its proposed form, the project is estimated to be realizable in the nineties and costs will amount to between 15 and 20 MSFr. (author) 10 figs., 6 tabs., 78 refs

  18. Damping of coherent oscillations in intense ion beams

    Karpov, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Transverse decoherence of a displaced ion bunch is an important phenomenon in synchrotrons and storage rings. An offset can be caused by an injection error after the bunch-to-bucket transfer between synchrotrons or by an externally generated kick. Decoherence results in a transverse emittance blowup, which can cause particle losses and a beam quality degradation. To prevent the beam blowup, a transverse feedback system (TFS) can be used. The damping time should be shorter than the characteristic decoherence time, which can be strongly affected by the interplay of different intensity effects (e.g., space charge and impedances). This thesis describes the development of the analytical models that explain decoherence and emittance growth with chromaticity, space charge, and image charges within the first synchrotron period. The pulsed response function including intensity effects was derived from the model for beam transfer functions. For a coasting beam, the two- dimensional model shows that space charge slows down and above intensity threshold suppresses decoherence. These predictions were confirmed by particle tracking simulations with self-consistent space charge fields. Additionally, halo buildup and losses during decoherence were observed in simulations. These effects were successfully interpreted using a non self-consistent particle-core model. The two-dimensional model was extended to the bunched beams. The simulation results reproduce the analytical predictions. The intensity threshold of decoherence suppression is higher in comparison to a coasting beam, image charges can restore decoherence. In the present work dedicated experiments were performed in the SIS18 synchrotron at GSI Darmstadt and the results were compared with simulations and analytical predictions. The contribution of nonlinearities and image charges is negligible while chromaticity and space charge dominate decoherence. To study the damping efficiency of TFS, a comprehensive TFS module was

  19. Damping of coherent oscillations in intense ion beams

    Karpov, Ivan

    2017-02-06

    Transverse decoherence of a displaced ion bunch is an important phenomenon in synchrotrons and storage rings. An offset can be caused by an injection error after the bunch-to-bucket transfer between synchrotrons or by an externally generated kick. Decoherence results in a transverse emittance blowup, which can cause particle losses and a beam quality degradation. To prevent the beam blowup, a transverse feedback system (TFS) can be used. The damping time should be shorter than the characteristic decoherence time, which can be strongly affected by the interplay of different intensity effects (e.g., space charge and impedances). This thesis describes the development of the analytical models that explain decoherence and emittance growth with chromaticity, space charge, and image charges within the first synchrotron period. The pulsed response function including intensity effects was derived from the model for beam transfer functions. For a coasting beam, the two- dimensional model shows that space charge slows down and above intensity threshold suppresses decoherence. These predictions were confirmed by particle tracking simulations with self-consistent space charge fields. Additionally, halo buildup and losses during decoherence were observed in simulations. These effects were successfully interpreted using a non self-consistent particle-core model. The two-dimensional model was extended to the bunched beams. The simulation results reproduce the analytical predictions. The intensity threshold of decoherence suppression is higher in comparison to a coasting beam, image charges can restore decoherence. In the present work dedicated experiments were performed in the SIS18 synchrotron at GSI Darmstadt and the results were compared with simulations and analytical predictions. The contribution of nonlinearities and image charges is negligible while chromaticity and space charge dominate decoherence. To study the damping efficiency of TFS, a comprehensive TFS module was

  20. Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation searches

    Whitehouse, D.A.; Rameika, R.; Stanton, N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the neutrino oscillation section of the Workshop on Future Directions in Particle and Nuclear Physics at Multi-GeV Hadron Beam Facilities. There were very lively discussions about the merits of the different oscillation channels, experiments, and facilities, but we believe a substantial consensus emerged. First, the next decade is one of great potential for discovery in neutrino physics, but it is also one of great peril. The possibility that neutrino oscillations explain the solar neutrino and atmospheric neutrino experiments, and the indirect evidence that Hot Dark Matter (HDM) in the form of light neutrinos might make up 30% of the mass of the universe, point to areas where accelerator-based experiments could play a crucial role in piecing together the puzzle. At the same time, the field faces a very uncertain future. The LSND experiment at LAMPF is the only funded neutrino oscillation experiment in the United States and it is threatened by the abrupt shutdown of LAMPF proposed for fiscal 1994. The future of neutrino physics at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS depends the continuation of High Energy Physics (HEP) funding after the RHIC startup. Most proposed neutrino oscillation searches at Fermilab depend on the completion of the Main Injector project and on the construction of a new neutrino beamline, which is uncertain at this point. The proposed KAON facility at TRIUMF would provide a neutrino beam similar to that at the AGS but with a much increase intensity. The future of KAON is also uncertain. Despite the difficult obstacles present, there is a real possibility that we are on the verge of understanding the masses and mixings of the neutrinos. The physics importance of such a discovery can not be overstated. The current experimental status and future possibilities are discussed below

  1. Intensity of Upward Muon Flux Due to Cosmic-Ray Neutrinos Produced in the Atmosphere

    Lee, T. D.; Robinson, H.; Schwartz, M.; Cool, R.

    1963-06-01

    Calculations were performed to determine the upward going muon flux leaving the earth's surface after production by cosmic-ray neutrinos in the crust. Only neutrinos produced in the earth's atmosphere are considered. Rates of the order of one per 100 sq m/day might be expected if an intermediate boson exists and has a mass less than 2 Bev. (auth)

  2. Focusing and guiding intense electron beams by a superconductor tube

    Roth, P.

    1996-01-01

    An intense electron beam travelling axially through the opening of a superconductor tube was studied. Model calculations showed that the beam is focused by the superconductor tube when the space-charge effect of the beam electrons is compensated. The tube functions as a lens for electrons injected parallel to the tube axis and also for electrons having a small initial radial velocity component. The electron trajectories were computed, and the focal length of the superconductor tube was estimated. (author). 2 figs., 6 refs

  3. Measurement of extent of intense ion beam charge neutralization

    Engelko, V [Efremov Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Giese, H; Schalk, S [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). INR

    1997-12-31

    Various diagnostic tools were employed to study and optimize the extent of space charge neutralization in the pulsed intense proton beam facility PROFA, comprising Langmuir probes, capacitive probes, and a novel type of the three electrode collector. The latter does not only allow us to measure ion and electron beam current densities in a high magnetic field environment, but also to deduce the density spectrum of the beam electrons. Appropriate operating conditions were identified to attain a complete space charge neutralisation. (author). 5 figs., 4 refs.

  4. Focusing and guiding intense electron beams by a superconductor tube

    Roth, P

    1997-12-31

    An intense electron beam travelling axially through the opening of a superconductor tube was studied. Model calculations showed that the beam is focused by the superconductor tube when the space-charge effect of the beam electrons is compensated. The tube functions as a lens for electrons injected parallel to the tube axis and also for electrons having a small initial radial velocity component. The electron trajectories were computed, and the focal length of the superconductor tube was estimated. (author). 2 figs., 6 refs.

  5. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    BIGI, I.; BOLTON, T.; FORMAGGIO, J.; HARRIS, D.; MORFIN, J.; SPENTZOURIS, P.; YU, J.; KAYSER, B.; KING, B.J.; MCFARLAND, K.; PETROV, A.; SCHELLMAN, H.; VELASCO, M.; SHROCK, R.

    2000-01-01

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters

  6. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    BIGI,I.; BOLTON,T.; FORMAGGIO,J.; HARRIS,D.; MORFIN,J.; SPENTZOURIS,P.; YU,J.; KAYSER,B.; KING,B.J.; MCFARLAND,K.; PETROV,A.; SCHELLMAN,H.; VELASCO,M.; SHROCK,R.

    2000-05-11

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters.

  7. Beam Dynamics in a Muon Ionisation Cooling Channel

    Rogers, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The Neutrino Factory has been proposed as a facility to provide an intense source of neutrinos suitable for the measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters and a possible CP violating phase to unprecedented precision. In the Neutrino Factory, neutrinos are produced by the decay of a muon beam with 20-50 GeV per muon. Initially, the muon beam occupies a large volume in phase space, which must be reduced before the beam can be accelerated. The proposed method to achieve this is to use a solenoidal ionisation colling channel.

  8. Intense ion beam neutralization using underdense background plasma

    Berdanier, William [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Roy, Prabir K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kaganovich, Igor [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Producing an overdense background plasma for neutralization purposes with a density that is high compared to the beam density is not always experimentally possible. We show that even an underdense background plasma with a small relative density can achieve high neutralization of intense ion beam pulses. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we show that if the total plasma electron charge is not sufficient to neutralize the beam charge, electron emitters are necessary for effective neutralization but are not needed if the plasma volume is so large that the total available charge in the electrons exceeds that of the ion beam. Several regimes of possible underdense/tenuous neutralization plasma densities are investigated with and without electron emitters or dense plasma at periphery regions, including the case of electron emitters without plasma, which does not effectively neutralize the beam. Over 95% neutralization is achieved for even very underdense background plasma with plasma density 1/15th the beam density. We compare results of particle-in-cell simulations with an analytic model of neutralization and find close agreement with the particle-in-cell simulations. Further, we show experimental data from the National Drift Compression experiment-II group that verifies the result that underdense plasma can neutralize intense heavy ion beams effectively.

  9. Investigations on transport and storage of high ion beam intensities

    Joshi, Ninad Shrikrishna

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis the intense low energy ion beam transport was investigated. Especially, the beam transport in toroidal magnetic field configurations was discussed, as it may allow the accumulation of high intensive beams in the future. One of the specific tasks is to design an injection system that can be used for the proposed low energy accumulator ring. A simulation code (TBT) was written to describe the particle motion in curved segments. Particle in Cell techniques were utilized to simulate a multi particle dynamics. A possibility of reading an external data file was made available so that a measured distribution can be used to compare simulation results with measured ones. A second order cloud in cell method was used to calculate charge density and in turn to solve Poisson's equation. Further simulations were performed to study the self field effects on beam transport. Experiments were performed to compare the simulation results and gain practical experience. The preparatory experiments consisted of building and characterization of the ion source in a first step. Along with the momentum spectrometer and emittance scanner the beam properties were studied. Low mass ion beams He + and mixed p, H 2+ , H 3+ beams were analyzed. In the second stage, beams were transported through a solenoid and the phase space distribution was measured as a function of the magnetic field for different beam energies. The phase-space as distributions measured in a first stage were simulated backward and then again forward transported through the solenoid. The simulated results were then compared with the measured distribution. The LINTRA transport program was used. The phase-space distribution was further simulated for transport experiments in a toroidal magnetic field. The transport program that was used to simulate the beam in the toroid was also used to design the injection system. The injection system with its special field configurations was designed to perform

  10. Investigations on transport and storage of high ion beam intensities

    Joshi, Ninad Shrikrishna

    2009-08-25

    In the framework of this thesis the intense low energy ion beam transport was investigated. Especially, the beam transport in toroidal magnetic field configurations was discussed, as it may allow the accumulation of high intensive beams in the future. One of the specific tasks is to design an injection system that can be used for the proposed low energy accumulator ring. A simulation code (TBT) was written to describe the particle motion in curved segments. Particle in Cell techniques were utilized to simulate a multi particle dynamics. A possibility of reading an external data file was made available so that a measured distribution can be used to compare simulation results with measured ones. A second order cloud in cell method was used to calculate charge density and in turn to solve Poisson's equation. Further simulations were performed to study the self field effects on beam transport. Experiments were performed to compare the simulation results and gain practical experience. The preparatory experiments consisted of building and characterization of the ion source in a first step. Along with the momentum spectrometer and emittance scanner the beam properties were studied. Low mass ion beams He{sup +} and mixed p, H{sup 2+}, H{sup 3+} beams were analyzed. In the second stage, beams were transported through a solenoid and the phase space distribution was measured as a function of the magnetic field for different beam energies. The phase-space as distributions measured in a first stage were simulated backward and then again forward transported through the solenoid. The simulated results were then compared with the measured distribution. The LINTRA transport program was used. The phase-space distribution was further simulated for transport experiments in a toroidal magnetic field. The transport program that was used to simulate the beam in the toroid was also used to design the injection system. The injection system with its special field configurations was

  11. Generation of an intense ion beam by a pinched relativistic electron beam

    Gilad, P.; Zinamon, Z.

    1976-01-01

    The pinched electron beam of a pulsed electron accelerator is used to generate an intense beam of ions. A foil anode and vacuum drift tube are used. The space charge field of the pinched beam in the tube accelerates ions from the foil anode. Ion currents of 10 kA at a density of 5kA/cm 2 with pulse length of 50 ns are obtained using a 5 kJ, 450 kV, 3 Ω diode. (author)

  12. The Saturne beam measurement system for orbit corrections and high and low intensity beam acceleration

    Degueurce, L.; Nakach, A.; Sole, J.

    1980-07-01

    This paper summarizes the dipolar and multipolar correction system and the main beam diagnostics of Saturne II: wide-band RF electrostatic pick-up electrode for observation of bunches, beam position and tune measurement systems, special electrodes for observation of emittance blow-up when particles cross a resonance line. For low intensity beams, special electrodes and electronics have been developed. All this instrumentation is computer controlled

  13. Application of Beam Diagnostics for Intense Heavy Ion Beams at the GSI UNILAC

    Barth, W; Glatz, J; Groening, L; Richter, S; Yaramishev, S

    2003-01-01

    With the new High Current Injector (HSI) of the GSI UNILAC the beam pulse intensity had been increased by approximately two orders of magnitudes. The HSI was mounted and commissioned in 1999; since this time the UNILAC serves as an injector for the synchrotron SIS, especially for high uranium intensities. Considering the high beam power of up to 1250 kW and the short stopping range for the UNILAC beam energies (≤12 MeV/u), accelerator components could be destroyed, even during a single beam pulse. All diagnostic elements had to be replaced preferably by non-destructive devices. The beam current is mainly measured by beam transformers instead of Faraday cups, beam positions are measured with segmented capacitive pick-ups and secondary beam monitors instead of profile harps. The 24 installed pick-ups are also used to measure intensities, widths and phase of the bunches, as well beam energies by evaluating pick-ups at different positions. The residual gas ionization monitors allow on-line measurements ...

  14. New target solution for a muon collider or a muon-decay neutrino beam facility: The granular waterfall target

    Han-Jie Cai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A new target solution, the granular waterfall target, is proposed here for a muon collider or a muon-decay neutrino beam facility, especially for the moment which adopts a 15 MW continuous-wave (cw superconducting linac. Compared to the mercury jet target, the granular waterfall target works by a much simpler mechanism which can operate with a much more powerful beam, which are indicated by the detailed investigations into the heat depositions and the evaluations of the temperature increases for different target concepts. By varying proton beam kinetic energy and the geometrical parameters of the waterfall target, an overall understanding of the figure of merit concerning muon production for this target concept as the target solutions of the long-baseline neutrino factory and the medium-baseline moment is obtained. With 8 GeV beam energy and the optimal geometrical parameters, the influence on muon yield by adopting different beam-target interaction parameters is explored. Studies and discussions of the design details concerning beam dumping are also presented.

  15. Advances in ion beam intensity at Sandia National Laboratories

    Mehlhorn, T.A.; Bailey, J.E.; Coats, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    In 1993 lithium beam intensities ≥1 TW/cm 2 were achieved and lithium-driven target experiments at the ∼1,400 TW/g level were performed on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) at Sandia National Laboratories. Hohlraum radiation temperatures of up to 60 eV were achieved using this lithium beam. The 1995 Light-Ion ICF Program milestone of achieving a 100 eV radiation temperature in an ion-driven hohlraum will require a lithium beam intensity of 5 ± 1 TW/cm 2 on a 4 mm diameter cylindrical target; this will require both an increase in coupled lithium power and a decrease in total lithium beam divergence. The lithium beam power has been limited to ∼5--6 TW by a so-called ''parasitic load.'' This parasitic current loss in the ion diodes has recently been identified as being carried by ions that are accelerated from plasmas that are formed when high voltage electrons are lost to anodes with many monolayers of hydrocarbon surface contamination. Control of anode and cathode plasmas on the SABRE accelerator using RF-discharge cleaning, anode heating, and cryogenic cooling of the cathode have increased the efficiency of the production of lithium current by a factor of 2--3. A new ion diode incorporating glow discharge cleaning and titanium gettering pumps has been installed in PBFA II and will be tested in December, 1994. Anode heaters should be available in January, 1995. Circuit model calculations indicate that one can more than double the coupled lithium ion power on PBFA II by eliminating the parasitic current. LiF source divergence presently dominates the total beam divergence. Progress in lithium beam focal intensity using diode cleaning techniques coupled with an active lithium source is reported

  16. A measurement of hadron production cross sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino oscillations in the Δm2 about equals 1-eV2 region

    Schmitz, David W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A measurement of hadron production cross-sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the Δm2 ~ 1 eV2} region. This dissertation presents measurements from two different high energy physics experiments with a very strong connection: the Hadron Production (HARP) experiment located at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, and the Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (Mini-BooNE) located at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois.

  17. Neutrino Physics at Drexel

    Lane, Charles [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dolinski, Michelle [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Neilson, Russell [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-07-11

    Our primary goal is to improve the understanding of the properties and interactions of neutrinos. We are pursuing this by means of the DUNE long-baseline and PROSPECT short-baseline neutrino experiments. For DUNE, a neutrino beam from Fermilab will be detected at the SURF facility in South Dakota, with the aim of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy (the mass ordering of neutrino flavors), and a measurement or limit on CP-violation via neutrinos. Our near-term experimental goal is to improve the characterization of the neutrino beam by measurements of muons produced as a byproduct of neutrino beam generation, to quantify the beam composition and flux. The short-range neutrino program has the aim of using the HFIR reactor at Oak Ridge as a neutrino source, with a detector placed nearby to find if there are short-distance oscillations to sterile neutrino flavors, and to resolve the 'reactor neutrino spectral anomaly' which has shown up as an unexplained 'bump' in the neutrino energy spectrum in recent experiments.

  18. Internal dynamics of intense twin beams and their coherence

    Peřina Jr., J.; Haderka, Ondřej; Allevi, A.; Bondani, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, Feb (2016), 1-8, č. článku 22320. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0382 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : dynamics of intense * twin beams * pump-depleted parametric * down-conversion * coherence Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  19. Modulation instability of an intense laser beam in an unmagnetized ...

    The modulation instability of an intense circularly polarized laser beam propagating in an unmagnetized, cold electron–positron–ion plasma is investigated. Adopting a generalized Karpman method, a three-dimensional nonlinear equation is shown to govern the laser field. Then the conditions for modulation instability and ...

  20. Resonant Self-Trapping and Absorption of Intense Bessel Beams

    Fan, J.; Parra, E.; Milchberg, H. M.

    2000-01-01

    We report the observation of resonant self-trapping and enhanced laser-plasma heating resulting from propagation of high intensity Bessel beams in neutral gas. The enhancement in absorption and plasma heating is directly correlated to the spatial trapping of laser radiation. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  1. Hydrodynamics of layer structured targets impinged by intense ion beams

    Davila, J.; Barrero, A.

    1989-01-01

    To minimize the energy loss in the corona outflow, a layer structured spherical hollow shell has been proposed to be used as target in inertial confinement fusion. For ion beam drivers, the major part of the beam energy is absorbed in the middle layer, which is called either absorber or pusher. The outer layer, called tamper, slows down the outward expansion of the absorbed low density region. The materials of the tamper and pusher are usually in the inner layer. The knowledge of the hydrodynamics of the interaction of an intense beam with a structured target is then an essential point in order to achieve break-even conditions in ion-beam fusion. (author) 2 refs., 2 figs

  2. Current density monitor for intense relativistic electron beams

    Fiorito, R.B.; Raleigh, M.; Seltzer, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    We describe a new type of electric probe which is capable of measuring the time-resolved current density profile of a stable, reproducible, high-energy (>4-MeV) high-current (>1-kA) electron beam. The sensing element of this probe is an open-ended but capped-off 50-Ω coaxial line constructed of graphite. The graphite sensor is 4.3 mm in diameter, 6 cm long, and is range thin to the primary beam electrons. The probe produces a signal proportional to the intercepted beam current. When the sensor is scanned radially through the beam during repeated pulses, a curve of signal versus depth of insertion is produced from which the radial current density profile can be determined. Measurements are presented of the profile of the electron beam from the Experimental Test Accelerator (4.5 MeV, 10 kA) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Good agreement is shown between measurements made with this probe and the beam radius as predicted by transport codes. The advantage of the electric probe lies in its ruggedness, simplicity, inherent fast rise time, and low cost. In contrast to other systems it requires no radiation shielding, water cooling, or auxiliary support equipment to operate in an intense beam environment

  3. Dosimetric Uncertainties in Verification of Intensity Modulated Photon Beams

    Jurkovic, S.

    2010-01-01

    The doctoral thesis presents method for the calculation of the compensators' shape to modulate linear accelerators' beams. Characteristic of the method is more strict calculation of the scattered radiation in beams with an inhomogeneous cross-section than it was before. Method could be applied in various clinical situations. It's dosimetric verification was made in phantoms, measuring dose distributions using ionization chambers as well as radiographic film. Therefore, ionization chambers were used for the evaluation of modulator shape and film was used for the evaluation of two-dimensional dose distributions. It is well known that dosimetry of the intensity modulated photon beams is rather complicated regarding inhomogeneity of the dose distribution. The main reason for that is the beam modulator which changes spectral distribution of the beam. Possibility of use different types of detectors for the measurements of dose distributions in modulated photon beams and their accuracy were examined. Small volume ionization chambers, different diodes and amorphus silicon detector and radigraphic film were used. Measured dose distributions were compared between each other as well as with distributions simulated using Monte Carlo particle transport algorithm. In this way the most accurate method for the verification of modulate photon beams is suggested. (author)

  4. Intense Ion Beams for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    Heimbucher, Lynn; Coleman, Joshua Eugene

    2008-01-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K + ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally, comparisons of

  5. Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    Coleman, Joshua Eugene [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K+ ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally

  6. LHC Beam Instrumentation: Beam Position and Intensity Measurements (1/3)

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The LHC is equipped with a full suite of sophisticated beam instrumentation which has been essential for rapid commissioning, the safe increase in total stored beam power and the understanding of machine optics and accelerator physics phenomena. These lectures will introduce these systems and comment on their contributions to the various stages of beam operation. They will include details on: the beam position system and its use for real-time global orbit feedback; the beam loss system and its role in machine protection; total and bunch by bunch intensity measurements; tune measurement and feedback; diagnostics for transverse beam size measurements, abort gap monitoring and longitudinal density measurements. Issues and problems encountered along the way will also be discussed together with the prospect for future upgrades.

  7. Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Inclusive Charged Current Cross Section on Iron using the MINOS Detector

    Loiacono, Laura Jean [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) produces an intense muon neutrino beam used by the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS), a neutrino oscillation experiment, and the Main INjector ExpeRiment v-A, (MINERv A), a neutrino interaction experiment. Absolute neutrino cross sections are determined via σv = N vv , where the numerator is the measured number of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Detector and the denominator is the flux of incident neutrinos. Many past neutrino experiments have measured relative cross sections due to a lack of precise measurements of the incident neutrino flux, normalizing to better established reaction processes, such as quasielastic neutrino-nucleon scattering. But recent measurements of neutrino interactions on nuclear targets have brought to light questions about our understanding of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. In this thesis the vμ inclusive charged current cross section on iron is measured using the MINOS Detector. The MINOS detector consists of alternating planes of steel and scintillator. The MINOS detector is optimized to measure muons produced in charged current vμ interactions. Along with muons, these interactions produce hadronic showers. The neutrino energy is measured from the total energy the particles deposit in the detector. The incident neutrino flux is measured using the muons produced alongside the neutrinos in meson decay. Three ionization chamber monitors located in the downstream portion of the NuMI beamline are used to measure the muon flux and thereby infer the neutrino flux by relation to the underlying pion and kaon meson flux. This thesis describes the muon flux instrumentation in the NuMI beam, its operation over the two year duration of this measurement, and the techniques used to derive the neutrino flux.

  8. Production of intense negative ion beams in magnetically insulated diodes

    Lindenbaum, H.

    1988-01-01

    Production of intense negative ion beams in magnetically insulated diodes was studied in order to develop an understanding of this process by measuring the ion-beam parameters as a function of diode and cathode plasma conditions in different magnetically insulated diodes. A coral diode, a racetrack diode, and an annular diode were used. The UCI APEX pulse line, with a nominal output of 1MV, 140kA, was used under matched conditions with a pulse length of 50 nsec. Negative-ion intensity and divergence were measured with Faraday cups and CR-39 track detectors. Cathode plasma was produced by passive dielectric cathodes and later, by an independent plasma gun. Negative-ion currents had an intensity of a few A/cm 2 with a divergence ranging between a few tenths milliradians for an active TiH 2 plasma gun and 300 milliradians for a passive polyethelene cathode. Negative ions were usually emitted from a few hot spots on the cathode surface. These hot spots are believed to cause transverse electrical fields in the diode gap responsible for the beam divergence. Mass spectrometry measurements showed that the ion beam consists of mainly H - ions when using a polyethelene or a TiH 2 cathodes, and mainly of negative carbon ions when using a carbon cathode

  9. Beam dynamics of mixed high intensity highly charged ion Beams in the Q/A selector

    Zhang, X.H., E-mail: zhangxiaohu@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yuan, Y.J.; Yin, X.J.; Qian, C.; Sun, L.T. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Du, H.; Li, Z.S.; Qiao, J.; Wang, K.D. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhao, H.W.; Xia, J.W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2017-06-11

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators for their advantages in producing high quality intense beams of highly charged ions. However, it exists challenges in the design of the Q/A selection systems for mixed high intensity ion beams to reach sufficient Q/A resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, as the emittance of beam from ECR ion sources is coupled, the matching of phase space to post accelerator, for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities, should be carefully studied. In this paper, the simulation and experimental results of the Q/A selection system at the LECR4 platform are shown. The formation of hollow cross section heavy ion beam at the end of the Q/A selector is revealed. A reasonable interpretation has been proposed, a modified design of the Q/A selection system has been committed for HIRFL-SSC linac injector. The features of the new design including beam simulations and experiment results are also presented.

  10. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state

  11. Pulsed hollow cathode discharge: intense electron beam and filamentary plasma

    Modreanu, Gabriel

    1998-01-01

    This work deals with a transient hollow cathode discharge optimised by a preionization one and providing intense electron beams. It exists a preionization current value for which the pulsed discharge becomes a very straight and bright filament, well collimated on the discharge tube axis for some tenths of centimeters. A remarkable feature of this discharge is that, without internal metallic electrodes very pure plasma could be produced. Using self-biasing by the beam of a Faraday cup placed only few millimeters behind the anode, we deduced the beam electron's distribution function and its temporal behavior for two radial positions, on the axis and 1 millimeter off-axis, respectively. The real advantage of this measurement technique is the transient polarization character, which allows analysis very closely from the electron beam extraction hole. On the other side, using the emission spectroscopy, we have studied the plasma produced in electron beam - gas interaction and deduced the temporal evolution of the electron temperature. The temporal behavior of the filamentary plasma diameter shows a constriction at the last moments of the beam existence, followed by diffusion controlled expansion. The ambipolar diffusion coefficient corresponding to the estimated electron temperature describes quite well this expansion and allows a quantitative interpretation of the measured temperature diminution, with taking into account the preferential fast electrons escape. The analysis of both beam and post-beam plasma phases suggests potential applications of this robust, very reproducible and not expensive discharge also susceptible to be external monitored. The beam - target interaction could be used for PVD, elementary analysis and filamentary or point-like X-ray emission. (author) [fr

  12. Determination of beam polarization from integrated Borrmann intensities

    Staudenmann, J.L.; Horning, R.D.; Murphy, W.J.; Chapman, L.D.; Liedl, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Borrmann effect can be used to determine the extent of beam polarization of any x-ray beam. The method is applicable, without any modification, to any diffractometer equipped with a partial or full Eulerian cradle. It consists of rocking a perfect crystal, in a thick crystal Laue transmission geometry, through the Bragg angle at various values of the azimuthal angle /sub chi/. If the thickness of the perfect crystal is such that μT/sub 0/>10, then it measures directly the polarization of the incident beam. Three different Ge perfect crystals were used to study the amount of polarization of x-rays produced by a MO and a W source, followed by a double crystal graphite monochromator. A 180 0 periodicity in the integrated intensity, as a function of /sub chi/, is observed; the periodic extremes show the extent of beam polarization. Anomalously transmitted integrated intensity ratios between parallel (σ-component) and perpendicular (π-component) scanning directions, with respect to the scattering plane, are used to characterize the polarization since they are quite insensitive to beam divergences, whereas the corresponding peak height radius show very important beam divergence effects. Also, the polarization properties of graphite monochromators can be related to those of a perfect crystal if the (002) lattice planes are used for any excitation line of the W-anode. This is due to the polarization contribution of the intense white radiation spectrum superimposed on that of the line. On the other hand, the same spectrum impinging on the (004) lattice planes produce polarization properties closer to that of the ideally mosaic crystal

  13. Beam halo in high-intensity hadron linacs

    Gerigk, F

    2006-12-21

    This document aims to cover the most relevant mechanisms for the development of beam halo in high-intensity hadron linacs. The introduction outlines the various applications of high-intensity linacs and it will explain why, in the case of the CERN Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) study a linac was chosen to provide a high-power beam, rather than a different kind of accelerator. The basic equations, needed for the understanding of halo development are derived and employed to study the effects of initial and distributed mismatch on high-current beams. The basic concepts of the particle-core model, envelope modes, parametric resonances, the free-energy approach, and the idea of core-core resonances are introduced and extended to study beams in realistic linac lattices. The approach taken is to study the behavior of beams not only in simplified theoretical focusing structures but to highlight the beam dynamics in realistic accelerators. All effects which are described and derived with simplified analytic models, are tested in realistic lattices and are thus related to observable effects in linear accelerators. This approach involves the use of high-performance particle tracking codes, which are needed to simulate the behavior of the outermost particles in distributions of up to 100 million macro particles. In the end a set of design rules are established and their impact on the design of a typical high-intensity machine, the CERN SPL, is shown. The examples given in this document refer to two different design evolutions of the SPL study: the first conceptual design report (SPL I) and the second conceptual design report (SPL II). (orig.)

  14. Intensity modulated tangential beam irradiation of the intact breast

    Hong, L.; Hunt, M.; Chui, C.; Forster, K.; Lee, H.; Lutz, W.; Yahalom, J.; Kutcher, G.J.; McCormick, B.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential benefits of intensity modulated tangential beams in the irradiation of the intact breast. The primary goal was to develop an intensity modulated treatment which would substantially decrease the dose to coronary arteries, lung and contralateral breast while still using a standard tangential beam arrangement. Improved target dose homogeneity, within the limits imposed by opposed fields, was also desired. Since a major goal of the study was the development of a technique which was practical for use on a large population of patients, the design of 'standard' intensity profiles analogous in function to conventional wedges was also investigated. Materials and Methods: Three dimensional treatment planning was performed using both conventional and intensity modulated tangential beams. Plans were developed for both the right and left breast for a range of patient sizes and shapes. For each patient, PTV, lung, heart, origin and peripheral branches of the coronary artery, and contralateral breast were contoured. Optimum tangential beam direction and shape were designed using Beams-Eye-View display and then used for both the conventional and intensity modulated plans. For the conventional plan, the optimum wedge combination and beam weighting were chosen based on the dose distribution in a single transverse plane through the field center. Intensity modulated plans were designed using an algorithm which allows the user to specify the prescribed, maximum and minimum acceptable doses and dose volume constraints for each organ of interest. Plans were compared using multiple dose distributions and DVHs. Results: Significant improvements in the doses to critical structures were achieved using the intensity modulated plan. Coronary artery dose decreased substantially for patients treated to the left breast. Ipsilateral lung and contralateral breast doses decreased for all patients. For one patient treated to

  15. Performance of GEM detectors in high intensity particle beams

    Bachmann, S; Ketzer, B; Deutel, M; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Bondar, A E; Buzulutskov, A F; Shekhtman, L I; Sokolov, A; Tatarinov, A A; Vasilev, A; Kappler, S; Schulte, E C

    2001-01-01

    We describe extensive tests of Double GEM and Triple GEM detectors, including full size prototypes for the COMPASS experiment, exposed to high intensity muon, proton and pion beams at the Paul~Scherrer Institute and at CERN. The measurements aim at detecting problems possible under these operation conditions, the main concern being the occurrence of discharges induced by beam particles. Results on the dependence of the probability for induced discharges on the experimental environment are presented and discussed. Implications for the application of GEM~detectors in experiments at high luminosity colliders are illustrated.

  16. Neutrino-argon interactions in the T2K near detector

    Koch, Lukas; Radermacher, Thomas; Roth, Stefan; Steinmann, Jochen [III. Physikalisches Institut B, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The T2K near detector employs three large, argon-filled TPCs with a total fiducial volume of about 10 m{sup 3} at ambient pressure. These TPCs have been exposed to the intense T2K muon-neutrino beam since the start of the experiment. The beam has a mean neutrino energy of 600 MeV and so far, data corresponding to over 6 . 10{sup 20}(4 . 10{sup 20}) protons on target was recorded in neutrino (anti-neutrino) mode. We expect about 600 charged current neutrino-argon interactions in the data. That enables us to do the world's first neutrino-Argon cross section measurement in gaseous argon, thus making an important contribution to constraining nuclear interaction models for future neutrino oscillation measurements. This talk describes the physics goals and present the current status of the analysis.

  17. Relativistic electron beam - plasma interaction with intense self-fields

    Davidson, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The major interest in the equilibrium, stability and radiation properties of relativistic electron beams and in beam-plasma interactions originates from several diverse research areas. It is well known that a many-body collection of charged particles in which there is not overall charge neutrality and/or current neutrality can be characterized by intense self-electric fields and/or self-magnetic fields. Moreover, the intense equilibrium self-fields associated with the lack of charge neutrality and/or current neutrality can have a large effect on particle trajectories and on detailed equilibrium and stability behavior. The main emphasis in Sections 9.1.2-9.1.5 of this chapter is placed on investigations of the important influence of self-fields on the equilibrium and stability properties of magnetically confined electron beam-plasma systems. Atomic processes and discrete particle interactions (binary collisions) are omitted from the analysis, and collective processes are assumed to dominate on the time and length scales of interest. Moreover, both macroscopic (Section 9.1.2) and kinetic (Sections 9.1.3-9.1.5) theoretical models are developed and used to investigate equilibrium and stability properties in straight cylindrical geometry. Several of the classical waves and instabilities characteristic of nonneutral plasmas and beam-plasma systems are analyzed in Sections 9.1.2-9.1.5, including stable surface oscillation on a nonneutral electron beam, the ion resonance instability, the diocotron instability, two-stream instabilities between beam electrons and plasma electrons and between beam electrons and plasma ions, the filamentation instability, the modified two-stream instability, etc

  18. A Study of Charged Current Single Charged Pion Productions on Carbon in a Few-GeV Neutrino Beam

    Hiraide, Katsuki [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2009-01-01

    Understanding single charged pion production via neutrino-nucleus charged current interaction in the neutrino energy region of a few GeV is essential for future neutrino oscillation experiments since this process is a dominant background for vμ → vx oscillation measurements. There are two contributions to this process: single pion production via baryonic resonance (vμN → μ-+) and coherent pion production interacting with the entire nucleus (vμA → μ-+), where N is nucleon in the nucleus and A is the nucleus. The purpose of the study presented in this thesis is a precise measurement of charged current single charged pion productions, resonant and coherent pion productions, with a good final state separation in the neutrino energy region of a few GeV. In this thesis, we focus on the study of charged current coherent pion production from muon neutrinos scattering on carbon, vμ 12C → μ-12+, in the SciBooNE experiment. This is motivated by the fact that without measuring this component first, the precise determination of resonant pion production cross section can not be achieved since the contribution of coherent pion production in the region of small muon scattering angle is not small. Furthermore, the coherent process is particularly interesting because it is deeply rooted in fundamental physics via Adler's partially conserved axial-vector current theorem. We took data from June 2007 until August 2008, in both the neutrino and antineutrino beam. In total, 2.52 x 1020 protons on target were collected. We have performed a search for charged current coherent pion production by using SciBooNE's full neutrino data set, corresponding to 0.99 x 1020 protons on target. No evidence for coherent pion production is observed. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the cross section ratio

  19. Accelerator and Technical Sector Seminar: Future neutrino facilities: the neutrino factory

    2012-01-01

    Thursday 19.January 2012 at 14:15  -  IT Auditorium (bldg. 31 3-004) Future neutrino facilities: the neutrino factory by Gersende Prior / University of Geneva and CERN EN/MEF The neutrino factory is one of the proposed designs for a future intense neutrino beam facility. In its current layout, a high-power proton beam impinges on an Hg jet target producing pions, decaying in turn into muons. In order to reduce the particle beam emittance, the muon transverse momentum is reduced through ionization cooling by a technically demanding set-up made of closely-packed RF cavities alternating with absorbers. In this talk I will present the motivation for building an intense neutrino beam and some of the proposed neutrino facilities' design. I will discuss the challenges inherent to the cooling of muons, possible optimization of the current baseline and the on-going R&D. ________________ ATS Seminars Organisers: H. Burkhardt (BE), S. Sgobba (EN), G. deRijk (TE)

  20. LHC Report: 25 ns spacing yields record beam intensity

    The LHC team

    2012-01-01

    Over the weekend the LHC broke two records: a record number of 2,748 proton bunches were injected into the accelerator giving a record beam intensity of around 2.7 x 1014 protons in both beams. These beams have yet to face the challenge of "ramping" to high energy.   These very good results were made possible by a new beam configuration: the design value of 25 nanosecond spacing between proton bunches replaced - for the first time – the typical 50 nanosecond spacing. This test run was done at 450 GeV with no collisions. Up to now, the LHC has been running with around 1,380 bunches with 50 nanoseconds between bunches. By going to 25 nanoseconds, the LHC operations team can double the number of bunches to around 2,800. One of the main limitations for this mode of operation is the so-called electron cloud (see Bulletin 15-16/2011) that is strongly enhanced by the reduced spacing among bunches.  The electron cloud has nasty effects on the beam (beam size increase...

  1. Thermal equilibrium properties of an intense relativistic electron beam

    Davidson, R.C.; Uhm, H.S.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal equilibrium properties of an intense relativistic electron beam with distribution function f 0 /sub b/=Z -1 /sub b/exp[-(H-β/sub b/cP/sub z/-ω/sub b/P/sub theta/) /T] are investigated. This choice of f 0 /sub b/ allows for a mean azimuthal rotation of the beam electrons (when ω/sub b/not =0), and corresponds to an important generalization of the distribution function first analyzed by Bennett. Beam equilibrium properties, including axial velocity profile V 0 /sub z/b(r), azimuthal velocity profile V 0 /sub thetab/(r), beam temperature profile T 0 /sub b/(r), beam density profile n 0 /sub b/(r), and equilibrium self-field profiles, are calculated for a broad range of system parameters. For appropriate choice of beam rotation velocity ω/sub b/, it is found that radially confined equilibrium solutions [with n 0 /sub b/(r→infinity) =0] exist even in the absence of a partially neutralizing ion background that weakens the repulsive space-charge force. The necessary and sufficient conditions for radially confined equilibria are ω - /sub b/ + /sub b/ for 0 2 /sub b/p /ω 2 /sub b/c) (1-f-β 2 /sub b/) 2 /sub b/p/ω 2 /sub b/c) (1-f-β 2 /sub b/) <0

  2. Again on neutrino oscillations

    Bilenky, S.M.; Pontecorvo, B.

    1976-01-01

    The general case is treated of a weak interaction theory in which a term violating lepton charges is present. In such a scheme the particles with definite masses are Majorana neutrinos (2N if in the weak interaction participate N four-component neutrinos). Neutrino oscillations are discussed and it is shown that the minimum average intensity at the earth of solar neutrinos is 1/2N of the intensity expected when oscillations are absent

  3. Neutrino hierarchy from CP-blind observables with high density magnetized detectors

    Donini, A.; Fernandez-Martinez, E.; Rigolin, S.; Migliozzi, P.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Selvi, M.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Terranova, F.

    2008-01-01

    High density magnetized detectors are well suited to exploit the outstanding purity and intensities of novel neutrino sources like neutrino factories and beta beams. They can also provide independent measurements of leptonic mixing parameters through the observation of atmospheric muon-neutrinos. In this paper, we discuss the combination of these observables from a multi-kT iron detector and a high energy beta beam; in particular, we demonstrate that even with moderate detector granularities the neutrino mass hierarchy can be determined for θ 13 values greater than 4 . (orig.)

  4. Gaussian representation of high-intensity focused ultrasound beams.

    Soneson, Joshua E; Myers, Matthew R

    2007-11-01

    A method for fast numerical simulation of high-intensity focused ultrasound beams is derived. The method is based on the frequency-domain representation of the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation, and assumes for each harmonic a Gaussian transverse pressure distribution at all distances from the transducer face. The beamwidths of the harmonics are constrained to vary inversely with the square root of the harmonic number, and as such this method may be viewed as an extension of a quasilinear approximation. The technique is capable of determining pressure or intensity fields of moderately nonlinear high-intensity focused ultrasound beams in water or biological tissue, usually requiring less than a minute of computer time on a modern workstation. Moreover, this method is particularly well suited to high-gain simulations since, unlike traditional finite-difference methods, it is not subject to resolution limitations in the transverse direction. Results are shown to be in reasonable agreement with numerical solutions of the full KZK equation in both tissue and water for moderately nonlinear beams.

  5. Beam Dynamics Studies and the Design, Fabrication and Testing of Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity for High Intensity Proton Accelerator

    Saini, Arun [Univ. of Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2012-03-01

    The application horizon of particle accelerators has been widening significantly in recent decades. Where large accelerators have traditionally been the tools of the trade for high-energy nuclear and particle physics, applications in the last decade have grown to include large-scale accelerators like synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron sources. Applications like generation of rare isotopes, transmutation of nuclear reactor waste, sub-critical nuclear power, generation of neutrino beams etc. are next area of investigation for accelerator scientific community all over the world. Such applications require high beam power in the range of few mega-watts (MW). One such high intensity proton beam facility is proposed at Fermilab, Batavia, US, named as Project-X. Project-X facility is based on H- linear accelerator (linac), which will operate in continuous wave (CW) mode and accelerate H- ion beam with average current of 1 mA from kinetic energy of 2.5 MeV to 3 GeV to deliver 3MW beam power. One of the most challenging tasks of the Project-X facility is to have a robust design of the CW linac which can provide high quality beam to several experiments simultaneously. Hence a careful design of linac is important to achieve this objective.

  6. Measurement of electron neutrino appearance with the MINOS experiment

    Boehm, Joshua Adam Alpern

    2009-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline two-detector neutrino oscillation experiment that uses a high intensity muon neutrino beam to investigate the phenomena of neutrino oscillations. By measuring the neutrino interactions in a detector near the neutrino source and again 735 km away from the production site, it is possible to probe the parameters governing neutrino oscillation. The majority of the ν μ oscillate to ν τ but a small fraction may oscillate instead to ν e . This thesis presents a measurement of the ν e appearance rate in the MINOS far detector using the first two years of exposure. Methods for constraining the far detector backgrounds using the near detector measurements is discussed and a technique for estimating the uncertainty on the background and signal selection are developed. A 1.6σ excess over the expected background rate is found providing a hint of ν e appearance.

  7. Intensity-modulated tangential beam irradiation of the intact breast

    Hong, L.; Hunt, M.; Chui, C.; Spirou, S.; Forster, K.; Lee, H.; Yahalom, J.; Kutcher, G.J.; McCormick, B.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential benefits of intensity modulated tangential beams in the irradiation of the intact breast. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional treatment planning was performed on five left and five right breasts using standard wedged and intensity modulated (IM) tangential beams. Optimal beam parameters were chosen using beams-eye-view display. For the standard plans, the optimal wedge angles were chosen based on dose distributions in the central plane calculated without inhomogeneity corrections, according to our standard protocol. Intensity-modulated plans were generated using an inverse planning algorithm and a standard set of target and critical structure optimization criteria. Plans were compared using multiple dose distributions and dose volume histograms for the planning target volume (PTV), ipsilateral lung, coronary arteries, and contralateral breast. Results: Significant improvements in the doses to critical structures were achieved using intensity modulation. Compared with a standard-wedged plan prescribed to 46 Gy, the dose from the IM plan encompassing 20% of the coronary artery region decreased by 25% (from 36 to 27 Gy) for patients treated to the left breast; the mean dose to the contralateral breast decreased by 42% (from 1.2 to 0.7 Gy); the ipsilateral lung volume receiving more than 46 Gy decreased by 30% (from 10% to 7%); the volume of surrounding soft tissue receiving more than 46 Gy decreased by 31% (from 48% to 33%). Dose homogeneity within the target volume improved greatest in the superior and inferior regions of the breast (approximately 8%), although some decrease in the medial and lateral high-dose regions (approximately 4%) was also observed. Conclusion: Intensity modulation with a standard tangential beam arrangement significantly reduces the dose to the coronary arteries, ipsilateral lung, contralateral breast, and surrounding soft tissues. Improvements in dose homogeneity throughout the target volume can also be

  8. Galactic neutrino communication

    Learned, John G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2505 Correa Road, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)], E-mail: jgl@phys.hawaii.edu; Pakvasa, Sandip [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2505 Correa Road, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)], E-mail: pakvasa@phys.hawaii.edu; Zee, A. [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)], E-mail: zee@kitp.ucsb.edu

    2009-01-12

    We examine the possibility to employ neutrinos to communicate within the galaxy. We discuss various issues associated with transmission and reception, and suggest that the resonant neutrino energy near 6.3 PeV may be most appropriate. In one scheme we propose to make Z deg. particles in an overtaking e{sup +}-e{sup -} collider such that the resulting decay neutrinos are near the W{sup -} resonance on electrons in the laboratory. Information is encoded via time structure of the beam. In another scheme we propose to use a 30 PeV pion accelerator to create neutrino or anti-neutrino beams. The latter encodes information via the beam CP state as well as timing. Moreover the latter beam requires far less power, and can be accomplished with presently foreseeable technology. Such signals from an advanced civilization, should they exist, will be eminently detectable in existing neutrino detectors.

  9. Relativistic focusing and ponderomotive channeling of intense laser beams

    Hafizi, B.; Ting, A.; Sprangle, P.; Hubbard, R. F.

    2000-01-01

    The ponderomotive force associated with an intense laser beam expels electrons radially and can lead to cavitation in plasma. Relativistic effects as well as ponderomotive expulsion of electrons modify the refractive index. An envelope equation for the laser spot size is derived, using the source-dependent expansion method with Laguerre-Gaussian eigenfunctions, and reduced to quadrature. The envelope equation is valid for arbitrary laser intensity within the long pulse, quasistatic approximation and neglects instabilities. Solutions of the envelope equation are discussed in terms of an effective potential for the laser spot size. An analytical expression for the effective potential is given. For laser powers exceeding the critical power for relativistic self-focusing the analysis indicates that a significant contraction of the spot size and a corresponding increase in intensity is possible. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  10. Thermal management of magnetic focussing horns used in the narrow and broad band neutrino beams at the AGS

    Leonhardt, W.; Carroll, A.; Monaghan, R.

    1987-01-01

    Operation of the AGS Neutrino Horns and their internal and external targets takes place in an environment of high voltage, severe shock and vibration, and high radiation. To insure reliable operation, energy from Joulean heating and the proton beam interaction must be dissipated to keep component temperatures at the lowest levels practical. This has been accomplished by carefully choosing component materials and providing dedicated air and water cooling systems to transfer the 6 kW of heat efficiently and safely to the environment. This paper describes how the rigid horn and target thermal design constraints were satisfied, and provides some record of the current operating experience

  11. Modeling nitrogen plasmas produced by intense electron beams

    Angus, J. R.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Schumer, J. W.; Hinshelwood, D. D. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Mosher, D.; Ottinger, P. F. [Independent contractors for NRL through Engility, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia 22314 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    A new gas–chemistry model is presented to treat the breakdown of a nitrogen gas with pressures on the order of 1 Torr from intense electron beams with current densities on the order of 10 kA/cm{sup 2} and pulse durations on the order of 100 ns. For these parameter regimes, the gas transitions from a weakly ionized molecular state to a strongly ionized atomic state on the time scale of the beam pulse. The model is coupled to a 0D–circuit model using the rigid–beam approximation that can be driven by specifying the time and spatial profiles of the beam pulse. Simulation results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the line–integrated electron density from experiments done using the Gamble II generator at the Naval Research Laboratory. It is found that the species are mostly in the ground and metastable states during the atomic phase, but that ionization proceeds predominantly through thermal ionization of optically allowed states with excitation energies close to the ionization limit.

  12. Bipolar pulse generator for intense pulsed ion beam accelerator

    Ito, H.; Igawa, K.; Kitamura, I.; Masugata, K.

    2007-01-01

    A new type of pulsed ion beam accelerator named ''bipolar pulse accelerator'' (BPA) has been proposed in order to improve the purity of intense pulsed ion beams. To confirm the principle of the BPA, we developed a bipolar pulse generator for the bipolar pulse experiment, which consists of a Marx generator and a pulse forming line (PFL) with a rail gap switch on its end. In this article, we report the first experimental result of the bipolar pulse and evaluate the electrical characteristics of the bipolar pulse generator. When the bipolar pulse generator was operated at 70% of the full charge condition of the PFL, the bipolar pulse with the first (-138 kV, 72 ns) and the second pulse (+130 kV, 70 ns) was successfully obtained. The evaluation of the electrical characteristics indicates that the developed generator can produce the bipolar pulse with fast rise time and sharp reversing time

  13. High intensity negative proton beams from a SNICS ion source

    Evans, C.R.; Hollander, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    For the past year we have been involved in a project to develop an intense (> 100μA) negative proton beam from a SNICS (Source of Negative Ions by Cesium Sputtering) ion source. This report will cover how we accomplished and exceeded this goal by more than 40%. Included in these observations will be the following: A description of an effective method for making titanium hydride cathodes. How to overcome the limitations of the titanium hydride cathode. The modification of the SNICS source to improve output; including the installation of the conical ionizer and the gas cathode. A discussion of problems including: poisoning the proton beam with oxygen, alternative gas cathode materials, the clogging of the gas inlet, long burn-in times, and limited cathode life times. Finally, how to optimize source performance when using a gas cathode, and what is the mechanism by which a gas cathode operates; facts, fantasies, or myth

  14. Progress of the intense positron beam project EPOS

    Krause-Rehberg, R.; Brauer, G.; Jungmann, M.; Krille, A.; Rogov, A.; Noack, K.

    2008-01-01

    EPOS (the ELBE POsitron Source) is a running project to build an intense, bunched positron beam for materials research. It makes use of the bunched electron beam of the ELBE radiation source (Electron Linac with high Brilliance and low Emittance) at the Research Centre Dresden-Rossendorf (40 MeV, 1 mA). ELBE has unique timing properties, the bunch length is <5 ps and the repetition time is 77 ns. In contrast to other Linacs made for Free Electron Lasers (e.g., TTF at DESY, Hamburg), ELBE can be operated in full cw-mode, i.e., with an uninterrupted sequence of bunches. The article continues an earlier publication. It concentrates on details of the timing system and describes issues of radiation protection

  15. Inertial Fusion Driven By Intense Heavy-Ion Beams

    Sharp, W.M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Dorf, M.A.; Lund, S.M.; Perkins, L.J.; Terry, M.R.; Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J.Y.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Lidia, S.M.; Ni, P.A.; Reginato, L.L.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Takakuwa, J.H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R.A.; Koniges, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  16. Two-dimensional computer simulation of high intensity proton beams

    Lapostolle, Pierre M

    1972-01-01

    A computer program has been developed which simulates the two- dimensional transverse behaviour of a proton beam in a focusing channel. The model is represented by an assembly of a few thousand 'superparticles' acted upon by their own self-consistent electric field and an external focusing force. The evolution of the system is computed stepwise in time by successively solving Poisson's equation and Newton's law of motion. Fast Fourier transform techniques are used for speed in the solution of Poisson's equation, while extensive area weighting is utilized for the accurate evaluation of electric field components. A computer experiment has been performed on the CERN CDC 6600 computer to study the nonlinear behaviour of an intense beam in phase space, showing under certain circumstances a filamentation due to space charge and an apparent emittance growth. (14 refs).

  17. Fast damping in mismatched high intensity beam transportation

    V. Variale

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available A very fast damping of beam envelope oscillation amplitudes was recently observed in simulations of high intensity beam transport, through periodic FODO cells, in mismatched conditions [V. Variale, Nuovo Cimento Soc. Ital. Fis. 112A, 1571–1582 (1999 and T. Clauser et al., in Proceedings of the Particle Accelerator Conference, New York, 1999 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1999, p. 1779]. A Landau damping mechanism was proposed at the origin of observed effect. In this paper, to further investigate the source of this fast damping, extensive simulations have been carried out. The results presented here support the interpretation of the mechanism at the origin of the fast damping as a Landau damping effect.

  18. Scientific Opportunities with the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment

    Adams, C.; et al.

    2013-07-28

    In this document, we describe the wealth of science opportunities and capabilities of LBNE, the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment. LBNE has been developed to provide a unique and compelling program for the exploration of key questions at the forefront of particle physics. Chief among the discovery opportunities are observation of CP symmetry violation in neutrino mixing, resolution of the neutrino mass hierarchy, determination of maximal or near-maximal mixing in neutrinos, searches for nucleon decay signatures, and detailed studies of neutrino bursts from galactic supernovae. To fulfill these and other goals as a world-class facility, LBNE is conceived around four central components: (1) a new, intense wide-band neutrino source at Fermilab, (2) a fine-grained `near' neutrino detector just downstream of the source, (3) the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota at an optimal distance (~1300 km) from the neutrino source, and (4) a massive liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) deployed there as a 'far' detector. The facilities envisioned are expected to enable many other science opportunities due to the high event rates and excellent detector resolution from beam neutrinos in the near detector and atmospheric neutrinos in the far detector. This is a mature, well developed, world class experiment whose relevance, importance, and probability of unearthing critical and exciting physics has increased with time.

  19. Dosimetric comparison between intensity modulated brachytherapy versus external beam intensity modulated radiotherapy for cervix cancer: a treatment planning study

    Subramani, V.; Sharma, D.N.; Jothy Basu, K.S.; Rath, G.K.; Gopishankar, N.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the dosimetric superiority of intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) based on inverse planning optimization technique with classical brachytherapy optimization and also with external beam intensity modulated radiotherapy planning technique in patients of cervical carcinoma

  20. Experimental study of intensive electron beam scattering in melting channel

    Balagura, V.S.; Kurilko, V.I.; Safronov, B.G.

    1988-01-01

    Multiple scattering of an intensive electron beam at 28 keV energy passing through a melting channel in iron targets is experimentally studied. The dependence of scattering on the melting current value is established. The material density in the channel on the basis of the binary collision method is evaluated. It is shown that these density values are of three orders less than the estimations made on the basis of the data on energy losses of electrons in the channel. 6 refs.; 4 figs

  1. A high intensity positron beam at the Brookhaven reactor

    Weber, M.; Lynn, K.G.; Roellig, L.O.; Mills, A.P. Jr.; Moodenbaugh, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a high intensity, low energy positron beam utilizing high specific activity /sup 64/Cu sources (870 Ci/g) produced in a reactor with high thermal neutron flux. Fast-to-slow moderation can be performed in a self moderation mode or with a transmission moderator. Slow positron rates up to 1.6 x 10/sup 8/ e/sup +//s with a half life of 12.8 h are calculated. Up to 1.0 x 10/sup 8/ e/sup +//s have been observed. New developments including a Ne moderator and an on-line isotope separation process are discussed. 21 refs., 9 figs

  2. Plasma opening switch for long-pulse intense ion beam

    Davis, H.A.; Mason, R.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Greenly, J.B.; Rej, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    A Plasma Opening Switch (POS) is being developed at Los Alamos, as part of an intense ion beam experiment with special application to materials processing. The switch must conduct up to 100 kA for 600 ns, and open quickly to avoid premature gap closure in the ion beam diode load. Power multiplication is not a necessity, but prepulse suppression is. A positive central polarity is desirable, since with it an ion beam can be conveniently launched beyond the switch from the central anode toward a negatively charged target. Thus, otherwise by virtue of traditional scaling rules, a POS was designed with a 1.25 cm radius inner anode, and a 4.75 cm radius outer cathode. This has been constructed, and subjected to circuit, and simulational analysis. The computations are being performed with the 2D ANTHEM implicit code. Preliminary results show a marked difference in switching dynamics, when the central positive polarity is used in place of the more conventional opposite choice. Opening goes by the fast development of a central anode magnetic layer, rather than by the more conventional slow evolution of a cathode gap. With the central anode, higher fill densities are needed to achieve desired conduction times. This has suggested switch design improvements, which are discussed

  3. Plasma opening switch for long-pulse intense ion beam

    Davis, H.A.; Mason, R.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Greenly, J.B.; Rej, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    A Plasma Opening Switch (POS) is being developed at Los Alamos, as part of an intense ion beam experiment with special application to materials processing. The switch must conduct up to 100 kA for 400 ns, and open quicky to avoid premature gap closure in the ion beam diode load. Power multiplication is not a necessity, but prepulse suppression is. A positive central polarity is desirable, since with it an ion beam can be conveniently launched beyond the switch from the central anode toward a negatively charged target. Using traditional scaling rules, a POS was designed with a 1.25 cm radius inner anode, and a 5.0 cm radius outer cathode. This has been constructed, and subjected to circuit, and simulational analysis. The computations are being performed with the 2D ANTHEM implicit code. Preliminary results show a marked difference in switching dynamics, when the central positive polarity is used in place of the more conventional opposite choice. Opening is achieved by the fast development of a central anode magnetic layer, rather than by the more conventional slow evolution of a cathode gap. With the central anode, higher fill densities are needed to achieve desired conduction times. This has suggested switch design improvements, which are discussed

  4. ORBIT : BEAM DYNAMICS CALCULATIONS FOR HIGH - INTENSITY RINGS

    HOLMES, J.A.; DANILOV, V.; GALAMBOS, J.; SHISHLO, A.; COUSINEAU, S.; CHOU, W.; MICHELOTTI, L.; OSTIGUY, F.; WEI, J.

    2002-01-01

    We are developing a computer code, ORBIT, specifically for beam dynamics calculations in high-intensity rings. Our approach allows detailed simulation of realistic accelerator problems. ORBIT is a particle-in-cell tracking code that transports bunches of interacting particles through a series of nodes representing elements, effects, or diagnostics that occur in the accelerator lattice. At present, ORBIT contains detailed models for strip-foil injection including painting and foil scattering; rf focusing and acceleration; transport through various magnetic elements; longitudinal and transverse impedances; longitudinal, transverse, and three-dimensional space charge forces; collimation and limiting apertures; and the calculation of many useful diagnostic quantities. ORBIT is an object-oriented code, written in C++ and utilizing a scripting interface for the convenience of the user. Ongoing improvements include the addition of a library of accelerator maps, BEAMLINE/MXYZPTLK the introduction of a treatment magnet errors and fringe fields; the conversion of the scripting interface to the standard scripting language, Python; and the parallelization of the computations using MPI. The ORBIT code is an open source, powerful, and convenient tool for studying beam dynamics in high-intensity rings

  5. Simultaneous beam geometry and intensity map optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Lee, Eva K.; Fox, Tim; Crocker, Ian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In current intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan optimization, the focus is on either finding optimal beam angles (or other beam delivery parameters such as field segments, couch angles, gantry angles) or optimal beam intensities. In this article we offer a mixed integer programming (MIP) approach for simultaneously determining an optimal intensity map and optimal beam angles for IMRT delivery. Using this approach, we pursue an experimental study designed to (a) gauge differences in plan quality metrics with respect to different tumor sites and different MIP treatment planning models, and (b) test the concept of critical-normal-tissue-ring-a tissue ring of 5 mm thickness drawn around the planning target volume (PTV)-and its use for designing conformal plans. Methods and Materials: Our treatment planning models use two classes of decision variables to capture the beam configuration and intensities simultaneously. Binary (0/1) variables are used to capture 'on' or 'off' or 'yes' or 'no' decisions for each field, and nonnegative continuous variables are used to represent intensities of beamlets. Binary and continuous variables are also used for each voxel to capture dose level and dose deviation from target bounds. Treatment planning models were designed to explicitly incorporate the following planning constraints: (a) upper/lower/mean dose-based constraints, (b) dose-volume and equivalent-uniform-dose (EUD) constraints for critical structures, (c) homogeneity constraints (underdose/overdose) for PTV, (d) coverage constraints for PTV, and (e) maximum number of beams allowed. Within this constrained solution space, five optimization strategies involving clinical objectives were analyzed: optimize total intensity to PTV, optimize total intensity and then optimize conformity, optimize total intensity and then optimize homogeneity, minimize total dose to critical structures, minimize total dose to critical structures and optimize conformity

  6. An ultra low noise AC beam transformer for deceleration and diagnostics of low intensity beams

    González, C

    1999-01-01

    The design of a broad band ultra-low noise ferrite loaded AC beam transformer is presented. It is designed for use in the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD), where beams of a few 107 charges must be decelerated from 3.5 GeV/c to 100 MeV/c. It is used in the RF beam-phase loop, and for intensity and bunch shape measurements during deceleration. When the beam is debunched for cooling on magnetic flat tops, the pick-up is used for measurements of intensity and momentum distribution by means of longitudinal Schottky scans. When used as Schottky pick-up, the signal to noise ratio should be better by about 40 dB than the existing stripline based longitudinal Schottky pick-up. The integrated design of pick-up and associated low-noise amplifier is presented. The achieved noise performance of a few from 1 to 3 MHz is obtained by attaching a low-noise, high-impedance silicon JFET (junction field effect transistor) amplifier to a high-Q resonant ferrite loaded cavity, and then eliminating the resonant response by low-nois...

  7. Feasibility of performing neutrino experiments at an intense source of strangeness

    Carlini, R.D.; Stephenson, G.J. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Several very important low energy neutrino experiments have been identified and discussed by Kayser and Rosen in these proceedings. We address the possibility of performing some of these experiments in the environment of a kaon factory. To carry out specific analyses, we draw upon the design of existing BNL detectors, the design of experiments that are proposed for an 800 MeV proton driven facility at Los Alamos, and the use of the code NUBEAM developed at CERN. Since in most cases we have not optimized, this is a conservative estimate. We find that many of the desired experiments can be performed with facilities now under discussion

  8. Short distance neutrino oscillations with Borexino

    Caminata A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Borexino detector has convincingly shown its outstanding performances in the low energy, sub-MeV regime through its unprecedented accomplishments in the solar and geo-neutrinos detection. These performances make it the ideal tool to accomplish a state-of-the-art experiment able to test unambiguously the long-standing issue of the existence of a sterile neutrino, as suggested by the several anomalous results accumulated over the past two decades, i.e. the outputs of the LSND and Miniboone experiments, the results of the source calibration of the two Gallium solar neutrino experiments, and the recently hinted reactor anomaly. The SOX project will exploit two sources, based on Chromium and Cerium, respectively, which deployed under the experiment, in a location foreseen on purpose at the time of the construction of the detector, will emit two intense beams of neutrinos (Cr and anti-neutrinos (Ce. Interacting in the active volume of the liquid scintillator, each beam would create an unmistakable spatial wave pattern in case of oscillation of the νe (or ν̅e into the sterile state: such a pattern would be the smoking gun proving the existence of the new sterile member of the neutrino family. Otherwise, its absence will allow setting a very stringent limit on its existence.

  9. Electron Production and Collective Field Generation in Intense Particle Beams

    Molvik, A W; Vay, J; Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Lee, E; Verboncoeur, J; Covo, M K

    2006-01-01

    Electron cloud effects (ECEs) are increasingly recognized as important, but incompletely understood, dynamical phenomena, which can severely limit the performance of present electron colliders, the next generation of high-intensity rings, such as PEP-II upgrade, LHC, and the SNS, the SIS 100/200, or future high-intensity heavy ion accelerators such as envisioned in Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion (HIF). Deleterious effects include ion-electron instabilities, emittance growth, particle loss, increase in vacuum pressure, added heat load at the vacuum chamber walls, and interference with certain beam diagnostics. Extrapolation of present experience to significantly higher beam intensities is uncertain given the present level of understanding. With coordinated LDRD projects at LLNL and LBNL, we undertook a comprehensive R and D program including experiments, theory and simulations to better understand the phenomena, establish the essential parameters, and develop mitigating mechanisms. This LDRD project laid the essential groundwork for such a program. We developed insights into the essential processes, modeled the relevant physics, and implemented these models in computational production tools that can be used for self-consistent study of the effect on ion beams. We validated the models and tools through comparison with experimental data, including data from new diagnostics that we developed as part of this work and validated on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL. We applied these models to High-Energy Physics (HEP) and other advanced accelerators. This project was highly successful, as evidenced by the two paragraphs above, and six paragraphs following that are taken from our 2003 proposal with minor editing that mostly consisted of changing the tense. Further benchmarks of outstanding performance are: we had 13 publications with 8 of them in refereed journals, our work was recognized by the accelerator and plasma physics communities by 8 invited papers and we have

  10. Self magnetic field effects on energy deposition by intense relativistic electron beams

    Nardi, E.; Peleg, E.; Zinamon, Z.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of the penetration of the self magnetic field of an intense relativsistic electron beam on the process of beam-target interaction is calculated. The diffusion of the magnetic field and the hydrodynamic expansion of the target are dynamically taken into account. It is found that at beam intensities of interest for pellet fusion considerable range shortening occurs by magnetic stopping. (author)

  11. Optimising the Target and Capture Sections of the Neutrino Factory

    Hansen, Ole Martin; Stapnes, Steinar

    The Neutrino Factory is designed to produce an intense high energy neutrino beam from stored muons. The majority of the muons are obtained from the decay of pions, produced by a proton beam impinging on a free-flowing mercury-jet target and captured by a high magnetic field. It is important to capture a large fraction of the produced pions to maximize the intensity of the neutrino beam. Various optimisation studies have been performed with the aim of maximising the muon influx to the accelerator and thus the neutrino beam intensity. The optimisation studies were performed with the use of Monte Carlo simulation tools. The production of secondary particles, by interactions between the incoming proton beam and the mercury target, was optimised by varying the proton beam impact position and impact angles on the target. The proton beam and target interaction region was studied and showed to be off the central axis of the capture section in the baseline configuration. The off-centred interaction region resulted in ...

  12. A scintillating fibre-based profiler for low intensity ion beams

    Finocchiaro, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Amato, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Ciavola, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Cuttone, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Gu, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Raia, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Rovelli, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy)

    1997-01-11

    In the framework of the EXCYT radioactive ion beam facility, now under development at LNS Catania, we have developed a new beam profile monitor based on a scintillating fibre and a photodetector. Its sensitivity allows the detection of single beam particles in pulse mode, thus representing a useful tool for diagnostics of low and very low intensity beams. (orig.).

  13. A scintillating fibre-based profiler for low intensity ion beams

    Finocchiaro, P.; Amato, A.; Ciavola, G.; Cuttone, G.; Gu, M.; Raia, G.; Rovelli, A.

    1997-01-01

    In the framework of the EXCYT radioactive ion beam facility, now under development at LNS Catania, we have developed a new beam profile monitor based on a scintillating fibre and a photodetector. Its sensitivity allows the detection of single beam particles in pulse mode, thus representing a useful tool for diagnostics of low and very low intensity beams. (orig.)

  14. Images of Complex Interactions of an Intense Ion Beam with Plasma Electrons

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2004-01-01

    Ion beam propagation in a background plasma is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because plasma electrons move in strong electric and magnetic fields of the beam. Computer simulation images of plasma interaction with an intense ion beam pulse are presented

  15. Nanostructured surface processing by an intense pulsed ion beam irradiation

    Yatsuzuka, M.; Masuda, T.; Yamasaki, T.; Uchida, H.; Nobuhara, S.; Hashimoto, Y.; Yoshihara, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Metal surface modification by irradiating an intense pulsed ion beam (IPIB) with short pulse width has been studied experimentally. An IPIB irradiation to a target leads to rapid heating above its melting point. After the beam is turned off, the heated region is immediately cooled by thermal conduction at a cooling rate of typically 10 10 K/s. This rapid cooling and resolidification results in generation of nanostructured phase in the top of surface. The typical hydrogen IPIB parameters are 200 kV of energy, 500 A/cm 2 of current density and 70 ns of pulsewidth. The IPIB was irradiated on a pure titanium to generate nanocrystalline phase. The IPIB-irradiated surface was examined with X-ray diffraction, SEM, and HR-TEM. The randomly oriented lattice fringes as well as a halo diffraction pattern are observed in the HR-TEM micrograph of IPIB-irradiated titanium. The average grain size is found to be 32 nanometers

  16. A modified space charge routine for high intensity bunched beams

    Lapostolle, P.; Garnett, R.W.; Wangler, T.P.

    1996-01-01

    In 1991 a space charge calculation for bunched beam with a three-dimensional ellipsoid was proposed, replacing the usual SCHEFF routines. It removes the cylindrical symmetry required in SCHEFF and avoids the point to point interaction computation, whose number of simulation points is limited. This routine has now been improved with the introduction of two or three ellipsoids giving a good representation of the complex non-symmetrical form of the bunch (unlike the 3-d ellipsoidal assumption). The ellipsoidal density distributions are computed with a new method, avoiding the difficulty encountered near the centre (the axis in 2-d problems) by the previous method. It also provides a check of the ellipsoidal symmetry for each part of the distribution. Finally, the Fourier analysis reported in 1991 has been replaced by a very convenient Hermite expansion, which gives a simple but accurate representation of practical distributions. Comparisons with other space charge routines have been made, particularly with the ones applying other techniques such as SCHEFF. Introduced in the versatile beam dynamics code DYNAC, it should provide a good tool for the study of the various parameters responsible for the halo formation in high intensity linacs. (orig.)

  17. Production of radioactivity in local soil at AGS [Alternating Gradient Synchrotron] fast neutrino beam

    Gollon, P.J.; Rohrig, N.; Hauptmann, M.G.; McIntyre, K.; Miltenberger, R.; Naidu, J.

    1989-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has constructed a new neutrino production target station at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). A study has been conducted in the vicinity of the old target area to determine the radiological consequences of operating this experimental facility. Results from all areas of the study are presented along with estimates of the potential environmental impact of the old and new facilities. 12 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Neutrinos (1/3)

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    The neutrino, the lightest and most weakly interacting particle of the Standard Model has revealed itself as the messenger of very exciting news in particle physics: there is Physics Beyond the Standard Model. All this thanks to the quantum-mechanical phenomenon of flavour oscillations which is intrinsically connected to the question of neutrino mass and which has been observed in neutrinos produced in natural sources, like the Sun and the Earth's atmosphere, as well as with human made neutrino beams at accelerator and reactors. The purpose of these lectures is to overview some aspects of the phenomenology of massive neutrinos. I will present the simplest extensions for adding neutrino masses to the SM, and then I will describe the phenomenology associated with neutrino oscillations in vacuum and in matter and its present signatures.

  19. High energy high intensity coherent photon beam for the SSC

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    What is proposed for the 20 TeV protons hitting a fixed target is to make a tertiary electron beam similar to that which is the basis of the tagged photon beam at Fermilab. Briefly, a zero degree neutral beam is formed by sweeping out the primary proton beam and any secondary charged particles. Then the photons, from the decay of π 0 in the neutral beam, are converted to e + e - pairs in a lead converter and a high quality electron beam is formed. This beam is brought to the target area where it is converted to a photon beam by Bremsstrahlung in a radiator

  20. A high intensity beam handling system at the KEK-PS new experimental hall

    Tanaka, K.H.; Minakawa, M.; Yamanoi, Y.

    1991-01-01

    We would like to summarize newly developed technology for handling high-intensity beams. This was practically employed in the beam-handling system of primary protons at the KEK-PS new experimental hall. (author)

  1. Research and simulation of intense pulsed beam transfer in electrostatic accelerate tube

    Li Chaolong; Shi Haiquan; Lu Jianqin

    2012-01-01

    To study intense pulsed beam transfer in electrostatic accelerate tube, the matrix method was applied to analyze the transport matrixes in electrostatic accelerate tube of non-intense pulsed beam and intense pulsed beam, and a computer code was written for the intense pulsed beam transporting in electrostatic accelerate tube. Optimization techniques were used to attain the given optical conditions and iteration procedures were adopted to compute intense pulsed beam for obtaining self-consistent solutions in this computer code. The calculations were carried out by using ACCT, TRACE-3D and TRANSPORT for different beam currents, respectively. The simulation results show that improvement of the accelerating voltage ratio can enhance focusing power of electrostatic accelerate tube, reduce beam loss and increase the transferring efficiency. (authors)

  2. Azimuthal asymmetry of recoil electrons in neutrino-electron elastic scattering as signature of neutrino nature

    Sobkow, W.; Blaut, A. [University of Wroclaw, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, we analyze the theoretically possible scenario beyond the standard model in order to show how the presence of the exotic scalar, tensor, V + A weak interactions in addition to the standard vector-axial (V - A) ones may help to distinguish the Dirac from Majorana neutrinos in the elastic scattering of an (anti)neutrino beam off the unpolarized electrons in the relativistic limit. We assume that the incoming (anti)neutrino beam comes from the polarized muon decay at rest and is the left-right chiral superposition with assigned direction of the transversal spin polarization with respect to the production plane. Our analysis is carried out for the flavour (current) neutrino eigenstates. It means that the transverse neutrino polarization estimates are the same both for the Dirac and Majorana cases. We display that the azimuthal asymmetry in the angular distribution of recoil electrons is generated by the interference terms between the standard and exotic couplings, which are proportional to the transversal (anti)neutrino spin polarization and independent of the neutrino mass. This asymmetry for the Majorana neutrinos is larger than for the Dirac ones. We also indicate the possibility of utilizing the azimuthal asymmetry measurements to search for the new CP-violating phases. Our study is based on the assumption that the possible detector (running for 1 year) has the shape of a flat circular ring, while the intense neutrino source is located in the centre of the ring and polarized perpendicularly to the ring. In addition, the large low-threshold, real-time detector is able to measure with a high resolution both the polar angle and the azimuthal angle of outgoing electron momentum. Our analysis is model-independent and consistent with the current upper limits on the non-standard couplings. (orig.)

  3. Accelerator Challenges and Opportunities for Future Neutrino Experiments

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    There are three types of future neutrino facilities currently under study, one based on decays of stored beta-unstable ion beams (Beta Beams), one based on decays of stored muon beams (Neutrino Factory), and one based on the decays of an intense pion beam (Superbeam). In this paper we discuss the challenges each design team must face and the R and D being carried out to turn those challenges into technical opportunities. A new program, the Muon Accelerator Program, has begun in the U.S. to carry out the R D for muon-based facilities, including both the Neutrino Factory and, as its ultimate goal, a Muon Collider. The goals of this program will be briefly described.

  4. Role of beam orientation optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Pugachev, Andrei; Li, Jonathan G.; Boyer, Arthur L.; Hancock, Steven L.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Lei Xing

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of beam orientation optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to examine the potential benefits of noncoplanar intensity-modulated beams. Methods and Materials: A beam orientation optimization algorithm was implemented. For this purpose, system variables were divided into two groups: beam position (gantry and table angles) and beam profile (beamlet weights). Simulated annealing was used for beam orientation optimization and the simultaneous iterative inverse treatment planning algorithm (SIITP) for beam intensity profile optimization. Three clinical cases were studied: a localized prostate cancer, a nasopharyngeal cancer, and a paraspinal tumor. Nine fields were used for all treatments. For each case, 3 types of treatment plan optimization were performed: (1) beam intensity profiles were optimized for 9 equiangular spaced coplanar beams; (2) orientations and intensity profiles were optimized for 9 coplanar beams; (3) orientations and intensity profiles were optimized for 9 noncoplanar beams. Results: For the localized prostate case, all 3 types of optimization described above resulted in dose distributions of a similar quality. For the nasopharynx case, optimized noncoplanar beams provided a significant gain in the gross tumor volume coverage. For the paraspinal case, orientation optimization using noncoplanar beams resulted in better kidney sparing and improved gross tumor volume coverage. Conclusion: The sensitivity of an IMRT treatment plan with respect to the selection of beam orientations varies from site to site. For some cases, the choice of beam orientations is important even when the number of beams is as large as 9. Noncoplanar beams provide an additional degree of freedom for IMRT treatment optimization and may allow for notable improvement in the quality of some complicated plans

  5. Phase and synchronous detector theory as applied to beam position and intensity measurements

    Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    A popular signal processing technique for beam position measurements uses the principle of amplitude-to-phase (AM/PM) conversion and phase detection. This technique processes position-sensitive beam-image-current probe-signals into output signals that are proportional to the beam's position. These same probe signals may be summed and processed in a different fashion to provide output signals that are proportional to the peak beam current which is typically referred to as beam intensity. This paper derives the transfer functions for the AM/PM beam position and peak beam current processors

  6. Study of the appearance of oscillating electron neutrinos issued from muon neutrino beam in the K2K experiment; Etude de l'apparition de neutrinos electroniques oscillant a partir de neutrinos muoniques du faisceau de l'experience K2K

    Argyriades, J

    2006-05-15

    The work presented in this thesis has been done in the K2K experiment. His principle consists in the use of a beam of muon neutrinos, which flux has been measured at short and long distances. Those data enable us to study the effects of neutrino oscillation, particularly by measuring {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance. Although this is not an appearance experiment, electronic neutrinos oscillation has been searched. In spite of no signal of appearance, this study enables to constrain oscillation parameters ({delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2}, sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13}). With one event for 1,07 expected event from background, the exclusion area edges are close to the best actual limits, provided by Chooz experiment. By setting {delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2}.= 2,8.10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, a limit at 90% confident level is reached: sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13} < 0,2. (author)

  7. The WARP Code: Modeling High Intensity Ion Beams

    Grote, David P.; Friedman, Alex; Vay, Jean-Luc; Haber, Irving

    2005-01-01

    The Warp code, developed for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy studies, is used to model high intensity ion (and electron) beams. Significant capability has been incorporated in Warp, allowing nearly all sections of an accelerator to be modeled, beginning with the source. Warp has as its core an explicit, three-dimensional, particle-in-cell model. Alongside this is a rich set of tools for describing the applied fields of the accelerator lattice, and embedded conducting surfaces (which are captured at sub-grid resolution). Also incorporated are models with reduced dimensionality: an axisymmetric model and a transverse ''slice'' model. The code takes advantage of modern programming techniques, including object orientation, parallelism, and scripting (via Python). It is at the forefront in the use of the computational technique of adaptive mesh refinement, which has been particularly successful in the area of diode and injector modeling, both steady-state and time-dependent. In the presentation, some of the major aspects of Warp will be overviewed, especially those that could be useful in modeling ECR sources. Warp has been benchmarked against both theory and experiment. Recent results will be presented showing good agreement of Warp with experimental results from the STS500 injector test stand

  8. Intense relativistic electron beam injector system for tokamak current drive

    Bailey, V.L.; Creedon, J.M.; Ecker, B.M.; Helava, H.I.

    1983-01-01

    We report experimental and theoretical studies of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) injection system designed for tokamak current drive experiments. The injection system uses a standard high-voltage pulsed REB generator and a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) to drive an REB-accelerating diode in plasma. A series of preliminary experiments has been carried out to test the system by injecting REBs into a test chamber with preformed plasma and applied magnetic field. REBs were accelerated from two types of diodes: a conventional vacuum diode with foil anode, and a plasma diode, i.e., an REB cathode immersed in the plasma. REB current was in the range of 50 to 100 kA and REB particle energy ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 MeV. MITL power density exceeded 10 GW/cm 2 . Performance of the injection system and REB transport properties is documented for plasma densities from 5 x 10 12 to 2 x 10 14 cm -3 . Injection system data are compared with numerical calculations of the performance of the coupled system consisting of the generator, MITL, and diode

  9. Applications of pulsed intense relativistic electron beam to aquatic conservation

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Kondo, Hironobu; Sasaki, Toru; Harada, Nob.; Moriwaki, Hiroshi; Imada, Go

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we propose aquatic conservations by using a pulsed intense relativistic electron beam (PIREB). Treatments of introduced species and toxics azo dyes by irradiating PIREB are investigated in this report. Zooplankton contained in water have been inactivated by irradiation of PIREB. A treatment chamber is filled with a solution of 3-wt% salt in water containing Artemia larvae as zooplankton samples, and is irradiated using the PIREB (2 MeV, 0.4 kA, 140 ns). We found that up to 24% of the Artemia are inactivated by firing 10 shots of PIREB irradiation. It is found that pH changes did not affect to inactivate the Artemia larvae during the time scale of PIREB irradiation. The reaction of congo red, a well-known toxic azo dye, occurred after irradiation by PIREB. An aquation of congo red was irradiated by PIREB (2 MeV, 0.36 kA, 140 ns). After PIREB irradiation, the solution was measured by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. It was found that congo red underwent a reaction (77% conversion after five shots of PIREB irradiation) and the hydroxylated compounds of the dye were observed as reaction products. (author)

  10. The WARP Code: Modeling High Intensity Ion Beams

    Grote, D P; Friedman, A; Vay, J L; Haber, I

    2004-01-01

    The Warp code, developed for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy studies, is used to model high intensity ion (and electron) beams. Significant capability has been incorporated in Warp, allowing nearly all sections of an accelerator to be modeled, beginning with the source. Warp has as its core an explicit, three-dimensional, particle-in-cell model. Alongside this is a rich set of tools for describing the applied fields of the accelerator lattice, and embedded conducting surfaces (which are captured at sub-grid resolution). Also incorporated are models with reduced dimensionality: an axisymmetric model and a transverse ''slice'' model. The code takes advantage of modern programming techniques, including object orientation, parallelism, and scripting (via Python). It is at the forefront in the use of the computational technique of adaptive mesh refinement, which has been particularly successful in the area of diode and injector modeling, both steady-state and time-dependent. In the presentation, some of the major aspects of Warp will be overviewed, especially those that could be useful in modeling ECR sources. Warp has been benchmarked against both theory and experiment. Recent results will be presented showing good agreement of Warp with experimental results from the STS500 injector test stand. Additional information can be found on the web page http://hif.lbl.gov/theory/WARP( ) summary.html

  11. Average intensity and spreading of partially coherent model beams propagating in a turbulent biological tissue

    Wu, Yuqian; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Qiu; Hu, Zhengda

    2016-01-01

    For Gaussian beams with three different partially coherent models, including Gaussian-Schell model (GSM), Laguerre-Gaussian Schell-model (LGSM) and Bessel-Gaussian Schell-model (BGSM) beams propagating through a biological turbulent tissue, the expression of the spatial coherence radius of a spherical wave propagating in a turbulent biological tissue, and the average intensity and beam spreading for GSM, LGSM and BGSM beams are derived based on the fractal model of power spectrum of refractive-index variations in biological tissue. Effects of partially coherent model and parameters of biological turbulence on such beams are studied in numerical simulations. Our results reveal that the spreading of GSM beams is smaller than LGSM and BGSM beams on the same conditions, and the beam with larger source coherence width has smaller beam spreading than that with smaller coherence width. The results are useful for any applications involved light beam propagation through tissues, especially the cases where the average intensity and spreading properties of the light should be taken into account to evaluate the system performance and investigations in the structures of biological tissue. - Highlights: • Spatial coherence radius of a spherical wave propagating in a turbulent biological tissue is developed. • Expressions of average intensity and beam spreading for GSM, LGSM and BGSM beams in a turbulent biological tissue are derived. • The contrast for the three partially coherent model beams is shown in numerical simulations. • The results are useful for any applications involved light beam propagation through tissues.

  12. Neutrinos, on your marks...!

    2006-01-01

    As the Bulletin was about to be released, the CNGS team was ready to produce its first neutrinos. The gradual commissioning of the installation should result in the production of a nominal beam during the month of August.

  13. Progress toward a microsecond duration, repetitively pulsed, intense-ion beam

    Davis, H A; Olson, J C; Reass, W A [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Coates, D M; Hunt, J W; Schleinitz, H M [DuPont Central Research and Development, Wilmington, DE (United States); Lovberg, R H [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Greenly, J B [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Lab. of Plasma Studies

    1997-12-31

    A number of intense ion beams applications are emerging requiring repetitive high-average-power beams. These applications include ablative deposition of thin films, rapid melt and resolidification for surface property enhancement, advanced diagnostic neutral beams for the next generation of Tokamaks, and intense pulsed-neutron sources. A 200-250 keV, 15 kA, 1 {mu}s duration, 1-30 Hz intense ion beam accelerator is being developed to address these applications. (author). 4 figs., 7 refs.

  14. To Test a Prototype of a Proton Lifetime Detector in a Neutrino Beam at the PS

    2002-01-01

    In order to test the performances of the calorimeter method in a nucleon lifetime experiment, a 3 ton prototype calorimeter made of iron and polystyrene scintillator sandwiches and of fine-grain counters has been designed by our collaboration. The energy and angular resolution will be tested by exposing this prototype to charged particles ($e, \\mu , \\pi$) in the 0.5 GeV/c range at Orsay and at CERN in Summer 1980. Since an unavoidable background to any experiment on nucleon decay consists of atmospheric neutrino events, which could in some cases simulate a nucleon decay, the knowledge of the configuration of such events in our detector is essential. It has been shown that the energy distribution of the $\

  15. Self-modulation and anomalous collective scattering of laser produced intense ion beam in plasmas

    K. Mima

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The collective interaction between intense ion beams and plasmas is studied by simulations and experiments, where an intense proton beam produced by a short pulse laser is injected into a pre-ionized gas. It is found that, depending on its current density, collective effects can significantly alter the propagated ion beam and the stopping power. The quantitative agreement that is found between theories and experiments constitutes the first validation of the collective interaction theory. The effects in the interaction between intense ion beams and background gas plasmas are of importance for the design of laser fusion reactors as well as for beam physics. Keywords: Two stream instabilities, Ultra intense short pulse laser, Proton beam, Wake field, Electron plasma wave, Laser plasma interaction, PACS codes: 52.38.Kd, 29.27.Fh, 52.40.Kh, 52.70.Nc

  16. Diode readout electronics for beam intensity and position monitors for FELs

    Herrmann, S; Hart, P; Freytag, M; Pines, J; Weaver, M; Sapozhnikov, L; Nelson, S; Koglin, J; Carini, G A; Tomada, A; Haller, G

    2014-01-01

    LCLS uses Intensity-Position Monitors (IPM) to measure intensity and position of the FEL x-ray pulses. The primary beam passes through a silicon nitride film and four diodes, arranged in quadrants, detect the backscattered x-ray photons. The position is derived from the relative intensity of the four diodes, while the sum provides beam intensity information. In contrast to traditional synchrotron beam monitors, where diodes measure a DC current signal, the LCLS beam monitors have to cope with the pulsed nature of the FEL, which requires a large single shot dynamic range. A key component of these beam monitors is the readout electronics. The first generation of beam monitors showed some limitations. A new scheme with upgraded electronics, firmware and software was implemented resulting in a more robust and reliable measuring tool.

  17. Muon physics possibilities at a muon-neutrino factory

    Jungmann, KP

    2001-01-01

    New intense proton accelerators with above GeV energies and MW beam power, such as they are discussed in connection with neutrino factories, appear to be excellently suited for feeding bright muon sources for low-energy muon science. Muon rates with several orders of magnitude increased flux

  18. Collisional pumping for the production of intense spin-polarized neutral beams: target considerations. Revision

    Stearns, J.W.; Burrell, C.F.; Kaplan, S.N.; Pyle, R.V.; Ruby, L.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1985-04-01

    Polarized beams at intensity levels heretofore not considered feasible have recently been proposed for heating and fueling fusion plasmas. Polarized-beam fueling could increase fusion rates by 50% as well as allow control of the directionality of the fusion products. A process which we have recently described, and called collisional pumping, promises to produce beams of polarized ions vastly more intense than producible by current methods

  19. Determination of beam intensity in a single step for IMRT inverse planning

    Chuang, Keh-Shih; Chen, Tzong-Jer; Kuo, Shan-Chi; Jan, Meei-Ling; Hwang, Ing-Ming; Chen, Sharon; Lin, Ying-Chuan; Wu, Jay

    2003-01-01

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), targets are treated by multiple beams at different orientations each with spatially-modulated beam intensities. This approach spreads the normal tissue dose to a greater volume and produces a higher dose conformation to the target. In general, inverse planning is used for IMRT treatment planning. The inverse planning requires iterative calculation of dose distribution in order to optimize the intensity profile for each beam and is very computation intensive. In this paper, we propose a single-step method utilizing a figure of merit (FoM) to estimate the beam intensities for IMRT treatment planning. The FoM of a ray is defined as the ratio between the delivered tumour dose and normal tissue dose and is a good index for the dose efficacy of the ray. To maximize the beam utility, it is natural to irradiate the tumour with intensity of each ray proportional to the value of the FoM. The nonuniform beam intensity profiles are then fixed and the weights of the beam are determined iteratively in order to yield a uniform tumour dose. In this study, beams are employed at equispaced angles around the patient. Each beam with its field size that just covers the tumour is divided into a fixed number of beamlets. The FoM is calculated for each beamlet and this value is assigned to be the beam intensity. Various weighting factors are incorporated in the FoM computation to accommodate different clinical considerations. Two clinical datasets are used to test the feasibility of the algorithm. The resultant dose-volume histograms of this method are presented and compared to that of conformal therapy. Preliminary results indicate that this method reduces the critical organ doses at a small expense of uniformity in tumour dose distribution. This method estimates the beam intensity in one single step and the computation time is extremely fast and can be finished in less than one minute using a regular PC

  20. High Power Proton Beam Shocks and Magnetohydrodynamics in a Mercury Jet Target for a Neutrino Factory

    Fabich, A; Fabjan, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of liquid metal jet targets for secondary particle production with high power proton beams has been studied. The main aspects of the thesis were benchmark experiments covering the behaviour of liquid targets under thermal shock waves induced by high power proton beams, and also magnetohydrodynamic effects. Severe challenges were imposed by safety issues and the restricted beam time to the tests in ISOLDE at CERN and at the High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Grenoble. Restricted access times in high radiation level areas were of the order of minutes and in this short time span, the complete experimental setup had to be performed and verified. The involvement of mercury as liquid target material and its activation during beam tests demanded special confinement precautions. The setup for both experiments was based on the use of a high speed camera system for observation of the mercury target. The presence of high radiation or high magnetic field required the installation of the sensitive camera sy...

  1. High intensity proton beam transportation through fringe field of 70 MeV compact cyclotron to beam line targets

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Ming; Wei, Sumin; Xing, Jiansheng; Hu, Yueming; Johnson, Richard R.; Piazza, Leandro; Ryjkov, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    From the stripping points, the high intensity proton beam of a compact cyclotron travels through the fringe field area of the machine to the combination magnet. Starting from there the beams with various energy is transferred to the switching magnet for distribution to the beam line targets. In the design of the extraction and transport system for the compact proton cyclotron facilities, such as the 70 MeV in France and the 100 MeV in China, the space charge effect as the beam crosses the fringe field has not been previously considered; neither has the impact on transverse beam envelope coupled from the longitudinal direction. Those have been concerned much more with the higher beam-power because of the beam loss problem. In this paper, based on the mapping data of 70 MeV cyclotron including the fringe field by BEST Cyclotron Inc (BEST) and combination magnet field by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), the beam extraction and transport are investigated for the 70 MeV cyclotron used on the SPES project at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL). The study includes the space charge effect and longitudinal and transverse coupling mentioned above, as well as the matching of beam optics using the beam line for medical isotope production as an example. In addition, the designs of the ±45° switching magnets and the 60° bending magnet for the extracted beam with the energy from 35 MeV to 70 MeV have been made. Parts of the construction and field measurements of those magnets have been done as well. The current result shows that, the design considers the complexity of the compact cyclotron extraction area and fits the requirements of the extraction and transport for high intensity proton beam, especially at mA intensity levels.

  2. High intensity proton beam transportation through fringe field of 70 MeV compact cyclotron to beam line targets

    Zhang, Xu, E-mail: emmazhang103@gmail.com [China Institute of Atomic Energy (China); Li, Ming; Wei, Sumin; Xing, Jiansheng; Hu, Yueming [China Institute of Atomic Energy (China); Johnson, Richard R.; Piazza, Leandro; Ryjkov, Vladimir [BEST Cyclotron Inc (Canada)

    2016-06-01

    From the stripping points, the high intensity proton beam of a compact cyclotron travels through the fringe field area of the machine to the combination magnet. Starting from there the beams with various energy is transferred to the switching magnet for distribution to the beam line targets. In the design of the extraction and transport system for the compact proton cyclotron facilities, such as the 70 MeV in France and the 100 MeV in China, the space charge effect as the beam crosses the fringe field has not been previously considered; neither has the impact on transverse beam envelope coupled from the longitudinal direction. Those have been concerned much more with the higher beam-power because of the beam loss problem. In this paper, based on the mapping data of 70 MeV cyclotron including the fringe field by BEST Cyclotron Inc (BEST) and combination magnet field by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), the beam extraction and transport are investigated for the 70 MeV cyclotron used on the SPES project at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN–LNL). The study includes the space charge effect and longitudinal and transverse coupling mentioned above, as well as the matching of beam optics using the beam line for medical isotope production as an example. In addition, the designs of the ±45° switching magnets and the 60° bending magnet for the extracted beam with the energy from 35 MeV to 70 MeV have been made. Parts of the construction and field measurements of those magnets have been done as well. The current result shows that, the design considers the complexity of the compact cyclotron extraction area and fits the requirements of the extraction and transport for high intensity proton beam, especially at mA intensity levels.

  3. Measurement of the Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Cross-Section for Electron Neutrinos on a Hydrocarbon Target

    Wolcott, Jeremy [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Appearance-type neutrino oscillation experiments, which observe the transition from muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos, promise to help answer some of the fundamental questions surrounding physics in the post-Standard-Model era. Because they wish to observe the interactions of electron neutrinos in their detectors, and because the power of current results is typically limited by their systematic uncertainties, these experiments require precise estimates of the cross-section for electron neutrino interactions. Of particular interest is the charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) process, which gures signi cantly in the composition of the reactions observed at the far detector. However, no experimental measurements of this crosssection currently exist for electron neutrinos; instead, current experiments typically work from the abundance of muon neutrino CCQE cross-section data and apply corrections from theoretical arguments to obtain a prediction for electron neutrinos. Veri cation of these predictions is challenging due to the di culty of constructing an electron neutrino beam, but the advent of modern high-intensity muon neutrino beams|together with the percent-level electron neutrino impurity inherent in these beams| nally presents the opportunity to make such a measurement. We report herein the rst-ever measurement of a cross-section for an exclusive state in electron neutrino scattering, which was made using the MINER A detector in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. We present the electron neutrino CCQE di erential cross-sections, which are averaged over neutrinos of energies 1-10 GeV (with mean energy of about 3 GeV), in terms of various kinematic variables: nal-state electron angle, nal-state electron energy, and the square of the fourmomentum transferred to the nucleus by the neutrino , Q2. We also provide a total cross-section vs. neutrino energy. While our measurement of this process is found to be in agreement with the predictions of the GENIE

  4. Spatially and temporally resolved diagnostics for microsecond, intense electron beams

    Gilgenbach, R.M.; Brake, M.; Horton, L.D.; Bidwell, S.; Lucey, R.F.; Smutek, L.; Tucker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments are underway to investigate new diagnostics for electron beams in vacuum and in a plasma background. Measured parameters include temporally resolved beam current profile and beam emittance. These characterizations are being performed during electron beam diode closure experiments (1) and beam-plasma interaction experiments with either of two long-pulse accelerators: MELBA (Michigan Electron Long Beam Accelerator): Voltage = -1 MV, Current = 10 kA, at Pulselength = 0.1 to 1μs (1.4μs) for voltage flat to within +.7% (+.10%). The second accelerator is a long-pulse Febetron with parameters: Voltage = -0.5 MV, Current = 1 kA, and Pulselength = 0.3 s. Two different configurations have been developed which use Cerenkov radiation to detect electron beam current profiles as a function of time. The first uses Cerenkov emission by electrons which impinge axially on a single fiberoptic lightguide enclosed in a lucite tube. Plasma light is blocked by graphite spray or thin foil covering the end of the optical fiber. This diagnostic has the following advantages: 1) The threshold energy for Cerenkov emission effectively discriminates between high energy beam electrons and low energy (3-5 eV) plasma electrons, 2) The small, nonconducting probe introduces a minimal perturbation into the beam-plasma system, 3) Excellent signal to noise ratio is obtained because the fiberoptic signal is directly transmitted to a photomultiplier tube in the Faraday cage, 4) Quantitative data is obtained directly

  5. R and D Toward Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2003-01-01

    R and D aimed at the production, acceleration, and storage of intense muon beams is under way in the U.S., in Europe, and in Japan. Considerable progress has been made in the past few years toward the design of a ''Neutrino Factory'' in which a beam of 20-50 GeV mu- or mu+ is stored. Decay neutrinos from the beam illuminate a detector located roughly 3000 km from the ring. Here, we briefly describe the ingredients of a Neutrino Factory and then discuss the current R and D program and its results. A key concept in the design is ''ionization cooling,'' a process whereby the muon emittance is reduced by repeated interactions with an absorber material followed by reacceleration with high-gradient rf cavities. Plans to test this concept in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) are well along and are described briefly

  6. Intense beams at the micron level for the Next Linear Collider

    Seeman, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    High brightness beams with sub-micron dimensions are needed to produce a high luminosity for electron-positron collisions in the Next Linear Collider (NLC). To generate these small beam sizes, a large number of issues dealing with intense beams have to be resolved. Over the past few years many have been successfully addressed but most need experimental verification. Some of these issues are beam dynamics, emittance control, instrumentation, collimation, and beam-beam interactions. Recently, the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) has proven the viability of linear collider technology and is an excellent test facility for future linear collider studies

  7. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-01-01

    By manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, it is possible to arrange for a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy (“heavy-ion fusion”). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly “wobbling” each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this is sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. It is found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.

  8. Working group report: Neutrino and astroparticle physics

    LMA MSW solution from the inverted hierarchical. N Nimai Singh model of neutrino .... needs a very high value of τ (~2.5) to start seeing the oxygen events dominate over the ¯νe events on protons at the high ... one needs to take data for three times longer duration with anti-neutrino beam compared to that for neutrino beam.

  9. Ion accumulation and space charge neutralization in intensive electron beams for ion sources and electron cooling

    Shirkov, G.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS), Electron Beam Ion Traps (EBIT) and electron beams for electron cooling application have the beam parameters in the same ranges of magnitudes. EBIS and EBIT produce and accumulate ions in the beam due to electron impact ionization. The cooling electron beam accumulates positive ions from the residual gas in the accelerator chamber during the cooling cycle. The space charge neutralization of cooling beam is also used to reduce the electron energy spread and enhance the cooling ability. The advanced results of experimental investigations and theoretical models of the EBIS electron beams are applied to analyze the problem of beam neutralization in the electron cooling techniques. The report presents the analysis of the most important processes connected with ion production, accumulation and losses in the intensive electron beams of ion sources and electron cooling systems for proton and ion colliders. The inelastic and elastic collision processes of charged particles in the electron beams are considered. The inelastic processes such as ionization, charge exchange and recombination change the charge states of ions and neutral atoms in the beam. The elastic Coulomb collisions change the energy of particles and cause the energy redistribution among components in the electron-ion beams. The characteristic times and specific features of ionization, beam neutralization, ion heating and loss in the ion sources and electron cooling beams are determined. The dependence of negative potential in the beam cross section on neutralization factor is studied. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  10. Techniques for intense-proton-beam profile measurements

    Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    In a collaborative effort with industry and several national laboratories, the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) facility and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac are presently being designed and developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The APT facility is planned to accelerate a 100-mA H + cw beam to 1.7 GeV and the SNS linac is planned to accelerate a 1- to 4-mA-average, H - , pulsed-beam to 1 GeV. With typical rms beam widths of 1- to 3-mm throughout much of these accelerators, the maximum average-power densities of these beams are expected to be approximately 30- and 1-MW-per-square millimeter, respectively. Such power densities are too large to use standard interceptive techniques typically used for acquisition of beam profile information. This paper summarizes the specific requirements for the beam profile measurements to be used in the APT, SNS, and the Low Energy Development Accelerator (LEDA)--a facility to verify the operation of the first 20-MeV section of APT. This paper also discusses the variety of profile measurement choices discussed at a recent high-average-current beam profile workshop held in Santa Fe, NM, and will present the present state of the design for the beam profile measurements planned for APT, SNS, and LEDA

  11. Determination of Beam Intensity and Position in a Particle Accelerator

    Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Raich, Uli

    2011-10-04

    A subject of the thesis is conception, design, implementation, tests and deployment of new position measurement system of particle bunch in the CERN PS circular accelerator. The system is based on novel algorithms of particle position determination. The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN†, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)‡. The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajectory and orbit measurement system of the PS is dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam posi...

  12. Determination of beam intensity and position in a particle accelerator

    Kasprowicz, G

    2011-01-01

    A subject of the thesis is conception, design, implementation, tests and deployment of new position measurement system of particle bunch in the CERN PS circular accelerator. The system is based on novel algorithms of particle position determination. The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajectory and orbit measurement system of the PS is dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam position monitors...

  13. Neutrino physics with JUNO

    An, Fengpeng; An, Guangpeng; An, Qi; Antonelli, Vito; Baussan, Eric; Beacom, John; Bezrukov, Leonid; Blyth, Simon; Brugnera, Riccardo; Buizza Avanzini, Margherita; Busto, Jose; Cabrera, Anatael; Cai, Hao; Cai, Xiao; Cammi, Antonio; Cao, Guofu; Cao, Jun; Chang, Yun; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Yixue; Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Clerbaux, Barbara; Conrad, Janet; D'Angelo, Davide; De Kerret, Hervé; Deng, Zhi; Deng, Ziyan; Ding, Yayun; Djurcic, Zelimir; Dornic, Damien; Dracos, Marcos; Drapier, Olivier; Dusini, Stefano; Dye, Stephen; Enqvist, Timo; Fan, Donghua; Fang, Jian; Favart, Laurent; Ford, Richard; Göger-Neff, Marianne; Gan, Haonan; Garfagnini, Alberto; Giammarchi, Marco; Gonchar, Maxim; Gong, Guanghua; Gong, Hui; Gonin, Michel; Grassi, Marco; Grewing, Christian; Guan, Mengyun; Guarino, Vic; Guo, Gang; Guo, Wanlei; Guo, Xin-Heng; Hagner, Caren; Han, Ran; He, Miao; Heng, Yuekun; Hsiung, Yee; Hu, Jun; Hu, Shouyang; Hu, Tao; Huang, Hanxiong; Huang, Xingtao; Huo, Lei; Ioannisian, Ara; Jeitler, Manfred; Ji, Xiangdong; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Jollet, Cécile; Kang, Li; Karagounis, Michael; Kazarian, Narine; Krumshteyn, Zinovy; Kruth, Andre; Kuusiniemi, Pasi; Lachenmaier, Tobias; Leitner, Rupert; Li, Chao; Li, Jiaxing; Li, Weidong; Li, Weiguo; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xiaonan; Li, Yi; Li, Yufeng; Li, Zhi-Bing; Liang, Hao; Lin, Guey-Lin; Lin, Tao; Lin, Yen-Hsun; Ling, Jiajie; Lippi, Ivano; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Hongbang; Liu, Hu; Liu, Jianglai; Liu, Jianli; Liu, Jinchang; Liu, Qian; Liu, Shubin; Liu, Shulin; Lombardi, Paolo; Long, Yongbing; Lu, Haoqi; Lu, Jiashu; Lu, Jingbin; Lu, Junguang; Lubsandorzhiev, Bayarto; Ludhova, Livia; Luo, Shu; Lyashuk, Vladimir; Möllenberg, Randolph; Ma, Xubo; Mantovani, Fabio; Mao, Yajun; Mari, Stefano M.; McDonough, William F.; Meng, Guang; Meregaglia, Anselmo; Meroni, Emanuela; Mezzetto, Mauro; Miramonti, Lino; Mueller, Thomas; Naumov, Dmitry; Oberauer, Lothar; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Olshevskiy, Alexander; Ortica, Fausto; Paoloni, Alessandro; Peng, Haiping; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Previtali, Ezio; Qi, Ming; Qian, Sen; Qian, Xin; Qian, Yongzhong; Qin, Zhonghua; Raffelt, Georg; Ranucci, Gioacchino; Ricci, Barbara; Robens, Markus; Romani, Aldo; Ruan, Xiangdong; Ruan, Xichao; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Shaevitz, Mike; Sinev, Valery; Sirignano, Chiara; Sisti, Monica; Smirnov, Oleg; Soiron, Michael; Stahl, Achim; Stanco, Luca; Steinmann, Jochen; Sun, Xilei; Sun, Yongjie; Taichenachev, Dmitriy; Tang, Jian; Tkachev, Igor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw; van Waasen, Stefan; Volpe, Cristina; Vorobel, Vit; Votano, Lucia; Wang, Chung-Hsiang; Wang, Guoli; Wang, Hao; Wang, Meng; Wang, Ruiguang; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Zhimin; Wei, Wei; Wen, Liangjian; Wiebusch, Christopher; Wonsak, Björn; Wu, Qun; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Wurm, Michael; Xi, Yufei; Xia, Dongmei; Xie, Yuguang; Xing, Zhi-zhong; Xu, Jilei; Yan, Baojun; Yang, Changgen; Yang, Chaowen; Yang, Guang; Yang, Lei; Yang, Yifan; Yao, Yu; Yegin, Ugur; Yermia, Frédéric; You, Zhengyun; Yu, Boxiang; Yu, Chunxu; Yu, Zeyuan; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zhan, Liang; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jingbo; Zhang, Qingmin; Zhang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Zhenghua; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhong, Weili; Zhou, Guorong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Rong; Zhou, Shun; Zhou, Wenxiong; Zhou, Xiang; Zhou, Yeling; Zhou, Yufeng; Zou, Jiaheng

    2016-03-01

    . Detection of neutrinos from all past core-collapse supernova explosions in the visible universe with JUNO would further provide valuable information on the cosmic star-formation rate and the average core-collapse neutrino energy spectrum. Antineutrinos originating from the radioactive decay of uranium and thorium in the Earth can be detected in JUNO with a rate of ˜400 events per year, significantly improving the statistics of existing geoneutrino event samples. Atmospheric neutrino events collected in JUNO can provide independent inputs for determining the MH and the octant of the {θ }23 mixing angle. Detection of the 7Be and 8B solar neutrino events at JUNO would shed new light on the solar metallicity problem and examine the transition region between the vacuum and matter dominated neutrino oscillations. Regarding light sterile neutrino topics, sterile neutrinos with {10}-5 {{{eV}}}2\\lt {{Δ }}{m}412\\lt {10}-2 {{{eV}}}2 and a sufficiently large mixing angle {θ }14 could be identified through a precise measurement of the reactor antineutrino energy spectrum. Meanwhile, JUNO can also provide us excellent opportunities to test the eV-scale sterile neutrino hypothesis, using either the radioactive neutrino sources or a cyclotron-produced neutrino beam. The JUNO detector is also sensitive to several other beyondthe-standard-model physics. Examples include the search for proton decay via the p\\to {K}++\\bar{ν } decay channel, search for neutrinos resulting from dark-matter annihilation in the Sun, search for violation of Lorentz invariance via the sidereal modulation of the reactor neutrino event rate, and search for the effects of non-standard interactions. The proposed construction of the JUNO detector will provide a unique facility to address many outstanding crucial questions in particle and astrophysics in a timely and cost-effective fashion. It holds the great potential for further advancing our quest to understanding the fundamental properties of neutrinos, one

  14. Time dependence of microsecond intense electron beam transport in gases

    Lucey, R.F. Jr.; Gilgenback, R.M.; Tucker, J.E.; Brake, M.L.; Enloe, C.L.; Repetti, T.E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present results of long-pulse (0.5 μs) electron beam propagation in the ion focused regime (IFR). Electron beam parameters are 800 kV with several hundred amperes injected current. For injection into air (from 0.7 mTorr to 75 mTorr) and helium (from 14 mTorr to 227 mTorr) the authors observe a ''time-dependent propagation window'' in which efficient (up to 100%) propagation starts at a time comparable to the electron impact ionization time needed to achieve n/sub i/ -- (1/γ/sup 2/)n/sub eb/. The transport goes abruptly to zero about 50-150 ns after this initial propagation. This is followed by erratic propagation often consisting of numerous narrower pulses 10-40 ns wide. In these pulses the transported current can be 100% of the injected current, but is generally lower. As the fill pressure is increased, there are differences in the propagated beam pulse, which can be summarized as follows: 1) the temporal occurrence of the beam propagation window shifts to earlier times, 2) the propagated beam current has much faster risetimes, 3) a larger portion of the injected beam is propagated. Similar results are observed when the electron beam is propagated in helium. However, at a given pressure, the beam transport window occurs at later times and exhibits a slower risetime. These effects are consistent with electron beam-induced ionization. Experiments are being performed to determine if the observed beam instability is due to the ion hose instability or streaming instability

  15. Neutrino-Electron Scattering in MINERvA for Constraining the NuMI Neutrino Flux

    Park, Jaewon [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Neutrino-electron elastic scattering is used as a reference process to constrain the neutrino flux at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam observed by the MINERvA experiment. Prediction of the neutrino flux at accelerator experiments from other methods has a large uncertainty, and this uncertainty degrades measurements of neutrino oscillations and neutrino cross-sections. Neutrino-electron elastic scattering is a rare process, but its cross-section is precisely known. With a sample corresponding to $3.5\\times10^{20}$ protons on target in the NuMI low-energy neutrino beam, a sample of $120$ $\

  16. Experimental results of beryllium exposed to intense high energy proton beam pulses

    Ammigan, K; Hurh, P; Zwaska, R; Butcher, M; Guinchard, M; Calviani, M; Losito, R; Roberts, S; Kuksenko, V; Atherton, A; Caretta, O; Davenne, T; Densham, C; Fitton, M; Loveridge, J; O'Dell, J

    2017-01-01

    Beryllium is extensively used in various accelerator beam lines and target facilities as a material for beam windows, and to a lesser extent, as secondary particle production targets. With increasing beam intensities of future accelerator facilities, it is critical to understand the response of beryllium under extreme conditions to reliably operate these components as well as avoid compromising particle production efficiency by limiting beam parameters. As a result, an exploratory experiment at CERN’s HiRadMat facility was carried out to take advantage of the test facility’s tunable high intensity proton beam to probe and investigate the damage mechanisms of several beryllium grades. The test matrix consisted of multiple arrays of thin discs of varying thicknesses as well as cylinders, each exposed to increasing beam intensities. This paper outlines the experimental measurements, as well as findings from Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) work where different imaging techniques were used to analyze and co...

  17. A target concept for intense radioactive beams in the 132Sn Region

    Nolen, J.A. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    To produce intense secondary beams of radioactive isotopes, primary beams of up to 100 kW are being proposed at some facilities. There are plans to test production targets with 800 MeV protons at such higher power at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. In this paper the use of high energy neutrons as a possible alternative is presented. The concept is to generate an intense beam of neutrons in a well-cooled target with a primary deuteron beam. The neutrons have a high cross section for producing fission fragments in a thick uranium target which is coupled to the ion source for the secondary beams. The effective target thickness is large and the power dissipated in the ISOL target is relatively small, which should lead to intense beams of neutron-rich, intermediate-mass isotopes such as 132 Sn

  18. Examination of Beryllium Under Intense High Energy Proton Beam at CERN's HiRadMat Facility

    Ammigan, K.; Hurh, P.; Zwaska, R.; Atherton, A.; Caretta, O.; Davenne,T.; Densham, C.; Fitton, M.; Loveridge, P.; O'Dell, J.; Roberts, S.; Kuksenko, V.; Butcher, M.; Calviani, M.; Guinchard, M.; Losito, R.

    2017-01-01

    Beryllium is extensively used in various accelerator beam lines and target facilities as material for beam win- dows, and to a lesser extent, as secondary particle produc- tion targets. With increasing beam intensities of future ac- celerator facilities, it is critical to understand the response of beryllium under extreme conditions to avoid compro- mising particle production efficiency by limiting beam pa- rameters. As a result, the planned experiment at CERN’s HiRadMat facility will take advantage of the test facility’s tunable high intensity proton beam to probe and investigate the damage mechanisms of several grades of beryllium. The test matrix will consist of multiple arrays of thin discs of varying thicknesses as well as cylinders, each exposed to increasing beam intensities. Online instrumentations will acquire real time temperature, strain, and vibration data of the cylinders, while Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) of the discs will exploit advanced microstructural characteri- zation and imagin...

  19. Examination of Beryllium Under Intense High Energy Proton Beam at CERN's HiRadMat Facility

    Ammigan, K; Hurh, P; Zwaska, R; Atherton, A; Caretta, O; Davenne, t; Densham, C; Fitton, M; Loveridge, P; O'Dell, J; Roberts, S; Kuksenko, v; Butcher, M; Calviani, M; Guinchard, M; Losito, R

    2015-01-01

    Beryllium is extensively used in various accelerator beam lines and target facilities as material for beam win- dows, and to a lesser extent, as secondary particle produc- tion targets. With increasing beam intensities of future ac- celerator facilities, it is critical to understand the response of beryllium under extreme conditions to avoid compro- mising particle production efficiency by limiting beam pa- rameters. As a result, the planned experiment at CERN’s HiRadMat facility will take advantage of the test facility’s tunable high intensity proton beam to probe and investigate the damage mechanisms of several grades of beryllium. The test matrix will consist of multiple arrays of thin discs of varying thicknesses as well as cylinders, each exposed to increasing beam intensities. Online instrumentations will acquire real time temperature, strain, and vibration data of the cylinders, while Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) of the discs will exploit advanced microstructural characteri- zation and imagin...

  20. From cosmic OPERA to neutrino ballet

    2006-01-01

    View of the OPERA detector (on the CNGS facility) with its two identical Super Modules, each of which contains one target section and one spectrometer.As the CNGS (CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso) project prepares to send its high intensity neutrino beam, some 730 km away in Italy, the OPERA collaboration is beginning to commission its electronic detectors in the underground Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS). OPERA is ready to come on stage. Based in the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, 732 km from CERN, the experiment will commission its electronic detectors with the high intensity neutrino beam sent by CNGS (see Bulletin n°29-30/2006). The OPERA Collaboration, which comprises 170 physicists from 35 research institutes and universities worldwide, aims to clear up the mystery of neutrino oscillation. The installation of the OPERA detector began in 2003 in Hall C of the underground laboratory at the LNGS. The detector is made of two identical Super Modules, each one containing one target section and ...

  1. Progress toward a microsecond duration, repetitive, intense-ion beam for active spectroscopic measurements on ITER

    Davis, H.A.; Bartsch, R.R.; Barnes, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    The authors describe the design of an intense, pulsed, repetitive, neutral beam based on magnetically insulated diode technology for injection into ITER for spectroscopic measurements of thermalizing alpha particle and thermal helium density profiles, ion temperature, plasma rotation, and low Z impurity concentrations in the confinement region. The beam is being developed to enhance low signal-to-noise ratios expected with conventional steady-state ion beams because of severe beam attenuation and intense bremstrahlung emission. A 5 GW (e.g., 100 keV, 50 kA) one-microsecond-duration beam would increase the signal by 10 3 compared to a conventional 5 MW beam with signal-to-noise ratios comparable to those from a chopped conventional beam in one second

  2. Mean intensity of the fundamental Bessel-Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere

    Lukin, Igor P.

    2017-11-01

    In the given article mean intensity of a fundamental Bessel-Gaussian optical beam in turbulent atmosphere is studied. The problem analysis is based on the solution of the equation for the transverse second-order mutual coherence function of a fundamental Bessel-Gaussian beam of optical radiation. Distributions of mean intensity of a fundamental Bessel- Gaussian beam optical beam in longitudinal and transverse to a direction of propagation of optical radiation are investigated in detail. Influence of atmospheric turbulence on change of radius of the central part of a Bessel optical beam is estimated. Values of parameters at which it is possible to generate in turbulent atmosphere a nondiffracting pseudo-Bessel optical beam by means of a fundamental Bessel-Gaussian optical beam are established.

  3. A modified space charge routine for high intensity bunched beams

    Lapostolle, P.; Lombardi, A.M.; Tanke, E.; Valero, S.; Garnett, R.W.; Wangler, T.P.

    1996-01-01

    A new routine and a computer code (DYNAC) for the calculation of space charge densities in a new generation of linear accelerators for various industrial applications is presented. The new beam dynamics method used in this code, employs a set of quasi-Liouvillian equations, allowing beam dynamics computations in long and complex structures for electrons, as well as protons and ions. With this new beam dynamics method, the coordinates of particles are known at any position in the accelerating elements, allowing multistep space charge calculations. (K.A.)

  4. Response of Solid and Liquid Targets to High Power Proton Beams for Neutrino Factories

    Sievers, P

    2000-01-01

    The response of solid and liquid targets to rapid heating by the incident proton beam is assessed in a classical way, among other things by solving the wave equation under linear conditions and in cylindrical symmetry. This study provides bench mark values and allows to identify critical issues and limiting factors which can help to guide further investigations with more sophisticated means.

  5. Neutrino oscillation study in the muon neutrino → electron neutrino channel at the Brookhaven accelerator

    Astier, P.

    1987-09-01

    The E816 experiment described in this thesis is devoted to a neutrino oscillation search at the Brookhaven AGS. The method used here is to look with a fine grained calorimeter for the appearence of electron neutrino in a muon neutrino beam. After recalling the theoretical treatment of the neutrino mass problem, the experimental phenomenology of massive neutrinos and more specifically neutrino oscillations is reviewed. The experiment itself is then extensively described, both on the technical side (detector, beam, simulation) and on the analysis side. In particular the statistical separation of the electromagnetic showers from electrons - our signal - and from photons - our background - treated in detail. The present analysis is based on 2/3 of the final statistics and it leads to the - preliminary - observation of an electron excess in the neutrino interactions yielding 19 ± 15.6 (stat) ± 7 (syst) [fr

  6. Multi-stage autoacceleration of an intense relativistic electron beam

    Kamada, K; Hasegawa, D; Igarashi, H; Kusunoki, T; Lee, C Y; Koguchi, H; Ando, R; Masuzaki, M [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). Department of Physics

    1997-12-31

    Two-stage autoacceleration was accomplished by using different length cavities. Two cavities were located with the distance longer than the beam duration. The electron kinetic energy increased from 500 to 700 keV at the first stage and from 700 to 900 keV at the second, while the beam duration decreased 10 to 5 ns at the first stage and 5 to 2.5 ns at the second. (author). 7 figs., 7 refs.

  7. Self-pinched transport of intense ion beams

    Ottinger, P.F.; Neri, J.M.; Stephanakis, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Electron beams with substantial net currents have been routinely propagated in the self-pinched mode for the past two decades. However, as the physics of gas breakdown and beam neutralization is different for ion beams, previous predictions indicated insufficient net current for pinching so that ion beam self-pinched transport (SPT) was assumed impossible. Nevertheless, recent numerical simulations using the IPROP code have suggested that ion SPT is possible. These results have prompted initial experiments to investigate SPT of ion beams. A 100-kA, 1.2-MeV, 3-cm-radius proton beam, generated on the Gamble II pulsed-power accelerator at NRL, has been injected into helium in the 30- to 250-mTorr regime to study this phenomenon. Evidence of self-pinched ion beam transport was observed in the 35- to 80-mTorr SPT pressure window predicted by IPROP. Measured signals from a time- and space-resolved scattered proton diagnostic and a time-integrated Li(Cu) nuclear activation diagnostic, both of which measure protons striking a 10-cm diameter target 50 cm into the transport region, are significantly larger in this pressure window than expected for ballistic transport. These results are consistent with significant self-magnetic fields and self-pinching of the ion beam. On the other hand, time-integrated signals from these same two diagnostics are consistent with ballistic transport at pressures above and below the SPT window. Interferometric electron line-density measurements, acquired during beam injection into the helium gas, show insignificant ionization below 35 mTorr, a rapidly rising ionization fraction with pressure in the SPT window, and a plateau in ionization fraction at about 2% for pressures above 80 mTorr. These and other results are consistent with the physical picture for SPT. IPROP simulations, which closely model the Gamble II experimental conditions, produce results that are in qualitative agreement with the experimental results. The advantages of SPT for

  8. Focused transport of intense charged particle beams. Final technical report FY/93

    1997-01-01

    Many recent developments in accelerator technology have increased the need for a better understanding of the physics of intense-beam transport. Of particular interest to the work described here is the appearance, as beam intensities are increased, of a class of nonlinear phenomena which involve the collective interaction of the beam particles. Beam intensity, used as a measure of the importance of space-charge collective behavior, depends on the ratio of current to emittance. The nonlinear beam dynamics, and any resulting emittance growth, which are characteristic of the intense-beam regime, can therefore occur even at low currents in any accelerator system with sufficiently high intensity, especially in the low beta section. Furthermore, since emittance of a beam is difficult to reduce, the ultimate achievement of necessary beam luminosities requires the consideration of possible causes of longitudinal and transverse emittance growth at every stage of the beam lifetime. The research program described here has addressed the fundamental physics which comes into play during the transport, acceleration and focusing of intense beams. Because of the long term and ongoing nature of the research program discussed here, this report is divided into two sections. The first section constitutes a long term revue of the accomplishments which have resulted from the research effort reported, especially in pioneering the use of particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulation techniques for simulation of the dynamics of space-charge-dominated beams in particle accelerators. The following section emphasizes, in more detail, the accomplishments of the FY 92/93 period immediately prior to the termination of this particular avenue of support. 41 refs

  9. Spill control and intensity monitoring for the Bevatron--Bevalac external particle beams

    Barale, J.J.; Crebbin, K.C.

    1975-03-01

    Time-intensity modulation in beam spill can be of primary concern in some experiments. The major source of this beam structure is from main-guide field-magnet power supply ripple. If the time constants are appropriate, then final control of beam structure can be accomplished by closed loop control of the intensity of beam spill. The response characteristics of the feedback system will determine the final structure. At high beam fluxes signal to noise ratio of beam detectors, in the feedback loop, can be improved by at least four orders of magnitude by using photomultiplier tubes and a water Cherenkov counter in place of the normal secondary emission monitor. At beam fluxes below 10 10 particles per second (PPS), a plastic scintillator and photomultiplier tube are used in the feedback system. A plastic scintillator and photomultiplier are also used in the beam as intensity monitors. At intensities below about 10 7 PPS standard counting techniques are used. For intensities between 10 6 to 110 9 PPS, the photomultiplier is used as a current source driving an integrating circuit which is then calibrated to read the number of particles per pulse. (U.S.)

  10. Supernova neutrinos

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    In the first part of his in-depth article on the 1987 supernova, David Schramm of the University of Chicago and the NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Centre reviewed the background to supernovae, the composition of massive stars and the optical history of SN 1987A, and speculated on what the 1987 remnant might be. In such a Type II supernova, gravitational pressure crushes the atoms of the star's interior producing neutron matter, or even a black hole, and releasing an intense burst of neutrinos. 1987 was the first time that physicists were equipped (but not entirely ready!) to intercept these particles, and in the second part of his article, David Schramm covers the remarkable new insights from the science of supernova neutrino astronomy, born on 23 February 1987

  11. Physics reach of CERN-based SuperBeam neutrino oscillation experiments

    Coloma, Pilar; Labarga, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We compare the physics potential of two representative options for a SuperBeam in Europe, studying the achievable precision at 1\\sigma with which the CP violation phase (\\delta) could be measured, as well as the mass hierarchy and CP violation discovery potentials. The first setup corresponds to a high energy beam aiming from CERN to a 100 kt liquid argon detector placed at the Pyh\\"asalmi mine (2300 km), one of the LAGUNA candidate sites. The second setup corresponds to a much lower energy beam, aiming from CERN to a 500 kt water \\v{C}erenkov detector placed at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (730 km). This second option is also studied for a baseline of 650 km, corresponding to the LAGUNA candidate sites of Umbria and the Canfranc underground laboratory. All results are presented also for scenarios with statistics lowered by factors of 2, 4, 8 and 16 to study the possible reductions of flux, detector mass or running time allowed by the large value of \\theta_{13} recently measured.

  12. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration of an Intense Positron Beam

    Blue, B

    2004-04-21

    The Plasma Wakefield Accelerator (PWFA) is an advanced accelerator concept which possess a high acceleration gradient and a long interaction length for accelerating both electrons and positrons. Although electron beam-plasma interactions have been extensively studied in connection with the PWFA, very little work has been done with respect to positron beam-plasma interactions. This dissertation addresses three issues relating to a positron beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator. These issues are (a) the suitability of employing a positron drive bunch to excite a wake; (b) the transverse stability of the drive bunch; and (c) the acceleration of positrons by the plasma wake that is driven by a positron bunch. These three issues are explored first through computer simulations and then through experiments. First, a theory is developed on the impulse response of plasma to a short drive beam which is valid for small perturbations to the plasma density. This is followed up with several particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations which study the experimental parameter (bunch length, charge, radius, and plasma density) range. Next, the experimental setup is described with an emphasis on the equipment used to measure the longitudinal energy variations of the positron beam. Then, the transverse dynamics of a positron beam in a plasma are described. Special attention is given to the way focusing, defocusing, and a tilted beam would appear to be energy variations as viewed on our diagnostics. Finally, the energy dynamics imparted on a 730 {micro}m long, 40 {micro}m radius, 28.5 GeV positron beam with 1.2 x 10{sup 10} particles in a 1.4 meter long 0-2 x 10{sup 14} e{sup -}/cm{sup 3} plasma is described. First the energy loss was measured as a function of plasma density and the measurements are compared to theory. Then, an energy gain of 79 {+-} 15 MeV is shown. This is the first demonstration of energy gain of a positron beam in a plasma and it is in good agreement with the predictions

  13. Determination of Beam Intensity and Position in a Particle Accelerator

    Kasprowicz, Grzegorz

    2010-01-01

    The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajec- tory and orbit measurement system of the PS dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam position monitors (BPMs) and an analogue signal processing chain to acquire the trajectory of one single particle bunch out of many, over two consecutive turns at a maximum rate of once every 5ms. The BPMs were in good condition, however the electronics was aging and ...

  14. A 3 GHz photoelectron gun for high beam intensity

    Bossart, Rudolf; Dehler, M; Godot, J C

    1996-01-01

    For the Compact Linear Collider Test Facility (CTF) at CERN a new rf gun with a laser driven photocathode is under construction. The new rf gun will replace the present 11/2 cell gun and will consist of 21/2 cells accelerating the beam to a momentum of 7.0 MeV/c with an electric field strength of 100 MV/m. The strong space-charge forces at low beam energy caused by the high charge density of the electron bunches are contained by radial and longitudinal rf focusing in the gun. The rf gun under construction has been optimized by MAFIA beam simulations for an injector assembly comprising a second accelerating rf structure and an intermediate solenoid magnet correcting the beam divergence of the 21/2 cell gun. The beam loading of the rf gun, by a train of 48 bunches with 21 nC charge each, causes a strong energy decay accompanied by an increase of the flight time for the bunches with lower energy. These effects can be corrected by slightly shifting the acceleration frequency of the gun. The experimental results...

  15. Stabilization of the Beam Intensity in the Linac at the CTF3 CLIC Test Facility

    Dubrovskiy, A; Bathe, BN; Srivastava, S

    2013-01-01

    A new electron beam stabilization system has been introduced in CTF3 in order to open new possibilities for CLIC beam studies in ultra-stable conditions and to provide a sustainable tool to keep the beam intensity and energy at its reference values for long term operations. The stabilization system is based on a pulse-to-pulse feedback control of the electron gun to compensate intensity deviations measured at the end of the injector and at the beginning of the linac. Thereby it introduces negligible beam distortions at the end of the linac and it significantly reduces energy deviations. A self-calibration mechanism has been developed to automatically configure the feedback controller for the optimum performance. The residual intensity jitter of 0.045% of the stabilized beam was measured whereas the CLIC requirement is 0.075%.

  16. Moessbauer Effect applications using intense radioactive ion beams

    Taylor, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Moessbauer Effect is reviewed as a promising tool for a number of new solid state studies when used in combination with radioactive beam/implantation facilities. The usual Moessbauer Effect involves long-lived radioactive parents (days to years) that populate low-lying nuclear excited states that subsequently decay to the ground state. Resonant emission/absorption of recoil-free gamma rays from these states provide information on a number of properties of the host materials. Radioactive ion beams (RIB) produced on-line allow new Moessbauer nuclei to be studied where there is no suitable parent. The technique allows useful sources to be made having extremely low local concentrations. The ability to separate the beams in both Z and A should provide high specific activity ''conventional'' sources, a feature important in some applications such as Moessbauer studies in diamond anvil high pressure cells. Exotic chemistry is proposed using RIB and certain Krypton and Xenon Moessbauer isotopes

  17. Spatially and temporally resolved diagnostics for microsecond, intense electron beams

    Gilgenbach, R.M.; Brake, M.; Horton, L.D.; Bidwell, S.; Lucey, R.F.; Smutek, L.; Tucker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Two different configurations have been developed which use Cerenkov radiation to detect electron beam current profiles as a function of time. The first uses Cerenkov emission by electrons which impinge axially on a single fiberoptic lightguide enclosed in a lucite tube. Plasma light is blocked by graphite spray or thin foil covering the end of the optical fiber. This diagnostic has the following advantages: 1) the threshold energy for Cerenkov emission effectively discriminates between high energy beam electrons and low energy (3-5 eV) plasma electrons. 2) The small, nonconducting probe introduces a minimal perturbation into the beam-plasma system. 3) Excellent signal to noise ratio is obtained because the fiberoptic signal is directly transmitted to a photomultiplier tube in the Faraday cage. 4) Quantitative data is obtained directly

  18. Implications of the Electrostatic Approximation in the Beam Frame on the Nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell Equations for Intense Beam Propagation

    Davidson, Ronald C.; Lee, W. Wei-li; Hong Qin; Startsev, Edward

    2001-01-01

    This paper develops a clear procedure for solving the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations for a one-component intense charged particle beam or finite-length charge bunch propagating through a cylindrical conducting pipe (radius r = r(subscript)w = const.), and confined by an applied focusing force. In particular, the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations are Lorentz-transformed to the beam frame ('primed' variables) moving with axial velocity relative to the laboratory. In the beam frame, the particle motions are nonrelativistic for the applications of practical interest, already a major simplification. Then, in the beam frame, we make the electrostatic approximation which fully incorporates beam space-charge effects, but neglects any fast electromagnetic processes with transverse polarization (e.g., light waves). The resulting Vlasov-Maxwell equations are then Lorentz-transformed back to the laboratory frame, and properties of the self-generated fields and resulting nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations in the laboratory frame are discussed

  19. Divergence in intense ion beams caused by incomplete charge neutralization

    Olson, C.L.; Poukey, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Space charge neutralization for light ion fusion (LIF) ion beam transport is usually assumed to be perfect in the open-quotes charge-neutralclose quotes region of the diode and in the gas transport cell. However, small charge clumps in the beam will not be totally charge-neutralized, and the residual net space charge may contribute to the beam microdivergence θ μ . If the net potential of the clump is limited only by electron trapping, the minimum potential will be eφ ∼ 1/2 m e v i 2 where m e is the electron mass and v i is the ion velocity. For proton beams this leads to θ μ ∼ (m e /M p ) 1/2 ∼ 23 mrad, where M p is the proton rest mass. For non-protonic beams, different results occur. The mechanism predicts (1) no dependence of θ μ on diode voltage, (2) non-protonic θ μ greater than proton θ μ for proton-contaminated beams, and (3) axial energy spread Δε parallel /ε parallel ∼ ±2 θ μ , which are all consistent with present data. Results of analytic studies and computer simulations of this mechanism are presented. Plasma shielding reduces the effects of this mechanism but collisions and magnetic fields reduce the plasma shielding effects. 2-D PIC MAGIC simulations show that this mechanism contributes to θ μ both in the open-quotes charge-neutralclose quotes region and in the gas transport region. It is concluded that this mechanism is especially important in the open-quotes charge-neutralclose quotes region

  20. Designing Neutralized Drift Compression for Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses in a Background Plasma

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Startsev, E.A.; Barnard, J.J.; Friedman, A.; Lee, E.P.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Welch, D.R.; Sefkow, A.B.

    2009-01-01

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective method for particle beam focusing and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear radial and longitudinal velocity drift is applied to a beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the drift-compression section. The beam intensity can increase more than a factor of 100 in both the radial and longitudinal directions, resulting in more than 10,000 times increase in the beam number density during this process. The self-electric and self-magnetic fields can prevent tight ballistic focusing and have to be neutralized by supplying neutralizing electrons. This paper presents a survey of the present theoretical understanding of the drift compression process and plasma neutralization of intense particle beams. The optimal configuration of focusing and neutralizing elements is discussed in this paper.

  1. Growth rate of non-thermodynamic emittance of intense electron beams

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1998-01-01

    The nonlinear free-energy concept has been particularly useful in estimating the emittance growth resulting from any excess energy of electron beams in periodic and uniform channels. However, additional emittance growth, that is geometrical rather than thermodynamic in origin, is induced if the particles have different kinetic energies and axial velocities, which is common for mildly relativistic, very intense electron beams. This effect is especially strong if particles lose or gain significant kinetic energy due to the beam's potential depression, as the beam converges and diverges. In this paper we analyze these geometric emittance growth mechanisms for a uniform, continuous, intense electron beam in a focusing transport channel consisting of discrete solenoidal magnets, over distances short enough that the beam does not reach equilibrium. These emittance growth mechanisms are based on the effects of (1) energy variations leading to nonlinearities in the space-charge force even if the current density is uniform, (2) an axial velocity shear radially along the beam due to the beam's azimuthal motion in the solenoids, and (3) an energy redistribution of the beam as the beam compresses or expands. The geometric emittance growth is compared in magnitude with that resulting from the nonlinear free energy, for the case of a mismatched beam in a uniform channel, and is shown to dominate for certain experimental conditions. Rules for minimizing the emittance along a beamline are outlined. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  2. A beam intensity monitor for the evaluation beamline for soft x-ray optical elements

    Imazono, Takashi; Moriya, Naoji; Harada, Yoshihisa; Sano, Kazuo; Koike, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation Beamline for Soft X-Ray Optical Elements (BL-11) at the SR Center of Ritsumeikan University has been operated to measure the wavelength and angular characteristics of soft x-ray optical components in a wavelength range of 0.65-25 nm using a reflecto-diffractometer (RD). The beam intensity monitor that has been equipped in BL-11 has observed the signal of the zero-th order light. For the purpose of more accurate evaluation of the performance of optical components, a new beam intensity monitor to measure the intensity of the first order light from the monochromator in BL-11 has been developed and installed in just front of RD. The strong positive correlation between the signal of the beam monitor and a detector equipped in the RD is shown. It is successful that the beam intensity of the first order light can be monitored in real time.

  3. Analog measurement of delayed antiproton annihilation time spectra in a high intensity pulsed antiproton beam

    Niestroj, A.; Hayano, R.S.; Ishikawa, T.; Tamura, H.; Torii, H.A.; Morita, N.; Yamazaki, T.; Sugai, I.; Nakayoshi, K.; Horvath, D.; Eades, J.; Widmann, E.

    1996-01-01

    An analog detection system has been developed to measure delayed antiproton annihilation time spectra for laser resonance spectroscopy of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms using the high-intensity pulsed beam of antiprotons from LEAR at CERN. (orig.)

  4. Sterile Neutrino Search with MINOS

    Devan, Alena V.

    2015-01-01

    MINOS, Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in the NuMI muon neutrino beam at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, IL. It consists of two detectors, a near detector positioned 1 km from the source of the beam and a far detector 734 km away in Minnesota. MINOS is primarily designed to observe muon neutrino disappearance resulting from three flavor oscillations. The Standard Model of Particle Physics predicts that neutrinos oscillate between three active flavors as they propagate through space. This means that a muon-type neutrino has a certain probability to later interact as a different type of neutrino. In the standard picture, the neutrino oscillation probabilities depend only on three neutrino flavors and two mass splittings, Δm 2 . An anomaly was observed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments that suggests the existence of a fourth, sterile neutrino flavor that does not interact through any of the known Standard Model interactions. Oscillations into a theoretical sterile flavor may be observed by a deficit in neutral current interactions in the MINOS detectors. A distortion in the charged current energy spectrum might also be visible if oscillations into the sterile flavor are driven by a large mass-squared difference, Δm s 2 ~ 1 eV 2 . The results of the 2013 sterile neutrino search are presented here.

  5. Sterile Neutrino Search with MINOS

    Devan, Alena V. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    MINOS, Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in the NuMI muon neutrino beam at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, IL. It consists of two detectors, a near detector positioned 1 km from the source of the beam and a far detector 734 km away in Minnesota. MINOS is primarily designed to observe muon neutrino disappearance resulting from three flavor oscillations. The Standard Model of Particle Physics predicts that neutrinos oscillate between three active flavors as they propagate through space. This means that a muon-type neutrino has a certain probability to later interact as a different type of neutrino. In the standard picture, the neutrino oscillation probabilities depend only on three neutrino flavors and two mass splittings, Δm2. An anomaly was observed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments that suggests the existence of a fourth, sterile neutrino flavor that does not interact through any of the known Standard Model interactions. Oscillations into a theoretical sterile flavor may be observed by a deficit in neutral current interactions in the MINOS detectors. A distortion in the charged current energy spectrum might also be visible if oscillations into the sterile flavor are driven by a large mass-squared difference, ms2 ~ 1 eV2. The results of the 2013 sterile neutrino search are presented here.

  6. New lens system using toroidal magnetic field for intense ion beam

    Mohri, Akihiro; Ikuta, Kazunari; Fujita, Junji.

    1976-11-01

    The use of toroidal magnetic field as a lens system is proposed for producing intense ion beam. The characteristics of the lens system are obtained both analytically and numerically. Some examples of ray-trajectories are presented for different focal lengths. The system is applicable to neutral beam injection heating and micro-pellet implosion for nuclear fusion, and to the other fields such as ion beam X-ray lasers. (auth.)

  7. SPES: A new cyclotron-based facility for research and applications with high-intensity beams

    Maggiore, M.; Campo, D.; Antonini, P.; Lombardi, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Andrighetto, A.; Monetti, A.; Scarpa, D.; Esposito, J.; Silvestrin, L.

    2017-06-01

    In 2016, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy) started the commissioning of a new accelerator facility based on a high-power cyclotron able to deliver proton beams up to 70 MeV of energy and 700 μA current. Such a machine is the core of the Selective Production of Exotic Species (SPES) project whose main goal is to provide exotics beam for nuclear and astrophysics research and to deliver high-intensity proton beams for medical applications and neutrons generator.

  8. Three-dimensional numerical studies of the temperature anisotropy instability in intense charged particle beams

    Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Qin, Hong

    2005-01-01

    In neutral plasmas with a uniform magnetic field and strongly anisotropic distribution function (T parallel /T perpendicular 0 <<1). Such high-intensity beams are relevant to next-step experiments such as the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX), which would serve as proof-of-principal experiment for heavy-ion fusion

  9. Characterization of a proton beam driven by a high-intensity laser

    Sagisaka, Akito; Daido, Hiroyuki; Ogura, Koichi; Orimo, Satoshi; Hayashi, Yukio; Mori, Michiaki; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Yogo, Akifumi; Kado, Masataka; Fukumi, Atsushi; Li, Zhong; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Nakamura, Shu

    2007-01-01

    High-energy protons are observed with a 3 μm thick tantalum target irradiated with a high intensity laser. The maximum proton energy is ∼900 keV. The half angle of the generated proton beam (>500 keV) is about 10deg. Characterization of the proton beam will significantly contribute to the proton applications. (author)

  10. The wondrous world of transport and acceleration of intense ion beams

    Siebenlist, F.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the transport, bunching and acceleration of intense ion beams in periodic focusing channels is described. The aim is to show the feasibility of accelerating high current ion beams with a Multiple Electrostatic Quadrupole Array Linear ACcelerator (MEQALAC). 83 refs.; 51 figs.; 3 tabs

  11. Engineering the on-axis intensity of Bessel beam by a feedback tuning loop

    Li, Runze; Yu, Xianghua; Yang, Yanlong; Peng, Tong; Yao, Baoli; Zhang, Chunmin; Ye, Tong

    2018-02-01

    The Bessel beam belongs to a typical class of non-diffractive optical fields that are characterized by their invariant focal profiles along the propagation direction. However, ideal Bessel beams only rigorously exist in theory; Bessel beams generated in the lab are quasi-Bessel beams with finite focal extensions and varying intensity profiles along the propagation axis. The ability to engineer the on-axis intensity profile to the desired shape is essential for many applications. Here we demonstrate an iterative optimization-based approach to engineering the on-axis intensity of Bessel beams. The genetic algorithm is used to demonstrate this approach. Starting with a traditional axicon phase mask, in the design process, the computed on-axis beam profile is fed into a feedback tuning loop of an iterative optimization process, which searches for an optimal radial phase distribution that can generate a generalized Bessel beam with the desired onaxis intensity profile. The experimental implementation involves a fine-tuning process that adjusts the originally targeted profile so that the optimization process can optimize the phase mask to yield an improved on-axis profile. Our proposed method has been demonstrated in engineering several zeroth-order Bessel beams with customized on-axis profiles. High accuracy and high energy throughput merit its use in many applications.

  12. A proton beam delivery system for conformal therapy and intensity modulated therapy

    Yu Qingchang

    2001-01-01

    A scattering proton beam delivery system for conformal therapy and intensity modulated therapy is described. The beam is laterally spread out by a dual-ring double scattering system and collimated by a program-controlled multileaf collimator and patient specific fixed collimators. The proton range is adjusted and modulated by a program controlled binary filter and ridge filters

  13. High-intensity light-ion beam research at NRL

    Cooperstein, G.; Colombant, D.G.; Barker, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    High-brightness proton beams (.4 MA, 1 MV) have recently been extracted from 20 cm 2 axial pinch-reflex diodes (PRDs) mounted on the NRL Gamble II generator. A source power brightness of GT 10 TW/cm 2 rad 2 was achieved in these experiments. A new barrel-shaped equitorial PRD that can be coupled to PBFA-II has also been operated on Gamble II and has demonstrated 50% proton efficiency with predominately azimuthally-symmetric charged-particle flow. In other experiments the stopping power of deuterons in hot plasmas was measured using a PRD on Gamble II. Results show about 40% enhancement in stopping power over that in cold targets when the beam was focused to about .25 MA/cm 2 . Research is also being performed on transporting ion beams in large-diameter channels (>= 2.5 cm) and on a post-transport, plasma-filled, magnetic-focusing section to bring the beam to pellet dimensions. (author)

  14. Microwave generation and frequency conversion using intense relativistic electron beams

    Buzzi, J.M.; Doucet, H.J.; Etlicher, B.

    1977-01-01

    Some aspects of the microwave generation and frequency conversion by relativistic electron beams are studied. Using an electron synchrotron maser, the excitation of microwaves by an annular relativistic electron beam propagating through a circular wave guide immersed in a longitudinal magnetic field is analyzed. This theoretical model is somewhat more realistic than the previous one because the guiding centers are not on the wave guide axis. Microwave reflection is observed on a R.E.B. front propagating into a gas filled waveguide. The frequency conversion from the incident X-band e.m. waves and the reflected Ka band observed signal is consistent with the Doppler model for β = 0.7. This value agrees with the average beam front velocity as measured from time-of-flight using two B/sub theta/ probes. The reflection is found to occur during the current rise time. With a low impedance device (2 Ω, 400 keV) a GW X-band emission has been observed using thin anodes and a gas filled waveguide. This emission is probably due to the self-fields of the beam and could be used as a diagnostic

  15. Emittance scanner for intense low-energy ion beams

    Allison, P.W.; Sherman, J.D.; Holtkamp, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    An emittance scanner has been developed for use with low-energy H - ion beams to satisfy the following requirements: (1) angular resolution of +-1/2 mrad, (2) small errors from beam space charge, and (3) compact and simple design. The scanner consists of a 10-cm-long analyzer containing two slits and a pair of electric deflection plates driven by a +-500-V linear ramp generator. As the analyzer is mechanically driven across the beam, the front slit passes a thin ribbon of beam through the plates. The ion transit time is short compared with the ramp speed; therefore, the initial angle of the ions that pass through the rear slit is proportional to the instantaneous ramp voltage. The current through the rear slit then is proportional to the phase-space density d 2 i/dxdx'. The data are computer-analyzed to give, for example, rms emittance and phase-space density contours. Comparison of measured data with those calculated from a prepared (collimated) phase space is in good agreement

  16. High-energy acceleration of an intense negative ion beam

    Takeiri, Y.; Ando, A.; Kaneko, O.

    1995-02-01

    A high-current H - ion beam has been accelerated with the two-stage acceleration. A large negative hydrogen ion source with an external magnetic filter produces more than 10 A of the H - ions from the grid area of 25cm x 50cm with the arc efficiency of 0.1 A/kW by seeding a small amount of cesium. The H - ion current increases according to the 3/2-power of the total beam energy. A 13.6 A of H - ion beam has been accelerated to 125 keV at the operational gas pressure of 3.4 mTorr. The optimum beam acceleration is achieved with nearly the same electric fields in the first and the second acceleration gaps on condition that the ratio of the first acceleration to the extraction electric fields is adjusted for an aspect ratio of the extraction gap. The ratio of the acceleration drain current to the H - ion current is more than 1.7. That is mainly due to the secondary electron generated by the incident H - ions on the extraction grid and the electron suppression grid. The neutralization efficiency was measured and agrees with the theoretical calculation result. (author)

  17. High-intensity pulsed beam source with tunable operation mode

    Nashilevskiy, A. V.; Kanaev, G. G.; Ezhov, V. V.; Shamanin, V. I.

    2017-05-01

    The report presents the design of an electron and an ion pulsed accelerator. The powerful high-voltage pulse generator of the accelerator and the vacuum bushing insulator is able to change the polarity of the output voltage. The low-inductance matching transformer provides an increase in the DFL output impedance by 4 times. The generator based on a high voltage pulse transformer and a pseudo spark switch is applied for DFL charging. The high-impedance magnetically insulated focusing diode with Br magnetic field and the “passive” anode was used to realize the ion beam generation mode. The plasma is formed on the surface of the anode caused by an electrical breakdown at the voltage edge pulse; as a result, the carbon ion and proton beam is generated. This beam has the following parameters: the current density is about 400 A/cm2 (in focus): the applied voltage is up to 450 kV. The accelerator is designed for the research on the interaction of the charged particle pulsed beams with materials and for the development of technological processes of a material modification.

  18. Stress Concentration Factor and Stress Intensity Factor with U-notch and Crack in the Beam

    Seo, Bo Seong; Lee, Kwang Ho [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The stress concentration factors and stress intensity factors for a simple beam and a cantilever are analyzed by using finite element method and photoelasticity. Using the analyzed results, the estimated graphs on stress concentration factors and stress intensity factors are obtained. To analyze stress concentration factors of notch, the dimensionless notch length H(height of specimen)/h=1.1-2 and dimensionless gap space r(radius at the notch tip)/h=0.1~0.5 are used, where h=H-c and c is the notch length. As the notch gap length increases and the gap decreases, the stress concentration factors increase. Stress concentration factors of a simple beam are greater than those of a cantilever beam. However, actually, the maximum stress values under a load, a notch length and a gap occur more greatly in the cantilever beam than in the simple beam. To analyze stress intensity factors, the normalized crack length α(crack length)/H=0.2~0.5 is used. As the length of the crack increases, the normalized stress intensity factors increase. The stress intensity factors under a constant load and a crack length occur more greatly in the cantilever beam than in the simple beam.

  19. Neutrino physics

    Gil-Botella, I.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental properties of neutrinos are reviewed in these lectures. The first part is focused on the basic characteristics of neutrinos in the Standard Model and how neutrinos are detected. Neutrino masses and oscillations are introduced and a summary of the most important experimental results on neutrino oscillations to date is provided. Then, present and future experimental proposals are discussed, including new precision reactor and accelerator experiments. Finally, different approaches for measuring the neutrino mass and the nature (Majorana or Dirac), of neutrinos are reviewed. The detection of neutrinos from supernovae explosions and the information that this measurement can provide are also summarized at the end. (author)

  20. Optimized simultaneous transverse and longitudinal focusing of intense ion beam pulses for warm dense matter applications

    Sefkow, Adam B.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Roy, Prabir K.; Seidl, Peter A.; Yu, Simon S.; Welch, Dale R.; Rose, David V.; Barnard, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Intense, space-charge-dominated ion beam pulses for warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion applications must undergo simultaneous transverse and longitudinal bunch compression in order to meet the requisite beam intensities desired at the target. The longitudinal compression of an ion bunch is achieved by imposing an initial axial velocity tilt on the drifting beam and subsequently neutralizing its space-charge and current in a drift region filled with high-density plasma. The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has measured a sixty-fold longitudinal current compression of an intense ion beam with pulse duration of a few nanoseconds, in agreement with simulations and theory. A strong solenoid is modeled near the end of the drift region in order to transversely focus the beam to a sub-millimeter spot size coincident with the longitudinal focal plane. The charge and current neutralization provided by the background plasma is critical in determining the total achievable transverse and longitudinal compression of the beam pulse. Numerical simulations show that the current density of an NDCX ion beam can be compressed over a few meters by factors greater than 10 5 with peak beam density in excess of 10 14 cm -3 . The peak beam density sets a lower bound on the local plasma density required near the focal plane for optimal beam compression, since the simulations show stagnation of the compression when n beam >n plasma . Beam-plasma interactions can also have a deleterious effect on the compression physics and lead to the formation of nonlinear wave excitations in the plasma. Simulations that optimize designs for the simultaneous transverse and longitudinal focusing of an NDCX ion beam for future warm dense matter experiments are discussed

  1. Development and application of high power and high intensity ion beam sources at NPI, Tomsk, Russia

    Ryabchikov, A.I.

    2007-01-01

    High - current ion beams have become a powerful tool for improving the surface properties of different materials. The prospects of wide commercial use of such beams for material treatment is not only due to the possibility of improving their properties, but, also for economic expediency. To achieve a high throughput and reduce the cost on ion beam material treatment, ion beams of high average and pulsed power are necessary. This paper gives an overview of work on generation of pulsed and repetitively pulsed beams of ion beams with currents ranging from fractions of an ampere to several tens of kA and with pulse duration from several tens of nanoseconds to several hundreds of microseconds. A number of different methods of materials surface properties modification using high power and intense ion beam and plasma are considered. (author)

  2. Method of active charge and current neutralization of intense ion beams for ICF

    Guiragossian, Z.G.T.; Orthel, J.L.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of generating the beam neutralization electrons with required properties are given in the context of a Light Ion Fusion Experiment (LIFE) designed accelerator. Recently derived envelope equations for neutralized and ballistically focused intense ion beams are applied to the LIFE geometry in which 10 MeV He + multiple beamlets coalesce and undergo 45:1 radial compression while beam pulses experience a 20:1 axial compression in the propagation range of 10 m. Both active and auto-neutralization methods are examined and found to produce initial electron temperatures consistent with the requirement of the envelope equation for both radial and axial adiabatic beam pulse compressions. The stability of neutralized beam propagation is also examined concerning the Pierce type electrostatic instability and for the case of LIFE beams it is found to have insignificant effect. A scaled experimental setup is presented which can serve to perform near term tests on the ballistically focused propagation of neutralized light ion beams

  3. Non-perturbative measurement of low-intensity charged particle beams

    Fernandes, M.; Geithner, R.; Golm, J.; Neubert, R.; Schwickert, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Tan, J.; Welsch, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Non-perturbative measurements of low-intensity charged particle beams are particularly challenging to beam diagnostics due to the low amplitude of the induced electromagnetic fields. In the low-energy antiproton decelerator (AD) and the future extra low energy antiproton rings at CERN, an absolute measurement of the beam intensity is essential to monitor the operation efficiency. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) based cryogenic current comparators (CCC) have been used for measuring slow charged beams in the nA range, showing a very good current resolution. But these were unable to measure fast bunched beams, due to the slew-rate limitation of SQUID devices and presented a strong susceptibility to external perturbations. Here, we present a CCC system developed for the AD machine, which was optimised in terms of its current resolution, system stability, ability to cope with short bunched beams, and immunity to mechanical vibrations. This paper presents the monitor design and the first results from measurements with a low energy antiproton beam obtained in the AD in 2015. These are the first CCC beam current measurements ever performed in a synchrotron machine with both coasting and short bunched beams. It is shown that the system is able to stably measure the AD beam throughout the entire cycle, with a current resolution of 30 {nA}.

  4. Course Notes: United States Particle Accelerator School Beam Physics with Intense Space-Charge

    Barnard, J.J.; Lund, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive introduction to the physics of beams with intense space charge. This course is suitable for graduate students and researchers interested in accelerator systems that require sufficient high intensity where mutual particle interactions in the beam can no longer be neglected. This course is intended to give the student a broad overview of the dynamics of beams with strong space charge. The emphasis is on theoretical and analytical methods of describing the acceleration and transport of beams. Some aspects of numerical and experimental methods will also be covered. Students will become familiar with standard methods employed to understand the transverse and longitudinal evolution of beams with strong space charge. The material covered will provide a foundation to design practical architectures. In this course, we will introduce you to the physics of intense charged particle beams, focusing on the role of space charge. The topics include: particle equations of motion, the paraxial ray equation, and the Vlasov equation; 4-D and 2-D equilibrium distribution functions (such as the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij, thermal equilibrium, and Neuffer distributions), reduced moment and envelope equation formulations of beam evolution; transport limits and focusing methods; the concept of emittance and the calculation of its growth from mismatches in beam envelope and from space-charge non-uniformities using system conservation constraints; the role of space-charge in producing beam halos; longitudinal space-charge effects including small amplitude and rarefaction waves; stable and unstable oscillation modes of beams (including envelope and kinetic modes); the role of space charge in the injector; and algorithms to calculate space-charge effects in particle codes. Examples of intense beams will be given primarily from the ion and proton accelerator communities with applications from, for example, heavy-ion fusion, spallation

  5. Improved genetic algorithm in optimization of beam orientation in intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Ni Xinye; Yang Jianhua; Sun Suping; Yao Yi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: At present beam orientation selection in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is mainly based on empiric knowledge. This study is to evaluate the feasibility of automated beam angle selection. Methods: Genetic algorithm technique which based on beam eye view dose measurement (BEVD-GA) was tested on two clinical cases, including a spine column cancer and a lung cancer. Three plans were obtained under the following different beam configurations: five equiangular-spaced beams, five beams with GA-selected, and five beams with BEVD-GA-selected beams. Then the dose distribution was compared among the three plans. Results: The method, restricting the range of genetic algorithm followed by carrying through genetic operations, not only shortened the optimization time, but also improved the optimization effect. For spine column cancer and lung cancer, the best IMRT plans were obtained with BEVD-GA-selected beams, which used automated beam orientation selection. Conclusions: Comparing with the conventional manual beam orientation selection, beam orientation optimization which is feasible in IMRT planning may significantly improve the efficiency and result. (authors)

  6. Neutrino cosmology

    Berstein, J.

    1984-01-01

    These lectures offer a self-contained review of the role of neutrinos in cosmology. The first part deals with the question 'What is a neutrino.' and describes in a historical context the theoretical ideas and experimental discoveries related to the different types of neutrinos and their properties. The basic differences between the Dirac neutrino and the Majorana neutrino are pointed out and the evidence for different neutrino 'flavours', neutrino mass, and neutrino oscillations is discussed. The second part summarizes current views on cosmology, particularly as they are affected by recent theoretical and experimental advances in high-energy particle physics. Finally, the close relationship between neutrino physics and cosmology is brought out in more detail, to show how cosmological constraints can limit the various theoretical possibilities for neutrinos and, more particularly, how increasing knowledge of neutrino properties can contribute to our understanding of the origin, history, and future of the Universe. The level is that of the beginning graduate student. (orig.)

  7. Intensive beam dosimetry of accelerated electrons of low energy

    Oproiu, C.

    1984-01-01

    Dosimetric control of electron beams ranging between 0.3 MeV and 10 MeV is treated using proper dosimetric methods relying on calorimetry, Tricke chemical solution, dosimetric film of cellulose triacetate. Proper methods are pointed out for measurements in inhomogeneous fields, bringing into evidence the results obtained in deep dose distributions and on the surface of irradiated material. A measuring method of dose distribution in depth by means of an assembly with calorimetric elements, as well as a practical method to pointing out dose distribution and equidose curves along the depth of irradiated electric cable depth are presented. In order to find out the main sizes of accelerated electron beam one uses proper devices relying on Faraday cylinder, total absorption calorimeter, ionization chambers. (author)

  8. The Theory of Coherent Radiation by Intense Electron Beams

    Buts, Vyacheslav A; Kurilko, V.I

    2006-01-01

    Spurred by the development of high-current, high-energy relativistic electron beams this books delves into the foundations of a device and geometry independent theoretical treatment of a large collection of interacting and radiating electron bunches. Part I deals with the basics of the radiation emission of a single charged particle, paying particular attention to the effect of radiation reaction and dwelling on the corresponding well-known paradoxes. Part II investigates the collective behaviour of a high-density electron bunch where both discrete and continous beam modelling is explored. Part III treats the application to modern systems while still keeping the treatment as general as possible. This book will be mandatory reading for anyone working on the foundations of modern devices such as free electron lasers, plasma accelerators, synchroton sources and other modern sources of bright, coherent radiation with high spectral density.

  9. Experimental Neutrino Physics

    Wilkes, Richard Jeffrey [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-11-15

    The University of Washington (UW) HEP neutrino group performed experimental research on the physics of neutrinos, using the capabilities offered by the T2K Experiment and the Super-Kamiokande Neutrino Observatory. The UW group included senior investigator R. J. Wilkes, two PhD students, four MS degree students, and a research engineer, all of whom are members of the international scientific collaborations for T2K and Super-Kamiokande. During the period of support, within T2K we pursued new precision studies sensitive to new physics, going beyond the limits of current measurements of the fundamental neutrino oscillation parameters (mass differences and mixing angles). We began efforts to measure (or significantly determine the absence of) 1 the CP-violating phase parameter δCP and determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. Using the Super-Kamiokande (SK) detector we pursued newly increased precision in measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters with atmospheric neutrinos, and extended the current reach in searches for proton decay, in addition to running the most sensitive supernova watch instrument [Scholberg 2012], performing other astrophysical neutrino studies, and analyzing beam-induced events from T2K. Overall, the research addressed central questions in the field of particle physics. It included the training of graduate students (both PhD and professional MS degree students), and postdoctoral researchers. Undergraduate students also participated as laboratory assistants.

  10. Ultrafast Melting of Carbon Induced by Intense Proton Beams

    Pelka, A.; Guenther, M. M.; Harres, K.; Otten, A.; Roth, M.; Gregori, G.; Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kritcher, A. L.; Heathcote, R.; Li, B.; Neely, D.; Kugland, N. L.; Niemann, C.; Makita, M.; Riley, D.; Mithen, J.; Schaumann, G.; Schollmeier, M.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-produced proton beams have been used to achieve ultrafast volumetric heating of carbon samples at solid density. The isochoric melting of carbon was probed by a scattering of x rays from a secondary laser-produced plasma. From the scattering signal, we have deduced the fraction of the material that was melted by the inhomogeneous heating. The results are compared to different theoretical approaches for the equation of state which suggests modifications from standard models.

  11. Neutrino physics and accelerators

    Kaftanov, V.

    1978-01-01

    The history is described of experiments aimed at the study of direct neutrino-matter interactions conducted in the past twenty years. Experiments are outlined carried out with the objective of proving the existence of the intermediate W meson which had been predicted by the weak interaction theory. The methods of obtaining neutrino beams using accelerators and the detectors used are briefly shown. Also described are experiments to be conducted in the near future in different laboratories. (Z.J.)

  12. Fast magnetic field penetration into an intense neutralized ion beam

    Armale, R.

    1992-06-01

    Experiments involving propagation of neutralized ion beams across a magnetic field indicate a magnetic field penetration time determined by the Hall resistivity rather than the Spitzer or Pedersen resistivity. In magnetohydrodynamics the Hall current is negligible because electrons and ions drift together in response to an electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field. For a propagating neutralized ion beam, the ion orbits are completely different from the electron orbits and the Hall current must be considered. There would be no effect unless there is a component of magnetic field normal to the surface which would usually be absent for a good conductor. It is necessary to consider electron inertia and the consequent penetration of the normal component to a depth c/ω p . In addition it is essential to consider a component of magnetic field parallel to the velocity of the beam which may be initially absent, but is generated by the Hall effect. The penetration time is determined by whistler waves rather than diffusion

  13. Study of neutrino- and antineutrino interactions in a neon-hydrogen mixture using the CERN narrow band beam

    Schultze, K.

    1977-01-01

    The charged-current cross sections for neutrinos and antineutrinos on nucleons in the energy range 20-200 GeV are given. Taken in conjunction with the previous Gargamelle results, they show that sigma/E is almost constant with energy for antineutrinos, and falls with energy for neutrinos. Above 50 GeV, sigma/E is compatible with being constant for neutrinos and antineutrinos. Rates for the production of neutral current events, di-lepton events and strange particles are given. The rate of di-lepton production shows no evidence for the production of 'bottom' states. Finally there is no indication for a charged heavy lepton coupled to the muon neutrino. (orig./WL) [de

  14. Study of the pulse power supply unit for the four-horn system of the CERN to Fréjus neutrino super beam

    Baussan, E; Dracos, M; Gaudiot, G; Osswald, F; Poussot, P; Vassilopoulos, N; Wurtz, J; Zeter, V

    2013-01-01

    The power supply studies for the four-horn system for the CERN to Fréjus neutrino Super Beam oscillation experiment are discussed here. The power supply is being studied to meet the physics potential and the mega-watt (MW) power requirements of the proton driver of the Super Beam. A one-half sinusoid current waveform with a 350 kA maximum current and pulse length of 100 \\mu s at 50 Hz frequency is generated and distributed to four-horns. In order to provide the necessary current needed to focus the charged mesons producing the neutrino beam, a bench of capacitors is charged at 50 Hz frequency to a +12 kV reference voltage and then discharged through a large switch to each horn via a set of strip-lines at the same rate. A current recovery stage allows to invert rapidly the negative voltage of the capacitor after the discharging stage in order to recuperate large part of the injected energy and thus to limit the power consuption. The energy recovery efficiency of that system is very high at 97%. For feasibilit...

  15. Design features and performance of the LAMPF high-intensity beam area

    Agnew, L.; Grisham, D.; Macek, R.J.; Sommer, W.F.; Werbeck, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    LAMPF is a multi-purpose high-intensity meson factory capable of producing a 1 mA beam of 800-MeV protons. The three target cells and the beam stop facilities in the high intensity area have many special design features that are required for operation in the presence of high heat loads and intense radiation fields where accessibility is extremely limited. Reliable targets, beam windows, beam stops, beam transport and diagnostic components, vacuum enclosures, and auxiliary systems have been developed. Sophisticated remote-handling systems are employed for maintenance. Complex protection systems have been developed to guard against damage caused by errant beam. Beam availability approaching 90% has been achieved at currents of 600 to 700 μA. A new facility for direct proton and neutron radiation effects studies will be installed in 1985. The new facility will provide an integrated spallation neutron flux of up to 5 x 10 17 m -2 s -1 and will anable proton irradiation studies in the primary beam

  16. EPOS-An intense positron beam project at the ELBE radiation source in Rossendorf

    Krause-Rehberg, R.; Sachert, S.; Brauer, G.; Rogov, A.; Noack, K.

    2006-01-01

    EPOS, the acronym of ELBE Positron Source, describes a running project to build an intense pulsed beam of mono-energetic positrons (0.2-40 keV) for materials research. Positrons will be created via pair production at a tungsten target using the pulsed 40 MeV electron beam of the superconducting linac electron linac with high brilliance and low emittance (ELBE) at Forschungszentrum Rossendorf (near Dresden, Germany). The chosen design of the system under construction is described and results of calculations simulating the interaction of the electron beam with the target are presented, and positron beam formation and transportation is also discussed

  17. Density and potential measurements in an intense ion-beam-generated plasma

    Abt, N.E.

    1982-05-01

    Neutral beams are created by intense large area ion beams which are neutralized in a gas cell. The interaction of the beam with the gas cell creates a plasma. Such a plasma is studied here. The basic plasma parameters, electron temperature, density, and plasma potential, are measured as a function of beam current and neutral gas pressure. These measurements are compared to a model based on the solution of Poisson's equation. Because of the cylindrical geometry the equation cannot be solved analytically. Details of the numerical method are presented

  18. CERN Accelerator School: Intensity Limitations in Particle Beams | 2-11 November

    2015-01-01

    Registration is now open for the CERN Accelerator School’s specialised course on Intensity Limitations in Particle Beams, to be held at CERN between 2 and 11 November 2015.   This course will mainly be of interest to staff in accelerator laboratories, university departments and companies manufacturing accelerator equipment. Many accelerators and storage rings, whether intended for particle physics experiments, synchrotron light sources or industrial applications, require beams of high brightness and the highest possible intensities. A good understanding of the possible limitations is required to achieve the desired performance. The programme for this course will cover the interaction of beams with their surroundings, with other beams and further collective effects. Lectures on the effects and possible mitigations will be complemented by tutorials. Further information can be found at: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/Intensity-Limitations-2015/IL-advert.html   http:/...

  19. Characteristics of bipolar-pulse generator for intense pulsed heavy ion beam acceleration

    Igawa, K.; Tomita, T.; Kitamura, I.; Ito, H.; Masugata, K.

    2006-01-01

    Intense pulsed heavy ion beams are expected to be applied to the implantation technology for semiconductor materials. In the application it is very important to purify the ion beam. In order to improve the purity of an intense pulsed ion beams we have proposed a new type of pulsed ion beam accelerator named 'bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA)'. A prototype of the experimental system has been developed to perform proof of principle experiments of the accelerator. A bipolar pulse generator has been designed for the generation of the pulsed ion beam with the high purity via the bipolar pulse acceleration and the electrical characteristics of the generator were evaluated. The production of the bipolar pulse has been confirmed experimentally. (author)

  20. Application of high power modulated intense relativistic electron beams for development of Wake Field Accelerator

    Friedman, M.

    1989-01-01

    This final Progress Report addresses DOE-sponsored research on the development of future high-gradient particle accelerators. The experimental and the theoretical research, which lasted three years, investigated the Two Beam Accelerator (TBA). This high-voltage-gradient accelerator was powered by a modulated intense relativistic electron beam (MIREB) of power >10 10 watts. This research was conceived after a series of successful experiments performed at NRL generating and using MIREBs. This work showed that an RF structure could be built which was directly powered by a modulated intense relativistic electron beam. This structure was then used to accelerate a second electron beam. At the end of the three year project the proof-of-principle accelerator demonstrated the generation of a high current beam of electrons with energy >60 MeV. Scaling laws needed to design practical devices for future applications were also derived

  1. Description of the intense, low energy, monoenergetic positron beam at Brookhaven

    Lynn, K.G.; Mills, A.P. Jr.; Roellig, L.O.; Weber, M.

    1985-01-01

    An intense (4 x 10 7 s -1 ), low energy (approx. =1.0 eV), monoenergetic (ΔE approx. = 75 MeV) beam of positrons has been built at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. This flux is more than 10 times greater than any existing beam from radioactive sources. Plans are underway to increase further the flux by more than an order of magnitude. The intense low energy positron beam is made by utilizing the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven to produce the isotope 64 Cu with an activity of 40 curies of positrons. Source moderation techniques are utilized to produce the low energy positron beam from the high energy positrons emitted from 64 Cu. 31 refs., 7 figs

  2. Upper limit of the muon-neutrino mass and charged-pion mass from the momentum analysis of a surface muon beam

    Kettle, P R [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    Using a surface muon beam and a magnetic spectrometer equipped with a position-sensitive detector, we have measured the muon momentum from pion decay at rest {pi}{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}, to be p{sub {mu}{sup +}}=(29.79200{+-}0.00011)MeV/c. This value together with the muon mass and the favoured pion mass leads to an upper limit of 0.17 MeV (90%CL) for the muon-neutrino mass. (author) 4 figs., 5 refs.

  3. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Miner ν A Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ˜10 % due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We have isolated a sample of 135 ±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux from 9% to 6%. Our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.

  4. Combining CPT-conjugate neutrino channels at Fermilab

    Jansson, Andreas; Parke, Stephen; Saoulidou, Niki; Mena, Olga

    2008-01-01

    We explore an alternative strategy to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy by making use of possible future neutrino facilities at Fermilab. Here, we use CPT-conjugate neutrino channels, exploiting a ν μ beam from the NuMI beamline and a ν e beam from a beta-beam experimental setup. Both experiments are performed at approximately the same /L. We present different possible accelerator scenarios for the beta-beam neutrino setup and fluxes. This CPT-conjugate neutrino channel scenario can extract the neutrino mass hierarchy down to sin 2 2θ 13 ≅0.02.

  5. Reaching for highest ion beam intensities through laser ion acceleration and beam compression

    Schumacher, Dennis; Brabetz, Christian; Blazevic, Abel; Bagnoud, Vincent; Weih, Simon [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (Germany); Jahn, Diana; Ding, Johannes; Roth, Markus [TU Darmstadt (Germany); Kroll, Florian; Schramm, Ulrich; Cowan, Tom [Helmholtzzentrum Dresden Rossendorf (Germany); Collaboration: LIGHT-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Laser ion acceleration provides access to ion sources with unique properties. To use these capabilities the LIGHT collaboration (Laser Ion Generation Handling and Transport) was founded. The aim of this collaboration is the beam transport and manipulation of laser accelerated ions with conventional accelerator structures. Therefor a dedicated beam line has been build up at GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung. With this beam line the manipulation of the transversal and also the longitudinal beam parameters has been achieved. It has been shown that laser generated ion beams can be transported over more than 6 meters and pulses shorter than 300 ps can be generated at this distance. This Talk will give an overview over the recent developments and plans of the LIGHT collaboration.

  6. Beam-front dynamics and ion acceleration in drifting intense relativistic electron beams

    Alexander, K.F.; Hintze, W.

    1976-01-01

    Collective ion acceleration at the injection of a relativistic electron beam into a low-pressure gas or a plasma is discussed and its strong dependence on the beam-front dynamics is shown. A simple one-dimensional model taking explicitly into account the motion and ionizing action of the ions in the beam-front region is developed for the calculation of the beam drift velocity. The obtained pressure dependence is in good agreement with experimental data. The energy distribution is shown of the ions accelerated in the moving potential well of the space charge region. Scaling laws for the beam-front dynamics and ion acceleration are derived. (J.U.)

  7. Status of neutrino factory and muon collider R and D

    Zisman, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    A significant worldwide R and D effort is presently directed toward solving the technical challenges of producing, cooling, accelerating, storing, and eventually colliding beams of muons. Its primary thrust is toward issues critical to a Neutrino Factory, for which R and D efforts are under way in the U.S., via the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC); in Europe, centered at CERN; and in Japan, at KEK. Under study and experimental development are production targets handling intense proton beams (1-4 MW), phase rotation systems to reduce beam energy spread, cooling channels to reduce transverse beam emittance for the acceleration system, and storage rings where muon decays in a long straight section provide a neutrino beam for a long-baseline (3000 km) experiment. Critical experimental activities include development of very high gradient normal conducting RF (NCRF) and superconducting RF (SCRF) cavities, high-power liquid-hydrogen absorbers, and high-field superconducting solenoids. Components and instrumentation that tolerate the intense decay products of the muon beam are being developed for testing. For a high-luminosity collider, muons must be cooled longitudinally as well as transversely, requiring an emittance exchange scheme. In addition to the experimental R and D effort, sophisticated theoretical and simulation tools are needed for the design. Here, the goals, present status, and future R and D plans in these areas will be described

  8. Muon Colliders: the Ultimate Neutrino Beamlines

    King, Bruce J.

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that muon decays in straight sections of muon collider rings will naturally produce highly collimated neutrino beams that can be several orders of magnitude stronger than the beams at existing accelerators. We discuss possible experimental setups and give a very brief overview of the physics potential from such beamlines. Formulae are given for the neutrino event rates at both short and long baseline neutrino experiments in these beams

  9. Neutrino mass?

    Kayser, B.

    1992-01-01

    After arguing that we should be looking for evidence of neutrino mass, we illustrate the possible consequences of neutrino mass and mixing. We then turn to the question of whether neutrinos are their own antiparticles, and to the process which may answer this question: neutrinoless double beta decay. Next, we review the proposed Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein solution to the solar neutrino problem, and discuss models which can generate neutrino electromagnetic moments large enough to play a role in the sun. Finally, we consider how the possible 17 keV neutrino, if real, would fit in with everything we know about neutrinos. (orig.)

  10. Numerical simulations of intense charged particle beam propagation in a dielectric wakefield accelerator

    Gai, W.; Kanareykin, A.D.; Kustov, A.L.; Simpson, J.

    1995-01-01

    The propagation of an intense electron beam through a long dielectric tube is a critical issue for the success of the dielectric wakefield acceleration scheme. Due to the head-tail instability, a high current charged particle beam cannot propagate long distance without external focusing. In this paper we examine the beam handling and control problem in the dielectric wakefield accelerator. We show that for the designed 15.6 GHz and 20 GHz dielectric structures a 150 MeV, 40 endash 100 nC beam can be controlled and propagate up to 5 meters without significant particle losses by using external applied focusing and defocusing channel (FODO) around the dielectric tube. Particle dynamics of the accelerated beam is also studied. Our results show that for typical dielectric acceleration structures, the head-tail instabilities can be conveniently controlled in the same way as the driver beam. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  11. Approach to a very high intensity beam at J-PARC

    Yamazaki, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The high-intensity, high-energy proton accelerator project, J-PARC, comprises the 400-MeV proton linac, the 3-GeV, 1-MW Rapid-Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) and the 50-GeV Marin Ring (MR) Synchrotron. The secondary particles such as neutrons, muons, Kaons, neutrinos and so forth will be fully made use of for materials science, life science, nuclear physics, and particle physics. Even the industrial use of the neutrons and the nuclear energy application are incorporated in the project. The rationale for choosing the accelerator schemes are presented together with the present status of the project and research and development for the high-intensity, high-energy proton accelerators J-PARC. The development of the high-field gradient RF cavity system making use of the magnetic alloy (MA), which is really necessary for the future development of the high-power proton accelerators, is reported in detail. (author)

  12. Beam loss studies in high-intensity heavy-ion linacs

    Ostroumov, P.N.; Aseev, V.N.; Lessner, E.S.; Mustapha, B.

    2004-01-01

    A low beam-loss budget is an essential requirement for high-intensity machines and represents one of their major design challenges. In a high-intensity heavy-ion machine, losses are required to be below 1 W/m for hands-on-maintenance. The driver linac of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) is designed to accelerate beams of any ion to energies from 400 MeV per nucleon for uranium up to 950 MeV for protons with a beam power of up to 400 kW. The high intensity of the heaviest ions is achieved by acceleration of multiple-charge-state beams, which requires a careful beam dynamics optimization to minimize effective emittance growth and beam halo formation. For beam loss simulation purposes, large number of particles must be tracked through the linac. Therefore the computer code TRACK has been parallelized and calculations are being performed on the JAZZ cluster recently inaugurated at ANL. This paper discusses how this powerful tool is being used for simulations for the RIA project to help decide on the high-performance and cost-effective design of the driver linac

  13. Design of a compact Faraday cup for low energy, low intensity ion beams

    Cantero, E.D., E-mail: esteban.cantero@cern.ch [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Sosa, A. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); The University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Andreazza, W.; Bravin, E.; Lanaia, D.; Voulot, D. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Welsch, C.P. [The University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-21

    Beam intensity is one of the key parameters in particle accelerators, in particular during machine commissioning, but also during operation for experiments. At low beam energies and low intensities a number of challenges arise in its measurement as commonly used non-invasive devices are no longer sensitive enough. It then becomes necessary to stop the beam in order to measure its absolute intensity. A very compact Faraday cup for determining ion beam currents from a few nanoamperes down to picoamperes for the HIE-ISOLDE post-accelerator at CERN has been designed, built and tested with beam. It has a large aperture diameter of 30 mm and a total length of only 16 mm, making it one of the most compact designs ever used. In this paper we present the different steps that were involved in the design and optimization of this device, including beam tests with two early prototypes and the final monitor. We also present an analysis of the losses caused by secondary particle emission for different repelling electrode voltages and beam energies. Finally, we show that results obtained from an analytical model for electron loss probability combined with Monte Carlo simulations of particles trajectories provide a very good agreement with experimental data.

  14. Neutrino masses and neutrino oscillations

    Di Lella, L

    2000-01-01

    These lectures review direct measurements of neutrino masses and the status of neutrino oscillation searches using both natural neutrino sources (the Sun and cosmic rays interacting in the Earth atmosphere) and artificial neutrinos (produced by nuclear reactors and accelerators). Finally, future experiments and plans are presented. (68 refs).

  15. Production of events with two or three muons in the final state during the interaction on nucleons of neutrinos and anti-neutrinos of the CERN narrow band beam with a maximum energy of 200 GeV

    Maillard, Jacques.

    1979-03-01

    A study was made of the production of dimuons and trimuons in the neutrino interactions using the data of the CDHS (CERN-Dortmund-Heidelberg-Saclay Cooperation) experiment taken in the CERN narrow band beam. The analysis of the quick results (since the statistics are weak) leads to significant conclusions on these events: 1) the c quark fragmentation function is approximately flat, 2) the production of heavy leptons, if this exists, only represents a very small part of the charged currents (10 -4 approximately). 3) the pair production of charmed quarks can explain some of the dimuons of same sign, the greater part of these events coming from the semi leptonic disintegration of pions and kaons (π→μν,K → μν) produced in the hadronic jet. 4) any other process (for instance the production of b quarks) is very weak ( -3 of the charged currents) [fr

  16. CERN neutrino project on target

    2005-01-01

    Scientists at CERN announced the completion of the target assembly for the CERN neutrinos to Gran Sasso project, CNGS. On schedule for start-up in May 2006, CNGS will send a beam of neutrinos through the Earth to the Gran Sasso laboratory 730 km away in Italy in a bid to unravel the mysteries of nature's most elusive particles (½ page)

  17. Generation and focusing of pulsed intense ion beams. Progress report, April 1, 1979-September 30, 1979

    Sudan, R.N.; Hammer, D.A.

    1981-04-01

    Theoretical calculations suggest that an intense pulsed approx. 1 MeV proton beam can be used to simulate the characteristics of approx. 1 GeV heavy ion beam propagation in an inertial confinement fusion reactor chamber. Given the present availability of the former beams and the high projected cost for obtaining the latter ones, such experimental simulations appear appropriate. Work was undertaken under the cited contract to apply the technology of intense proton beams to this end. The first task was the development of a high brightness pulsed proton source which could produce a weakly convergent approx. 10 kA proton beam in a field free drift region. This was accomplished at approx. 250 keV, and preliminary beam propagation experiments were performed. It was concluded that a proper simulation experiment would require a higher voltage beam. An upgraded version of the existing generator, which would have produced a 30 kA beam at about 500 keV, and further propagation experiments were proposed as part of our unsuccessful renewal proposal dated October 15, 1979

  18. Generation of intense spin-polarized electron beams at the electron accelerator facility ELSA

    Heiliger, Dominik

    2014-08-01

    The inverted source of polarized electrons at the electron accelerator ELSA in Bonn routinely provides a pulsed and low energetic beam of polarized electrons (100 mA, 48 keV) by irradiating a GaAs strained-layer superlattice photocathode with laser light. Due to the beam energy of 48 keV the beam transport to the linear accelerator is strongly space charge dominated and the actual beam current has an impact on the beam dynamics. Thus, the optics of the transfer line to the linear accelerator must be optimized with respect to the chosen beam intensity. An intensity upgrade including numerical simulations of the beam transport as well as a generation and a transport of a beam current of nearly 200 mA was successfully operated. In order to enhance the reliability and uptime of the source, a new extreme high vacuum load lock system was installed and commissioned. It consists of an activation chamber for heat cleaning of the photocathodes and activation with cesium and oxygen, a storage in which different types of photocathodes can be stored and a loading chamber in which an atomic hydrogen source is used to remove nearly any remaining surface oxidation. The new cleaning procedure with atomic hydrogen was investigated regarding its potential to restore the initial quantum efficiency of the photocathode after many activations.

  19. Massive Cherenkov neutrino facilities?their evolution, their future: Twenty-five years at these International Neutrino Conferences

    Sulak, Lawrence R.

    2005-01-01

    This review traces the evolution of massive water Cherenkov tracking calorimeters. Pioneering concepts, first presented in this conference a quarter of a century ago, have led to 1) IMB, the first large detector (10kT), which was designed primarily to search for proton decay, and secondarily to be sensitive to supernova neutrinos and atmospheric oscillations, and 2) Dumand, an attempt to initiate the search for TeV astrophysical neutrinos with a prototype for a 1 km 3 telescope. The concepts and initial work on IMB influenced subsequent detectors: Kamiokande, Super-K, SNO, and, in part, Kamland. These detectors have to their credit the elucidation of the physics of atmospheric, solar, reactor and supernova neutrinos. With the advent of the K2K beam, controlled accelerator neutrinos confirm the atmospheric studies. The path breaking developments of Dumand now are incorporated in the high-volume Amanda and Antares detectors, as well as their sequels, IceCube and the proposed Cubic Kilometer detector. The future (ultimate?) facilities have new physics challenges: A high-resolution megaton detector, eventually coupled with an intense accelerator neutrino source, is critical for precision studies of neutrino oscillation parameters and for the potential discovery of CP violation in the lepton sector. The Gigaton TeV neutrino telescopes (IceCube and Cubic Kilometer) seek to open high-energy neutrino astronomy, still an elusive goal. (Amanda, IceCube, and UNO, as well as Minos, Icarus and other large neutrino facilities using non-Cherenkov technologies, are treated in other contributions to this volume.)

  20. A feasibility study of a neutrino source based on a muon storage ring

    Finley, D

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of a study commissioned by the Fermilab Director on the feasibility of an intense neutrino source, based on a muon storage ring. Muon colliders have been discussed as an alternate route to very high-energy lepton colliders. As a by-product, such a collider would produce very intense neutrino beams because of the decaying muons circulating in the storage ring. In a dedicated storage ring, these neutrino beams could be produced in long straight sections which would point towards long, medium or short baseline detectors, opening up a whole new class of neutrino physics experiments because of the enormous neutrino flux that, in principle, could be achieved in such a facility as compared to more standard fixed target sources. Intense pion sources in combination with powerful emittance cooling strategies for the comparatively large muon emittance are necessary to make this type of neutrino source as well as a muon collider, feasible for a possible future high energy physics facility. The Neut...

  1. Experimental study of the transport limits of intense heavy ion beams in the HCX

    Prost, L.R.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Dugan, C.C.; Faltens, A.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Haber, I.

    2004-01-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is part of the US program to explore heavy-ion beam transport at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linac driver for fusion energy production. The primary mission of this experiment is to investigate aperture fill factors acceptable for the transport of space-charge-dominated heavy-ion beams at high space-charge intensity (line charge density up to ∼ 0.2 (micro)C/m) over long pulse durations (4 (micro)s) in alternating gradient focusing lattices of electrostatic or magnetic quadrupoles. The experiment also contributes to the practical baseline knowledge of intense beam manipulations necessary for the design, construction and operation of a heavy ion driver for inertial fusion. This experiment is testing transport issues resulting from nonlinear space-charge effects and collective modes, beam centroid alignment and beam steering, matching, image charges, halo, electron cloud effects, and longitudinal bunch control. We first present the results for a coasting 1 MeV K + ion beam transported through the first ten electrostatic transport quadrupoles, measured with optical beam-imaging and double-slit phase-space diagnostics. This includes studies at two different radial fill factors (60% and 80%), for which the beam transverse distribution was characterized in detail. Additionally, beam energy measurements will be shown. We then discuss the first results of beam transport through four pulsed room-temperature magnetic quadrupoles (located downstream of the electrostatic quadrupoles), where the beam dynamics become more sensitive to the presence of secondary electrons

  2. Sterile Neutrinos in Cold Climates

    Jones, Benjamin J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of neutrino oscillations at short baselines contain an intriguing set of experimental anomalies that may be suggestive of new physics such as the existence of sterile neutrinos. This three-part thesis presents research directed towards understanding these anomalies and searching for sterile neutrino oscillations. Part I contains a theoretical discussion of neutrino coherence properties. The open-quantum-system picture of neutrino beams, which allows a rigorous prediction of coherence distances for accelerator neutrinos, is presented. Validity of the standard treatment of active and sterile neutrino oscillations at short baselines is verified, and non-standard coherence loss effects at longer baselines are predicted. Part II concerns liquid argon detector development for the MicroBooNE experiment, which will search for short-baseline oscillations in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab. Topics include characterization and installation of the MicroBooNE optical system; test-stand measurements of liquid argon optical properties with dissolved impurities; optimization of wavelength-shifting coatings for liquid argon scintillation light detection; testing and deployment of high-voltage surge arrestors to protect TPC field cages; and software development for optical and TPC simulation and reconstruction. Part III presents a search for sterile neutrinos using the IceCube neutrino telescope, which has collected a large sample of atmospheric-neutrino-induced events in the 1-10 TeV energy range. Sterile neutrinos would modify the detected neutrino flux shape via MSW-resonant oscillations. Following a careful treatment of systematic uncertainties in the sample, no evidence for MSW-resonant oscillations is observed, and exclusion limits on 3+1 model parameter space are derived. Under the mixing assumptions made, the 90% confidence level exclusion limit extends to sin 2 2θ 24 ≤ 0.02 at m 2 ~ 0.3 eV 2 , and the LSND and MiniBooNE allowed regions are excluded at

  3. Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) to simulate intense beam propagation through a periodic focusing quadrupole field

    Davidson, Ronald C.; Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik; Majeski, Richard; Qin, Hong

    2002-01-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is under construction at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to simulate intense beam propagation through a periodic quadrupole magnetic field. In the Paul trap configuration, a long nonneutral plasma column is confined axially by dc voltages on end cylinders at z=+L and z=-L, and transverse confinement is provided by segmented cylindrical electrodes with applied oscillatory voltages ±V 0 (t) over 90 deg. segments. Because the transverse focusing force is similar in waveform to that produced by a discrete set of periodic quadrupole magnets in a frame moving with the beam, the Paul trap configuration offers the possibility of simulating intense beam propagation in a compact laboratory facility. The experimental layout is described, together with the planned experiments to study beam mismatch, envelope instabilities, halo particle production, and collective wave excitations

  4. Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) to simulate intense beam propagation through a periodic focusing quadrupole field

    Davidson, Ronald C.; Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik; Majeski, Richard; Qin, Hong

    2002-01-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is under construction at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to simulate intense beam propagation through a periodic quadrupole magnetic field. In the Paul trap configuration, a long nonneutral plasma column is confined axially by dc voltages on end cylinders at z=+L and z=-L, and transverse confinement is provided by segmented cylindrical electrodes with applied oscillatory voltages ±V0(t) over 90° segments. Because the transverse focusing force is similar in waveform to that produced by a discrete set of periodic quadrupole magnets in a frame moving with the beam, the Paul trap configuration offers the possibility of simulating intense beam propagation in a compact laboratory facility. The experimental layout is described, together with the planned experiments to study beam mismatch, envelope instabilities, halo particle production, and collective wave excitations.

  5. Preliminary research results for parameter diagnostics of intense pulsed ion beams

    Yang Hailiang; Qiu Aici; Sun Jianfeng; He Xiaoping; Tang Junping; Wang Haiyang; Li Jingya; Ren Shuqing; Huang Jianjun; Zhang Jiasheng; Peng Jianchang; Ouyang Xiaoping; Zhang Guoguang; Li Hongyu

    2004-01-01

    The preliminary experimental results for parameter diagnostics of intense pulsed ion beams from the FLASH II accelerator were reported. The ion number of an intense pulsed ion beam were experimentally determined by monitoring delayed radioactivity from protons induced nuclear reactions in a 12 C target. The prompt γ-rays and diode Bremsstrahlung X-rays were measured with PIN semi-conductor detector and a ST401 plastic scintillator detector. The Bremsstrahlung distribution outside of the drift tube was detected with a thermoluminescent detector and the shielding design was also determined. The current densities of beam were measured with biased ion collector array. The ion beams were also recorded with a CR-39 detector. (author)

  6. The key physics and technology issues in the intense-beam proton accelerators

    Fu Shinian; Fang Shouxian

    2002-01-01

    Beam power is required to raise one order in the next generation spallation neutron source. There are still some physics and technology difficulties need to be overcome, even though no fatal obstacle exists due to the rapid development of the technology in intense-beam accelerator in recent years. Therefore, it is highly demanded to clarify the key issues and to lunch an R and D program to break through the technological barriers before author start to build the expansive machine. The new technological challenge arises from the high beam current, the high accelerator power and the high demand on the reliability and stability of the accelerator operation. The author will discuss these issues and the means to resolve them, as well as the state of the art in a few of major technological disciplines. Finally, the choice the framework of intense-beam accelerator is discussed

  7. Study and realization of a beam analyser of high intensity (10610)

    Perret-Gallix, D.

    1975-01-01

    A beam analyser working under high-beam intensity in the range of 10 6 to 10 10 particles per burst and giving position profile and intensity of this beam is studied. The reasons of this study, the principle of measurement, the construction of hardware and the different tests carried out on the chamber in order to evaluate the main features are related. The analyser is a multi-cellular ionisation chamber or stripe chamber; each cell made by a copper stripe (0.25mm wide) inserted between two high voltage planes (500V) forms a small independent ionisation chamber. This system, working under the on-line control of a mini-computer allows to associate to each event or event group the instantaneous position and profile of the beam [fr

  8. Analytical calculations of intense Gaussian laser beam propagating in plasmas with relativistic collision correction

    Wang Ying; Yuan Chengxun; Gao Ruilin; Zhou Zhongxiang

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical investigations of a Gaussian laser beam propagating in relativistic plasmas have been performed with the WKB method and complex eikonal function. We consider the relativistic nonlinearity induced by intense laser beam, and present the relativistically generalized forms of the plasma frequency and electron collision frequency in plasmas. The coupled differential equations describing the propagation variations of laser beam are derived and numerically solved. The obtained simulation results present the similar variation tendency with experiments. By changing the plasma density, we theoretically analyze the feasibility of using a plasmas slab of a fixed thickness to compress the laser beam-width and acquire the focused laser intensity. The present work complements the relativistic correction of the electron collision frequency with reasonable derivations, promotes the theoretical approaching to experiments and provides effective instructions to the practical laser-plasma interactions.

  9. X-ray luminescence computed tomography imaging via multiple intensity weighted narrow beam irradiation

    Feng, Bo; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan; Zhang, Limin; Li, Jiao; Zhou, Zhongxing

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to introduce and study a novel x-ray beam irradiation pattern for X-ray Luminescence Computed Tomography (XLCT), termed multiple intensity-weighted narrow-beam irradiation. The proposed XLCT imaging method is studied through simulations of x-ray and diffuse lights propagation. The emitted optical photons from X-ray excitable nanophosphors were collected by optical fiber bundles from the right-side surface of the phantom. The implementation of image reconstruction is based on the simulated measurements from 6 or 12 angular projections in terms of 3 or 5 x-ray beams scanning mode. The proposed XLCT imaging method is compared against the constant intensity weighted narrow-beam XLCT. From the reconstructed XLCT images, we found that the Dice similarity and quantitative ratio of targets have a certain degree of improvement. The results demonstrated that the proposed method can offer simultaneously high image quality and fast image acquisition.

  10. Optical diagnosis system for intense electron beam diode plasma

    Yang Jie; Shu Ting; Zhang Jun; Fan Yuwei; Yang Jianhua; Liu Lie; Yin Yi; Luo Ling

    2012-01-01

    A nanosecond time-resolved imaging platform for diode plasmas diagnostics has been constructed based on the pulsed electron beam accelerator and high speed framing camera (HSFC). The accelerator can provide an electrical pulse with voltages of 200-500 kV, rise-time (from 10% to 90% amplitude) of 25 ns and duration of 110 ns. The diode currents up to kA level can be extracted. The trigger signal for camera was picked up by a water-resistor voltage divider after the main switch of the accelerator, which could avoid the disadvantageous influence of the time jitter caused by the breakdown of the gas gaps. Then the sampled negative electrical pulse was converted into a transistor-transistor logic (TTL) signal (5 V) with rise time of about 1.5 ns and time jitter less than 1 ns via a processor. And this signal was taken as the synchronization time base. According to the working characteristics of the camera, the synchronization scheme relying mainly on electrical pulse delay method supplemented by light signal delay method was determined to make sure that the camera can work synchronously with the light production and transportation from the diode plasma within the time scale of nanosecond. Moreover, shielding and filtering methods were used to restrain the interference on the measurement system from the accelerator. Finally, time resolved 2-D framing images of the diode plasma were acquired. (authors)

  11. Intensity limitations of cooled heavy ion beams in the ESR

    Hofmann, I.; Meyer-Pruessner, R.

    1985-06-01

    We consider the possibility of achieving maximum intensity and phase space density of heavy ions cooled by electrons in the Experimental Storage Ring to be built at GSI. Intrabeam scattering and the longitudinal microwave instability are found to be important limiting effects particularly at low energies. They are evaluated in diagrams, which can serve as a preliminary orientation for the expected performance of experiments. Examples have been calculated for U 92+ at 50 and 500 MeV/u; in the latter case we find that 9 ions at Δp/p=2x10 -4 and epsilon=0.2π mm mrad are on the safe side for an assumed cooling time of 100 msec. We have also analyzed I 20+ as a candidate for generating high energy density in matter. (orig.)

  12. Neutrino Charm Production and a Limit to Neutrino Oscillations

    Bailey, David Charles [McGill U.

    1983-10-01

    The production of charmed particles and a limit to tau lepton production have been measured using a hybrid emulsion spectrometer in the Fermilab wide-band neutrino beam. The relative cross section for charged current charmed particle production is $\\sigma(\

  13. Nonlinear δf Simulation Studies of Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Temperature Anisotropy

    Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Qin, Hong

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a 3-D nonlinear perturbative particle simulation code (BEST) [H. Qin, R.C. Davidson and W.W. Lee, Physical Review Special Topics on Accelerators and Beams 3 (2000) 084401] is used to systematically study the stability properties of intense nonneutral charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy (T perpendicularb >> T parallelb ). The most unstable modes are identified, and their eigenfrequencies, radial mode structure, and nonlinear dynamics are determined for axisymmetric perturbations with ∂/∂θ = 0

  14. 650 mm long liquid hydrogen target for use in a high intensity electron beam

    Mark, J.W.

    1983-07-01

    This paper describes a 650 mm long liquid hydrogen target constructed for use in the high intensity electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The main design problem was to construct a target that would permit the heat deposited by the electron beam to be removed rapidly without boiling the hydrogen so as to maintain constant target density for optimum data taking. Design requirements, construction details and operating experience are discussed

  15. The beam intensity and positron monitoring system of the Daresbury Electron Synchrotron (NINA)

    Poole, D.E.; Ring, T.; Peters, D.G.; Allen, J.

    1976-01-01

    The beam sensing system of NINA has been redesigned and rebuilt to provide comprehensive monitoring of beam intensity and position. The reasons for the change are stated, and the requirements and performance specification for the new system are listed. The report falls under the following heads: the sensing head; the head electronics unit; the line receiver unit; performance of installed monitors; display system and computer interface. The performance of the new system is summarized. (U.K.)

  16. On the fast gas ionization wave in an intense laser beam

    Fisher, V.I.

    1980-01-01

    The transfer of the adsorption zone of laser radiation along a beam is considered. It is shown that for a sufficiently strong laser beam intensity, q 0 >q tilde, the conditions of wave propagation differ principally from those known previously. In particular, the plasma temperature behind the wave front Tsup(*) decreases with the increase of q 0 , whereas the wave velocity D(q 0 ) grows faster than a linear function. The structure and laws of propagation of the ionization wave are determined

  17. The proposed INEL intense slow positron source, beam line, and positron microscope facility

    Makowitz, H.; Denison, A.B.; Brown, B.

    1993-01-01

    A program is currently underway at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to design and construct an Intense Slow Positron Beam Facility with an associated Positron Microscope. Positron beams have been shown to be valuable research tools and have potential application in industrial processing and nondestructive evaluation (microelectronics, etc.). The limit of resolution or overall usefulness of the technique has been limited because of lack of sufficient intensity. The goal of the INEL positron beam is ≥ 10 12 slow e+/s over a 0.03 cm diameter which represents a 10 3 to 10 4 advancement in beam current over existing beam facilities. The INEL is an ideal site for such a facility because of the nuclear reactors capable of producing intense positron sources and the personnel and facilities capable of handling high levels of radioactivity. A design using 58 Co with moderators and remoderators in conjunction with electrostatic positron beam optics has been reached after numerous computer code studies. Proof-of-principle electron tests have demonstrated the feasibility of the large area source focusing optics. The positron microscope development is occurring in conjunction with the University of Michigan positron microscope group. Such a Beam Facility and associated Intense Slow Positron Source (ISPS) can also be utilized for the generation and study of positron, and positron electron plasmas at ≤ 10 14 particles/cm 3 with plasma temperatures ranging from an eV to many keV, as well as an intense x-ray source via positron channeling radiation. The possibility of a tunable x-ray laser based on channeling positron radiation also exists. In this discussion the authors will present a progress report on various activities associated with the INEL ISPS

  18. Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electrons

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-01-01

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons form the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100 G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  19. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B; Friedman, A.F.; Lee, E.P.

    2009-01-01

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating

  20. Physics of Neutralization of Intense High-Energy Ion Beam Pulses by Electrons

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B.; Lee, E.P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-01-01

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self- magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  1. On oscillations of neutrinos with Dirac and Majorana masses

    Bilenky, S.M.; Hosek, J.; Petcov, S.T.; Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia)

    1980-01-01

    Pontecorvo neutrino beam oscillations are discussed assuming both Dirac and Majorana neutrino mass terms. It is proved that none of possible experiments on neutrino oscillations, including those on effects of CP violation, can distinguish between these two possibilities. Neutrino oscillations with concomitant Dirac and Majorana mass terms are also considered

  2. Neutrino Oscillation Results from NOvA

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    NOvA is an accelerator long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment optimised to measure electron neutrino appearance in a high-purity beam of muon neutrinos from Fermilab. The exciting discovery of the theta13 neutrino mixing angle in 2012 has opened a door to making multiple new measurements of neutrinos. These include leptonic CP violation, the neutrino mass ordering and the octant of theta23. NOvA with its 810km baseline and higher energy beam has about triple the matter effect of T2K which opens a new window on the neutrino mass ordering. With about 20% of our design beam exposure and significant analysis improvements we have recently released updated results. I will present both our disappearance and appearance measurements.

  3. The solar neutrino problem after the GALLEX artificial neutrino source experiment

    Vignaud, D.

    1995-01-01

    Using an intense 51 Cr artificial neutrino source (more than 60 PBq), the GALLEX solar neutrino collaboration has recently checked that its radiochemical detector was fully efficient for the detection of solar neutrinos. After this crucial result, the status of the solar neutrino problem is reviewed, with emphasis on how neutrino oscillations may explain (through the MSW effect) the different deficits observed in the four existing experiments. (author). 25 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  4. Electron beam based transversal profile measurements of intense ion beams; Elektronenstrahl-Diagnostik zur Bestimmung vom transversalen Profil intensiver Ionenstrahlen

    El Moussati, Said

    2014-11-03

    A non-invasive diagnostic method for the experimental determination of the transverse profile of an intense ion beam has been developed and investigated theoretically as well as experimentally within the framework of the present work. The method is based on the deflection of electrons when passing the electromagnetic field of an ion beam. To achieve this an electron beam is employed with a specifically prepared transversal profile. This distinguish this method from similar ones which use thin electron beams for scanning the electromagnetic field [Roy et al. 2005; Blockland10]. The diagnostic method presented in this work will be subsequently called ''Electron-Beam-Imaging'' (EBI). First of all the influence of the electromagnetic field of the ion beam on the electrons has been theoretically analyzed. It was found that the magnetic field causes only a shift of the electrons along the ion beam axis, while the electric field only causes a shift in a plane transverse to the ion beam. Moreover, in the non-relativistic case the magnetic force is significantly smaller than the Coulomb one and the electrons suffer due to the magnetic field just a shift and continue to move parallel to their initial trajectory. Under the influence of the electric field, the electrons move away from the ion beam axis, their resulting trajectory shows a specific angle compared to the original direction. This deflection angle practically depends just on the electric field of the ion beam. Thus the magnetic field has been neglected when analysing the experimental data. The theoretical model provides a relationship between the deflection angle of the electrons and the charge distribution in the cross section of the ion beam. The model however only can be applied for small deflection angles. This implies a relationship between the line-charge density of the ion beam and the initial kinetic energy of the electrons. Numerical investigations have been carried out to clarify the

  5. EBIS/T charge breeding for intense rare isotope beams at MSU

    Schwarz, S; Marrs, R E; Kittimanapun, K; Lapierre, A; Mendez, A J; Ames, F; Beene, J R; Lindroos, M; Ahle, L E; Stracener, D W; Kester, O; Wenander, F; Lopez-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Dilling, J; Bollen, G

    2010-01-01

    Experiments with reaccelerated beams are an essential component of the science program of existing and future rare isotope beam facilities. NSCL is currently constructing ReA3, a reaccelerator for rare isotopes that have been produced by projectile fragmentation and in-flight fission and that have been thermalized in a gas stopper. The resulting low-energy beam will be brought to an Electron Beam Ion Source/Trap (EBIS/T) in order to obtain highly charged ions at an energy of 12 keV/u. This charge breeder is followed by a compact linear accelerator with a maximum beam energy of 3MeV/u for U-238 and higher energies for lighter isotopes. Next-generation rare isotope beam facilities like the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams FRIB, but also existing Isotope Separator On-line (ISOL) facilities are expected to provide rare-isotope beam rates in the order of 10(11) particles per second for reacceleration. At present the most promising scheme to efficiently start the reacceleration of these intense beams is the use of a...

  6. Nonlinear delta f Simulations of Collective Effects in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    Hong Qi

    2003-01-01

    A nonlinear delta(f) particle simulation method based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equations has been recently developed to study collective processes in high-intensity beams, where space-charge and magnetic self-field effects play a critical role in determining the nonlinear beam dynamics. Implemented in the Beam Equilibrium, Stability and Transport (BEST) code [H. Qin, R.C. Davidson, and W.W. Lee, Physical Review -- Special Topics on Accelerator and Beams 3 (2000) 084401; 3 (2000) 109901.], the nonlinear delta(f) method provides a low-noise and self-consistent tool for simulating collective interactions and nonlinear dynamics of high-intensity beams in modern and next-generation accelerators and storage rings, such as the Spallation Neutron Source and heavy ion fusion drivers. A wide range of linear eigenmodes of high-intensity charged-particle beams can be systematically studied using the BEST code. Simulation results for the electron-proton two-stream instability in the Proton Storage Ring experiment [R. Macek, ...

  7. Experimental results of beryllium exposed to intense high energy proton beam pulses

    Ammigan, K. [Fermilab; Hartsell, B. [Fermilab; Hurh, P. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. [Fermilab; Butcher, M. [CERN; Guinchard, M. [CERN; Calviani, M. [CERN; Losito, R. [CERN; Roberts, S. [Culham Lab; Kuksenko, V. [Oxford U.; Atherton, A. [Rutherford; Caretta, O. [Rutherford; Davenne, T. [Rutherford; Densham, C. [Rutherford; Fitton, M. [Rutherford; Loveridge, J. [Rutherford; O' Dell, J. [Rutherford

    2017-02-10

    Beryllium is extensively used in various accelerator beam lines and target facilities as a material for beam windows, and to a lesser extent, as secondary particle production targets. With increasing beam intensities of future accelerator facilities, it is critical to understand the response of beryllium under extreme conditions to reliably operate these components as well as avoid compromising particle production efficiency by limiting beam parameters. As a result, an exploratory experiment at CERN’s HiRadMat facility was carried out to take advantage of the test facility’s tunable high intensity proton beam to probe and investigate the damage mechanisms of several beryllium grades. The test matrix consisted of multiple arrays of thin discs of varying thicknesses as well as cylinders, each exposed to increasing beam intensities. This paper outlines the experimental measurements, as well as findings from Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) work where different imaging techniques were used to analyze and compare surface evolution and microstructural response of the test matrix specimens.

  8. Performance analysis of the intense slow-positron beam at the NC State University PULSTAR reactor

    Moxom, J.; Hathaway, A.G.; Bodnaruk, E.W.; Hawari, A.I.; Xu, J.

    2007-01-01

    An intense positron beam, for application in nanophase characterization, is now under construction at the 1 MW PULSTAR nuclear reactor at North Carolina State University (NCSU). A tungsten converter/moderator is used, allowing positrons to be emitted from the surface with energies of a few electron volts. These slow positrons will be extracted from the moderator and formed into a beam by electrostatic lenses and then injected into a solenoidal magnetic field for transport to one of three experimental stations, via a beam switch. To optimize the performance of the beam and to predict the slow-positron intensity, a series of simulations were performed. A specialized Monte-Carlo routine was integrated into the charged-particle transport calculations to allow accounting for the probabilities of positron re-emission and backscattering from multiple-bank moderator/converter configurations. The results indicate that either a two-bank or a four-bank tungsten moderator/converter system is preferred for the final beam design. The predicted slow-positron beam intensities range from nearly 7x10 8 to 9x10 8 e + /s for the two-bank and the four-bank systems, respectively

  9. High intensity metallic ion beams from an ecr ion source at GANIL

    Leherissier, P.; Barue, C.; Canet, C.; Dupuis, M.; Flambard, J.L.; Gaubert, G.; Gibouin, S.; Huguet, Y.; Jardin, P.; Lecesne, N.; Lemagnen, F.; Leroy, R.; Pacquet, J.Y.; Pellemoine-Landre, F.; Rataud, J.P.; Jaffres, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    In the recent years, progress concerning the production of high intensity of metallic ions beams ( 58 Ni, 48 Ca, 76 Ge) at Ganil have been performed. The MIV0C method has been successfully used to produce a high intensity nickel beam with the ECR4 ion source: 20 eμA of 58 Ni 11+ at 24 kV extraction voltage. This beam has been maintained for 8 days and accelerated up to 74.5 MeV/u by our cyclotrons with a mean intensity of 0.13 pμA on target. This high intensity, required for experiment, led to the discovery of the doubly magic 48 Ni isotope. The oven method has been first tested with natural metallic calcium on the ECR4 ion source, then used to produce a high power beam (740 W on target i.e. 0.13 pμA accelerated up to 60 MeV/u) of 48 Ca still keeping a low consumption (0.09 mg/h). A germanium beam is now under development, using the oven method with germanium oxide. The ionization efficiencies have been measured and compared. (authors)

  10. Initial Results on Neutralized Drift Compression Experiments (NDCX-IA) for High Intensity Ion Beam

    Roy, Prabir K; Baca, David; Bieniosek, Frank; Coleman, Joshua E; Davidson, Ronald C; Efthimion, Philip; Eylon, Shmuel; Gilson, Erik P; Grant Logan, B; Greenway, Wayne; Henestroza, Enrique; Kaganovich, Igor D; Leitner, Matthaeus; Rose, David; Sefkow, Adam; Sharp, William M; Shuman, Derek; Thoma, Carsten H; Vanecek, David; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam neutralization and compression experiments are designed to determine the feasibility of using compressed high intensity ion beams for high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments and for inertial fusion power. To quantitatively ascertain the various mechanisms and methods for beam compression, the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) facility is being constructed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). In the first compression experiment, a 260 KeV, 25 mA, K+ ion beam of centimeters size is radially compressed to a mm size spot by neutralization in a meter-long plasma column and beam peak current is longitudinally compressed by an induction velocity tilt core. Instrumentation, preliminary results of the experiments, and practical limits of compression are presented. These include parameters such as emittance, degree of neutralization, velocity tilt time profile, and accuracy of measurements (fast and spatially high resolution diagnostic) are discussed.

  11. Designing and Building a Collimation System for the High-Intensity LHC Beam

    Assmann, R W; Baishev, I S; Bruno, L; Brugger, M; Chiaveri, Enrico; Dehning, Bernd; Ferrari, A; Goddard, B; Jeanneret, J B; Jiménez, M; Kain, V; Kaltchev, D I; Lamont, M; Ruggiero, F; Schmidt, R; Sievers, P; Uythoven, J; Vlachoudis, V; Vos, L; Wenninger, J

    2003-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will collide proton beams at 14 TeV c.m. with unprecedented stored intensities. The transverse energy density in the beam will be about three orders of magnitude larger than previously handled in the Tevatron or in HERA, if compared at the locations of the betatron collimators. In particular, the population in the beam halo is much above the quench level of the superconducting magnets. Two LHC insertions are dedicated to collimation with the design goals of preventing magnet quenches in regular operation and preventing damage to accelerator components in case of irregular beam loss. We discuss the challenges for designing and building a collimation system that withstands the high power LHC beam and provides the required high cleaning efficiency. Plans for future work are outlined.

  12. A mask for high-intensity heavy-ion beams in the MAYA active target

    Rodríguez-Tajes, C., E-mail: rodriguez@ganil.fr [Grand Accélérateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, 14076 Caen (France); Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pancin, J.; Damoy, S.; Roger, T.; Babo, M. [Grand Accélérateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, 14076 Caen (France); Caamaño, M. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Farget, F.; Grinyer, G.F.; Jacquot, B.; Pérez-Loureiro, D. [Grand Accélérateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, 14076 Caen (France); Ramos, D. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Suzuki, D. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Université Paris-Sud 11, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91406 Orsay (France)

    2014-12-21

    The use of high-intensity and/or heavy-ion beams in active targets and time-projection chambers is often limited by the strong ionization produced by the beam. Besides the difficulties associated with the saturation of the detector and electronics, beam-related signals may hide the physical events of interest or reduce the detector performance. In addition, space-charge effects may deteriorate the homogeneity of the electric drift field and distort the subsequent reconstruction of particle trajectories. In anticipation of future projects involving such conditions, a dedicated beam mask has been developed and tested in the MAYA active target. Experimental results with a {sup 136}Xe beam are presented.

  13. Numerical Studies of Electromagnetic Instabilities in Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Energy Anisotropy

    Startsev, Edward; Lee, Wei-li

    2005-01-01

    In intense charged particle beams with large energy anisotropy, free energy is available to drive transverse electromagnetic Weibel-type instabilities. Such slow-wave transverse electromagnetic instabilities can be described by the so-called Darwin model, which neglects the fast-wave portion of the displacement current. The Weibel instability may also lead to an increase in the longitudinal velocity spread, which would make the focusing of the beam difficult and impose a limit on the minimum spot size achievable in heavy ion fusion experiments. This paper reports the results of recent numerical studies of the Weibel instability using the Beam Eigenmode And Spectra (bEASt) code for space-charge-dominated, low-emittance beams with large tune depression. To study the nonlinear stage of the instability, the Darwin model is being developed and incorporated into the Beam Equilibrium Stability and Transport(BEST) code.

  14. Self-consistent simulation studies of periodically focused intense charged-particle beams

    Chen, C.; Jameson, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    A self-consistent two-dimensional model is used to investigate intense charged-particle beam propagation through a periodic solenoidal focusing channel, particularly in the regime in which there is a mismatch between the beam and the focusing channel. The present self-consistent studies confirm that mismatched beams exhibit nonlinear resonances and chaotic behavior in the envelope evolution, as predicted by an earlier envelope analysis [C. Chen and R. C. Davidson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2195 (1994)]. Transient effects due to emittance growth are studied, and halo formation is investigated. The halo size is estimated. The halo characteristics for a periodic focusing channel are found to be qualitatively the same as those for a uniform focusing channel. A threshold condition is obtained numerically for halo formation in mismatched beams in a uniform focusing channel, which indicates that relative envelope mismatch must be kept well below 20% to prevent space-charge-dominated beams from developing halos

  15. A stable production of intense electron beam plasma with ion back stream

    Uramoto, Johshin.

    1975-12-01

    An intense electron beam is extracted without space charge limit from a dc plasma source along a magnetic field. The beam space charge is neutralized stably through back streaming of self-ionized ions from the beam extracting anode region where a neutral gas is fed locally. In Appendix I, a space charge free electron gun is designed under this neutralization method. In Appendix II, a dynamic discharge through a series resistance is described, where an operative mechanism of the well-known TP-D plasma is clarified. (auth.)

  16. Generation of equal-intensity coherent optical beams by binary geometrical phase on metasurface

    Wang, Zheng-Han; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Xiong, Xiang; Peng, Ru-Wen, E-mail: rwpeng@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: muwang@nju.edu.cn; Wang, Mu, E-mail: rwpeng@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: muwang@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and School of Physics, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2016-06-27

    We report here the design and realization of a broadband, equal-intensity optical beam splitter with a dispersion-free binary geometric phase on a metasurface with unit cell consisting of two mirror-symmetric elements. We demonstrate experimentally that two identical beams can be efficiently generated with incidence of any polarization. The efficiency of the device reaches 80% at 1120 nm and keeps larger than 70% in the range of 1000–1400 nm. We suggest that this approach for generating identical, coherent beams have wide applications in diffraction optics and in entangled photon light source for quantum communication.

  17. Propagation of an intense laser beam in a tapered plasma channel

    Jha, Pallavi; Singh, Ram Gopal; Upadhyaya, Ajay K.; Mishra, Rohit K.

    2008-01-01

    Propagation characteristics and modulation instability of an intense laser beam propagating in an axially tapered plasma channel, having a parabolic radial density profile, are studied. Using the source-dependent expansion technique, the evolution equation for the laser spot is set up and conditions for propagation of the laser beam with a constant spot size (matched beam) are obtained. Further, the dispersion relation and growth rate of modulation instability of the laser pulse as it propagates through linearly and quadratically tapered plasma channels, have been obtained

  18. A high-intensity He-jet production source for radioactive beams

    Vieira, D.J.; Kimberly, H.J.; Grisham, D.L.; Talbert, W.L.; Wouters, J.M.; Rosenauer, D.; Bai, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The use of a thin-target, He-jet transport system operating with high primary beam intensities is explored as a high-intensity production source for radioactive beams. This method is expected to work well for short-lived, non-volatile species. As such the thin-target, He-jet approach represents a natural complement to the thick-target ISOL method in which such species are not, in general, rapidly released. Highlighted here is a thin-target, He-jet system that is being prepared for a 500 + μA, 800-MeV proton demonstration experiment at LAMPF this summer

  19. Low energy intense electron beams with extra-low energy spread

    Aleksandrov, A.V.; Calabrese, R.; Ciullo, G.; Dikansky, N.S.; Guidi, V.; Kot, N.C.; Kudelainen, V.I.; Lamanna, G.; Lebedev, V.A.; Logachov, P.V.; Tecchio, L.; Yang, B.

    1994-01-01

    Maximum achievable intensity for low energy electron beams is a feature that is not very often compatible with low energy spread. We show that a proper choice of the source and the acceleration optics allows one to match them together. In this scheme, a GaAs photocathode excited by a single-mode infrared laser and adiabatic acceleration in fully magnetised optics enables the production of a low-energy-spread electron beam with relatively high intensity. The technological problems associated with the method are discussed together with its limitations. (orig.)

  20. Neutrino physics

    Hernandez, P.

    2016-01-01

    This is the writeup of the lectures on neutrino physics delivered at various schools: TASI and Trieste in 2013 and the CERN-Latin American School in 2015. The topics discussed in this lecture include: general properties of neutrinos in the SM, the theory of neutrino masses and mixings (Dirac and Majorana), neutrino oscillations both in vacuum and in matter, as well as an overview of the experimental evidence for neutrino masses and of the prospects in neutrino oscillation physics. We also briefly review the relevance of neutri- nos in leptogenesis and in beyond-the-Standard-Model physics.